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Sample records for contrasting effective dose

  1. The Effect of Contrast Material on Radiation Dose at CT: Part I. Incorporation of Contrast Material Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W Paul; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To develop a method to incorporate the propagation of contrast material into computational anthropomorphic phantoms for estimation of organ dose at computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A patient-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of the human cardiovascular system was incorporated into 58 extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) patient phantoms. The PBPK model comprised compartmental models of vessels and organs unique to each XCAT model. For typical injection protocols, the dynamics of the contrast material in the body were described according to a series of patient-specific iodine mass-balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast material concentration time curves for each compartment. Each organ was assigned to a corresponding time-varying iodinated contrast agent to create the contrast material-enhanced five-dimensional XCAT models, in which the fifth dimension represents the dynamics of contrast material. To validate the accuracy of the models, simulated aortic and hepatic contrast-enhancement results throughout the models were compared with previously published clinical data by using the percentage of discrepancy in the mean, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of enhancement in a paired t test at the 95% significance level. Results The PBPK model allowed effective prediction of the time-varying concentration curves of various contrast material administrations in each organ for different patient models. The contrast-enhancement results were in agreement with results of previously published clinical data, with mean percentage, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of less than 10% (P > .74), 4%, 7%, and 14% for uniphasic and 12% (P > .56), 4%, 12%, and 14% for biphasic injection protocols, respectively. The exception was hepatic enhancement results calculated for a uniphasic injection protocol for which the discrepancy was less than 25%. Conclusion A technique to model the propagation of

  2. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

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    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kronnerwetter, C. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Nemec, S.; Prayer, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ladd, M.E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  3. The effect of iodine uptake on radiation dose absorbed by patient tissues in contrast enhanced CT imaging: Implications for CT dosimetry.

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    Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Spanakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Hatzidakis, Adam; Damilakis, John

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of iodine uptake on tissue/organ absorbed doses from CT exposure and its implications in CT dosimetry. The contrast-induced CT number increase of several radiosensitive tissues was retrospectively determined in 120 CT examinations involving both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT imaging. CT images of a phantom containing aqueous solutions of varying iodine concentration were obtained. Plots of the CT number increase against iodine concentration were produced. The clinically occurring iodine tissue uptake was quantified by attributing recorded CT number increase to a certain concentration of aqueous iodine solution. Clinically occurring iodine uptake was represented in mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Standard 120 kV CT exposures were simulated using Monte Carlo methods and resulting organ doses were derived for non-enhanced and iodine contrast-enhanced CT imaging. The mean iodine uptake range during contrast-enhanced CT imaging was found to be 0.02-0.46% w/w for the investigated tissues, while the maximum value recorded was 0.82% w/w. For the same CT exposure, iodinated tissues were found to receive higher radiation dose than non-iodinated tissues, with dose increase exceeding 100% for tissues with high iodine uptake. Administration of iodinated contrast medium considerably increases radiation dose to tissues from CT exposure. • Radiation absorption ability of organs/tissues is considerably affected by iodine uptake • Iodinated organ/tissues may absorb up to 100 % higher radiation dose • Compared to non-enhanced, contrast-enhanced CT may deliver higher dose to patient tissues • CT dosimetry of contrast-enhanced CT imaging should encounter tissue iodine uptake.

  4. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, Mette; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were...... and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen...... that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed...

  5. Effect of Fixed-Volume and Weight-Based Dosing Regimens on the Cost and Volume of Administered Iodinated Contrast Material at Abdominal CT.

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    Davenport, Matthew S; Parikh, Kushal R; Mayo-Smith, William W; Israel, Gary M; Brown, Richard K J; Ellis, James H

    2017-03-01

    To determine the magnitude of subject-level and population-level cost savings that could be realized by moving from fixed-volume low-osmolality iodinated contrast material administration to an effective weight-based dosing regimen for contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT. HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-exempt retrospective cohort study of 6,737 subjects undergoing contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT from 2014 to 2015. Subject height, weight, lean body weight (LBW), and body surface area (BSA) were determined. Twenty-six volume- and weight-based dosing strategies with literature support were compared with a fixed-volume strategy used at the study institution: 125 mL 300 mgI/mL for routine CT, 125 mL 370 mgI/mL for multiphasic CT (single-energy, 120 kVp). The predicted population- and subject-level effects on cost and contrast material utilization were calculated for each strategy and sensitivity analyses were performed. Most subjects underwent routine CT (91% [6,127/6,737]). Converting to lesser-volume higher-concentration contrast material had the greatest effect on cost; a fixed-volume 100 mL 370 mgI/mL strategy resulted in $132,577 in population-level savings with preserved iodine dose at routine CT (37,500 versus 37,000 mgI). All weight-based iodine-content dosing strategies (mgI/kg) with the same maximum contrast material volume (125 mL) were predicted to contribute mean savings compared with the existing fixed-volume algorithm ($4,053-$116,076/strategy in the overall study population, $1-$17/strategy per patient). Similar trends were observed in all sensitivity analyses. Large cost and material savings can be realized at abdominopelvic CT by adopting a weight-based dosing strategy and lowering the maximum volume of administered contrast material. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

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    Marklund, Mette [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: mm@frh.regionh.dk; Christensen, Robin [Parker Institute: Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: robin.christensen@frh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: stp@frh.regionh.dk; Thomsen, Carsten [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk; Nolsoe, Christian P. [Department of Radiology, Koge Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: cnolsoe@dadlnet.dk

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  7. Effect of Low Tube Voltage on Image Quality, Radiation Dose, and Low-Contrast Detectability at Abdominal Multidetector CT: Phantom Study

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    Kun Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of low tube voltage (80 kV on image quality, radiation dose, and low-contrast detectability (LCD at abdominal computed tomography (CT. Materials and Methods. A phantom containing low-contrast objects was scanned with a CT scanner at 80 and 120 kV, with tube current-time product settings at 150–650 mAs. The differences between image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, and scores of LCD obtained with 80 kV at 150–650 mAs and those obtained with 120 kV at 300 mAs were compared respectively. Results. The image noise substantially increased with low tube voltage. However, with identical dose, use of 80 kV resulted in higher CNR compared with CNR at 120 kV. There were no statistically significant difference in CNR and scores of LCD between 120 kV at 300 mAs and 80 kV at 550–650 mAs (>0.05. The relative dose delivered at 80 kV ranged from 58% at 550 mAs to 68% at 650 mAs. Conclusion. With a reduction of the tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV at abdominal CT, the radiation dose can be reduced by 32% to 42% without degradation of CNR and LCD.

  8. Dose optimization of contrast-enhanced carotid MR angiography

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    Unterweger, M.; Froehlich, J.M.; Kubik-Huch, R.A.; Seifert, B.; Birrer, M.; Huber, T.; Otto, R. [Institute of Radiology, Cantonal Hospital Baden, Baden (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the diagnostic performance of a single-contrast or a double-contrast dose of carotid contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). One-hundred nineteen patients (mean age 65{+-}14.4 years) underwent carotid contrast-enhanced MRA with a standardized protocol (repetition time/echo 3.73 ms/1.38 ms, flip-angle 25 , acquisition-time 19 s, voxel size 1.2 x 1.2 x 0.9 mm{sup 3}) on a 1.5-T scanner (Sonata, Siemens-Medical-Systems) using a neck phased-array coil. Contrast agent was administered intravenously at a rate of 3.0 ml/s, either as a single dose (n=57; 0.1 mmol/kg body weight) or as a double dose (n=62; 0.2 mmol/kg body weight) of meglumine gadoterate (0.5 M/l), followed by 30 ml saline. Qualitative image analysis was performed on maximum intensity projections using a five-point scale. Signal intensities were measured at three different vascular levels on both sides to assess the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Image quality was rated as good or excellent in all cases. A double dose did not influence the efficacy of carotid enhancement (CNR single dose 69.12{+-}19.8; CNR double dose 70.01{+-}20.7; p=0.81) compared with a single dose. In both dose groups the mean CNRs were inversely related to bodyweight, despite adjusted contrast volumes (p=0.0005). Double-dose contrast-enhanced carotid MRA is not superior to single-dose MRA, as overall diagnostic performance and quantitative contrast enhancement are equal. Being more cost-efficient, a single-dose administration of contrast agent is recommended for MRA of the carotid arteries. (orig.)

  9. Analysis on the entrance surface dose and contrast medium dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination

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    Seo, Young Hyun [Dept. of Cardiovascular Center, Yeocheon Jeonnam Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Choi, Nam Gil; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study aimed to identify dose reduction measures by retrospectively analyzing the entrance surface dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination and to contribute the patients with renal impairmend and a high probability of side effects to determine the inspection's direction by measuring the contrast usages actually to active actions for the dose by actually measuring the contrast medium dose. The CTDIvol value and air kerma value, which are the entrance surface doses of the two examinations, and the contrast medium dose depending on the number of slides were compared and analyzed. This study was conducted in 21 subjects (11 males; 10 females) who underwent Cardiac Computed Tomographic Angiography (CCTA) and Coronary Angiography (CAG) in this hospital during the period from May 2014 to May 2016. The subject's age was 48-85 years old (mean 65±10 years old), and the weight was 37.6~83.3 kg (mean 63±6 kg). Dose reduction could be expected in the cardiovascular examination using CCTA rather than in the examination using CAG. In terms of contrast medium dose, CAG used a smaller dose than CCTA. In particular, as the number of slides increases at CAG, the contrast medium dose increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the contrast medium dose, the number of slides suitable for the scan range must be selected.

  10. S-Nitrosylation in Organs of Mice Exposed to Low or High Doses of γ-Rays: The Modulating Effect of Iodine Contrast Agent at a Low Radiation Dose

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    Fadia Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The covalent addition of nitric oxide (NO• onto cysteine thiols, or S-nitrosylation, modulates the activity of key signaling proteins. The dysregulation of normal S-nitrosylation contributes to degenerative conditions and to cancer. To gain insight into the biochemical changes induced by low-dose ionizing radiation, we determined global S-nitrosylation by the “biotin switch” assay coupled with mass spectrometry analyses in organs of C57BL/6J mice exposed to acute 0.1 Gy of 137Cs γ-rays. The dose of radiation was delivered to the whole body in the presence or absence of iopamidol, an iodinated contrast agent used during radiological examinations. To investigate whether similar or distinct nitrosylation patterns are induced following high-dose irradiation, mice were exposed in parallel to acute 4 Gy of 137Cs g rays. Analysis of modulated S-nitrosothiols (SNO-proteins in freshly-harvested organs of animals sacrificed 13 days after irradiation revealed radiation dose- and contrast agent-dependent changes. The major results were as follows: (i iopamidol alone had significant effects on S-nitrosylation in brain, lung and liver; (ii relative to the control, exposure to 0.1 Gy without iopamidol resulted in statistically-significant SNO changes in proteins that differ in molecular weight in liver, lung, brain and blood plasma; (iii iopamidol enhanced the decrease in S-nitrosylation induced by 0.1 Gy in brain; (iv whereas a decrease in S-nitrosylation occurred at 0.1 Gy for proteins of ~50 kDa in brain and for proteins of ~37 kDa in liver, an increase was detected at 4 Gy in both organs; (v mass spectrometry analyses of nitrosylated proteins in brain revealed differential modulation of SNO proteins (e.g., sodium/potassium-transporting ATPase subunit beta-1; beta tubulins; ADP-ribosylation factor 5 by low- and high-dose irradiation; and (vi ingenuity pathway analysis identified major signaling networks to be modulated, in particular the neuronal

  11. High-dose N-acetylcysteine for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy.

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    Trivedi, Hariprasad; Daram, Sumanth; Szabo, Aniko; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2009-09-01

    Whether N-acetylcysteine is beneficial for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy is uncertain. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of high-dose N-acetylcysteine for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy. Our prespecified inclusion criteria were as follows: adult subjects; English language literature; administration of high-dose N-acetylcysteine a priori defined as a daily dose greater than 1200 mg or a single periprocedural dose (within 4 hours of contrast exposure) greater than 600 mg; prospective trials of individuals randomized to N-acetylcysteine, administered orally or intravenously, versus a control group; and trials that included the end point of the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy. Trials that compared N-acetylcysteine with another active treatment were excluded. Sixteen comparisons of patients randomized to high-dose N-acetylcysteine versus controls met our prespecified inclusion criteria with a total sample size of 1677 subjects (842 assigned to high-dose N-acetylcysteine and 835 assigned to the control arm). The average population age was 68 years, 38.7% were diabetic, and the majority was male (67.8% of reported instances). The weighted mean baseline creatinine of the overall population was 1.58 mg/dL. No significant heterogeneity was detected (P = .09; I(2) = 34%). The overall effect size assuming a common odds ratio revealed an odds ratio of 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33-0.63) for the occurrence of contrast-induced nephropathy with the use of high-dose N-acetylcysteine. The results of the more conservative random effects approach were similar (odds ratio = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34-0.78). There was no evidence of publication bias (P = .34). Our results suggest that high-dose N-acetylcysteine decreases the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  12. Low-dose quantitative phase contrast medical CT

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    Mittone, A.; Bravin, A.; Coan, P.

    2018-02-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful and routinely used clinical diagnostic technique, which is well tolerated by patients, and which provides high-resolution images and volumetric information about the body. However, two important limitations still affect this examination procedure: (1) its low sensitivity with respect to soft tissues, and (2) the hazards associated with x-ray exposure. Conventional radiology is based on the detection of the different photon absorption properties that characterize biological tissues, and thus the obtainable image contrast from soft and/or similar tissues is intrinsically limited. In this scenario, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) has been extensively tested and proven to overcome some of the main issues surrounding standard x-ray imaging. In addition to the absorption signal, XPCI relies on detecting the phase shifts induced by an object. Interestingly, as the order of magnitude of the phase contrast is higher than that of absorption, XPCI can, in principle, offer higher sensitivity at lower radiation doses. However, other technical aspects may counterbalance this gain, and an optimized setup and image processing solutions need to be implemented. The work presented here describes the strategies and developments we have realized, with the aim of controlling the radiation dose for the highly sensitive and quantitative XPCI-CT. Different algorithms for the phase retrieval and CT reconstruction of the XPCI data are presented. The CT algorithms we have implemented, namely the equally sloped tomography and the dictionary learning method, allow the image quality to be preserved while reducing the number of angular projections required by a factor of five. The results applied to breast imaging report accurate reconstructions at clinically compatible doses of the 3D distribution of the refractive properties of full human organs obtained by using three different phase retrieval methods. The described methodologies and the

  13. High Atomic Number Contrast Media Offer Potential for Radiation Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography.

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    Roessler, Ann-Christin; Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Kalender, Willi A

    2016-04-01

    Spectral optimization of x-ray computed tomography (CT) has led to substantial radiation dose reduction in contrast-enhanced CT studies using standard iodinated contrast media. The purpose of this study was to analyze the potential for further dose reduction using high-atomic-number elements such as hafnium and tungsten. As in previous studies, spectra were determined for which the patient dose necessary to provide a given contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is minimized. We used 2 different quasi-anthropomorphic phantoms representing the liver cross-section of a normal adult and an obese adult patient with the lateral widths of 360 and 460 mm and anterior-posterior heights of 200 and 300 mm, respectively. We simulated and measured on 2 different scanners with x-ray spectra from 80 to 140 kV and from 70 to 150 kV, respectively. We determined the contrast for iodine-, hafnium-, and tungsten-based contrast media, the noise, and 3-dimensional dose distributions at all available tube voltages by measurements and by simulations. The dose-weighted CNR was determined as optimization parameter. Simulations and measurements were in good agreement regarding their dependence on energy for all parameters investigated. Hafnium provided the best performance for normal and for obese patient phantoms, indicating a dose reduction potential of 30% for normal and 50% for obese patients at 120 kV compared with iodine; this advantage increased further with higher kV values. Dose-weighted CNR values for tungsten were always slightly below the hafnium results. Iodine proved to be the superior choice at voltage values of 80 kV and below. Hafnium and tungsten both seem to be candidates for contrast-medium-enhanced CT of normal and obese adult patients with strongly reduced radiation dose at unimpaired image quality. Computed tomography examinations of obese patients will decrease in dose for higher kV values.

  14. Dose correction for post-contrast T1 mapping of the Heart: the MESA study

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    Gai, Neville D.; Sandfort, Veit; Liu, Songtao; Lima, João AC; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Post-contrast myocardial T1 (T1myo,c) values have been shown to be sensitive to myocardial fibrosis. Recent studies have shown differences in results obtained from T1myo,c and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) with respect to percentage fibrosis. By exploring the relationship between blood plasma volume and T1myo,c, the underlying basis for the divergence can be explained. Furthermore, dose administration based on BMI, age and gender can mitigate the divergence in results. Methods Inter-subject comparison of T1myo,c required adjustment for dose (in mmol/kg), time and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Further adjustment for effective dose based on lean muscle mass reflected by blood/plasma volume (PV) was performed. A test case of 605 subjects from the MESA study who had undergone pre and post-contrast T1 mapping was studied. T1myo,c values were compared between subjects with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS), between smoking and non-smoking subjects, and subjects with and without impaired glucose tolerance, before and after dose adjustment based on plasma volume. Comparison with ECV (which is dose independent), pre-contrast myocardial T1 and blood normalized myocardial T1 values was also performed to validate the correction. Results There were significant differences in T1myo,c (post plasma volume correction) and ECV between current and former smokers (p-value 0.017 and 0.01, respectively) but not T1myo,c prior to correction (p = 0.12). Prior to dose adjustment for plasma volume, p-value was ECV p values were 0.44 and 0.99, respectively. Overall, ECV results showed the best agreement with PV corrected T1myo,c (mean absolute difference in p values = 0.073) and pre-contrast myocardial T1 in comparison with other measures (T1myo,c prior to correction and blood/plasma T1 value normalized myocardium). Conclusions Weight-based contrast dosing administered in mmol/kg results in a bias in T1 values which can lead to erroneous conclusions. After adjustment for

  15. Bayesian estimation of cerebral perfusion using reduced-contrast-dose dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion at 3T.

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    Nael, K; Mossadeghi, B; Boutelier, T; Kubal, W; Krupinski, E A; Dagher, J; Villablanca, J P

    2015-04-01

    DSC perfusion has been increasingly used in conjunction with other contrast-enhanced MR applications and therefore there is need for contrast-dose reduction when feasible. The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of reduced-contrast-dose brain DSC perfusion by using a probabilistic Bayesian method and to compare the results with the commonly used singular value decomposition technique. Half-dose (0.05-mmol/kg) and full-dose (0.1-mmol/kg) DSC perfusion studies were prospectively performed in 20 patients (12 men; 34-70 years of age) by using a 3T MR imaging scanner and a gradient-EPI sequence (TR/TE, 1450/22 ms; flip angle, 90°). All DSC scans were processed with block circulant singular value decomposition and Bayesian probabilistic methods. SNR analysis was performed in both half-dose and full-dose groups. The CBF, CBV, and MTT maps from both full-dose and half-dose scans were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively in both WM and GM on coregistered perfusion maps. Statistical analysis was performed by using a t test, regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. The SNR was significantly (P < .0001) lower in the half-dose group with 32% and 40% reduction in GM and WM, respectively. In the half-dose group, the image-quality scores were significantly higher in Bayesian-derived CBV (P = .02) and MTT (P = .004) maps in comparison with block circulant singular value decomposition. Quantitative values of CBF, CBV, and MTT in Bayesian-processed data were comparable and without a statistically significant difference between the half-dose and full-dose groups. The block circulant singular value decomposition-derived half-dose perfusion values were significantly different from those of the full-dose group both in GM (CBF, P < .001; CBV, P = .02; MTT, P = .02) and WM (CBF, P < .001; CBV, P = .003; MTT, P = .01). Reduced-contrast-dose (0.05-mmol/kg) DSC perfusion of the brain is feasible at 3T by using the Bayesian probabilistic method with quantitative results

  16. Suitability of new anode materials in mammography: dose and subject contrast considerations using Monte Carlo simulation.

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    Delis, H; Spyrou, G; Costaridou, L; Tzanakos, G; Panayiotakis, G

    2006-11-01

    optimization task in terms of subject contrast to dose ratio, tube voltage was found to have a minor effect, while with respect to the filter material, a lesion specific performance was noticed, with Al filtered spectra showing improved characteristics in case of the inhomogeneities simulating microcalcifications, while softer k-edge filtered spectra are more suitable for the discrimination of inhomogeneities simulating masses.

  17. Image quality, threshold contrast and mean glandular dose in CR mammography.

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    Jakubiak, R R; Gamba, H R; Neves, E B; Peixoto, J E

    2013-09-21

    In many countries, computed radiography (CR) systems represent the majority of equipment used in digital mammography. This study presents a method for optimizing image quality and dose in CR mammography of patients with breast thicknesses between 45 and 75 mm. Initially, clinical images of 67 patients (group 1) were analyzed by three experienced radiologists, reporting about anatomical structures, noise and contrast in low and high pixel value areas, and image sharpness and contrast. Exposure parameters (kV, mAs and target/filter combination) used in the examinations of these patients were reproduced to determine the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD). The parameters were also used to radiograph a CDMAM (version 3.4) phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, The Netherlands) for image threshold contrast evaluation. After that, different breast thicknesses were simulated with polymethylmethacrylate layers and various sets of exposure parameters were used in order to determine optimal radiographic parameters. For each simulated breast thickness, optimal beam quality was defined as giving a target CNR to reach the threshold contrast of CDMAM images for acceptable MGD. These results were used for adjustments in the automatic exposure control (AEC) by the maintenance team. Using optimized exposure parameters, clinical images of 63 patients (group 2) were evaluated as described above. Threshold contrast, CNR and MGD for such exposure parameters were also determined. Results showed that the proposed optimization method was effective for all breast thicknesses studied in phantoms. The best result was found for breasts of 75 mm. While in group 1 there was no detection of the 0.1 mm critical diameter detail with threshold contrast below 23%, after the optimization, detection occurred in 47.6% of the images. There was also an average MGD reduction of 7.5%. The clinical image quality criteria were attended in 91.7% for all breast thicknesses evaluated in

  18. Evaluation of low contrast resolution and radiation dose in abdominal CT protocols by a difference detail curve (DDC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommer Christian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of optimised CT protocols regarding radiation exposure is a legal requirement. Since low contrast visibility is intrinsically varying within the CT slice, there is no adequate method for optimisation of dose and image quality. We developed a method to access image quality in a way that represents the situation closer to a real patient. This method is based on a novel difference detail curve (DDC phantom with low contrast objects representing native tissue contrast and contrast media with different densities and diameters. The position of the contrast objects have been evaluated by a noise level analysis of CT slices of different manufactures. The dose – length – product can be measured within the phantom simultaneously. For all tested manu-factures and CT protocols, the noise analysis revealed a similar spatial variation of the signal -to-noise ratio (SNR. For the DDC method, contrast steps of 6 (4-8 Hounsfield Units (HU are adequate. For the different CT units, comparable low contrast detectability is associated with remarkably varying dose levels (CTDI range from 8 to 18 mGy for native contrast and 9-16 mGy for contrast media. The novel DDC phantom is sensitive to protocol optimisations and therefore suitable for rating subtle effects caused by protocol optimisation.

  19. Whole-Body High-Pitch CT Angiography: Strategies to Reduce Radiation Dose and Contrast Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manneck, Sebastian; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Seaman, Danielle M; Heye, Tobias; Boll, Daniel T

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to assess the noninferiority of dual-source high-pitch CT angiography (CTA) performed with high-concentration (iopamidol 370) low-volume (60 mL) iodinated contrast material at low voltage (100 kVp) in comparison with dual-source high-pitch CTA with standard-of-care low-concentration (iopamidol 300) standard-volume (75 mL) iodinated contrast material at high voltage (120 kVp) to determine whether use of the high-concentration low-volume method would afford a reduction in radiation dose and contrast volume without negatively affecting vascular opacification. This study had three arms. A phantom was used to assess vascular contrast enhancement at different iodine and saline solution dilutions with iopamidol 300 or 370 to compare lower-iodination (iopamidol 300) high-voltage (120 kVp) high-pitch (120 kVp, 250 mAs) imaging with higher-iodination (iopamidol 370) low-voltage (100 kVp) high-pitch (100 kVp, 100-240 mAs) acquisition. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors were placed in an anthropomorphic phantom to extract organ-based radiation profiles, and ANOVA was performed. The study prospectively enrolled 150 patients: 50 patients received 75 mL iopamidol 300, and image acquisition was performed at 120 kVp and 250 mAs; 50 patients received 75 mL iopamidol 370, and acquisition was performed at 100 kVp and 240 mAs; and 50 patients received 60 mL iopamidol, and acquisition was performed at 370 at 100 kVp and 240 mAs. Vascular signal-to-noise ratio was evaluated at 18 anatomic locations. Longitudinal signal-to-noise ratio was used to assess homogeneity of contrast enhancement. Size-specific dose estimates were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed by ANOVA. Noninferiority of high-concentration (iopamidol 370) low-voltage (100 kVp) high-pitch acquisitions compared with low-concentration (iopamidol 300) high-voltage (120 kVp) high-pitch acquisition was achieved at 170 mAs in vitro. Radiation assessment showed significant

  20. Ultrasound Signal Analysis Applied to Determine the Optimal Contrast Dose for Echographic Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto FRANCHINI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the understanding of the behaviour of currently available ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs, in the form of gas-filled microbubbles encapsulated in elastic shells, has significantly improved thanks to “ad hoc” designed “in vitro” studies. However, in several studies there has been a tendency to use high UCA concentrations, potentially reducing the safety of microbubbles in clinical applications. In this study we investigated a possible strategy to improve microbubble safety by reducing the injection dose and employing low ultrasound intensities. We measured the achievable contrast enhancement insonifying microbubbles at different low concentrations (range 0.01-0.10 µL/mL using a very low mechanical index (MI=0.08. Our results, based on the use of advanced techniques for signal processing and spectrum analysis, showed that UCA backscatter strongly depends on microbubble concentration also in the considered low range, providing useful indications towards the definition of an optimal low contrast dose, effectively employable at low MIs.

  1. Influence of the intravenous contrast media on treatment planning dose calculations of lower esophageal and rectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrollah, Jabbari; Mikaeil, Molazadeh; Omid, Esnaashari; Mojtaba, Seyed Siahi; Ahad, Zeinali

    2014-01-01

    The impact of intravenous (IV) contrast media (CM) on radiation dose calculations must be taken into account in treatment planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of an intravenous contrast media on dose calculations in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for lower esophageal and rectal cancers. Seventeen patients with lower esophageal tumors and 12 patients with rectal cancers were analyzed. At the outset, all patients were planned for 3D-CRT based on the computed tomography (CT) scans with IV contrast media. Subsequently, all the plans were copied and replaced on the scans without intravenous CM. The radiation doses calculated from the two sets of CTs were compared. The dose differences between the planning image set using intravenous contrast and the image set without contrast showed an average increase in Monitor Units (MUs) in the lower esophageal region that was 1.28 and 0.75% for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference in the rectal region between the two sets of scans in the 3D-CRT plans. The results showed that the dose differences between the plans for the CT scans with and without CM were small and clinically tolerable. However, the differences in the lower esophageal region were significant in the statistical analysis.

  2. Coronary computed tomography angiography - Tolerability of β-blockers and contrast media, and temporal changes in radiation dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte; Thomsen, Camilla F; Hosbond, Susanne Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the risk of administration of β-blockers, contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) and trend in x-rays use, during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: A total of 416 patients were referred for elective CCTA. To achieve a resting heart rate below 60.......0001. Conclusions: In terms of side effects to β-blockers and contrast media, there were no short term complications to CCTA. Furthermore the radiation dose was dramatically diminished over the last three years....

  3. Evaluation of contrast dose reduction for excretory urography using computed radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strautman, P.R.; Fajardo, L.L.; Hillman, B.J.; Yoshino, M.T.; Boyle, R.R. Jr.; Fritz, H.; Mockbee, W.B.

    1989-02-01

    Sixty sequential patients were randomly assigned to undergo computed urography with either our full (282 mg I/kg body weight) or half our usual dose (141 mg I/kg body weight) of intraveneous 60% diatrizoate meglumine. Three blinded observers judged automatically post-processed full dose tomograms and KUBs as qualitatively superior to both automatically post-processed and individually, interactively post-processed half dose images. Thus, post-acquisition image manipulation could not fully compensate for diminished image quality due to contrast dose reduction. (orig./HP).

  4. Deep learning enables reduced gadolinium dose for contrast-enhanced brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Enhao; Pauly, John M; Wintermark, Max; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2018-02-13

    There are concerns over gadolinium deposition from gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) administration. To reduce gadolinium dose in contrast-enhanced brain MRI using a deep learning method. Retrospective, crossover. Sixty patients receiving clinically indicated contrast-enhanced brain MRI. 3D T 1 -weighted inversion-recovery prepped fast-spoiled-gradient-echo (IR-FSPGR) imaging was acquired at both 1.5T and 3T. In 60 brain MRI exams, the IR-FSPGR sequence was obtained under three conditions: precontrast, postcontrast images with 10% low-dose (0.01mmol/kg) and 100% full-dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine. We trained a deep learning model using the first 10 cases (with mixed indications) to approximate full-dose images from the precontrast and low-dose images. Synthesized full-dose images were created using the trained model in two test sets: 20 patients with mixed indications and 30 patients with glioma. For both test sets, low-dose, true full-dose, and the synthesized full-dose postcontrast image sets were compared quantitatively using peak-signal-to-noise-ratios (PSNR) and structural-similarity-index (SSIM). For the test set comprised of 20 patients with mixed indications, two neuroradiologists scored blindly and independently for the three postcontrast image sets, evaluating image quality, motion-artifact suppression, and contrast enhancement compared with precontrast images. Results were assessed using paired t-tests and noninferiority tests. The proposed deep learning method yielded significant (n = 50, P 5 dB PSNR gains and >11.0% SSIM). Ratings on image quality (n = 20, P = 0.003) and contrast enhancement (n = 20, P deep learning method, gadolinium dose can be reduced 10-fold while preserving contrast information and avoiding significant image quality degradation. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  6. On the influence of the electron dose rate on the HRTEM image contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Juri, E-mail: ju.barthel@fz-juelich.de [RWTH Aachen University, Ahornstraße 55, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Lentzen, Markus; Thust, Andreas [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate a possible dependence between the applied electron dose-rate and the magnitude of the resulting image contrast in HRTEM of inorganic crystalline objects. The present study is focussed on the question whether electron irradiation can induce excessively strong atom vibrations or displacements, which in turn could significantly reduce the resulting image contrast. For this purpose, high-resolution images of MgO, Ge, and Au samples were acquired with varying dose rates using a C{sub S}-corrected FEI Titan 80–300 microscope operated at 300 kV accelerating voltage. This investigation shows that the magnitude of the signal contrast is independent from the dose rates occurring in conventional HRTEM experiments and that excessively strong vibrations or displacements of bulk atoms are not induced by the applied electron irradiation. - Highlights: • No dependence between electron dose rate and HRTEM image contrast is found. • This finding is in full accordance with established solid-state physics theory. • Object-related causes for the previous Stobbs-factor phenomenon are ruled out.

  7. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Z., E-mail: zhongbo.lee@uni-ulm.de; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-10-15

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions.

  8. Gadolinium-based contrast media may be nephrotoxic even at approved doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730, Herlev (Denmark)

    2004-09-01

    It is generally believed that gadolinium-based contrast media are not nephrotoxic at the approved doses for MR (<0.3 mmol/kg body weight). Recently, a patient with diabetic nephropathy required dialysis because of anuria 6-7 days after MR angiography with 0.14 mmol/kg body weight gadolinium-DTPA-BMA to assess renal artery stenosis. No special precautions (e.g., hydration) had been taken. The serum creatinine levels had been within 200 and 300 {mu}mol/l for the last 3 years with a very slow increase. This case highlights that gadolinium-based contrast media can cause contrast medium-induced nephropathy even at doses below 0.2 mmol/kg body weight in patients with multiple risk factors. (orig.)

  9. Low-dose and fast grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Faiz; Wang, Shenghao; Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wu, Zhao; Zhu, Peiping; Tian, Yangchao

    2017-09-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has experienced rapid development over the last few decades, and, in this technology, the phase modulation strategy of phase stepping (PS) is used most widely to measure the sample's phase signal. However, because of its discontinuous nature, PS has the defects of worse mechanical stability and high exposure dose, which greatly hinder its wide use in dynamic phase measurement and potential clinical applications. We demonstrate preliminary research on the use of integrating-bucket (IB) phase modulation method to retrieve the phase information in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Experimental results show that our proposed method can be well employed to extract the differential phase-contrast image, compared with the commonly used PS strategy, the advantage of the IB phase modulation technique is that fast measurement and low dose are promising.

  10. Spatial and contrast resolution of ultralow dose dentomaxillofacial CT imaging using iterative reconstruction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Bischel, Alexander; Stratis, Andreas; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Gassner, Eva-Maria; Puelacher, Wolfgang; Pauwels, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how iterative reconstruction technology (IRT) influences contrast and spatial resolution in ultralow-dose dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. A polymethyl methacrylate phantom with various inserts was scanned using a reference protocol (RP) at CT dose index volume 36.56 mGy, a sinus protocol at 18.28 mGy and ultralow-dose protocols (LD) at 4.17 mGy, 2.36 mGy, 0.99 mGy and 0.53 mGy. All data sets were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and the following IRTs: adaptive statistical iterative reconstructions (ASIRs) (ASIR-50, ASIR-100) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Inserts containing line-pair patterns and contrast detail patterns for three different materials were scored by three observers. Observer agreement was analyzed using Cohen's kappa and difference in performance between the protocols and reconstruction was analyzed with Dunn's test at α = 0.05. Interobserver agreement was acceptable with a mean kappa value of 0.59. Compared with the RP using FBP, similar scores were achieved at 2.36 mGy using MBIR. MIBR reconstructions showed the highest noise suppression as well as good contrast even at the lowest doses. Overall, ASIR reconstructions did not outperform FBP. LD and MBIR at a dose reduction of >90% may show no significant differences in spatial and contrast resolution compared with an RP and FBP. Ultralow-dose CT and IRT should be further explored in clinical studies.

  11. Anisotropy in Werner's binocular depth contrast effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ee, R. van; Erkelens, Casper J.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated Werner's binocular depth contrast effect. Subjects viewed stereograms consisting of a test pattern and an inducing pattern. The halfimages of the inducing pattern were either horisontally scaled or sheared relative to each other. Subjects judged the (induced) percieved slant of the

  12. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  13. Monte Carlo dose simulation for intracoronary radiation therapy with a rhenium 188 solution-filled balloon with contrast medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Oh, Seung-Jun; Choi, Chang-Woon; Lim, Sang-Moo; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Park, Seong-Wook

    2002-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is limited by the incidence of restenosis. Intracoronary irradiation has shown to be effective in restenosis control by inhibiting the neointimal proliferation. Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to calculate the dose to the vessel wall for intracoronary irradiation with a rhenium 188 solution-filled balloon for restenosis inhibition. With a 3-mm-diameter and 30-mm-long balloon, the radiation dose at 1 mm from the balloon surface was 5.3% lower when the balloon structure was included in geometric modeling of the angioplasty catheter, as compared with that obtained by ignoring the structure. The additional dose reduction due to Hexabrix 320 contrast medium added in 30% of volume ratio was 4.7%. With regard to axial dose distribution, the dose was uniform over the balloon length except near the balloon end, at which the dose was reduced by 35% at a 1-mm-deep layer in the vessel wall. With the Re-188 solution mixed with 30% of Hexabrix 320 in volume ratio, the Re-188 activity to be injected for delivery of 15 Gy to the 1-mm-deep layer by 1-minute irradiation was 27.3 GBq/mL. Dose estimates produced in this study should be helpful in determining the Re-188 activity to be injected or the irradiation time for a varying situation in terms of length and diameter of the irradiated arterial segment and depth of the target layer.

  14. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  15. SU-C-12A-03: The Impact of Contrast Medium On Radiation Dose in CT: A Systematic Evaluation Across 58 Patient Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahbaee, P [NC State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of contrast medium on radiation dose as a function of time via Monte Carlo simulation from the liver CT scan across a library of 5D XCAT models Methods: A validated Monte Carlo simulation package (PENELOPE) was employed to model a CT system (LightSpeed 64 VCT, GE Healthcare). The radiation dose was estimated from a common abdomen CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on a library of adult extended cardiac-torso (5D XCAT) phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The 5D XCAT models were created based on patient-specific iodine concentration-time results from our computational contrast medium propagation model for different intravenous injection protocols. To enable a dynamic estimation of radiation dose, each organ in the model was assigned to its own time-concentration curve via the PENELOPE package, material.exe. Using the Monte Carlo, for each scan time point after the injection, 80 million photons were initiated and tracked through the phantoms. Finally, the dose to the liver was tallied from the deposited energy. Results: Monte Carlo simulation results of radiation dose delivered to the liver from the XCAT models indicated up to 30% increase in dose for different time after the administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The contrast enhancement is employed in over 60% of imaging modalities, which not only remarkably affects the CT image quality, but also increases the radiation dose by as much as 70%. The postinjection multiple acquisition in several enhanced CT protocols, makes the radiation dose increment through the use of contrast medium, an inevitable factor in optimization of these protocols. The relationship between radiation dose and injected contrast medium as a function of time studied in this work allows optimization of contrast administration for vulnerable individuals.

  16. Minimizing Contrast Medium Doses to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism with 80-kVp Multidetector Computed Tomography in Azotemic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmquist, F. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Hansson, K.; Pasquariello, F. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden)); Bjoerk, J. (Competence Center for Clinical Research, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Lund, Lund (Sweden)); Nyman, U. (Dept. of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Background: In diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in azotemic patients, scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently inconclusive or not available in many hospitals. Computed tomography is readily available, but relatively high doses (30-50 g I) of potentially nephrotoxic iodine contrast media (CM) are used. Purpose: To report on the diagnostic quality and possible contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after substantially reduced CM doses to diagnose PE in azotemic patients using 80-peak kilovoltage (kVp) 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) combined with CM doses tailored to body weight, fixed injection duration adapted to scan time, automatic bolus tracking, and saline chaser. Material and Methods: Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <50 ml/min were scheduled to undergo 80-kVp MDCT using 200 mg I/kg, and those with eGFR =50 ml/min, 120-kVp MDCT with 320 mg I/kg. Both protocols used an 80-kg maximum dose weight and a fixed 15-s injection time. Pulmonary artery density and contrast-to-noise ratio were measured assuming 70 Hounsfield units (HU) for a fresh clot. CIN was defined as a plasma creatinine rise >44.2 mumol/l from baseline. Results: 89/148 patients (63/68 females) underwent 80-/120-kVp protocols, respectively, with 95% of the examinations being subjectively excellent or adequate. Mean values in the 80-/120-kVp cohorts regarding age were 82/65 years, body weight 66/78 kg, effective mAs 277/117, CM dose 13/23 g I, pulmonary artery density 359/345 HU, image noise (1 standard deviation) 24/21 HU, contrast-to-noise ratio 13/13, and dose-length product 173/258 mGycm. Only 1/65 and 2/119 patients in the 80- and 120-kVp cohorts, respectively, with negative CT and no anticoagulation suffered non-fatal thromboembolism during 3-month follow-up. No patient developed CIN. Conclusion: 80-kVp 16-row MDCT with optimization of injection parameters may be performed with preserved diagnostic quality, using markedly reduced CM

  17. Dose and image quality measurements for contrast-enhanced dual energy mammography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduko, J. M.; Homolka, P.; Jones, V.; Whitwam, D.

    2015-03-01

    The results of patient dose surveys of two contrast-enhanced dual energy mammography systems are presented, showing mean glandular doses for both low and high energy components of the exposures. For one system the distribution of doses is of an unusual pattern, very different from that normally measured in patient dose surveys. The contribution of the high energy component of the exposure to the total is shown to be about 20% of that of the low energy component for this system. It is about 33% for the other system, for which the distribution of doses is similar to previously published surveys . A phantom containing disks with a range of different iodine content was used, with tissue-equivalent materials, to investigate the properties of one dual energy system. The iodine signal difference to noise ratio is suggested as a measure of image quality. It was found to remain practically constant as phantom thickness was varied, and increased only slowly (with a power relationship) as air kerma increased. Other measurements showed good reproducibility of the iodine signal difference, and that it was proportional to iodine concentration in the phantom. The iodine signal difference was found to be practically the same for a wide range of phantom thickness and glandularity.

  18. Bile duct evaluation of potential living liver donors with Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR cholangiography: Single-dose, double dose or half-dose contrast enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja, E-mail: Sonja.Kinner@uni-due.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Steinweg, Verena [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Maderwald, Stefan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Radtke, Arnold; Sotiropoulos, Georgios [Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael; Schroeder, Tobias [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: Detailed knowledge of the biliary anatomy is essential to avoid complications in living donor liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal dosage of Gd-EOB-DTPA for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (ce-MRC) with reference to contrast-enhanced CT cholangiography (ce-CTC). Materials and methods: 30 potential living liver donors (PLLD) underwent both ce-CTC and ce-MRC. Ten candidates each received single, double or half-dose Gd-EOB-DTPA. Ce-MRC images with and without inversion recovery pulses (T1w ± IR) were acquired 20–30 min after intravenous contrast injection. Image data was quantitatively and qualitatively reviewed by two radiologists based on a on a 5-point scale. Data sets were compared using a Mann–Whitney-U-test or Wilcoxon-rank-sum-test. Kappa values were also calculated. Results: All image series provided sufficient diagnostic information both showing normal biliary anatomy and variant bile ducts. Ce-CTC showed statistically significant better results compared to all ce-MRC data sets. T1w MRC with single dose Gd-EOB-DTPA proved to be superior to half and double dose in subjective and objective evaluation without a statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Ce-MRC is at any dosage inferior to ce-CTC. As far as preoperative planning of bile duct surgery is focused on the central biliary anatomy, ce-MRC can replace harmful ce-CTC strategies, anyway. Best results were seen with single dose GD-EOB-DTPA on T1w MRC+IR.

  19. Bile duct evaluation of potential living liver donors with Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR cholangiography: Single-dose, double dose or half-dose contrast enhanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Sonja; Steinweg, Verena; Maderwald, Stefan; Radtke, Arnold; Sotiropoulos, Georgios; Forsting, Michael; Schroeder, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Detailed knowledge of the biliary anatomy is essential to avoid complications in living donor liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal dosage of Gd-EOB-DTPA for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (ce-MRC) with reference to contrast-enhanced CT cholangiography (ce-CTC). 30 potential living liver donors (PLLD) underwent both ce-CTC and ce-MRC. Ten candidates each received single, double or half-dose Gd-EOB-DTPA. Ce-MRC images with and without inversion recovery pulses (T1w±IR) were acquired 20-30min after intravenous contrast injection. Image data was quantitatively and qualitatively reviewed by two radiologists based on a on a 5-point scale. Data sets were compared using a Mann-Whitney-U-test or Wilcoxon-rank-sum-test. Kappa values were also calculated. All image series provided sufficient diagnostic information both showing normal biliary anatomy and variant bile ducts. Ce-CTC showed statistically significant better results compared to all ce-MRC data sets. T1w MRC with single dose Gd-EOB-DTPA proved to be superior to half and double dose in subjective and objective evaluation without a statistically significant difference. Ce-MRC is at any dosage inferior to ce-CTC. As far as preoperative planning of bile duct surgery is focused on the central biliary anatomy, ce-MRC can replace harmful ce-CTC strategies, anyway. Best results were seen with single dose GD-EOB-DTPA on T1w MRC+IR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantifying potential reduction in contrast dose with monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-layer detector spectral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Derek S; Merchant, Thomas E; Merchant, Sophie E; Smith, Hanna; Yagil, Yoad; Hua, Chia-Ho

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the potential dose reduction in iodinated contrast when interpreting monoenergetic images from spectral CT. 51 paediatric patients received contrast-enhanced CT simulation for radiation therapy using a single-source, dual-layer detector spectral CT. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of blood vessels were measured relative to surrounding soft tissue. CNRs on monoenergetic 40-70 keV images were compared with polychromatic 120 kVp images. To compare with in vivo results, a phantom with iodine inserts (2-20 mg ml -1 concentration) was scanned and CNRs were calculated relative to water background. Monoenergetic keV and body site had significant effects on CNR ratio (p images, respectively. Image noise was highest at 40 keV and lowest at 70 keV. Phantom measurements indicated that the same CNR as 120 kVp images can be achieved with a 4.0-fold lower iodine concentration on 40 keV images and 2.5-fold lower on 50 keV images. 50 keV monoenergetic images provided the best balance of improved CNR on all studies (mean 2.4-fold increase in vivo) for enhancing vessels vs image noise. A 50% reduction in contrast dose on a 50 keV image should maintain comparable or better CNR as compared with polychromatic CT in over 80% of CT studies. Advances in knowledge: Use of a novel, single-source, dual-layer detector spectral CT scanner to improve visualization of contrast-enhanced blood vessels will reduce the amount of iodinated contrast required for radiation oncology treatment planning.

  1. Optimization of image quality in pulmonary CT angiography with low dose of contrast material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Abed Al Nasser; Abu Arra, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare objective image quality data for patient pulmonary embolism between a conventional pulmonary CTA protocol with respect to a novel acquisition protocol performed with optimize radiation dose and less amount of iodinated contrast medium injected to the patients during PE scanning. Materials and Methods: Sixty- four patients with Pulmonary Embolism (PE) possibility, were examined using angio-CT protocol. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: A (16 women and 16 men, with age ranging from 19-89 years) mean age, 62 years with standard deviation 16; range, 19-89 years) - injected contrast agent: 35-40 ml. B (16 women and 16 men, with age ranging from 28-86 years) - injected contrast agent: 70-80 ml. Other scanning parameters were kept constant. Pulmonary vessel enhancement and image noise were quantified; signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective vessel contrast was assessed by two radiologists in consensus. Result: A total of 14 cases of PE (22 %) were found in the evaluated of subjects (nine in group A, and five in group B). All PE cases were detected by the two readers. There was no significant difference in the size or location of the PEs between the two groups, the average image noise was 14 HU for group A and 19 HU for group B. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.09). Overall, the SNR and CNR were slightly higher on group B (24.4 and 22.5 respectively) compared with group A (19.4 and 16.4 respectively), but those differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.71 and p = 0.35, respectively). Conclusion and Discussion: Both groups that had been evaluated by pulmonary CTA protocol allow similar image quality to be achieved as compared with each other's, with optimize care dose for both protocol and contrast volume were reduced by 50 % in new protocol comparing to the conventional protocol.

  2. Three-dimensional dose distribution in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films: Feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yi-Shuan; Lin, Yu-Ying; Cheung, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    This study was aimed to establish three-dimensional dose distributions for contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) using self-developed Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. Dose calibration and distribution evaluations were performed on a full-field digital mammography unit with dual energy (DE) contrast-enhanced option. Strategy for dose calibration of films in the DE mode was based on the data obtained from common target/filter/kVp combinations used clinically and the dose response model modified from Rampado's model. Dose derived from films were also verified by measured data from an ionization chamber. The average difference of dose was 8.9% in the dose range for clinical uses. Three-dimensional dose distributions were estimated using triangular acrylic phantom equipped with the mammography system. Five pieces of film sheets were separately placed between the acrylic slabs to evaluate the dose distribution at different depths. After normalizing the dose in each pixel to the maximum dose at the top-center position of the acrylic, normalized dose distribution for transverse, coronal and sagittal planes, could thus be obtained. The depth dose distribution evaluated in this study may further serve as a reference for evaluating the patient glandular dose at different depths based on the entrance exposure information.

  3. Enhanced radiation dose and DNA damage associated with iodinated contrast media in diagnostic X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbron, Richard; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Bouffler, Simon D; Tanner, Rick J; Eakins, Jonathan S; Pearce, Mark S

    2017-11-01

    A review was undertaken of studies reporting increased DNA damage in circulating blood cells and increased organ doses, for X-ray exposures enhanced by iodinated contrast media (ICM), compared to unenhanced imaging. This effect may be due to ICM molecules acting as a source of secondary radiation (Auger/photoelectrons, fluorescence X-rays) following absorption of primary X-ray photons. It is unclear if the reported increase in DNA damage to blood cells necessarily implies an increased risk of developing cancer. Upon ICM-enhancement, the attenuation properties of blood differ substantially from surrounding tissues. Increased energy deposition is likely to occur within very close proximity to ICM molecules (within a few tens of micrometres). Consequently, in many situations, damage and dose enhancement may be restricted to the blood and vessel wall only. Increased cancer risks may be possible, in cases where ICM molecules are given sufficient time to reach the capillary network and interstitial fluid at the time of exposure. In all situations, the extrapolation of blood cell damage to other tissues requires caution where contrast media are involved. Future research is needed to determine the impact of ICM on dose to cells outside the blood itself and vessel walls, and to determine the concentration of ICM in blood vessels and interstitial fluid at the time of exposure.

  4. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Verdun, Francis R. [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gervaz, Pascal [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Digestive Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) {>=} 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI {>=} 18.5. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMIor= 18.5.

  6. Low-contrast medium doses for ultrasound imaging during renal revascularization by PTA-stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Rosario; Lavini, Raffaella; Letizia, Claudio; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Manfredini, Paolo; Cerroni, Franca; Ciano, Giuseppe; Clemenzia, Gianfranco; Coen, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of progressive renal damage in patients with chronic renal insufficiency and renal-artery stenosis undergoing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTA-stenting), color Doppler ultrasound (CDU)-guided, a procedure requiring low-contrast medium doses, or digital subtraction angiography were compared. Thirty patients with renal artery stenosis and severe renal insufficiency underwent PTA-stenting for revascularization, 15 patients with CDU guidance and 15 patients with standard selective digital subtraction angiography (SDSA). Serum creatinine (Cr) concentrations were compared in the two groups at 6 days and 12 months after revascularization. The stents were properly positioned and resolved the renal artery stenosis. None of the patients who underwent ultrasound-guided PTA-stenting had significantly increased Cr values (>50% or >1 mg/dL) at 6 days after surgery (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0-21.8); and none had progressive chronic renal insufficiency at 12 months. Conversely, six of the 15 patients in the group who underwent PTA-stenting with standard SDSA had significantly increased Cr values at 6 days (95% CI, 16.3-67.7) and two patients had progressive chronic renal insufficiency at 12 months. Our results suggest that PTA-stenting under CDU guidance, a procedure requiring low-contrast medium doses, is suitable for patients with severe renal dysfunction and especially for those with diabetes mellitus undergoing percutaneous renal revascularization.

  7. Prospective evaluation of reduced dose computed tomography for the detection of low-contrast liver lesions. Direct comparison with concurrent standard dose imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooler, B.D.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Kim, David H.; Chen, Oliver T. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Pickhardt, Perry J. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, E3/311 Clinical Science Center, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic performance of reduced-dose (RD) contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) with standard-dose (SD) CECT for detection of low-contrast liver lesions. Seventy adults with non-liver primary malignancies underwent abdominal SD-CECT immediately followed by RD-CECT, aggressively targeted at 60-70 % dose reduction. SD series were reconstructed using FBP. RD series were reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR (Veo). Three readers - blinded to clinical history and comparison studies - reviewed all series, identifying liver lesions ≥4 mm. Non-blinded review by two experienced abdominal radiologists - assessing SD against available clinical and radiologic information - established the reference standard. RD-CECT mean effective dose was 2.01 ± 1.36 mSv (median, 1.71), a 64.1 ± 8.8 % reduction. Pooled per-patient performance data were (sensitivity/specificity/PPV/NPV/accuracy) 0.91/0.78/0.60/0.96/0.81 for SD-FBP compared with RD-FBP 0.79/0.75/0.54/0.91/0.76; RD-ASIR 0.84/0.75/0.56/0.93/0.78; and RD-MBIR 0.84/0.68/0.49/0.92/0.72. ROC AUC values were 0.896/0.834/0.858/0.854 for SD-FBP/RD-FBP/RD-ASIR/RD-MBIR, respectively. RD-FBP (P = 0.002) and RD-MBIR (P = 0.032) AUCs were significantly lower than those of SD-FBP; RD-ASIR was not (P = 0.052). Reader confidence was lower for all RD series (P < 0.001) compared with SD-FBP, especially when calling patients entirely negative. Aggressive CT dose reduction resulted in inferior diagnostic performance and reader confidence for detection of low-contrast liver lesions compared to SD. Relative to RD-ASIR, RD-FBP showed decreased sensitivity and RD-MBIR showed decreased specificity. (orig.)

  8. Effect of iodinated contrast media on thyroid: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Mehlika Kuşkonmaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In parallel to the increased use of computed tomography, iodinated contrast agents are increasingly becoming a source of excess iodide. Iodinated contrast agents may induce thyroid dysfunction in exposed patients, especially in the presence of an underlying thyroid disease. Thus, an ordinary dose of the contrast used for the imaging, can induce hyper or hypothyroidism in a patient with subtle thyroid disease. This review will briefly discuss the physiology of iodine and the clinical evaluation of iodine induced thyroid dysfunction.

  9. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  10. Low-radiation-dose dual-phase MDCT protocol with split contrast media dose and time optimization: protocol design for renal donors evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: bazeed@mans.eun.eg; Fooshang, Fawzy F (National Inst. of Urology and Nephrology (Egypt)); Ahmed, Magdy Aly (Nephrology Dept., Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2011-10-15

    Background A routine, multiphase, computed tomography (CT) protocol is associated with high radiation exposure to potential kidney donors. To reduce radiation exposure, several authors have suggested a reduction in the number of phases. Purpose To evaluate a low-radiation-dose, dual-phase protocol (i.e. a protocol with an unenhanced phase and combined vascular and excretory phase) for the preoperative evaluation of potential renal donors. Material and Methods Sixty-five potential renal donors were divided into two groups. The first group was scanned with a routine quadric-phase protocol (non-contrast, arterial, venous, and delayed), and the second group was scanned with a triple-phase protocol (dual phase protocol + venous phase). In the second group, we replaced CT angiography with a routine abdominal CT technique. In addition to the evaluation of renal arteries, veins, and excretory systems, the radiation dose of the suggested protocol was compared to that of the routine quadric-phase protocol. Results The suggested protocol was efficient in the evaluation of renal arteries, veins, and excretory systems in all studied potential renal donors. Renal arteries were well visualized in the combined vascular excretory phase using the routine abdominal CT technique; no significant difference was noted when these results were compared to those obtained from the CT angiography used in the quadric-phase protocol. The mean effective radiation dose of our suggested dual-phase protocol was only 34% of the dose resulting from the routine quadric-phase protocol. Conclusion Use of a low-radiation, dual-phase, CT protocol, which relied on both an unenhanced phase and a combined vascular and excretory phase, significantly reduced radiation dose. Furthermore, the proposed protocol provides adequate visualization of renal arteries and veins, and affords sufficient opacification of the urinary tract using improved acquisition triggering

  11. 23. Does the maximum allowable contrast dose (MACD predict the risk of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Abdulaziz Al-Harthi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Overall it is best to limit contrast dose to the extent possible as this is a known risk factor, however MACD is not a useful variable in a risk model for predicting CIN in our population. Primary PCI was the only predictor of CIN in our population.

  12. Effect of stimulus width on simultaneous contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Shi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Perceived brightness of a stimulus depends on the background against which the stimulus is set, a phenomenon known as simultaneous contrast. For instance, the same gray stimulus can look light against a black background or dark against a white background. Here we quantified the perceptual strength of simultaneous contrast as a function of stimulus width. Previous studies have reported that wider stimuli result in weaker simultaneous contrast, whereas narrower stimuli result in stronger simultaneous contrast. However, no previous research has quantified this relationship. Our results show a logarithmic relationship between stimulus width and perceived brightness. This relationship is well matched by the normalized output of a Difference-of-Gaussians (DOG filter applied to stimuli of varied widths.

  13. The effect of defocus on edge contrast sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, NM; Kooijman, AC

    The effect of optical blur (defocus) on edge contrast sensitivity was studied. Edge contrast sensitivity detoriates with fairly small amounts of blur (similar to 0.5 D) and is roughly reduced by half for each dioptre of blur. The effect of blur on edge contrast sensitivity equals the effect of blur

  14. Coronary computed tomography angiography - tolerability of β-blockers and contrast media, and temporal changes in radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Charlotte; Thomsen, Camilla F; Hosbond, Susanne E; Thomassen, Anders; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2014-10-01

    To determine the risk in administering β-blockers, contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) and the trend in X-ray use, during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). A total of 416 patients were referred for elective CCTA. To achieve a resting heart rate below 60 beats per minute, oral and/or intravenous β-blockers were administered. Using questionnaires, information on the adverse effects of β-blockers was collected from the patients. The levels of s-creatinine and estimated GFR (eGFR) were measured before and after contrast enhanced CCTA. Radiation exposure was compared with the exposure 3 years earlier. There was no significant difference in the symptoms (dizziness, lipothymia and palpitations) between patients with and patients without β-blocker pretreatment. Compared to baseline values, the decrease in s-creatinine was not significant (75.2 vs. 74.6 μmol/L, p = 0.09), while the increase in eGFR was not significant (78 vs. 79 mL/min, p = 0.17). Also, subgroups of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes or pre-existing slight impairment in renal function did not develop CIN. The mean radiation exposure decreased from 17.5 to 6.7 mSv, p < 0.0001. In terms of the side effects of β-blockers and contrast media, there were no short term complications to CCTA. Furthermore, the radiation dose has been dramatically diminished over the last three years.

  15. Can low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of iodine contrast medium in a dynamic CT study of the liver?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Okada, Masahiro; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hidaka, Syojiro; Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Murakami, Takamichi, E-mail: murakami@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether low-dose dynamic CT of the liver with iterative reconstruction can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium. Materials and methods: This study was approved by our institutional review board. 113 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group A/group B (fifty-eight/fifty-five patients) underwent liver dynamic CT at 120/100 kV, with 0/40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with a contrast dose of 600/480 mg I/kg, respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated based on the manufacturer's phantom data. The enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma, vessels and the tumor-to-liver contrast of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) were compared between two groups. Two readers independently assessed the CT images of the hepatic parenchyma and HCCs. Results: The mean CT dose indices: 6.38/4.04 mGy, the dose-length products: 194.54/124.57 mGy cm, for group A/group B. The mean enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma and the tumor-to-liver contrast of HCCs with diameters greater than 1 cm in the post-contrast all phases did not differ significantly between two groups (P > 0.05). The enhancement values of vessels in group B were significantly higher than that in group A in the delayed phases (P < 0.05). Two reader's confidence levels for the hepatic parenchyma in the delayed phases and HCCs did not differ significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Low-dose dynamic CT with ASIR can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium without image quality degradation, compared to conventional dynamic CT without ASIR.

  16. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  17. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients weighing 70 kg or less: initial trial of compact-bolus dynamic CT with low-dose contrast material at 80 kVp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaga, Yumi; Awai, Kazuo; Nakaura, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Funama, Yoshinori; Date, Shuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic capability of hepatic dynamic CT with low-dose contrast material (420 mg I/kg body weight) at 80 kVp with that of the same modality performed with standard-dose contrast material at 120 kVp. We randomly assigned 111 patients (50 women, 61 men; mean age, 69.1 years) with known or suspected hepatocellular carcinoma and a body weight of 70 kg or less to one of two protocols. In the 80-kVp protocol, the contrast material (444 mg I/kg body weight) was delivered over 15 seconds at a tube voltage of 80 kVp. In the 120-kVp protocol, a contrast dose of 600 mg I/kg was delivered over 30 seconds at 120 kVp. Of the 111 patients, 38 had hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, we compared the two protocols for the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tumors (difference between tumor attenuation and liver attenuation divided by noise in the liver) and the figure of merit (square of contrast-to-noise ratio divided by effective dose) of the tumors during the arterial phase of imaging. Effective doses also were compared. The contrast-to-noise ratio of the tumors was significantly higher with the 80-kVp than with the 120-kVp protocol (median, 5.3 vs 4.2; p = 0.04). The figure of merit also was significantly higher with the 80-kVp than with the 120-kVp protocol (10.2 vs 5.3, p = 0.02). The effective dose was significantly lower with the 80-kVp than with the 120-kVp protocol (2.97 vs 3.41 mSv, p < 0.01). With 80-kVp acquisition, the contrast-to-noise ratio and figure of merit of tumors during the arterial phase improved despite the lower contrast dose and radiation exposure.

  19. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ching-Jung [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Yang, Pei-Ying [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian, E-mail: chaot@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Tu, Shu-Ju, E-mail: sjtu@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively.

  1. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Alan J.; Vora, Nayana [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Suh, Steve [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Liu, An, E-mail: aliu@coh.org [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V{sub 45} {sub Gy}, V{sub 30} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way.

  2. Dose assessment in contrast enhanced digital mammography using simple phantoms simulating standard model breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, R W; van Engen, R E; Young, K C; Veldkamp, W J H; Dance, D R

    2015-01-07

    Slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE) slabs are used to simulate standard model breasts for the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). These phantoms are optimized for the energy spectra used in DM and DBT, which normally have a lower average energy than used in contrast enhanced digital mammography (CEDM). In this study we have investigated whether these phantoms can be used for the evaluation of AGD with the high energy x-ray spectra used in CEDM. For this purpose the calculated values of the incident air kerma for dosimetry phantoms and standard model breasts were compared in a zero degree projection with the use of an anti scatter grid. It was found that the difference in incident air kerma compared to standard model breasts ranges between -10% to +4% for PMMA slabs and between 6% and 15% for PMMA-PE slabs. The estimated systematic error in the measured AGD for both sets of phantoms were considered to be sufficiently small for the evaluation of AGD in quality control procedures for CEDM. However, the systematic error can be substantial if AGD values from different phantoms are compared.

  3. Brightness contrast-contrast induction model predicts assimilation and inverted assimilation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Yuval; Spitzer, Hedva; Einav, Shmuel

    2008-10-17

    In classical assimilation effects, intermediate luminance patches appear lighter when their immediate surround is comprised of white patches and appear darker when their immediate surround is comprised of dark patches. With patches either darker or lighter than both inducing patches, the direction of the brightness effect is reversed and termed as "inverted assimilation effect." Several explanations and models have been suggested, some are relevant to specific stimulus geometry, anchoring theory, and models that involve high level cortical processing (such as scission, etc.). None of these studies predicted the various types of assimilation effects and their inverted effects. We suggest here a compound brightness model, which is based on contrast-contrast induction (second-order adaptation mechanism). The suggested model predicts the various types of brightness assimilation effects and their inverted effects. The model is composed of three main stages: (1) composing post-retinal second-order opponent receptive fields, (2) calculations of local and remote contrast, and (3) adaptation of the second-order (contrast-contrast induction). We also utilize a variation of the Jacobi iteration process to enable elegant edge integration in order to evaluate the model is performance.

  4. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a photon-counting detector: quantitative accuracy and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced mammography has been used to demonstrate functional information about a breast tumor by injecting contrast agents. However, a conventional technique with a single exposure degrades the efficiency of tumor detection due to structure overlapping. Dual-energy techniques with energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) also cause an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy of material decomposition due to the limitations of EIDs. On the other hands, spectral mammography with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) is able to resolve the issues induced by the conventional technique and EIDs using their energy-discrimination capabilities. In this study, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was implemented by using a polychromatic dual-energy model, and the proposed technique was compared with the dual-energy technique with an EID in terms of quantitative accuracy and radiation dose. The results showed that the proposed technique improved the quantitative accuracy as well as reduced radiation dose comparing to the dual-energy technique with an EID. The quantitative accuracy of the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was slightly improved as a function of radiation dose. Therefore, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumors and improving diagnostic accuracy.

  5. Effects of contrast materials in IMRT and VMAT of prostate using a commercial Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundayadan Chandroth, Mahesh; Venning, Anthony; Chick, Brendan; Waller, Brett

    2016-06-01

    Contrast materials help in contouring in radiotherapy. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effects of contrast materials in bladder on the dosimetry during prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy. The study also investigates the difference of the two dose calculation options namely 'dose to medium (Dm)' and 'dose to water (Dw)' in a commercial Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. Eight IMRT treatment plans were retrospectively studied which were used to treat high risk prostate cancer patients. The treatment plans generated in Monaco treatment planning system use seven coplanar beams and calculated 'Dm' as the clinical option. These plans were recalculated, keeping the segments, beam angle and monitor units the same, with different relative electron densities assigned to the structure 'bladder' to mimic the presence of contrast material. The same plans were recalculated using the 'Dw' option. Further, keeping the IMRT constraints and plan calculation properties the same, these plans were re-optimised with the delivery method changed to volumetric modulated arc therapy and calculated using both 'Dm' and 'Dw' options. For all the four scenarios, it was found that for the target volumes CTV and PTV, 'minimum dose' is the only endpoint studied having a significant difference with the presence of contrast material. For bladder, the endpoint V40 Gy is affected. Any significant dosimetric effect is found only when the relative electron density of the contrast material is 1.2 or more. Also, the dosimetric difference is greater when 'Dm' option is used for calculation. For rectum, the dosimetry remains unaffected. Hence, contrast materials should be contoured and assigned appropriate relative electron densities during IMRT and VMAT treatment planning of prostate. Also, the difference in dose reported with the two dose calculation options (Dm and Dw) in the presence of contrast materials is significant.

  6. Application of low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT scans in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Song, Lei; Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qifeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of using low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT examinations in children with congenital heart disease. Ninety patients with congenital heart disease were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac scans on a Discovery CT750 HD scanner. Group A received 270 mg I/mL iodixanol, and group B received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol contrast media and was scanned with prospective ECG triggering mode. Group C received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol and was scanned with conventional retrospective ECG gating mode. The same weight-based contrast injection protocol was used for all three groups. Images were reconstructed using a 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm and a 50% ASIR in groups A and B and a 30% ASIR in group C. The subjective and objective image quality evaluations, diagnostic accuracies, radiation doses and amounts of contrast media in the three groups were measured and compared. All images in the three groups met the diagnostic requirements, with the same diagnostic accuracy and image quality scores greater than 3 in a 4-point scoring system. However, ventricular enhancement and the objective noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality scores in group C were better than those in groups A and B (all Pcontrast dose (14% lower than that of groups B and C). Enhanced CT scan images with low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media can meet the diagnostic requirements for examining children with congenital heart disease while reducing the potential risk of radiation damage and contrast-induced nephropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Using 80 kVp on a 320-row scanner for hepatic multiphasic CT reduces the contrast dose by 50 % in patients at risk for contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Narumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Imuta, Masanori; Yamamura, Sadahiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Kidoh, Masafumi; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Hatemura, Masahiro; Kai, Noriyuki [Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Central Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    We evaluated the effects of a low contrast material (CM) dose protocol using 80-kVp on the image quality of hepatic multiphasic CT scans acquired on a 320-row CT scanner. We scanned 30 patients with renal insufficiency (eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) using 80-kVp and a CM dose of 300mgI/kg. Another 30 patients without renal insufficiency (eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) were scanned with the conventional 120-kVp protocol and the standard CM dose of 600mgI/kg. Quantitative image quality parameters, i.e. CT attenuation, image noise, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared and the visual image quality was scored on a four-point scale. The volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) recorded with the 80- and the 120-kVp protocols were also compared. Image noise and contrast enhancement were equivalent for the two protocols. There was no significant difference in the CNR of all anatomic sites and in the visual scores for overall image quality. The CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE were approximately 25-30 % lower under the 80-kVp protocol. Hepatic multiphase CT using 80-kVp on a 320-row CT scanner allowed for a decrease in the CM dose and a reduction in the radiation dose without image quality degradation in patients with renal insufficiency. (orig.)

  8. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  9. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnica-Garza, H M [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional Unidad Monterrey, Via del Conocimiento 201 Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Apodaca NL C.P. 66600 (Mexico)], E-mail: hgarnica@cinvestav.mx

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360 deg. arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  10. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360° arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  11. Comportamento da dose glandular versus contraste do objeto em mamografia: determinação de formalismo semi-empírico para diferentes combinações alvo-filtro Behavior of subject contrast versus glandular dose in mammography: determination of a semi-empirical formalism for different target-filter combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hoff

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito da mudança no contraste do objeto, tempo de exposição e dose de radiação quando diferentes espessuras de filtração de molibdênio (Mo e ródio (Rh são empregadas em mamógrafos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Realizaram-se medidas da exposição na entrada da pele com uma câmara de ionização para diferentes espessuras para os filtros de Mo e Rh. Para determinar a dose glandular média foi utilizado simulador de BR12 (50% tecido adiposo e 50% tecido glandular de diferentes espessuras (4 cm e 8 cm. Energias na faixa de 24 kVp a 34 kVp foram empregadas e filmes Kodak MinR 2000 foram utilizados. RESULTADOS: Os resultados evidenciaram dados de contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para diferentes espessuras de filtros adicionais e diferentes tensões. Esses dados indicaram aumento nos valores de contraste do objeto e tempo de exposição, com o aumento da espessura dos filtros. A dose glandular apresentou comportamento com diferentes tendências para cada caso analisado. Equações foram definidas para possibilitar a estimativa do contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para os casos estudados. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados possibilitaram a estimativa de equações que auxiliam na verificação do comportamento do contraste do objeto e da dose glandular para simuladores com espessura de 4 cm e 8 cm e para os filtros de Rh e Mo. Dessa forma, torna-se possível estimar a figura de mérito (razão entre o contraste do objeto e a dose glandular, podendo auxiliar na análise da relação risco-benefício dos casos estudados.OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to verify the effect of changes in subject contrast, exposure time and radiation dose when different thicknesses of molybdenum (Mo and rhodium (Rh filters are used in mammography equipments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Entrance skin exposure measurements were performed with an ionization chamber for different thicknesses of Mo and Rh filters

  12. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: possible synergistic effect of stress hyperglycemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress on the renal tubules has been implicated as a mechanism of injury in both stress hyperglycemia and contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of these effects has a synergistic effect on accentuating renal tubular apoptosis and therefore increasing the risk of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  13. Optimal gadolinium dose level for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of U87-derived tumors in athymic nude rats for the assessment of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Varghai, Davood; Flask, Chris A.; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of varying gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dose on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) tracking of brain tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells (derived from human malignant glioma) into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 9, 12, and 13 days DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 9.4 T micro-MRI scanner before and after administration of 100, 150, or 200 μL of Gd-DTPA. Results: Tumor region normalized DCE-MRI scan enhancement at peak was: 1.217 over baseline (0.018 Standard Error [SE]) at the 100 μL dose, 1.339 (0.013 SE) at the 150 μL dose, and 1.287 (0.014 SE) at the 200 μL dose. DCE-MRI peak tumor enhancement at the 150 μL dose was significantly greater than both the 100 μL dose (p < 3.323E-08) and 200 μL dose (p < 0.0007396). Discussion: In this preliminary study, the 150 μL Gd-DTPA dose provided the greatest T1 weighted contrast enhancement, while minimizing negative T2* effects, in DCE-MRI scans of U87-derived tumors. Maximizing Gd-DTPA enhancement in DCE-MRI scans may assist development of a clinically robust (i.e., unambiguous) technique for PDT outcome assessment.

  14. The effective dose of different scanning protocols using the Sirona GALILEOS(®) comfort CBCT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D; Bohay, R; Kaci, L; Barnett, R; Battista, J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effective dose and CT dose index (CTDI) for a range of imaging protocols using the Sirona GALILEOS(®) Comfort CBCT scanner (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany). Calibrated optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed at 26 sites in the head and neck of a modified RANDO(®) phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Greenwich, NY). Effective dose was calculated for 12 different scanning protocols. CTDI measurements were also performed to determine the dose-length product (DLP) and the ratio of effective dose to DLP for each scanning protocol. The effective dose for a full maxillomandibular scan at 42 mAs was 102 ± 1 μSv and remained unchanged with varying contrast and resolution settings. This compares with 71 μSv for a maxillary scan and 76 μSv for a mandibular scan with identical milliampere-seconds (mAs) at high contrast and resolution settings. Changes to mAs and beam collimation have a significant influence on effective dose. Effective dose and DLP vary linearly with mAs. A collimated maxillary or mandibular scan decreases effective dose by approximately 29% and 24%, respectively, as compared with a full maxillomandibular scan. Changes to contrast and resolution settings have little influence on effective dose. This study provides data for setting individualized patient exposure protocols to minimize patient dose from ionizing radiation used for diagnostic or treatment planning tasks in dentistry.

  15. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT image reconstruction using pre-contrast normal-dose CT scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Changfei; Han, Ce; Gan, Guanghui; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Zheng, Xiaomin; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion CT (DMP-CT) imaging provides quantitative functional information for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by calculating myocardial perfusion hemodynamic parameter (MPHP) maps. However, the level of radiation delivered by dynamic sequential scan protocol can be potentially high. The purpose of this work is to develop a pre-contrast normal-dose scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria to improve the image quality of DMP-CT with a low-mAs CT acquisition. For simplicity, the present approach was termed as ‘PWLS-ndiSTV’. Specifically, the ndiSTV regularization takes into account the spatial-temporal structure information of DMP-CT data and further exploits the higher order derivatives of the objective images to enhance denoising performance. Subsequently, an effective optimization algorithm based on the split-Bregman approach was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Evaluations with modified dynamic XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine datasets have demonstrated that the proposed PWLS-ndiSTV approach can achieve promising gains over other existing approaches in terms of noise-induced artifacts mitigation, edge details preservation, and accurate MPHP maps calculation.

  16. MR imaging in recurrent pain after back surgery. A comparative study using standard and high doses of gadolinium contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakeson, P. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Annertz, M. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Kristoffersen, D.T. [Nycomed Imaging AS, Oslo (Norway); Jonsson, E. [Nycomed AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Holtaas, S. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-11-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic results following injection of (a) a high dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) of gadodiamide injection and (b) the standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) of Gd-DTPA, in patients with recurrent symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with recurrent or sustained symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniations were examined. MR imaging (0.3 T) was first performed before and after Gd-DTPA at 0.1 mmol/kg b.w., and then within one month (17 patients) or within 3 months (3 patients) before and after gadodiamide injection at 0.3 mmol/kg b.w. The examinations were first evaluated by 2 neuroradiologists blinded to dose but not to patient as the images were presented in pairs. Six months later the same investigators evaluated the examinations again, this time blinded to both dose and patient. Results: At the evaluation in pairs (with the investigators blinded to dose only) the high-dose examinations were considered the most informative (p=0.05). However, at the later evaluation (with the investigators blinded both to dose and patient) no significant difference between high and standard dose was found regarding diagnosis or diagnostic certainty. Conclusion: In this study the high-dose contrast enhancement of MR imaging at 0.3 T did not increase the diagnostic information for differentiating between scar and recurrent hernia. The high-dose images were considered more informative when evaluated in pairs, but gave no additional or different information when evaluated separately. The study also indicated that comparisons in pairs should be interpreted with caution. (orig.).

  17. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  18. Effect of organic contrast Media on the haematology and Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Contrast media, haematology, serum electrolytes, dogs, xylazine. The effect of contrast media on the hematology and serum electrolyte was determined in five dogs sedated with 2mg/kg of xylazine intramuscular (i.m). A total of 800mg/kg bolus of 76% urograffin was then administered by intravenous injection ...

  19. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: m_bazeed@yahoo.com; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh (Cardiology Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal Univ. (Egypt)); Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim (Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aim Shams Univ. (Egypt)); Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh (Dept. of Cardiac Services, Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 +- 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  20. Ultralow dose dentomaxillofacial CT imaging and iterative reconstruction techniques: variability of Hounsfield units and contrast-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischel, Alexander; Stratis, Andreas; Kakar, Apoorv; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Gassner, Eva-Maria; Puelacher, Wolfgang; Pauwels, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether application of ultralow dose protocols and iterative reconstruction technology (IRT) influence quantitative Hounsfield units (HUs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Methods: A phantom with inserts of five types of materials was scanned using protocols for (a) a clinical reference for navigated surgery (CT dose index volume 36.58 mGy), (b) low-dose sinus imaging (18.28 mGy) and (c) four ultralow dose imaging (4.14, 2.63, 0.99 and 0.53 mGy). All images were reconstructed using: (i) filtered back projection (FBP); (ii) IRT: adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-50 (ASIR-50), ASIR-100 and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR); and (iii) standard (std) and bone kernel. Mean HU, CNR and average HU error after recalibration were determined. Each combination of protocols was compared using Friedman analysis of variance, followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test. Results: Pearson's sample correlation coefficients were all >0.99. Ultralow dose protocols using FBP showed errors of up to 273 HU. Std kernels had less HU variability than bone kernels. MBIR reduced the error value for the lowest dose protocol to 138 HU and retained the highest relative CNR. ASIR could not demonstrate significant advantages over FBP. Conclusions: Considering a potential dose reduction as low as 1.5% of a std protocol, ultralow dose protocols and IRT should be further tested for clinical dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Advances in knowledge: HU as a surrogate for bone density may vary significantly in CT ultralow dose imaging. However, use of std kernels and MBIR technology reduce HU error values and may retain the highest CNR. PMID:26859336

  1. Deconvolution by finite-size-source effects of x-ray phase-contrast images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Tangaro, Sabina; Pelliccia, Daniele; Giannini, Cinzia; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Bellotti, Roberto [Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy) and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Universita degli Studi di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); School of Physics, Monash University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy) and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Universita degli Studi di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In the hard x-ray region, the cross sections for the phase shift of low-Z elements are about 1000 times larger than the absorption ones. As a consequence, phase contrast is detectable even when absorption contrast is minimal or absent. Therefore, phase-contrast imaging could become a valid alternative to absorption contrast without delivering high dose to tissue/human body parts. Methods: To enhance the quality of phase-contrast images without increasing the dose, a possible approach could be the partial deconvolution of the finite source size effects by experimental phase-contrast images. The deconvolution procedure, the authors propose, employs the acquisition of two images on a suitable well-known test sample, one in contact and the other in phase-contrast conditions. Both acquired images are used along with a simulated phase-contrast image (obtained from the test sample in ideal conditions of pointlike source illumination) to correctly retrieve the experimental source distribution function. This information allows a generic experimental phase-contrast image, acquired in the same conditions, to be partially deconvolved by finite source size effects. Results: The performed experimental tests indicate that deconvolved images are equivalent to those which would be obtained with a source 40% smaller than the actual size. In turn, this finding is equivalent to an increase of the ''effective'' lateral spatial coherence length. The corresponding quality improvement of the phase-contrast imaging is directly deducible by the presence of many Fresnel fringes, much better visible with respect to the original experimental phase-contrast images. Conclusions: The use of a test standard sample, always possible in every experimental setup, to partially deconvolve the finite-size-source blurring effects shows that higher quality phase-contrast images could be readily available, making easier diagnoses and tissue/sample analyses. The method could give

  2. Comparison of Low-Dose Higher-Relaxivity and Standard-Dose Lower-Relaxivity Contrast Media for Delayed-Enhancement MRI: A Blinded Randomized Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Benjamin Y C; Duran, Cihan; Preventza, Ourania A; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-09-01

    The gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent gadobenate dimeglumine has nearly twice the MR relaxivity of gadopentetate dimeglumine at 1.5 T. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lower dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine can be used to obtain delayed-enhancement MR images comparable to those obtained with a standard dose (0.2 mmol/kg) of gadopentetate dimeglumine. In this blinded randomized crossover study, 20 patients with known myocardial infarction underwent two separate delayed-enhancement MRI examinations after receiving 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine and 0.2 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (random administration). The conspicuity of lesion enhancement 5, 10, and 20 minutes after contrast administration was quantified as relative enhancement ratio (RER). With either gadolinium-based contrast agent, damaged myocardium had higher signal intensity than normal remote myocardium (RER > 4) on delayed-enhancement MR images, and the blood RER declined over time after contrast administration. The blood RER was not significantly higher for gadobenate dimeglumine than for gadopentetate dimeglumine at 5 and 10 minutes. Nevertheless, there was a larger reduction in blood RER for gadobenate dimeglumine than for gadopentetate dimeglumine between 5 and 10 minutes and between 10 and 20 minutes. The volumes of enhancement were similar for gadobenate dimeglumine (13.6 ± 8.8 cm(3)) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (13.5 ± 8.9 cm(3)) (p = 0.98). The mean difference in Bland-Altman analysis for delayed-enhancement volume between the agents was 0.1 cm(3). Qualitatively and quantitatively, delayed-enhancement MR images of ischemic myocardium obtained with 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine are comparable to those obtained with 0.2 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine 5, 10, and 20 minutes after contrast administration.

  3. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography: Glandular dose estimation using a Monte Carlo code and voxel phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzamicha, E; Yakoumakis, E; Tsalafoutas, I A; Dimitriadis, A; Georgiou, E; Tsapaki, V; Chalazonitis, A

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the mean glandular dose of contrast enhanced digital mammography, using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and female adult voxel phantom. Automatic exposure control of full field digital mammography system was used for the selection of the X-ray spectrum and the exposure settings for dual energy imaging. Measurements of the air-kerma and of the half value layers were performed and a Monte Carlo simulation of the digital mammography system was used to compute the mean glandular dose, for breast phantoms of various thicknesses, glandularities and for different X-ray spectra (low and high energy). For breast phantoms of 2.0-8.0 cm thick and 0.1-100% glandular fraction, CC view acquisition, from AEC settings, can result in a mean glandular dose of 0.450 ± 0.022 mGy -2.575 ± 0.033 mGy for low energy images and 0.061 ± 0.021 mGy - 0.232 ± 0.033 mGy for high energy images. In MLO view acquisition mean glandular dose values ranged between 0.488 ± 0.007 mGy - 2.080 ± 0.021 mGy for low energy images and 0.065 ± 0.012 mGy - 0.215 ± 0.010 mGy for high energy images. The low kV part of contrast enhanced digital mammography is the main contributor to total mean glandular breast dose. The results of this study can be used to provide an estimated mean glandular dose for individual cases. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Degradation of CT Low-Contrast Spatial Resolution Due to the Use of Iterative Reconstruction and Reduced Dose Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Kofler, James M.; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zhoubo; Carter, Rickey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the dose reduction that could be achieved without degrading low-contrast spatial resolution (LCR) performance for two commercial iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques, each evaluated at two strengths with many repeated scans. Materials and Methods Two scanner models were used to image the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation phantom LCR section at volume CT dose indexes of 8, 12, and 16 mGy. Images were reconstructed by using filtered back projection (FBP) and two manufacturers’ IR techniques, each at two strengths (moderate and strong). Data acquisition and reconstruction were repeated 100 times for each, yielding 1800 images. Three diagnostic medical physicists reviewed the LCR images in a blinded fashion and graded the visibility of four 6-mm rods with a six-point scale. Noninferiority and inferiority-superiority analyses were used to interpret the differences in LCR relative to FBP images acquired at 16 mGy. Results LCR decreased with decreasing dose for all reconstructions. Relative to FBP and full dose, 25%–50% dose reductions resulted in inferior LCR for vendors 1 and 2 for FBP and 25% dose reductions resulted in inferior and equivalent performance for vendor 1 and equivalent and superior performance for vendor 2 at moderate and strong IR settings, respectively. When dose was reduced by 50%, both IR techniques resulted in inferior LCR at both strength settings. Conclusion For radiation dose reductions of 25% or more, the ability to resolve the four 6-mm rods in the ACR CT accreditation phantom can be lost. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:25811326

  5. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  6. Noise indices adjusted to body mass index and an iterative reconstruction algorithm maintain image quality on low-dose contrast-enhanced liver CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongxia; Suo, Hongna; Wu, Yanmin; Zuo, Ziwei; Zhao, Sisi; Cheng, Shujie

    2017-04-05

    Since body mass index (BMI) affects medical imaging quality or noise due to penetration of the radiation through bodies with varying sizes, this study aims to investigate and determine the optimal BMI-adjusted noise index (NI) setting on the contrast-enhanced liver CT scans obtained using 3D Smart mA technology with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR 2.0) algorithm. A total of 320 patients who had contrast-enhanced liver CT scans were divided into two equal-sized groups: A (18.5 kg/m2≤BMIreconstructed with 50% ASIR 2.0. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated after the late arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phases were completed. Images were evaluated by two radiologists using a subjective 0 -5 scale. Mean CT dose index of volume, dose-length product, and effective dose (ED) were calculated and compared using one-way ANOVA. In group A, the best-quality images obtained at the lowest ED were scanned at an NI of 15 in the late arterial phase, and at an NI of 17 in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. In group B, the best results were obtained at an NI of 13 in the late arterial phase, and at an NI of 15 in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. Adjusting NI and iterative reconstruction algorithm based on body mass index can help improve image quality on contrast-enhanced liver CT scans, even at low radiation dose.

  7. Low-tube-voltage selection for non-contrast-enhanced CT: Comparison of the radiation dose in pediatric and adult phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonobo, Toshiaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kiguchi, Masao; Masuda, Takanori; Sakabe, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We used pediatric and adult anthropomorphic phantoms to compare the radiation dose of low- and standard tube voltage chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans. We also discuss the optimal low tube voltage for non-contrast-enhanced CT. Using a female adult- and three differently-sized pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms we acquired chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced scans on a 320-multidetector CT volume scanner. The tube voltage was set at 80-, 100-, and 120 kVp. The tube current was automatically assigned on the CT scanner in response to the set image noise level. On each phantom and at each tube voltage we measured the surface and center dose using high-sensitivity metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. The mean surface dose of chest and abdominal CT scans in 5-year olds was 4.4 and 5.3 mGy at 80 kVp, 4.5 and 5.4 mGy at 100 kV, and 4.0 and 5.0 mGy at 120 kVp, respectively. These values were similar in our 3-pediatric phantoms (p > 0.05). The mean surface dose in the adult phantom increased from 14.7 to 19.4 mGy for chest- and from 18.7 to 24.8 mGy for abdominal CT as the tube voltage decreased from 120 to 80 kVp (p voltage and the low tube voltage technique can be used for non-contrast-enhanced chest- and abdominal scanning. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low-dose, time-resolved, contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography in cardiac and vascular diseases: correlation to high spatial resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnam, M.S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)], E-mail: mkrishnam@mednet.ucla.edu; Tomasian, A.; Lohan, D.G.; Tran, L.; Finn, J.P.; Ruehm, S.G. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose, contrast-enhanced, time-resolved, three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (TR-MRA) in the assessment of various cardiac and vascular diseases, and to compare the results with high-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA). Materials and Methods: Thirty consecutive patients underwent contrast-enhanced 3D TR-MRA and high spatial resolution 3D CE-MRA for evaluation of cardiac and thoracic vascular diseases at 1.5 T, and neurovascular, abdominal and peripheral vascular diseases at 3 T. Gadolinium-based contrast medium was administered at a constant dose of 5 ml for TR-MRA, and 20 ml (lower extremity 30 ml) for CE-MRA. Two readers evaluated image quality using a four-point scale (from 0 = excellent to 3 = non-diagnostic), artefacts and findings on both datasets. Interobserver variability was tested with kappa coefficient. Results: The overall image quality for TR-MRA was in the diagnostic range (median 0, range 0-1; k = 0.74). Readers demonstrated important additional dynamic information on TR-MRA in 28 of 30 patients (k = 0.84). Confident evaluation of organ perfusion (n = 23), arteriovenous malformation/fistula flow patterns (n = 7), exclusion of intra-cardiac shunts (n = 6), and assessment of stent and conduit patency (n = 5) were performed by both readers using TR-MRA. Readers demonstrated fine vascular details with higher confidence in 10 patients on CE-MRA. Using CE-MRA, Reader 1 and 2 depicted anatomical details in 6 and 5 patients, respectively, only on CE-MRA. Conclusion: Low-dose TR-MRA yields rapid and important functional and anatomical information in patients with cardiac and vascular diseases. Due to limited spatial resolution, TR-MRA is inferior to CE-MRA in demonstrating fine vascular details.

  9. Effect of static scatterers in laser speckle contrast imaging: an experimental study on correlation and contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro Guilherme; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Figueiras, Edite; Correia, Carlos; Cardoso, Joao M R

    2017-12-05

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive microvascular blood flow assessment technique with good temporal and spatial resolutions. Most LSCI systems, including commercials devices, can only perform qualitative blood flow evaluation which is a major limitation of this technique. There are several factors that prevent LSCI to be a quantitative technique. Among these factors we can highlight the effect of static scatterers. The goal of this work was to study the influence of different static and dynamic scatterers concentrations on laser speckle correlation and contrast. In order to achieve this, a laser speckle prototype was developed and tested using an optical phantom with different concentrations of static and dynamic scatterers. It has been found that the laser speckle correlation can be used to estimate the relative concentration of static/dynamic scatterers within a sample. Moreover, the speckle correlation proved to be independent of the dynamic scatterers velocity which is a fundamental characteristic to be used as contrast correction method. Creative Commons Attribution license.

  10. Immediate hypersensitivity to iodinated contrast media: diagnostic accuracy of skin tests and intravenous provocation test with low dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesé, L; Gaouar, H; Autegarden, J-E; Alari, A; Amsler, E; Vial-Dupuy, A; Pecquet, C; Francès, C; Soria, A

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of HSR to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is challenging based on clinical history and skin tests. This study evaluates the negative predictive value (NPV) of skin tests and intravenous provocation test (IPT) with low-dose ICM in patients with suspected immediate hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) to ICM. Thirty-seven patients with suspected immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ICM were included retrospectively. Skin tests and a single-blind placebo-controlled intravenous provocation test (IPT) with low-dose iodinated contrast media (ICM) were performed. Skin tests with ICM were positive in five cases (one skin prick test and five intradermal test). Thirty-six patients were challenged successfully by IPT, and only one patient had a positive challenge result, with a grade I reaction by the Ring and Messmer classification. Ten of 23 patients followed up by telephone were re-exposed to a negative tested ICM during radiologic examination; two experienced a grade I immediate reaction. For immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ICM, the NPV for skin tests and IPT with low dose was 80% (95% CI 44-97%). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Supra-aortic low-dose contrast-enhanced time-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) angiography at 3 T: comparison with time-of-flight MR angiography and high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Joo; Kim, Bum-soo; Koo, Ja-Sung; Kim, Bom-Yi; Jang, Jinhee; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose, time-resolved, contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance angiography (TR-CEMRA) has been described previously; however, a comparative study between low dose TR-CEMRA and time-of-flight MRA (TOF-MRA) in the diagnosis of supra-aortic arterial stenosis has not yet been published. To demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of low-dose TR-CEMRA compared with TOF-MRA, using high-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (HR-CEMRA) as the reference standard. This prospective study consisted of 30 consecutive patients. All patients underwent TOF-MRA of the neck and circle of Willis and supra-aortic HR-CEMRA, followed by supra-aortic low-dose TR-CEMRA. Gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®), Guerbet, Roissy CdG Cedex, France) was injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg for HR-CEMRA, followed by a 0.03 mmol/kg bolus for low-dose TR-CEMRA. Three readers evaluated the assessibility and image quality, and then two readers classified each stenosis into the following categories: normal (0-30%), mild stenosis (31-50%), moderate (51-70%), severe (71-99%), and occlusion. TR-CEMRA and HR-CEMRA showed a greater number of assessable arterial segments than TOF-MRA (P < 0.01). For TR-CEMRA, 29 cases showed within or better than the diagnostic range, whereas all 30 cases were in the diagnostic range for TOF-MRA and HR-CEMRA. For evaluation of stenosis in a total of 743 arterial segments, both TR-CEMRA and TOF-MRA results agreed with those of HR-CEMRA in 729 segments (98.1%), with excellent inter-observer agreement of TR-CEMRA; stenosis was overestimated in nine segments (1.2%) and underestimated in five segments (0.7%). For diagnosis of stenosis using 30% as the cut-off value on HR-CEMRA, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.2% and 99.3%, respectively, for the TR-CEMRA procedure, versus 94.1% and 99.6%, respectively, for TOF-MRA. Low-dose TR-CEMRA is feasible and effective in the diagnosis of supra-aortic arterial stenosis, and could be more useful option than TOF-MRA. © The

  12. A method for high-energy, low-dose mammography using edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Bravin, Alberto; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Ruat, Marie; Grandl, Susanne; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid; Mittone, Alberto; Brun, Emmanuel; Ponchut, Cyril; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Coan, Paola; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    Since the breast is one of the most radiosensitive organs, mammography is arguably the area where lowering radiation dose is of the uttermost importance. Phase-based x-ray imaging methods can provide opportunities in this sense, since they do not require x-rays to be stopped in tissue for image contrast to be generated. Therefore, x-ray energy can be considerably increased compared to those usually exploited by conventional mammography. In this article we show how a novel, optimized approach can lead to considerable dose reductions. This was achieved by matching the edge-illumination phase method, which reaches very high angular sensitivity also at high x-ray energies, to an appropriate image processing algorithm and to a virtually noise-free detection technology capable of reaching almost 100% efficiency at the same energies. Importantly, while proof-of-concept was obtained at a synchrotron, the method has potential for a translation to conventional sources.

  13. Assessment of the image contrast improvement and dose reduction in mammography with synchrotron radiation compared to standard units

    CERN Document Server

    Moeckli, R; Fiedler, S; Pachoud, M; Hessler, C; Meuli, R; Valley, J F

    2001-01-01

    An objective method was used to evaluate image quality and dose in mammography with synchrotron radiation and to compare them to standard units. It was performed systematically in the energy range of interest for mammography through the evaluation of the contrast and the measurement of the mean glandular dose. Synchrotron radiation measurements were performed at the ESRF and a slit was placed between the test object and the screen-film system in order to reduce scatter. The conventional films were obtained on mammography units with an anti-scatter grid. In a recent paper, it was shown that the use of synchrotron radiation leads to a noticeable improvement of the image quality-dose relationship (Moeckli et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 45(12)3509). The reason of that enhancement is partly due to the monochromaticity of the synchrotron beam and partly due to the use of a slit instead of a grid. The dose reduction with synchrotron radiation can be attributed to a better X-ray total transmission of the slit and the contra...

  14. Spontaneous recovery of effects of contrast adaptation without awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxing eMei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to a high contrast stimulus reduces the neural sensitivity to subsequent similar patterns. Recent work has disclosed that contrast adaptation is controlled by multiple mechanisms operating over differing timescales. Adaptation to high contrast for a relatively longer period can be rapidly eliminated by adaptation to a lower contrast (or meanfield in the present study. Such rapid deadaptation presumably causes a short-term mechanism to signal for a sensitivity increase, cancelling ongoing signals from long-term mechanisms. Once deadaptation ends, the short-term mechanism rapidly returns to baseline, and the slowly decaying effects in the long-term mechanisms reemerge, allowing the perceptual aftereffects to recover during continued testing. Although this spontaneous recovery effect is considered strong evidence supporting the multiple mechanisms theory, it remains controversial whether the effect is mainly driven by visual memory established during the initial longer-term adaptation period. To resolve this debate, we used a modified Continuous Flash Suppression (CFS and visual crowding paradigms to render the adapting stimuli invisible, but still observed the spontaneous recovery phenomenon. These results exclude the possibility that spontaneous recovery found in the previous work was merely the consequence of explicit visual memory. Our findings also demonstrate that contrast adaptation, even at the unconscious processing levels, is controlled by multiple mechanisms.

  15. Improvements in low contrast detectability with iterative reconstruction and the effect of slice thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2017-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction has become a popular route for dose reduction in CT scans. One method for assessing the dose reduction of iterative reconstruction is to use a low contrast detectability phantom. The apparent improvement in detectability can be very large on these phantoms, with many studies showing dose reduction in excess of 50%. In this work, we show that much of the advantage of iterative reconstruction in this context can be explained by differences in slice thickness. After adjusting the effective reconstruction kernel by blurring filtered backprojection images to match the shape of the noise power spectrum of iterative reconstruction, we produce thick slices and compare the two reconstruction algorithms. The remaining improvement from iterative reconstruction, at least in scans with relatively uniform statistics in the raw data, is significantly reduced. Hence, the effective slice thickness in iterative reconstruction may be larger than that of filtered backprojection, explaining some of the improvement in image quality.

  16. Teacher popularity and contrast effects in a classroom token economy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kistner, J.; Hammer, D.; Wolfe, D; Rothblum, E; Drabman, R S

    1982-01-01

    There is a common fear that the use of a token economy in one classroom might harm pupil performance in situations where the contingencies are not in effect. This study investigated potential contrast effects on measures of children's productivity and attitudes toward teachers. Six children with reading deficits participated. A multiple baseline design was used to assess the effects of a token economy which was systematically introduced across three teachers. Dependent measures included two r...

  17. Contrast effects on speed perception for linear and radial motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Rebecca A; Warren, Paul A

    2017-11-01

    Speed perception is vital for safe activity in the environment. However, considerable evidence suggests that perceived speed changes as a function of stimulus contrast, with some investigators suggesting that this might have meaningful real-world consequences (e.g. driving in fog). In the present study we investigate whether the neural effects of contrast on speed perception occur at the level of local or global motion processing. To do this we examine both speed discrimination thresholds and contrast-dependent speed perception for two global motion configurations that have matched local spatio-temporal structure. Specifically we compare linear and radial configurations, the latter of which arises very commonly due to self-movement. In experiment 1 the stimuli comprised circular grating patches. In experiment 2, to match stimuli even more closely, motion was presented in multiple local Gabor patches equidistant from central fixation. Each patch contained identical linear motion but the global configuration was either consistent with linear or radial motion. In both experiments 1 and 2, discrimination thresholds and contrast-induced speed biases were similar in linear and radial conditions. These results suggest that contrast-based speed effects occur only at the level of local motion processing, irrespective of global structure. This result is interpreted in the context of previous models of speed perception and evidence suggesting differences in perceived speed of locally matched linear and radial stimuli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A new method for effective dose calculation based on the ambient dose height distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebmann Mario

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The realistic determination of effective dose of the staff in diagnostic radiology has been a challenge both for personal dosimetry and ambient dose measurement. A model for dosimetry of occupational exposure is presented that allows direct determination of effective dose from measured or even manufacturer given ambient dose distribution in front of the personnel. This model considers a wide range of radiation energies, different radiation protection situations, and gender effects.

  19. Reduction of side effects in aortofemoral angiography: low-osmolar contrast medium compared with conventional contrast medium plus local anaesthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, H.; Wiebe, V.

    1981-04-01

    Ioglicinate plus lidocaine and ioxaglate were used for aortofemoral angiography in 15 patients. Side effects of the two contrast media were compared in a double blind study. Injection of ioxaglate caused significantly less vascular pain. With both contrast agents sensation of heat and increase of heart rate were equal. Unlike ioglicinate plus lidocaine ioxaglate did not induce a significant drop of blood pressure. Angiography using low osmolar contrast media causes less side effects than conventional medium plus local anesthetic.

  20. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Rosen, Gerald M. [University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  1. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography: patient radiation dose estimation using a Monte Carlo code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoumakis, E; Tzamicha, E; Dimitriadis, A; Georgiou, E; Tsapaki, V; Chalazonitis, A

    2015-07-01

    Mammography is a standard procedure that facilitates breast cancer detection. Initial results of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) are promising. The purpose of this study is to assess the CEDM radiation dose using a Monte Carlo code. EGSnrc MC code was used to simulate the interaction of photons with matter and estimate the glandular dose (Dg). A voxel female human phantom with a 2-8-cm breast thickness range and a breast glandular composition of 50 % was applied. Dg values ranged between 0.96 and 1.45 mGy (low and high energy). Dg values for a breast thickness of 5.0 cm and a glandular fraction of 50 % for craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique view were 1.12 (low energy image contribution is 0.98 mGy) and 1.07 (low energy image contribution is 0.95 mGy), respectively. The low kV part of CEDM is the main contributor to total glandular breast dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Radiation and contrast agent doses reductions by using 80-kV tube voltage in coronary computed tomographic angiography: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Jian-xin [Department of Radiology, Wuhan 161th Hospital, Wuhan (China); Wang, Yi-min, E-mail: wym6669@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Wuhan 161th Hospital, Wuhan (China); Lu, Jin-guo [Department of Cardiology, Asia Heart Hospital, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Yu; Wang, Peng; Yang, Cheng [Department of Radiology, Wuhan 161th Hospital, Wuhan (China)

    2014-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the effects of 80-kilovoltage (kV) tube voltage coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) with a reduced amount of contrast agent on qualitative and quantitative image quality parameters and on radiation dose in patients with a body mass index (BMI) <23.0 kg/m{sup 2}. Methods: One hundred and twenty consecutive patients with a BMI <23.0 kg/m{sup 2} and a low calcium load undergoing retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated dual-source CCTA were randomized into two groups [standard-tube voltage (120-kV) vs. low-tube voltage (80-kV)]. The injection flow rate of contrast agent (350 mg I/mL) was adjusted to body weight of each patient (4.5–5.5 mL/s in the 120-kV group and 2.8–3.8 mL/s in the 80-kV group). Radiation and contrast agent doses were evaluated. Quantitative image quality parameters and figure of merit (FOM) of coronary artery were evaluated. Each coronary segment was evaluated for image quality on a 4-point scale. Results: Compared with the 120-kV group, effective dose and amount of contrast agent in the 80-kV group were decreased by 57.8% and 30.5% (effective dose:2.7 ± 0.5vs. 6.4 ± 1.3 mSv; amount of contrast agent:57.1 ± 3.2 vs. 82.1 ± 6.1 mL; both p < 0.0001), respectively. Image noise was 22.7 ± 2.1 HU for 120-kV images and 33.2 ± 5.2 HU for 80-kV images (p < 0.0001). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the proximal right coronary artery (RCA) and left main coronary artery (LMA) were all lower in 80-kV than 120-kV images (SNR in the proximal RCA: 16.5 ± 1.8 vs. 19.4 ± 2.8; SNR in the LMA: 16.3 ± 2.0 vs.19.6 ± 2.7; CNR in the proximal RCA: 19.4 ± 2.3 vs.22.9 ± 3.0; CNR in the LMA: 18.8 ± 2.4 vs. 22.7 ± 2.9; all p < 0.0001). FOM were all significantly higher in 80-kV than 120-kV images (proximal RCA: 146.7 ± 45.1 vs. 93.4 ± 32.0; LMA: 139.1 ± 47.2 vs. 91.6 ± 31.1; all p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in image quality score between the two groups (3.3 ± 0

  3. Contrasting ecosystem-effects of morphologically similar copepods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Matthews

    Full Text Available Organisms alter the biotic and abiotic conditions of ecosystems. They can modulate the availability of resources to other species (ecosystem engineering and shape selection pressures on other organisms (niche construction. Very little is known about how the engineering effects of organisms vary among and within species, and, as a result, the ecosystem consequences of species diversification and phenotypic evolution are poorly understood. Here, using a common gardening experiment, we test whether morphologically similar species and populations of Diaptomidae copepods (Leptodiaptomus ashlandi, Hesperodiaptomus franciscanus, Skistodiaptomus oregonensis have similar or different effects on the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. We found that copepod species had contrasting effects on algal biomass, ammonium concentrations, and sedimentation rates, and that copepod populations had contrasting effects on prokaryote abundance, sedimentation rates, and gross primary productivity. The average size of ecosystem-effect contrasts between species was similar to those between populations, and was comparable to those between fish species and populations measured in previous common gardening experiments. Our results suggest that subtle morphological variation among and within species can cause multifarious and divergent ecosystem-effects. We conclude that using morphological trait variation to assess the functional similarity of organisms may underestimate the importance of species and population diversity for ecosystem functioning.

  4. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, P D

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR).

  5. Relatively speaking: contrast effects influence assessors' scores and narrative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Peter; Cardell, Jenna; Byrne, Gerard; Eva, Kevin W

    2015-09-01

    In prior research, the scores assessors assign can be biased away from the standard of preceding performances (i.e. 'contrast effects' occur). This study examines the mechanism and robustness of these findings to advance understanding of assessor cognition. We test the influence of the immediately preceding performance relative to that of a series of prior performances. Further, we examine whether assessors' narrative comments are similarly influenced by contrast effects. Clinicians (n = 61) were randomised to three groups in a blinded, Internet-based experiment. Participants viewed identical videos of good, borderline and poor performances by first-year doctors in varied orders. They provided scores and written feedback after each video. Narrative comments were blindly content-analysed to generate measures of valence and content. Variability of narrative comments and scores was compared between groups. Comparisons indicated contrast effects after a single performance. When a good performance was preceded by a poor performance, ratings were higher (mean 5.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.79-5.24) than when observation of the good performance was unbiased (mean 4.36, 95% CI 4.14-4.60; p narrative comments showed contrast effects similar to those found in numerical scores. These findings are consistent with research from behavioural economics and psychology that suggests judgement tends to be relative in nature. Observing that the valence of narrative comments is similarly influenced suggests these effects represent more than difficulty in translating impressions into a number. The extent to which such factors impact upon assessment in practice remains to be determined as the influence is likely to depend on context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Patient radiation exposure in uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata: calculation of organ doses and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, S.; Strecker, E.P. [Department of Radiology, Diakonissenkrankenhaus, Diakonissenstrasse 28, 76199, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schultz, F.W.; Zoetelief, J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Medical Physics, Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this study was estimation of patient effective dose from uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata. Parameters and data relevant to patient dose were recorded for 33 consecutive procedures. Using Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, organ and effective doses were calculated in detail for a subset of five procedures, to estimate the effective dose for all procedures. Mean dose area product was 59.9, median 23.4, and range 8.8-317.5 Gycm{sup 2}. Mean absorbed ovarian dose was calculated as 51 mGy in the five procedures. Using the dose conversion factor estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation for all procedures a mean estimated effective dose of 34 mSv (median 13 mSv, range 5-182 mSv) results, with a tendency to lower values regarding the succession of the procedures. Patients' radiation exposure level is up to twice of that of an abdominal CT examination. Angiographic equipment related dose-reducing features and radiographic technique essentially influence organ doses and effective dose. Consistent application of dose-reducing techniques and awareness of radiation exposure justifies uterine artery embolization as a therapeutic option for the treatment of uterine fibroids. (orig.)

  7. Spectral motion contrast as a speech context effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningyuan; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral contrast effects may help “normalize” the incoming sound and produce perceptual constancy in the face of the variable acoustics produced by different rooms, talkers, and backgrounds. Recent studies have concentrated on the after-effects produced by the long-term average power spectrum. The present study examined contrast effects based on spectral motion, analogous to visual-motion after-effects. In experiment 1, the existence of spectral-motion after-effects with word-length inducers was established by demonstrating that the identification of the direction of a target spectral glide was influenced by the spectral motion of a preceding inducer glide. In experiment 2, the target glide was replaced with a synthetic sine-wave speech sound, including a formant transition. The speech category boundary was shifted by the presence and direction of the inducer glide. Finally, in experiment 3, stimuli based on synthetic sine-wave speech sounds were used as both context and target stimuli to show that the spectral-motion after-effects could occur even with inducers with relatively short speech-like durations and small frequency excursions. The results suggest that spectral motion may play a complementary role to the long-term average power spectrum in inducing speech context effects. PMID:25190397

  8. Teacher popularity and contrast effects in a classroom token economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, J; Hammer, D; Wolfe, D; Rothblum, E; Drabman, R S

    1982-01-01

    There is a common fear that the use of a token economy in one classroom might harm pupil performance in situations where the contingencies are not in effect. This study investigated potential contrast effects on measures of children's productivity and attitudes toward teachers. Six children with reading deficits participated. A multiple baseline design was used to assess the effects of a token economy which was systematically introduced across three teachers. Dependent measures included two rating forms of teacher popularity and work rate on a programmed reading series. The results indicated that the token system was effective in increasing the children's productivity and that no consistent behavioral contrast effects occurred. Furthermore, children's attitudes toward teachers did not appear to be influenced by the token economy until only one teacher was not delivering tokens. At this point, her popularity declined until she also delivered tokens. The token economy manipulation appeared to have a specific, desirable effect on the targeted behavior (i.e., work rate) and had minimal negative or positive "side effects" on teacher popularity.

  9. Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in supF shuttle vector. Ji Hye Kim1 and ... Purpose: To determine how the dose and rate of NO• treatment affects mutagenic responses. Methods: Shuttle vector pSP189 was ... form a strong oxidant and nitrating agent, peroxynitrite (ONOO-), which can initiate.

  10. A conversion coefficient from dose-area products to effective doses for patients in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kenji; Yosue, Takashi [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Sakaino, Rie; Harata, Yasuo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2002-06-01

    A conversion coefficient from dose-area products to effective doses was proposed as a practical estimator of patient health detriments from intraoral radiography. According to the tissue-dose data reported by Gibbs et al. (Dentomaxillofac. Radiol., 1987 and 1988) and the tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 60, the effective doses and the dose-area products were calculated at 70, 80, and 90 kV for E-speed films employed at each of seven geometries using bisecting angle, paralleling, and bitewing techniques with round or rectangular collimated beams. The focus-skin distances were 20 cm for the short cone and 40 cm for the long cone, respectively. From a total of 90 sets of exposure factors in intraoral radiographic examinations for adults, the effective doses were in the range of 0.38 {mu}Sv to 8.0 {mu}Sv, and the corresponding dose-area products were 0.58 cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and 7.6 cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}. The obtained linear regression coefficient to convert the dose-area product to the effective dose was 0.97 {mu}Sv/cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}. We conclude that effective doses can be estimated from the dose-area products if an uncertainty of a factor of two is acceptable in intraoral radiography. (author)

  11. Effects of Exposure Imprecision on Estimation of the Benchmark Dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose......Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose...

  12. The dose and dose-rate effects of paternal irradiation on transgenerational instability in mice: a radiotherapy connection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safeer K Mughal

    Full Text Available The non-targeted effects of human exposure to ionising radiation, including transgenerational instability manifesting in the children of irradiated parents, remains poorly understood. Employing a mouse model, we have analysed whether low-dose acute or low-dose-rate chronic paternal γ-irradiation can destabilise the genomes of their first-generation offspring. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR locus Ms6-hm was established in DNA samples extracted from sperm of directly exposed BALB/c male mice, as well as from sperm and the brain of their first-generation offspring. For acute γ-irradiation from 10-100 cGy a linear dose-response for ESTR mutation induction was found in the germ line of directly exposed mice, with a doubling dose of 57 cGy. The mutagenicity of acute exposure to 100 cGy was more pronounced than that for chronic low-dose-rate irradiation. The analysis of transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation revealed that ESTR mutation frequencies were equally elevated in the germ line (sperm and brain of the offspring of fathers exposed to 50 and 100 cGy of acute γ-rays. In contrast, neither paternal acute irradiation at lower doses (10-25 cGy, nor low-dose-rate exposure to 100 cGy affected stability of their offspring. Our data imply that the manifestation of transgenerational instability is triggered by a threshold dose of acute paternal irradiation. The results of our study also suggest that most doses of human exposure to ionising radiation, including radiotherapy regimens, may be unlikely to result in transgenerational instability in the offspring children of irradiated fathers.

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  14. Dose-ranging design and analysis methods to identify the minimum effective dose (MED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yijie; Chen, Su; Sullivan, Danielle; Li, Yihan; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Wangang; Zhang, Hongtao; Tang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Li; Hartford, Alan; Yang, Bo

    2017-12-01

    In dose ranging clinical trials, it is critical to investigate the dose-response profile and to identify a minimum effective dose (MED) to guide the dose selection for phase 3 confirmatory trials. Traditional dose ranging trials focus on pairwise comparisons between placebo and each investigational dose, while in recent years MCP-Mod (Multiple Comparison Procedures & Modeling) arose and gained popularity in the design and analysis of dose ranging trials. Comprehensive comparison between MCP-Mod and other methods have been made on continuous variables assuming a normal distribution. In this article, we extend the comparison to binary/binomial response variables. Via simulation, the rate of correct and incorrect MED identification are compared for Dunnett's test, trend test and MCP-Mod for a variety of underlying dose response profiles including both monotone and non-monotone dose responses and are compared under a large number of trial design settings. The precision of MED estimation using MCP-Mod is also evaluated comparing the design options of more dose levels and smaller sample size per dose versus fewer dose levels and larger sample size per dose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of N-acetyl cysteine in prevention of contrast nephropathy on patients under intravenous pyelography and contrast CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Momeni

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Because GFR was higher in case group and there were no drug side-effects in patients, we recommend the use of NAC before administration of intravenous contrast especially in high-risk population such as diabetic patients.

  16. Consistent effects of biodiversity loss on multifunctionality across contrasting ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanin, Nicolas; Gundale, Michael J; Farrell, Mark; Ciobanu, Marcel; Baldock, Jeff A; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Kardol, Paul; Wardle, David A

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how loss of biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning, and thus the delivery of ecosystem goods and services, has become increasingly necessary in a changing world. Considerable recent attention has focused on predicting how biodiversity loss simultaneously impacts multiple ecosystem functions (that is, ecosystem multifunctionality), but the ways in which these effects vary across ecosystems remain unclear. Here, we report the results of two 19-year plant diversity manipulation experiments, each established across a strong environmental gradient. Although the effects of plant and associated fungal diversity loss on individual functions frequently differed among ecosystems, the consequences of biodiversity loss for multifunctionality were relatively invariant. However, the context-dependency of biodiversity effects also worked in opposing directions for different individual functions, meaning that similar multifunctionality values across contrasting ecosystems could potentially mask important differences in the effects of biodiversity on functioning among ecosystems. Our findings highlight that an understanding of the relative contribution of species or functional groups to individual ecosystem functions among contrasting ecosystems and their interactions (that is, complementarity versus competition) is critical for guiding management efforts aimed at maintaining ecosystem multifunctionality and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services.

  17. A review of dose rate dependent effects of total ionizing dose /TID/ irradiations. [on semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    The basic effects of ionizing radiation are summarized. The problem of the existence of a true dose rate effect is examined. Consideration is given to the nature of long term annealing, which is sometimes manifested as an 'apparent' dose rate effect. Both analytical and experimental work is considered and the results are related to practical testing requirements.

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  20. Low-dose triple-rule-out using 320-row-detector volume MDCT - less contrast medium and lower radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Tahir; Lembcke, Alexander; Muehler, Matthias R.; Hamm, Bernd; Hein, Patrick A. [Charite - University Hospital Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Rogalla, Patrik [Universitiy of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    To investigate image quality of triple-rule-out (TRO) computed tomography (CT) using a 320-row-detector CT system with substantially reduced contrast medium volume at 100 kV. Forty-six consecutive patients with noncritical, acute chest pain underwent 320-row-detector CT using a two-step TRO protocol consisting of a non-spiral, non-gated chest CT acquisition (150 mA) followed by a non-spiral, electrocardiography-gated cardiac acquisition (200-500 mA based on body mass index (BMI)). Data were acquired using a biphasic injection protocol with a total iodinated contrast medium volume of 60 ml (370 mg/ml). Vessel attenuation and effective doses were recorded. Image quality was scored independently by two readers. Mean attenuation was 584 {+-} 114 Hounsfield units (HU) in the ascending aorta, 335 {+-} 63HU in the aortic arch, 658 {+-} 136HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 521 {+-} 97HU and 549 {+-} 102HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. In all but one patient, attenuation and image quality allowed accurate visualization of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries in a single examination. Ninety-six percent of all coronary artery segments were rated diagnostic. Radiation exposure ranged between 2.0 and 3.3 mSv. Using 320-row-detector CT the investigated low-dose TRO protocol resulted in excellent opacification and image quality with substantial reduction of contrast medium volume compared to recently published TRO protocols. (orig.)

  1. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  2. Arterial input functions (AIFs) measured directly from arteries with low and standard doses of contrast agent, and AIFs derived from reference tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyang; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Pineda, Federico D; Yousuf, Ambereen; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of arterial input function (AIF) can have large systematic errors at standard contrast agent doses in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). We compared measured AIFs from low dose (AIFLD) and standard dose (AIFSD) contrast agent injections, as well as the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue and artery (AIFref). Twenty-two prostate cancer patients underwent DCE-MRI. Data were acquired on a 3T scanner using an mDixon sequence. Gadobenate dimeglumine was injected twice, at doses of 0.015 and 0.085 mmol/kg. Directly measured AIFs were fitted with empirical mathematical models (EMMs) and compared to the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue (AIFref). EMMs accurately fitted the AIFs. The 1st and 2nd pass peaks were visualized in AIFLD, but not in AIFSD, thus the peak and shape of AIFSD could not be accurately measured directly. The average scaling factor between AIFSD and AIFLD in the washout phase was only 56% of the contrast dose ratio (~6:1). The shape and magnitude of AIFref closely approximated that of AIFLD after empirically determined dose-dependent normalization. This suggests that AIFref may be a good approximation of the local AIF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonlinear image blending for dual-energy MDCT of the abdomen: can image quality be preserved if the contrast medium dose is reduced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Marin, Daniele; Alfaro-Cordoba, Marcela; Eusemann, Christian D; Scribano, Emanuele; Blandino, Alfredo; Mazziotti, Silvio; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the image quality of a dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique at reduced load of contrast medium with a simulated 120-kVp linear blending technique at a full dose during portal venous phase MDCT of the abdomen. Forty-five patients (25 men, 20 women; mean age, 65.6 ± 9.7 [SD] years; mean body weight, 74.9 ± 12.4 kg) underwent contrast-enhanced single-phase dual-energy CT of the abdomen by a random assignment to one of three different contrast medium (iomeprol 400) dose injection protocols: 1.3, 1.0, or 0.65 mL/kg of body weight. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and noise at the portal vein, liver, aorta, and kidney were compared among the different datasets using the ANOVA. Three readers qualitatively assessed all datasets in a blinded and independent fashion. Nonlinear blended images at a 25% reduced dose allowed a significant improvement in CNR (p images at a full dose. No statistically significant difference existed in CNR and noise between the nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose and the simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. Nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose were considered in all cases to have acceptable image quality. The dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique allows reducing the dose of contrast medium up to 50% during portal venous phase imaging of the abdomen while preserving image quality.

  4. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis: optimization of beam quality for dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S Jr, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705 (United States)

    2011-10-07

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis is a promising technique to obtain three-dimensional functional information from the breast with high resolution and speed. To optimize this new method, this study searched for the beam quality that maximized image quality in terms of mass detection performance. A digital tomosynthesis system was modeled using a fast ray-tracing algorithm, which created simulated projection images by tracking photons through a voxelized anatomical breast phantom containing iodinated lesions. The single-energy images were combined into dual-energy images through a weighted log subtraction process. The weighting factor was optimized to minimize anatomical noise, while the dose distribution was chosen to minimize quantum noise. The dual-energy images were analyzed for the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) of iodinated masses. The fast ray-tracing explored 523 776 dual-energy combinations to identify which yields optimum mass SdNR. The ray-tracing results were verified using a Monte Carlo model for a breast tomosynthesis system with a selenium-based flat-panel detector. The projection images from our voxelized breast phantom were obtained at a constant total glandular dose. The projections were combined using weighted log subtraction and reconstructed using commercial reconstruction software. The lesion SdNR was measured in the central reconstructed slice. The SdNR performance varied markedly across the kVp and filtration space. Ray-tracing results indicated that the mass SdNR was maximized with a high-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 92.5 {mu}m of copper filtration and a low-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 95 {mu}m of tin filtration. This result was consistent with Monte Carlo findings. This mammographic technique led to a mass SdNR of 0.92 {+-} 0.03 in the projections and 3.68 {+-} 0.19 in the reconstructed slices. These values were markedly higher than those for non-optimized techniques. Our findings indicate that dual

  5. Estimate Of Reference Effective Dose And Renal Dose During Abdominal CT Scan For Dose Optimization Procedures In Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issahaku Shirazu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study is to estimate renal and effective dose during abdominal MDCT scan using image data for dose optimization for purposes of radiation protection in Ghana. In addition dose influencing parameters including CTDIVOL DLP and MSAD were recorded and compared with ICRPICRU AAPM EU and IAEA dose optimization recommendations. All the measurements were done during abdominal MDCT examination. The measured parameters were part of image data on the MeVisLab DICOM application software platform. The total photon fluence mAs per area and the photon energy fluence kVp per area on the abdominal and renal surface was also determined. Renal and effective dose were estimated using ICRP publication 103 recommendations. The results of the measured parameters based on the average renal surface area of 29.52cm2 and 30.67cm2 for the right and left kidney respectively shows that The mean dose parameters were 6.33mGy 7.78mGy 936.25mGy cm 5.76mGy 10.99mSv and 14.09mSv for CTDIV CTDIW DLP MSAD RD and E respectively. The average values were lower than the general recommended average critical values but this seems misleading based on the fact that 37 of the individual dose and exposure parameters exceeded the recommended critical values. A tradeoff between patient radiation dose and image quality in abdominal CT has been established. Where at a mean SNR of 6.6 decibels an adequate images were produce to answer all the clinical questions with an average effective dose of 14.09mSv and renal dose of 10.99mSv. Radiation dose during x-ray CT imaging is an important patient safety concern. Reducing radiation dose result in a reduction of the risk to patient however reducing dose also reduces the signal strength and thereby reduces the signal to noise ratio in the resulting CT image hence the image quality is affected. It is recommended that the established reference values be use as clinical advisory mechanism to protect patience and clinicians. It is also recommended that

  6. Efficacy of Short-Term High-Dose Statin Pretreatment in Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Updated Study-Level Meta-Analysis of 13 Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ki-Hyun; Jung, Ji-hyun; Lee, Sang Eun; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Yang, Han-Mo; Park, Kyung Woo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Jo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been conflicting results across the trials that evaluated prophylactic efficacy of short-term high-dose statin pre-treatment for prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) in patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG). The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date meta-analysis regarding the efficacy of high-dose statin pre-treatment in preventing CIAKI. Methods and Results Randomized-controlled trials comparing high-dose statin versus low-dose statin or placebo pre-treatment for prevention of CIAKI in patients undergoing CAG were included. The primary endpoint was the incidence of CIAKI within 2–5days after CAG. The relative risk (RR) with 95% CI was the effect measure. This analysis included 13 RCTs with 5,825 total patients; about half of them (n = 2,889) were pre-treated with high-dose statin (at least 40 mg of atorvastatin) before CAG, and the remainders (n = 2,936) pretreated with low-dose statin or placebo. In random-effects model, high-dose statin pre-treatment significantly reduced the incidence of CIAKI (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.35–0.57, pstatin or placebo. The benefit of high-dose statin was consistent in both comparisons with low-dose statin (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.34–0.65, pstatin showed significant reduction of CIAKI across various subgroups of chronic kidney disease, acute coronary syndrome, and old age (≥60years), regardless of osmolality of contrast or administration of N-acetylcystein. Conclusions High-dose statin pre-treatment significantly reduced overall incidence of CIAKI in patients undergoing CAG, and emerges as an effective prophylactic measure to prevent CIAKI. PMID:25369120

  7. Contrasting effects of aquatic subsidies on a terrestrial trophic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Nadin; Bucher, Roman; Schäfer, Ralf B; Entling, Martin H

    2017-05-01

    Subsidies from adjacent ecosystems can alter recipient food webs and ecosystem functions, such as herbivory. Emerging aquatic insects from streams can be an important prey in the riparian zone. Such aquatic subsidies can enhance predator abundances or cause predators to switch prey, depending on the herbivores. This can lead to an increase or decrease of in situ herbivores and herbivory. We examined the effects of aquatic subsidies on a simplified terrestrial food web consisting of two types of herbivores, plants and predators (spiders). In our six-week experiment, we focused on the prey choice of the spiders by excluding predator immigration and reproduction. In accordance with predator switching, survival of leafhoppers increased in the presence of aquatic subsidies. By contrast, the presence of aquatic subsidies indirectly reduced weevils and herbivory. Our study shows that effects of aquatic subsidies on terrestrial predators can propagate through the food web in contrasting ways. Thereby, the outcome of the trophic cascade is determined by the prey choice of predators. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Pathogenic effects of low dose irradiation: dose-effect relationships; Effets pathogenes d'un faible debit de dose: la relation ''dose-effet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Academie des Technologies, 91 - Saint Michel sur Orge (France)

    2002-10-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and 'severe socio-economic and psychological pressures... poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors' as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. (author)

  9. Memory interfering effects of chlordiazepoxide on consummatory successive negative contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Leonardo A; Glueck, Amanda C; Daniel, Alan M; Prado-Rivera, Mayerli A; White, Michelle M; Papini, Mauricio R

    2014-01-01

    Long-Evans rats downshifted from 32% to 4% sucrose solution exhibit lower consummatory behavior during downshift trials than rats exposed only to 4% sucrose. In Experiment 1, this effect, called consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC), was attenuated by administration of the benzodiazepine anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5mg/kg, ip) before the second downshift trial (Trial 12), but was not affected when CDP was administered before the first downshift trial (Trial 11). In Experiment 2, CDP administered after Trial 11 actually enhanced the cSNC effect on Trial 12. This posttrial effect of CDP was reduced by delayed administration (Experiment 3). This CDP effect was not present in the absence of incentive downshift (Experiments 4-5), or when animals were tested with the preshift incentive (Experiment 6) or after complete recovery from cSNC (Experiment 7). The posttrial CDP effect was observed after an 8-day interval between Trials 11 and 12 (Experiment 8) and when administered after Trial 12, rather than Trial 11 (Experiment 9). Experiment 10 extended the effect to Wistar rats. Because CDP is a memory interfering drug, it was hypothesized that its posttrial administration interferes with the consolidation of the memory of the downshifted incentive, thus prolonging the mismatch between expected (32% sucrose) and obtained (4% sucrose) incentives that leads to the cSNC effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contrasting effects of sunitinib within in vivo models of metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welti, Jonathan C; Powles, Thomas; Foo, Shane

    2012-01-01

    that correlated with increased seeding of metastasis. By administering sunitinib to mice after intravenous injection of tumour cells, we demonstrate that while sunitinib does not inhibit the growth of 4T1 lung tumour nodules, it does block the growth of RENCA lung tumour nodules. This contrasting response...... both form lung metastases in Balb/c mice, to re-address the effects of sunitinib on the progression of metastatic disease in mice. We show that treatment of mice with sunitinib prior to intravenous injection of tumour cells can promote the seeding and growth of 4T1 lung metastases, but not RENCA lung......Sunitinib is a potent and clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor that can suppress tumour growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. However, conflicting data exist regarding the effects of this drug on the growth of metastases in preclinical models. Here we use 4T1 and RENCA tumour cells, which...

  11. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  12. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, T I; Wøhni, T

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  13. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Eiskjær, Søren Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... leads to tissue damage. It has been documented in large cohort studies that radiographic imaging during childhood for spinal deformities eg. scoliosis, increases the lifetime risk of breast cancer. The EOS biplane x-ray imaging system (EOS Imaging S.A, Paris France) has been developed to produce high...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...

  14. The effect of contrast media on the synovial membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papacharalampous, Xenophon [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: medgraph@otenet.gr; Patsouris, Efstratios [Department of Pathology, University of Athens, Mikras Asias 75 str., GR-115 27 Athens (Greece); Mundinger, Alexander [Clinic of Radiology, Marienhospital Osnabrueck, Johannisfreiheit 2-4, D-49074 Osnabruek (Germany); Beck, Andreas [Clinic of Radiology, Konstanz, Luisenstrasse 7, D-78461 Konstanz (Germany); Kouloulias, Vasilios [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece); Primetis, Elias [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece); Koureas, Andreas [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece); Vlahos, Lambros [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)

    2005-09-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of intra-articular injection of contrast media, sorbitol and normal saline on the synovial membrane. Materials and methods: Sixty three rabbits (126 knees) were used in this study. We injected the knees with amidotrizoate, ioxaglate, iopamidol, iotrol and diluted gadolinium-DTPA (2 mmol/l). Normal saline and sorbitol 27.25% were used for comparison. A histological and histochemical examination of the knees was carried out 1, 2, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 days after the injection. Results: On histological examination, the knees injected with normal saline, ioxaglate and gadolinium-DTPA had a normal appearance. Intra-articular injection of amidotrizoate, iopamidol, iotrol and sorbitol caused early, mild and transient histological changes of the synovium (synovial hyperplasia, infiltration by leucocytes). Furthermore, the knees injected with amidotrizoate presented with late, extensive histological changes (severe synovial hyperplasia, moderate vascular dilatation, severe infiltration by leukocytes). Conclusion: The results suggest that the chemical structure and not the osmolality of the contrast media is the main cause for the histological changes of the synovium.

  15. Contrast in the Photoelectric Effect of Organic and Biochemical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, G. B.; Burke, C.; Dehlinger, P.; Griffith, O. H.

    1973-01-01

    The photoelectric effect can provide the physical basis for a new method of mapping organic and biological surfaces. The technique, photoelectron microscopy, is similar to fluorescence microscopy using incident ultraviolet light except that photoejected electrons form the image of the specimen surface. In this work the minimum wavelengths of incident light required to produce an image were determined for the molecules 3,6-bis(dimethylamino)acridine (acridine orange) (I), benzo[a]pyrene (II), N,N,N′,N′-tetraphenylbenzidine (III), and copper phthalocyanine (IV). The photoelectron image thresholds for these compounds are 220 (I), 215 (II), 220 (III), and 240 nm (IV), all ±5 nm. Contrast of I-IV with respect to typical protein, lipid, nucleic acid, and polysaccharide surfaces was examined over the wavelength range 240-180 nm. The low magnification micrographs exhibited bright areas corresponding to I-IV but dark regions for the biochemical surfaces. The high contrast suggests the feasibility of performing extrinsic photoelectron microscopy experiments through selective labeling of sites on biological surfaces. ImagesFIGURE 3 PMID:4704486

  16. Effect of Bismuth Breast Shielding on Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Coronary CT Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Elliston, Carl D.; Groves, Daniel W.; Cheng, Bin; Wolff, Steven D.; Pearson, Gregory D. N.; Peters, M. Robert; Johnson, Lynne L.; Bokhari, Sabahat; Johnson, Gary W.; Bhatia, Ketan; Pozniakoff, Theodore; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is associated with high radiation dose to the female breasts. Bismuth breast shielding offers the potential to significantly reduce dose to the breasts and nearby organs, but the magnitude of this reduction and its impact on image quality and radiation dose have not been evaluated. Methods Radiation doses from CCTA to critical organs were determined using metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors positioned in a customized anthropomorphic whole-body dosimetry verification phantom. Image noise and signal were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) including the coronary arteries. Results With bismuth shielding, breast radiation dose was reduced 46–57% depending on breast size and scanning technique, with more moderate dose reduction to the heart, lungs, and esophagus. However, shielding significantly decreased image signal (by 14.6 HU) and contrast (by 28.4 HU), modestly but significantly increased image noise in ROIs in locations of coronary arteries, and decreased contrast-to-noise ratio by 20.9%.. Conclusions While bismuth breast shielding can significantly decrease radiation dose to critical organs, it is associated with an increase in image noise, decrease in contrast-to-noise, and changes tissue attenuation characteristics in the location of the coronary arteries. PMID:22068687

  17. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukhi, J.; Yusob, D.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Vuanghao, L.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging.

  18. Contrast agent and radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT by a combination of low tube voltage and advanced image reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buls, Nico; Gompel, Gert van; Nieboer, Koenraad; Willekens, Inneke; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Research group LABO, Brussel (Belgium); Cauteren, Toon van [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Research group LABO, Brussel (Belgium); Verfaillie, Guy [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Evans, Paul; Macholl, Sven; Newton, Ben [GE Healthcare, Department of Medical Diagnostics, Amersham, Buckinghamshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    To assess image quality in abdominal CT at low tube voltage combined with two types of iterative reconstruction (IR) at four reduced contrast agent dose levels. Minipigs were scanned with standard 320 mg I/mL contrast concentration at 120 kVp, and with reduced formulations of 120, 170, 220 and 270 mg I/mL at 80 kVp with IR. Image quality was assessed by CT value, dose normalized contrast and signal to noise ratio (CNRD and SNRD) in the arterial and venous phases. Qualitative analysis was included by expert reading. Protocols with 170 mg I/mL or higher showed equal or superior CT values: aorta (278-468 HU versus 314 HU); portal vein (205-273 HU versus 208 HU); liver parenchyma (122-146 HU versus 115 HU). In the aorta, all 170 mg I/mL protocols or higher yielded equal or superior CNRD (15.0-28.0 versus 13.7). In liver parenchyma, all study protocols resulted in higher SNRDs. Radiation dose could be reduced from standard CTDI{sub vol} = 7.8 mGy (6.2 mSv) to 7.6 mGy (5.2 mSv) with 170 mg I/mL. Combining 80 kVp with IR allows at least a 47 % contrast agent dose reduction and 16 % radiation dose reduction for images of comparable quality. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral bone subtraction CT angiography using 80 kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction: contrast medium and radiation dose reduction with improvement of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Yasunori [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirarta, Kenichiro [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a contrast medium (CM), radiation dose reduction protocol for cerebral bone-subtraction CT angiography (BSCTA) using 80-kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Seventy-five patients who had undergone BSCTA under the 120- (n = 37) or the 80-kVp protocol (n = 38) were included. CM was 370 mgI/kg for the 120-kVp and 296 mgI/kg for the 80-kVp protocol; the 120- and the 80-kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and SAFIRE, respectively. We compared effective dose (ED), CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of two protocols. We also scored arterial contrast, sharpness, depiction of small arteries, visibility near skull base/clip, and overall image quality on a four-point scale. ED was 62% lower at 80- than 120-kVp (0.59 ± 0.06 vs 1.56 ± 0.13 mSv, p < 0.01). CT attenuation of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) was significantly higher on 80- than 120-kVp (ICA: 557.4 ± 105.7 vs 370.0 ± 59.3 Hounsfield units (HU), p < 0.01; MCA: 551.9 ± 107.9 vs 364.6 ± 62.2 HU, p < 0.01). The CNR was also significantly higher on 80- than 120-kVp (ICA: 46.2 ± 10.2 vs 36.9 ± 7.6, p < 0.01; MCA: 45.7 ± 10.0 vs 35.7 ± 9.0, p < 0.01). Visibility near skull base and clip was not significantly different (p = 0.45). The other subjective scores were higher with the 80- than the 120-kVp protocol (p < 0.05). The 80-kVp acquisition with SAFIRE yields better image quality for BSCTA and substantial reduction in the radiation and CM dose compared to the 120-kVp with FBP protocol. (orig.)

  20. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhu

    Full Text Available To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values.26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22 underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A. Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22 were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B. GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD, signal-noise-ratio (SNR, contrast-noise-ratio (CNR of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis.As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684. CT dose index (CTDI values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000, respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B.The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol.

  1. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol.

  2. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  4. Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Omer, E.; Suliman, I. I.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). TLDs were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, CTDIvol 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients ESDs values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

  5. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dao-jun; Wu, Li-fang; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2001-02-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+, N+(20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased with the increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in the higher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerably radio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  6. Quantitative dosimetric assessment for effect of gold nanoparticles as contrast media on radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Yang, Pei-Ying; Hong, Ji-Hong; Lo, Ching-Jung

    2013-07-01

    In CT planning for radiation therapy, patients may be asked to have a medical procedure of contrast agent (CA) administration as required by their physicians. CA media improve quality of CT images and assist radiation oncologists in delineation of the target or organs with accuracy. However, dosimetric discrepancy may occur between scenarios in which CA media are present in CT planning and absent in treatment delivery. In recent preclinical experiments of small animals, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been identified as an excellent contrast material of x-ray imaging. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate the effect of AuNPs to be used as a potential material of contrast enhancement in radiotherapy planning with an analytical phantom and clinical case. Conray 60, an iodine-based product for contrast enhancement in clinical uses, is included as a comparison. Other additional variables such as different concentrations of CA media, radiation delivery techniques and dose calculation algorithms are included. We consider 1-field AP, 4-field box, 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). CA media of AuNPs (Conray 60) with concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% containing 28.2, 56.4, 84.6, 112.8 and 141.0 mg of gold (iodine) per mL were prepared prior to CT scanning. A virtual phantom with a target where nanoparticle media are loaded and clinical case of gastric lymphoma in which the Conray 60 media were given to the patient prior to the CT planning are included for the study. Compared to Conray 60 media with concentration of 10%/50%, Hounsfield units for AuNP media of 10%/50% are 322/1608 higher due to the fact that atomic number of Au (Z=79) is larger than I (Z=53). In consequence, dosimetric discrepancy of AuNPs is magnified between presence and absence of contrast media. It was found in the phantom study that percent dose differences between presence and absence of CA media may be

  7. The effects of X-ray contrast media on bacterial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, M.P.; Halasz, S.J. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA (Australia)

    1995-02-01

    Six widely used X-ray contrast media (XRC) were tested against nine commonly isolated organisms to determine the practicality of using XRC to outline body spaces prior to obtaining specimens for culture and to assess the feasibility of using XRC in divided doses to reduce cost. Preparations of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus milleri in two approximate concentrations of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} colony forming units/mL (cfu/mL) were inoculated into the following XRC: Conray 280, Hexabrix 320, lopamiro 370, Omnipaque 350, Ultravist 300 and Optiray 320 each in two concentrations. Sampling was performed in triplicate at 0, 2, 4 and 20 h with the 20 h counts made after exposure at both 22 C and 4 C. There were 16 significant interactions, predominantly with the Gram-negative organisms. Conray 280 produced the greatest number of effects. Most effects were bacteriostatic. Organisms were most susceptible at low concentration and after prolonged contact with XRC. No effect was seen with dilute XRC. All weekly sterility checks were negative. Non-ionic XRC have no significant effect on the growth of Gram-positive organisms and little effect on Gram-negative organisms if processing is performed promptly. Using standard aseptic technique, no contamination of XRC occurred, suggesting multi-dosing may be a safe and cost-effective method of XRC utilization. 6 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. In Vivo Mutagenic Effect of Very Low Dose Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Pamela J.; Day, Tanya K.; Swinburne, Sarah J.; Lane, Joanne M.; Morley, Alexander A.; Hooker, Antony M.; Bhat, Madhava

    2006-01-01

    Almost all of our knowledge about the mutational effect of radiation has come from high dose studies which are generally not relevant to public exposure. The pKZ1 mouse recombination mutagenesis assay enables study of the mutational effect of very low doses of low LET radiation (μGy to cGy range) in a whole animal model. The mutational end-point studied is chromosomal inversion which is a common mutation in cancer. We have observed 1) a non-linear dose response of induced inversions in pKZ1 mice exposed to a wide dose range of low LET radiation, 2) the ability of low priming doses to cause an adaptive response to subsequent higher test doses and 3) the effect of genetic susceptibility where animals that are heterozygous for the Ataxia Telangiectasia gene (Atm) exhibit different responses to low dose radiation compared to their normal litter-mates. PMID:18648587

  9. Contrasting effects of invasive plants in plant-pollinator networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartomeus, Ignasi; Vilà, Montserrat; Santamaría, Luís

    2008-04-01

    The structural organization of mutualism networks, typified by interspecific positive interactions, is important to maintain community diversity. However, there is little information available about the effect of introduced species on the structure of such networks. We compared uninvaded and invaded ecological communities, to examine how two species of invasive plants with large and showy flowers (Carpobrotus affine acinaciformis and Opuntia stricta) affect the structure of Mediterranean plant-pollinator networks. To attribute differences in pollination to the direct presence of the invasive species, areas were surveyed that contained similar native plant species cover, diversity and floral composition, with or without the invaders. Both invasive plant species received significantly more pollinator visits than any native species and invaders interacted strongly with pollinators. Overall, the pollinator community richness was similar in invaded and uninvaded plots, and only a few generalist pollinators visited invasive species exclusively. Invasive plants acted as pollination super generalists. The two species studied were visited by 43% and 31% of the total insect taxa in the community, respectively, suggesting they play a central role in the plant-pollinator networks. Carpobrotus and Opuntia had contrasting effects on pollinator visitation rates to native plants: Carpobrotus facilitated the visit of pollinators to native species, whereas Opuntia competed for pollinators with native species, increasing the nestedness of the plant-pollinator network. These results indicate that the introduction of a new species to a community can have important consequences for the structure of the plant-pollinator network.

  10. Comparison radiation dose with upper and lower limbs of automated injection of contrast media with a bolus tracking system in pulmonary embolism MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shin Heung College University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Woon Kwan [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Eun [Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Young Hwan [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Bolus tracking system allows optimized enhancement of the organs and reduces the dose of contrast material. In a retrospective study we investigated the radiation dose of this method with the intention of optimizing enhancement during examination of the pulmonary embolism MDCT. The purpose of the study was to compare radiation dose (CTDIvol and DLP) of MDCT performed with bolus tracking system in the pulmonary embolism. In total, we examined 75 patients under pulmonary embolism conditions. All examinations were performed on a MDCT system using the bolus tracking system of blood from the upper body to the lower limbs of patient. This produces repetitive low-dose test images and measures the Hounsfield attenuation in a pre-selected region of interest. After exceeding a defined threshold, a diagnostic spiral CT examination was begun automatically. Compared with bolus tracking system, upper limb injected of contrast media resulted in reduction of the pulmonary embolism in the CTDIvol (81.1%) and DLP (82.1%). Bolus triggering allows optimized enhancement of the organs and reduces the dose of contrast material required compared with lower limbs administration.

  11. A model for low dose effects of low-LET radiation delivered at high dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllnberger, H.; Stewart, R.D.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro studies show that protective tumour-reducing effects occur for low dose rates (mGy per minute). To account for these phenomena, we have previously developed stochastic and deterministic multi-stage cancer models that include radiation-induced adaptations in DNA repair processes and radical scavenging. Here, these models are extended to account for the induction of radioprotective mechanisms for low doses of low LET radiation delivered at high dose rates. Cellular adaptations in DNA repair are related to temporal changes in the amount of DNA damage in a cell. The combined effects of endogenous DNA damage, background radiation and artificial irradiation are considered. PMID:22318364

  12. Submillisievert standard-pitch CT pulmonary angiography with ultra-low dose contrast media administration: A comparison to standard CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Mikat, Christian; Stenzel, Elena; Erfanian, Youssef; Wetter, Axel; Schlosser, Thomas; Forsting, Michael; Nassenstein, Kai

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of submillisievert standard-pitch CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) with ultra-low dose contrast media administration in comparison to standard CTPA. Hundred patients (56 females, 44 males, mean age 69.6±15.4 years; median BMI: 26.6, IQR: 5.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism were examined with two different protocols (n = 50 each, group A: 80 kVp, ref. mAs 115, 25 ml of contrast medium; group B: 100 kVp, ref. mAs 150, 60 ml of contrast medium) using a dual-source CT equipped with automated exposure control. Objective and subjective image qualities, radiation exposure as well as the frequency of pulmonary embolism were evaluated. There was no significant difference in subjective image quality scores between two groups regarding pulmonary arteries (p = 0.776), whereby the interobserver agreement was excellent (group A: k = 0.9; group B k = 1.0). Objective image analysis revealed that signal intensities (SI), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the pulmonary arteries were equal or significantly higher in group B. There was no significant difference in the frequency of pulmonary embolism (p = 0.65). Using the low dose and low contrast media protocol resulted in a radiation dose reduction by 71.8% (2.4 vs. 0.7 mSv; pcontrast agent volume can obtain sufficient image quality to exclude or diagnose pulmonary emboli while reducing radiation dose by approximately 71%.

  13. Effects of two types of medical contrast media on routine chemistry results by three automated chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Jin; Rim, John Hoon; Yim, Jisook; Lee, Sang-Guk; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    The use of iodinated contrast media has grown in popularity in the past two decades, but relatively little attention has been paid to the possible interferential effects of contrast media on laboratory test results. Herein, we investigate medical contrast media interference with routine chemistry results obtained by three automated chemistry analyzers. Ten levels of pooled serum were used in the study. Two types of medical contrast media [Iopamiro (iopamidol) and Omnipaque (iohexol)] were evaluated. To evaluate the dose-dependent effects of the contrast media, iopamidol and iohexol were spiked separately into aliquots of serum for final concentrations of 1.8%, 3.6%, 5.5%, 7.3%, and 9.1%. The 28 analytes included in the routine chemistry panel were measured by using Hitachi 7600, AU5800, and Cobas c702 analyzers. We calculated the delta percentage difference (DPD) between the samples and the control, and examined dose-dependent trends. When the mean DPD values were compared with the reference cut-off criteria, the only uniformly interferential effect observed for all analyzers was in total protein with iopamidol. Two additional analytes that showed trends toward interferential effects only in few analyzers and exceeded the limits of the allowable error were the serum iron and the total CO 2 . The other combinations of analyzer and contrast showed no consistent dose-dependent propensity for change in any analyte level. Our study suggests that many of the analytes included in routine chemistry results, except total protein and serum iron, are not significantly affected by iopamidol and iohexol. These results suggest that it would be beneficial to apply a flexible medical evaluation process for patients requiring both laboratory tests and imaging studies, minimizing the need for strict regulations for sequential tests. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. X-ray contrast media of low osmolality. Causes, effects, and hazards of reactions to contrast media used in radiodiagnostics. Niederosmolare Roentgenkontrastmittel. Ursachen, Wirkungen und Risiken von Kontrastmittelreaktionen in der Roentgendiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, A.; Vogel, H.

    1987-01-01

    For this book, a literature study has been made compiling the results of research into the causes and mechanisms of reactions to contrast media. The distinction made by many authors, between osmotic/local and general reactions, has been adopted for the arrangement of the book in hand. The reactions rather due to osmotic conditions, all apparently dose dependent, include angiodynia, endothelial damage, disturbance of blood-brain barrier, thrombosis and thrombophlebitis, vasodilatation, pressure increase in pulmonary circulation, arachnoiditis, and inotropic effects. The general reactions to contrast media are not determined by the dose and probably are due to the ionicity and the chemical toxicity of the molecule. Such reactions are nausea and vomiting, skin effects, bronchospasm, irritations of mucous membrane, and circulatory distress. The book reviews the status of research into the various causes of reactions, each chapter also including a survey of experimental studies with low-osmolar contrast media and their action with regard to the side effect in question.

  15. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. METHODS: In the North European Small......-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. RESULTS: The average dose during the second year of the randomised...... trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0...

  16. Contrasting effects of alpha- and beta-androstenediol on oncogenic myeloid cell lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, P N; Loria, R M

    1997-08-01

    The in vitro effects of 17 alpha AED, the isomer of 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta diol (17 beta AED) on the basal growth of murine RAW 264.7, P388D1, and human HL-60 cells were investigated. 17 alpha AED treatment of RAW cells for 48 h reduced total cell number without increasing cell death as detected by trypan blue exclusion. At these doses, DNA synthesis as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation was suppressed by as much as 65%, P time- and dose-dependent and reversible on removal of the steroid. Similar results were obtained with P388D1 and human HL-60 cell lines. At 50 nM or above, 17 alpha AED induced apoptosis in RAW cells and HL-60 as detected by transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assays. By contrast, treating cells with the isomer 17 beta AED had no such effect. These data suggest that the balance between the anti-proliferative effect of 17 alpha AED and the proliferative effects of 17 beta AED may determine the overall level of myelopoiesis.

  17. Post-exercise effects of cold water immersion and contrast water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-exercise effects of cold water immersion and contrast water therapy - Part 2: Acute effects of contrast water therapy and passive recovery on the physical and haematological parameters in male university rugby players over a 48-hour recovery period.

  18. Effects of contrasting category, conjoint frequency and typicality on categorization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.; Swart, de J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether (a) experience with a contrasting category, (b) conjoint frequency of dimensional values, (c) range of typicality of values, and (d) type of information administered during learning influenced subsequent test performance. Each experiment began

  19. Contrasts and effect sizes in behavioral research: a correlational approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenthal, Robert; Rosnow, Ralph L; Rubin, Donald B

    2000-01-01

    .... Researchers, teachers of research methods, and graduate students will be familiar with the principles and procedures of contrast analysis but will also be introduced to a series of newly developed...

  20. uv keratoconjunctivitis vs. established dose effect relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulvady, N.U.

    1976-08-01

    A patient who received a uv dose to his eyes 11 times greater than the photokeratitic threshold of Pitts and 4/sup 1///sub 2/ times the photokeratitic threshold as found by Leach. The patient had severe keratoconjunctivitis for 3 days and did not develop any keratitis.

  1. Computer-aided evaluation of low-dose and low-contrast agent third-generation dual-source CT angiography prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankerl, Peter; Hammon, Matthias; Seuss, Hannes; Tröbs, Monique; Schuhbaeck, Annika; Hell, Michaela M; Cavallaro, Alexander; Achenbach, Stephan; Uder, Michael; Marwan, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the performance of computer-aided evaluation software for a comprehensive workup of patients prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using low-contrast agent and low radiation dose third-generation dual-source CT angiography. We evaluated 30 consecutive patients scheduled for TAVI. All patients underwent ECG-triggered high-pitch dual-source CT angiography of the aortic root and aorta with a standardized contrast agent volume (30 ml Imeron350, flow rate 4 ml/s) and low-dose (100 kv/350 mAs) protocol. An expert (10 years of experience) manually evaluated aortic root and iliac access dimensions (distance between coronary ostia and aortic annulus, minimal/maximal diameters and area-derived diameter of the aortic annulus) and best CT-predicted fluoroscopic projection angle as the reference standard. Utilizing computer-aided software (syngo.via), the same pre-TAVI workup was performed and compared to the reference standard. Mean CTDI[Formula: see text] was 3.46 mGy and mean DLP 217.6 ± 12.1 mGy cm, corresponding to a mean effective dose of 3.7 ± 0.2 mSv. Computer-aided evaluation was successful in all but one patient. Compared to the reference standard, Bland-Altman analysis indicated very good agreement for the distances between aortic annulus and coronary ostia (RCA: mean difference 0.8 mm; 95 % CI 0.4-1.2 mm; LM: mean difference 0.9 mm; 95 % CI 0.5-1.3 mm); however, we demonstrated a systematic overestimation of annulus- derived diameter using the software (mean difference 44.4 mm[Formula: see text]; 95 % CI 30.4-58.3 mm[Formula: see text]). Based on respective annulus dimensions, the recommended prosthesis size (Edwards SAPIEN 3) matched in 26 out of the 29 patients (90 %). CT-derived fluoroscopic projection angles showed an excellent agreement for both methods. Out of 58 iliac arteries, 15 (25 %) arteries could not be segmented by the software. Preprocessing time of the software was 71 ± 11 s (range 51-96

  2. Automated tube voltage selection for radiation dose and contrast medium reduction at coronary CT angiography using 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Poole, Zachary B.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the relationship between automated tube voltage selection (ATVS) and body mass index (BMI) and its effect on image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We evaluated 272 patients who underwent CCTA with 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Prospectively ECG-triggered spiral acquisition was performed with automated tube current selection and advanced iterative reconstruction. Tube voltages were selected by ATVS (70-120 kV). BMI, effective dose (ED), and vascular attenuation in the coronary arteries were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. Image quality was rated good to excellent in 98.9 % of examinations without significant differences for proximal and distal attenuation (all p ≥.0516), whereas image noise was rated significantly higher at 70 kV compared to ≥100 kV (all p <.0266). However, no significant differences were observed in SNR or CNR at 70-120 kV (all p ≥.0829). Mean ED at 70-120 kV was 1.5 ± 1.2 mSv, 2.4 ± 1.5 mSv, 3.6 ± 2.7 mSv, 5.9 ± 4.0 mSv, 7.9 ± 4.2 mSv, and 10.7 ± 4.1 mSv, respectively (all p ≤.0414). Correlation analysis showed a moderate association between tube voltage and BMI (r =.639). ATVS allows individual tube voltage adaptation for CCTA performed with 3{sup rd} generation DSCT, resulting in significantly decreased radiation exposure while maintaining image quality. (orig.)

  3. Radiation dose reduction using 100-kVp and a sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm in adolescent head CT: Impact on grey-white matter contrast and image noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yasunori; Nakaura, Takeshi; Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirarta, Kenichiro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-07-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of 100-kVp scans with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (IR) for unenhanced head CT in adolescents. Sixty-nine patients aged 12-17 years underwent head CT under 120- (n = 34) or 100-kVp (n = 35) protocols. The 120-kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), 100-kVp images with FBP (100-kVp-F) and sinogram-affirmed IR (100-kVp-S). We compared the effective dose (ED), grey-white matter (GM-WM) contrast, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between protocols in supratentorial (ST) and posterior fossa (PS). We also assessed GM-WM contrast, image noise, sharpness, artifacts, and overall image quality on a four-point scale. ED was 46% lower with 100- than 120-kVp (p noise was lower, on 100-kVp-S than 120-kVp at ST (p noise in adolescent head CT. • 100-kVp head CT provides 46% radiation dose reduction compared with 120-kVp. • 100-kVp scanning improves subjective and objective GM-WM contrast. • Sinogram-affirmed IR decreases head CT image noise, especially in supratentorial region. • 100-kVp protocol with sinogram-affirmed IR is suited for adolescent head CT.

  4. Low-tube-voltage (80 kVp) CT aortography using 320-row volume CT with adaptive iterative reconstruction: lower contrast medium and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Chu, Sung-Yu; Hsu, Ming-Yi [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou, College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Ying-Lan [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Tsai, Hui-Yu [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taoyuan (China)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate CT aortography at reduced tube voltage and contrast medium dose while maintaining image quality through iterative reconstruction (IR). The Institutional Review Board approved a prospective study of 48 patients who underwent follow-up CT aortography. We performed intra-individual comparisons of arterial phase images using 120 kVp (standard tube voltage) and 80 kVp (low tube voltage). Low-tube-voltage imaging was performed on a 320-detector CT with IR following injection of 40 ml of contrast medium. We assessed aortic attenuation, aortic attenuation gradient, image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}), and figure of merit (FOM) of image noise and CNR. Two readers assessed images for diagnostic quality, image noise, and artefacts. The low-tube-voltage protocol showed 23-31 % higher mean aortic attenuation and image noise (both P < 0.01) than the standard-tube-voltage protocol, but no significant difference in the CNR and aortic attenuation gradients. The low-tube-voltage protocol showed a 48 % reduction in CTDI{sub vol} and an 80 % increase in FOM of CNR. Subjective diagnostic quality was similar for both protocols, but low-tube-voltage images showed greater image noise (P = 0.01). Application of IR to an 80-kVp CT aortography protocol allows radiation dose and contrast medium reduction without affecting image quality. (orig.)

  5. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 {mu}Sv and 37.8 {mu}Sv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 {mu}Sv, 27.6 {mu}Sv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 {mu}Sv, 15.9 {mu}Sv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  6. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  7. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-15

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology.

  8. Effective dose delivered by conventional radiology to Aosta Valley population between 2002 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, F; Aimonetto, S; Catuzzo, P; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Marchisio, P; Natrella, M; Rosanò, A M; Meloni, T; Pasquino, M; Tofani, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective Medical diagnostic procedures can be considered the main man-made source of ionising radiation exposure for the population. Conventional radiography still represents the largest contribution to examination frequency. The present work evaluates procedure frequency and effective dose from the majority of conventional radiology examinations performed at the Radiological Department of Aosta Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Method Effective dose to the patient was evaluated by means of the software PCXMC. Data provided by the radiological information system allowed us to obtain collective effective and per caput dose. Results The biggest contributors to per caput effective dose from conventional radiology are vertebral column, abdomen, chest, pelvis and (limited to females) breast. Vertebral column, pelvis and breast procedures show a significant dose increment in the period of the study. The mean effective dose per inhabitant from conventional radiology increased from 0.131 mSv in 2002 to 0.156 mSv in 2009. Combining these figures with those from our study of effective dose from CT (0.55 mSv in 2002 to 1.03 mSv in 2009), the total mean effective dose per inhabitant increased from 0.68 mSv to 1.19 mSv. The contribution of CT increased from 81% to 87% of the total. In contrast, conventional radiology accounts for 85% of the total number of procedures, but only 13% of the effective dose. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that conventional radiography still represents the biggest contributor to examination frequency in Aosta Valley in 2009. However, the frequency of the main procedures did not change significantly between 2002 and 2009. PMID:21937611

  9. Dose-dependent effects of alcohol administration on behavioral profiles in the MCSF test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Roman, Erika

    2016-02-01

    The acute effects of alcohol administration are age-, dose-, time- and task-dependent. Although generally considered to be a sedative drug, alcohol has both stimulatory and depressant effects on behavior, depending on dose and time. Alcohol-induced motor activating effects are consistently shown in mice but rarely demonstrated in adult, outbred rats using conventional behavioral tests. The aim of the present experiment was to study acute alcohol-induced effects on behavioral profiles in a more complex environment using the novel multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) test, designed for assessing different behaviors in the same trial including locomotor activity. Adult male Wistar rats (Sca:WI) were administered one intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of alcohol (0.0 g/kg, 0.5 g/kg, 1.0 g/kg, or 1.5 g/kg) 5 min prior to the 30-min MCSF test. The two highest doses induced marked motor-suppressing effects. A significant interaction between group and time was found in general activity when comparing rats exposed to alcohol at 0.0 g/kg and 0.5 g/kg. In contrast to the 0.0 g/kg dose that increased the activity over time, animals administered the low dose (0.5 g/kg) demonstrated an initial high activity followed by a decline over time. No indications for acute alcohol-induced anxiolytic-like effects were found. The multivariate setting in the MCSF test appears to be sensitive for detecting motor-activating effects of low doses of alcohol as well as reduced locomotion at doses lower than in other behavioral tasks. The detection of subtle changes in behavior across time and dose is important for understanding alcohol-induced effects. This approach may be useful in evaluating alcohol doses that correspond to different degrees of intoxication in humans. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  11. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, P. D.; Murphy, K. P.; Hayes, S.A; Carey, K; Sammon, J.; Crush, L.; O’Neill, F.; Normoyle, B.; McGarrigle, A. M.; Barry, J E; Maher, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). Methods Thirty-three patients with clinically suspected renal colic were prospectively included. Conventional dose (CD-CT) and LD-CT data sets were contemporaneously acquired. LD-CT images were reconstructed with 40 %, 70 % and 90 % ASiR. Image quality was sub...

  12. [About Dose-Effect Relationship in the Environment Radiation Protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalova, A A

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important stages in the development of a methodology for the environment radiation protection is the assessment and justification of critical radiation exposure levels for ecosystem components. In this study application of the approach for critical dose level estimation is demonstrated on the example of the data about ionizing radiation effect on reproduction and survival of agricultural plants after acute and chronic exposures. Influence of the type of dose-effect relationship on the estimated values of the critical doses and dose rates is studied using three models (linear, logarithmic and logistic). The findings obtained do not provide any robust recommendations in favor of one of the three tested functions. The models of dose-effect relationship (threshold or non-threshold) and types of radiation-induced effects (stochastic and deterministic) are discussed from the viewpoint of developing a system for radiation protection of human and non-human biota.

  13. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age: the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M; Kirk, Jeremy; Donaldson, Malcolm; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Söder, Olle; Roche, Edna; Hoey, Hilary; Dunger, David B; Juul, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. In the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. The average dose during the second year of the randomised trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0.17 SDS, s.d. 0.18) during the second year of the randomised trial compared with the high-dose group (0.46 SDS, s.d. 0.25), but not significantly lower than the low-dose group (0.23 SDS, s.d. 0.15; P=0.17). The IGF1 titration group had lower IGF1 levels after 2 years of the trial (mean 1.16, s.d. 1.24) compared with both the low-dose (mean 1.76, s.d. 1.48) and the high-dose (mean 2.97, s.d. 1.63) groups. IGF1 titration of GH dose in SGA children proved less effective than current dosing strategies. IGF1 titration resulted in physiological IGF1 levels with a wide range of GH dose and a poorer growth response, which indicates the role of IGF1 resistance and highlights the heterogeneity of short SGA children. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  14. Collective effective dose from diagnostic radiology in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnyk, L; Shalopa, O; Nosyk, O

    2015-07-01

    The frequencies and effective doses for the most common X-ray diagnostic examinations in Ukraine were assessed in the frame of the European Commission (EC) Study on European Population Doses from Medical Exposure (Dose Datamed 2). The average effective doses for all radiographic procedures were estimated using the ODS-60 software (Finland). The estimation of the effective doses for the chest film fluorography was carried out from the results of own representative measurements with thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry and a standard Alderson-Rando phantom. The effective doses for fluoroscopy procedures were assessed using the Russian guidelines for estimation of effective doses. For all other X-ray examinations and procedures [computed tomography (CT), angiography and interventional procedures], typical effective dose values were taken from the EC Guidance RP154. The most frequently performed in Ukraine is chest film fluorography, with 389 examinations per 1000 population annually, reflecting in the greatest contribution to the total collective effective dose (CED) of 428 mSv per 1000 population (44 %). The total frequency and CED from all X-ray diagnostic examinations and procedures were estimated to be 1218 examinations and 1060 mSv per 1000 populations, respectively. The expected additional cancer risk from X-ray diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures is 2680 cases per year, with 1200 of them due to the contribution of chest fluorography. The main important action in radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology is the organisation of the monitoring of patient doses for different types of X-ray diagnostic examinations and replacement of chest film fluorography with digital X-ray systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evaluation of a High Concentrated Contrast Media Injection Protocol in Combination with Low Tube Current for Dose Reduction in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: A Randomized, Two-center Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yibo; Hua, Yanqing; Wang, Mingpeng; Mao, Dingbiao; Jin, Xiu; Li, Cheng; Shi, Kailei; Xu, Jianrong

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to prospectively evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential and image quality (IQ) of a high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) injection protocol in combination with a low tube current (mAs) in coronary computed tomography angiography. Eighty-one consecutive patients (mean age: 62 years; 34 females; body mass index: 18-31) were included and randomized-assigned into two groups. All computed tomography (CT) examinations were performed in two groups with the same tube voltage (100 kV), flow rate of contrast medium (5.0 mL/s), and iodine dose (22.8 g). An automatic mAs and low concentration contrast medium (300 mgI/mL) were used in group A, whereas effective mAs was reduced by a factor 0.6 along with HCCM (400 mgI/mL) in group B. Radiation dose was assessed (CT dose index [CTDI vol ] and dose length product), and vessel-based objective IQ for various regions of interest (enhancement, noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio), subjective IQ, noise, and motion artifacts were analyzed overall and vessel-based with a 5-point Likert scale. The CT attenuation of coronary arteries and image noise in group B were significantly higher than those in group A (ranges: 507.5-548.1 Hounsfield units vs 407.5-444.5 Hounsfield units; and 20.3 ± 8.6 vs 17.7 ± 8.0) (P ≤ 0.0166). There was no significant difference between the two groups in signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, and subjective IQ of coronary arteries (29.4-31.7, 30.0-37.0, and medium score of 5 in group A vs 29.4-32.4, 27.7-36.3, and medium score of 5 in group B, respectively, P ≥ 0.1859). Both mean CTDI vol and dose length product in group B were 58% of those of group A. HCCM combined with low tube current allows dose reduction in coronary computed tomography angiography and does not compromise IQ. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spreading pattern of contrast medium in the high thoracic epidural space in rabbits: the effect of neck flexion and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lim, Young Jin; Hong, Deok-Man; Jeon, Yun-Seok; Park, Hee Pyoung; Jeon, Young-Tae; Shin, Soon Young; Han, Sun Sook

    2010-08-01

    Neck flexion has been shown to increase cranial spread of contrast agent when a small fixed volume was injected into the high thoracic epidural space. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of volume of contrast medium on its distribution through the high thoracic epidural space during neck extension and flexion using the rabbit model. An epidural catheter was introduced into the epidural space of New Zealand white rabbits with the tip located at the T3-4 intervertebral level. The neck was extended or flexed (n = 8 for each group), and the contrast medium was injected with the volume increasing by increments of 0.1 ml/kg, up to 0.3 ml/kg. The spread of contrast medium was determined by counting the number of vertebral body units using lateral epidurographic images. In both groups, the total spread of contrast medium was similar, increasing continuously with injected volume. The cranial spread was greater in the flexion group than the extension group. However, the caudal spread was greater in the extension than in the flexion group. In the extension group, the contrast medium spread caudally about twice as far as it spread cranially, but there was no statistically significant difference between cranial and caudal spread in the flexion group. In the high thoracic epidural space of rabbit, the contrast medium of varying doses showed limited cranial spread. The flexion of the neck increased cranial spread and extension of the neck increased caudal spread.

  17. Committed effective doses at various times after intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed effective doses at nine times after intake from intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu 1 AMAD particles by adults. Data are given for various chemical forms of 359 nuclides. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on committed equivalent doses to organs is given in NRPB-M288. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  18. Does low dose oral ketamine have oxytocic effect? | Okorie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate if low dose oral Ketamine has oxytotic effect on term pregnant uterus. Methodology: This is a cross sectional double blind placebo control prospective study. A total of 745 parturients were studied, 261 had low dose oral Ketamine in active phase of labour (group A), 227 had Oxytocin augmentation ...

  19. Effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron on the ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, it is concluded that sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron reduced the amounts of ovarian constituents during ovarian development and oogenesis in S. litura. These reductions increased with an increase in dose from LD10 to LD30. The effects of chlorfluazuron on the amounts of ovarian constituents are presumed to ...

  20. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  1. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  2. Effectiveness of Prevention Strategies for Contrast-Induced Nephropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Rathan M; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Wilson, Renee F; Turban, Sharon; Zhang, Allen; Sherrod, Cheryl; Aboagye, Jonathan; Eng, John; Choi, Michael J; Hutfless, Susan; Bass, Eric B

    2016-03-15

    N-acetylcysteine, sodium bicarbonate, statins, and ascorbic acid have been studied for reducing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of interventions to reduce CIN in adults receiving contrast media. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Scopus databases through June 2015. Risk of bias and overall strength of evidence (SOE) of studies were assessed. Randomized, controlled trials of N-acetylcysteine, sodium bicarbonate, statins, or ascorbic acid that used intravenous (IV) or intra-arterial contrast media and defined CIN with enough data for meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Low-dose N-acetylcysteine plus IV saline compared with IV saline (risk ratio [RR], 0.75 [95% CI, 0.63 to 0.89]; low SOE), N-acetylcysteine plus IV saline compared with IV saline in patients receiving low-osmolar contrast media (RR, 0.69 [CI, 0.58 to 0.84]; moderate SOE), and statins plus N-acetylcysteine plus IV saline versus N-acetylcysteine plus IV saline (RR, 0.52 [CI, 0.29 to 0.93]; low SOE) had clinically important and statistically significant benefits. The following 3 comparisons suggested a clinically important difference that was not statistically significant: sodium bicarbonate versus IV saline in patients receiving low-osmolar contrast media (RR, 0.65 [CI, 0.33 to 1.25]; low SOE), statins plus IV saline versus IV saline (RR, 0.68 [CI, 0.39 to 1.20]; low SOE), and ascorbic acid versus IV saline (RR, 0.72 [CI, 0.48 to 1.01]; low SOE). Strength of evidence was generally insufficient for comparisons of the need for renal replacement, cardiac events, and mortality. Too few studies were done in patients receiving IV contrast media. The greatest reduction in CIN was seen with N-acetylcysteine plus IV saline in patients receiving LOCM and with statins plus N-acetylcysteine plus IV saline. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  3. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  4. Towards a new dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF)? Some comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, K H

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this article is to offer a broader, mechanism-based, analytical tool than that used by (Rühm et al 2016 Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) for the interpretation of cancer induction relationships. The article explains the limitations of this broader analytical tool and the implications of its use in view of the publications by Leuraud et al 2015 (Lancet Haematol. 2 e276-81) and Richardson et al 2015 (Br. Med. J. 351 h5359). The publication by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79), which is clearly work in progress, reviews the current status of the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) as recommended by the ICRP. It also considers the issues which might influence a reassessment of both the value of the DDREF as well as its application in radiological protection. In this article, the problem is approached from a different perspective and starts by commenting on the limited scientific data used by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) to develop their analysis which ultimately leads them to use a linear-quadratic dose effect relationship to fit solid cancer mortality data from the Japanese life span study of atomic bomb survivors. The approach taken here includes more data on the induction of DNA double strand breaks and, using experimental data taken from the literature, directly relates the breaks to cell killing, chromosomal aberrations and somatic mutations. The relationships are expanded to describe the induction of cancer as arising from radiation induced cytological damage coupled to cell killing since the cancer mutated cell has to survive to express its malignant nature. Equations are derived for the induction of cancer after both acute and chronic exposure to sparsely ionising radiation. The equations are fitted to the induction of cancer in mice to illustrate a dose effect relationship over the total dose range. The 'DDREF' derived from the two equations varies with dose and the DDREF concept is called into question. Although the equation for

  5. Low contrast- and low radiation dose protocol for cardiac CT of thin adults at 256-row CT: usefulness of low tube voltage scans and the hybrid iterative reconstruction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Kidoh, Masafumi; Sakaino, Naritsugu; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Kawahara, Tetsuya; Harada, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effect on image quality of a low contrast and radiation dose protocol for cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a low tube voltage, the hybrid-iterative reconstruction algorithm, and a 256-row CT scanner. Before clinical study, we performed phantom experiments to evaluate the hybrid iterative reconstruction technique. We randomly assigned 68 patients undergoing cardiac CT to one of two protocols; 33 were scanned with our conventional 120 kVp protocol, the contrast material (370 mgI/kg body weight) was delivered over 15 s. The other 35 patients underwent scanning at a tube voltage of 80 kVp; the contrast dose, reduced by 50 % (185 mgI/kg), was delivered at the same fractional dose (24.7 mgI/kg/s). The 80 kVp images were post-processed with the 60 % hybrid-iterative reconstruction technique. We evaluated the effective dose (ED), image noise, mean attenuation, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each protocol. The hybrid-iterative reconstruction technique offers almost same spatial resolution and noise-power-spectrum curve as compared with filtered back projection reconstruction. There were no decrease in spatial resolution and no shift of spatial frequency in noise power spectrum. The average ED was 74 % lower with the 80- than the 120 kVp protocol (1.4 vs 5.4 mSv). Dunnett's test showed that there were no significant differences in the image noise, mean attenuation, and CNR between hybrid-iterative-reconstructed 80 kVp scans and 120 kVp scans (28.6 ± 6.5 vs 25.3 ± 4.5, p = 0.18; 475.0 HU ± 87.0 vs 445.3 HU ± 67.7, p = 0.20; 17.1 HU ± 3.5 vs 17.8 HU ± 3.1, p = 0.53). The low kVp scan and hybrid-iterative reconstruction algorithm can dramatically decrease the radiation dose and contrast dose with adequate image quality at cardiac CT of thin adults using a 256-row CT scanner.

  6. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  7. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  8. The effect of methadone dose regimen on neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John J; Leamon, Martin H; Willits, Neil H; Salo, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a multiple daily dose methadone regimen in pregnancy on neonatal outcomes. Although methadone maintenance has been the standard for the treatment of opioid dependence in pregnancy, there is no consensus on proper dosing. Single daily dosing is the most common strategy. Because of accelerated metabolism of methadone in pregnancy, this regimen may expose mother and fetus to daily episodes of withdrawal and possibly contribute to more severe Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). This study reports on a protocol that increased both methadone dose and dose frequency in response to maternal reports of withdrawal. Treatment of NAS was needed in 29% of neonates, compared to a published rate of 60% to 80%. The mean methadone dose was 152 mg at delivery, divided into 2 to 6 doses per day. Ninety-two percent of mothers were free of illicit drug use at delivery. There was no relationship between methadone dose and treatment of NAS. Female babies had a treatment rate of 16% versus 38% for male babies. Beyond abstinence symptoms, cohort outcomes in terms of gestational age, birth weight, prematurity, Caesarian sections, and breastfeeding equaled or approximated US population norms. The protocol was associated with low rates of treatment of NAS and high rates of maternal recovery. High rates of treatment for NAS reported in methadone-exposed neonates might relate in part to iatrogenic factors and be reduced through the use of divided daily doses and protocols that minimize maternal withdrawal.

  9. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  10. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Sonja J; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; Coppes, Robert P; van Luijk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late RILD are also due to different pathologies. As such, new

  11. Variable effects of radiological contrast media on thrombus growth in a rabbit jugular vein thrombosis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Biemond, B. J.; Sturk, A.; Hoek, J.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effect of an ionic high osmolar contrast medium (Ioxitalamate), an ionic low osmolar contrast medium (Ioxaglate) and various nonionic low osmolar contrast media (Iopamidol, Iopromide and Iohexol) on thrombus growth in a rabbit jugular vein thrombosis model. Thrombus growth was

  12. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-05-15

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose magnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. (author)

  13. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Claus

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Methods Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB dose on tumor control probability (TCP was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Results Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition. Discussion Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on

  14. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer--modelling of dose effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-03-18

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for alpha/beta, gamma 50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high gamma 50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only

  15. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Methods Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Results Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Discussion Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than

  16. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A.; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Materials and Methods Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological

  17. Organ and effective dose reduction for region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT and fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    In some medical-imaging procedures using CBCT and fluoroscopy, it may be needed to visualize only the center of the field-of-view with optimal quality. To reduce the dose to the patient as well as enable increased contrast in the region of interest (ROI) during CBCT and fluoroscopy procedures, a 0.7 mm thick Cu ROI attenuator with a circular aperture 12% of the FOV was used. The aim of this study was to quantify the dose-reduction benefit of ROI imaging during a typical CBCT and interventional fluoroscopy procedures in the head and torso. The Toshiba Infinix C-Arm System was modeled in BEAMnrc/EGSnrc with and without the ROI attenuator. Patient organ and effective doses were calculated in DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc Monte-Carlo software for CBCT and interventional procedures. We first compared the entrance dose with and without the ROI attenuator on a 20 cm thick solid-water block. Then we simulated a CBCT scan and an interventional fluoroscopy procedure on the head and torso with and without an ROI attenuator. The results showed that the entrance-surface dose reduction in the solid water is about 85.7% outside the ROI opening and 10.5% in the ROI opening. The results showed a reduction in most organ doses of 45%-70% and in effective dose of 46%-66% compared to the dose in a CBCT scan and in an interventional procedure without the ROI attenuator. This work provides evidence of substantial reduction of organ and effective doses when using an ROI attenuator during CBCT and fluoroscopic procedures.

  18. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  19. A simple phantom study of the effects of dose reduction (by kVp increment) below current dose levels on CR chest image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbe, N.O., E-mail: nneoyiegbe@yahoo.co [Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Forresterhill (United Kingdom); Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F. [Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Forresterhill (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the applicability of a simple commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert, in image quality and dose optimisation studies in computed radiography (CR). Methods: Lung and mediastinal lesions simulated with gelatine were positioned on the chest phantom and exposures made at the current chest radiography dose, set as D{sub ref} in the study. Further exposures were made at doses below D{sub ref} to study the effect of reducing patient dose below current dose levels, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions in computed radiography. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers using a commercial image viewing software without image manipulation, and a local image viewing software that allowed image contrast enhancement. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D{sub ref}) was assessed for both unmanipulated and manipulated images, from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D{sub ref}. Results: Results show that as the dose was decreased below D{sub ref}, both the clarity and detectability of lesions in the lung images worsened when there was no facility to manipulate the image. The onset of a significant difference in image clarity in the lung area occurred at 0.06 mGy while significant detectability changes were observed at 0.04 mGy. Similar changes in image quality were observed with the use of image manipulation. However, dose reduction produced statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in both image clarity and detectability at 0.10 mGy. Image clarity and detectability in the mediastinal area showed no statistical difference at all doses (p > 0.05) with and without image manipulation. Conclusion: The clarity and detectability of lesion images as a function of patient doses in computed radiography may be dependent on whether or not contrast enhancement techniques are employed. There is also evidence to

  20. SU-F-P-29: Impact of Oral Contrast Agent for Assisting in Outlining Small Intestine On Pelvic IMAT Dose in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Fan, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the advanced intensity modulated arc therapy(IMAT) delivery systems becoming a main role of treatment ways, which places even greater demands on delivering accuracy. The impact of oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) for assisting in outlining the small intestine on pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer was investigated. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans, and the planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (including the small intestine, rectum, bladder, colon and the left and right femoral head) were contoured. The IMAT plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system for each case, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel. The first plan (plan A) was the conventional IMAT plan (with oral contrast agent), and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel (without oral contrast agent). Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans. Results: The PTV’s D2, D50, D95, V110, conformity index, and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 5610.5 vs. 5611.4 cGy (P=0.175), 5348.5 vs. 5348.0 cGy (P=0.869), 5039 vs. 5042.3 (P=0.518), 6.0% vs. 6.1 %( P=0.886), 0.1269 vs. 0.1271 (P=0.34) and 0.8421 vs. 0.8416 (P=0.598), respectively. The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy (V30) and the minimum dose of 2% volume accepted (D2) for plans A and B were 31.6% vs. 31.9% (P=0.371) and 5067.8 vs. 5085.4 cGy (P=0.377), while rectum V50 of the two plans was 12.4% vs. 12.1% (P=0.489). Conclusion: The oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) filling the small intestine does not lead to a significant increase in the pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer.

  1. Consecutive acquisition of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography and perfusion MR imaging with added dose of gadolinium-based contrast agent aids diagnosis of suspected brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Shigeki; Shimoji, Keigo; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (TCMRA) and perfusion MR imaging (PWI) have been used to assess the hemodynamics of brain tumors. We assessed the feasibility and value of consecutive performance of these techniques to evaluate suspected brain metastasis following supplementary injection of gadolinium-based contrast medium. In 69 patients with suspected brain metastasis, we obtained precontrast MR images followed by TCMRA and postcontrast T1-weighted images after administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoteridol. When findings were negative or equivocal, we injected an additional 0.1-mmol/kg dose of gadoteridol and obtained PWI and second postcontrast T1-weighted images. We used a 3-point scale to grade perfusion maps and TCMRA and assessed whether these techniques added information to conventional MR imaging in the differential diagnosis. We also evaluated whether the second contrast injection improved the conspicuity and/or number of enhancing lesions and used a 4-point scoring system to quantitatively analyze diagnostic yield of TCMRA and PWI. We could assess tumor hemodynamics on PWI maps and TCMRA images in all 69 patients. In 14 cases (20%), PWI and/or TCMRA added information to conventional MR findings. After second injection of contrast medium, lesion conspicuity improved in 58 of the 69 cases (84%), and the number of detected lesions increased in 11 of 31 cases diagnosed with metastatic disease (36%). Quantitative analysis revealed TCMRA and PWI provided significant additional diagnostic information (Kruskal-Wallis test, PPWI using supplementary contrast injection can facilitate differential diagnosis of suspected brain metastasis and improve the number and conspicuity of detected lesions.

  2. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  3. Radiation dose reduction using 100-kVp and a sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm in adolescent head CT: Impact on grey-white matter contrast and image noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Yasunori [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakaura, Takeshi; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirarta, Kenichiro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of 100-kVp scans with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (IR) for unenhanced head CT in adolescents. Sixty-nine patients aged 12-17 years underwent head CT under 120- (n = 34) or 100-kVp (n = 35) protocols. The 120-kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), 100-kVp images with FBP (100-kVp-F) and sinogram-affirmed IR (100-kVp-S). We compared the effective dose (ED), grey-white matter (GM-WM) contrast, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between protocols in supratentorial (ST) and posterior fossa (PS). We also assessed GM-WM contrast, image noise, sharpness, artifacts, and overall image quality on a four-point scale. ED was 46% lower with 100- than 120-kVp (p < 0.001). GM-WM contrast was higher, and image noise was lower, on 100-kVp-S than 120-kVp at ST (p < 0.001). CNR of 100-kVp-S was higher than of 120-kVp (p < 0.001). GM-WM contrast of 100-kVp-S was subjectively rated as better than of 120-kVp (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the other criteria between 100-kVp-S and 120-kVp (p = 0.072-0.966). The 100-kVp with sinogram-affirmed IR facilitated dramatic radiation reduction and better GM-WM contrast without increasing image noise in adolescent head CT. (orig.)

  4. Neuroimmune Effects of Inhaling Low Dose Sarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    effects of sarin on Src-like pretein tyrosine kinases (Fyn and Lck) (19-22 months). b. Examine the effects of sarin on PLC-¥1 (23-26 months) c. Investigate...proliferative response of spleen cells to the T-cell Palo Alto, CA, USA), rats were anesthetized with an mitogen, Concanavalin A (Con A), was measured ...mitogen, Concanavalin A (Con A), was measured as previ- intramuscular injection of a mixture of ketamine and xyla- ously described (Sopori et al

  5. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mintz, E. D.; Cartter, M. L.; Hadler, J. L.; Wassell, J. T.; Zingeser, J. A.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure ...

  6. Radiation effects on livestock: physiological effects, dose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M C

    1985-06-01

    Farm livestock show no measurable effects from being exposed to ionizing radiation unless the level is greatly in excess of the natural background radiation. Possible sources of ionizing radiation which might affect livestock or contribute to radioactivity in the food chain to humans are reactor accidents, fuel reprocessing plant accidents and thermonuclear explosions. Most data on ionizing radiation effects on livestock are from whole body gamma doses near the LD 50/60 level. However, grazing livestock would be subjected to added beta exposure from ingested and skin retained radioactive particles. Results of attempts to simulate exposure of the Hereford cattle at Alamogardo, NM show that cattle are more sensitive to ingested fallout radiation than other species. Poultry LD 50/60 for gamma exposure is about twice the level for mammals, and swine appear to have the most efficient repair system being able to withstand the most chronic gamma exposure. Productivity of most livestock surviving an LD 50/60 exposure is temporarily reduced and longterm effects are small. Livestock are good screeners against undesirables in our diet and with the exception of radiosotopes of iodine in milk, very little fission product radioactivity would be expected to be transferred through the food chain in livestock products for humans. Feeding of stored feed or moving livestock to uncontaminated pastures would be the best protective action to follow.

  7. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP1-02: Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Kang, S; Eom, J [Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Photon-counting detectors (PCDs) allow multi-energy X-ray imaging without additional exposures and spectral overlap. This capability results in the improvement of accuracy of material decomposition for dual-energy X-ray imaging and the reduction of radiation dose. In this study, the PCD-based contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (CEDM) was compared with the conventional CDEM in terms of radiation dose, image quality and accuracy of material decomposition. Methods: A dual-energy model was designed by using Beer-Lambert’s law and rational inverse fitting function for decomposing materials from a polychromatic X-ray source. A cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based PCD, which has five energy thresholds, and iodine solutions included in a 3D half-cylindrical phantom, which composed of 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissues, were simulated by using a Monte Carlo simulation tool. The low- and high-energy images were obtained in accordance with the clinical exposure conditions for the conventional CDEM. Energy bins of 20–33 and 34–50 keV were defined from X-ray energy spectra simulated at 50 kVp with different dose levels for implementing the PCD-based CDEM. The dual-energy mammographic techniques were compared by means of absorbed dose, noise property and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE). Results: Comparing to the conventional CEDM, the iodine solutions were clearly decomposed for the PCD-based CEDM. Although the radiation dose for the PCD-based CDEM was lower than that for the conventional CEDM, the PCD-based CDEM improved the noise property and accuracy of decomposition images. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the PCD-based CDEM allows the quantitative material decomposition, and reduces radiation dose in comparison with the conventional CDEM. Therefore, the PCD-based CDEM is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumor and enhancing diagnostic accuracy in mammography.

  8. Eighty-peak kilovoltage 16-channel multidetector computed tomography and reduced contrast-medium doses tailored to body weight to diagnose pulmonary embolism in azotaemic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmquist, Fredrik [Lund University, Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital, 205 02, Malmoe (Sweden); Nyman, Ulf [Lund University, Department of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, 23185, Trelleborg (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of minimising contrast-medium (CM) doses using 80-peak kilovoltage (kVp) 16-channel multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with CM dose tailored to body weight, when diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE) in azotaemic patients. Twenty-nine patients (68-93 years; 38-79 kg) with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 12-49 ml/min underwent 80 kVp MDCT at a median dose of 200 mg iodine (I)/kg and 15 s injection time. Pulmonary artery (PA) enhancement where compared with our own reference material using 320 mg I/kg at 120 kVp and with reported figures in the literature at 120-140 kVp and a 42 g iodine CM dose. Median (1st and 3rd quartiles) values regarding CM dose were 12.2 (9.9-12.8) g iodine; density of left main and lower lobe segmental PA 339 (275-395) Hounsfield units (HU) and 354 (321-442) HU, respectively. Those enhancement values were similar to those obtained from the reference population at 120 kVp and those reported in the literature at 120-140 kVp. One patient had a transient increase in plasma creatinine. Three months' follow-up revealed deep venous thrombosis among 1/18 patients with negative results from computed tomography (CT). We conclude that 80 kVp 16-channel MDCT to diagnose PE in azotaemic patients may be performed with markedly reduced CM doses, implying a lesser risk for CM-induced nephropathy. (orig.)

  9. Ultralow contrast medium doses at CT to diagnose pulmonary embolism in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansson, Mattias; Nyman, Ulf [Lasarettet Trelleborg, University of Lund, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Trelleborg (Sweden); Holmquist, Fredrik [Malmoe University Hospital, University of Lund, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    To analyse 80-kVp 16-MDCT in patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) and diminished renal function after a reduction in dose of contrast medium (CM) from 200 to 150 mg I/kg. Fifty patients with suspected PE and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 50 mL/min underwent 80-kVp 16-MDCT with 150 mg I/kg. Mean density/image noise (1 standard deviation) was measured in a region of interest in the left pulmonary artery (LPA) and a lower lobe segmental artery (LLSA), and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The values of LPA and LLSA were averaged. Median values/2.5-97.5 percentiles were: age 84/67-96 years, weight 65/43-84 kg, GFR 36/21-45 mL/min, CM dose 9.6/6.4-12 g of iodine, PA density 353/164-495 HU and CNR 11/4.4-20. PE incidence was 16%, and 8% and 12% of the examinations were regarded suboptimal by observer 1 and 2, respectively. Density/CNR values were within ranges reported for common 120-kVp MDCT protocols. None of 32 patients with plasma-creatinine follow-up within 1 week experienced a rise of more than 44.2 {mu}mol/L and none of 50 patients had oliguria/anuria or dialysis. None of 40 patients with a negative CT/no anticoagulation had thromboembolism during follow-up. 80-kVp MDCT combined with individualised ultralow CM doses may provide satisfactory diagnostic quality, which should be to the benefit of patients at risk of contrast medium-induced nephropathy. (orig.)

  10. The effect of different doses of isotretinoin on pituitary hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Takci, Zennure; Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Balahoroglu, Ragip; Takir, Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    There are a limited number of studies investigating the side effects and effectiveness of various doses of isotretinoin (ISO). We have previously shown that high-dose ISO affects pituitary hormones. To our knowledge, there is no study in the literature looking into the effects of various doses of ISO on pituitary hormones. We searched pituitary hormones in three groups of different doses in acne patients. We included 105 acne vulgaris patients from two different centers. We divided the patients into three groups; the first group received 0.5-1 mg/kg/day, the second 0.2-0.5 mg/kg/day and the third intermittent 0.5-1 mg/kg/day (only 1 week in 1 month) ISO treatment. Blood samples were collected for biochemistry and hormone analysis, before the treatment and after 3 months. After 3 months of treatment with ISO, luteinizing hormone (LH) (p testosterone (p < 0.001), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) (p < 0.001), cortisol (p < 0.001), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (p < 0.001), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (p = 0.002), growth hormone (GH) (p = 0.002) and free T3 (fT3) (p < 0.001) levels had decreased significantly. Furthermore, we split data into three different groups. Among the patients receiving intermittent-dose ISO, LH, ACTH, IGF-1, GH and fT3 measurements lost significance. Most of the significant measurements observed in the whole group were also significant among the patients receiving high-dose ISO. Additionally, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (p = 0.003) levels increased, and free T4 levels decreased significantly. ISO affects pituitary hormones at all of these three doses. The differences in pituitary hormones are more pronounced in high-dose treatment. The weakest effect was observed in the intermittent-dose group. Choosing lower doses of ISO may decrease side effects, however the effectiveness of the treatment may also be diminished. ISO, by affecting the PPARγ/RXR system, may affecting hormone systems. These changes in various

  11. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  12. Cost-effectiveness of iso- versus low-osmolality contrast media in outpatients with high risk of contrast medium-induced nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicaíza-Becerra, Liliana Alejandra; García-Molina, Mario; Gamboa, Óscar

    2012-06-01

    Contrast media can cause acute renal failure by direct toxic effects on the tubular cells and kidney ischemia. Diabetics and hospitalized patients have a greater risk of developing contrast-induced nephropathy than the general population. The cost effectiveness of iso and low-osmolality contrast media was assessed in high risk outpatients. The analysis was based on a systematic literature review comparing the nephrotoxic effects of iso- to low-osmolality contrast media. Only direct costs were considered; these were obtained from the official tariff manual. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, efficiency curves and acceptability curves were calculated. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed for costs and effects, as well as probabilistic analyses. Zero and 3% discounts were applied to results. The cost-effectiveness threshold was equal to the per capita GDP per life-year gained. Alternatives with Iopamidol and Iodixanol are preferable to the others, because both reduce risk of contrast-induced nephropathy and are less costly. The incremental cost-effectiveness of the Iodixanol alternative compared to the Iopamidol alternative is US$ 14,660 per additional life year gained; this is more than twice the threshold. The low-osmolality contrast medium, Iopamidol, appears to be cost-effective when compared with Iohexol or other low-osmolality contrast media (Iopromide, Iobitridol, Iomeprol, Iopentol and Ioxilan) in contrast-induced nephropathy, high-risk outpatients. The choice of the iso-osmolality contrast medium, Iodixanol, depends on its cost per vial and on the willingness to pay.

  13. Feasibility of low-volume injections of contrast material with a body weight-adapted iodine-dose protocol in 320-detector row coronary CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Inada, Yuki; Kanazawa, Shuji; Nakai, Go; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Hideaki; Takada, Haruhiko; Ashida, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Shushi; Fukumura, Katsunori; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of low-volume injections of contrast material with a body weight-adapted iodine-dose protocol in computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) using a 320-detector row scanner. Ninety-eight patients who underwent CTCA in a single heartbeat with electrocardiogram-gating were divided into two groups, receiving 0.8 mL/kg of contrast material injected at a fixed duration of 12 seconds (A; n = 48) or 0.7 mL/kg of contrast material injected at a fixed duration of 10 seconds (B; n = 50); all patients then received 20 mL of saline. Contrast densities were assessed for the ascending aorta, left ventricle, right coronary artery (RCA), and left main coronary artery (LMA). The mean flow rate was 4.00 + or - 0.56 mL/second in group A and 4.06 + or - 0.57 mL/second in group B (P = .51). There were no significant differences in the mean enhancement values of the ascending aorta, LMA and proximal RCA between the two groups. Also, there was no significant difference between the mean enhancement values at the three different levels of the RCA (proximal, middle, and distal segments) (group A; P = .27, group B; P = .07). The use of 0.7 mL/kg of contrast material injected at a fixed duration of 10 seconds was feasible for CTCA using 320-detector row CT, with a sufficient and reliable contrast enhancement in the ascending aorta and coronary artery. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Computed tomography angiography: the effect of different chaser flow rates, volumes, and fluids on contrast enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Florian F; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Keil, Sebastian; Mottaghy, Felix M; Günther, Rolf W; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to intraindividually compare the effect of different chaser flow rates, volumes, and fluids on contrast enhancement in multidetector-row computed tomography. Multidetector-row computed tomography scanning of 5 dogs was performed under standardized conditions using an adapted injection protocol to ensure an identical iodine delivery rate of 1.0 gI/s and a total iodine dose of 300 mg/kg body weight (iopromide 300 and 370). The contrast medium application was followed by a 10-mL saline chaser at different injection rates (0, 2.7, 4, 6, and 8 mL/s) or by different saline chaser volumes (0, 5, 10, and 15 mL) at a flow rate of 4 mL/s. Furthermore, different chaser fluids (NaCl, hydroxyethyl starch 10%, and Dextran 1%) with different viscosities (hydroxyethyl starch 10% and dextran 1%: 3.28 and 5.98 mPa · s at 37°C) were tested (volume: 10 mL; flow rate: 6 mL/s). Each dog was examined with each protocol. The interval between each computed tomography scan session which included 2 measurements was at least 3 days. Dynamic computed tomography scans were acquired at the level of the cephalic vein, cranial vena cava, pulmonary artery, and ascending and descending aorta. Time-enhancement curves were computed, and pulmonary and aortic peak enhancements as well as time-to-peak were analyzed. Increased saline chaser flow rates or increased saline chaser volumes resulted in increased pulmonary and aortic peak contrast enhancement. Peak enhancement was highest and significantly greater compared with no saline chaser for a flow rate of 8 mL/s (pulmonary artery: 816.8 vs. 471.5 HU, P = 0.0079; ascending aorta: 578.7 vs. 384.1 HU, P = 0.0079; descending aorta: 581.4 HU vs. 390.6 HU, P = 0.0159) and a saline volume of 15 mL (pulmonary artery: 670.2 vs. 453.5 HU, P = 0.0079; ascending aorta: 512.1 vs. 370.6 HU, P = 0.0317; descending aorta: 504.0 HU vs. 394.4 HU, P = 0.0159). No significant differences between the peak times for different saline chasers were

  15. Quantification of the effect of water exchange in dynamic contrast MRI perfusion measurements in the brain and heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Rosenbaum, S; Fritz-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of myocardial and brain perfusion when using exogenous contrast agents (CAs) such as gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) and MRI is affected by the diffusion of water between compartments. This water exchange may have an impact on signal enhancement, or, equivalently, on the longitudinal......(i)) by using a realistic simulation. These results were verified by in vivo studies of the heart and brain in humans. The conclusion is that water exchange between the vascular and extravascular extracellular space has no effect on K(i) estimation in the myocardium when a normal dose of Gd-DTPA is used. Water...... exchange can have a significant effect on perfusion estimation (F) in the brain when using Gd-DTPA, where it acts as an intravascular contrast agent....

  16. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  17. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted...

  18. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF COWPEA VARIETY, DOSE AND EXPOSURE TIME ON. BRUCHID .... of cowpea variety as well as its interactive effect with exposure .... RESULTS. Seed morphometrics and characteristics. Table. 1 shows seed morphometrics and characteristics of the cowpea varieties used for this study. KDV.

  19. Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers' performance. ... The potential performance-enhancement effect of pseudoephedrine (PSE) use has led to its prohibition in competition sports (urine concentrations >150 μg/ml). Data are, however ... Method. A double-blinded cross-over study design was used.

  20. Thermal dose requirement for tissue effect: experimental and clinical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhirst, Mark; Viglianti, Benjamin L.; Lora-Michiels, Michael; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hanson, Margaret A.

    2003-06-01

    In this review we have summarized the basic principles that govern the relationships between thermal exposure (temperature and time of exposure) and thermal damage, with an emphasis on normal tissue effects. We have also attempted to identify specific thermal dose information (for safety and injury) for a variety of tissues in a variety of species. We address the use, accuracy and difficulty of conversion of an individual time and temperature (thermal dose) to a standardized value (eg equivalent minutes at 43degC) for comparison of thermal treatments. Although, the conversion algorithm appears to work well within a range of moderately elevated temperatures (2-15degC) above normal physiologic baseline (37-39degC) there is concern that conversion accuracy does not hold up for temperatures which are minimally or significantly above baseline. An extensive review of the literature suggests a comprehensive assessment of the "thermal dose-to-tissue effect" has not previously been assembled for most individual tissues and never been viewed in a semi-comprehensive (tissues and species) manner. Finally, we have addressed the relationship of thermal dose-to-effect vs. baseline temperature. This issues is important since much of the thermal dose-to-effect information has been accrued in animal models with baseline temperatures 1-2 deg higher than that of humans.

  1. Comparison of effects of dose on image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis across multiple vendors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Amy; Santana, Maira; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    In traditional radiography and computed tomography (CT), contrast is an important measure of image quality that, in theory, does not vary with dose. While increasing dose may increase the overall contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the contrast in an image should be primarily dependent on variation in tissue density and attenuation. We investigated the behavior of all three currently FDA-approved vendors' 3D DBT systems (Siemens, Hologic, and General Electric (GE)) using the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) Model 011A Breast Phantom and found that for both Siemens and Hologic systems, contrast increased with dose across multiple repeated trials. For these two systems, experimental CNR also appeared to increase above the expected CNR, which suggests that these systems seem to have introduced post-processing by manipulation of contrast, and thus DBT data cannot be used to reliably quantify tissue characteristics. Additional experimentation with both 2D mammography and 3D DBT systems from GE in addition to the previously mentioned vendors, however, suggested that this relationship is not true for all systems. An initial comparison of contrast vs. dose showed no relationship between contrast and dose for 2D mammography, with the contrast remaining relatively constant in the dose range of 33% of the automatic exposure control setting (AEC) to 300% AEC for all three vendors. The GE DBT system also did not exhibit increased contrast with increased dose, suggesting that the behavior of 3D DBT systems is vendor-specific.

  2. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Hakim, R.; Schulman, G. [Department of Nephrology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significat activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these dsata serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  3. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae. PMID:25927361

  4. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stark

    Full Text Available Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later, to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  5. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  6. The determination of effective antiviral doses using a computer program for sigmoid dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J L; O'Brien, W J; Goldman, A I

    1984-05-01

    A computer program was designed to construct best fit sigmoid dose-response curves for determination of the dose required to reduce the yield of virus by 50%, effective antiviral dose (ED50). A single antiviral agent, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine, was examined for effectiveness against four strains of herpes simplex virus type 1. The resulting ED50 values were compared with those obtained by probit analysis. The statistical parameters obtained from sigmoid curve fit program were utilized to evaluate statistical differences between ED50 values for resistant and sensitive virus strains and to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the regression line to the data. In addition, using this analytical method, it was shown that a change in one experimental variable, i.e., multiplicity of infection, in the yield reduction assay significantly affected the apparent ED50 value. The computer program was easily utilized for analysis of data obtained from both plaque reduction and yield reduction assays and generated the parameters necessary for statistical comparison of relative antiviral activity of any antiviral agent.

  7. Post-exercise effects of cold water immersion and contrast water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-exercise effects of cold water immersion and contrast water therapy - Part 1: Acute effects of cold water immersion and passive recovery on the physical and haematological parameters in male university rugby players over a 48-hour recovery period.

  8. Effective UV radiation dose in polyethylene exposed to weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Calero Marín, S. P.; Vega-Durán, J. T.; Moreno-Virgen, R.

    2009-09-01

    In this work we quantified the effective UV radiation dose in orange and colorless polyethylene samples exposed to weather in the city of Aguascalientes, Ags. Mexico. The spectral distribution of solar radiation was calculated using SMART 2.9.5.; the samples absorption properties were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy and the quantum yield was calculated using samples reflectance properties. The determining factor in the effective UV dose is the spectral distribution of solar radiation, although the chemical structure of materials is also important.

  9. Cocaine and Pavlovian fear conditioning: dose-effect analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Suzanne C; Fay, Jonathan; Sage, Jennifer R; Anagnostaras, Stephan G

    2007-01-25

    Emerging evidence suggests that cocaine and other drugs of abuse can interfere with many aspects of cognitive functioning. The authors examined the effects of 0.1-15mg/kg of cocaine on Pavlovian contextual and cued fear conditioning in mice. As expected, pre-training cocaine dose-dependently produced hyperactivity and disrupted freezing. Surprisingly, when the mice were tested off-drug later, the group pre-treated with a moderate dose of cocaine (15mg/kg) displayed significantly less contextual and cued memory, compared to saline control animals. Conversely, mice pre-treated with a very low dose of cocaine (0.1mg/kg) showed significantly enhanced fear memory for both context and tone, compared to controls. These results were not due to cocaine's anesthetic effects, as shock reactivity was unaffected by cocaine. The data suggest that despite cocaine's reputation as a performance-enhancing and anxiogenic drug, this effect is seen only at very low doses, whereas a moderate dose disrupts hippocampus and amygdala-dependent fear conditioning.

  10. Effect of nonionic and ionic contrast media on fibrinolysis in patients undergoing angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giedrojc, J.; Radziwon, P.; Krupinski, K.; Kielpinska, K.; Galar, M.; Bielawiec, M. [Department of Hematology, Medical Academy, Bialystok (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    Radiological contrast media may influence processes of hemostasis resulting in increased thrombotic or bleeding tendency. A number of clinical case reports suggest that the use of nonionic contrast media is associated with thrombotic complications. In vitro studies have indicated that nonionic contrast media may induce generation of thrombin in blood whereas ionic contrast agents do not show such an effect. Not much is known about the effects of contrast media on the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the systemic effects of markers for activation of fibrinolysis with a nonionic contrast medium (Iopromid/Ultravist-300/Schering AG) and ionic contrast medium (Uropolinum, Polfa) in 82 patients undergoing angiography. We measured tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), using COA-SET, t-PA and COA-TEST PAI (Chromogenix). Fibrinogen concentration and euglobulin lysis time (ELT) were also estimated. Both contrast agents caused a significant decrease in fibrinogen concentrations. A marked difference was seen for PAI activity. A statistically significant increase was seen in the Iopromid group and no statistically significant rise was seen in the Uropolinum group. t-PA activity remained virtually unchanged in both groups. ELT has been significantly prolonged in patients who received Iopromid but not in those who received Uropolinum. It is likely that nonionic contrast medium could release PAI from platelets and endothelial cells. The changes in fibrinolysis may result from endothelial cell dysfunction. (author) 15 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  11. A low dose chemical mixture modulates the effect of PFNA in male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Skov, Kasper; Taxvig, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: When mathematical models are applied for assessment of chemical mixture effects, assumptions of lack of synergy or potentiation have to be made; Thus joint effects of chemicals are anticipated not to be unexpectedly high. The present investigation was designed to test whether a chemical...... mixture at human relevant doses interacts with perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by synergy or potentiation. Methods: Male rats were given PFNA at 0.0125, 0.25 or 5 mg/kg bw/day for 14 days with or without a mixture containing 12 endocrine disrupters (total dose 2.5 mg/kg bw/day), bergamottin from grapefruit...... on testes enzyme mRNA levels. These effects were similar both with and without mixture. In contrast, co-treatment with mixture increased both relative and absolute liver weights of the 5 mg/kg/day PFNA, suggesting that liver toxicity was exacerbated by the mixture. These data suggest that a chemical mixture...

  12. Effect of smoking on dose requirements for vecuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teiriä, H; Rautoma, P; Yli-Hankala, A

    1996-01-01

    We have compared the potency of vecuronium given to 12 smokers and 12 non-smokers during propofol-alfentanil-nitrous oxide anaesthesia. After obtaining individual dose-response curves, bolus doses of vecuronium were given to maintain neuromuscular block at 90-98% for 60 min. Adductor pollicis EMG was used to monitor neuromuscular block. Mean ED95 values were 61.38 micrograms kg-1 and 47.49 micrograms kg-1 for smokers and non-smokers, respectively (P < 0.01). The dose of vecuronium to maintain 90-98% neuromuscular block was 25% higher in smokers than in non-smokers (96.80 vs 72.11 micrograms kg-1 h-1; P < 0.01). These data reflect the effects of smoking on neuromuscular block induced by vecuronium. The effect may be at the receptor level, although possible increased metabolism of vecuronium in smokers cannot be excluded.

  13. Contrasting effects of different mammalian herbivores on sagebrush plant communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari E Veblen

    Full Text Available Herbivory by both grazing and browsing ungulates shapes the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, and both types of herbivory have been implicated in major ecosystem state changes. Despite the ecological consequences of differences in diets and feeding habits among herbivores, studies that experimentally distinguish effects of grazing from spatially co-occurring, but temporally segregated browsing are extremely rare. Here we use a set of long-term exclosures in northern Utah, USA, to determine how domestic grazers vs. wild ungulate herbivores (including browsers and mixed feeders affect sagebrush-dominated plant communities that historically covered ~62 million ha in North America. We sampled plant community properties and found that after 22 years grazing and browsing elicited perceptible changes in overall plant community composition and distinct responses by individual plant species. In the woody layer of the plant community, release from winter and spring wild ungulate herbivory increased densities of larger Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata, ssp. wyomingensis at the expense of small sagebrush, while disturbance associated with either cattle or wild ungulate activity alone was sufficient to increase bare ground and reduce cover of biological soil crusts. The perennial bunchgrass, bottlebrush squirretail (Elymus elymoides, responded positively to release from summer cattle grazing, and in turn appeared to competitively suppress another more grazing tolerant perennial grass, Sandberg's blue grass (Poa secunda. Grazing by domestic cattle also was associated with increased non-native species biomass. Together, these results illustrate that ungulate herbivory has not caused sagebrush plant communities to undergo dramatic state shifts; however clear, herbivore-driven shifts are evident. In a dry, perennial-dominated system where plant community changes can occur very slowly, our results provide insights into

  14. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  15. Activation of platelets by low-osmolar contrast media: differential effects of ionic and nonionic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeman, M. R.; Konijnenberg, A.; Sturk, A.; Reekers, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effects of an ionic low-osmolar contrast medium (ioxaglate) and two nonionic low-osmolar contrast media (iohexol and iopamidol) on human platelet activation in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis subsequent to reaction with fluorescence-labeled monoclonal antibodies was used to detect

  16. Effect of X-ray Contrast Media, Chlorination, and Chloramination on Zebrafish Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of X-ray Contrast Media, Chlorination, and Chloramination on Zebrafish Development Little is known about the vertebrate developmental toxicity of chlorinated or chloraminated drinking water (DW), iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM, a common contaminate of DW) or how the c...

  17. The postoperative analgesic effects of low-dose gabapentin in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Clinical studies have suggested that gabapentin may produce analgesia in postoperative patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effects of low-dose gabapentin administered during the first 24 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods. A prospective, double-blind, randomised study ...

  18. Beneficial effects of low dose Musa paradisiaca on the semen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study aimed at determining the effects of administration of mature green fruits of Musa paradisiaca on the semen quality of adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: The animals used for the study were grouped into three: the control group, given 2 ml of double distilled water, a low dose group given ...

  19. Hepatotoxic effects of low dose oral administration of monosodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is aimed at investigating the potentials of low concentration administration of monosodium glutamate in inducing hepatotoxic effects in male albino rats. Thus, monosodium glutamate at a dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight was administered to adult male albino rats by oral intubation. Treatment was daily for ...

  20. Effects of a Single Dose of Caffeine on Resting Cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of 5mg/kg body weight dose of caffeine on cardiovascular system of normal young adult males of Black African Origin. Twenty normal young adult male volunteers participated. A repeated measures 2 randomized Crosse over (counter balanced) double blind design was ...

  1. Effect of high dose thiamine therapy on activity and molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... This study was therefore designed to investigate the effect of high dose thiamine therapy on the activity and molecular aspects of transketolase in Type 2 diabetic patients. Over 100 Type 2 microalbuminuric diabetics were enrolled in a randomized, double blind placebo controlled clinical trial for 6 months.

  2. Effects of a Single Dose of Caffeine on Resting Cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Cardiovascular System of Normal Young Black. African Adults. Lamina Sikiru and Musa Danladi I. (Prof). Abstract. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of. 5mg/kg body weight dose of caffeine on cardiovascular system of normal .... Test procedure: On arrival to the exercise Physiology Laboratory of the.

  3. Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in increased oxygenated blood supply to the exercising muscles, reducing the premature onset of muscle fatigue. The total torque production of the muscles is consequently increased and may result in enhanced athletic performance.[2,3] These and other positive effects of PSE appeal to athletes, although doses ≥240 mg ...

  4. Low-dose spinal anaesthesia provides effective labour analgesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-dose spinal anaesthesia provides effective labour analgesia and does not limit ambulation. T Anabaha*, A Olufolabia,b,d, J Boydc and R Georgec,d. aSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana. bDuke University Medical Centre, Durham, NC, USA. cIWK Health Centre ...

  5. Measurement of effective dose for paediatric scoliotic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chih-I. [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); McLean, Donald [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)]. E-mail: rdmc@imag.wsahs.nsw.gov.au; Robinson, John [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Paediatric radiation dose from scoliosis X-ray examinations is of concern because of its routine nature. Few studies have calculated effective dose which is the primary indicator of radiation risk. This study reports on the use of a new flexible Monte Carlo software package PCXMC14 for such calculation from documented radiographic and patient data. Method: Patient and radiographic data were collected from 54 patient examinations for both postero-anterior (PA) and lateral X-ray projections. A spreadsheet mainly based on radiographic calibration was used to process the raw data and compute entrance air kerma for input in the PCXMC program. A partitioning model was developed to more accurately estimate the effect of an aluminium wedge filter. Results: Results showed the effective dose ranged from 81 to 123 {mu}Sv for the PA projection and 124 to 207 {mu}Sv for the lateral projection, with patient weights varying from 20 to 70 kg. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the usefulness of the PCXMC program to evaluate the effective dose in paediatric scoliosis radiography.

  6. Comparison of two dose and three dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules: cost effectiveness analysis based on transmission model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-06

    To investigate the incremental cost effectiveness of two dose human papillomavirus vaccination and of additionally giving a third dose. Cost effectiveness study based on a transmission dynamic model of human papillomavirus vaccination. Two dose schedules for bivalent or quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines were assumed to provide 10, 20, or 30 years' vaccine type protection and cross protection or lifelong vaccine type protection without cross protection. Three dose schedules were assumed to give lifelong vaccine type and cross protection. United Kingdom. Males and females aged 12-74 years. No, two, or three doses of human papillomavirus vaccine given routinely to 12 year old girls, with an initial catch-up campaign to 18 years. Costs (from the healthcare provider's perspective), health related utilities, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Giving at least two doses of vaccine seems to be highly cost effective across the entire range of scenarios considered at the quadrivalent vaccine list price of £86.50 (€109.23; $136.00) per dose. If two doses give only 10 years' protection but adding a third dose extends this to lifetime protection, then the third dose also seems to be cost effective at £86.50 per dose (median incremental cost effectiveness ratio £17,000, interquartile range £11,700-£25,800). If two doses protect for more than 20 years, then the third dose will have to be priced substantially lower (median threshold price £31, interquartile range £28-£35) to be cost effective. Results are similar for a bivalent vaccine priced at £80.50 per dose and when the same scenarios are explored by parameterising a Canadian model (HPV-ADVISE) with economic data from the United Kingdom. Two dose human papillomavirus vaccine schedules are likely to be the most cost effective option provided protection lasts for at least 20 years. As the precise duration of two dose schedules may not be known for decades, cohorts given two doses should be closely

  7. The ratios of effective dose to entrance skin dose to the air kerma for some medical sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, K.N. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Results are presented for the ratios of the effective dose to skin entrance dose and to air kerma for broad beams of radiation expected to be encountered by medical workers. These workers are monitored by the Personal Radiation Monitoring Service (PRMS) using thermoluminescent dosimeters worn at the front of the body to provide estimates of the entrance skin dose. Factors are given for converting estimates of entrance skin dose to effective dose as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1991) for beams incident on the body by one of three modes-from the front of the subject, from the back of the subject or by rotation around the subject. Additional tables are also given to calculate effective dose for these beams from a measurement of air kerma free-in-air 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, E D; Cartter, M L; Hadler, J L; Wassell, J T; Zingeser, J A; Tauxe, R V

    1994-02-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure group, P = 0.006) and greater proportions reported body aches (71 v. 85 v. 94%, P = 0.0009) and vomiting (21 v. 56 v. 57%, P = 0.002). Among 118 case-persons who completed a follow-up questionnaire, increased dose was associated with increases in median weight loss in kilograms (3.2 v. 4.5 v. 5.0, P = 0.0001), maximum daily number of stools (12.5 v. 15.0 v. 20.0, P = 0.02), subjective rating of illness severity (P = 0.0007), and the number of days of confinement to bed (3.0 v. 6.5 v. 6.5, P = 0.04). In this outbreak, ingested dose was an important determinant of the incubation period, symptoms and severity of acute salmonellosis.

  9. Dose-response effects of water supplementation on cognitive performance and mood in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Caroline J; Crosbie, Laura; Fatima, Fareeha; Hussain, Maryam; Jacob, Nicole; Gardner, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Water supplementation has been found to facilitate visual attention and short-term memory, but the dose required to improve performance is not yet known. We assessed the dose response effect of water on thirst, mood and cognitive performance in both adults and children. Participants were offered either no water, 25 ml or 300 ml water to drink. Study 1 assessed 96 adults and in Study 2, data are presented from 60 children aged 7-9 years. In both studies, performance was assessed at baseline and 20 min after drinking (or no drink); on thirst and mood scales, letter cancellation and a digit span test. For both children and adults, a large drink (300 ml) was necessary to reduce thirst, while a small drink (25 ml) was sufficient to improve visual attention (letter cancellation). In adults, a large drink improved digit span, but there was no such effect in children. In children, but not adults, a small drink resulted in increased thirst ratings. Both children and adults show dose-response effects of drinking on visual attention. Visual attention is enhanced by small amounts of fluid and appears not to be contingent on thirst reduction. Memory performance may be related to thirst, but differently for children and adults. These contrasting dose-response characteristics could imply cognitive enhancement by different mechanisms for these two domains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Mayr, Nina A; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (alpha=0.15 Gy(-1) and alpha/beta=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD2) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125I and 103Pd implants. The EUD2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125I and 103Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125I and 1.3-1.6 for 103Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  11. The effects of teaching contrastive skills of Islam and cognitive-behavioral for coping on anxiety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahnaz Asadi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effects of teaching contrastive skills of Islam originated from versus of holly book of Quran and cognitive-behavioral for coping on anxiety...

  12. Effect on thrombus growth and thrombolysis of two types of osmolar contrast media in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Pascucci, C.; Agnelli, G.; Sturk, A.; Hoek, J.; ten Cate, J. Wouter

    1990-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications have been reported after diagnostic or interventional radiological procedures. However, contrast media inhibit platelet function and blood coagulation in vitro. To investigate these characteristics in vivo, we determined the effect of nonionic and ionic low osmolar

  13. Effect of age and sex on warfarin dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury G

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ghada Khoury,1 Marwan Sheikh-Taha2 1School of Pharmacy, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Objective: We examined the potential effect of sex and age on warfarin dosing in ambulatory adult patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients attending an anticoagulation clinic. We included patients anticoagulated with warfarin for atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism who had a therapeutic international normalized ratio of 2–3 for 2 consecutive months. We excluded patients who had been on any drug that is known to have a major interaction with warfarin, smokers, and heavy alcohol consumers. Out of 340 screened medical records, 96 met the predetermined inclusion criteria. The primary outcome assessed was warfarin total weekly dose (TWD. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the TWD among the ages (P<0.01; older patients required lower doses. However there was no statistically significant difference in the TWD between sexes (P=0.281. Conclusion: Age was found to have a significant effect on warfarin dosing. Even though women did require a lower TWD than men, this observation was not statistically significant. Keywords: warfarin, INR, anticoagulation, vitamin K antagonists, age

  14. Effective dose of 3 types machines with panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Honjoya, Takashi; Sawada, Kunihiko; Satomi, Reiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Shinoda, Koji; Maruyama, Takashi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2000-01-01

    A study was done to measure and compare the organ and tissue doses of radioactivity during panoramic X-ray radiography using three types of device. The panoramic X-ray machines used were an HIDA N70-R100 (orthopantomography), a Morita Veraview (elipsopantomography), and a Philips Stat ORALIX (intra-oral tube panoramic radiography). The organs and tissues for which the radiation dose was measured were the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, lungs, stomach, large intestine, liver, esophagus, breast, bladder, eyes, brain and salivary glands. National UD-170A and UD-110S thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for measurement. These were calibrated with a standard dosimeter from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The measurements were done using a RANDO woman phantom. The effective doses were calculated as 9.1, 15.2 and 11.6 {mu}Sv by intraoral panoramic radiography of the upper, lower and lateral, respectively. The effective doses during panoramic radiography for the elipso and or ortho machines were 16.1 and 24.9 {mu}Sv, respectively. (author)

  15. Comparison of TID Effects in Space-Like Variable Dose Rates and Constant Dose Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.; McClure, Steven S.; Rax, Bernard G.; Evans, Robin W.; Jun, Insoo

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied at different TID dose rate profiles, including several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. A comparison of results following constant dose rate vs. variable dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predict the performance during a simulated space-like mission. Testing at a constant dose rate equal to the lowest dose rate seen during the simulated flare provides an extremely conservative estimate of the overall amount of degradation. A constant dose rate equal to the average dose rate is also more conservative than the variable rate. It appears that, for this part, weighting the dose rates by the amount of total dose received at each rate (rather than the amount of time at each dose rate) results in an average rate that produces an amount of degradation that is a reasonable approximation to that received by the variable rate.

  16. Effect of dosing frequency on chronic cardiovascular disease medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Craig I; Roberts, Matthew S; Sobieraj, Diana M; Lee, Soyon; Alam, Tawfikul; Kaur, Rajbir

    2012-05-01

    Many cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) require patients to take one or more long term medications, often administered multiple times a day. We sought to determine the effect of chronic CVD medication dosing frequency on medication adherence. A search of Medline and Embase from 1986 to December 2011 was performed. Included studies used a prospective design, assessed adults with chronic CVDs, evaluated scheduled oral medications administered one to four times daily, and measured adherence for ≥1 month using an electronic monitoring device. Mixed linear model meta-regression was used to determine how dosing frequency affected adherence using three definitions of increasing strictness: taking, regimen and timing adherence. A total of 29 studies, comprising 41, 29, and 27 dosing frequency arms for the taking, regimen and timing adherence definitions were included. Crude pooled adherence estimates were highest when the lenient taking definition was assessed (range for dosing frequencies: 80.1%-93.1%), and lowest when the strictest timing definition was assessed (range: 57.1%-76.3%). Upon meta-regression, the adjusted weighted mean percentage adherence for twice and three times daily dosing regimens (no studies evaluated four times daily regimens), were 6.9% and 13.7% lower than once daily regimens for the taking, 14.0% and 27.5% lower for the regimen, and 22.9% and 30.4% lower for the timing adherence definition (p adherent with once daily dosing compared with more frequently scheduled chronic CVD medication regimens. This finding is magnified when more stringent definitions of adherence are used.

  17. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, P D; Murphy, K P; Hayes, S A; Carey, K; Sammon, J; Crush, L; O'Neill, F; Normoyle, B; McGarrigle, A M; Barry, J E; Maher, M M

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). Thirty-three patients with clinically suspected renal colic were prospectively included. Conventional dose (CD-CT) and LD-CT data sets were contemporaneously acquired. LD-CT images were reconstructed with 40 %, 70 % and 90 % ASiR. Image quality was subjectively and objectively measured. Images were also clinically interpreted. Mean ED was 0.48 ± 0.07 mSv for LD-CT compared with 4.43 ± 3.14 mSv for CD-CT. Increasing the percentage ASiR resulted in a step-wise reduction in mean objective noise (p ASiR LD-CT images had higher diagnostic acceptability and spatial resolution than 90 % ASiR LD-CT images (p ASiR LD-CT with two false positives and 16 false negatives (diameter = 2.3 ± 0.7 mm) equating to a sensitivity and specificity of 72 % and 94 %. Seventy % ASiR LD-CT had a sensitivity and specificity of 87 % and 100 % for detection of calculi >3 mm. Reconstruction of LD-CT images with 70 % ASiR resulted in superior image quality than FBP, 40 % ASIR and 90 % ASIR. LD-CT with ASIR demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity for detection of calculi >3 mm. • Low-dose CT studies for urinary calculus detection were performed with a mean dose of 0.48 ± 0.07 mSv • Low-dose CT with 70 % ASiR detected calculi >3 mm with a sensitivity and specificity of 87 % and 100 % • Reconstruction with 70 % ASiR was superior to filtered back projection, 40 % ASiR and 90 % ASiR images.

  18. Effects of developer exhaustion on DFL Contrast FV-58 and Kodak Insight dental films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabiano Pachêco; da Silveira, M M F; Frazão, M A G; de Santana, S T; dos Anjos Pontual, M L

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the DFL Contrast FV-58 F-speed film (DFL Co., Rio de Janerio, Brazil) with the Kodak Insight E/F speed film (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) in fresh and exhausted processing solutions. The parameters studied were the speed, average gradient and latitude. Five samples of each type of film were exposed under standardized conditions over 5 weeks. The films were developed in fresh and progressively exhausted processing solutions. Characteristic curves were constructed from values of optical density and radiation dose and were used to calculate the parameters. An analysis of variance was performed separately for film type and time. DFL Contrast FV-58 film has a speed and average gradient that is significantly higher than Insight film, whereas the values of latitude are lower. Exhausted processing solutions were not significant in the parameters studied. DFL Contrast FV-58 film has stable properties when exhausted manual processing solutions are used and can be recommended for use in dental practice, contributing to dose reduction.

  19. [Systemic and renal effects of preventing contrast nephrotoxicity with isotonic (0.9%) and hypotonic (0.45%) saline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrón, Belén; Ruiz, Elisa; Fernández, Cristina; Almeida, Pedro; Horcajada, Cristina; Navarro, Felipe; Caramelo, Carlos

    2007-10-01

    Physiological and hypotonic saline solutions have been used interchangeably for preventing contrast media nephrotoxicity. No analysis of the possible differential effects of the two solutions on the milieu interieur or intercompartmental fluid volumes has been performed. Our aim was to study the systemic and renal effects of two types of saline solution regularly used to prevent contrast media nephrotoxicity in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Changes in electrolyte levels and volume distribution were studied in 71 individuals who were randomized to receive either 0.9% isotonic saline (n=36) or 0.45% hypotonic saline (n=35) during the 12 hours before and after contrast injection (2000 mL in each period). The creatinine level was elevated equally often in the isotonic and hypotonic saline groups. Isotonic saline administration led to reductions in hemoglobin level, hematocrit and plasma albumin level, and to increases in plasma volume, by 12.3% and 10.4% at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. These changes were significant compared with baseline measurements and compared with the group that received hypotonic saline. Neither of the two saline solutions resulted in a change in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide level. Plasma and urine osmolality decreased only with hypotonic saline. The increase in plasma creatinine level was similar with both isotonic and hypotonic saline. During standard therapy for preventing contrast media nephrotoxicity, (1) isotonic saline, but not hypotonic saline, increased plasma volume; (2) this increase did not raise the atrial natriuretic peptide level; and (3) no difference in the increase in serum creatinine level was observed between the two saline solutions. These findings provide evidence that 0.45% saline, at a dose suitable for preventing contrast media nephrotoxicity, is associated with a lower risk of volume expansion. This result is important for patients with severely impaired ventricular function.

  20. Differential effects of moderate alcohol consumption on motion and contrast processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weschke, Sarah; Niedeggen, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Although a moderate blood alcohol concentration already affects attention, an effect on early visual processing is still questionable. Using psychophysical measures and visually evoked potentials (VEP), we examined the effects of alcohol on the processing of contrast and motion features. In our tasks, two lateralized stimuli were briefly presented, and participants had to identify either the stimulus of higher contrast or motion coherence. In the contrast task, alcohol was found to decrease the discrimination ability and induced a global attenuation of VEP amplitudes. In the motion task, discrimination was not impaired. VEP amplitudes were reduced contralateral to the target position, indicating an effect of alcohol on the deployment of visuospatial attention. In sum, our data suggest that specialized areas for motion and contrast processing within the visual cortex are differently sensitive to moderate alcohol exposure. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  1. Feasibility of low-dose contrast medium high pitch CT angiography for the combined evaluation of coronary, head and neck arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Wang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of combined heart, head, and neck CT angiography (CTA using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol, compared with single coronary CTA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 151 consecutive patients were prospectively included and randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 47 underwent combined heart, neck, and head CTA using prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral (Flash scan protocol with a single-phase intravenous injection of iodinated contrast and saline flush; Group 2 (n = 51 underwent single coronary CTA with Flash scan protocol; and Group 3 (n = 53 underwent single coronary CTA with prospective sequence scan protocol. All patients were examined on a dual source CT (Definition FLASH. The image quality was determined for each CT study. RESULTS: Patients of scanning protocol Group 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant differences in age, sex, heart rates, and BMI. Evaluation of coronary artery image quality showed comparable results in the three scanning protocol groups on a per patient-based analysis. In group 1, image quality was found to be sufficient to be diagnostic in all arterial segments of carotid arteries. The mean dose-length product (DLP for group 1 was 256.3±24.5 mGy×cm and was significantly higher in comparison with group 2 (93.4±19.9 mGy×cm; p < 0.001. However, there was no significant difference of DLP between group 1 and group 3 (254.1±69.9 mGy×cm. CONCLUSIONS: The combined heart, neck, and head arteries scan using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol in 1 single examination resulted in an excellent opacification of the aorta, the carotid arteries, and the coronary arteries and provided a good image quality with low radiation dose.

  2. Effective dose efficiency: an application-specific metric of quality and dose for digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T; Dobbins, James T III; Ravin, Carl E, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the effective DQE (eDQE) are relevant metrics of image quality for digital radiography detectors and systems, respectively. The current study further extends the eDQE methodology to technique optimization using a new metric of the effective dose efficiency (eDE), reflecting both the image quality as well as the effective dose (ED) attributes of the imaging system. Using phantoms representing pediatric, adult and large adult body habitus, image quality measurements were made at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp using the standard eDQE protocol and exposures. ED was computed using Monte Carlo methods. The eDE was then computed as a ratio of image quality to ED for each of the phantom/spectral conditions. The eDQE and eDE results showed the same trends across tube potential with 80 kVp yielding the highest values and 120 kVp yielding the lowest. The eDE results for the pediatric phantom were markedly lower than the results for the adult phantom at spatial frequencies lower than 1.2-1.7 mm{sup -1}, primarily due to a correspondingly higher value of ED per entrance exposure. The relative performance for the adult and large adult phantoms was generally comparable but affected by kVps. The eDE results for the large adult configuration were lower than the eDE results for the adult phantom, across all spatial frequencies (120 and 140 kVp) and at spatial frequencies greater than 1.0 mm{sup -1} (80 and 100 kVp). Demonstrated for chest radiography, the eDE shows promise as an application-specific metric of imaging performance, reflective of body habitus and radiographic technique, with utility for radiography protocol assessment and optimization.

  3. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  4. [Doses-related effects of lynestrenol on ovulation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, M A; Thomas, K; Ferin, J

    1976-01-01

    8 women, aged 22-28, with normal, ovulatory menstrual cycles, volunteered to take different doses of Lynestrenol to determine its effects on Luteineizing Hormone (LH) secretion, and on plasma progesterone levels. Blood samples were taken in the morning and plasma was immediately separated. Results showed that body temperature varied unpredictably during the cycle, and therefore could not be considered a reliable parameter of ovulation. 0.35 mg of Lynestrenol administered daily was enough to suppress ovulation, as evidenced by the absence of LH during midcycle. Although differences exists in individual reactions, administration of Lynestrenol beyond 0.6 mg. daily always suppresses ovulation because of hypothalamo-pituitary inhibition, while doses below 0.5mg. daily can bring about episodic peaks. It is still not clear how Lynestrenol influences gonadotropins, especially LH, while intermittent bleeding seems to be the only sure side effect.

  5. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  6. Can contrast effects regulate emotions? A follow-up study of vital loss decisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    Full Text Available Although many studies focus on the how contrast effects can impact cognitive evaluations, the question of whether emotions are regulated by such contrast effects is still the subject of considerable debate, especially in the study of loss-related decisions. To address this gap in the literature, we designed three decision making loss conditions: (i both losses are trivial (TT, (ii one loss is trivial and the other loss is vital (TV, or (iii one loss is trivial and the other loss is routine (TR. In study 1, which compared the difference between the negative emotion ratings in TT and TV, we found that negative emotions were affected by the contrast effects. In study 2, which compared the difference between the importance of trivial options in TT and TV, we found that the contrast effects differentially changed the importance of trivial options in the two conditions, which in turn down-regulated negative emotions. In study 3, the impact of decision difficulty was controlled by predetermining the items to be lost. In this study, we found that, when comparing the differences between the negative emotions of losing trivial options in TV and TR, the contrast effects still modulated the loss-related emotions. We concluded that the contrast effects could down-regulate emotions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that contrast effects can alleviate negative affect in loss-related decision making. This study will enrich and extend the literature on emotion regulation theory, and it will provide a new cost-effective mitigation strategy for regulating negative emotions.

  7. Can contrast effects regulate emotions? A follow-up study of vital loss decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Qi, Yue; Liu, Xianyun; Luo, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Although many studies focus on the how contrast effects can impact cognitive evaluations, the question of whether emotions are regulated by such contrast effects is still the subject of considerable debate, especially in the study of loss-related decisions. To address this gap in the literature, we designed three decision making loss conditions: (i) both losses are trivial (TT), (ii) one loss is trivial and the other loss is vital (TV), or (iii) one loss is trivial and the other loss is routine (TR). In study 1, which compared the difference between the negative emotion ratings in TT and TV, we found that negative emotions were affected by the contrast effects. In study 2, which compared the difference between the importance of trivial options in TT and TV, we found that the contrast effects differentially changed the importance of trivial options in the two conditions, which in turn down-regulated negative emotions. In study 3, the impact of decision difficulty was controlled by predetermining the items to be lost. In this study, we found that, when comparing the differences between the negative emotions of losing trivial options in TV and TR, the contrast effects still modulated the loss-related emotions. We concluded that the contrast effects could down-regulate emotions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that contrast effects can alleviate negative affect in loss-related decision making. This study will enrich and extend the literature on emotion regulation theory, and it will provide a new cost-effective mitigation strategy for regulating negative emotions.

  8. Radiation dose in investigations on the large bowel. Comparison of radiation doses in examinations of the colon with double-contrast barium enema with the Welin modification and colonoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerdsen, J.; Moeller Pedersen, V.; Kjaergaard, H.; Nordkild, P.; Andersen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the increasing and repeated application of colonoscopy and double-contrast barium enema with the Welin modification in connection with the checking of patients who have been treated for neoplastic polyps, it has been found valuable to examine the amount of radiation that the patients are exposed to in the two kinds of examinations. The radiation dose in the examination of the colon with the Welin modification (35 examinations) and at colonoscopy (114 examinations) was, on an average, 387 and 10 mSv, respectively. Since colonoscopy gives a possibility not only of diagnosis but also of treatment, and also exposes the patients to 40 times less radiation than X-ray examination with the Welin modification, colonoscopy for diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic colonic polyps is recommended.

  9. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  10. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Lifeng; Leng Shuai; Chen Lingyun; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey E. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 Multiplication-Sign 26 cm{sup 2} torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was -15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The

  11. Effect of ketamine dose on self-rated dissociation in patients with treatment refractory anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Cameron; Gray, Andrew; Neehoff, Shona; Glue, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Patients receiving ketamine for refractory depression and anxiety report dissociative symptoms in the first 60 min post-dose. The most commonly used instrument to assess this is the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS), developed based on the assessment of patients with dissociative symptoms. Its psychometric properties for ketamine-induced dissociation have not been reported. We evaluated these from a study using 0.25-1 mg/kg ketamine and midazolam (as an active control) in 18 patients with treatment-resistant anxiety. Dissociation ratings were increased by ketamine in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, midazolam showed no effect on ratings of dissociation. For individual CADSS items, the magnitude of change and the ketamine dose at which changes were observed were not homogenous. The Cronbach alpha for the total scale was high (0.937), with acceptable item-rest correlations for almost all individual items. Purposefully removing items to maximise alpha did not lead to meaningful improvements. Acceptable internal consistency was still observed after removing items which lacked evidence of responsiveness at lower doses. The high Cronbach alpha values identified in this study suggests that the CADSS is an internally consistent instrument for evaluating ketamine-induced dissociation in clinical trials in anxiety, although it does not capture symptoms such as thought disorder.

  12. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Jay E; Smith, Ethan A; Kunisaki, Shaun M; Dillman, Jonathan R

    2015-07-01

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (reconstruction method. CTDIvol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose.

  13. Effect of anode/filter combination on average glandular dose in mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Biegala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the mean glandular doses was conducted in 100 female patients who underwent screening mammography in 2011 and 2013. Siemens Mammomat Novation with the application of the W/Rh anode/filter combination was used in 2011, whereas in 2013 anode/filter combination was Mo/Mo or Mo/Rh. The functioning of mammography was checked and the effectiveness of the automatic exposure control (AEC system was verified by measuring compensation of changes in the phantom thickness and measuring tube voltage. On the base of exposure parameters, an average glandular dose for each of 100 female patients was estimated. The images obtained by using AEC system had the acceptable threshold contrast visibility irrespective of the applied anode/filter combination. Mean glandular doses in the females, examined with the application of the W/Rh anode/filter combination, were on average 23.6% lower than that of the Mo/Mo or Mo/Rh anode/filter combinations. It is recommended to use a combination of the W/Rh anode /filter which exhibited lower mean glandular doses.

  14. [Effects of high-strip density anti-scatter grid on image quality and radiation dose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamser, G; Maier, W; Aichinger, H; Bohndorf, K

    1997-06-01

    Using a new type of a stationary high strip density grid (13/75) for plain films of the abdomen, the effect was evaluated with regard to quality and patient dose in comparison with an established moving radiographic grid (12/40). The high strip density grid (13/75) was compared with a 12/40 grid using test objects and 100 patients per each grid type for plain films of the abdomen. The examinations were carried out via the screen-film system, speed class (SC) 400. Patients' weight, age and dose measurements were recorded. The image quality was evaluated via a multi-reader study using delineation of anatomical structures and a rating scale (score 1-5 or 1-3). Both measurements with test objects and patients abdominal plain films showed a decrease in radiation dose of 17% using the 13/75 grid, and 24%, respectively. The delineation of 4 out of 7 anatomical structures was slightly reduced with the new high strip density grid (maximum score reduction: 0.4), the image contrast, as well as the radiologists' subjective rating. Apart from an acceptable loss in image quality compared with the 12/40 grid, the new high strip density grid (13/ 75) enables a clear reduction in radiation dose.

  15. Effect Of Beauveria Bassiana Doses On Spodoptera Litura Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Rini Indriyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Beauveria bassiana is a parasitic mold for insect it is commonly used as a control agent. Spodoptera litura is insect pest attacked tobacco plants in Salatiga. This studied would give analysis the effectiveness of B. Bassiana on S. litura larvae mortality with various doses. B. bassiana was obtained from Estate Crop Protection Board BPTBUN in Salatiga Central Java as dust formulation. The S. litura. larvae were obtained from tobacco farm then adapted to laboratory environment for two days before used for Bioessay. There were five different doses treatment 1g 100 mL-1 2g 100 mL-1 4g 100 mL-1 8g 100 mL-1 and 0 g 100 mL-1 as control. Each treatment used 10 larvae and repeated five times. The result showed that B. bassiana with 8 g100 mL-1 concentration was more effective to kill S.litura larvae than others doses. The important finding of this research is that B. Bassiana can be used to control S. litura larvae safely and not pollute the environment.

  16. Including getter effect in a numerical contrast calculation for micrographs: A numerical contrast calculation for electron beam induced current at gettered dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, H. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) microscopy is a very powerful technique for revealing the electrical activity of defects in semiconductors. Gettering of impurities at defects has been observed previously after certain sample heat treatments, which resulted in altered contrast patterns and line scan profiles. Getter effects have been included in a numerical or analytical contrast simulation which employ the Monte Carlo method for generating the carrier distribution. We compare the findings with an observed white contrast at misfit dislocations in EBIC micrographs. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Effects of exposure imprecision on estimation of the benchmark dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    In regression analysis failure to adjust for imprecision in the exposure variable is likely to lead to underestimation of the exposure effect. However, the consequences of exposure error for determination of safe doses of toxic substances have so far not received much attention. The benchmark...... approach is one of the most widely used methods for development of exposure limits. An important advantage of this approach is that it can be applied to observational data. However, in this type of data, exposure markers are seldom measured without error. It is shown that, if the exposure error is ignored......, then the benchmark approach produces results that are biased toward higher and less protective levels. It is therefore important to take exposure measurement error into account when calculating benchmark doses. Methods that allow this adjustment are described and illustrated in data from an epidemiological study...

  18. Glomerular filtration rate in evaluation of the effect of iodinated contrast media on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joshua; Babb, James; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the reference standard of renal function, to assess the deleterious effect of iodinated contrast media on renal function. Such an effect has been traditionally defined as a greater than 0.5-mg/dL increase in serum creatinine concentration or a 25% or greater increase 24-72 hours after the injection of iodinated contrast medium. This pilot investigation was focused on the consequences of clinically indicated IV injection of iodinated contrast media; intraarterial injection was excluded. One hundred thirteen patients with normal serum creatinine concentrations were enrolled in an approved protocol. At random, as chosen by one of the investigators, patients underwent imaging with one of three monomeric agents (iopamidol 300, iopromide 300, iohexol 300) and one dimeric agent (iodixanol 320). Measured GFR was determined immediately before CT and approximately 3 and 72 hours after the contrast injection for the CT examination. Iodinated contrast medium, a glomerular filtrate with no tubular excretion or reabsorption, was the GFR marker. Measured GFR was determined by x-ray fluorescence analysis with nonisotopic iodinated contrast media. Monomeric and dimeric contrast agents in diagnostic CT volumes (based on bodyweight and imaging protocol) did not induce a significant change in measured GFR (95% confidence by Wilcoxon test), suggesting that use of the evaluated contrast media will not lead to more than a 12% variation. The three monomeric agents studied and the one dimeric agent were equivalent in terms of lack of a significant effect on measured GFR when administered to patients with a normal GFR.

  19. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed equivalent doses to individual organs for intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu m AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and by adults. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on the way committed doses increase with the integration period is given in NRPB-M289. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  20. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  1. Beneficial effects of high dose taurine treatment in juvenile dystrophic mdx mice are offset by growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Pinniger, Gavin J; Nair, Keshav V; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disease manifested in young boys, for which there is no current cure. We have shown that the amino acid taurine is safe and effective at preventing dystropathology in the mdx mouse model for DMD. This study aimed to establish if treating growing mdx mice with a higher dose of taurine was more effective at improving strength and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Mice were treated with a dose of taurine estimated to be 16 g/kg/day, in drinking water from 1-6 weeks of age, after which in vivo and ex vivo muscle strength was assessed, as were measures of inflammation, oxidative stress and taurine metabolism. While the dose did decrease inflammation and protein oxidation in dystrophic muscles, there was no improvement in muscle strength (in contrast with benefits observed with the lower dose) and growth of the young mice was significantly restricted. We present novel data that a high taurine dose increases the cysteine content of both mdx liver and plasma, a possible result of down regulation of the taurine synthesis pathway in the liver (which functions to dispose of excess cysteine, which is toxic). These data caution that a high dose of taurine can have adverse effects and may be less efficacious than lower taurine doses. Therefore, monitoring of taurine dosage needs to be considered in future pre-clinical trials, in anticipation of using taurine as a clinical therapy for growing DMD boys (and other conditions).

  2. Beneficial effects of high dose taurine treatment in juvenile dystrophic mdx mice are offset by growth restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Terrill

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a fatal muscle wasting disease manifested in young boys, for which there is no current cure. We have shown that the amino acid taurine is safe and effective at preventing dystropathology in the mdx mouse model for DMD. This study aimed to establish if treating growing mdx mice with a higher dose of taurine was more effective at improving strength and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Mice were treated with a dose of taurine estimated to be 16 g/kg/day, in drinking water from 1-6 weeks of age, after which in vivo and ex vivo muscle strength was assessed, as were measures of inflammation, oxidative stress and taurine metabolism. While the dose did decrease inflammation and protein oxidation in dystrophic muscles, there was no improvement in muscle strength (in contrast with benefits observed with the lower dose and growth of the young mice was significantly restricted. We present novel data that a high taurine dose increases the cysteine content of both mdx liver and plasma, a possible result of down regulation of the taurine synthesis pathway in the liver (which functions to dispose of excess cysteine, which is toxic. These data caution that a high dose of taurine can have adverse effects and may be less efficacious than lower taurine doses. Therefore, monitoring of taurine dosage needs to be considered in future pre-clinical trials, in anticipation of using taurine as a clinical therapy for growing DMD boys (and other conditions.

  3. Spasmolytic effect of peppermint oil in barium during double-contrast barium enema compared with Buscopan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asao, T.; Kuwano, H.; Ide, M.; Hirayama, I.; Nakamura, J.-I.; Fujita, K.-I.; Horiuti, R

    2003-04-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of peppermint oil in barium as a spasmolytic agent during a double-contrast barium enema (DCBE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 383 DCBEs with positive results from occult blood tests were assessed. Patients were assigned to one of four groups: peppermint in barium (n=91), peppermint in tube (n=90), Buscopan (n=105), or no treatment (n=97). After a screening sigmoidoscopy, the DCBEs were performed using air as a distending gas. In the Buscopan group, the DCBE was performed with an intramuscular injection of 20 mg Buscopan at the start of the examination. Patients in the no-treatment group underwent DCBE without any spasmolytic agent. A peppermint oil preparation (30 ml) was mixed in the barium solution for patients in the peppermint-in-barium group, and the same dose of peppermint oil was included in the enema tube in the peppermint-in-tube group. The presence of spasm on a series of spot films was evaluated without information about the type of spasmolytic agent used. RESULTS: The percentage of patients in the four groups (no treatment, Buscopan, peppermint in tube, and peppermint in barium) with absence of spasm in the entire colon on the series of spot films was 13.4, 38.1, 41.8, and 37.8%, respectively. In the group using peppermint oil or Buscopan, the rate of patients with non-spasm examination was higher than that in no-treatment group (p<0.0005). Peppermint oil had the same spasmolytic effect as the systemic administration of Buscopan in the transverse and descending colon. Peppermint oil had a stronger effect in the caecum and the ascending colon than a Buscopan injection (p<0.005). There was no advantage to placing peppermint oil in the enema tube over mixing it in the barium solution. A total of 157 polyps were found during the DCBE procedures, and no differences were observed in the number of lesions among the four groups. Peppermint oil did not impair image quality. CONCLUSION: Barium solution mixed with peppermint oil

  4. Optimizing CT technique to reduce radiation dose: effect of changes in kVp, iterative reconstruction, and noise index on dose and noise in a human cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin J; Collins, Scott; Li, Baojun; Mayo-Smith, William W

    2017-06-01

    For assessment of the effect of varying the peak kilovoltage (kVp), the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique (ASiR), and automatic dose modulation on radiation dose and image noise in a human cadaver, a cadaver torso underwent CT scanning at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp, each at ASiR settings of 0, 30 and 50 %, and noise indices (NIs) of 5.5, 11 and 22. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), image noise, and attenuation values of liver and fat were analyzed for 20 data sets. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs) and liver-to-fat contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated. Values for different combinations of kVp, ASiR, and NI were compared. The CTDIvol varied by a power of 2 with kVp values between 80 and 140 without ASiR. Increasing ASiR levels allowed a larger decrease in CTDIvol and SSDE at higher kVp than at lower kVp while image noise was held constant. In addition, CTDIvol and SSDE decreased with increasing NI at each kVp, but the decrease was greater at higher kVp than at lower kVp. Image noise increased with decreasing kVp despite a fixed NI; however, this noise could be offset with the use of ASiR. The CT number of the liver remained unchanged whereas that of fat decreased as the kVp decreased. Image noise and dose vary in a complicated manner when the kVp, ASiR, and NI are varied in a human cadaver. Optimization of CT protocols will require balancing of the effects of each of these parameters to maximize image quality while minimizing dose.

  5. Dose uncertainty due to aperture effects in dynamic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, P D; Alaei, P

    2006-07-01

    Dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation therapy requires accurate modeling of the beamlets that comprise each treatment segment. Planning systems such as Varian Eclipse and Philips Pinnacle recommend measuring dose distributions and output factors for fields as small as possible, generally down to at least 2 x 2 cm2. Conventionally, we perform these measurements for regular fields, defined by the secondary collimators. In practice, it is the multileaf collimation system (MLC) that defines the intensity map and provides dynamic dose modulation in either a moving window or segmented step-and-shoot mode. For this review we have only considered the latter delivery mode. Using this method, we have studied aperture motion effects on the dynamic collimator scatter (S(c)), total scatter (S(c,p)), and phantom scatter (S(p)) factors for various combinations of collimator settings (4 x 4-14 x 40 cm2) and dynamically stepped leaf gaps (0.1 to 1.0 cm) in comparison with those for static field factors. For two different Varian linear accelerators, we found similar results in a systematic dependence of collimator scatter on gap width and collimator setting. As the gap increases from 0.1 to 1.0 cm the dynamic collimator scatter factors converge from a maximum difference of about 30% toward the static field values. At the same time, there is no measurable difference between dynamic field phantom scatter factors and those conventionally obtained for static fields. Second, we evaluated the two planning systems as to how well they account for collimator scatter by attempting to mimic the dynamic apertures used above by planning and measuring dose distributions to several small, cylindrical targets for a similar range of fixed collimator settings. We found that the ratio of measured-to-planned doses as a function of target size were similar to the measured, dynamic S(c) data for the Varian Eclipse planning system, indicating underestimation of dose for targets smaller than 1 cm

  6. Effect of Dose Rate Variation on Dose Distribution in IMRT with a Dynamic Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyoung Dal; Jae, Young Wan; Yoon, Il Kyu; Lee, Jae Hee; Yoo, Suk Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate dose distribution differences when the dose rates are randomly changed in intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a dynamic multileaf collimator. Two IMRT treatment plans including small-field and large-field plans were made using a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan had three sub-plans according to various dose rates of 100, 400, and 600 MU/min. A chamber array (2D-Array Seven729, PTW-Freiburg) was positioned between solid water phantom slabs to give measurement depth of 5 cm and backscattering depth of 5 cm. Beam deliveries were performed on the array detector using a 6 MV beam of a linear accelerator (Clinac 21EX, Varian, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with 120-leaf MLC (Millenium 120, Varian). At first, the beam was delivered with same dose rates as planned to obtain reference values. After the standard measurements, dose rates were then changed as follows: 1) for plans with 100 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min, 2) for plans with 400 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 500 and 600 MU/min, 3) for plans with 600 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Finally, using an analysis software (Verisoft 3.1, PTW-Freiburg), the dose difference and distribution between the reference and dose-rate-varied measurements was evaluated. For the small field plan, the local dose differences were -0.8, -1.1, -1.3, -1.5, and -1.6% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100 MU/min reference), +0.9, +0.3, +0.1, -0.2, and -0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 400 MU/min reference) and +1.4, +0.8, +0.5, +0.3, and +0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 MU/min, respectively (for 600 MU/min reference). On the other hand, for the large field plan, the pass-rate differences were -1.3, -1.6, -1.8, -2.0, and -2.4% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100

  7. Dose-related effects of alcohol on cognitive functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Dry

    Full Text Available We assessed the suitability of six applied tests of cognitive functioning to provide a single marker for dose-related alcohol intoxication. Numerous studies have demonstrated that alcohol has a deleterious effect on specific areas of cognitive processing but few have compared the effects of alcohol across a wide range of different cognitive processes. Adult participants (N = 56, 32 males, 24 females aged 18-45 years were randomized to control or alcohol treatments within a mixed design experiment involving multiple-dosages at approximately one hour intervals (attained mean blood alcohol concentrations (BACs of 0.00, 0.048, 0.082 and 0.10%, employing a battery of six psychometric tests; the Useful Field of View test (UFOV; processing speed together with directed attention; the Self-Ordered Pointing Task (SOPT; working memory; Inspection Time (IT; speed of processing independent from motor responding; the Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP; strategic optimization; the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART; vigilance, response inhibition and psychomotor function; and the Trail-Making Test (TMT; cognitive flexibility and psychomotor function. Results demonstrated that impairment is not uniform across different domains of cognitive processing and that both the size of the alcohol effect and the magnitude of effect change across different dose levels are quantitatively different for different cognitive processes. Only IT met the criteria for a marker for wide-spread application: reliable dose-related decline in a basic process as a function of rising BAC level and easy to use non-invasive task properties.

  8. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dos...

  9. [Properties of gas (CO2) microbubbles made by hand agitation and it's contrast enhancing effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Y; Yabuuchi, I; Ito, T

    1998-04-01

    The property of gas (CO2) microbubbles made by hand agitation and it's contrast enhancing effect of abdominal organs on gray scale ultrasound are here described. The size of microbubbles of CO2 gas adequately prepared with 5% human serum albumin was nearly 23 microns in mean diameter. However, the size and the density of gas microbubbles are affected with many factors, including mixing times, volume ratio of gas and liquid and the species of gas and liquid. On the other hand, contrast enhancing effect is determined by the size and the density of gas microbubbles. For the adequate evaluation of contrast enhancing effect of abdominal tumors by enhanced ultrasonography, the property of gas microbubbles described as above should be carefully considered.

  10. Effect of magnetic susceptibility contrast medium on myocardial signal intensity with fast gradient-recalled echo and spin-echo MR imaging: initial experience in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, H; O'Sullivan, M; Lucas, J; Wendland, M F; Saeed, M; Dulce, M C; Watson, A; Bleyl, K L; LaFrance, N D; Higgins, C B

    1994-01-01

    To show the effect of dysprosium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid bis-methylamine injection on the images of normal human myocardium. T2-sensitive fast gradient-recalled echo (GRE) (repetition time [TR], 10.8 msec; echo time [TE], 4.2 msec) and spin-echo (SE) (TR, three RR intervals; TE, 60 msec) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with driven equilibrium-preparation pulse was used to produce T2 contrast material enhancement. The contrast agent was injected into 12 healthy subjects at doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mmol/kg. Driven equilibrium-prepared GRE images showed a transient decrease of myocardial signal intensity at doses of 0.2-0.6 mmol/kg. Postcontrast T2-weighted SE images showed a myocardial signal attenuation (30%-45% decrease) at a dose of 0.4 mmol/kg or higher. Dynamic MR imaging with a magnetic susceptibility contrast medium can be used to monitor the first pass of contrast media through human myocardium with a conventional MR imager and a fast GRE sequence.

  11. TID Effects in Space-like Variable Dose Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied with different types of TID dose rates. These include several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. The varying dose rate of a solar flare is the type of real total dose exposure that a space mission might see in lunar or Martian orbit. A comparison of these types of dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predicts the performance during a simulated space-like mission.

  12. The Effect of Attention on Neuronal Responses to High and Low Contrast Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonyeol

    2010-01-01

    It remains unclear how attention affects the tuning of individual neurons in visual cerebral cortex. Some observations suggest that attention preferentially enhances responses to low contrast stimuli, whereas others suggest that attention proportionally affects responses to all stimuli. Resolving how attention affects responses to different stimuli is essential for understanding the mechanism by which it acts. To explore the effects of attention on stimuli of different contrasts, we recorded from individual neurons in the middle temporal visual area (MT) of rhesus monkeys while shifting their attention between preferred and nonpreferred stimuli within their receptive fields. This configuration results in robust attentional modulation that makes it possible to readily distinguish whether attention acts preferentially on low contrast stimuli. We found no evidence for greater enhancement of low contrast stimuli. Instead, the strong attentional modulations were well explained by a model in which attention proportionally enhances responses to stimuli of all contrasts. These data, together with observations on the effects of attention on responses to other stimulus dimensions, suggest that the primary effect of attention in visual cortex may be to simply increase the strength of responses to all stimuli by the same proportion. PMID:20538780

  13. Effect of low dose oral contraceptives on exercise performance.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryner, R W; Toffle, R C; Ullrich, I H; Yeater, R A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--to examine the effect of cycle phase or a low dose oral contraceptive on exercise performance in young women. METHODS--As controls, 15 men were tested twice by a maximal treadmill test (Vo2 max) and by an endurance run 14 d apart to determine performance variability from causes other than hormonal fluctuations. Ten women ages 18-30 were then tested for Vo2 max and endurance in the same way in both the follicular and the luteal phase (random order, ovulation assessed by sonography)....

  14. Mathematics anxiety and its effect on drug dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, W H; O'Neill, G P

    1989-10-01

    Eighty learners were randomly selected from 160 first-year nursing students enrolled in an urban community college nursing program in Ontario. They were subsequently divided into control and treatment groups to investigate the effects of different teaching methods on mathematics anxiety and the students' ability to accurately calculate fractional drug doses. The results obtained in this study indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the control and treatment groups in either mathematics anxiety levels or in arithmetic test performance. These findings counter many of those found in previous investigations. Reasons for these discrepancies are provided along with recommendations for present practice and future research.

  15. Effects of microchannel confinement on acoustic vaporisation of ultrasound phase change contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengtao; Zhang, Ge; Hau Leow, Chee; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-09-01

    The sub-micron phase change contrast agent (PCCA) composed of a perfluorocarbon liquid core can be activated into gaseous state and form stable echogenic microbubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. It has shown great promise in imaging microvasculature, tumour microenvironment, and cancer cells. Although PCCAs have been extensively studied for different diagnostic and therapeutic applications, the effect of biologically geometrical confinement on the acoustic vaporisation of PCCAs is still not clear. We have investigated the difference in PCCA-produced ultrasound contrast enhancement after acoustic activation with and without a microvessel confinement on a microchannel phantom. The experimental results indicated more than one-order of magnitude less acoustic vaporisation in a microchannel than that in a free environment taking into account the attenuation effect of the vessel on the microbubble scattering. This may provide an improved understanding in the applications of PCCAs in vivo.

  16. Effects of microchannel confinement on acoustic vaporisation of ultrasound phase change contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengtao; Zhang, Ge; Leow, Chee Hau; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-08-07

    The sub-micron phase change contrast agent (PCCA) composed of a perfluorocarbon liquid core can be activated into gaseous state and form stable echogenic microbubbles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. It has shown great promise in imaging microvasculature, tumour microenvironment, and cancer cells. Although PCCAs have been extensively studied for different diagnostic and therapeutic applications, the effect of biologically geometrical confinement on the acoustic vaporisation of PCCAs is still not clear. We have investigated the difference in PCCA-produced ultrasound contrast enhancement after acoustic activation with and without a microvessel confinement on a microchannel phantom. The experimental results indicated more than one-order of magnitude less acoustic vaporisation in a microchannel than that in a free environment taking into account the attenuation effect of the vessel on the microbubble scattering. This may provide an improved understanding in the applications of PCCAs in vivo.

  17. Effective dose and organ doses estimation taking tube current modulation into account with a commercial software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rendon, X. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, H.; Zanca, F. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, R. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the effect of including tube current modulation (TCM) versus using the average mAs in estimating organ and effective dose (E) using commercial software. Forty adult patients (24 females, 16 males) with normal BMI underwent chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) performed with TCM at 120 kVp, reference mAs of 110 (chest) and 200 (abdomen). Doses to fully irradiated organs (breasts, lungs, stomach, liver and ovaries) and E were calculated using two versions of a dosimetry software: v.2.0, which uses the average mAs, and v.2.2, which accounts for TCM by implementing a gender-specific mAs profile. Student's t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences between organ doses calculated with the two versions. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was found for E on chest and abdomen CT, with E being lower by 4.2 % when TCM is considered. Similarly, organ doses were also significantly lower (p < 0.001): 13.7 % for breasts, 7.3 % for lungs, 9.1 % for the liver and 8.5 % for the stomach. Only the dose to the ovaries was higher with TCM (11.5 %). When TCM is used, for the stylized phantom, the doses to lungs, breasts, stomach and liver decreased while the dose to the ovaries increased. (orig.)

  18. Differential effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on second-order texture contrast sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Antoine; Landy, Michael S.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    The visual system can use a rich variety of contours to segment visual scenes into distinct perceptually coherent regions. However, successfully segmenting an image is a computationally expensive process. Previously we have shown that exogenous attention—the more automatic, stimulus-driven component of spatial attention—helps extract contours by enhancing contrast sensitivity for second-order, texture-defined patterns at the attended location, while reducing sensitivity at unattended locations, relative to a neutral condition. Interestingly, the effects of exogenous attention depended on the second-order spatial frequency of the stimulus. At parafoveal locations, attention enhanced second-order contrast sensitivity to relatively high, but not to low second-order spatial frequencies. In the present study we investigated whether endogenous attention—the more voluntary, conceptually-driven component of spatial attention—affects second-order contrast sensitivity, and if so, whether its effects are similar to those of exogenous attention. To that end, we compared the effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on the sensitivity to second-order, orientation-defined, texture patterns of either high or low second-order spatial frequencies. The results show that, like exogenous attention, endogenous attention enhances second-order contrast sensitivity at the attended location and reduces it at unattended locations. However, whereas the effects of exogenous attention are a function of the second-order spatial frequency content, endogenous attention affected second-order contrast sensitivity independent of the second-order spatial frequency content. This finding supports the notion that both exogenous and endogenous attention can affect second-order contrast sensitivity, but that endogenous attention is more flexible, benefitting performance under different conditions. PMID:22895879

  19. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J [Dept. of Pediatrics, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, H [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Dept. of Bio-Convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  20. Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent from Internal Exposure to 222Rn in Ramsar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2015-05-01

    It is clear that the annual effective dose from internal exposure to 222Rn in areas of Ramsar with high levels of natural radiation was significantly higher than the maximum annual effective dose permissible for public.

  1. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  2. Native herbivore exerts contrasting effects on fire regime and vegetation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose L. Hierro; Kenneth L. Clark; Lyn C. Branch; Diego. Villarreal

    2011-01-01

    Although native herbivores can alter fire regimes by consuming herbaceous vegetation that serves as fine fuel and, less commonly, accumulating fuel as nest material and other structures, simultaneous considerations of contrasting effects of herbivores on fire have scarcely been addressed. We proposed that a colonial rodent, vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus...

  3. Mixing, Matching, and Mating: Demonstrating the Effect of Contrast on Relationship Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian P.; Gurung, Regan A. R.

    2003-01-01

    We extended earlier demonstrations of the matching phenomenon (individuals choose romantic partners who tend to match them on a variety of traits) to demonstrate several relationship issues including contrast effects, the impact of alternative mates on relationship satisfaction, and social exchange and equity theories. Students first place playing…

  4. Explaining the Effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method for Managing Interpersonal Interactions across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Hanako; Pusina, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of intercultural education comes from the limited availability of training efficacy studies. The present study focused on explaining the effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method (CCM) as an intercultural education method for managing interpersonal interactions across cultures between graduate…

  5. Spatial contrasts in air pollution and the effects on lung function in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eeftens, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the ESCAPE project (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects), we aimed to characterize and explain spatial contrasts in ambient air pollution within and between European study areas. Following a standard protocol, project partners selected “street” and

  6. First-order structure induces the 3-D curvature contrast effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, S.F. te; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    A 3-D curvature contrast effect has been reported in shading-and-texture-defined (Curran & Johnson (1996). Vision Research 36, 3641–3653) and in stereoscopically defined (te Pas, Rogers, & Ledgeway (2000). Current Psychology Letters: Brain, Beha iour and Cognition 1, 117–126) stimuli. Our

  7. Understanding the exposure-time effect on speckle contrast measurements for laser displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koji; Kubota, Shigeo

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of exposure time on speckle noise for laser displays, speckle contrast measurement method was developed observable at a human eye response time using a high-sensitivity camera which has a signal multiplying function. The nonlinearity of camera light sensitivity was calibrated to measure accurate speckle contrasts, and the measuring lower limit noise of speckle contrast was improved by applying spatial-frequency low pass filter to the captured images. Three commercially available laser displays were measured over a wide range of exposure times from tens of milliseconds to several seconds without adjusting the brightness of laser displays. The speckle contrast of raster-scanned mobile projector without any speckle-reduction device was nearly constant over various exposure times. On the contrary to this, in full-frame projection type laser displays equipped with a temporally-averaging speckle-reduction device, some of their speckle contrasts close to the lower limits noise were slightly increased at the shorter exposure time due to the noise. As a result, the exposure-time effect of speckle contrast could not be observed in our measurements, although it is more reasonable to think that the speckle contrasts of laser displays, which are equipped with the temporally-averaging speckle-reduction device, are dependent on the exposure time. This discrepancy may be attributed to the underestimation of temporal averaging factor. We expected that this method is useful for evaluating various laser displays and clarify the relationship between the speckle noise and the exposure time for a further verification of speckle reduction.

  8. Effects of a moderate evening alcohol dose. II: performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Tracy L; Acebo, Christine; Seifer, Ronald; Carskadon, Mary A

    2007-08-01

    This second of a pair of papers investigates the effects of a moderate dose of alcohol and staying up late on driving simulation performance and simple visual reaction time (RT) at a known circadian phase in well-rested young adults. Twenty-nine adults (9 males), ages 21 to 25 years, spent 1 week on an at-home stabilization schedule of 8.5 to 9 hours, followed by 3 nonconsecutive nights in-lab: adaptation, placebo, and alcohol. Performance task practice occurred on 3 occasions before the study. Alcohol (vodka; 0.54 g/kg men; 0.49 g/kg women mixed with tonic) was consumed over 30 minutes ending 1 hour before normal bedtime; the same quantity of beverage was given on placebo. Driving simulation (with drive-only and dual-task drive and subtract components) and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) testing occurred before and after alcohol/placebo ingestion. Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) readings were taken before all test sessions. Saliva samples were taken approximately every 30 minutes to determine circadian phase. Driving simulation and PVT variables significantly deteriorated with increasing time awake. Driving simulator lane variability was worse with alcohol compared with placebo at 15.5 hours awake. No PVT variable showed an effect of alcohol. Driving simulation performance deteriorated with extended waking and with alcohol; driving was most impaired at the peak alcohol level. The PVT, less complex than the driving simulation, did not show effects of alcohol, a finding consistent with previous literature that disruptive effects of low alcohol concentrations increase with task complexity. Overall, simulated driving performance is significantly impaired late at night when even a moderate dose of alcohol is consumed.

  9. [Side effects and contrast medium resorption of iopamidol and iocarmate in lumbar myelography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeter, P; Bergleiter, R; Schneider, I; Kubina, F G

    1982-12-01

    Lumbar myelographies were carried out with lopamidol and locarmat of identical concentrations of iodine in 2 groups of 20 patients each. In about one-third of the cases, clinical side effects and EEG changes were found after the examination without difference with the exception of one seizure and one state of confusion which occurred only after locarmat. Resorption of the contrast media was judged by CT examinations of the lumbar spine and the head. There was a more rapid decrease of lumbar contrast density in patients with a narrow lumbar sac which was accompanied by a more rapid intracranial accumulation of the contrast medium. This may be due to a more active transport of cerebrospinal fluid in this group of patients.

  10. Highly magnetic iron carbide nanoparticles as effective T(2) contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoming; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zijian; Chi, Xiaoqin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM(-1) S(-1), which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM(-1) S(-1)). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications.

  11. Ultraviolet-photoelectric effect for augmented contrast and resolution in electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Seniutinas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new tool providing material contrast control in scanning electron microscopy (SEM is demonstrated. The approach is based on deep-UV illumination during SEM imaging and delivers a novel material based contrast as well as higher resolution due to the photoelectric effect. Electrons liberated from illuminated sample surface contribute to the imaging which can be carried out at a faster acquisition rate, provide material selective contrast, reduce distortions caused by surface charging, and can substitute metal coating in SEM. These features provide high fidelity SEM imaging and are expected to significantly improve the performance of electron beam instruments as well as to open new opportunities for imaging and characterization of materials at the nanoscale.

  12. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kimori@orion.ac.jp [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 5-1 Higashiyama, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method.

  13. Corticosteroids in acute severe asthma: effectiveness of low doses.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowler, S D; Mitchell, C. A.; Armstrong, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the need for corticosteroids in acute severe asthma is well established the appropriate dose is not known. METHODS: The response to intravenous hydrocortisone 50 mg (low dose), 100 mg (medium dose), and 500 mg (high dose), administered every six hours for 48 hours and followed by oral prednisone, was compared in patients with acute asthma in a double blind randomised study. After initial emergency treatment with bronchodilators subjects received oral theophylline or intra...

  14. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Keskin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence exists that enoxaparin can reduce brain injury because of its anticoagulant activity. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury, at 20 minutes after modeling, male BALB/c mouse models of cold-induced traumatic brain injury were intraperitoneally administered 3 and 10 mg/kg enoxaparin or isotonic saline solution. Twenty-four hours later, enoxaparin at 10 mg/kg greatly reduced infarct volume, decreased cell apoptosis in the cortex and obviously increased serum level of total antioxidant status. By contrast, administration of enoxaparin at 3 mg/kg did not lead to these changes. These findings suggest that enoxaparin exhibits neuroprotective effect on cold-induced traumatic brain injury in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Mantovani, Fernanda B; Taylor, Polly M; Dixon, Mike J; Luna, Stelio P L

    2009-11-01

    The dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous (IV) buprenorphine were evaluated in cats. Thermal (TT) and mechanical threshold (MT) devices were used for nociceptive stimulation. After baseline threshold recordings, buprenorphine was administered IV (0.01, 0.02 or 0.04 mg/kg; B1, B2 and B4, respectively) in a randomised, blinded and cross-over study. Data were analysed by ANOVA (P<0.05) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). TT increased 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.2+/-2.7 degrees C), 2, 3 and 4 h after B1; 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.1+/-3.9 degrees C) and 2 h after B2, and 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.4+/-3.3 degrees C), 2, 3, 6 and 8 h after B4. MT increased 15 and 45 min after B2 (260+/-171 mmHg), and 30 (209+/-116 mmHg) and 45 min and 1 and 2 h after B4. At 45 min, MT values were significantly higher after B2 compared to B1 (P<0.05). With MT, B2 and B4 produced more antinociception and longer duration of action than B1, respectively. No dose response to thermal stimulation was detected.

  16. Estimation of mean glandular dose for contrast enhanced digital mammography: factors for use with the UK, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2014-05-07

    The UK, European and IAEA protocols for breast dosimetry in mammography use tabulations of conversion factors, which relate measurements of incident air kerma to the mean glandular dose to the breast. To supplement the existing tabulations, a Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate conversion factors for the high-energy spectra used for contrast enhanced digital mammography. The calculations were made for the x-ray spectra from a tungsten target (tube voltage range 40-50 kV) filtered by 0.28, 0.30 and 0.32 mm of copper, and from molybdenum and rhodium targets (tube voltage range 40-49 kV), each filtered by 0.30 mm of copper. The g-factors for all of these spectra were plotted for each breast thickness as a function of half value layer (HVL) and were found to lie on smooth curves within 0.3%. These reflect the fact that the characteristic x-rays present in the spectra from molybdenum and rhodium are heavily filtered and all the spectra are essentially Bremsstrahlung. As a consequence, the s-factor previously used in the dosimetry protocols to adjust for different target/filter combinations can be taken as unity for all of the spectra considered. Tables of g-factors and c-factors are provided for breast thicknesses in the range 20-110 mm and HVLs in the range 2.4-3.6 mm of aluminium. The tables of c-factors are given for breast glandularities in the range 0.1%-100% and for typical glandularities for women in the age bands 40-49 and 50-64 attending the UK national breast screening programme.

  17. Estimation of mean glandular dose for contrast enhanced digital mammography: factors for use with the UK, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2014-05-01

    The UK, European and IAEA protocols for breast dosimetry in mammography use tabulations of conversion factors, which relate measurements of incident air kerma to the mean glandular dose to the breast. To supplement the existing tabulations, a Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate conversion factors for the high-energy spectra used for contrast enhanced digital mammography. The calculations were made for the x-ray spectra from a tungsten target (tube voltage range 40-50 kV) filtered by 0.28, 0.30 and 0.32 mm of copper, and from molybdenum and rhodium targets (tube voltage range 40-49 kV), each filtered by 0.30 mm of copper. The g-factors for all of these spectra were plotted for each breast thickness as a function of half value layer (HVL) and were found to lie on smooth curves within 0.3%. These reflect the fact that the characteristic x-rays present in the spectra from molybdenum and rhodium are heavily filtered and all the spectra are essentially Bremsstrahlung. As a consequence, the s-factor previously used in the dosimetry protocols to adjust for different target/filter combinations can be taken as unity for all of the spectra considered. Tables of g-factors and c-factors are provided for breast thicknesses in the range 20-110 mm and HVLs in the range 2.4-3.6 mm of aluminium. The tables of c-factors are given for breast glandularities in the range 0.1%-100% and for typical glandularities for women in the age bands 40-49 and 50-64 attending the UK national breast screening programme.

  18. Bayesian designs of phase II oncology trials to select maximum effective dose assuming monotonic dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beibei; Li, Yisheng

    2014-07-29

    For many molecularly targeted agents, the probability of response may be assumed to either increase or increase and then plateau in the tested dose range. Therefore, identifying the maximum effective dose, defined as the lowest dose that achieves a pre-specified target response and beyond which improvement in the response is unlikely, becomes increasingly important. Recently, a class of Bayesian designs for single-arm phase II clinical trials based on hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative prior densities has been proposed and shown to outperform common Bayesian designs based on posterior credible intervals and common frequentist designs. We extend this and related approaches to the design of phase II oncology trials, with the goal of identifying the maximum effective dose among a small number of pre-specified doses. We propose two new Bayesian designs with continuous monitoring of response rates across doses to identify the maximum effective dose, assuming monotonicity of the response rate across doses. The first design is based on Bayesian hypothesis tests. To determine whether each dose level achieves a pre-specified target response rate and whether the response rates between doses are equal, multiple statistical hypotheses are defined using nonlocal alternative prior densities. The second design is based on Bayesian model averaging and also uses nonlocal alternative priors. We conduct simulation studies to evaluate the operating characteristics of the proposed designs, and compare them with three alternative designs. In terms of the likelihood of drawing a correct conclusion using similar between-design average sample sizes, the performance of our proposed design based on Bayesian hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative priors is more robust than that of the other designs. Specifically, the proposed Bayesian hypothesis test-based design has the largest probability of being the best design among all designs under comparison and the smallest probability of

  19. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  20. Comparative Effect of Contrast Media Type on the Incidence of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, John; Wilson, Renee F; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Zhang, Allen; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Turban, Sharon; Choi, Michael J; Sherrod, Cheryl; Hutfless, Susan; Iyoha, Emmanuel E; Bass, Eric B

    2016-03-15

    Iodine contrast media are essential components of many imaging procedures. An important potential side effect is contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). To compare CIN risk for contrast media within and between osmolality classes in patients receiving diagnostic or therapeutic imaging procedures. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Clinical Trials.gov, and Scopus through June 2015. Randomized, controlled trials that reported CIN-related outcomes in patients receiving low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) or iso-osmolar contrast media for imaging. Independent study selection and quality assessment by 2 reviewers and dual extraction of study characteristics and results. None of the 5 studies that compared types of LOCM reported a statistically significant or clinically important difference among study groups, but the strength of evidence was low. Twenty-five randomized, controlled trials found a slight reduction in CIN risk with the iso-osmolar contrast media agent iodixanol compared with a diverse group of LOCM that just reached statistical significance in a meta-analysis (pooled relative risk, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.65 to 0.99]; P = 0.045). This comparison's strength of evidence was moderate. In a meta regression of randomized, controlled trials of iodixanol, no relationship was found between route of administration and comparative CIN risk. Few studies compared LOCM. Procedural details about contrast administration were not uniformly reported. Few studies specified clinical indications or severity of baseline renal impairment. No differences were found in CIN risk among types of LOCM. Iodixanol had a slightly lower risk for CIN than LOCM, but the lower risk did not exceed a criterion for clinical importance. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  1. Effect of Vaccinium arctostaphylos L. Ointment in Contrast of Zinc Oxide in Secondary Healing of Postsurgical Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rezaei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin wound healing is very significant physiological procedure. It is quite obvious that promoting this healing is important too. One of the most popular compounds used ever for skin care is Vaccinium arctostaphylos essential oil. In this study we tried to compare the effects of V. arctostaphylos and zinc oxide on secondary intentioned open-wound healing in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 75 male rats included in 5 groups: eucerin, zinc oxide, Vaccinium extract 10 and 20%, not treated. The whole operation was taking place under general anesthesia circumstances. Took photos continuously 21 days after wound creation and catch biopsy intervals were 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. Wounds areas are measured by Scion Image ™ software. At last, all data were analyzed using SPSS-17. Results: As a result V. arctostaphylos with dose of 20% has significant healing properties compared to zinc oxide. These data were validating under confidence surface of 99% (p<0.01. Conclusion: Base on earned data it will be suitable to use of zinc oxide ointment for healing reason but there is opportunity to researcher to survey higher dose of this plant extraction in contrast of zinc oxide.

  2. Resource Letter EIRLD-2: Effects of Ionizing Radiation at Low Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard

    2012-04-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on people at low doses. Journal articles, books and web pages are provided for the following: data at high dose levels, effects of moderate to high doses (leukemia, solid cancer, lung cancer, childhood cancer, and non-cancer outcomes), effects of dose rate, relationship to background, supra linearity and hormesis, and policy implications.

  3. Renal Protective Effect of Probucol in Rats with Contrast-Induced Nephropathy and its Underlying Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Wei, Ri-Bao; Li, Qing-Ping; Yang, Xi; Li, Ping; Huang, Meng-Jie; Wang, Rui; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2015-09-26

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) refers to acute renal damage that occurs after the use of contrast agents. This study investigated the renal protective effect of probucol in a rat model of contrast-induced nephropathy and the mechanism of its effect. Twenty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control group, model group, N-acetylcysteine(NAC) group, and probucol group. We used a rat model of iopromide-induced CIN. One day prior to modeling, the rats received gavage. At 24 h after the modeling, blood biochemistry and urine protein were assessed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured in renal tissue. Kidney sections were created for histopathological examination. The model group of rats showed significantly elevated levels of blood creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24-h urine protein, histopathological scores, and parameters of oxidative stress (Preduce kidney damage caused by contrast agent. The underlying mechanism may be that probucol accelerates the recovery of renal function and renal pathology by reducing local renal oxidative stress.

  4. Abdominal vascular and visceral parenchymal contrast enhancement in MDCT: Effects of injection duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuge, Yusuke, E-mail: tsugeu@cup.ocn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, 590 Kobityo Shimokobi, Minokamo City, Gifu 505-8503 (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Miyoshi, Toshiharu [Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Onozuka, Minoru [Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka (Japan); Moriyama, Noriyuki [Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tsukiji (Japan); Bae, Kyongtae T. [Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of short and long injection durations on aortic, pancreatic and hepatic enhancement in abdominal MDCT. Methods and materials: Triphasic contrast-enhanced CT images (16-MDCT, 1.25-mm collimation, 5-mm thickness, 6.1-s acquisition time for each phase) were obtained with 2 mL/kg injection of 300 mgI/mL iodine contrast material in 116 patients. Patients were prospectively randomized into two groups: one receiving contrast medium for 25-s injection duration and the other for 35-s injection duration. In both groups, triphasic scans were initiated 5, 15, and 40 s after the completion of contrast injection for the first, second and third phases, respectively. CT values (HU) in the abdominal aorta, liver, spleen, pancreas, splenic and superior mesenteric arteries, and veins (splenic, superior mesenteric, portal, and hepatic) were measured. Quantitative and qualitative analysis for the degree of contrast enhancement between the two groups in various organs was compared at each scan phase. Results: The aortic and arterial enhancements in the first-phase scan were higher for the 25-s group than those of the 35-s group (P < .001). Hepatic enhancement was higher for the 35-s group in the first (P < .001) and second (P < .01) phases, but no difference in the third-phase. No difference was found between the groups for the pancreatic enhancement at any phases. Qualitative results were in good agreement with quantitative results. Conclusion: Contrast administration with shorter injection duration increased peak aortic and arterial enhancement and contributed to improvement in the quality of CT angiograms, but for the solid abdominal organs 35-s protocol is recommended.

  5. Alcohol and cirrhosis: dose--response or threshold effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Grønbaek, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: General population studies have shown a strong association between alcohol intake and death from alcoholic cirrhosis, but whether this is a dose-response or a threshold effect remains unknown, and the relation among alcohol misusers has not been studied. METHODS: A cohort of 6152...... alcohol misusing men and women aged 15-83 were interviewed about drinking pattern and social issues and followed for 84,257 person-years. Outcome was alcoholic cirrhosis mortality. Data was analyzed by means of Cox-regression models. RESULTS: In this large prospective cohort study of alcohol misusers...... there was a 27 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in men and a 35 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in women compared to the Danish population. Number of drinks per day was not significantly associated with death from alcoholic cirrhosis, since there was no additional risk of death...

  6. Paradoxical facilitatory effect of low-dose alcohol consumption on memory mediated by NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev-Zylinska, Maggie L; During, Matthew J

    2007-09-26

    Epidemiological studies have suggested a negative correlation between alcohol intake and Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, ethanol negatively modulates NMDA receptor function. We hypothesized that chronic moderate alcohol intake leads to improved memory via adaptive responses in the expression of NMDA receptors and downstream signaling. We fed liquid diets containing no, moderate, or high amounts of ethanol to control and matched rats with hippocampal knock-down of the NR1 subunit. Rats with increased hippocampal NR1 expression were also generated to determine whether they had a phenotype similar to that of ethanol-fed animals. We found that moderate ethanol intake improved memory, increased NR1 expression, and changed some aspects of neurotrophin signaling. NR1 knock-down prevented ethanol's facilitatory effects, whereas hippocampal NR1 overexpression mimicked the effect of chronic low-dose ethanol intake on memory. In contrast, high-dose ethanol reduced neurogenesis, inhibited NR2B expression, and impaired visual memory. In conclusion, adaptive changes in hippocampal NMDA receptor expression may contribute to the positive effects of ethanol on cognition.

  7. Dose-dependent effects of atorvastatin on myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbarash O

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Olga Barbarash, Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Ekaterina Belik, Yulia Dyleva, Victoria KaretnikovaFederal State Budgetary Institution, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, the Russian Federation Background: Dyslipidemia is a key factor determining the development of both myocardial infarction (MI and its subsequent complications. Dyslipidemia is associated with endothelial dysfunction, activation of inflammation, thrombogenesis, and formation of insulin resistance. Statin therapy is thought to be effective for primary and secondary prevention of complications associated with atherosclerosis.Methods: This study examined 210 patients with Segment elevated MI (ST elevated MI who were treated with atorvastatin from the first 24 hours after MI. Group 1 (n=110 were given atorvastatin 20 mg/day. Group 2 (n=100 were given atorvastatin 40 mg/day. At days 1 and 12 after MI onset, insulin resistance levels determined by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, lipid profiles, and serum glucose, insulin, adipokine, and ghrelin levels were measured.Results: Free fatty acid levels showed a sharp increase during the acute phase of MI. Treatment with atorvastatin 20 mg/day, and especially with 40 mg/day, resulted in a decrease in free fatty acid levels. The positive effect of low-dose atorvastatin (20 mg/day is normalization of the adipokine status. Administration of atorvastatin 20 mg/day was accompanied with a statistically significant reduction in glucose levels (by 14% and C-peptide levels (by 38%, and a decrease in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index on day 12.Conclusion: Determination of atorvastatin dose and its use during the in-hospital period and subsequent periods should take into account changes in biochemical markers of insulin resistance and adipokine status in patients with MI.Keywords: myocardial infarction, statin, insulin resistance, adipokines

  8. More Dose-dependent Side Effects with Mercaptopurine over Azathioprine in IBD Treatment Due to Relatively Higher Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekman, Mark M T J; Coenen, Marieke J H; van Marrewijk, Corine J; Wanten, Geert J A; Wong, Dennis R; Verbeek, Andre L M; Klungel, Olaf H; Hooymans, Piet M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Derijks, Luc J J; de Jong, Dirk J

    2017-10-01

    There are substantial global differences in the preference for mercaptopurine (MP) or its prodrug azathioprine (AZA) as first-choice thiopurine to treat inflammatory bowel diseases. Studies comparing both agents are scarce. Our aim was to compare AZA and MP in thiopurine-naive patients with inflammatory bowel disease for the frequency of side effects and efficacy. Post hoc analysis of the "Thiopurine response Optimization by Pharmacogenetic testing in Inflammatory bowel disease Clinics" (TOPIC) trial, in which thiopurine-naive patients with inflammatory bowel disease with an indication for a thiopurine were randomized for a genotype-based dose versus standard of care. For this study, Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated to compare AZA and MP for discontinuation rates within 5 months, incidence of hepatotoxicity, leukopenia, and gastrointestinal side effects. Treatment efficacy was compared by logistic regression. Patient characteristics were similar for patients treated with AZA (n = 494, 64.4%) and MP (n = 273, 35.6%), yet patients with MP were relatively higher dosed compared with those on AZA. Discontinuation rates within 5 months were not different, 39.3% (AZA) and 38.1% (MP), HR 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.17; P = 0.50); however, patients on MP were more often subjected to dose reductions (30% versus 14%, P < 0.01). Higher rates of hepatotoxicity, HR 1.93 (95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.76; P < 0.01) and leukopenia, HR 2.55 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-4.30; P < 0.01) were observed with MP, which annulled in a secondary analysis with adjustment for the higher dose and metabolite levels. Patients treated with MP were relatively higher dosed, which resulted in more dose-dependent side effects and a higher rate of dose reductions.

  9. Dose effects of raw soybean flour on pancreatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R G; Crass, R A; Oates, P S

    1986-01-01

    Raw soya flour (RSF) feeding to rats produces pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and, if sufficiently prolonged, the spontaneous development of pancreatic neoplasms and the potentiation of pancreatic carcinogens. With continuous exposure to RSF the threshold dose for pancreatic growth is approximately 20% RSF, but the threshold for the other effects has not been defined. If 100% RSF is fed for less than 24 weeks continuously the effects on the pancreas are completely reversible, but feeding for longer than this leads to irreversible progression to pancreatic adenoma and carcinoma over the next 50-70 weeks. Repeated alternation of the diet between 100% RSF and rat chow for prolonged periods leads to effects on the pancreas at least as marked as those seen with continuous RSF feeding. This occurs with RSF feeding for periods as short as 2 days out of 7. The effects seen in the rat must be applied to human nutrition with caution, but it is suggested that infants fed soya based milk substitutes and fad dieters who frequently radically alter dietary composition may be more susceptible to spontaneous or carcinogen-induced pancreatic neoplasms.

  10. Concentration rather than dose defines the local brain toxicity of agents that are effectively distributed by convection-enhanced delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Saito, Ryuta; Mano, Yui; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-01-30

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has been developed as a potentially effective drug-delivery strategy into the central nervous system. In contrast to systemic intravenous administration, local delivery achieves high concentration and prolonged retention in the local tissue, with increased chance of local toxicity, especially with toxic agents such as chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, the factors that affect local toxicity should be extensively studied. With the assumption that concentration-oriented evaluation of toxicity is important for local CED, we evaluated the appearance of local toxicity among different agents after delivery with CED and studied if it is dose dependent or concentration dependent. Local toxicity profile of chemotherapeutic agents delivered via CED indicates BCNU was dose-dependent, whereas that of ACNU was concentration-dependent. On the other hand, local toxicity for doxorubicin, which is not distributed effectively by CED, was dose-dependent. Local toxicity for PLD, which is extensively distributed by CED, was concentration-dependent. Traditional evaluation of drug induced toxicity was dose-oriented. This is true for systemic intravascular delivery. However, with local CED, toxicity of several drugs exacerbated in concentration-dependent manner. From our study, local toxicity of drugs that are likely to distribute effectively tended to be concentration-dependent. Concentration rather than dose may be more important for the toxicity of agents that are effectively distributed by CED. Concentration-oriented evaluation of toxicity is more important for CED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of gamma-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Pradeep K. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Department of Management Science, U.P. Technical University, Lucknow 226021 (India); Jha, Rakhi [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Ch. C.S. University, Meerut 200005 (India); Gupta, B.L. [CH3/56 Kendriya Vihar, Kharghar, Sector-11, Navi Mumbai-410 210 (India); Guha, Sujoy K., E-mail: guha_sk@yahoo.co [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of gamma-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min gamma-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy gamma-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  12. Effect of γ-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pradeep K.; Jha, Rakhi; Gupta, B. L.; Guha, Sujoy K.

    2010-05-01

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of γ-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG ® (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG ®. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min γ-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy γ-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  13. The use of equivalent radiation dose in the evaluation of late effects after childhood cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Irma W. E. M.; van Os, Rob M.; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; van der Pal, Helena J. H.; Koning, Caro C. E.; Caron, Huib N.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic research radiation-associated late effects after childhood cancer are usually analyzed without considering fraction dose. According to radiobiological principles, fraction dose is an important determinant of late effects. We aim to provide the rationale for using equivalent dose in

  14. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Karen Mandrup; Boberg, Julie; Isling, Louise Krag

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in food contact materials, toys, and other products. Several studies have indicated that effects observed at doses near human exposure levels may not be observed at higher doses. Many studies have shown effects on mammary glands at low doses of BPA, however, because...

  15. Significance testing of synergistic/antagonistic, dose level-dependent, or dose ratio-dependent effects in mixture dose-response analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.J.; Svendsen, C.; Bedaux, J.J.; Bongers, M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, the state of the art for effect assessment of chemical mixtures is through multiple dose¿response analysis of single compounds and their combinations. Investigating whether such data deviate from the reference models of concentration addition and/or independent action to identify

  16. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, Christina; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-10-01

    During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19-75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk-benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used.

  17. Absorbed organ and effective doses from digital intra-oral and panoramic radiography applying the ICRP 103 recommendations for effective dose estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ylhan, Betȕl; Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Ekestubbe, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Objective: During dental radiography, the salivary and thyroid glands are at radiation risk. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) updated the methodology for determining the effective dose, and the salivary glands were assigned tissue-specific weighting factors for the first time. The aims of this study were to determine the absorbed dose to the organs and to calculate, applying the ICRP publication 103 tissue-weighting factors, the effective doses delivered during digital intraoral and panoramic radiography. Methods: Thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. The organ-absorbed doses were measured at 30 locations, representing different radiosensitive organs in the head and neck, and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP recommendations. Results: The salivary glands and the oral mucosa received the highest absorbed doses from both intraoral and panoramic radiography. The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination was 15 μSv and for panoramic radiography, the effective dose was in the range of 19–75 μSv, depending on the panoramic equipment used. Conclusion: The effective dose from a full-mouth intraoral examination is lower and that from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported. Clinicians should be aware of the higher effective dose delivered during panoramic radiography and the risk–benefit profile of this technique must be assessed for the individual patient. Advances in knowledge: The effective dose of radiation from panoramic radiography is higher than previously reported and there is large variability in the delivered radiation dosage among the different types of equipment used. PMID:27452261

  18. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

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    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  19. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

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    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  20. Contrasting Effects of Vocabulary Knowledge on Temporal and Parietal Brain Structure across Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Filippi, Roberto; Harth, Helen; Price, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Using behavioral, structural, and functional imaging techniques, we demonstrate contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure in 47 healthy volunteers who ranged in age from 7 to 73 years. In the left posterior supramarginal gyrus, vocabulary knowledge was positively correlated with gray matter density in teenagers but not adults. This region was not activated during auditory or visual sentence processing, and activation was unrelated to vocabulary skills. Its gray matter density may reflect the use of an explicit learning strategy that links new words to lexical or conceptual equivalents, as used in formal education and second language acquisition. By contrast, in left posterior temporal regions, gray matter as well as auditory and visual sentence activation correlated with vocabulary knowledge throughout lifespan. We propose that these effects reflect the acquisition of vocabulary through context, when new words are learnt within the context of semantically and syntactically related words. PMID:19366285

  1. Contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure across lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M; Thomas, Michael S C; Filippi, Roberto; Harth, Helen; Price, Cathy J

    2010-05-01

    Using behavioral, structural, and functional imaging techniques, we demonstrate contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure in 47 healthy volunteers who ranged in age from 7 to 73 years. In the left posterior supramarginal gyrus, vocabulary knowledge was positively correlated with gray matter density in teenagers but not adults. This region was not activated during auditory or visual sentence processing, and activation was unrelated to vocabulary skills. Its gray matter density may reflect the use of an explicit learning strategy that links new words to lexical or conceptual equivalents, as used in formal education and second language acquisition. By contrast, in left posterior temporal regions, gray matter as well as auditory and visual sentence activation correlated with vocabulary knowledge throughout lifespan. We propose that these effects reflect the acquisition of vocabulary through context, when new words are learnt within the context of semantically and syntactically related words.

  2. Applicator Attenuation Effect on Dose Calculations of Esophageal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using EDR2 Film

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    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Daghigh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Interaluminal brachytherapy is one of the important methods of esophageal cancer treatment. The effect of applicator attenuation is not considered in dose calculation method released by AAPM-TG43. In this study, the effect of High-Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy esophageal applicator on dose distribution was surveyed in HDR brachytherapy. Materials and Methods A cylindrical PMMA phantom was built in order to be inserted by various sizes of esophageal applicators. EDR2 films were placed at 33 mm from Ir-192 source and irradiated with 1.5 Gy after planning using treatment planning system for all applicators. Results The results of film dosimetry in reference point for 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm applicators were 1.54, 1.53, 1.48, and 1.50 Gy, respectively. The difference between practical and treatment planning system results was 0.023 Gy (

  3. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti-Galdino, M K; Silva, J A da; Mendes, L C; Santos, N A da; Simas, M L B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd) as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1) no alcohol intake (control group) and 2) alcohol ingestion (experimental group). The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions.

  4. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Cavalcanti-Galdino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1 no alcohol intake (control group and 2 alcohol ingestion (experimental group. The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions.

  5. The effect of pterygium surgery on contrast sensitivity and corneal topographic changes

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    Joo Youn Oh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Joo Youn Oh, Won Ryang WeeDepartment of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, KoreaPurpose: To investigate the effect of pterygium surgery on corneal topography and contrast sensitivity.Patient and methods: The IRB approved this prospective, nonrandomized, self-controlled study. Computerized videokeratography (Orbscan II was performed in 36 patients with primary pterygia, both before and 1 month after pterygium excision with limbal-conjunctival autografting. The topographic parameters were compared. Spatial contrast sensitivity testing was performed using VCTS 6500. Differences between preoperative and postoperative values were evaluated statistically.Results: The mean Sim K astigmatism and irregularity index, significantly decreased after pterygium surgery. The mean refractive power significantly increased after the operation. The “with-the-rule” astigmatism induced by pterygium became “against-the-rule” astigmatism after pterygium removal (P = 0.041. The contrast sensitivity of 6, 12, and 18 cycles per degree, significantly increased from 1.55 ± 0.28, 0.97 ± 0.47, and 0.29 ± 0.16 to 1.72 ± 0.18, 1.21 ± 0.44, and 0.65 ± 0.48, respectively (P = 0.007, <0.001, <0.001, respectively.Conclusions: Pterygium surgery significantly reduces corneal topographic astigmatism and improves contrast sensitivity.Keywords: corneal topography, visual acuity

  6. The effect of Bangerter filters on optotype acuity, Vernier acuity, and contrast sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Naomi V; Leske, David A; Hatt, Sarah R; Adams, Wendy E; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2008-12-01

    Bangerter filters are designed to cause progressive degradation of distance optotype acuity to predicted levels (density label indicating expected decimal acuity) and are used to treat amblyopia and diplopia. Few authors have reported data regarding induced acuity deficits. We investigated the effect of Bangerter filters on distance and near optotype acuity, vernier acuity, and contrast sensitivity. Fifteen subjects with best-corrected optotype acuity of at least 20/25 in each eye were blurred sequentially in one eye with 7 Bangerter filters (densities vernier acuity, and contrast sensitivity were assessed. Mean log acuities were compared using generalized estimating equation methods. The 1.0, 0.8, and 0.4 filters degraded distance optotype acuity to a similar degree (mean 0.22, 0.23, and 0.28 logMAR). Subsequent filters progressively degraded acuity: 0.44, 0.57, 0.93, and 1.69 logMAR. Near optotype acuity was reduced in a similar pattern. Vernier acuity was minimally degraded by 1.0, 0.8, and 0.4 filters (18, 19, and 20 arcsec), followed by progressive degradation with subsequent filters (31, 35, 113, and 387 arcsec). Contrast sensitivity was minimally reduced with filters 1.0 through 0.2 and then precipitously degraded with 0.1 and vernier acuity, whereas subsequent filters cause progressive degradation. Contrast sensitivity is not markedly reduced until the 0.1 filter. These results have important implications for the use of Bangerter filters therapeutically.

  7. Effects of gadolinium-based contrast agents on thyroid hormone receptor action and thyroid hormone-induced cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis

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    Noriyuki Koibuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gadolinium (Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs are critical to the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs. We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and thyroid hormone-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. In contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3 treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−8–10−6 M augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10−5 – 10−4 M, with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10-9 M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−7 M but was suppressed by higher dose (10−5 M. Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10-9 M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10-5 M as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization

  8. Effects of low-dose versus placebo or conventional-dose postmenopausal hormone therapy on variables related to cardiovascular risk: a systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Gislaine; Bossardi Ramos, Ramon; Ziegelmann, Patrícia; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2015-03-01

    Hormone therapy (HT), the most efficient treatment for menopausal symptoms, might have deleterious cardiovascular (CV) effects. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-dose estrogen HT on CV risk factors vs conventional-dose HT and placebo in postmenopausal women with no established CV disease. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, and EMBASE were searched for trials published in 1990-2013; a hand search of reference lists of selected articles was performed; and ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for unpublished trials. Within randomized controlled trials of healthy postmenopausal women comparing low-dose HT to placebo or conventional-dose HT, 11 418 studies were initially identified. Data were independently extracted by two investigators. Disagreements were resolved by a third author. Twenty-eight trials (3360 patients) were included. Low-dose HT vs placebo or conventional-dose HT did not effect weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, C-reactive protein, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Low-dose HT was associated with lower levels of total cholesterol (-12.16 mg/dL, 95% confidence interval [CI], -17.41 - -6.92) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (-12.16 mg/dL; 95% CI, -16.55 - -7.77) vs placebo. Compared with conventional-dose HT, low-dose HT was associated with higher total cholesterol (5.05 mg/dL; 95% CI, 0.88-9.21) and LDL-C (4.49 mg/dL; 95% CI, 0.59-8.39). Low-dose HT was not associated with differences in triglycerides vs placebo. Oral, low-dose HT was associated with lower triglycerides vs conventional-dose HT (-14.09 mg/dL; 95% CI, -24.2 - -3.93). In this population of apparently healthy postmenopausal women, the effect of low-dose HT did not differ from that of placebo or conventional-dose HT regarding weight, BMI, blood pressure, CRP, or HDL-C. In contrast, low-dose HT was associated with better lipid profile vs placebo, and induced higher total and LDL-C and lower triglycerides vs conventional-dose HT.

  9. Dose-related effects of propericiazine in rats

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    Cechin E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of the neuroleptic agent propericiazine on animal models of anxiety and memory. Adult male Wistar rats (250 to 350 g received intraperitoneal injections of propericiazine (0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 mg/kg, diazepam (1 mg/kg, saline, or diazepam vehicle (20% propylene glycol and 80% saline 30 min prior to the experimental procedure. Animals (10-15 for each task were tested for step-down inhibitory avoidance (0.3-mA footshock and habituation to an open-field for memory assessment, and submitted to the elevated plus-maze to evaluate the effects of propericiazine in a model of anxiety. Animals treated with 0.075 mg/kg propericiazine showed a reduction in anxiety measures (P0.05 in the elevated plus-maze model of anxiety. Memory was not affected by propericiazine in any of the tests, but was impaired by diazepam. The results indicate a dose-related, inverse U-shaped effect of propericiazine in an anxiety model, but not on memory tasks, perhaps reflecting involvement of the dopaminergic system in the mechanisms of anxiety.

  10. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ae Ryeon [Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 {mu}Sv and 20.93 {mu}Sv, those in child mode were 462 {mu}Sv and 11.54 {mu}Sv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l {mu}Sv in adult mode, 20.14 {mu}Sv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0{sup -6} and 1.47x10{sup -6} 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  11. Estimating dose painting effects in radiotherapy: a mathematical model.

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    Juan Carlos López Alfonso

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity is widely considered to be a determinant factor in tumor progression and in particular in its recurrence after therapy. Unfortunately, current medical techniques are unable to deduce clinically relevant information about tumor heterogeneity by means of non-invasive methods. As a consequence, when radiotherapy is used as a treatment of choice, radiation dosimetries are prescribed under the assumption that the malignancy targeted is of a homogeneous nature. In this work we discuss the effects of different radiation dose distributions on heterogeneous tumors by means of an individual cell-based model. To that end, a case is considered where two tumor cell phenotypes are present, which we assume to strongly differ in their respective cell cycle duration and radiosensitivity properties. We show herein that, as a result of such differences, the spatial distribution of the corresponding phenotypes, whence the resulting tumor heterogeneity can be predicted as growth proceeds. In particular, we show that if we start from a situation where a majority of ordinary cancer cells (CCs and a minority of cancer stem cells (CSCs are randomly distributed, and we assume that the length of CSC cycle is significantly longer than that of CCs, then CSCs become concentrated at an inner region as tumor grows. As a consequence we obtain that if CSCs are assumed to be more resistant to radiation than CCs, heterogeneous dosimetries can be selected to enhance tumor control by boosting radiation in the region occupied by the more radioresistant tumor cell phenotype. It is also shown that, when compared with homogeneous dose distributions as those being currently delivered in clinical practice, such heterogeneous radiation dosimetries fare always better than their homogeneous counterparts. Finally, limitations to our assumptions and their resulting clinical implications will be discussed.

  12. THE EFFECT OF BORON DOSES ON PARICA (Schizolobium amazonicum Herb.

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    Sebastião Ferreira de Lima

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in order to evaluate the effects of boron on parica growth and on concentration and contents of macro and micronutrients indry matter of shoots and roots. Six treatments constituted by boron doses of 0.0; 0.1; 0.3; 0.9;1.5 and 2.1 mg/dm3 in four replications were used. It was evaluated the characteristics:visual diagnostic, plants height and diameter, dry matter production of shoots and roots,concentration and contents of nutrients in dry matter of shoots and roots. The symptoms ofdeficiency can be observed in new leaves and roots and the toxicity in older leaves. Bothboron deficiency and excess inhibits plants growth, but toxicity is more damaging. The Comportamento do paricá (Schizolobium amazonicum Herb. submetido ...193approximate dose of 0 Estimate of average equilibrium moisture content of wood for 26Brazilian states, by Hailwood and Harrobin one hydrate sorption theory equation.15mg/dm3 was the best for plants growth in MSPA and MSRA. The concentration of boronincreased in MSPA and MSRA with application of increasing concentration of B, with a smallreduction in concentration of MSRA from the concentration 1.9 mg/dm3. The toxicity of boronbegins when concentration reaches 36.06 mg/dm3 in shoots and 32.38 in roots. The contentsof all nutrients, except Mn and Fe in MSPA and Cu, Fe and B in MSRA, followed its own drymatter production curves.

  13. Intussusception reduction: Effect of air vs. liquid enema on radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Summer L.; Edgar, J.C.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Zhu, Xiaowei [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Magill, Dennise; Felice, Marc A. [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Both air and radiopaque liquid contrast are used to reduce ileocolic intussusception under fluoroscopy. Some suggest air lowers radiation dose due to shorter procedure times. However, air enema likely lowers radiation dose regardless of fluoroscopy time due to less density over the automatic exposure control cells. We test the hypothesis that air enema reduction of ileocolic intussusception results in lower radiation dose than liquid contrast enema independent of fluoroscopy time. We describe a role for automatic exposure control in this dose difference. We retrospectively evaluated air and liquid intussusception reductions performed on a single digital fluoroscopic unit during a 26-month period. We compared patient age, weight, gender, exam time of day and year, performing radiologist(s), radiographic image acquisitions, grid and magnification use, fluoroscopy time and dose area product. We compared categorical and continuous variables statistically using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. The mean dose area product was 2.7-fold lower for air enema, 1.3 ± 0.9 dGy.cm{sup 2}, than for liquid, 3.5 ± 2.5 dGy.cm{sup 2} (P<0.005). The mean fluoroscopy time was similar between techniques. The mean dose area product/min was 2.3-fold lower for air, 0.6 ± 0.2 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min, than for liquid, 1.4 ± 0.5 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min (P<0.001). No group differences were identified in other measured dose parameters. Fluoroscopic intussusception reduction using air enema uses less than half the radiation dose of liquid contrast enema. Dose savings are independent of fluoroscopy time and are likely due to automatic exposure control interaction. (orig.)

  14. Vessel packaging effect in laser speckle contrast imaging and laser Doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Laser speckle-based techniques are frequently used to assess microcirculatory blood flow. Perfusion estimates are calculated either by analyzing the speckle fluctuations over time as in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), or by analyzing the speckle contrast as in laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). The perfusion estimates depend on the amount of blood and its speed distribution. However, the perfusion estimates are commonly given in arbitrary units as they are nonlinear and depend on the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the optical properties in the tissue under investigation. We describe how the spatial confinement of blood to vessels, called the vessel packaging effect, can be modeled in LDF and LSCI, which affect the Doppler power spectra and speckle contrast, and the underlying bio-optical mechanisms for these effects. As an example, the perfusion estimate is reduced by 25% for LDF and often more than 50% for LSCI when blood is located in vessels with an average diameter of 40 μm, instead of being homogeneously distributed within the tissue. This significant effect can be compensated for only with knowledge of the average diameter of the vessels in the tissue.

  15. Absorbed and effective dose from periapical radiography by portable intraoral x-ray machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose and to calculate the effective dose for periapical radiography done by portable intraoral x-ray machines. 14 full mouth, upper posterior and lower posterior periapical radiographs were taken by wall-type 1 and portable type 3 intraoral x-ray machines. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed at 23 sites at the layers of the tissue-equivalent ART woman phantom for dosimetry. Average tissue absorbed dose and radiation weighted dose were calculated for each major anatomical site. Effective dose was calculated using 2005 ICRP tissue weighted factors. On 14 full mouth periapical radiographs, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 30 Sv; for portable x-ray machines were 30 Sv, 22 Sv, 36 Sv. On upper posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 4 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 3 Sv, 5 Sv. On lower posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall type x-ray machine was 5 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 4 Sv, 5 Sv. Effective doses for periapical radiographs performed by portable intraoral x-ray machines were similar to doses for periapical radiographs taken by wall type intraoral x-ray machines.

  16. A Simulation of the Effects of Receive Field Contrast on Motion-Corrected EPI Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Sheltraw, D

    2012-01-01

    The receive field of MRI imparts an image contrast which is spatially fixed relative to the receive coil. If motion correction is used to correct subject motion occurring during an EPI time series then the receiver contrast will effectively move relative to the subject and produce temporal modulations in the image amplitude. This effect, which we will call the RFC-MoCo effect, may have consequences in the analysis and interpretation of fMRI results. There are many potential causes of motion-related noise and systematic error in EPI time series and isolating the RFC-MoCo effect would be difficult. Therefore, we have undertaken a simulation of this effect to better understand its severity. The simulations examine this effect for a receive-only single-channel 16-leg birdcage coil and a receive-only 12-channel phased array. In particular we study: (1) The effect size; (2) Its consequences to the temporal correlations between signals arising at different spatial locations (spatial-temporal correlations) as is ofte...

  17. Modeling the effects of distortion, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio on stereophotogrammetric range mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Deen, Robert G.; Huffman, William C.; Willson, Reginald G.

    2016-09-01

    Stereophotogrammetry typically employs a pair of cameras, or a single moving camera, to acquire pairs of images from different camera positions, in order to create a three dimensional `range map' of the area being observed. Applications of this technique for building three-dimensional shape models include aerial surveying, remote sensing, machine vision, and robotics. Factors that would be expected to affect the quality of the range maps include the projection function (distortion) of the lenses and the contrast (modulation) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquired image pairs. Basic models of the precision with which the range can be measured assume a pinhole-camera model of the geometry, i.e. that the lenses provide perspective projection with zero distortion. Very-wide-angle or `fisheye' lenses, however (for e.g. those used by robotic vehicles) typically exhibit projection functions that differ significantly from this assumption. To predict the stereophotogrammetric range precision for such applications, we extend the model to the case of an equidistant lens projection function suitable for a very-wide-angle lens. To predict the effects of contrast and SNR on range precision, we perform numerical simulations using stereo image pairs acquired by a stereo camera pair on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Contrast is degraded and noise is added to these data in a controlled fashion and the effects on the quality of the resulting range maps are assessed.

  18. Studies of the Effects of Actuator Errors on the HCIT/PIAA Contrast Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Testbed Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (HCIT/PIAA) coronagraph system at JPL relies on an Electric-Field Conjugation (EFC) wavefront correction algorithm to obtain the required high contrast. This algorithm works with one deformable mirror (DM) to estimate the electric-field to be controlled, and with one or multiple DM's to create a "dark-hole" in the image plane. We have investigated the effects of DM actuator errors on the efficiency of the EFC algorithm. The structural design of the optical system as well as the parameters of various optical elements used in the analysis are drawn from those of the HCIT/PIAA system that have been and will be implemented with one or two DM's. The simulation takes into account the surface errors of various optical elements. In this paper, we report our findings in the case of narrowband wavelength light.

  19. Generation of composite dose and biological effective dose (BED) over multiple treatment modalities and multistage planning using deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Feygelman, Vladimir; Stevens, Craig; Forster, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are no commercially available tools to generate composite plans across different treatment modalities and/or different planning image sets. Without a composite plan, it may be difficult to perform a meaningful dosimetric evaluation of the overall treatment course. In this paper, we introduce a method to generate composite biological effective dose (BED) plans over multiple radiotherapy treatment modalities and/or multistage plans, using deformable image registration. Two cases were used to demonstrate the method. Case I was prostate cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a permanent seed implant. Case II involved lung cancer treated with two treatment plans generated on two separate computed tomography image sets. Thin-plate spline or optical flow methods were used as appropriate to generate deformation matrices. The deformation matrices were then applied to the dose matrices and the resulting physical doses were converted to BED and added to yield the composite plan. Cell proliferation and sublethal repair were considered in the BED calculations. The difference in BED between normal tissues and tumor volumes was accounted for by using different BED models, alpha/beta values, and cell potential doubling times. The method to generate composite BED plans presented in this paper provides information not available with the traditional simple dose summation or physical dose summation. With the understanding of limitations and uncertainties of the algorithms involved, it may be valuable for the overall treatment plan evaluation. 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Zooming, Colorization, and Contrast Conversion on Proximal Caries Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Valizadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Different enhancements have been used to improve the diagnostic accuracy of radiographic images in digital systems. However, the diagnostic accuracy of the effects of these enhancement options on dental caries has not been determined. Objectives This study evaluated the effects of software enhancements of zooming, colorization, and contrast conversion on the accuracy of proximal caries detection. Materials and Methods In this diagnostic in vitro trial study, 42 non-cavitated and restoration-free extracted permanent molars and premolars were selected and mounted onto 14 blocks in contact with each other. Radiographic images were obtained from the teeth in similar standardized condition using the paralleling technique. The images were shown without any enhancement or with using the options of zooming, colorization, and contrast conversion. Depth of proximal caries was determined by a radiologist using four-scaled criteria. The diagnostic accuracy of digital images that had undergone different enhancements was calculated by the chi-square test. Results The diagnostic odds of the original digital images were lower than 20 (5.7. By using the enhancement options of zooming, colorization, and contrast conversion, the diagnostic odds of the enamel proximal caries had a score of less than 20. The score was higher than 20 for proximal caries located in the outer and inner half of the dentin. Conclusions The enhancement options of zooming, colorization, and contrast conversion did not significantly influence the diagnostic accuracy of digital images in enamel caries, but they enhanced caries diagnosis/progression in the outer and inner half of the dentin.

  1. Effects of noradrenaline and adenosine triphosphate on the degree on contrast enhancement in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis during contrast-enhanced ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Deng, You-Bin; Liu, Kun; Wang, Yu-Bo

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the effects of vasoactive agents on the degree of contrast enhancement in experimental atherosclerotic plaque during contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). Abdominal aortic atherosclerosis was induced in 25 New Zealand white rabbits by a combination of cholesterol-rich diet and balloon endothelial denudation. Standard ultrasonography and CEUS were performed at baseline and during intravenous infusion of noradrenaline or adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The degree of contrast enhancement of the plaque after injection of contrast material was quantified by calculating the enhanced intensity in the plaque. The infusion of noradrenaline induced significant increase in systolic blood pressure (84 ± 13 mm Hg vs. 112 ± 20 mm Hg, p = 0.011) and significant decrease in the enhanced intensity in the plaque (7.52 ± 1.32 dB vs. 5.88 ± 1.33 dB, p < 0.001) during CEUS. The infusion of ATP resulted in the significant decrease in systolic blood pressure (80 ± 13 mm Hg vs. 65 ± 11 mm Hg, p = 0.005) and increase in the enhanced intensity in the plaque (7.52 ± 1.32 dB vs. 8.84 ± 1.55 dB, p < 0.001) during CEUS. The degree of contrast enhancement within an experimental atherosclerotic plaque during CEUS can be influenced by vasoactive agents and hemodynamic status. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Baricity of Bupivacaine on Median Effective Doses for Motor Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Quan; Chen, Chun; Li, Lin

    2017-10-01

    BACKGROUND The median effective dose (ED50) of a drug gives the amount or dose of drug needed to produce effective therapeutic response or desired effect in at least 50% of the population taking it. Our study focused on determining the ED50 required for effective motor block using hyperbaric and plain bupivacaine, and evaluated the influence of baricity on the ED50 required for motor block. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 38 patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups according to the baricity of bupivacaine: group P received plain bupivacaine and group H received hyperbaric bupivacaine. The patients were administered 0.5% plain or hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally. The dosage of anesthetics in each patient was calculated according to the standard up-down sequential allocation method of Dixon. The first patient in each group received a dose of 7.5 mg bupivacaine, and a dose of 1.0 mg was used as the testing interval. The dose was increased or decreased by 1.0 mg for each patient according to the estimated score of motor block. RESULTS The ED50 required for effective motor block in spinal anesthesia was 7.20 and 10.05 mg in groups H and P, respectively. Their relative motor blocking potency ratio was found to be 0.72. CONCLUSIONS The ED50 for motor block was significantly decreased using hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally compared with plain bupivacaine, and the baricity of bupivacaine obviously affected the ED50 for the motor block.

  3. Dose-related Effects of Salvinorin A in Humans: Dissociative, Hallucinogenic, and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Katherine A.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Reissig, Chad J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the plant Salvia divinorum, which has increased in popularity as a recreational drug over the past decade. Few human studies have examined salvinorin A. Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the dose-related effects of inhaled salvinorin A in individuals with histories of hallucinogen use. Methods Eight healthy hallucinogen-using adults inhaled up to 16 doses of salvinorin A (0.375 - 21 μg/kg) in ascending order. Physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min after administration. Qualitative subjective effects were assessed retrospectively via questionnaires at the end of sessions. Persisting effects were assessed 1 month later. Results Orderly dose-related effects peaked at 2 min and then rapidly dissipated, replicating previous findings. Subjective effects were intense, with maximal drug strength ratings or unresponsiveness frequently observed at high doses. Questionnaires assessing qualitative effects (Hallucinogen Rating Scale, Pharmacological Class Questionnaire) suggested some overlap with serotonergically mediated classic hallucinogens. Salvinorin A also produced dose-related dissociative effects and impairments in recall/recognition memory. At 1-month follow-up, there was no evidence of persisting adverse effects. Participants reported salvinorin A effects were qualitatively different from other drugs. Conclusions Salvinorin A produces a unique profile of subjective and cognitive effects, including strong dissociative effects and memory impairment, which only partially overlap with classic hallucinogen effects. Along with nonhuman studies of salvinorin A, these results are important for understanding the neurobiology of the kappa opioid system and may ultimately have important therapeutic applications. PMID:23135605

  4. Evaluation of acute toxicity and the effect of single injected doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-12

    Jul 12, 2010 ... The animals were observed continuously for clinical change and mortality. Next, zerumbone was injected in ... evaluate the effect of single doses of zerumbone on the extent of tissue damages of liver and .... Rats serum kidney markers quantified following injected dose of cisplatin and single injected doses ...

  5. Effect of different doses of urea on the uptake of cadmium from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation was conducted to study the effect of different doses of urea on cadmium uptake by canola (Brassica napus L.) applied in full and split doses. Nine different treatments of urea used were: 0 (control), 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg/ha applied to soil as full doses before sowing, and 60, 90, 120, and 150 kg/ha ...

  6. Effect of different doses of urea on the uptake of cadmium from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... The present investigation was conducted to study the effect of different doses of urea on cadmium uptake by canola (Brassica napus L.) applied in full and split doses. Nine different treatments of urea used were: 0 (control), 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg/ha applied to soil as full doses before sowing, and 60, 90,.

  7. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Té

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. METH...

  8. Enhancement of Low Contrast Images Based on Effective Space Combined with Pixel Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengfei Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Images captured in bad conditions often suffer from low contrast. In this paper, we proposed a simple, but efficient linear restoration model to enhance the low contrast images. The model’s design is based on the effective space of the 3D surface graph of the image. Effective space is defined as the minimum space containing the 3D surface graph of the image, and the proportion of the pixel value in the effective space is considered to reflect the details of images. The bright channel prior and the dark channel prior are used to estimate the effective space, however, they may cause block artifacts. We designed the pixel learning to solve this problem. Pixel learning takes the input image as the training example and the low frequency component of input as the label to learn (pixel by pixel based on the look-up table model. The proposed method is very fast and can restore a high-quality image with fine details. The experimental results on a variety of images captured in bad conditions, such as nonuniform light, night, hazy and underwater, demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  9. Development of a fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculation in treatment planning and feasibility study of high contrast portal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Keivan

    A fast and accurate treatment planning system is essential for radiation therapy and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques produce the most accurate results for dose calculation in treatment planning. In this work, we developed a fast Monte Carlo code based on pre-calculated data (PMC, Pre-calculated Monte Carlo) for applications in radiation therapy treatment planning. The PMC code takes advantage of large available memory in current computer hardware for extensive generation of pre-calculated data. Primary tracks of electrons are generated in the middle of homogeneous materials (water, air, bone, lung) and with energies between 0.2 and 18 MeV using the EGSnrc code. Secondary electrons are not transported but their position, energy, charge and direction are saved and used as a primary particle. Based on medium type and incident electron energy, a track is selected from the pre-calculated set. The performance of the method is tested in various homogeneous and heterogeneous configurations and the results were generally within 2% compared to EGSnrc but with a 40-60 times speed improvement. The limitations of various techniques for the improvement of speed and accuracy of particle transport have been evaluated. We studied the obstacles for further increased speed ups in voxel based geometries by including ray-tracing and particle fluence information in the pre-generated track information. The latter method leads to speed-increases of about a factor of 500 over EGSnrc for voxel-based geometries. In both approaches, no physical calculation is carried out during the runtime phase after the pre-generated data has been stored even in the presence of heterogeneities. The pre-calculated data is generated for each particular material and this improves the performance of the pre-calculated Monte Carlo code both in terms of accuracy and speed. The PMC is also extended for proton transport in radiation therapy. The pre-calculated data is based on tracks of 1000 primary protons using

  10. Effects of a moderate evening alcohol dose. I: sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Tracy L; Acebo, Christine; Van Reen, Eliza; Carskadon, Mary A

    2007-08-01

    Few studies examining alcohol's effects consider prior sleep/wake history and circadian timing. We examined introspective and physiological sleepiness on nights with and without moderate alcohol consumption in well-rested young adults at a known circadian phase. Twenty-nine adults (males=9), ages 21 to 25 years (M=22.6, SD=1.2), spent 1 week on an at-home stabilized sleep schedule (8.5 or 9 hours), followed by 3 in-lab nights: adaptation, placebo, and alcohol. Alcohol (vodka; 0.54 g/kg for men; 0.49 g/kg for women) or placebo beverage was consumed over 30 minutes ending 1 hour before stabilized bedtime. In addition to baseline, 3 sleep latency tests (SLTs) occurred after alcohol/placebo ingestion (15, 16.5, and 18 hours after waking). Stanford Sleepiness Scales (SSS) and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) of sleepiness were completed before each SLT and approximately every 30 minutes. The Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) was administered a total of 4 times (baseline, 5, 60, and 90 minutes postalcohol/placebo). Subjects' circadian phase was determined from melatonin levels in saliva samples taken at approximately 30-minute intervals. All sleepiness and sedation measures increased with time awake. Only SSS and BAES sedation measures showed higher levels of sleepiness and sedation after alcohol compared with placebo. The mean circadian phase was the same for assessments at both conditions. Alcohol did not increase physiological sleepiness compared with placebo nor was residual sedation evident under these conditions. We conclude that the effects on sleepiness of a moderate dose of alcohol are masked when sleep-wake homeostatic and circadian timing influences promote high levels of sleepiness.

  11. Dedicated breast CT: effect of adaptive filtration on dose distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work was experimental investigations of the breast dose distributions with adaptive filtration. Adaptive filtration reduces detector dynamic range and improves image quality. The adaptive filter with predetermined shape is placed at the x-ray beam such that the x-ray intensity at the detector surface is flat. However, adaptive filter alters the mean dose to the breast, as well as volume distribution of the dose. Methods: The dose was measured using a 14 cm diameter cylindrical acrylic breast phantom. An acrylic adaptive filter was fabricated to match the 14 cm diameter of the phantom. The dose was measured using ion chamber inserted into holes distributed along the radius of the phantom from the center to the edge. The radial distribution of dose was measured and fitted by an analytical function and the volume distribution and mean value of dose was calculated. The measurements were performed at 40, 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages and 6.6 mGy air kerma. Results: The adaptive filt...

  12. Appropriate Use of Effective Dose in Radiation Protection and Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell R; Fahey, Frederic H

    2017-08-01

    Effective dose was introduced by the ICRP for the single, over-arching purpose of setting limits for radiation protection. Effective dose is a derived quantity or mathematical construct and not a physical, measurable quantity. The formula for calculating effective dose to a reference model incorporates terms to account for all radiation types, organ and tissue radiosensitivities, population groups, and multiple biological endpoints. The properties and appropriate applications of effective dose are not well understood by many within and outside the health physics profession; no other quantity in radiation protection has been more confusing or misunderstood. According to ICRP Publication 103, effective dose is to be used for "prospective dose assessment for planning and optimization in radiological protection, and retrospective demonstration of compliance for regulatory purposes." In practice, effective dose has been applied incorrectly to predict cancer risk among exposed persons. The concept of effective dose applies generally to reference models only and not to individual subjects. While conceived to represent a measure of cancer risk or heritable detrimental effects, effective dose is not predictive of future cancer risk. The formula for calculating effective dose incorporates committee-selected weighting factors for radiation quality and organ sensitivity; however, the organ weighting factors are averaged across all ages and both genders and thus do not apply to any specific individual or radiosensitive subpopulations such as children and young women. Further, it is not appropriate to apply effective dose to individual medical patients because patient-specific parameters may vary substantially from the assumptions used in generalized models. Also, effective dose is not applicable to therapeutic uses of radiation, as its mathematical underpinnings pertain only to observed late (stochastic) effects of radiation exposure and do not account for short-term adverse

  13. Additional effective dose by patients undergoing NAI-131 capsules therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, M.; Jovanovic, M.; Spasic Jokic, V.; Cuknic, O.; Ilic, Z.; Vranjes Djuric, S. [VINCA - Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2006-07-01

    Capsules or solutions containing Na{sup 131}I are indicated for the therapy of some thyroid carcinomas such as functioning metastatic papillary or follicular carcinoma of the thyroid; and for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (diffuse toxic goiter and single or multiple toxic nodular goiter). The recommended dosage ranges of Na{sup 131}I capsules or solution for the therapy of the average patient (70 kg) are: (3.7-5.55) GBq for ablation of normal thyroid tissue; (3.7-7.4) GBq for subsequent treatments; a (148-370) MBq for hyperthyroidism. The purpose of this paper is to calculate effective dose as a result of iodine-131 capsules remaining in stomach before absorption starts. This result can determine the disadvantage of capsule versus solution containing sodium iodine-131 (Na{sup 131}I) in radionuclide therapy application from radiation protection point of view. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to model transport of gamma and beta particles emitted by radionuclide {sup 131}I treated as a point source at the bottom of stomach. Absorbed energy per unit transformation in stomach and surrounding organs has been calculated. (authors)

  14. Effect of Intravenous Administration of Contrast Media on Serum Creatinine Levels in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Maria A; White, Ammie M; Edgar, J Christopher; Pradhan, Madhura; Raab, Elisabeth L; Meyer, James S

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of intravenous contrast media on renal function in neonates. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained with waiver of consent. Electronic health records from January 2011 to April 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Measures of renal function were obtained in inpatient neonates who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or computed tomography (CT) and for whom serum creatinine (Cr) levels were obtained within 72 hours before imaging and at least one time after imaging (>1 day after administration of contrast material). A total of 140 neonates who received contrast material (59 who underwent CT with iohexol or iodixanol and 81 who underwent MR imaging with gadopentetate dimeglumine) were identified. These neonates were frequency matched according to sex, gestational and postnatal age, and preimaging serum Cr levels with neonates who underwent unenhanced MR imaging or CT. Cr levels and glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) were grouped according to when they were obtained (before imaging, 1-2 days after imaging, 3-5 days after imaging, 6-9 days after imaging, 10-45 days after imaging, and more than 45 days after imaging). Serum Cr levels and GFRs for each time period were compared between groups by using hierarchic regressions or χ 2 or Fisher exact tests and with repeated-measures analysis of variance to compare groups on the rate of change in serum Cr levels and GFRs from before to after imaging. Results Cr levels decreased and GFRs increased in both groups from before to after imaging (CT group, P ≤ .01; MR imaging group, P ≤ .01). The neonates who underwent contrast material-enhanced imaging and the neonates who underwent unenhanced imaging showed similar serum Cr levels at all examined time periods. Groups also did not differ in the proportion of neonates with serum Cr levels higher than the reference range (>0.4 mg/dL) at any time point (iodine- [P > .12] or gadolinium-based [P > .13] contrast

  15. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  16. Cumulative effective dose associated with radiography and CT of adolescents with spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemburg, Stefan P; Peters, Soeren A; Roggenland, Daniela; Nicolas, Volkmar; Heyer, Christoph M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the quantity and distribution of cumulative effective doses in diagnostic imaging of adolescents with spinal injuries. At a level 1 trauma center from July 2003 through June 2009, imaging procedures during initial evaluation and hospitalization and after discharge of all patients 10-20 years old with spinal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative effective doses for all imaging studies were calculated, and the doses to patients with spinal injuries who had multiple traumatic injuries were compared with the doses to patients with spinal injuries but without multiple injuries. The significance level was set at 5%. Imaging studies of 72 patients (32 with multiple injuries; average age, 17.5 years) entailed a median cumulative effective dose of 18.89 mSv. Patients with multiple injuries had a significantly higher total cumulative effective dose (29.70 versus 10.86 mSv, p cumulative effective dose to multiple injury patients during the initial evaluation (18.39 versus 2.83 mSv, p cumulative effective dose. Adolescents with spinal injuries receive a cumulative effective dose equal to that of adult trauma patients and nearly three times that of pediatric trauma patients. Areas of focus in lowering cumulative effective dose should be appropriate initial estimation of trauma severity and careful selection of CT scan parameters.

  17. Effect of DM Actuator Errors on the WFIRST/AFTA Coronagraph Contrast Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shi, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The WFIRST/AFTA 2.4 m space telescope currently under study includes a stellar coronagraph for the imaging and the spectral characterization of extrasolar planets. The coronagraph employs two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to compensate for phase and amplitude errors in creating dark holes. DMs are critical elements in high contrast coronagraphs, requiring precision and stability measured in picometers to enable detection of Earth-like exoplanets. Working with a low-order wavefront-sensor the DM that is conjugate to a pupil can also be used to correct low-order wavefront drift during a scientific observation. However, not all actuators in a DM have the same gain. When using such a DM in low-order wavefront sensing and control subsystem, the actuator gain errors introduce high-spatial frequency errors to the DM surface and thus worsen the contrast performance of the coronagraph. We have investigated the effects of actuator gain errors and the actuator command digitization errors on the contrast performance of the coronagraph through modeling and simulations, and will present our results in this paper.

  18. EFFECT OF SEDATION ON CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF THE SPLEEN IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Federica; Fina, Caroline; Stock, Emmelie; Vanderperren, Katrien; Duchateau, Luc; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2016-05-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the spleen enables the dynamic assessment of the perfusion of this organ, however, both subjective and quantitative evaluation can be strongly influenced by sedative agent administration. The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to test effects of two sedative agents on splenic perfusion during contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the spleen in a sample of healthy dogs. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the spleen was repeated in six healthy Beagles following a cross-over study design comparing three protocols: awake, butorphanol 0.2 mg/Kg intramuscular (IM), and dexmedetomidine 500 μg/m(2) IM. After intravenous injection of a phospholipid stabilized sulfur hexafluoride microbubble solution (SonoVue®, Bracco Imaging, Milano, Italy), the enhancement intensity and perfusion pattern of the splenic parenchyma were assessed and perfusion parameters were calculated. Normal spleen was slightly heterogeneous in the early phase, but the parenchyma was homogeneous at a later phase. Sedation with butorphanol did not modify perfusion of the spleen. Dexmedetomidine significantly reduced splenic enhancement, providing diffuse parenchymal hypoechogenicity during the entire examination. Measured parameters were significantly modified, with increased arrival time (AT; (dogs. Short-term and diffuse heterogeneity of the spleen in the early venous phase was determined to be a normal finding. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Maturation-Related Effect of Low-Dose Plyometric Training on Performance in Youth Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jason; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Todd, Oliver; Collison, Jay; Parry, Dave A

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this intervention study was to investigate if a low-dose of plyometric training (PT) could improve sprint and jump performance in groups of different maturity status. Male youth field hockey players were divided into Pre-PHV (from -1 to -1.9 from PHV; Experimental: n = 9; Control = 12) and Mid-PHV (0 to +0.9 from PHV; Experimental: n = 8; Control = 9) groups. Participants in the experimental groups completed 60 foot contacts, twice-weekly for 6 weeks. PT exerted a positive effect (effect size: 0.4 [-0.4-1.2]) on 10 m sprint time in the experimental Mid-PHV group but this was less pronounced in the Pre-PHV group (0.1 [-0.6-0.9]). Sprint time over 30 m (Mid-PHV: 0.1 [-0.8-0.9]; Pre-PHV: 0.1 [-0.7-0.9]) and CMJ (Mid-PHV: 0.1 [-0.8-0.9]; Pre-PHV: 0.0 [-0.7-0.8]) was maintained across both experimental groups. Conversely, the control groups showed decreased performance in most tests at follow up. Between-group analysis showed positive effect sizes across all performance tests in the Mid-PHV group, contrasting with all negative effect sizes in the Pre-PHV group. These results indicate that more mature hockey players may benefit to a greater extent than less mature hockey players from a low-dose PT stimulus. Sixty foot contacts, twice per week, seems effective in improving short sprint performance in Mid-PHV hockey players.

  20. Antisecretory effect and oral pharmacokinetics following low dose omeprazole in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, C W; Forrest, J A; Meredith, P A; Reid, J L

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single and repeated doses of omeprazole 10 mg on gastric secretion were studied in a group of six healthy subjects. Single doses had no significant effect on basal or stimulated acid output. After 7 days of treatment, there was a 93.1% reduction in basal acid output (P less than 0.02) and a 66.5% reduction in stimulated output (P less than 0.01). Pepsin output was not affected. Systemic availability of omeprazole, as reflected in the AUC, increased significantly (P less than 0.05) with repeated dosing. Low doses of omeprazole can produce substantial reductions in acid output after repeated dosing. PMID:3929808

  1. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J.; Poulsen, P.; Kuncic, Z.; Keall, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2-10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT cone beam computed tomography pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy.

  2. Morphine sparing effect of low dose ketamine during patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCIA) of low dose morphine plus ketamine with morphine. Design: Double blind case control study. Setting: Academic hospital. Patients: Thirty-six patients scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly divided into two groups to ...

  3. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification - a quantitative and qualitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolar, Dieter H.; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W. [Diagnostikum Graz-Suedwest, Graz (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p {<=} 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p {<=} 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p {<=} 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement. (orig.)

  4. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification--a quantitative and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolar, Dieter H; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W

    2010-09-01

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p < or = 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p < or = 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p < or = 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement.

  5. Effective Dose of Positioning Scans for Five CBCT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    became apparent that some patients received multiple full scans as well as multiple previews, and these events were counted as well for the...Dentofacial Orthopedics 2013;143(6):784-792. 5. Qu XM, Li G, Sanderink GCH, Zhang ZY, Ma XC. Dose reduction of cone beam CT scanning for the entire oral...Dentofacial Orthopedics 2013;144(6):802-817. 15. Wang AS, Stayman JW, Otake Y, Vogt S, Kleinszig G, Khanna AJ, Gallia GL, Siewerdsen JH. Low-dose

  6. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in-situ measurement of indoor and outdoor radiation dose rate at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching hospital was done using well calibrated radiation meter (Radalert-100). The minimum and maximum indoor gamma dose rate were found to be 121.8 ±4.02 nGyh-1 and 200.1±5.06 nGyh-1 respectively while the ...

  7. Effects of monthly dose and regular dosing of intravenous active vitamin D use on mortality among patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Peter, Wendy L; Li, Shuling; Liu, Jiannong; Gilbertson, David T; Arneson, Thomas J; Collins, Allan J

    2009-02-01

    To determine if apparent protective mortality benefits of intravenous active vitamin D in patients undergoing hemodialysis extend across all groups defined by dialysis duration; if higher monthly dose and dosing regularity are associated with reduced mortality; and if intravenous active vitamin D use is associated with reduced cardiovascular, infectious, and cancer-related mortality. Retrospective cohort study. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services End-Stage Renal Disease database. A total of 193,830 patients undergoing hemodialysis during 1999-2000, of whom 94,208 (48.6%) were taking intravenous active vitamin D in the baseline period. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effects of monthly vitamin D dose and dosing regularity over 3-month intervals on risk of all-cause and cause-specific death, by dialysis duration groups (or=5 yrs from dialysis initiation). Models were adjusted for baseline characteristics, time-varying hospital days, monthly epoetin alfa dose, mean hemoglobin level, and urea reduction ratio in the 3-month intervals. Maximum follow-up time was 5.25 years. Adjusted all-cause mortality risk was reduced 7-17% among patients receiving vitamin D each month of the 3-month interval, with the highest reduction among patients with shorter dialysis duration. However, regular vitamin D dosing did not show consistent benefit across dialysis duration groups for cardiovascular, infectious, cancer, or other (all deaths not attributable to cardiovascular disease, infection, or cancer) mortality. Mortality benefits of intravenous vitamin D cannot be easily explained by currently proposed biologic mechanisms. Randomized controlled trials are needed to show definitively whether intravenous vitamin D can reduce all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients undergoing dialysis compared with placebo.

  8. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bohic, Sylvain [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38000 Grenoble (France); INSERM U-836 (Team 6: Synchrotron Radiation and Medical Research), Grenoble Institut of Neuroscience, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  9. Total ionizing dose effects in multiple-gate field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardin, Marc; Marcandella, Claude; Martinez, Martial; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Richard, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    This paper focuses on total ionizing dose (TID) effects induced in multiple-gate field-effect transistors. The impact of device architecture, geometry and scaling on the TID response of multiple-gate transistors is reviewed in both bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. These innovating devices exhibit specific ionizing dose responses which strongly depend on their three-dimensional nature. Their TID responses may look like the one usually observed in planar two-dimensional bulk or SOI transistors, but multiple-gate devices can also behave like any other CMOS device.

  10. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    torque increased 18-29% (P muscle fibers hypertrophied 20% (P muscles is highly responsive......Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well...... as neural and muscular adaptations in women with chronic neck muscle pain. A group of employed women (n = 42) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10-wk randomized controlled trial; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles, general fitness training performed as leg...

  11. Atypical focal non-neoplastic brain changes in neurofibromatosis type 1: mass effect and contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raininko, R. [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Radiology, Uppsala University (Sweden); Thelin, L. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Gaevle County Hospital (Sweden); Eeg-Olofsson, O. [Dept. of Women' s and Children' s Health, Section of Pediatrics, Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Abstract Children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 often have small high-signal foci on T2-weighted images of the brain. We describe follow-up of two patients in whom one of the foci had atypical features, commonly regarded as signs of a neoplasm. In the first, one lesion showed temporary contrast enhancement and decreasing mass effect. The second developed an expanding lesion that increased minimally in size over 4.5 year's follow-up. The borderline between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions seems to be indistinct. (orig.)

  12. Dose-effect relationships for individual pelvic floor muscles and anorectal complaints after prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Hopman, Wim P M; van Lin, Emile N J Th; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2012-06-01

    To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤ 30 Gy to the IAS; ≤ 10 Gy to the EAS; ≤ 50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤ 40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are excluded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan, E-mail: r.smeenk@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Aswin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hopman, Wim P.M. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  14. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or

  15. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy(-1)) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was risk ratio of 1.06 (95% CI 0.30, 1.83) for solid cancer mortality and 0.58 (95% CI 0.10, 1.06) for mortality + incidence data. The

  16. Estimating effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing interventional radiology procedures using anthropomorphic phantoms and MOSFET dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Nelson; Gordon, Christopher L; Thomas, Karen; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective doses received by pediatric patients during interventional radiology procedures and to present those doses in "look-up tables" standardized according to minute of fluoroscopy and frame of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Organ doses were measured with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters inserted within three anthropomorphic phantoms, representing children at ages 1, 5, and 10 years, at locations corresponding to radiosensitive organs. The phantoms were exposed to mock interventional radiology procedures of the head, chest, and abdomen using posteroanterior and lateral geometries, varying magnification, and fluoroscopy or DSA exposures. Effective doses were calculated from organ doses recorded by the MOSFET dosimeters and are presented in look-up tables according to the different age groups. The largest effective dose burden for fluoroscopy was recorded for posteroanterior and lateral abdominal procedures (0.2-1.1 mSv/min of fluoroscopy), whereas procedures of the head resulted in the lowest effective doses (0.02-0.08 mSv/min of fluoroscopy). DSA exposures of the abdomen imparted higher doses (0.02-0.07 mSv/DSA frame) than did those involving the head and chest. Patient doses during interventional procedures vary significantly depending on the type of procedure. User-friendly look-up tables may provide a helpful tool for health care providers in estimating effective doses for an individual procedure.

  17. Salient stimuli in advertising: the effect of contrast interval length and type on recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G Douglas

    2002-09-01

    Salient auditory stimuli (e.g., music or sound effects) are commonly used in advertising to elicit attention. However, issues related to the effectiveness of such stimuli are not well understood. This research examines the ability of a salient auditory stimulus, in the form of a contrast interval (CI), to enhance recall of message-related information. Researchers have argued that the effectiveness of the CI is a function of the temporal duration between the onset and offset of the change in the background stimulus and the nature of this stimulus. Three experiments investigate these propositions and indicate that recall is enhanced, providing the CI is 3 s or less. Information highlighted with silence is recalled better than information highlighted with music.

  18. Fluence to Effective Dose and Effective Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients foe Photons from 50 KeV to 10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Pelliccioni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati; Pillon, M. [Associazione EUROATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati. Rome (Italy)

    1996-07-01

    Effective dose equivalent and effective dose per unit photon fluence have been calculated by the FLUKA code for various geometrical conditions of irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom placed in a vacuum. Calculations have been performed for monoenergetic photons of energy ranging from 50 keV to 10 GeV. The agreement with the results of other authors, when existing, is generally very satisfactory.

  19. Effects of High-Dose Capsaicin on TMD Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B.K.; Fillingim, R.B.; Lee, S.; Brao, R.; Price, D.D.; Neubert, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a complex musculoskeletal disorder that presents with pain, limited jaw opening, and abnormal noises in the temporomandibular joint. Despite the significant impact that TMD has in terms of suffering and financial burden, relatively few new treatments have emerged; therefore, development of novel treatments to treat TMD pain remains a high priority. The rationale of this study was to use a double-blind, vehicle-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a high-concentration (8%) capsaicin cream on TMD. This is based on the hypothesis that targeting TRP vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) for pain control may provide a novel method for pain relief in TMD patients. TRPV1 is primarily expressed on a population of nociceptive-specific neurons and provides a candidate target for the development of pain treatments. Capsaicin is the primary agonist for TRPV1 and has been used previously in relatively low doses (0.025% to 0.075%) as a therapeutic for a variety of pain disorders, including postherpetic neuralgia and osteoarthritis; however, analgesic efficacy remains equivocal. TMD and healthy control subjects were assigned to either an active capsaicin or vehicle control group. The treatments were applied for 2 h and then removed. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was completed prior to drug application (baseline), 2 h after drug application, and 1 wk later. Perceived pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) following capsaicin or vehicle cream application. Significantly lower pain was reported in the week after application in the capsaicin-treated TMD subjects. For QST measures, there was a decreased thermal pain threshold 2 h after capsaicin application for both the control and TMD groups, but this resolved within a week. Capsaicin had no effect on pressure pain threshold or mechanical sensitivity in both TMD and healthy individuals. This study demonstrates that 8% topical capsaicin therapy is a

  20. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  1. A Challenge to Scientific Risk Estimation on Health Effects of Low Dose Radiation - An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ono

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Although experimental as well as epidemiological studies have revealed the health effects of ionizing radiation, most of our knowledge is for high doses of radiation, while little is known for low doses. For practical purposes, we estimate the risk of low dose radiation by extrapolating the effects at high doses to low doses in a linear relationship. However, several lines of evidence have accumulated in recent years that suggest this linear extrapolation is not necessarily correct and needs further scientific evaluation. Today, many scientists in the field are striving to understand the biological responses to low dose radiation. This work will provide new and perhaps convincing data which are necessary for risk estimation of low dose radiation. Here, I overview the background of the issue.

  2. The therapeutic effect of high-dose esomeprazole on stress ulcer bleeding in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li-Hong; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yan, Zhi-Hui; He, Xing; Gong, San-Dong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of different doses of intravenous esomeprazole on treating trauma patients with stress ulcer bleeding. A total of 102 trauma patients with stress ulcer bleeding were randomly divided into 2 groups: 52 patients were assigned to the high-dose group who received 80 mg intravenous esomeprazole, and then 8 mg/h continuous infusion for 3 days; 50 patients were assigned to the conventional dose group who received 40 mg intravenous esomeprazole sodium once every 12 h for 72 h. Compared with the conventional dose group, the total efficiency of the high-dose group and conventional dose group was 98.08% and 86.00%, respectively (p esomeprazole have good hemostatic effects on stress ulcer bleeding in trauma patients. The high-dose esomeprazole is better for hemostasis.

  3. Effect of design specifications in dose-finding trials for combination therapies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Gosho, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    Model-based dose-finding methods for a combination therapy involving two agents in phase I oncology trials typically include four design aspects namely, size of the patient cohort, three-parameter dose-toxicity model, choice of start-up rule, and whether or not to include a restriction on dose-level skipping. The effect of each design aspect on the operating characteristics of the dose-finding method has not been adequately studied. However, some studies compared the performance of rival dose-finding methods using design aspects outlined by the original studies. In this study, we featured the well-known four design aspects and evaluated the impact of each independent effect on the operating characteristics of the dose-finding method including these aspects. We performed simulation studies to examine the effect of these design aspects on the determination of the true maximum tolerated dose combinations as well as exposure to unacceptable toxic dose combinations. The results demonstrated that the selection rates of maximum tolerated dose combinations and UTDCs vary depending on the patient cohort size and restrictions on dose-level skipping However, the three-parameter dose-toxicity models and start-up rules did not affect these parameters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effect of microbubble contrast on intracranial blood flow velocity assessed by transcranial Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logallo, Nicola; Fromm, Annette; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Thomassen, Lars; Matre, Knut

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) salvage a considerable number of transcranial Doppler (TCD) exams which would have failed because of poor bone window. UCA bolus injection causes an undesirable increase in measured blood flow velocity (BFV). The effect of UCA continuous infusion on measured BFV has not been investigated, and some in vitro experiments suggest that gain reduction during UCA administration may also influence measured BFV. This study aimed to investigate the effect of UCA continuous infusion on BFV measured by TCD and the influence of gain reduction on these measurements in a clinical setting. The right middle cerebral artery of ten patients with optimal bone window was insonated using a 2 MHz probe. UCA were administered using an infusion pump. BFV was measured (1) at baseline, (2) during UCA infusion, (3) during UCA infusion with gain reduction, and (4) after UCA wash-out phase. Gain reduction was based on the agreement between two neurosonographers on the degree of gain reduction necessary to restore baseline Doppler signal intensity (DSI). Actual DSI was estimated offline by analysis of raw data. BFV measured during UCA infusion with no gain adjustment was significantly higher than baseline BFV [peak systolic velocity (PSV): 85.1 ± 19.7 vs. 74.4 ± 19.7 cm/s, p Doppler gain thus restoring pre-contrast DSI.

  5. Radionuclide tumor therapy with ultrasound contrast microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Bernard, Bert; ten Cate, Folkert; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides have shown to be effective in tumour therapy. However, the side effects determine the maximum deliverable dose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells can be permeabilised through sonoporation using ultrasound and contrast microbubbles. The use of sonoporation in treatment of

  6. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  7. Two separate dose-dependent effects of paroxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anette Green; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Nøhr-Jensen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate paroxetine's putative dose-dependent impact on pupil reaction and inhibition of the O-demethylation of tramadol. METHODS: Twelve healthy CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers participated in this double-blinded randomized five-way placebo controlled cross-over study; they received...... placebo, 10, 20, 30, and 50 mg paroxetine as single oral doses at bedtime. Next morning the pupil was measured followed by oral intake of 50 mg of tramadol, and urine was collected for 8 h. Three hours after ingestion of tramadol a second measurement of the pupil was performed. Enantioselective urine...... concentrations of (+/-)-tramadol and (+/-)-O-desmethyltramadol (M1) were determined. RESULTS: With placebo, the median maximum pupil diameter was 6.43 mm (range 5.45-7.75 mm) before tramadol and 6.22 mm (4.35-7.65 mm) after 50 mg of tramadol (P = 0.4935). Paroxetine resulted in a statistically significant, dose...

  8. Radiation dose measurements and effective dose calculations around the patients administered radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejiri, Kazutaka; Minami, Kazuyuki; Orito, Takeo [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). Health Science; Suzuki, Kasuo; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Naito, Aiko; Shimura, Masami; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koga, Sukehiko

    1999-05-01

    In order to estimate the effective dose (E) of a person who may come into close contact to the {sup 99m}Tc-GSA patients. Radiation dose rates around 21 adult patients (male: 14, female: 7) were measured with three ionization surveymeters (Aloka, ICS-301) at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the patients. Measurements were carried out at 0.75, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 h after the administrations of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA. Surveymeters were set up to the first cervical vertebrae (Level I), xiphoid process (Level II) and anterior superior iliac spine (Level III) of the patients with their standing erect. The maximum dose equivalent (H{sub 1cm}) rate of 64.98 {mu}Svh{sup -1} per 185 MBq was recorded in the level II. Effective half life of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA was 5.8 h. Total E around the patients were calculated by the initial H{sub 1cm} rates and the effective half life. Total E were 285, 62, 23 and 13 {mu}Sv per 185 MBq at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m, respectively. E for the first 24 h was corresponding to 94.3% of the total E. (author)

  9. Radiation dose measurements and effective dose calculations around the patients administered radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejiri, Kazutaka; Minami, Kazuyuki; Orito, Takeo [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Health Sciences; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Naito, Aiko; Shimura, Masami; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koga, Sukehiko

    1999-05-01

    In order to estimate the effective dose (E) of a person who may come into close contact to the {sup 99m}Tc-GSA patients. Radiation dose rates around 21 adult patients (male: 14, female: 7) were measured with three ionization surveymeters (Aloka, ICS-301) at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the patients. Measurements were carried out at 0.75, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 h after the administrations of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA. Surveymeters were set up to the first cervical vertebrae (Level I), xiphoid process (Level II) and anterior superior iliac spine (Level III) of the patients with their standing erect. The maximum dose equivalent (H{sup 1cm}) rate of 64.98 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} per 185 MBq was recorded in the Level II. Effective half life of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA was 5.8 h. Total E around the patients were calculated by the initial H{sup 1cm} rates and the effective half life. Total E were 285, 62, 23 and 13 {mu}Sv per 185 MBq at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m, respectively. E for the first 24 h was corresponding to 94.3% of the total E. (author)

  10. Radiation dose measurements and effective dose calculations around the patients administered radiopharmaceuticals of [sup 99m]Tc-GSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejiri, Kazutaka; Minami, Kazuyuki; Orito, Takeo (Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). Health Science); Suzuki, Kasuo; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Naito, Aiko; Shimura, Masami; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koga, Sukehiko

    1999-05-01

    In order to estimate the effective dose (E) of a person who may come into close contact to the [sup 99m]Tc-GSA patients. Radiation dose rates around 21 adult patients (male: 14, female: 7) were measured with three ionization surveymeters (Aloka, ICS-301) at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the patients. Measurements were carried out at 0.75, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 h after the administrations of [sup 99m]Tc-GSA. Surveymeters were set up to the first cervical vertebrae (Level I), xiphoid process (Level II) and anterior superior iliac spine (Level III) of the patients with their standing erect. The maximum dose equivalent (H[sub 1cm]) rate of 64.98 [mu]Svh[sup -1] per 185 MBq was recorded in the level II. Effective half life of [sup 99m]Tc-GSA was 5.8 h. Total E around the patients were calculated by the initial H[sub 1cm] rates and the effective half life. Total E were 285, 62, 23 and 13 [mu]Sv per 185 MBq at distances of 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m, respectively. E for the first 24 h was corresponding to 94.3% of the total E. (author)

  11. Sex reversal effects on Caiman latirostris exposed to environmentally relevant doses of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, C; Rey, F; Rodriguez, H; Ramos, J G; Sirosky, P; Larriera, A; Luque, E H; Muñoz-de-Toro, M

    2003-10-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants known as endocrine disruptors (EDs) alters the development and function of reproductive organs in several species. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical that leaches from dental materials and plastic food and beverage containers. BPA has been found in sewage, surface and drinking water, and therefore poses a potentially significant risk for human and wildlife. Prenatal exposure of rodents to environmentally relevant doses of BPA alters the development of the reproductive organs of male and female offspring. Species with temperature dependent sex determination (TSD) could act as sentinels of ecosystem health by providing sensitive biomarkers of endocrine disruptor's effects. We selected Caiman latirostris as an animal model to study endocrine disruption caused by BPA. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure in ovum to BPA could cause estrogen-like effects on the reproductive system of C. latirostris. Sex determination and gonadal histoarchitecture were the endpoints evaluated after in ovum exposure to different doses of BPA and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)). We confirmed that C. latirostris is a species with TSD and additionally demonstrated that BPA causes estrogen-like developmental effects by reversing gonadal sex and altering gonadal histoarchitecture. Differences in responses to BPA and E(2) in our in vivo system were on the order of 100-fold. In contrast published in vitro studies have reported differences on the order of 10,000x or more. These results support the utility of C. latirostris, a species in which sex determination is temperature dependent, as a tool in assessing estrogenic activity in vivo and as a sentinel to monitor EDs in aquatic environment.

  12. The effect of tinted spectacle lenses on contrast sensitivity and colour vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shaik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Spectacle wearers often prefer tintedlenses to clear or non-tinted lenses for their protection against harmful radiation, improved cos-mesis, enhancement of visual performance and effects on colour vision. Among the available tinted lenses on the market blue, brown and grey tinted spectacle lenses are popular with varying gradesranging from A to D. Due to reduced transmission of light through such lenses, the optical system of the eyes and the environmental vision may be temporarily altered. Colour vision (CV and con-trast sensitivity (CS are important aspects of this altered visual world. This study investigated the effect of spectacle lenses of varying grades of tint on CS and CV.Method: The study adopted a pre- and postest research design and a sample of 90 participants were selected from the University of KwaZulu-Natal student population using convenience sam-ling. Each participant was screened for patholgy, dyschromatopsia, severe dry eyes (TBUT<5 seconds, and the presence of any more than low metropia. Thereafter each successful participant was tested for CS and CV with their habitual precription and then tested randomly with a white clear lens (placebo and tinted (blue, brown, and grey spectacle lenses made of CR39 material each having grades A, B and C over their habitual state. Light transmission was 85%, 75%, and 50% for grades A, B, and C respectively. The Functional Acuity Contrast Test (FACT chart and American Optical Hardy, Rand, and Rittler (AO HRR were used for the assessment of CS and CV respectively.Results: The data was analysed using the Statistical Package of Social Science (SPSS version18. Compared to the habitual state, contrast sensitivity was enhanced with all the tinted lensesThe greater enhancement was for low spatial frequencies (LSF and least for high spatial frequencies (HSF. With all tints Grade C had the least enhancement for very HSF. Many subjects showed no change in CV with any of the lensesused. The grey

  13. Cardiac-Specific Conversion Factors to Estimate Radiation Effective Dose From Dose-Length Product in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Halliburton, Sandra; Thompson, Carla M; Xu, Yanping; Chelliah, Anjali; Jambawalikar, Sachin R; Peng, Boyu; Peters, M Robert; Jacobs, Jill E; Ghesani, Munir; Jang, James J; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Einstein, Andrew J

    2017-08-16

    This study sought to determine updated conversion factors (k-factors) that would enable accurate estimation of radiation effective dose (ED) for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and calcium scoring performed on 12 contemporary scanner models and current clinical cardiac protocols and to compare these methods to the standard chest k-factor of 0.014 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1). Accurate estimation of ED from cardiac CT scans is essential to meaningfully compare the benefits and risks of different cardiac imaging strategies and optimize test and protocol selection. Presently, ED from cardiac CT is generally estimated by multiplying a scanner-reported parameter, the dose-length product, by a k-factor which was determined for noncardiac chest CT, using single-slice scanners and a superseded definition of ED. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor radiation detectors were positioned in organs of anthropomorphic phantoms, which were scanned using all cardiac protocols, 120 clinical protocols in total, on 12 CT scanners representing the spectrum of scanners from 5 manufacturers (GE, Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba). Organ doses were determined for each protocol, and ED was calculated as defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Effective doses and scanner-reported dose-length products were used to determine k-factors for each scanner model and protocol. k-Factors averaged 0.026 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1) (95% confidence interval: 0.0258 to 0.0266) and ranged between 0.020 and 0.035 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1). The standard chest k-factor underestimates ED by an average of 46%, ranging from 30% to 60%, depending on scanner, mode, and tube potential. Factors were higher for prospective axial versus retrospective helical scan modes, calcium scoring versus coronary CTA, and higher (100 to 120 kV) versus lower (80 kV) tube potential and varied among scanner models (range of average k-factors: 0.0229 to 0.0277 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1)). Cardiac

  14. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  15. Effect of strong elastic contrasts on the propagation of seismic wave in hard-rock environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, R.; Zheng, L.; Liu, Q.; Milkereit, B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the propagation of seismic waves in a presence of strong elastic contrasts, such as topography, tunnels and ore-bodies is still a challenge. Safety in mining is a major concern and seismic monitoring is the main tool here. For engineering purposes, amplitudes (peak particle velocity/acceleration) and travel times of seismic events (mostly blasts or microseismic events) are critical parameters that have to be determined at various locations in a mine. These parameters are useful in preparing risk maps or to better understand the process of spatial and temporal stress distributions in a mine. Simple constant velocity models used for monitoring studies in mining, cannot explain the observed complexities in scattered seismic waves. In hard-rock environments modeling of elastic seismic wavefield require detailed 3D petrophysical, infrastructure and topographical data to simulate the propagation of seismic wave with a frequencies up to few kilohertz. With the development of efficient numerical techniques, and parallel computation facilities, a solution for such a problem is achievable. In this study, the effects of strong elastic contrasts such as ore-bodies, rough topography and tunnels will be illustrated using 3D modeling method. The main tools here are finite difference code (SOFI3D)[1] that has been benchmarked for engineering studies, and spectral element code (SPECFEM) [2], which was, developed for global seismology problems. The modeling results show locally enhanced peak particle velocity due to presence of strong elastic contrast and topography in models. [1] Bohlen, T. Parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference seismic modeling. Computers & Geosciences 28 (2002) 887-899 [2] Komatitsch, D., and J. Tromp, Introduction to the spectral-element method for 3-D seismic wave propagation, Geophys. J. Int., 139, 806-822, 1999.

  16. The differential effects of fluency due to repetition and fluency due to color contrast on judgments of truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rita R; Garcia-Marques, Teresa; Mello, Joana

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments contrast the effects of fluency due to repetition and fluency due to color contrast on judgments of truth, after participants learn to associate high levels of fluency with falseness (i.e., a reversal of the fluency-truth link). Experiment 1 shows that the interpretation of fluency as a sign of truth is harder to reverse when learning is promoted with repetition rather than with perceptual fluency. Experiment 2 shows that when color contrast and repetition are manipulated orthogonally, the reversal of the truth effect learned with color contrast does not generalize to repetition. These results suggest specificities in the processing experiences generated by different sources of fluency, and that their influences can be separated in contexts that allow the contrast of their distinctive features. We interpret and discuss these results in light of the research addressing the convergence vs. dissociation of the effects elicited by different fluency sources.

  17. Contrasting effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on coral-associated reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Mary C; Almany, Glenn R; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2011-07-01

    Disturbance can result in the fragmentation and/or loss of suitable habitat, both of which can have important consequences for survival, species interactions, and resulting patterns of local diversity. However, effects of habitat loss and fragmentation are typically confounded during disturbance events, and previous attempts to determine their relative significance have proved ineffective. Here we experimentally manipulated live coral habitats to examine the potential independent and interactive effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on survival, abundance, and species richness of recruitment-stage, coral-associated reef fishes. Loss of 75% of live coral from experimental reefs resulted in low survival of a coral-associated damselfish and low abundance and richness of other recruits 16 weeks after habitat manipulations. In contrast, fragmentation had positive effects on damselfish survival and resulted in greater abundance and species richness of other recruits. We hypothesize that spacing of habitat through fragmentation weakens competition within and among species. Comparison of effect sizes over the course of the study period revealed that, in the first six weeks following habitat manipulations, the positive effects of fragmentation were at least four times stronger than the effects of habitat loss. This initial positive effect of fragmentation attenuated considerably after 16 weeks, whereas the negative effects of habitat loss increased in strength over time. There was little indication that the amount of habitat influenced the magnitude of the habitat fragmentation effect. Numerous studies have reported dramatic declines in coral reef fish abundance and diversity in response to disturbances that cause the loss and fragmentation of coral habitats. Our results suggest that these declines occur as a result of habitat loss, not habitat fragmentation. Positive fragmentation effects may actually buffer against the negative effects of habitat loss and contribute

  18. STUDIES OF SAFETY AND FUNCTIONAL AND METABOLIC EFFECTS OF NON-IONIC CONTRAST MEDIA IN CHILDREN WITH NEPHROPATHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Tsygina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to assess the safety of non-ionic contrast media in paediatric nephrourology and their impact onto renal function and homeostasis, reflecting the risk of development of contrast-induced nephropathy. After contrast media use we observed elevation of cystatin C and endothelin, decrease of sodium fractional excretion and hypocoagulation were identified. The results obtained indicate that renal hypoperfusion with a consequent decrease of sodium fractional excretion and elevation of endothelin production may play a role in contrast-induced nephropathy. Increased serum cystatin C reflects adverse impact of contrast agents on renal function. Hypocoagulation effect requires that coagulation disorders must be excluded before use of contast media.Key words: children, contrast-induced nephropathy, renal function, cystatin C, endothelin, hemostasis. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(2:78-82

  19. Effectiveness of 3 doses of Intermittent Preventive Therapy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In 2014, Nigeria scaled up to at least 3 doses of intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (ITPp-SP). While the fact of existing evidence as to the superiority of SP3 over SP2 was shown by WHO back in 2012, the Nigerian Government domesticated it in her Federal Ministry ...

  20. Carbamazepine Poisoning and Effect of Multiple-Dose Activated Charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnoush B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carbamazepine is commonly used in a variety of indications. Poisoning by this drug, can lead to coma, seizures, cardiac disorders and respiratory distress. The treatment of poisoning is generally supportive. Method: 68 poisoned patients with carbamazepine, who referred to poisoning ward of Loghman Hospital, from July 2003 to September 2004, were studied. These patients were investigated for demographic details, complications and types of treatment. Patients were grouped into two, receiving either single dose of activated charcoal (30patients or multiple doses of activated charcoal (38patients. Results: 58.8%of patients were female and 41.2% were male, the average age being 24.2 years old. The most obvious clinical symptom was a decreased level of consciousness, in 69% of cases. Therapeutically, those taking multiple doses of charcoal, were about 24 hours faster in recovery from clinical symptoms and leaving the hospital than other patients. Conclusion and Recommendation: The results of this study are compatible with previous ones. Factors like education for suitable management, good care and psychiatric consult have important roles in prevention and treatment. Furthermore, administration of repeated doses of charcoal is therapeutically very important.

  1. Effect of high-dose finasteride combined with transurethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Re-bleeding within 3 months after surgery in the three groups were performed and the patients observed. ... Seven days after surgery, international prostate symptom score (IPSS), serum PSA, and TNF-α and IL-1β in prostatic fluid of the high- and low-dose groups were ...

  2. Chemi-luminescent technique using low dose effect characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, A.I.; Porokhnyak, L.A. [A.V. palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-03-01

    Some Ukrainian and Belarusian territories are polluted by radioactive elements as Chernobyl AES accident consequence in 1986. Radioactive substances enter to animals and human organism with the food and lead to internal irradiation. The purpose of this work is he changes characteristic for an organism under internal irradiation low dose estimated by means of chemi-luminescent (Chl) techniques. (authors)

  3. Dose-dependent effects of exogenous gonadotrophins on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We compared the serwn levels of oestrogen and progesterone and the endometrial morphology of normal pregnant rats at 5,5 days' gestation with those of pregnant rats given either low (10 IU) or high (20 IU) doses of two gonadotrophins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and hwnan chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG).

  4. Effective dose estimation in whole-body multislice CT in paediatric trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Robin D.; Saueressig, Ulrich; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Bley, Thorsten A. [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Strohm, Peter C.; Zwingmann, Joern; Suedkamp, Norbert P. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Uhl, Markus [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Paediatric Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The number of multislice CT (MSCT) scans performed in polytraumatized children has increased rapidly. There is growing concern regarding the radiation dose in MSCT and its long-term consequences, especially in children. To determine the effective dose to polytraumatized children who undergo whole-body MSCT. A total of 51 traumatized children aged 0-16 years underwent a polytrauma protocol CT scan between November 2004 and August 2006 at our institution. The effective dose was calculated retrospectively by a computer program (CT-Expo 1.5, Hannover, Germany). The mean effective dose was 20.8 mSv (range 8.6-48.9 mSv, SD{+-}7.9 mSv). There was no statistically significant difference in the effective dose between male and female patients. Whole-body MSCT is a superior diagnostic tool in polytraumatized children with 20.8 mSv per patient being a justified mean effective dose. In a potentially life-threatening situation whole-body MSCT provides the clinicians with relevant information to initiate life-saving therapy. Radiologists should use special paediatric protocols that include dose-saving mechanisms to keep the effective dose as low as possible. Further studies are needed to examine and advance dose-saving strategies in MSCT, especially in children. (orig.)

  5. Dose-related effects of dexamethasone on liver damage due to bile duct ligation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eken, Halil; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Ozturk, Hulya; Buyukbayram, Huseyin

    2006-09-07

    To evaluate the effects of dexamethasone on liver damage in rats with bile duct ligation. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 165-205 g, were used in this study. Group 1 (sham-control, n = 10) rats underwent laparotomy alone and the bile duct was just dissected from the surrounding tissue. Group 2 rats (untreated, n = 10) were subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) and no drug was applied. Group 3 rats (low-dose dexa, n = 10) received a daily dose of dexamethasone by orogastric tube for 14 d after BDL. Group 4 rats (high-dose dexa, n = 10) received a daily dose of dexamethasone by orogastric tube for 14 d after BDL. At the end of the two-week period, biochemical and histological evaluations were processed. The mean serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels significantly decreased, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) values were significantly increased in low-dose dexa and high-dose dexa groups when compared to the untreated group. The histopathological score was significantly less in the low-dose and high-dose dexa groups compared to the untreated rats. In the low-dose dexa group, moderate liver damage was seen, while mild liver damage was observed in the high-dose dexa group. Corticosteroids reduced liver damage produced by bile duct obstruction. However, the histopathological score was not significantly lower in the high-dose corticosteroid group as compared to the low-dose group. Thus, low-dose corticosteroid provides a significant reduction of liver damage without increased side effects, while high dose is associated not with lower fibrosis but with increased side effects.

  6. In vivo monitoring of sorafenib therapy effects on experimental prostate carcinomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and macromolecular contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyran, Clemens C; Schwarz, Bettina; Paprottka, Philipp M; Sourbron, Steven; von Einem, Jobst C; Dietrich, Olaf; Hinkel, Rabea; Clevert, Dirk A; Bruns, Christiane J; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2013-12-16

    To investigate dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with macromolecular contrast media (MMCM) to monitor the effects of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib on subcutaneous prostate carcinomas in rats with immunohistochemical validation. Copenhagen rats, implanted with prostate carcinoma allografts, were randomized to the treatment group (n = 8) or the control group (n = 8). DCE-MRI with albumin-(Gd-DTPA)35 was performed at baseline and after 1 week using a clinical 3-Tesla system. The treatment group received sorafenib, 10 mg/kg body weight daily. Kinetic analysis yielded quantitative parameters of tumor endothelial permeability-surface area product (PS; ml/100 ml/min) and fractional blood volume (Vb, %). Tumors were harvested on day 7 for immunohistochemical analysis. In sorafenib-treated tumors, PS (0.62 ± 0.20 vs 0.08 ± 0.09 ml/100 ml/min; P effects of a 1-week, daily treatment course of sorafenib on experimental prostate carcinoma allografts.

  7. Vitamin D status and effect of low-dose cholecalciferol and high-dose ergocalciferol supplementation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, G S; Cettomai, D; Baynes, M; Ratchford, J N; Newsome, S; Harrison, D; Kerr, D; Greenberg, B M; Calabresi, P A

    2009-06-01

    Vitamin D is important for bone health and immune regulation, and has been shown to be low in multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought to determine the effect of over the counter low dose cholecalciferol (LDC) and high dose ergocalciferol (HDE) on the vitamin D levels in MS patients. We retrospectively evaluated serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels of 199 patients (CIS, n = 32; RRMS, n = 115; PPMS, n = 10; SPMS, n = 16; Transverse Myelitis (TM), n = 9; other neurological diseases, n = 16) attending our clinic between 2004 and 2008. We examined the change in 25(OH)D levels in 40 MS patients who took either LDC ( or =100 nmol/L) were only achieved in less than 40% of patients. We conclude that large numbers of patients with MS and TM in our cohort are deficient in vitamin D. HDE significantly elevated 25(OH)D levels in MS patients and was more effective at increasing 25(OH)D levels than LDC. Prospective studies are required to determine appropriate dosing regimen to achieve optimal levels in the majority of MS patients and to ascertain the safety, immunological response, and ultimately the clinical efficacy of vitamin D replacement therapy.

  8. Effects of radiographic techniques on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of digital radiography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsleem, Haney; U, Paul; Mong, Kam Shan; Davidson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the radiation exposure factors kilovolt peak and tube current time (milliampere seconds) on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of 3 types of planar digital radiography systems. Detectability performance of an imaging system refers to its ability to detect and present the low-contrast details of organs in the acquired image. The authors also compare detectability performance between computed radiography, indirect digital radiography, and direct digital radiography by evaluating low-contrast details of the obtained images. A low-contrast detail phantom was inserted within 10-cm thicknesses of Perspex plastic sheets. The images were obtained with various kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings for each of the 3 digital radiography systems. Artinis CDRAD Analyser software was used to score the images and calculate the inverse image quality figure (IQFinv). The higher milliampere second levels in each kilovolt peak selection resulted in higher IQFinv in computed radiography and indirect and direct digital radiography. IQFinv values significantly increased in indirect digital radiography with increasing kilovolt peak in only 1 and 2 mAs. There were insignificant differences in IQFinv values when altering kilovolt peak in each milliampere second level in direct digital radiography. The indirect digital radiography system generally demonstrated better detectability performance than computed radiography and direct digital radiography. However, direct digital radiography demonstrated better detectability performance than indirect digital radiography at lower kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings, as did computed radiography at lower kilovolt peak settings. Higher milliampere second settings increase photon count, which results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio and thus increased detectability. Lower milliampere second settings increase noise level on images, which increases the risk of diagnostic detail loss. Changing

  9. Evaluation of Patient Skin Effective Dose Due to Diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common procedures are the plain radiographs of the chest, skull, cervical spine, sinus, lumbosacral spine, pelvis, abdomen, shoulder and foot and hysterosalpingography (HSG), intravenous urography, barium meal and barium enema are the special or contrast procedures. 1977 procedures were monitored in some ...

  10. Effect of Extrusion Procedure on Selected Grain Parameters in Contrast Wheat Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Dvořáček

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that the majority of registered wheats (Triticum aestivum L. belonging to cultivars suitable for baking applications, more than 60% of annual Czech wheat production is utilized for feeding. Regarding this fact, a proper extrusion process may offer an improvement of grain feeding quality. The study was aimed at monitoring of grain quality parameter changes in extruded wholemeal from three technologically contrasting cultivars (Elixier, Bodyček, Cimrmanova raná obtained after 8 different combinations of extrusion processes with variation in water dosage and insertion diameter. Technologically different wheat cultivars significantly changed extrusion temperature. Simultaneously, the extrusion process significantly increased RDS content in starch (from 36 to 86 %. On the contrary, the parameters CP and ADF content showed minimal changes after extrusion. The mild reduction of CF and NDF after extrusion probably included hemicellulose degradation. It is possible to conclude that the applied extrusion processes showed comparable effect in all 3 contrasting wheat cultivars on the one hand. On the other hand, the selection of a proper wheat cultivar with suitable grain composition can also bring a further progress in the final quality of extrudates.

  11. Effects of Prematurity on the Development of Contrast Sensitivity: Testing the Visual Experience Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Rain G.; Dobkins, Karen R.

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of visual experience on early visual development, the current study compared contrast sensitivity across infants born with different levels of moderate-to-late prematurity. Here the logic is that at any given postterm age, the most premature infants will have the oldest postnatal age. Given that postnatal age is a proxy for visual experience, the visual experience hypothesis predicts that infants who are more premature, yet healthy, should have higher sensitivity. Luminance (light/dark) and chromatic (red/green) contrast sensitivities (CS) were measured in 236 healthy infants (born −10 to +2 weeks relative to due date) between 5 and 32 weeks postterm age from due date and 8 to 38 weeks postnatal from birth date. For chromatic CS, we found clear evidence that infants who were most premature within our sample had the highest sensitivity. Specifically, 4 to 10 additional weeks of visual experience, by virtue of being born early, enhanced chromatic CS. For luminance CS, similar but weaker results were seen. Here, only infants with an additional 6 to 10 weeks of visual experience, and only at later age points in development, showed enhanced sensitivity. However, CS in preterm infants was still below that of fullterm infants with equivalent postnatal age. In sum, these results suggest that chromatic CS is influenced more by prematurity (and possibly visual experience) than is luminance CS, which has implications for differential development of Parvocellular and Magnocellular pathways. PMID:23485427

  12. Effect on renal function of an iso-osmolar contrast agent in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Lorenzo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Agazzi, Alberto; Martinelli, Giovanni [Division of Haematology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Occupational Medicin ' ' Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto' ' Section of Medical Statistics and Biometry ' ' GA Maccacaro' ' , Milan (Italy); Lanfranchi, Carla Federica [University of Milan, IRCCS, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Passerini, Rita [Unit of Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Calvetta, Albania [Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, IRCCS, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, IRCCS, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    To assess the safety of the non-ionic iso-osmolar contrast agent iodixanol on renal function in patients with monoclonal gammopathies undergoing CT. We explored the effect of iodixanol on renal function in 30 patients with monoclonal gammopathies and 20 oncological patients with a normal electrophoretic profile (control group). The parameters used to estimate renal function were: serum creatinine, eGFR (determined 24 h before and 48 h after the administration of iodixanol), and urinary excretion of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) determined 2 h and 24 h after. Serum creatinine was also determined 1 month after the administration of iodixanol. No significant increase in serum creatinine values were observed in the monoclonal gammopathies group and in 19/20 patients in the control group. Only 1 patient in the control group developed a transient contrast agent-induced nephropathy. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the percentage variation from baseline values of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, NGAL 2 h after, and eGFR. Whereas NGAL at 24 h showed a statistically significant increase in patients with Monoclonal gammopathies. The use of iodixanol appears to be safe in patients with monoclonal gammopathies and an eGFR {>=} 60 ml/min/1.73 mq. (orig.)

  13. Effects of hand gestures on auditory learning of second-language vowel length contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yukari; Kelly, Spencer D; Huang, Jessica; Manansala, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Research has shown that hand gestures affect comprehension and production of speech at semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic levels for both native language and second language (L2). This study investigated a relatively less explored question: Do hand gestures influence auditory learning of an L2 at the segmental phonology level? To examine auditory learning of phonemic vowel length contrasts in Japanese, 88 native English-speaking participants took an auditory test before and after one of the following 4 types of training in which they (a) observed an instructor in a video speaking Japanese words while she made syllabic-rhythm hand gesture, (b) produced this gesture with the instructor, (c) observed the instructor speaking those words and her moraic-rhythm hand gesture, or (d) produced the moraic-rhythm gesture with the instructor. All of the training types yielded similar auditory improvement in identifying vowel length contrast. However, observing the syllabic-rhythm hand gesture yielded the most balanced improvement between word-initial and word-final vowels and between slow and fast speaking rates. The overall effect of hand gesture on learning of segmental phonology is limited. Implications for theories of hand gesture are discussed in terms of the role it plays at different linguistic levels.

  14. Effect of Admission Oral Diuretic Dose on Response to Continuous versus Bolus Intravenous Diuretics in Acute Heart Failure: An Analysis from DOSE-AHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi V.; McNulty, Steven; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Braunwald, Eugene; Givertz, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Results from the Diuretic Optimization Strategies in Acute Heart Failure (DOSE-AHF) study suggest that an initial continuous infusion of loop diuretics is not superior to bolus dosing with regard to clinical endpoints in AHF. We hypothesized that outpatient furosemide dose was associated with congestion and poorer renal function, and explored the hypothesis that a continuous infusion may be more effective in patients on higher outpatient diuretic doses. Methods DOSE-AHF randomized 308 patients within 24 hours of admission to high vs. low initial intravenous diuretic dose given as either a continuous infusion or bolus. We compared baseline characteristics and assessed associations between mode of administration (bolus vs. continuous) and outcomes in patients receiving high-dose (≥120 mg furosemide equivalent, n=177) versus low-dose (diuretics. Results Patients on higher doses of furosemide were less frequently on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (P=.01), and had worse renal function and more advanced symptoms. There was a significant interaction between outpatient dose and mode of therapy (P=0.01) with respect to net fluid loss at 72 hours after adjusting for creatinine and intensification strategy. Admission diuretic dose was associated with an increased risk of death or rehospitalization at 60 days (adjusted HR=1.08 per 20-mg increment in dose, 95% CI 1.01–1.16, P=.03). Conclusions In acute HF, patients on higher diuretic doses have greater disease severity, and may benefit from an initial bolus strategy. PMID:23194486

  15. Epidemiological methods for assessing dose-response and dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellström, Tord; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    and their compounds. An entirely new structure and illustrations represent the vast array of advancements made since the last edition. Special emphasis has been placed on the toxic effects in humans with chapters on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of metal poisoning. This up-to-date reference provides easy...... and Toxicity Carcinogenicity of Metal Compounds Immunotoxicology of Metals Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Metals Ecotoxicology of Metals - Sources, Transport, and Effects in the Ecosystem Risk Assessment Diagnosis and Treatment of Metal Poisoning - General Aspects Principles for Prevention...... of the Toxic Effects of Metals Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Barium Beryllium Bismuth Cadmium Chromium Cobalt Copper Gallium and Semiconductor Compounds Germanium Indium Iron Lead Manganese Mercury Molybdenum Nickel Palladium Platinum Selenium Silver Tellurium Thallium Tin Titanium Tungsten Uranium Vanadium Zinc...

  16. Enteric coating can lead to reduced antiplatelet effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz Haastrup, Peter; Grønlykke, Thor; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Enteric coated ASA has been developed in order to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. The consequences of enteric coating on pharmacokinetics and antiplatelet effect of ASA have not systematically be....... Therefore, low dose enteric coated ASA might not be bioequivalent to plain ASA, entailing the risk of insufficient cardiovascular prophylaxis....

  17. Can a single dose response predict the effect of montelukast on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin T. G.; Akkerman-Nijland, Anne M.; Driessen, Jean M. M.; Diamant, Zuzana; Thio, Bernard J.

    RationaleExercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) can be prevented by a single dose of montelukast (MLK). The effect is variable, similar to the variable responsiveness observed after daily treatment with MLK. We hypothesized that the effect of a single MLK-dose (5 or 10mg) on EIB could predict

  18. Effectiveness of a 6-dose regimen of Artemether-Lumefantrine for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex dosage schedule could militate against its effectiveness. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of AL prescribed under routine outpatient conditions ... Enrolled children received 6-dose course of AL (20/120mg tablets). The first dose was administered in the health facility and caregivers were instructed on how ...

  19. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  20. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitan, J.B.; Bergan, T.D.; Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway); Melbye, O.J. [Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Revealing life-history traits by contrasting genetic estimations with predictions of effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Gili; Renan, Sharon; Templeton, Alan R; Bouskila, Amos; Saltz, David; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Bar-David, Shirli

    2017-12-22

    Effective population size, a central concept in conservation biology, is now routinely estimated from genetic surveys, and can also be theoretically-predicted from demographic, life-history and mating-system hypotheses. However, by evaluating the consistency of theoretical predictions with empirically-estimated effective size, insights can be gained regarding life-history characteristics, as well as the relative impact of different life-history traits on genetic drift. These insights can be used to design and inform management strategies aimed at increasing effective population size. Here we describe and demonstrate this approach by addressing the conservation of a reintroduced population of Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus). We estimate the variance effective size (Nev ) from genetic data (Nev = 24.3), and we formulate predictions for the impacts on Nev of demography, polygyny, female variance in life-time reproductive success, and heritability of female reproductive success. By contrasting the genetic estimation with theoretical predictions, we find that polygyny is the strongest factor effecting genetic drift, as only when accounting for polygyny were predictions consistent with the genetically-measured Nev , with 10.6% mating males per generation when heritability of female RS was unaccounted for (polygyny responsible for 81% decrease in Nev ), and 19.5% when it was accounted for (polygyny responsible for 67% decrease in Nev ). Heritability of female reproductive success was also found to affect Nev , with hf2 = 0.91 (heritability responsible for 41% decrease in Nev ). The low effective population size is of concern, and we suggest specific management actions focusing on factors identified as strongly affecting Nev -increasing the availability of artificial water sources to increase number of dominant males contributing to the gene pool. This approach - evaluating life-history hypotheses, in light of their impact on effective population size, and contrasting

  2. The effect of rare-earth filtration on organ doses in intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asako, Satoshi; Satoh, Kenji; Furumoto, Keiichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-08-01

    Filters of rare-earth elements such as lanthanum (La, Z=57), samarium (Sm, Z=62), gadolinium (Gd, Z=64) and erbium (Er, Z=68) are frequently used in radiography for the purpose of reducing the patient dose by eliminating low-energy and high-energy X-rays which are not involved in imaging. It is useful to evaluate the dose reduction achieved by these rare-earth filters in terms of organ dose, and the effective dose equivalent, which is used for evaluating carcinogenic risks and hereditary effects of X-ray irradiation, for the purpose of optimizing the radiographic technique and radiation protection. Therefore, we calculated the organ dose and effective dose equivalent during intraoral radiography of the maxillary incisor region by simulation using samarium or erbium, typical rare-earth elements, in filtration. We evaluated the effects of these metals in dose reduction. When samarium or erbium, 0.1 mm thick, was used in added filtration at tube voltage of 60, 70, 80 and 90 kV, the time required for radiography almost doubled, respectively. The organ dose at each tube voltage was the largest in the parathyroid and thyroid glands, followed by bone surfaces and the optic lenses, skin, red bone marrow and salivary glands, larynx, and brain, in that order. The organ dose at sites other than the larynx and brain decreased as the quality of the incident X-ray beam was hardened. When samarium or erbium was added at each voltage, the effective dose equivalent was reduced by about 20% to 45%. Erbium was more effective than samarium in reducing the effective dose equivalent, and either of the two elements decreased its effectiveness with an increase in tube voltage. (author) 43 refs.

  3. Using the continual reassessment method to estimate the minimum effective dose in phase II dose-finding studies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Chevret, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The Continual Reassessment Method typically is presented as the method of choice for the purpose of dose-finding based on a toxicity scale in phase I clinical trials. However, this adaptive statistical approach also can be applied easily to dose-finding experiments in phase II trials. To provide a case study from a real clinical trial to illustrate the use of the Continual Reassessment Method in the context of phase II dose finding. The Continual Reassessment Method was used to model the dose-failure relationship in order to estimate the minimal effective dose. This approach was retrospectively used to determine the minimal effective dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood stem cell collection in allografted patients following chemotherapy. After the inclusion of 25 patients, the minimal effective dose was estimated to be the third dose level tested in the study. The main limitation of the Continual Reassessment Method, which is not specific to the method but to the dose-finding setting, is that the empirical choice of the dose range can be either under or over-estimated. The method requires a calibration study prior to trial onset. Assuming that a dose-effect relationship is monotonically increasing, the use of the Continual Reassessment Method in phase II dose-finding studies allows the estimation of the minimum effective dose for further studies. Modeling the dose-failure relationship allows the direct use of available software developed for the Continual Reassessment Method in the context of phase I clinical trials.

  4. Noncontrast chest computed tomography immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: Clinical benefits and effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon-Il [Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom, E-mail: dockhb@naver.com [Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jong Seok [Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Young Whan; An, Sang Bu [Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Heung-kyu [Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joong-Won [Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical benefits of noncontrast chest computed tomography (CT) immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and to assess the effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning. Materials and methods: From June to October 2010, we performed standard-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in 160 patients and low-dose CTs in 88 patients. We reviewed the entire noncontrast chest CTs and follow-up CTs to reveal the clinical benefits of CT evaluation immediately after transarterial chemoembolization. Using two independent readers, we also retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose and image quality in terms of the image noise, contrast between the liver parenchyma and iodized oil and diagnostic acceptability for the evaluation of treatment response after transarterial chemoembolization. Results: In 5.2% of the patients, additional treatment was performed immediately after the interpretation of the noncontrast chest CT, and additional pulmonary lesions were found in 8.5% of the patients. The measured mean dose-length product for the low-dose scanning was 18.4% of that of the standard-dose scanning. The image noise was significantly higher with the low-dose scanning (p < 0.001). However, all of the low-dose CT scans were diagnostically acceptable, and the mean scores for the subjective assessments of the contrast and diagnostic acceptability showed no significant differences for either reader. Conclusion: A noncontrast chest CT immediately after transarterial chemoembolization has some clinical benefits for immediate decision making and detecting pulmonary lesions. Low-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization consistently provide diagnostically acceptable images and information on treatment response in patients who have undergone transarterial chemoembolization.

  5. Cytogenetic biodosimetry and dose<