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Sample records for contrasting effective dose

  1. The effect of introduction of axial cineangiography and echocardiography on contrast and radiation doses during cardiac catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, E.M.; McLardy, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of routine preliminary echocardiography and adoption of axial cine angiography in a Paediatric Cardiac Investigation Centre were assessed in relation to contrast volume, fluoroscopy time and radiation dose. The results showed a significant increase in radiation dose with some reduction in fluoroscopy time in neonates and some increase in contrast volume used in infants [fr

  2. Effect of contrast on treatment planning system dose calculations in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, J.; Holloway, L.; Fuller, M.; Forstner, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Contrast-enhanced x-ray computed tomography is utilised in the planning of radiotherapy lung treatments to allow greater accuracy in defining tumour volume and nodal areas. The use of contrast results in increased density in the region of the tumour and may result in an overall increased density in the lung volume. It is possible that this change in density may affect the accuracy of any dose calculations based on this CT data. As yet, the effect of the contrast agent on the calculations performed by the treatment planning computer is unclear. Ideally, a study would be undertaken using pre- and post- contrast patient data, however this may be considered unethical as an extra CT scan would be required. For this reason, the following study was undertaken to assess the possible impact in a simulated environment. The object of this study was to explore the effect of the contrast agent upon the isodose curves and the monitor units calculated by the treatment planning system. Two investigations were made. Initially, pre- and post-contrast images were acquired using an anthropomorphic phantom. Contrast-enhancement was simulated by replacing cylindrical sections of the lung with lengths of drinking straw containing contrast agent. The effect of increased density in the tumour volume was considered in this comparison. Secondly, block density corrections were used in an existing patient dataset to simulate an increase in lung density and compared with the original dataset. In the two investigations, a treatment was generated using both datasets. Fields were placed on the non contrast-enhanced scan, and then transferred onto the contrast-enhanced scan. The numbers of monitor units calculated in each of the plans were compared, as were the resulting isodose curves. In the first investigation, the relative electron density in the contrast-enhanced scan varied between 0.523 and 1.705 within the tumour volume. This resulted from the presence of undiluted contrast agent

  3. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M.; Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V.; Kronnerwetter, C.; Widhalm, G.; Nemec, S.; Prayer, D.; Ladd, M.E.; Trattnig, S.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  4. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kronnerwetter, C. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Nemec, S.; Prayer, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ladd, M.E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  5. CONTRASTING DOSE-RATE EFFECTS OF GAMMA-IRRADIATION ON RAT SALIVARY-GLAND FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSINK, A; DOWN, JD; KONINGS, AWT

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation delivered at high (HDR) and low (LDR) dose-rates on rat salivary gland function. Total-body irradiation (TBI; total doses 7.5, 10 and 12.5 Gy) was applied from a Co-60 source at dose-rates of 1 cGy/min (LDR) and 40 cGy/min

  6. Cytogenetic effects of cardioangiography on blood lymphocytes in children and in vitro effects of contrast medium and low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikula, E.; Kiviniitty, K.

    1987-01-01

    Structural chromosome aberrations were analysed in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 15 children, aged 1 to 13 years, before, immediately after, 24 hours after and 6 to 8 months after cardioangiographic examination. Statistically significant increases were only demonstrated in the frequency of gaps and, consequently, in the frequency of aberrant cells immediately after cardioangiography. Most of the chromosome damage clearly disappeared within 24 hours. In addition, whole blood cultures were exposed in vitro to low dose radiation, a contrast medium, and radiation together with the contrast medium. No statistically significant differences could be observed in the chromosome aberration frequencies. It was concluded that the modern radiographic procedure, which uses very low radiation doses and less contrast medium, does not cause a consistent, permanent increase of chromosomal damage in the lymphocytes of children. However, the situation may be different if the child undergoes many radiography examinations or the radiation doses are high. (orig./MG)

  7. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in

  8. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Mcnaughton, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr- versus 0.3 mSv yr-). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr- threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr- air pathway

  9. Effects of high iodine doses given parenterally as contrast medium on parameter of the pro/antioxidative balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Griebenow, S.; Scheidleder, B.; Bailer, H.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of high iodine doses given parenterally as contrast medium on parameters of lipid status and thyroid hormone status as well as on parameters of the pro/antioxidative balance of spa patients. 29 patients with a comparable indication who had to undergo an angiography were chosen. The blood parameters of these patients were determined before and after the angiographic treatment. No provable changes of the thyroid parameters f-T 3 , f-T 4 and TSH were found after the angiography. In case of enzyme activities, the protective enzymes SOD and GSHPX showed no changes, while the concentrations of peroxides and MDA were increased significantly. Corresponding to this, the total antioxidative status and the vitamin E level decreased significantly. Altogether these results stand for a moderate deterioration of the antioxidative protective potential by the highly iodine containing contrast medium. (author)

  10. Survey of effective doses to patients undergoing contrast-based X-ray fluoroscopy procedures in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngaile, J.E.; Msaki, P.K.; Kazema, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the radiation burden imparted to patients from contrast-based X-ray fluoroscopy procedures in Tanzania. The effective doses (EDs) to patients from five contrast-based fluoroscopy procedures were obtained from four hospitals. The ED was estimated using the knowledge of the patient characteristics, patient-related exposure parameters, measurements of air kerma area product and PCXCM software. The median EDs for the barium swallow (BS), barium meal (BM), barium enema (BE), hysterosalpingography (HSG) and retrograde urethrography (RUG) were 0.50, 1.43, 2.83, 0.65 and 0.59 mSv, respectively. The median ED per hospital for the BS and BM procedures varied by factors of up to 9.9 and 4.2, respectively, while for the BE, HSG and RUG varied by factors of up to 2.3, 2.4 and 4.3, respectively. The overall differences between individual EDs across the four hospitals varied by factors of up to 53, 58.9 and 11.4 for the BS, BM and BE, respectively, while for the HSG and RUG differed by factors of up to 22 and 46.7, respectively. The mean EDs in this study were mostly lower than reported values from Spain, the UK, Ghana and Greece, while slightly higher than those reported from India. The observed wide variations of procedural protocols and patient doses within and across the hospitals; and the observed high patient doses in this study relative to those from the literature call for the need to standardize procedural protocols and optimize contrast-based fluoroscopy procedures. (authors)

  11. Abdominal multi-detector row CT: Effectiveness of determining contrast medium dose on basis of body surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Takamichi; Kim, Tonsok; Hori, Masatoshi; Osuga, Keigo; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Higashihara, Hiroki; Maeda, Noboru; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Tomoda, Kaname; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the validity of determining the contrast medium dose based on body surface area (BSA) for the abdominal contrast-enhanced multi-detector row CT comparing with determining based on body weight (BW). Materials and methods: Institutional review committee approval was obtained. In this retrospective study, 191 patients those underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced multi-detector row CT were enrolled. All patients received 96 mL of 320 mg I/mL contrast medium at the rate of 3.2 mL. The iodine dose required to enhance 1 HU of the aorta at the arterial phase and that of liver parenchyma at portal venous phase per BSA were calculated (EU BSA ) and evaluated the relationship with BSA. Those per BW were also calculated (EU BW ) and evaluated. Estimated enhancement values (EEVs) of the aorta and liver parenchyma with two protocols for dose decision based on BSA and BW were calculated and patient-to-patient variability was compared between two protocols using the Levene test. Results: The mean of EU BSA and EU BW were 0.0621 g I/m 2 /HU and 0.00178 g I/kg/HU for the aorta, and 0.342 g I/m 2 /HU and 0.00978 g I/kg/HU for the liver parenchyma, respectively. In the aortic enhancement, EU BSA was almost constant regardless of BSA, and the mean absolute deviation of the EEV with the BSA protocol was significantly lower than that with the BW protocol (P < .001), although there was no significant difference between two protocols in the hepatic parenchymal enhancement (P = .92). Conclusion: For the aortic enhancement, determining the contrast medium dose based on BSA was considered to improve patient-to-patient enhancement variability.

  12. The effect of iodine uptake on radiation dose absorbed by patient tissues in contrast enhanced CT imaging. Implications for CT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [University of Crete, Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Spanakis, Kostas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hatzidakis, Adam [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the effect of iodine uptake on tissue/organ absorbed doses from CT exposure and its implications in CT dosimetry. The contrast-induced CT number increase of several radiosensitive tissues was retrospectively determined in 120 CT examinations involving both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT imaging. CT images of a phantom containing aqueous solutions of varying iodine concentration were obtained. Plots of the CT number increase against iodine concentration were produced. The clinically occurring iodine tissue uptake was quantified by attributing recorded CT number increase to a certain concentration of aqueous iodine solution. Clinically occurring iodine uptake was represented in mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Standard 120 kV CT exposures were simulated using Monte Carlo methods and resulting organ doses were derived for non-enhanced and iodine contrast-enhanced CT imaging. The mean iodine uptake range during contrast-enhanced CT imaging was found to be 0.02-0.46% w/w for the investigated tissues, while the maximum value recorded was 0.82% w/w. For the same CT exposure, iodinated tissues were found to receive higher radiation dose than non-iodinated tissues, with dose increase exceeding 100% for tissues with high iodine uptake. Administration of iodinated contrast medium considerably increases radiation dose to tissues from CT exposure. (orig.)

  13. Indication-related dosing for magnetic resonance contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Parker, J.R.; Carvlin, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews the issue of contrast media dosing and imaging protocols for the optimal MR imaging detection and characterization of pathology. The cumulative clinical experience gained in performing contrast-enhanced MR examinations with gadolinium chelates indicates that a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight provides safe and effective enhancement of most CNS pathology. Doses lower than 0.1 mmol/kg have been shown to be inadequate for delineating all but selected types of CNS pathology, such as masses with a high lesion to background ratio on post-contrast images (acoustic neuromas) or lesions located in areas in which the normal tissue very rapidly takes up contrast agent (e. g. microadenomas in the pituitary gland). Recent clinical studies have suggested a role for high dose gadolinium administration (up to 0.3 mmol/kg) for the optimal detection and delineation of cerebral metastases or other small or poorly enhancing lesions. Differences in the histopathologic characteristics (capillary permeability, vascularity, location, size) of specific diseased tissues may require varying doses or even a different contrast agent to be used for optimal imaging results. As new MR contrast agents and new scanning techniques are introduced, the specific diagnostic question posed will likely determine the choice of pulse sequence, contrast agent and dose used. (orig.)

  14. Intravenous contrast medium administration at 128 multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography: Bolus tracking versus test bolus and the implications for diagnostic quality and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, J.C.L.; Mathias, H.; Negus, I.S.; Manghat, N.E.; Hamilton, M.C.K.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of a test bolus protocol contrast medium administration on diagnostic image quality in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Materials and methods: Fifty patients referred for exclusion of pulmonary embolism underwent CTPA using a test bolus protocol CTPA at 120 kVp and were compared with 50 patients undergoing CTPA using a standard bolus-tracking protocol at 120 kVp, via assessment of attenuation, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) seen in the pulmonary arteries (PAs). An additional group of 10 non-obese patients who underwent CTPA using a test bolus protocol performed at 100 kVp were also analysed. Mean effective dose was calculated from the dose–length product, using standard conversion factors. Results: The test bolus protocol showed significantly higher attenuation, SNR, and CNR in the pulmonary vasculature down to the segmental level compared to bolus-tracking CTPA (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in effective dose between the test bolus and bolus tracking cohorts. The additional group of test bolus CTPA examinations performed at 100 kVp had a significantly reduced effective dose in comparison to both test bolus CTPA at 120 kVp and bolus-tracking CTPA at 120 kVp (p < 0.005) yet maintained mean PA attenuation to segmental level significantly better than bolus-tracking CTPA performed at 120 kVp and comparable to the test bolus cohort performed at 120 kVp. Conclusion: Test bolus contrast administration should be used as an optimal protocol. Performing test bolus CTPA at 100 kVp, as opposed to 120 kVp, significantly reduces dose without compromising PA attenuation in non-obese subjects.

  15. High-dose contrast-enhanced MRI in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koudriavtseva, T. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Pozzilli, C. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Di Biasi, C. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Iannilli, M. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Trasimeni, G. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Gasperini, C. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Argentino, C. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Gualdi, G.F. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy)

    1996-05-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is effective for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and may provide an outcome measure for testing the efficacy of treatment in clinical trials. To compare the sensitivity of high-dose gadolinium-HP-DO3A with that of a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA, we studied 16 patients with relapsing-remitting MS in the acute phase of the disease. Each underwent two MRI examinations within at most 48 h. The initial MRI study was with a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), and the second one an experimental dose of gadolinium-HP-DO3A (0.3 mmol/kg). No adverse effects were attributed to the contrast media. The high-dose study revealed more enhancing lesions than the standard-dose study (56 vs 38). This difference was found to be more relevant for infratentorial and small lesions. Furthermore, with the higher dose, there was a marked qualitative improvement in the visibility and delineation of the lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. High-dose contrast-enhanced MRI in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudriavtseva, T.; Pozzilli, C.; Di Biasi, C.; Iannilli, M.; Trasimeni, G.; Gasperini, C.; Argentino, C.; Gualdi, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is effective for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and may provide an outcome measure for testing the efficacy of treatment in clinical trials. To compare the sensitivity of high-dose gadolinium-HP-DO3A with that of a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA, we studied 16 patients with relapsing-remitting MS in the acute phase of the disease. Each underwent two MRI examinations within at most 48 h. The initial MRI study was with a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), and the second one an experimental dose of gadolinium-HP-DO3A (0.3 mmol/kg). No adverse effects were attributed to the contrast media. The high-dose study revealed more enhancing lesions than the standard-dose study (56 vs 38). This difference was found to be more relevant for infratentorial and small lesions. Furthermore, with the higher dose, there was a marked qualitative improvement in the visibility and delineation of the lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marklund, Mette [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: mm@frh.regionh.dk; Christensen, Robin [Parker Institute: Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: robin.christensen@frh.regionh.dk; Torp-Pedersen, Soren [Parker Institute: Imaging Unit, Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: stp@frh.regionh.dk; Thomsen, Carsten [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk; Nolsoe, Christian P. [Department of Radiology, Koge Hospital (Denmark)], E-mail: cnolsoe@dadlnet.dk

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  18. Signal intensity of normal breast tissue at MR mammography on midfield: Applying a random coefficient model evaluating the effect of doubling the contrast dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, Mette; Christensen, Robin; Torp-Pedersen, Soren; Thomsen, Carsten; Nolsoe, Christian P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the effect on signal intensity (SI) of healthy breast parenchyma on magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) when doubling the contrast dose from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight. Materials and methods: Informed consent and institutional review board approval were obtained. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers (median age: 24 years (range: 21-37 years) and median bodyweight: 65 kg (51-80 kg)) completed two dynamic MRM examinations on a 0.6 T open scanner. The inter-examination time was 24 h (23.5-25 h). The following sequences were applied: axial T2W TSE and an axial dynamic T1W FFED, with a total of seven frames. At day 1, an i.v. gadolinium (Gd) bolus injection of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight (Omniscan) (low) was administered. On day 2, the contrast dose was increased to 0.2 mmol/kg (high). Injection rate was 2 mL/s (day 1) and 4 mL/s (day 2). Any use of estrogen containing oral contraceptives (ECOC) was recorded. Post-processing with automated subtraction, manually traced ROI (region of interest) and recording of the SI was performed. A random coefficient model was applied. Results: We found an SI increase of 24.2% and 40% following the low and high dose, respectively (P < 0.0001); corresponding to a 65% (95% CI: 37-99%) SI increase, indicating a moderate saturation. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), the results indicated a tendency, towards lower maximal SI in the breast parenchyma of ECOC users compared to non-ECOC users. Conclusion: We conclude that the contrast dose can be increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight, if a better contrast/noise relation is desired but increasing the contrast dose above 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight is not likely to improve the enhancement substantially due to the moderate saturation observed. Further research is needed to determine the impact of ECOC on the relative enhancement ratio, and further studies are needed to determine if a possible use of ECOC should be considered a compromising

  19. Dose optimisation of double-contrast barium enema examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, K; Båth, M; Jonasson, P; Cappelen-Smith, J; Fogelstam, P; Söderberg, J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to optimise the filtration and dose setting for double-contrast barium enema examinations using a Philips MultiDiagnost Eleva FD system. A phantom study was performed prior to a patient study. A CDRAD phantom was used in a study where copper and aluminium filtration, different detector doses and tube potentials were examined. The image quality was evaluated using the software CDRAD Analyser and the phantom dose was determined using the Monte Carlo-based software PCXMC. The original setting [100 % detector dose (660 nGy air kerma) and a total filtration of 3.5 mm Al, at 81 kVp] and two other settings identified by the phantom study (100 % detector dose and additional filtration of 1 mm Al and 0.2 mm Cu as well as 80 % detector dose and added filtration of 1 mm Al and 0.2 mm Cu) were included in the patient study. The patient study included 60 patients and up to 8 images from each patient. Six radiologists performed a visual grading characteristics study to evaluate the image quality. A four-step scale was used to judge the fulfillment of three image quality criteria. No overall statistical significant difference in image quality was found between the three settings (P > 0.05). The decrease in the effective dose for the settings in the patient study was 15 % when filtration was added and 34 % when both filtrations was added and detector dose was reduced. The study indicates that additional filtration of 1 mm Al and 0.2 mm Cu and a decrease in detector dose by 20 % from the original setting can be used in colon examinations with Philips MultiDiagnost Eleva FD to reduce the patient dose by 30 % without significantly affecting the image quality. For 20 exposures, this corresponds to a decrease in the effective dose from 1.6 to 1.1 mSv.

  20. The combination of a reduction in contrast agent dose with low tube voltage and an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm in CT enterography: Effects on image quality and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Cui; Zhu, Di; Zou, Xianlun; Li, Anqin; Hu, Xuemei; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the subjective and quantitative image quality and radiation exposure of CT enterography (CTE) examination performed at low tube voltage and low concentration of contrast agent with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm, compared with conventional CTE.One hundred thirty-seven patients with suspected or proved gastrointestinal diseases underwent contrast enhanced CTE in a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. All cases were assigned to 2 groups. Group A (n = 79) underwent CT with low tube voltage based on patient body mass index (BMI) (BMI contrast agent (270 mg I/mL), the images were reconstructed with standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and 50% ASIR algorithm. Group B (n = 58) underwent conventional CTE with 120 kVp and 350 mg I/mL contrast agent, the images were reconstructed with FBP algorithm. The computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), effective dose (ED), and total iodine dosage were calculated and compared. The CT values, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the normal bowel wall, gastrointestinal lesions, and mesenteric vessels were assessed and compared. The subjective image quality was assessed independently and blindly by 2 radiologists using a 5-point Likert scale.The differences of values for CTDIvol (8.64 ± 2.72 vs 11.55 ± 3.95, P  .05) and all image quality scores were greater than or equal to 3 (moderate). Fifty percent ASIR-A group images provided lower image noise, but similar or higher quantitative image quality in comparison with FBP-B group images.Compared with the conventional protocol, CTE performed at low tube voltage, low concentration of contrast agent with 50% ASIR algorithm produce a diagnostically acceptable image quality with a mean ED of 6.34 mSv and a total iodine dose reduction of 26.1%.

  1. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinck, P.A.; Muller, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r 1 and r 2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T 1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R 1 = 1/T 1 and R 2 = 1/T 2 ) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields. (orig.)

  2. Effect of duration of contrast material injection on peak enhancement times and values of the aorta, main portal vein, and liver at dynamic MDCT with the dose of contrast medium tailored to patient weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erturk, S.M.; Ichikawa, T.; Sou, H.; Tsukamoto, T.; Motosugi, U.; Araki, T.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of contrast material injection duration on peak enhancement times and attenuation values of the aorta, main portal vein, and liver at MDCT when the dose of contrast material is adjusted to patient weight. Material and methods: Seventy-five patients were randomly assigned to one of five groups, with durations of injection of 25, 30, 35, 40, or 45 s. All patients were injected with 2 ml/kg iodine (300 mg/ml). Attenuation values and peak enhancement times for the aorta, main portal vein, and liver were determined. The relationship between patient weight and enhancement times and values, the differences regarding peak enhancement times, and the relationship between injection duration and enhancement values were investigated using Pearson correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Spearman rank correlation, respectively. Results: No significant correlations were seen between patient weight and peak enhancement times or values. Mean peak enhancement times for the aorta, main portal vein, and liver were 9-11 s, 18-22 s, and 30-34 s, respectively (p > 0.05). The correlations between injection duration and peak enhancement values were significant and negative. Conclusions: Regardless of patient weight and injection duration, peak enhancement times of aorta, main portal vein and liver were approximately 10, 20, and 30 s, respectively. The enhancement values tended to be higher for shorter injection durations

  3. Analysis on the entrance surface dose and contrast medium dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Hyun [Dept. of Cardiovascular Center, Yeocheon Jeonnam Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Choi, Nam Gil; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study aimed to identify dose reduction measures by retrospectively analyzing the entrance surface dose at computed tomography and angiography in cardiovascular examination and to contribute the patients with renal impairmend and a high probability of side effects to determine the inspection's direction by measuring the contrast usages actually to active actions for the dose by actually measuring the contrast medium dose. The CTDIvol value and air kerma value, which are the entrance surface doses of the two examinations, and the contrast medium dose depending on the number of slides were compared and analyzed. This study was conducted in 21 subjects (11 males; 10 females) who underwent Cardiac Computed Tomographic Angiography (CCTA) and Coronary Angiography (CAG) in this hospital during the period from May 2014 to May 2016. The subject's age was 48-85 years old (mean 65±10 years old), and the weight was 37.6~83.3 kg (mean 63±6 kg). Dose reduction could be expected in the cardiovascular examination using CCTA rather than in the examination using CAG. In terms of contrast medium dose, CAG used a smaller dose than CCTA. In particular, as the number of slides increases at CAG, the contrast medium dose increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the contrast medium dose, the number of slides suitable for the scan range must be selected.

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Effect of Iodine Contrast Agent Concentration On Cerebrovascular Dose for Synchrotron Radiation Microangiography Based On a Simple Mouse Head Model and a Voxel Mouse Head Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Jing, J; Xie, C [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China); Lu, Y [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To find effective setting methods to mitigate the irradiation injure in synchrotron radiation microangiography(SRA) by Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: A mouse 1-D head model and a segmented voxel mouse head phantom were simulated by EGSnrc/Dosxyznrc code to investigate the dose enhancement effect of the iodine contrast agent irradiated by a monochromatic synchrotron radiation(SR) source. The influence of, like iodine concentration (IC), vessel width and depth, with and without skull layer protection and the various incident X ray energies, were simulated. The dose enhancement effect and the absolute dose based on the segmented voxel mouse head phantom were evaluated. Results: The dose enhancement ratio depends little on the irradiation depth, but strongly on the IC, which is linearly increases with IC. The skull layer protection cannot be ignored in SRA, the 700µm thick skull could decrease 10% of the dose. The incident X-ray energy can significantly affact the dose. E.g. compared to the dose of 33.2keV for 50mgI/ml, the 32.7keV dose decreases 38%, whereas the dose of 33.7 keV increases 69.2%, and the variation will strengthen more with enhanced IC. The segmented voxel mouse head phantom also showed that the average dose enhancement effect and the maximal voxel dose per photon depends little on the iodine voxel volume ratio, but strongly on IC. Conclusion: To decrease dose damage in SRA, the high-Z contrast agent should be used as little as possible, and try to avoid radiating locally the injected position immediately after the contrast agent injection. The fragile vessel containing iodine should avoid closely irradiating. Avoiding irradiating through the no or thin skull region, or appending thin equivalent material from outside to protect is also a better method. As long as SRA image quality is ensured, using incident X-ray energy as low as possible.

  5. Energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose and object-detectability-dose curves for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Cohen, G.

    1982-01-01

    The energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose (CdD) and object-detectability-dose (OdD) curves for computed tomographic scanners is investigated. The effects of changes in beam energy on perceptibility are shown to be due to changes in signal-to-noise ratio resulting from changes in contrast and photon statistics. Energy-dependence analysis of OdD curves is shown to depend on the atomic composition of the phantom used to generate the curves, while such an analysis of CdD curves is independent of the atomic composition of the phantom. It is also shown that any OdD curve can be generated from CdD curves and that use of this fact rectifies any potential energy-dependent interpretation of CdD curves

  6. Effects of MRI Protocol Parameters, Preload Injection Dose, Fractionation Strategies, and Leakage Correction Algorithms on the Fidelity of Dynamic-Susceptibility Contrast MRI Estimates of Relative Cerebral Blood Volume in Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, K; Boxerman, J L; Ellingson, B M

    2017-03-01

    DSC perfusion MR imaging assumes that the contrast agent remains intravascular; thus, disruptions in the blood-brain barrier common in brain tumors can lead to errors in the estimation of relative CBV. Acquisition strategies, including the choice of flip angle, TE, TR, and preload dose and incubation time, along with post hoc leakage-correction algorithms, have been proposed as means for combating these leakage effects. In the current study, we used DSC-MR imaging simulations to examine the influence of these various acquisition parameters and leakage-correction strategies on the faithful estimation of CBV. DSC-MR imaging simulations were performed in 250 tumors with perfusion characteristics randomly generated from the distributions of real tumor population data, and comparison of leakage-corrected CBV was performed with a theoretic curve with no permeability. Optimal strategies were determined by protocol with the lowest mean error. The following acquisition strategies (flip angle/TE/TR and contrast dose allocation for preload and bolus) produced high CBV fidelity, as measured by the percentage difference from a hypothetic tumor with no leakage: 1) 35°/35 ms/1.5 seconds with no preload and full dose for DSC-MR imaging, 2) 35°/25 ms/1.5 seconds with ¼ dose preload and ¾ dose bolus, 3) 60°/35 ms/2.0 seconds with ½ dose preload and ½ dose bolus, and 4) 60°/35 ms/1.0 second with 1 dose preload and 1 dose bolus. Results suggest that a variety of strategies can yield similarly high fidelity in CBV estimation, namely those that balance T1- and T2*-relaxation effects due to contrast agent extravasation. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. Analysis of contrast and absorbed doses in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, F.M.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Subtil, L.J.; Silva, R. da

    2001-01-01

    One of the great causes of mortality between women in the world is the breast cancer. The mammograms are the method most efficient to detect some cases of cancer of breast before this to be clinically concrete. The quality of a picture system must be determined by the ability to detect tissue soft masses, cyst or tumors, but also calcifications. This detection is directly connected with the contrast obtained in these pictures. This work has for objective to develop a method for the analysis of this contrast in mammograms verifying the doses referred to these mammograms and comparing them with national and international levels of reference. (author)

  8. Low dose reconstruction algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhentian; Huang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Li; Chen, Zhiqiang; Kang, Kejun; Yin, Hongxia; Wang, Zhenchang; Marco, Stampanoni

    2011-01-01

    Differential phase contrast imaging computed tomography (DPCI-CT) is a novel x-ray inspection method to reconstruct the distribution of refraction index rather than the attenuation coefficient in weakly absorbing samples. In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm for DPCI-CT which benefits from the new compressed sensing theory. We first realize a differential algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) by discretizing the projection process of the differential phase contrast imaging into a linear partial derivative matrix. In this way the compressed sensing reconstruction problem of DPCI reconstruction can be transformed to a resolved problem in the transmission imaging CT. Our algorithm has the potential to reconstruct the refraction index distribution of the sample from highly undersampled projection data. Thus it can significantly reduce the dose and inspection time. The proposed algorithm has been validated by numerical simulations and actual experiments.

  9. Contrast monitoring techniques in CT pulmonary angiography: An important and underappreciated contributor to breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.P., E-mail: dpmmitchell@gmail.com; Rowan, M., E-mail: mrowan@mater.ie; Loughman, E., E-mail: eloughman@mater.ie; Ridge, C.A., E-mail: cridge@mater.ie; MacMahon, P.J., E-mail: pmacmahon@mater.ie

    2017-01-15

    Objective: The aims of our study were to evaluate the contribution of contrast-monitoring techniques to breast dose in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to investigate the effect of a reduced peak kilovoltage (kV) monitoring scan protocol on breast dose and Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) diagnostic quality. Materials and methods: Single center retrospective study of 221 female patients undergoing a reduced kV 80 kV contrast-monitoring CTPA protocol compared to 281 patients using the conventional 120 kV contrast-monitoring protocol (Siemens Somatom Definition AS + ). 99 pregnant patients analyzed separately. ImPACT dosimetry software was used to calculate dose. Group subsets were evaluated to assess CTPA diagnostic quality. Results: The contrast-monitoring component of a CTPA study constituted 27% of the overall breast dose when using a standard 120 kV protocol compared to only 7% of the overall breast dose in the 80 kV study group. The dose to the breast from the contrast-monitoring component alone was reduced by 79% in the non-pregnant patients (0.36mGy ± 0.37 versus 1.7mGy ± 1.02; p < 0.001), and by 88% in the pregnant population (0.25 mGy ± 0.67 versus 2.24mGy ± 1.61; p < 0.001). There was no statistical difference in CTPA diagnostic quality or timing. Conclusion: Despite a short scan length and relatively small DLP, contrast-monitoring techniques (test-bolus or bolus-tracked) set at 120 kV can account for 27% of the overall breast dose accrued from a CTPA study. By decreasing the kilovoltage of the contrast-monitoring component, a significant reduction in breast dose for pregnant and non-pregnant female patients can be achieved without affecting CTPA quality or timing.

  10. Patient radiation dose during fluoroscopy testes with contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsalih, Abir Abdelrady El noor

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the patient radiation dose received in fluoroscopy examinations during contrast medium. The cumulative air kerma (Ck), kerma area product (KAP) and fluoroscopy time were measured for sixty ( male and female ) patients undergoing five fluoroscopy examinations KAP metre which was installed for the purpose of this study. The mean kerma area product were found to be 2.681, 5.1561, 9.85529. 5.7974 and 13.09 Gy.cm"2 for HSG, A.S and D.S, GI Track and sonogram tests, respectively. The obtained mean cumulative dose was were 6.31, 13.88, 24.61, 22.56 and 32.14 mGy for HSG, A.S, A.S and D.S , GI Track, respectively, the mean fluoroscopy time were. 0.18, 0.51,0.89,1.57 and 1.75 min, for HSG, A.S, A.S, and D.S, G1 Track and sonogram test respectively. Patient dose is mainly dependent on the patient size, procedure, equipment used exposure factor and user experience. As KV and mA were controlled by the AEC and it was found to be well calibrated, possible optimization could be achieved by radiologist by decreasing the exposure time if possible. (Author)

  11. Low-dose quantitative phase contrast medical CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittone, A.; Bravin, A.; Coan, P.

    2018-02-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful and routinely used clinical diagnostic technique, which is well tolerated by patients, and which provides high-resolution images and volumetric information about the body. However, two important limitations still affect this examination procedure: (1) its low sensitivity with respect to soft tissues, and (2) the hazards associated with x-ray exposure. Conventional radiology is based on the detection of the different photon absorption properties that characterize biological tissues, and thus the obtainable image contrast from soft and/or similar tissues is intrinsically limited. In this scenario, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) has been extensively tested and proven to overcome some of the main issues surrounding standard x-ray imaging. In addition to the absorption signal, XPCI relies on detecting the phase shifts induced by an object. Interestingly, as the order of magnitude of the phase contrast is higher than that of absorption, XPCI can, in principle, offer higher sensitivity at lower radiation doses. However, other technical aspects may counterbalance this gain, and an optimized setup and image processing solutions need to be implemented. The work presented here describes the strategies and developments we have realized, with the aim of controlling the radiation dose for the highly sensitive and quantitative XPCI-CT. Different algorithms for the phase retrieval and CT reconstruction of the XPCI data are presented. The CT algorithms we have implemented, namely the equally sloped tomography and the dictionary learning method, allow the image quality to be preserved while reducing the number of angular projections required by a factor of five. The results applied to breast imaging report accurate reconstructions at clinically compatible doses of the 3D distribution of the refractive properties of full human organs obtained by using three different phase retrieval methods. The described methodologies and the

  12. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  13. Effects of computed tomography contrast medium factors on contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasawa, Kazuaki; Hatcho, Atsushi; Okuda, Itsuko

    2011-01-01

    The various nonionic iodinated contrast media used in contrast computed tomography (CT) studies differ in terms of their composition, characteristics, and iodine concentration (mgI/ml), as well as the volume injected (ml). Compared with ionic iodinated contrast media, nonionic iodinated contrast media are low-osmolar agents, with different agents having different osmotic pressures. Using a custom-made phantom incorporating a semipermeable membrane, the osmotic flow rate (hounsfield unit (HU)/s) could easily be measured based on the observed increase in CT numbers, and the relationship between the osmotic pressure and the osmotic flow rate could be obtained (r 2 =0.84). In addition, taking the effects of patient size into consideration, the levels of contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta (AA) and inferior vena cava (IVC) were compared among four types of CT contrast medium. The results showed differences in contrast enhancement in the IVC during the equilibrium phase depending on the type of contrast medium used. It was found that the factors responsible for the differences observed in enhancement in the IVC were the osmotic flow rate and the volume of the blood flow pathways in the circulatory system. It is therefore considered that the reproducibility of contrast enhancement is likely to be reduced in the examination of parenchymal organs, in which scanning must be performed during the equilibrium phase, even if the amount of iodine injected per unit body weight (mgI/kg) is maintained at a specified level. (author)

  14. The optimal dose of the contrast media for spiral CT portography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiansheng; Xiao Peiyu; Meng Xiaochun; Xu Chuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the optimal dose of the contrast media in SCTP. Methods: 40 healthy patients were divided into 2 groups according to their body weight (20 cases in group A with weight below 60kg, 20 cases in group B with weight over 70kg). They all received 90ml contrast media at a rate of 4.0 ml/sec in the contrast-enhanced CT ex- amination. And non-cirrhosis cases, liver cirrhosis without ascites cases and liver cirrhosis with ascites cases were selected respectively, 60 patients in each group. Then, the patients of each group were randomly divided into 3 sub-groups, 20 cases in each of them, which respectively received 1.5ml/kg, 2.0ml/kg, 2.5ml/kg contrast media at a rate of 4.0 ml/sec in the contrast-enhanced CT examination. The effect of the dose of the contrast material on the imaging quality of portal vein system in patients with different weight and different state of illness was analyzed. Results: In 40 healthy patients, the density difference between portal vein and hepatic parenchyma was significantly higher in Group A than in Group B (P 0.05), and both of them showed significant difference while using 1.5ml/kg contrast media (P 0.05), and they both had significant difference when using 1.5ml/kg contrast media (P< 0.05). Besides these, the imaging quality of portal vein branches and collateral vessels were better in 2.0ml/kg group than others. Conclusion: The patient's body weight and the state of liver disease influenced the extent of portal vein enhancement. To calculate the dose of contrast media according to patient's weight is crucial for ensuring the imaging quality of portal vein system. 2.0ml/kg contrast media can provide a better effect. (authors)

  15. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  16. Development and validation of Monte Carlo dose computations for contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautrin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) is an innovative technique based on localized dose-enhancement effects obtained by reinforced photoelectric absorption in the tumor. Medium energy monochromatic X-rays (50 - 100 keV) are used for irradiating tumors previously loaded with a high-Z element. Clinical trials of SSRT are being prepared at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), an iodinated contrast agent will be used. In order to compute the energy deposited in the patient (dose), a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed for the clinical trials, based on the ISOgray TPS. This work focuses on the SSRT specific modifications of the TPS, especially to the PENELOPE-based Monte Carlo dose engine. The TPS uses a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of medium energy polarized photons to compute the deposited energy in the patient. Simulations are performed considering the synchrotron source, the modeled beamline geometry and finally the patient. Specific materials were also implemented in the voxelized geometry of the patient, to consider iodine concentrations in the tumor. The computation process has been optimized and parallelized. Finally a specific computation of absolute doses and associated irradiation times (instead of monitor units) was implemented. The dedicated TPS was validated with depth dose curves, dose profiles and absolute dose measurements performed at the ESRF in a water tank and solid water phantoms with or without bone slabs. (author) [fr

  17. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  18. Influence of contrast agent dose and ultrasound exposure on cardiomyocyte injury induced by myocardial contrast echocardiography in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Douglas L; Li, Peng; Dou, Chunyan; Gordon, David; Edwards, Chris A; Armstrong, William F

    2005-10-01

    To detect specific cardiomyocyte injury induced by myocardial contrast material-enhanced echocardiography (ie, myocardial contrast echocardiography) in rats and to ascertain the influences of contrast material dose and ultrasound exposure on this injury. All animal procedures were approved by the university committee for the use and care of animals. Myocardial contrast echocardiography with 1:4 electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering was performed at 1.5 MHz in 61 anesthetized rats. Evans blue (EB) dye was injected as the vital stain for cardiomyocyte injury. At the start of myocardial contrast echocardiography, which lasted 10 minutes, perflutren lipid microsphere-based contrast material was infused through the tail vein for 5 minutes. Premature heartbeats were counted from the ECG record. The numbers of EB-stained cells counted on sections of heart specimens obtained 24 hours after myocardial contrast echocardiography and then either fresh frozen or embedded in paraffin were determined by using fluorescence microscopy. Results were compared statistically by using t tests and Mann-Whitney rank sum tests. EB-stained cells were concentrated in the anterior region of the myocardium. In the paraffin-embedded specimens, EB-stained cells were often accompanied by but largely separate from areas of inflammatory cell infiltration. At end-systolic triggering with a 50 microL/kg dose of microsphere contrast material, the EB-stained cell count increased with increasing peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, with significantly increased cell counts at 1.6 MPa (P .1). EB-stained cell counts increased with increasing contrast material dose, from 10 to 50 microL/kg, at 2.0 MPa. Cardiomyocyte injury was induced by the interaction of ultrasound pulses with contrast agent microbubbles during myocardial contrast echocardiography in rats, and the numbers of injured cells increased with increasing contrast agent dose and ultrasound exposure. RSNA, 2005

  19. Effects of theophyline on contrast

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Fatahiyan; B. Baqerii; A. Mohseni; A. Makhlouq

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Contrast-induced nephropathy (CN) is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic acute renal failure. In fact CN is the third leading cause of new ARF in hospitalized patients. Radiocontrast-associated ARF is a significant problem in patients with cardiovascular disease. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease also predispose these patients to an increased risk of renal failure. Various strategies have been suggested for preventing CN. Since adenosine may play a ro...

  20. Suitability of new anode materials in mammography: Dose and subject contrast considerations using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, H.; Spyrou, G.; Costaridou, L.; Tzanakos, G.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2006-01-01

    optimization task in terms of subject contrast to dose ratio, tube voltage was found to have a minor effect, while with respect to the filter material, a lesion specific performance was noticed, with Al filtered spectra showing improved characteristics in case of the inhomogeneities simulating microcalcifications, while softer k-edge filtered spectra are more suitable for the discrimination of inhomogeneities simulating masses

  1. Effect of contrast material on image noise and radiation dose in adult chest computed tomography using automatic exposure control: A comparative study between 16-, 64- and 128-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jijo, E-mail: jijopaul1980@gmail.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe University, Department of Biophysics, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Schell, Boris, E-mail: boris.schell@googlemail.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kerl, J. Matthias, E-mail: matthias.kerl@gmai.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Maentele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University, Department of Biophysics, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W., E-mail: ralfwbauer@aol.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the difference in radiation dose between non-enhanced (NECT) and contrast-enhanced (CECT) chest CT examinations contributed by contrast material with different scanner generations with automatic exposure control (AEC). Methods and materials: Each 42 adult patients received a NECT and CECT of the chest in one session on a 16-, 64- or 128-slice CT scanner with the same scan protocol settings. However, AEC technology (Care Dose 4D, Siemens) underwent upgrades in each of the three scanner generations. DLP, CTDIvol and image noise were compared. Results: Although absolute differences in image noise were very small and ranged between 10 and 13 HU for NECT and CECT in median, the differences in image noise and dose (DLP: 16-slice:+2.8%; 64-slice:+3.9%; 128-slice:+5.6%) between NECT and CECT were statistically significant in all groups. Image noise and dose parameters were significantly lower in the most recent 128-slice CT generation for both NECT and CECT (DLP: 16-slice:+35.5-39.2%; 64-slice:+6.8-8.5%). Conclusion: The presence of contrast material lead to an increase in dose for chest examinations in three CT generations with AEC. Although image noise values were significantly higher for CECT, the absolute differences were in a range of 3 HU. This can be regarded as negligible, thus indicating that AEC is able to fulfill its purpose of maintaining image quality. However, technological developments lead to a significant reduction of dose and image noise with the latest CT generation.

  2. Image quality, threshold contrast and mean glandular dose in CR mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubiak, R R; Gamba, H R; Neves, E B; Peixoto, J E

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, computed radiography (CR) systems represent the majority of equipment used in digital mammography. This study presents a method for optimizing image quality and dose in CR mammography of patients with breast thicknesses between 45 and 75 mm. Initially, clinical images of 67 patients (group 1) were analyzed by three experienced radiologists, reporting about anatomical structures, noise and contrast in low and high pixel value areas, and image sharpness and contrast. Exposure parameters (kV, mAs and target/filter combination) used in the examinations of these patients were reproduced to determine the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD). The parameters were also used to radiograph a CDMAM (version 3.4) phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, The Netherlands) for image threshold contrast evaluation. After that, different breast thicknesses were simulated with polymethylmethacrylate layers and various sets of exposure parameters were used in order to determine optimal radiographic parameters. For each simulated breast thickness, optimal beam quality was defined as giving a target CNR to reach the threshold contrast of CDMAM images for acceptable MGD. These results were used for adjustments in the automatic exposure control (AEC) by the maintenance team. Using optimized exposure parameters, clinical images of 63 patients (group 2) were evaluated as described above. Threshold contrast, CNR and MGD for such exposure parameters were also determined. Results showed that the proposed optimization method was effective for all breast thicknesses studied in phantoms. The best result was found for breasts of 75 mm. While in group 1 there was no detection of the 0.1 mm critical diameter detail with threshold contrast below 23%, after the optimization, detection occurred in 47.6% of the images. There was also an average MGD reduction of 7.5%. The clinical image quality criteria were attended in 91.7% for all breast thicknesses evaluated in both

  3. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken with each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 ± 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 ± 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 ± 0.010 and 0.781 ± 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.

  4. Evaluation of subject contrast and normalized average glandular dose by semi-analytical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomal, A.; Poletti, M.E.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, two semi-analytical models are described to evaluate the subject contrast of nodules and the normalized average glandular dose in mammography. Both models were used to study the influence of some parameters, such as breast characteristics (thickness and composition) and incident spectra (kVp and target-filter combination) on the subject contrast of a nodule and on the normalized average glandular dose. From the subject contrast results, detection limits of nodules were also determined. Our results are in good agreement with those reported by other authors, who had used Monte Carlo simulation, showing the robustness of our semi-analytical method.

  5. Dose efficiency and low-contrast detectability of an amorphous silicon x-ray detector for digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufrichtig, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The effect of dose reduction on low-contrast detectability is investigated theoretically and experimentally for a production grade amorphous silicon (a-Si) x-ray detector and compared with a standard thoracic screen-film combination. A non-prewhitening matched filter observer model modified to include a spatial response function and internal noise for the human visual system (HVS) is used to calculate a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) related to object detectability. Other inputs to the SNR calculation are the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the imaging system. Besides threshold detectability, the model predicts the equivalent perception dose ratio (EPDR), which is the fraction of the screen-film exposure for which the digital detector provides equal detectability. Images of a contrast-detail phantom are obtained with the digital detector at dose levels corresponding to 27%, 41%, 63% and 100% of the dose used for screen-film. The images are used in a four-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) observer perception study in order to measure threshold detectability. A statistically significant improvement in contrast detectability is measured with the digital detector at 100% and 63% of the screen-film dose. There is no statistical difference between screen-film and digital at 41% of the dose. On average, the experimental EPDR is 44%, which agrees well with the model prediction of 40%. (author)

  6. Contrast media and glomerular filtration: dose dependence of clearance for three agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeck, S.E.K.; Krutzen, E.; Nilsson-Ehle, P.

    1988-01-01

    Determination of plasma clearance of contrast agents has been advocated as a means to assess glomerular filtration rate. To evaluate the feasibility of different agents for this purpose, we have compared, in healthy volunteers, the dose dependence of plasma clearance for three contrast media (iohexol, a nonionic agent, and iothalamate and metrizoate, which are ionic substances), with special emphasis on the lower dose range (2-20 mL corresponding to 0.9-12.9 g, depending on dose and agent). Iohexol and iothalamate were cleared at constant rates, irrespective of given dose, whereas metrizoate clearance increased significantly at lower doses. In general, the clearances or iothalamate and metrizoate were, respectively, moderately and markedly higher than that of iohexol. The clearance of different doses of metrizoate (2 mL versus a radiographic dose of 40 mL or more) was also compared with the clearance of [ 51 Cr]EDTA in two groups of patients with reduced renal function. When compared with [ 51 Cr]EDTA in patients with renal dysfunction, metrizoate was cleared significantly faster after a 2-mL dose, whereas clearances were identical when the metrizoate dose was 40 mL or more. These findings indicate that tubular secretion plays an active role in the elimination of metrizoate. The pharmacokinetic properties of iohexol, in combination with its low toxicity, make it a suitable agent for determination of glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice

  7. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Tong Yu; Jun Gao; Zhi-Min Liu; Qi-Feng Zhang; Yong Liu; Ling Jiang; Yun Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors...

  8. Contrast effects on stop consonant identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, R L; Elman, J L; McCusker, S B

    1978-11-01

    Changes in the identification of speech sounds following selective adaptation are usually attributed to a reduction in sensitivity of auditory feature detectors. An alternative explanation of these effects is based on the notion of response contrast. In several experiments, subjects identified the initial segment of synthetic consonant-vowel syllables as either the voiced stop [b] or the voiceless stop [ph]. Each test syllable had a value of voice onset time (VOT) that placed it near the English voiced-voiceless boundary. When the test syllables were preceded by a single clear [b] (VOT = -100 msec), subjects tended to identify them as [ph], whereas when they were preceded by an unambiguous [ph] (VOT = 100 msec), the syllables were predominantly labeled [b]. This contrast effect occurred even when the contextual stimuli were velar and the test stimuli were bilabial, which suggests a featural rather than a phonemic basis for the effect. To discount the possibility that these might be instances of single-trial sensory adaptation, we conducted a similar experiment in which the contextual stimuli followed the test items. Reliable contrast effects were still obtained. In view of these results, it appears likely that response contrast accounts for at least some component of the adaptation effects reported in the literature.

  9. A method to evaluate the dose increase in CT with iodinated contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Lizio, Domenico; Settineri, Nicola; Di Pasquale, Andrea; Salamone, Ignazio; Pandolfo, Ignazio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to develop a method to calculate the relative dose increase when a computerized tomography scan (CT) is carried out after administration of iodinated contrast medium, with respect to the same CT scan in absence of contrast medium. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of anthropomorphic neck and abdomen phantoms exposed to a simplified model of CT scanner was set up in order to calculate the increase of dose to thyroid, liver, spleen, kidneys, and pancreas as a function of the quantity of iodine accumulated; a series of experimental measurements of Hounsfield unit (HU) increment for known concentrations of iodinated contrast medium was carried out on a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner in order to obtain a relationship between the increment in HU and the relative dose increase in the organs studied. The authors applied such a method to calculate the average dose increase in three patients who underwent standard CT protocols consisting of one native scan in absence of contrast, followed by a contrast-enhanced scan in venous phase. Results: The authors validated their GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation by comparing the resulting dose increases for iodine solutions in water with the ones presented in literature and with their experimental data obtained through a Roentgen therapy unit. The relative dose increases as a function of the iodine mass fraction accumulated and as a function of the Hounsfield unit increment between the contrast-enhanced scan and the native scan are presented. The data shown for the three patients exhibit an average relative dose increase between 22% for liver and 74% for kidneys; also, spleen (34%), pancreas (28%), and thyroid (48%) show a remarkable average increase. Conclusions: The method developed allows a simple evaluation of the dose increase when iodinated contrast medium is used in CT scans, basing on the increment in Hounsfield units observed on the patients' organs. Since many clinical protocols

  10. A method to evaluate the dose increase in CT with iodinated contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Ernesto; Lizio, Domenico; Settineri, Nicola; Di Pasquale, Andrea; Salamone, Ignazio; Pandolfo, Ignazio [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Messina, Messina 98125 (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Messina, Messina 98166 (Italy); University Hospital ' ' G. Martino' ' , Messina 98125 (Italy); Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Messina, Messina 98125 (Italy) and University Hospital ' ' G. Martino' ' , Messina 98125 (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to develop a method to calculate the relative dose increase when a computerized tomography scan (CT) is carried out after administration of iodinated contrast medium, with respect to the same CT scan in absence of contrast medium. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of anthropomorphic neck and abdomen phantoms exposed to a simplified model of CT scanner was set up in order to calculate the increase of dose to thyroid, liver, spleen, kidneys, and pancreas as a function of the quantity of iodine accumulated; a series of experimental measurements of Hounsfield unit (HU) increment for known concentrations of iodinated contrast medium was carried out on a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner in order to obtain a relationship between the increment in HU and the relative dose increase in the organs studied. The authors applied such a method to calculate the average dose increase in three patients who underwent standard CT protocols consisting of one native scan in absence of contrast, followed by a contrast-enhanced scan in venous phase. Results: The authors validated their GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation by comparing the resulting dose increases for iodine solutions in water with the ones presented in literature and with their experimental data obtained through a Roentgen therapy unit. The relative dose increases as a function of the iodine mass fraction accumulated and as a function of the Hounsfield unit increment between the contrast-enhanced scan and the native scan are presented. The data shown for the three patients exhibit an average relative dose increase between 22% for liver and 74% for kidneys; also, spleen (34%), pancreas (28%), and thyroid (48%) show a remarkable average increase. Conclusions: The method developed allows a simple evaluation of the dose increase when iodinated contrast medium is used in CT scans, basing on the increment in Hounsfield units observed on the patients' organs. Since many clinical

  11. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Young Sil; Yoon, Joon Kee; Hong, Seon Pyo; Joh, Chul Woo; Yoon, Seok Nam

    2006-01-01

    The standard protocol using large volume of oral contrast media may cause gastrointestinal discomfort and contrast-related artifacts in PET/CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast in 18 F-FDG PET/CT. We retrospectively reviewed the whole-body PET/CT images in a total of 435 patients. About 200 ml of oral contrast agent (barium sulfate) was administered immediately before injection of 18 F-FDG. The FDG uptake of intestines was analyzed by visual and semi-quantitative method on transaxial, coronal and saggital planes. Seventy (16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake (peak SUV > 4); 50 (74%, 84 sites) with diffuse and 20 (26%, 29 sites) with focal uptake. The most commonly delivered site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n = 27, 39%). On PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast media in 26 patients (54%, 38 sites) with diffuse pattern and 9 (45%, 9 sites) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38 (45%) and 9 (31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29/47 sites). A visual analysis of available non-attenuation corrected PET images of 27 matched regions revealed no contrast-related artifact. We concluded that the application of low dose contrast media could be helpful in the evaluation of abdominal uptake in the FDG PET/CT image

  12. Deep learning enables reduced gadolinium dose for contrast-enhanced brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Enhao; Pauly, John M; Wintermark, Max; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2018-02-13

    There are concerns over gadolinium deposition from gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) administration. To reduce gadolinium dose in contrast-enhanced brain MRI using a deep learning method. Retrospective, crossover. Sixty patients receiving clinically indicated contrast-enhanced brain MRI. 3D T 1 -weighted inversion-recovery prepped fast-spoiled-gradient-echo (IR-FSPGR) imaging was acquired at both 1.5T and 3T. In 60 brain MRI exams, the IR-FSPGR sequence was obtained under three conditions: precontrast, postcontrast images with 10% low-dose (0.01mmol/kg) and 100% full-dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine. We trained a deep learning model using the first 10 cases (with mixed indications) to approximate full-dose images from the precontrast and low-dose images. Synthesized full-dose images were created using the trained model in two test sets: 20 patients with mixed indications and 30 patients with glioma. For both test sets, low-dose, true full-dose, and the synthesized full-dose postcontrast image sets were compared quantitatively using peak-signal-to-noise-ratios (PSNR) and structural-similarity-index (SSIM). For the test set comprised of 20 patients with mixed indications, two neuroradiologists scored blindly and independently for the three postcontrast image sets, evaluating image quality, motion-artifact suppression, and contrast enhancement compared with precontrast images. Results were assessed using paired t-tests and noninferiority tests. The proposed deep learning method yielded significant (n = 50, P 5 dB PSNR gains and >11.0% SSIM). Ratings on image quality (n = 20, P = 0.003) and contrast enhancement (n = 20, P deep learning method, gadolinium dose can be reduced 10-fold while preserving contrast information and avoiding significant image quality degradation. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Efficacy of high iodine concentration contrast medium with saline pushing in hepatic CT in patients with chronic liver disease. Comparison of high doses-standard contrast medium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoba, Munetaka; Kondo, Tamaki; Nishikawa, Takahiro; Kuginuki, Yasuaki; Yokota, Hajime; Higashi, Kotaro; Tonami, Hisao

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the enhancement of liver parenchyama with high iodine concentration contrast medium with saline pushing to that with high doses standard iodine concentration in hepatic CT in patients with chronic liver disease. There was no statistically significant difference regarding to the enhancement of liver parenchyama between the 370 mgI/ml of contrast medium with saline pushing and high doses standard iodine concentration contrast medium. (author)

  14. Reducing the oral contrast dose in CT colonography: evaluation of faecal tagging quality and patient acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedenbaum, M.H.; Denters, M.J.; Zijta, F.M.; Ravesteijn, V.F. van; Bipat, S.; Vos, F.M.; Dekker, E.; Stoker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the minimal iodine contrast medium load necessary for an optimal computed tomography colonography tagging quality. Materials and Methods: Faecal occult blood test positive patients were randomly selected for one of three iodine bowel preparations: (1) 3 x 50 ml meglumine ioxithalamate (45 g iodine), (2) 4 x 25 ml meglumine ioxithalamate (30 g iodine); or (3) 3 x 25 ml (22.5 g iodine) meglumine ioxithalamate. Two experienced readers assessed the tagging quality per colonic segment on a five-point scale and the presence of adherent stool. Also semi-automatic homogeneity measurements were performed. Patient acceptance was assessed with questionnaires. Results: Of 70 eligible patients, 45 patients participated (25 males, mean age 62 years). Each preparation group contained 15 patients. The quality of tagging was insufficient (score 1-2) in 0% of segments in group 1; 4% in group 2 (p < 0.01 versus group 1); and 5% in group 3 (p = 0.06 versus group 1). In group 1 in 11% of the segments adherent stool was present compared with 49% in group 2 and 41% in group 3 (p < 0.01, group 2 and 3 versus group 1). Homogeneity was 85, 102 (p < 0.01), and 91 SD HU (p = 0.26) in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In group 1 two patients experienced no burden after contrast agent ingestion compared to one patient in group 2 and nine patients in group 3 (p = 0.017). Conclusion: A dose of 3 x 50 ml meglumine ioxithalamate is advisable for an optimal tagging quality despite beneficial effects on the patient acceptance in patients receiving a lower dose.

  15. Plutonium dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Osamu

    1976-01-01

    Dose in internal exposure to Pu was investigated, and dose-effect relationship was discussed. Dose-effect relationship in internal exposure was investigated by means of two methods, which were relationship between dose and its effect (relationship between μ Ci/Kg and its effect), and exposure dose and its effects (rad-effect), and merits and demerits of two methods were mentioned. Problems in a indication method such as mean dose were discussed with respect to the dose in skeleton, the liver and the lung. Pu-induced osteosarcoma in mice rats, and beagles was described, and differences in its induction between animals were discussed. Pulmonary neoplasma induced by 239 PuO 2 inhalation in beagles was reported, and description was made as to differences in induction of lung cancer between animals when Pu was inhaled and was taken into the lung. A theoretical and experimental study of a extrapolation of the results of the animal experiment using Pu to human cases is necessary. (Serizawa, K.)

  16. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R 2   >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented. (paper)

  17. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  18. Effective doses in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, Olga; Diaconescu, Cornelia; Roca, Antoaneta

    2001-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study is to assess in terms of effective doses the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses to the patient. Effective doses have been derived from measurements of dose-area product (DAP) carried out on over 900 patients undergoing X-ray examinations, in five paediatric units. The conversion coefficients for estimating effective doses are those calculated by the NRPB using Monte-Carlo technique on a series of 5 mathematical phantoms representing 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old children. The annual frequency of X-ray examinations necessary for collective dose calculation are those reported in our last national study on medical exposure, conducted in 1995. The annual effective doses from all medical examinations for the average paediatric patient are as follows: 1.05 mSv for 0 year old, 0.98 mSv for 1 year old, 0.53 mSv for 5 year old, 0.65 mSv for 10 year old and 0.70 mSv for 15 year old. The resulting annual collective effective dose was evaluated at 625 man Sv with the largest contribution of pelvis and hip examinations (34%). The annual collective effective associated with paediatric radiology in Romania represent 5% of the annual value resulting from all diagnostic radiology. Examination of the chest is by far the most frequent procedure for children, accounting for about 60 per cent of all annually performed X-ray conventional examinations. Knowledge of real level of patient dose is an essential component of quality assurance programs in paediatric radiology. (authors)

  19. Saving radiation dose and contrast media in intravenous digital subtraction angiography by use of bolus chasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckforth, J.; Schuermann, K.; Vorwerk, D.; Guenther, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the dose area product, the amount of contrast media and the examination quality of the bolus chasing technique compared to the single-step technique in intravenous digital subtraction angiography. Material and Methods: 15 examinations each with bolus chasing and single-step technique were compared. The dose area product and the volume of contrast media were recorded. The examination quality was scored by two examiners. Results: With bolus chasing the volume of the administered contrast media could be decreased on average by 114 ml (43%). The difference between the dose area product of bolus chasing (722 dGy/cm 2 ) and single-step technique (1910 dGy/cm 2 ) was significant. No significant difference in examination quality was found. Conclusions: The intravenous bolus chasing technique is a practicable method. Compared to the single-step technique it allows a remarkable dose reduction and a low consumption of contrast media without restriction of examination quality. (orig.) [de

  20. On the influence of the electron dose rate on the HRTEM image contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Juri, E-mail: ju.barthel@fz-juelich.de [RWTH Aachen University, Ahornstraße 55, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Lentzen, Markus; Thust, Andreas [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate a possible dependence between the applied electron dose-rate and the magnitude of the resulting image contrast in HRTEM of inorganic crystalline objects. The present study is focussed on the question whether electron irradiation can induce excessively strong atom vibrations or displacements, which in turn could significantly reduce the resulting image contrast. For this purpose, high-resolution images of MgO, Ge, and Au samples were acquired with varying dose rates using a C{sub S}-corrected FEI Titan 80–300 microscope operated at 300 kV accelerating voltage. This investigation shows that the magnitude of the signal contrast is independent from the dose rates occurring in conventional HRTEM experiments and that excessively strong vibrations or displacements of bulk atoms are not induced by the applied electron irradiation. - Highlights: • No dependence between electron dose rate and HRTEM image contrast is found. • This finding is in full accordance with established solid-state physics theory. • Object-related causes for the previous Stobbs-factor phenomenon are ruled out.

  1. Patient radiation doses in upper GI examinations: a comparison between conventional and double-contrast techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankvall, G; Owman, T

    1982-01-01

    A total of 60 patients, divided into 3 groups with 20 patients in each, were examined with 3 different techniques: group 1 -- conventional technique, exposure at 120 kV; group 2 -- double-contrast technique (hypotonic gastrography, HG), exposure at 80 kW; group 3 -- HG, exposure at 120 kV. All examinations were performed in the same examination room and by the same radiologist. Absorbed doses to skin, thyroid, breasts, and gonads as well as energy imparted were measured. The only significant dose enhancements found when using double-contrast instead of conventional technique were in the female breasts and then only if the voltage was in the lower range. With exposure at 120 kV there was little difference in absorbed dose, but a significant advantage with respect to energy was imparted when using a double-contrast technique instead of a conventional technique. The testes doses were very low in all 3 types of examinations, and it seems that use of a testes shield is hardly motivated. With regard to both diagnostic accuracy and patient radiation dose, there can be no reason to use a conventional technique for upper GI examinations.

  2. Radiation dose optimization in pediatric temporal bone computed tomography: influence of tube tension on image contrast and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauer, Claude Bertrand; Zubler, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian; Stieger, Christof; Senn, Pascal; Arnold, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of tube tension reduction on image contrast and image quality in pediatric temporal bone computed tomography (CT). Seven lamb heads with infant-equivalent sizes were scanned repeatedly, using four tube tensions from 140 to 80 kV while the CT-Dose Index (CTDI) was held constant. Scanning was repeated with four CTDI values from 30 to 3 mGy. Image contrast was calculated for the middle ear as the Hounsfield unit (HU) difference between bone and air and for the inner ear as the HU difference between bone and fluid. The influence of tube tension on high-contrast detail delineation was evaluated using a phantom. The subjective image quality of eight middle and inner ear structures was assessed using a 4-point scale (scores 1-2 = insufficient; scores 3-4 = sufficient). Middle and inner ear contrast showed a near linear increase with tube tension reduction (r = -0.94/-0.88) and was highest at 80 kV. Tube tension had no influence on spatial resolution. Subjective image quality analysis showed significantly better scoring at lower tube tensions, with highest image quality at 80 kV. However, image quality improvement was most relevant for low-dose scans. Image contrast in the temporal bone is significantly higher at low tube tensions, leading to a better subjective image quality. Highest contrast and best quality were found at 80 kV. This image quality improvement might be utilized to further reduce the radiation dose in pediatric low-dose CT protocols.

  3. Radiation dose optimization in pediatric temporal bone computed tomography: influence of tube tension on image contrast and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauer, Claude Bertrand; Zubler, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian; Stieger, Christof; Senn, Pascal; Arnold, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of tube tension reduction on image contrast and image quality in pediatric temporal bone computed tomography (CT). Seven lamb heads with infant-equivalent sizes were scanned repeatedly, using four tube tensions from 140 to 80 kV while the CT-Dose Index (CTDI) was held constant. Scanning was repeated with four CTDI values from 30 to 3 mGy. Image contrast was calculated for the middle ear as the Hounsfield unit (HU) difference between bone and air and for the inner ear as the HU difference between bone and fluid. The influence of tube tension on high-contrast detail delineation was evaluated using a phantom. The subjective image quality of eight middle and inner ear structures was assessed using a 4-point scale (scores 1-2 = insufficient; scores 3-4 = sufficient). Middle and inner ear contrast showed a near linear increase with tube tension reduction (r = -0.94/-0.88) and was highest at 80 kV. Tube tension had no influence on spatial resolution. Subjective image quality analysis showed significantly better scoring at lower tube tensions, with highest image quality at 80 kV. However, image quality improvement was most relevant for low-dose scans. Image contrast in the temporal bone is significantly higher at low tube tensions, leading to a better subjective image quality. Highest contrast and best quality were found at 80 kV. This image quality improvement might be utilized to further reduce the radiation dose in pediatric low-dose CT protocols. (orig.)

  4. CT of multiple sclerosis: reassessment of delayed scanning with high doses of contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, S.M.; Vinuela, F.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study involving 87 patients was carried out to evaluate the necessity for a high dose of contrast material in addition to delayed computed tomographic (CT) scanning for optimal detection of the lesions of multiple sclerosis in the brain. In patients with either clinically definite multiple sclerosis or laboratory-supported definite multiple sclerosis, CT scans were obtained with a uniform protocol. Lesions consistent with multiple sclerosis were demonstrated on the second scan in 54 patients. In 36 of these 54 patients, the high-dose delayed scan added information. These results are quite similar to those of a previous study from this institution using different patients, in whom the second scan was obtained immediately after the bolus injection of contrast material containing 40 g of organically bound iodine. The lack of real difference in the results of the two studies indicate that the increased dose, not just the delay in scanning, is necessary for a proper study

  5. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Z.; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions

  6. Development of low-dose photon-counting contrast-enhanced tomosynthesis with spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitzberger, Florian F; Fallenberg, Eva Maria; Lawaczeck, Rüdiger; Hemmendorff, Magnus; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Susanne; Pöllinger, Alexander; Engelken, Florian J; Diekmann, Felix

    2011-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose photon-counting tomosynthesis in combination with a contrast agent (contrast material-enhanced tomographic mammography) for the differentiation of breast cancer. All studies were approved by the institutional review board, and all patients provided written informed consent. A phantom model with wells of iodinated contrast material (3 mg of iodine per milliliter) 1, 2, 5, 10, and 15 mm in diameter was assessed. Nine patients with malignant lesions and one with a high-risk lesion (atypical papilloma) were included (all women; mean age, 60.7 years). A multislit photon-counting tomosynthesis system was utilized (spectral imaging) to produce both low- and high-energy tomographic data (below and above the k edge of iodine, respectively) in a single scan, which allowed for dual-energy visualization of iodine. Images were obtained prior to contrast material administration and 120 and 480 seconds after contrast material administration. Four readers independently assessed the images along with conventional mammograms, ultrasonographic images, and magnetic resonance images. Glandular dose was estimated. Contrast agent was visible in the phantom model with simulated spherical tumor diameters as small as 5 mm. The average glandular dose was measured as 0.42 mGy per complete spectral imaging tomosynthesis scan of one breast. Because there were three time points (prior to contrast medium administration and 120 and 480 seconds after contrast medium administration), this resulted in a total dose of 1.26 mGy for the whole procedure in the breast with the abnormality. Seven of 10 cases were categorized as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System score of 4 or higher by all four readers when reviewing spectral images in combination with mammograms. One lesion near the chest wall was not captured on the spectral image because of a positioning problem. The use of contrast-enhanced tomographic mammography has been demonstrated successfully in

  7. Radiation. Doses, effect, risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapirev, E.; Todorov, P.

    1994-12-01

    This book outlines in a popular form the topic of ionizing radiation impacts on living organisms. It contains data gathered by ICRP for a period of 35 years. The essential dosimetry terms and units are presented. Natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation are described. Possible biological radiation effects and diseases as a consequence of external and internal irradiation at normal and accidental conditions are considered. An assessment of genetic risk for human populations is presented and the concept of 'acceptable risk' is discussed

  8. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N [Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image.

  9. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N

    2004-01-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image

  10. Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Breast CT Using Spectral Shaping Filters: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Iodinated contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging of the breast has been studied with various modalities, including full-field digital mammography (FFDM), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and dedicated breast CT. Contrast imaging with breast CT has a number of advantages over FFDM and DBT, including the lack of breast compression, and generation of fully isotropic 3-D reconstructions. Nonetheless, for breast CT to be considered as a viable tool for routine clinical use, it would be desirable to reduce radiation dose. One approach for dose reduction in breast CT is spectral shaping using X-ray filters. In this paper, two high atomic number filter materials are studied, namely, gadolinium (Gd) and erbium (Er), and compared with Al and Cu filters currently used in breast CT systems. Task-based performance is assessed by imaging a cylindrical poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom with iodine inserts on a benchtop breast CT system that emulates clinical breast CT. To evaluate detectability, a channelized hoteling observer (CHO) is used with sums of Laguerre-Gauss channels. It was observed that spectral shaping using Er and Gd filters substantially increased the dose efficiency (defined as signal-to-noise ratio of the CHO divided by mean glandular dose) as compared with kilovolt peak and filter settings used in commercial and prototype breast CT systems. These experimental phantom study results are encouraging for reducing dose of breast CT, however, further evaluation involving patients is needed.

  11. Determination of organ doses and effective doses in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Martinez, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With an increasing chance of success in radiooncology, it is necessary to estimate the risk from radiation scatter to areas outside the target volume. The cancer risk from a radiation treatment can be estimated from the organ doses, allowing a somewhat limited effective dose to be estimated and compared. Material and Methods: The doses of the radiation-sensitive organs outside the target volume can be estimated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE developed by van der Giessen. The effective doses are determined according to the concept of ICRP, whereby the target volume and the associated organs related to it are not taken into consideration. Results: Organ doses outside the target volume are generally < 1% of the dose in the target volume. In some cases, however, they can be as high as 3%. The effective doses during radiotherapy are between 60 and 900 mSv, depending upon the specific target volume, the applied treatment technique, and the given dose in the ICRU point. Conclusion: For the estimation of the radiation risk, organ doses in radiooncology can be calculated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE. While evaluating the radiation risk after ICRP, for the calculation of the effective dose, the advanced age of many patients has to be considered to prevent that, e.g., the high gonad doses do not overestimate the effective dose. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of half-dose and full-dose gadolinium MR contrast on the enhancement of bone and soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costelloe, Colleen M. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Murphy, William A.; Haygood, Tamara M.; Kumar, Rajendra; McEnery, Kevin W.; Madewell, John E. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, Texas (United States); Stafford, R.J. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Houston, Texas (United States); Roy, Anjali [Cancer Treatment Centers of America Medical Diagnostic Imaging Group, Arizona (United States); Bassett, Roland L.; Harrell, Robyn K. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2011-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of half-dose intravenous gadolinium contrast on the enhancement of bone and soft tissue tumors. This study is HIPAA compliant and informed consent was waived by the institutional review board. An institutional database search was performed over a 1-year period for patients with full- and half-dose MR examinations performed for musculoskeletal oncologic indications. Examination pairs that were identical with regard to field strength and presence or absence of fat saturation were included, resulting in 29 paired examinations. When multiple, the lesion that was best delineated and enhanced well on the first examination in the pair was chosen, yielding 17 bone and 12 soft tissue. Five musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to dosages were asked to assess for a difference in enhancement when comparing the lesion on both examinations and to rate the degree of difference on a three-point scale. They were also asked to identify the examination on which the lesion enhanced less (tallied as low dose). Results were analyzed with the exact binomial test. The readers perceived an enhancement difference in 41% (59/145) of studies (p = 0.03) and the majority were rated as ''mild'' (66%, 39/59). The readers did not accurately identify the low-dose examinations (54% correctly identified, 32/59, p = 0.60). Half-dose gadolinium enhancement of lesions could not be accurately distinguished from full-dose enhancement upon review of the same lesion imaged at both concentrations. (orig.)

  13. Short term high dose atorvastatin for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients undergoing computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Sanei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statins are shown effective by some studies in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN. We evaluated the effectiveness of atorvastatin in the prevention of CIN in computed tomography angiography (CTA candidates. METHODS: This study was conducted on patients referring for elective CTA with normal renal function. Patients received atorvastatin (80 mg/day or placebo from 24 h before to 48 h after administration of the contrast material. Serum creatinine was measured before and 48 h after contrast material injection. CIN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine level of ≥ 0.5 mg/dl or ≥ 25% of the baseline creatinine. RESULTS: A total of 236 patients completed the study; 115 atorvastatin, 121 placebo, mean age = 58.40 ± 9.80 year, 68.6% male. Serum creatinine increased after contrast material injection in both the atorvastatin (1.00 ± 0.16-1.02 ± 0.15 mg/dl, P = 0.017 and placebo groups (1.03 ± 0.17-1.08 ± 0.18 mg/dl, P < 0.001. Controlling for age, gender, comorbidities, drug history, and baseline serum creatinine level, patients who received atorvastatin experienced less increase in serum creatinine after contrast material injection (beta = 0.127, P = 0.034. However, there was no difference between the atorvastatin and placebo groups in the incidence of CIN (4.3 vs. 5.0%, P = 0.535. CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing CTA, a short-term treatment with high dose atorvastatin is effective in preventing contrast-induced renal dysfunction, in terms of less increase in serum creatinine level after contrast material injection. Further trials including larger sample of patients and longer follow-ups are warranted.   Keywords: Kidney Diseases, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Contrast Media, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Atorvastatin 

  14. Occupational doses during the injection of contrast media in paediatric CT procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, A.N.; Lobriguito, A.M.; Lagarde, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    The administration of intravenous contrast media by hand or power injection in paediatric computed tomography (CT) procedures is carried out at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre for chest, abdomen and torso diagnostic examinations. Some procedures require the CT unit to commence patient scanning during the injection of the last volume of the contrast medium. During the injection, even if the nurse is wearing a 0.5 mm lead equivalent protective apron, the head region and the hand are likely to receive high doses. This study was therefore made to assess the head and extremity doses to the nurses during CT procedures where typical exposure parameters of 200 to 220 mA s and 120 kV p were used. Thermoluminescence dosemeters were deployed for three consecutive months in two CT rooms. A total of 96 procedures were performed during this period and they were included in this study. Scattered radiation measurements were done at different locations where the nurse may be positioned. Results showed that the average dose to the head region and the hands per paediatric case were 50 μSv and 80 μSv respectively. This study investigated the factors that affect the dose and found them to be the length of stay inside the room, type of CT examination, exposure parameters and location of the nurse. (author)

  15. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergy TM linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central 'target zone' and a partially attenuated beam for an outer 'set-up zone'. Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error

  16. Contrast timing in computed tomography: Effect of different contrast media concentrations on bolus geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Jost, Gregor; Seidensticker, Peter; Kuhl, Christiane; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of low-osmolar, monomeric contrast media with different iodine concentrations on bolus shape in aortic CT angiography. Materials and methods: Repeated sequential computed tomography scanning of the descending aorta of eight beagle dogs (5 male, 12.7 ± 3.1 kg) was performed without table movement with a standardized CT scan protocol. Iopromide 300 (300 mg I/mL), iopromide 370 (370 mg I/mL) and iomeprol 400 (400 mg I/mL) were administered via a foreleg vein with an identical iodine delivery rate of 1.2 g I/s and a total iodine dose of 300 mg I/kg body weight. Time-enhancement curves were computed and analyzed. Results: Iopromide 300 showed the highest peak enhancement (445.2 ± 89.1 HU), steepest up-slope (104.2 ± 17.5 HU/s) and smallest full width at half maximum (FWHM; 5.8 ± 1.0 s). Peak enhancement, duration of FWHM, enhancement at FWHM and up-slope differed significantly between iopromide 300 and iomeprol 400 (p 0.05). Conclusions: Low viscous iopromide 300 results in a better defined bolus with a significantly higher peak enhancement, steeper up-slope and smaller FWHM when compared to iomeprol 400. These characteristics potentially affect contrast timing.

  17. Effect of intensifying screens to subject contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ja; Huh, Joon; Kang, Hong Seok; Yoon, Chul Ho

    1990-01-01

    It is an experimental report about object contrast according to the Kinds of screen and obtained results as follows ; 1. In the same object radiography, use acquired the difference of the object contrast between LT-II(CaWO 4 system) and G4(Gd system) screens. 2. object contrast more decreased in Gd system screen than CaWO 4 and object contrast controlled by X-ray tube voltage. 3. The difference of object contrast seen clearly in 80 kVp

  18. Influence of intravenous contrast agent on dose calculations of intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Jeung-Kee; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Joo; Hong, Young-Seoub; Park, Sungkwang; Ahn, Kijung; Cho, Heunglae

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the effect of an intravenous contrast agent (CA) on dose calculations and its clinical significance in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with head and neck cancer and involved neck nodes were enrolled. Each patient took two sets of computerized tomography (CT) in the same position before and after intravenous CA injections. Target volumes and organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on the enhanced CT, and then an IMRT plan of nine equiangular beams with a 6 MV X-ray was created. After the fusion of non-enhanced and enhanced CTs, the contours and the IMRT plan created from the enhanced CT were copied and placed to the non-enhanced CT. Doses were calculated again from the non-enhanced CT by the same IMRT plan. The radiation doses calculated from the two sets of CTs were compared with regard to planning target volumes (PTV) and the three OARs, both parotid glands and the spinal cord, by Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: The doses (maximum, mean, and the dose of 95% of PTV received (D 95% )) of PTV70 and PTV59.4 calculated from the enhanced CTs were lower than those from the non-enhanced CTs (p < 0.05), but the dose differences were less than 1% compared to the doses calculated from the enhanced CTs. The doses of PTV50.4, parotid glands, and spinal cord were not significantly different between the non-enhanced and enhanced CTs. Conclusions: The difference between the doses calculated from the CTs with and without CA enhancement was tolerably small, therefore using intravenous CA could be recommended for the planning CT of head and neck IMRT

  19. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  20. Minimizing Contrast Medium Doses to Diagnose Pulmonary Embolism with 80-kVp Multidetector Computed Tomography in Azotemic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmquist, F. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Hansson, K.; Pasquariello, F. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden)); Bjoerk, J. (Competence Center for Clinical Research, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Lund, Lund (Sweden)); Nyman, U. (Dept. of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Background: In diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in azotemic patients, scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently inconclusive or not available in many hospitals. Computed tomography is readily available, but relatively high doses (30-50 g I) of potentially nephrotoxic iodine contrast media (CM) are used. Purpose: To report on the diagnostic quality and possible contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after substantially reduced CM doses to diagnose PE in azotemic patients using 80-peak kilovoltage (kVp) 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) combined with CM doses tailored to body weight, fixed injection duration adapted to scan time, automatic bolus tracking, and saline chaser. Material and Methods: Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <50 ml/min were scheduled to undergo 80-kVp MDCT using 200 mg I/kg, and those with eGFR =50 ml/min, 120-kVp MDCT with 320 mg I/kg. Both protocols used an 80-kg maximum dose weight and a fixed 15-s injection time. Pulmonary artery density and contrast-to-noise ratio were measured assuming 70 Hounsfield units (HU) for a fresh clot. CIN was defined as a plasma creatinine rise >44.2 mumol/l from baseline. Results: 89/148 patients (63/68 females) underwent 80-/120-kVp protocols, respectively, with 95% of the examinations being subjectively excellent or adequate. Mean values in the 80-/120-kVp cohorts regarding age were 82/65 years, body weight 66/78 kg, effective mAs 277/117, CM dose 13/23 g I, pulmonary artery density 359/345 HU, image noise (1 standard deviation) 24/21 HU, contrast-to-noise ratio 13/13, and dose-length product 173/258 mGycm. Only 1/65 and 2/119 patients in the 80- and 120-kVp cohorts, respectively, with negative CT and no anticoagulation suffered non-fatal thromboembolism during 3-month follow-up. No patient developed CIN. Conclusion: 80-kVp 16-row MDCT with optimization of injection parameters may be performed with preserved diagnostic quality, using markedly reduced CM

  1. Normal tissue dose-effect models in biological dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alber, M.

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated radiotherapy techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy with photons and protons rely on numerical dose optimisation. The evaluation of normal tissue dose distributions that deviate significantly from the common clinical routine and also the mathematical expression of desirable properties of a dose distribution is difficult. In essence, a dose evaluation model for normal tissues has to express the tissue specific volume effect. A formalism of local dose effect measures is presented, which can be applied to serial and parallel responding tissues as well as target volumes and physical dose penalties. These models allow a transparent description of the volume effect and an efficient control over the optimum dose distribution. They can be linked to normal tissue complication probability models and the equivalent uniform dose concept. In clinical applications, they provide a means to standardize normal tissue doses in the face of inevitable anatomical differences between patients and a vastly increased freedom to shape the dose, without being overly limiting like sets of dose-volume constraints. (orig.)

  2. Effective dose and dose to crystalline lens during angiographic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, J.

    1998-01-01

    The highest radiation doses levels received by radiologists are observed during interventional procedures. Doses to forehead and neck received by a radiologist executing angiographic examinations at the department of radiology at the academic hospital (AZ-VUB) have been measured for a group of 34 examinations. The doses to crystalline lens and the effective doses for a period of one year have been estimated. For the crystalline lens the maximum dose approaches the ICRP limit, that indicates the necessity for the radiologist to use leaded glasses. (N.C.)

  3. Effect of iodinated contrast media on thyroid: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Mehlika Kuşkonmaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In parallel to the increased use of computed tomography, iodinated contrast agents are increasingly becoming a source of excess iodide. Iodinated contrast agents may induce thyroid dysfunction in exposed patients, especially in the presence of an underlying thyroid disease. Thus, an ordinary dose of the contrast used for the imaging, can induce hyper or hypothyroidism in a patient with subtle thyroid disease. This review will briefly discuss the physiology of iodine and the clinical evaluation of iodine induced thyroid dysfunction.

  4. A network meta-analysis on randomized trials focusing on the preventive effect of statins on contrast-induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peruzzi, Mariangela; De Luca, Leonardo; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-01

    -analysis. Randomized trials focusing on statins were searched and pooled with random-effect odds ratios. A total of 14 trials (6,160 patients) were included, focusing on atorvastatin (high/low dose), rosuvastatin (high dose), simvastatin (high/low dose), and placebo or no statin therapy before contrast administration....... The risk of contrast-induced nephropathy was reduced by atorvastatin high dose and rosuvastatin high dose, with no difference between these two agents. Results for atorvastatin low dose and simvastatin (high/low dose) in comparison to placebo were inconclusive. Atorvastatin and rosuvastatin administered...

  5. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  6. Bile duct evaluation of potential living liver donors with Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR cholangiography: Single-dose, double dose or half-dose contrast enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja, E-mail: Sonja.Kinner@uni-due.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Steinweg, Verena [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Maderwald, Stefan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Radtke, Arnold; Sotiropoulos, Georgios [Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael; Schroeder, Tobias [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Introduction: Detailed knowledge of the biliary anatomy is essential to avoid complications in living donor liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal dosage of Gd-EOB-DTPA for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (ce-MRC) with reference to contrast-enhanced CT cholangiography (ce-CTC). Materials and methods: 30 potential living liver donors (PLLD) underwent both ce-CTC and ce-MRC. Ten candidates each received single, double or half-dose Gd-EOB-DTPA. Ce-MRC images with and without inversion recovery pulses (T1w ± IR) were acquired 20–30 min after intravenous contrast injection. Image data was quantitatively and qualitatively reviewed by two radiologists based on a on a 5-point scale. Data sets were compared using a Mann–Whitney-U-test or Wilcoxon-rank-sum-test. Kappa values were also calculated. Results: All image series provided sufficient diagnostic information both showing normal biliary anatomy and variant bile ducts. Ce-CTC showed statistically significant better results compared to all ce-MRC data sets. T1w MRC with single dose Gd-EOB-DTPA proved to be superior to half and double dose in subjective and objective evaluation without a statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Ce-MRC is at any dosage inferior to ce-CTC. As far as preoperative planning of bile duct surgery is focused on the central biliary anatomy, ce-MRC can replace harmful ce-CTC strategies, anyway. Best results were seen with single dose GD-EOB-DTPA on T1w MRC+IR.

  7. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk; Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Munro, P. R. T. [Optical + Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia and Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation, and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  8. Contrast effects of a gadolinium filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Several authors have suggested using heavy metal filters with K edges in the diagnostic energy range to reduce the width of the x-ray spectrum and hence reduce patient radiation exposure. This spectral narrowing also increases subject contrast and permits an increase in tube potential. Results of contrast measurements are presented for a 250 mu gadolinium filter. It was found that aluminum filter contrast could be matched by using 8 to 10 kVp higher potential with the gadolinium filter. Similar results were found for calcium tungstate and rare-earth screens. Measurements were also done to determine skin exposure and mAs ratios for both constant contrast and constant kVp technique conversion methods. A simple theory with one adjustable parameter gives a reasonable fit to the experimental results

  9. The effect of defocus on edge contrast sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, NM; Kooijman, AC

    The effect of optical blur (defocus) on edge contrast sensitivity was studied. Edge contrast sensitivity detoriates with fairly small amounts of blur (similar to 0.5 D) and is roughly reduced by half for each dioptre of blur. The effect of blur on edge contrast sensitivity equals the effect of blur

  10. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  11. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  12. Contextual effects on perceived contrast: figure-ground assignment and orientation contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Matthew W; Mookhoek, Aart; Tjalma, Nienke; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2015-02-02

    Figure-ground segregation is an important step in the path leading to object recognition. The visual system segregates objects ('figures') in the visual scene from their backgrounds ('ground'). Electrophysiological studies in awake-behaving monkeys have demonstrated that neurons in early visual areas increase their firing rate when responding to a figure compared to responding to the background. We hypothesized that similar changes in neural firing would take place in early visual areas of the human visual system, leading to changes in the perception of low-level visual features. In this study, we investigated whether contrast perception is affected by figure-ground assignment using stimuli similar to those in the electrophysiological studies in monkeys. We measured contrast discrimination thresholds and perceived contrast for Gabor probes placed on figures or the background and found that the perceived contrast of the probe was increased when it was placed on a figure. Furthermore, we tested how this effect compared with the well-known effect of orientation contrast on perceived contrast. We found that figure-ground assignment and orientation contrast produced changes in perceived contrast of a similar magnitude, and that they interacted. Our results demonstrate that figure-ground assignment influences perceived contrast, consistent with an effect of figure-ground assignment on activity in early visual areas of the human visual system. © 2015 ARVO.

  13. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Verdun, Francis R. [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gervaz, Pascal [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Digestive Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) {>=} 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI {>=} 18.5. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Rutschmann, Olivier T.; Verdun, Francis R.; Gervaz, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI ≥ 18.5. (orig.)

  15. Three-dimensional dose distribution in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yi-Shuan; Lin, Yu-Ying; Cheung, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to establish three-dimensional dose distributions for contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) using self-developed Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. Dose calibration and distribution evaluations were performed on a full-field digital mammography unit with dual energy (DE) contrast-enhanced option. Strategy for dose calibration of films in the DE mode was based on the data obtained from common target/filter/kVp combinations used clinically and the dose response model modified from Rampado's model. Dose derived from films were also verified by measured data from an ionization chamber. The average difference of dose was 8.9% in the dose range for clinical uses. Three-dimensional dose distributions were estimated using triangular acrylic phantom equipped with the mammography system. Five pieces of film sheets were separately placed between the acrylic slabs to evaluate the dose distribution at different depths. After normalizing the dose in each pixel to the maximum dose at the top-center position of the acrylic, normalized dose distribution for transverse, coronal and sagittal planes, could thus be obtained. The depth dose distribution evaluated in this study may further serve as a reference for evaluating the patient glandular dose at different depths based on the entrance exposure information. - Highlights: • CEDM techniques can enhance contrast uptake areas and suppress background tissue. • Dose for the dual-energy acquisition is about 20% higher than standard mode. • A new method is proposed to estimate the 3D dose distribution in dual-energy CEDM. • Depth of normalized dose ratio of 0.5 is less than but near 1 cm in the DE mode

  16. Notes on the effect of dose uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent dose-response relationship between amount of exposure to acute radiation and level of mortality in humans is affected by uncertainties in the dose values. It is apparent that one of the greatest concerns regarding the human data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki is the unexpectedly shallow slope of the dose response curve. This may be partially explained by uncertainty in the dose estimates. Some potential effects of dose uncertainty on the apparent dose-response relationship are demonstrated

  17. A prospective evaluation of contrast and radiation dose and image quality in cardiac CT in children with complex congenital heart disease using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qiao-Ru; Gao, Wei; Sun, Ai-Min; Wang, Qian; Qiu, Hai-Sheng; Wang, Fang; Hu, Li-Wei; Li, Jian-Ying; Zhong, Yu-Min

    2017-02-01

    To the assess image quality, contrast dose and radiation dose in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current in comparison with standard dose protocol. 110 patients with CHD were randomized to 1 of the 2 scan protocols: Group A (n = 45) with 120 mA tube current and contrast agent of 270 mgI/ml in concentration (Visipaque ™ ; GE Healthcare Ireland, Co., Cork, UK); and Group B (n = 65) with the conventional 160 mA and 370 mgI/ml concentration contrast (Iopamiro ® ; Shanghai Bracco Sine Pharmaceutical Corp Ltd, Shanghai, China). Both groups used 80 kVp tube voltage and were reconstructed with 70% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The CT value and noise in aortic arch were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. A five-point scale was used to subjectively evaluate image quality. Contrast and radiation dose were recorded. There was no difference in age and weight between the two groups (all p > 0.05). The iodine load and radiation dose in Group A were statistically lower (3976 ± 747 mgI vs 5763 ± 1018 mgI in iodine load and 0.60 ± 0.08 mSv vs 0.77 ± 0.10 mSv in effective dose; p  0.05), and with good agreement between the two observers. Comparing the surgery results, the diagnostic accuracy for extracardiac and intracardiac defects for Group A was 96% and 92%, respectively, while the corresponding numbers for Group B were 95% and 93%. Compared with the standard dose protocol, the use of low tube voltage (80 kVp), low tube current (120 mA) and low-concentration iodinated contrast agent (270 mgI/ml) enables a reduction of 30% in iodine load and 22% in radiation dose while maintaining compatible image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Advances in knowledge: The new cardiac CT scanning protocol can largely reduce the adverse effects of

  18. Prospective evaluation of reduced dose computed tomography for the detection of low-contrast liver lesions. Direct comparison with concurrent standard dose imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooler, B.D.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Kim, David H.; Chen, Oliver T.; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic performance of reduced-dose (RD) contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) with standard-dose (SD) CECT for detection of low-contrast liver lesions. Seventy adults with non-liver primary malignancies underwent abdominal SD-CECT immediately followed by RD-CECT, aggressively targeted at 60-70 % dose reduction. SD series were reconstructed using FBP. RD series were reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR (Veo). Three readers - blinded to clinical history and comparison studies - reviewed all series, identifying liver lesions ≥4 mm. Non-blinded review by two experienced abdominal radiologists - assessing SD against available clinical and radiologic information - established the reference standard. RD-CECT mean effective dose was 2.01 ± 1.36 mSv (median, 1.71), a 64.1 ± 8.8 % reduction. Pooled per-patient performance data were (sensitivity/specificity/PPV/NPV/accuracy) 0.91/0.78/0.60/0.96/0.81 for SD-FBP compared with RD-FBP 0.79/0.75/0.54/0.91/0.76; RD-ASIR 0.84/0.75/0.56/0.93/0.78; and RD-MBIR 0.84/0.68/0.49/0.92/0.72. ROC AUC values were 0.896/0.834/0.858/0.854 for SD-FBP/RD-FBP/RD-ASIR/RD-MBIR, respectively. RD-FBP (P = 0.002) and RD-MBIR (P = 0.032) AUCs were significantly lower than those of SD-FBP; RD-ASIR was not (P = 0.052). Reader confidence was lower for all RD series (P < 0.001) compared with SD-FBP, especially when calling patients entirely negative. Aggressive CT dose reduction resulted in inferior diagnostic performance and reader confidence for detection of low-contrast liver lesions compared to SD. Relative to RD-ASIR, RD-FBP showed decreased sensitivity and RD-MBIR showed decreased specificity. (orig.)

  19. Prospective evaluation of reduced dose computed tomography for the detection of low-contrast liver lesions. Direct comparison with concurrent standard dose imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooler, B.D.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Kim, David H.; Chen, Oliver T. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Pickhardt, Perry J. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, E3/311 Clinical Science Center, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To prospectively compare the diagnostic performance of reduced-dose (RD) contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) with standard-dose (SD) CECT for detection of low-contrast liver lesions. Seventy adults with non-liver primary malignancies underwent abdominal SD-CECT immediately followed by RD-CECT, aggressively targeted at 60-70 % dose reduction. SD series were reconstructed using FBP. RD series were reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR (Veo). Three readers - blinded to clinical history and comparison studies - reviewed all series, identifying liver lesions ≥4 mm. Non-blinded review by two experienced abdominal radiologists - assessing SD against available clinical and radiologic information - established the reference standard. RD-CECT mean effective dose was 2.01 ± 1.36 mSv (median, 1.71), a 64.1 ± 8.8 % reduction. Pooled per-patient performance data were (sensitivity/specificity/PPV/NPV/accuracy) 0.91/0.78/0.60/0.96/0.81 for SD-FBP compared with RD-FBP 0.79/0.75/0.54/0.91/0.76; RD-ASIR 0.84/0.75/0.56/0.93/0.78; and RD-MBIR 0.84/0.68/0.49/0.92/0.72. ROC AUC values were 0.896/0.834/0.858/0.854 for SD-FBP/RD-FBP/RD-ASIR/RD-MBIR, respectively. RD-FBP (P = 0.002) and RD-MBIR (P = 0.032) AUCs were significantly lower than those of SD-FBP; RD-ASIR was not (P = 0.052). Reader confidence was lower for all RD series (P < 0.001) compared with SD-FBP, especially when calling patients entirely negative. Aggressive CT dose reduction resulted in inferior diagnostic performance and reader confidence for detection of low-contrast liver lesions compared to SD. Relative to RD-ASIR, RD-FBP showed decreased sensitivity and RD-MBIR showed decreased specificity. (orig.)

  20. Iodinated contrast media and contrast-induced nephropathy: is there a preferred cost-effective agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Samin K

    2008-05-01

    Over 20 years have passed since the introduction of the tri-iodinated low-osmolar nonionic contrast agents such as iopamidol, iohexol, ioversol and iopromide. During this time, most cardiology practices have switched to these nonionic agents to avoid the nuisance side effects and cardiac adverse events associated with the older ionic contrast agents. Although the improved tolerability of the nonionic agents is generally attributed to their decreased osmolality (approximately half that of the older ionic contrast agents), in fact, these contrast agents also differ from the older agents in their ionicity, viscosity and direct chemotoxicity. The impact of these properties on safety, together with cost differences, should be considered when selecting a contrast agent.

  1. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Ching-Jung; Yang, Pei-Ying; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively

  2. Low-dose x-ray phase-contrast and absorption CT using equally sloped tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Cloetens, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projections is often desirable in transmission CT modalities for purposes of low-dose tomography and fast acquisition imaging. However under such conditions, due to the violation of the Nyquist sampling criteria and the presence of noise, reconstructions with acceptable accuracy may not be possible. Recent experiments in transmission electron tomography and coherent diffraction microscopy have shown that the technique of equally sloped tomography (EST), an exact tomographic method utilizing an oversampling iterative Fourier-based reconstruction, provides more accurate image reconstructions when the number of projections is significantly undersampled relative to filtered back projection and algebraic iterative methods. Here we extend this technique by developing new reconstruction algorithms which allow for the incorporation of advanced mathematical regularization constraints, such as the nonlocal means total variational model, in a manner that is consistent with experimental projections. We then evaluate the resulting image quality of the developed algorithm through simulations and experiments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility on image quality phantoms using the x-ray absorption and phase contrast CT modalities. Both our simulation and experimental results have indicated that the method can reduce the number of projections by 60-75% in parallel beam modalities, while achieving comparable or better image quality than the conventional reconstructions. As large-scale and compact synchrotron radiation facilities are currently under rapid development worldwide, the implementation of low-dose x-ray absorption and phase-contrast CT can find broad applications in biology and medicine using these advanced x-ray sources.

  3. Gamma dose rate effect on JFET transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Gamma dose rate on JFET transistors is presented. The irradiation was accomplished at the following available dose rates: 1, 2.38, 5, 10 , 17 and 19 kGy/h at a constant dose of 600 kGy. A non proportional relationship between the noise and dose rate in the medium range (between 2.38 and 5 kGy/h) was observed. While in the low and high ranges, the noise was proportional to the dose rate as the case of the dose effect. This may be explained as follows: the obtained result is considered as the yield of a competition between many reactions and events which are dependent on the dose rate. At a given values of that events parameters, a proportional or a non proportional dose rate effects are generated. No dependence effects between the dose rate and thermal annealing recovery after irradiation was observed . (author)

  4. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  5. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  6. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  7. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  8. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  9. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Alan J.; Vora, Nayana [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Suh, Steve [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Liu, An, E-mail: aliu@coh.org [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Department of Radiation Physics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V{sub 45} {sub Gy}, V{sub 30} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way.

  10. Can low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of iodine contrast medium in a dynamic CT study of the liver?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Okada, Masahiro; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hidaka, Syojiro; Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Murakami, Takamichi, E-mail: murakami@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether low-dose dynamic CT of the liver with iterative reconstruction can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium. Materials and methods: This study was approved by our institutional review board. 113 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group A/group B (fifty-eight/fifty-five patients) underwent liver dynamic CT at 120/100 kV, with 0/40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with a contrast dose of 600/480 mg I/kg, respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated based on the manufacturer's phantom data. The enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma, vessels and the tumor-to-liver contrast of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) were compared between two groups. Two readers independently assessed the CT images of the hepatic parenchyma and HCCs. Results: The mean CT dose indices: 6.38/4.04 mGy, the dose-length products: 194.54/124.57 mGy cm, for group A/group B. The mean enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma and the tumor-to-liver contrast of HCCs with diameters greater than 1 cm in the post-contrast all phases did not differ significantly between two groups (P > 0.05). The enhancement values of vessels in group B were significantly higher than that in group A in the delayed phases (P < 0.05). Two reader's confidence levels for the hepatic parenchyma in the delayed phases and HCCs did not differ significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Low-dose dynamic CT with ASIR can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium without image quality degradation, compared to conventional dynamic CT without ASIR.

  11. Optimal dose and injection duration (injection rate) of contrast material for depiction of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas by multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanaga, Yumi; Awai, Kazuo; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Nakaura, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Funama, Yoshinori; Aoyama, Masahito; Asada, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal dose and injection duration of contrast material (CM) for depicting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) during the hepatic arterial phase with multidetector row computed tomography (CT). The study population consisted of 71 patients with hypervascular HCCs. After unenhanced scans, the first (early arterial phase, or EAP), second (late arterial phase, or LAP), and third (equilibrium phase) scanning was started at 30, 43, and 180 s after injection of contrast material (CM). During a 33-s period, patients with a body weight ≤50 kg received 100 ml of non-ionic CM with an iodine concentration of 300 mgI/ml; patients whose body weight was >50 kg received 100 ml of CM with an iodine concentration of 370 mgI/ml. First, we measured enhancement in the abdominal aorta and tumor-to-liver contrast (TLC) during the EAP and LAP. Next, to investigate the relation between aortic enhancement and TLC during the LAP, two radiologists visually assessed the conspicuity of hypervascular HCCs during the LAP using a 3-point scale: grade 1, poor; grade 2, fair; grade 3, excellent. Finally, to examine the effect of the CM dose and injection duration on aortic enhancement during the EAP, we simulated aortic enhancement curves using test bolus data obtained for 10 HCC patients and the method of Fleischmann and Hittmair. A relatively strong correlation was observed between aortic enhancement during the EAP and TLC during the LAP (correlation coefficient r=0.75, P 280 HU for aortic enhancement simulations during EAP, the injection duration should be <25 s for patients receiving a CM dose of 1.7 ml/kg with 300 mgI/ml iodine and <30 s for those receiving 2.0 ml/kg. For excellent depiction of hypervascular HCCs during the hepatic arterial phase, the injection duration should be <25 s in patients receiving a CM dose of 1.7 ml/kg with 300 mgI/ml iodine and <30 s for patients receiving 2.0 ml/kg. (author)

  12. Renal effects of the non-ionic contrast medium iopentol after intravenous injection in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobsen, J.A.; Berg, K.J.; Waaler, A.; Andrew, E. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiology Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Renal Section Nycomed A/S, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Clinical Research and Development)

    1990-01-01

    Renal effects of the new non-ionic contrast medium iopentol in increasing doses were assessed and compared with the effects of physiologic saline. Twenty-four healthy male volunteers, allocated to three dose groups, were given iopentol intravenously in doses of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 g I/kg body weight, respectively. The highest dose group was also given physiologic saline separately as a control. The diuresis increased in all groups, most in the highest dose group, and with a concomitant fall of urine osmolality and increase in osmolar clearance. A slight decrease of serum osmolality, creatinine and urea occurred at 3 hours due to hemodilution. The glomerular filtration rate was unaffected by iopentol. The urinary excretion of albumin and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin was unchanged. However, urinary N-acetyl-{beta}-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly, most in the highest dose group. All changes were reversible. (orig.).

  13. Bayesian estimation of dose rate effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnish, J.J.; Groer, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    A Bayesian statistical method was used to quantify the effectiveness of high dose rate 137 Cs gamma radiation at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice. The Bayesian approach considers both the temporal and dose dependence of radiation carcinogenesis and total mortality. This paper provides the first direct estimation of dose rate effectiveness using Bayesian statistics. This statistical approach provides a quantitative description of the uncertainty of the factor characterising the dose rate in terms of a probability density function. The results show that a fixed dose from 137 Cs gamma radiation delivered at a high dose rate is more effective at inducing fatal mammary tumours and increasing the overall mortality rate in BALB/c female mice than the same dose delivered at a low dose rate. (author)

  14. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-04-05

    Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0.36 and -1.716 for liver, -0.153 and -1.546 for pancreas, and 2.427 and 0.866 for renal cortex, all P> 0.05). Signal-to-noise ratio of the abdominal organs was significantly lower in Group A than in Group B (t = -8.11 for liver, -7.83 for pancreas, and -5.38 for renal cortex, all P 3, indicating clinically acceptable image quality. Single-phase, dual-energy spectral CT used for children with solid abdominal tumors can reduce contrast dose and radiation dose and can also maintain clinically acceptable image quality.

  15. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Contrasting Causal Effects of Workplace Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izano, Monika A; Brown, Daniel M; Neophytou, Andreas M; Garcia, Erika; Eisen, Ellen A

    2018-07-01

    Occupational exposure guidelines are ideally based on estimated effects of static interventions that assign constant exposure over a working lifetime. Static effects are difficult to estimate when follow-up extends beyond employment because their identifiability requires additional assumptions. Effects of dynamic interventions that assign exposure while at work, allowing subjects to leave and become unexposed thereafter, are more easily identifiable but result in different estimates. Given the practical implications of exposure limits, we explored the drivers of the differences between static and dynamic interventions in a simulation study where workers could terminate employment because of an intermediate adverse health event that functions as a time-varying confounder. The two effect estimates became more similar with increasing strength of the health event and outcome relationship and with increasing time between health event and employment termination. Estimates were most dissimilar when the intermediate health event occurred early in employment, providing an effective screening mechanism.

  17. Experience of slowly infused high-iodine-dose contrast computed tomography (SHD) of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Kiyoaki; Numata, Hideharu; Hokama, Yasuo

    1983-01-01

    A study was done on 20 patients with intracranial tumors by means of the slowly infused high-iodine-dose (SHD) contrast-enhancement technique. An intravenous drip infusion of 300 ml of Angiografin was given for three hours. Computerized tomograms were taken 1 hour, (2 hours), and 3 hours after the beginning of the drip infusion. The authors divided the lesions into four groups by analyzing the sequential changes in CT numbers using a histograms or profile of the region of interest. In group I, additional lesions were visible on the SHD scan (one case of metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer). In group 2, lesions were better displayed on the SHD scan due to increased enhancement (17 cases). In group 3, SHD scans showed no change (2 cases of fibrous astrocytoma). In group 4, the enhancement was diminished, but the lesion per se was still clealy identifiable (no case). Finally, in 18 cases out of 20 (90%), an additional or better display of the lesion was detected on SHD enhanced CT. The rational for doing the SHD enhancement is to detect a lesion with a minimally impaired blood-brain barrier by exposing a prolonged high blood-iodine level, and so the scanning is delayed until detectable levels of the contrast medium have accumulated within the vascular-channel pool or extravascular space of the lesion. SHD enhancement is useful: I) for revealing any additional lesion in a metastatic brain tumor; 2) for better displaying an obscure lesion on a usual scan; 3) for differentiating the quality of the lesion (for example, malignancy or cyst formation), and 4) for predicting the prognosis of the lesion. (J.P.N.)

  18. Optimal gadolinium dose level for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of U87-derived tumors in athymic nude rats for the assessment of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Varghai, Davood; Flask, Chris A.; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of varying gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dose on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) tracking of brain tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells (derived from human malignant glioma) into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 9, 12, and 13 days DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 9.4 T micro-MRI scanner before and after administration of 100, 150, or 200 μL of Gd-DTPA. Results: Tumor region normalized DCE-MRI scan enhancement at peak was: 1.217 over baseline (0.018 Standard Error [SE]) at the 100 μL dose, 1.339 (0.013 SE) at the 150 μL dose, and 1.287 (0.014 SE) at the 200 μL dose. DCE-MRI peak tumor enhancement at the 150 μL dose was significantly greater than both the 100 μL dose (p DTPA dose provided the greatest T1 weighted contrast enhancement, while minimizing negative T2* effects, in DCE-MRI scans of U87-derived tumors. Maximizing Gd-DTPA enhancement in DCE-MRI scans may assist development of a clinically robust (i.e., unambiguous) technique for PDT outcome assessment.

  19. PET/CT in malignant melanoma: contrast-enhanced CT versus plain low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, Thomas; Schneider, Vera; Fougere, Christian la; Bartenstein, Peter; Weiss, Mayo; Melzer, Henriette Ingrid; Coppenrath, Eva; Berking, Carola

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) versus non-enhanced low-dose CT (NECT) in the staging of advanced malignant melanoma with 18 F-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In total, 50 18 F-FDG PET/CT examinations were performed in 50 patients with metastasized melanoma. For attenuation correction, whole-body NECT was performed followed by diagnostic CECT with contrast agent. For the whole-body PET, 18 F-FDG was applied. Criteria for evaluation were signs of vital tumour tissue (extent of lesions, contrast enhancement, maximum standardized uptake value >2.5). Findings suspicious for melanoma were considered lesions. NECT, CECT and 18 F-FDG PET were evaluated separately, followed by combined analysis of PET/NECT and PET/CECT. Findings were verified histologically and/or by follow-up (>6 months). Overall, 232 lesions were analysed, and 151 proved to be metastases. The sensitivity of NECT, CECT, PET, PET/NECT and PET/CECT was 62, 85, 90, 97 and 100%, and specificity was 52, 63, 88, 93 and 93%, respectively. Compared to CECT, NECT obtained additional false-negative results: lymph node (n = 19) and liver/spleen metastases (n = 9). Misinterpreted physiological structures mainly caused additional false-positive findings (n = 17). In combined analysis of PET/NECT, six false-positive [other tumours (n = 2), inflammatory lymph nodes (n = 2), inflammatory lung lesion (n = 1), blood vessel (n = 1)] and five false-negative findings [liver (n = 3), spleen (n = 1), lymph node metastases (n = 1)] remained. On PET/CECT, six false-positive [inflammatory lymph nodes (n = 3), other tumours (n = 2), inflammatory lung lesion (n = 1)] and no false-negative findings occurred. However, additional false findings on PET/NECT (6 of 232) did not change staging compared to PET/CECT. Our results indicate that it is justified to perform PET/NECT instead of PET/CECT for melanoma staging. (orig.)

  20. Effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G.

    1986-01-01

    The term 'small radiation dosis' means doses of about (1 rem), fractions of one rem as well as doses of a few rem. Doses like these are encountered in various practical fields, e.g. in X-ray diagnosis, in the environment and in radiation protection rules. The knowledge about small doses is derived from the same two forces, on which the radiobiology of human beings nearly is based: interpretation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data, as well as the experience from radiotherapy. Careful interpretation of Hiroshima dates do not provide any evidence that small doses can induce cancer, fetal malformations or genetic damage. Yet in radiotherapy of various diseases, e.g. inflammations, doses of about 1 Gy (100 rad) do no harm to the patients. According to a widespread hypothesis even very small doses may induce some types of radiation damage ('no threshold'). Nevertheless an alternative view is justified. At present no decision can be made between these two alternatives, but the usefullness of radiology is definitely better established than any damage calculated by theories or extrapolations. Based on experience any exaggerated fear of radiations can be met. (author)

  1. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: possible synergistic effect of stress hyperglycemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress on the renal tubules has been implicated as a mechanism of injury in both stress hyperglycemia and contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of these effects has a synergistic effect on accentuating renal tubular apoptosis and therefore increasing the risk of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  2. Organ or tissue doses, effective dose and collective effective dose from X-ray diagnosis, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1996-01-01

    Effective doses and collective effective doses from X-ray diagnostic examinations were calculated on the basis of the frequency of examinations estimated by a nationwide survey and the organ or tissue doses experimentally determined. The average organ or tissue doses were determined with thermoluminescence dosimeters put at various sites of organs or tissues in an adult and a child phantom. Effective doses (effective dose equivalents) were calculated as the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all the organs or tissues of the body. As the examples of results, the effective doses per radiographic examination were approximately 7 mGy for male, and 9 mGy for female angiocardiography, and about 3 mGy for barium meal. Annual collective effective dose from X-ray diagnostic examinations in 1986 were about 104 x 10 3 person Sv from radiography and 118 x 10 3 person Sv from fluoroscopy, with the total of 222 x 10 3 person Sv. (author)

  3. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80 each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. • Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection provides appropriate scan protocols. • Abdominal CT is feasible using spectral imaging and 300 mgI/kg contrast agent. • 50-keV monochromatic images with 50 % ASIR provide optimal image quality.

  4. TU-G-204-04: A Unified Strategy for Bi-Factorial Optimization of Radiation Dose and Contrast Dose in CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahbaee, P; Zhang, Y; Solomon, J; Becchetti, M; Segars, P; Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To substantiate the interdependency of contrast dose, radiation dose, and image quality in CT towards the patient- specific optimization of the imaging protocols Methods: The study deployed two phantom platforms. A variable sized (12, 18, 23, 30, 37 cm) phantom (Mercury-3.0) containing an iodinated insert (8.5 mgI/ml) was imaged on a representative CT scanner at multiple CTDI values (0.7–22.6 mGy). The contrast and noise were measured from the reconstructed images for each phantom diameter. Linearly related to iodine-concentration, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), were calculated for 16 iodine-concentration levels (0–8.5 mgI/ml). The analysis was extended to a recently developed suit of 58 virtual human models (5D XCAT) with added contrast dynamics. Emulating a contrast-enhanced abdominal image procedure and targeting a peak-enhancement in aorta, each XCAT phantom was “imaged” using a simulation platform (CatSim, GE). 3D surfaces for each patient/size established the relationship between iodine-concentration, dose, and CNR. The ratios of change in iodine-concentration versus dose (IDR) to yield a constant change in CNR were calculated for each patient size. Results: Mercury phantom results show the image-quality size- dependence on CTDI and IC levels. For desired image-quality values, the iso-contour-lines reflect the trade off between contrast-material and radiation doses. For a fixed iodine-concentration (4 mgI/mL), the IDR values for low (1.4 mGy) and high (11.5 mGy) dose levels were 1.02, 1.07, 1.19, 1.65, 1.54, and 3.14, 3.12, 3.52, 3.76, 4.06, respectively across five sizes. The simulation data from XCAT models confirmed the empirical results from Mercury phantom. Conclusion: The iodine-concentration, image quality, and radiation dose are interdependent. The understanding of the relationships between iodine-concentration, image quality, and radiation dose will allow for a more comprehensive optimization of CT imaging devices and techniques

  5. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  6. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a photon-counting detector: quantitative accuracy and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced mammography has been used to demonstrate functional information about a breast tumor by injecting contrast agents. However, a conventional technique with a single exposure degrades the efficiency of tumor detection due to structure overlapping. Dual-energy techniques with energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) also cause an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy of material decomposition due to the limitations of EIDs. On the other hands, spectral mammography with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) is able to resolve the issues induced by the conventional technique and EIDs using their energy-discrimination capabilities. In this study, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was implemented by using a polychromatic dual-energy model, and the proposed technique was compared with the dual-energy technique with an EID in terms of quantitative accuracy and radiation dose. The results showed that the proposed technique improved the quantitative accuracy as well as reduced radiation dose comparing to the dual-energy technique with an EID. The quantitative accuracy of the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was slightly improved as a function of radiation dose. Therefore, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumors and improving diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Application of low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT scans in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Song, Lei; Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qifeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of using low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT examinations in children with congenital heart disease. Ninety patients with congenital heart disease were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac scans on a Discovery CT750 HD scanner. Group A received 270 mg I/mL iodixanol, and group B received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol contrast media and was scanned with prospective ECG triggering mode. Group C received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol and was scanned with conventional retrospective ECG gating mode. The same weight-based contrast injection protocol was used for all three groups. Images were reconstructed using a 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm and a 50% ASIR in groups A and B and a 30% ASIR in group C. The subjective and objective image quality evaluations, diagnostic accuracies, radiation doses and amounts of contrast media in the three groups were measured and compared. All images in the three groups met the diagnostic requirements, with the same diagnostic accuracy and image quality scores greater than 3 in a 4-point scoring system. However, ventricular enhancement and the objective noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality scores in group C were better than those in groups A and B (all Pcontrast dose (14% lower than that of groups B and C). Enhanced CT scan images with low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media can meet the diagnostic requirements for examining children with congenital heart disease while reducing the potential risk of radiation damage and contrast-induced nephropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Using 80 kVp on a 320-row scanner for hepatic multiphasic CT reduces the contrast dose by 50 % in patients at risk for contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Narumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Imuta, Masanori; Yamamura, Sadahiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Kidoh, Masafumi; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Hatemura, Masahiro; Kai, Noriyuki [Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Central Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    We evaluated the effects of a low contrast material (CM) dose protocol using 80-kVp on the image quality of hepatic multiphasic CT scans acquired on a 320-row CT scanner. We scanned 30 patients with renal insufficiency (eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) using 80-kVp and a CM dose of 300mgI/kg. Another 30 patients without renal insufficiency (eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}) were scanned with the conventional 120-kVp protocol and the standard CM dose of 600mgI/kg. Quantitative image quality parameters, i.e. CT attenuation, image noise, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared and the visual image quality was scored on a four-point scale. The volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) recorded with the 80- and the 120-kVp protocols were also compared. Image noise and contrast enhancement were equivalent for the two protocols. There was no significant difference in the CNR of all anatomic sites and in the visual scores for overall image quality. The CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE were approximately 25-30 % lower under the 80-kVp protocol. Hepatic multiphase CT using 80-kVp on a 320-row CT scanner allowed for a decrease in the CM dose and a reduction in the radiation dose without image quality degradation in patients with renal insufficiency. (orig.)

  9. Effects of iodinated contrast media on blood and endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelin, Peter; Stacul, Fulvio; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Morcos, Sameh K.; Molen, Aart J. van der

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of iodinated contrast media on blood components and endothelium based on experimental and clinical studies and to produce clinically relevant guidelines for reducing thrombotic and hematologic complications following the intravascular use of contrast media. A report was drafted after review of the literature and discussions among the members of the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology. The final report was produced following discussion at the 12th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Ljubljana, Slovenia (2005). Experimental data indicate that all iodinated contrast media produce an anticoagulant effect and that this effect is greater with ionic contrast media. Several of the in vitro and experimental in vivo studies on haematological effects of contrast media have not been confirmed by clinical studies. Low- or iso-osmolar contrast media should be used for diagnostic and interventional angiographic procedures, including phlebography. Meticulous angiographic technique is the most important factor for reducing the thrombotic complications associated with angiographic procedures. Drugs and interventional devices that decrease the risk of thromboembolic complications during interventional procedures minimize the importance of the effects of contrast media. (orig.)

  10. Effects of iodinated contrast media on blood and endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspelin, Peter [Karolinska Institute/Huddinge University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Centre for Surgical Sciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Stacul, Fulvio [Institute of Radiology, Trieste (Italy); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Diagnostic Radiology 54E2, Herlev (Denmark); Morcos, Sameh K. [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Molen, Aart J. van der [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of iodinated contrast media on blood components and endothelium based on experimental and clinical studies and to produce clinically relevant guidelines for reducing thrombotic and hematologic complications following the intravascular use of contrast media. A report was drafted after review of the literature and discussions among the members of the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology. The final report was produced following discussion at the 12th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Ljubljana, Slovenia (2005). Experimental data indicate that all iodinated contrast media produce an anticoagulant effect and that this effect is greater with ionic contrast media. Several of the in vitro and experimental in vivo studies on haematological effects of contrast media have not been confirmed by clinical studies. Low- or iso-osmolar contrast media should be used for diagnostic and interventional angiographic procedures, including phlebography. Meticulous angiographic technique is the most important factor for reducing the thrombotic complications associated with angiographic procedures. Drugs and interventional devices that decrease the risk of thromboembolic complications during interventional procedures minimize the importance of the effects of contrast media. (orig.)

  11. The concept of the effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of the human body by external or internal sources leads mostly to a simultaneous exposure of several organs. However, so far no clear and consistent recommendations for the combination of organ doses and the assessment of an exposure limit under such irradiation conditions are available. Following a proposal described in ICRP-publication 14 one possible concept for the combination of organ doses is discussed in this paper. This concept is based on the assumption that at low doses the total radiation detriment to the exposed person is given by the sum of radiation detriments to the single organs. Taking into account a linear dose-risk relationship, the sum of weighted organ doses leads to the definition of an 'Effective Dose'. The applicability and consequences of this 'Effective Dose Concept' are discussed especially with regard to the assessment of the maximum permissible intake of radionuclides into the human body and the combination of external and internal exposure. (orig.) [de

  12. Effect of organic contrast Media on the haematology and Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Contrast media, haematology, serum electrolytes, dogs, xylazine. The effect of contrast media on the hematology and serum electrolyte was determined in five dogs sedated with 2mg/kg of xylazine intramuscular (i.m). A total of 800mg/kg bolus of 76% urograffin was then administered by intravenous injection ...

  13. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  14. High Energy Resolution Hyperspectral X-Ray Imaging for Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Silvia; Saifuddin, Sarene C; Ferreira, Filipa I M; Henthorn, Nicholas; Seller, Paul; Sellin, Paul J; Stratmann, Philipp; Veale, Matthew C; Wilson, Matthew D; Cernik, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) is an alternative to conventional X-ray mammography for imaging dense breasts. However, conventional approaches to CEDM require a double exposure of the patient, implying higher dose, and risk of incorrect image registration due to motion artifacts. A novel approach is presented, based on hyperspectral imaging, where a detector combining positional and high-resolution spectral information (in this case based on Cadmium Telluride) is used. This allows simultaneous acquisition of the two images required for CEDM. The approach was tested on a custom breast-equivalent phantom containing iodinated contrast agent (Niopam 150®). Two algorithms were used to obtain images of the contrast agent distribution: K-edge subtraction (KES), providing images of the distribution of the contrast agent with the background structures removed, and a dual-energy (DE) algorithm, providing an iodine-equivalent image and a water-equivalent image. The high energy resolution of the detector allowed the selection of two close-by energies, maximising the signal in KES images, and enhancing the visibility of details with the low surface concentration of contrast agent. DE performed consistently better than KES in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio of the details; moreover, it allowed a correct reconstruction of the surface concentration of the contrast agent in the iodine image. Comparison with CEDM with a conventional detector proved the superior performance of hyperspectral CEDM in terms of the image quality/dose tradeoff.

  15. The dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents calculations that illustrate two conclusions; for any particular cell type there will be a critical radius at which tumor control breaks down, and the radius at which this occurs is strongly dependent upon the low-dose-rate radiosensitivity of the cells

  16. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnica-Garza, H M [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional Unidad Monterrey, Via del Conocimiento 201 Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Apodaca NL C.P. 66600 (Mexico)], E-mail: hgarnica@cinvestav.mx

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360 deg. arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  17. Augmented Quadruple-Phase Contrast Media Administration and Triphasic Scan Protocol Increases Image Quality at Reduced Radiation Dose During Computed Tomography Urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, Charbel; Mohamad, May; Kerek, Racha; Hamieh, Nadine; Alsheikh Deeb, Ibrahim; El-Achkar, Bassam; Tamim, Hani; Abdul Razzak, Farah; Haddad, Maurice; Abi-Ghanem, Alain S; El-Merhi, Fadi

    The aim of this article was to investigate the opacification of the renal vasculature and the urogenital system during computed tomography urography by using a quadruple-phase contrast media in a triphasic scan protocol. A total of 200 patients with possible urinary tract abnormalities were equally divided between 2 protocols. Protocol A used the conventional single bolus and quadruple-phase scan protocol (pre, arterial, venous, and delayed), retrospectively. Protocol B included a quadruple-phase contrast media injection with a triphasic scan protocol (pre, arterial and combined venous, and delayed), prospectively. Each protocol used 100 mL contrast and saline at a flow rate of 4.5 mL. Attenuation profiles and contrast-to-noise ratio of the renal arteries, veins, and urogenital tract were measured. Effective radiation dose calculation, data analysis by independent sample t test, receiver operating characteristic, and visual grading characteristic analyses were performed. In arterial circulation, only the inferior interlobular arteries in both protocols showed a statistical significance (P contrast-to-noise ratio than protocol A (protocol B: 22.68 ± 13.72; protocol A: 14.75 ± 5.76; P contrast media and triphasic scan protocol usage increases the image quality at a reduced radiation dose.

  18. Overall evaluability of low dose protocol for computed tomography angiography of thoracic aorta using 80 kV and iterative reconstruction algorithm using different concentration contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Andrea Daniele; Mancini, Maria E; Andreini, Daniele; Formenti, Alberto; Mushtaq, Saima; Nobili, Enrica; Guglielmo, Marco; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Pepi, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography (MDCTA) is presently the imaging modality of choice for aortic disease. However, the effective radiation dose and the risk related to the use of contrast agents associated with MDCTA is an issue of concern. Aim of this study was to assess image quality of a low dose ECG-gated MDCTA of thoracic aorta using different concentration contrast media without tailored injection protocol. Two-hundred patients were randomised into four different scan protocols: Group A (Iodixanol 320 and 80 Kvp tube voltage), Group B (Iodixanol 320 and 100 Kvp tube voltage), Group C (Iomeprol 400 and 80 Kvp tube voltage) and Group D (Iomeprol 400 and 100 Kvp tube voltage). Image quality, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose (ED) were compared among groups. No significant differences in image noise, SNR and CNR between groups with the same tube voltage. Significant differences in SNR and CNR were found among groups with 80 kV versus groups using 100 kV but without differences in terms of image quality. ED was significantly lower in groups with 80 kV. Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography protocols using 80 kV and low concentration contrast media are feasible without need of tailored injection protocols. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Comportamento da dose glandular versus contraste do objeto em mamografia: determinação de formalismo semi-empírico para diferentes combinações alvo-filtro Behavior of subject contrast versus glandular dose in mammography: determination of a semi-empirical formalism for different target-filter combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hoff

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito da mudança no contraste do objeto, tempo de exposição e dose de radiação quando diferentes espessuras de filtração de molibdênio (Mo e ródio (Rh são empregadas em mamógrafos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Realizaram-se medidas da exposição na entrada da pele com uma câmara de ionização para diferentes espessuras para os filtros de Mo e Rh. Para determinar a dose glandular média foi utilizado simulador de BR12 (50% tecido adiposo e 50% tecido glandular de diferentes espessuras (4 cm e 8 cm. Energias na faixa de 24 kVp a 34 kVp foram empregadas e filmes Kodak MinR 2000 foram utilizados. RESULTADOS: Os resultados evidenciaram dados de contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para diferentes espessuras de filtros adicionais e diferentes tensões. Esses dados indicaram aumento nos valores de contraste do objeto e tempo de exposição, com o aumento da espessura dos filtros. A dose glandular apresentou comportamento com diferentes tendências para cada caso analisado. Equações foram definidas para possibilitar a estimativa do contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para os casos estudados. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados possibilitaram a estimativa de equações que auxiliam na verificação do comportamento do contraste do objeto e da dose glandular para simuladores com espessura de 4 cm e 8 cm e para os filtros de Rh e Mo. Dessa forma, torna-se possível estimar a figura de mérito (razão entre o contraste do objeto e a dose glandular, podendo auxiliar na análise da relação risco-benefício dos casos estudados.OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to verify the effect of changes in subject contrast, exposure time and radiation dose when different thicknesses of molybdenum (Mo and rhodium (Rh filters are used in mammography equipments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Entrance skin exposure measurements were performed with an ionization chamber for different thicknesses of Mo and Rh filters

  20. Application of 80-kVp scan and raw data-based iterative reconstruction for reduced iodine load abdominal-pelvic CT in patients at risk of contrast-induced nephropathy referred for oncological assessment: effects on radiation dose, image quality and renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yasunori; Tanoue, Shota; Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yoshida, Eri; Yoshida, Morikatsu; Kidoh, Masafumi; Tateishi, Machiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the image quality, radiation dose, and renal safety of contrast medium (CM)-reduced abdominal-pelvic CT combining 80-kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) in patients with renal dysfunction for oncological assessment. We included 45 patients with renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate  60 ml per lmin per 1.73 m 2 ) who underwent standard oncological abdominal-pelvic CT (600 mgI kg -1 , 120-kVp, filtered-back projection) were included as controls. CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Two observers performed subjective image analysis on a 4-point scale. Size-specific dose estimate and renal function 1-3 months after CT were measured. The size-specific dose estimate and iodine load of 80-kVp protocol were 32 and 41%,, respectively, lower than of 120-kVp protocol (p 0.05). No significant kidney injury associated with CM administration was observed. 80-kVp abdominal-pelvic CT with SAFIRE yields diagnostic image quality in oncology patients with renal dysfunction under substantially reduced iodine and radiation dose without renal safety concerns. Advances in knowledge: Using 80-kVp and SAFIRE allows for 40% iodine load and 32% radiation dose reduction for abdominal-pelvic CT without compromising image quality and renal function in oncology patients at risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  1. Optimizing image quality and dose for digital radiography of distal pediatric extremities using the contrast-to-noise ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, R.; Neitzel, U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of X-ray tube voltage and filtration on image quality in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and dose for digital radiography of distal pediatric extremities and to determine conditions that give the best balance of CNR and patient dose. Materials and Methods: In a phantom study simulating the absorption properties of distal extremities, the CNR and the related patient dose were determined as a function of tube voltage in the range 40 - 66 kV, both with and without additional filtration of 0.1 mm Cu/1 mm Al. The measured CNR was used as an indicator of image quality, while the mean absorbed dose (MAD) - determined by a combination of measurement and simulation - was used as an indicator of the patient dose. Results: The most favorable relation of CNR and dose was found for the lowest tube voltage investigated (40 kV) without additional filtration. Compared to a situation with 50 kV or 60 kV, the mean absorbed dose could be lowered by 24 % and 50 %, respectively, while keeping the image quality (CNR) at the same level. Conclusion: For digital radiography of distal pediatric extremities, further CNR and dose optimization appears to be possible using lower tube voltages. Further clinical investigation of the suggested parameters is necessary. (orig.)

  2. Dosimetry in Interventional Radiology - Effective Dose Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jarvinen, H.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures can lead to significant radiation doses to patients and to staff members. In order to evaluate the personal doses with respect to the regulatory dose limits, doses measured by dosimeters have to be converted to effective doses (E). Measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using a single unshielded dosimeter above the lead apron can lead to significant overestimation of the effective dose, while the measurement with dosimeter under the apron can lead to underestimation. To improve the accuracy, measurements with two dosimeters, one above and the other under the apron have been suggested ( d ouble dosimetry ) . The ICRP has recommended that interventional radiology departments develop a policy that staff should wear two dosimeters. The aim of this study was to review the double dosimetry algorithms for the calculation of effective dose in high dose interventional radiology procedures. The results will be used to develop general guidelines for personal dosimetry in interventional radiology procedures. This work has been carried out by Working Group 9 (Radiation protection dosimetry of medical staff) of the CONRAD project, which is a Coordination Action supported by the European Commission within its 6th Framework Program.(author)

  3. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  4. Effect of aberrations in human eye on contrast sensitivity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Wang, Feng-lin; Wang, Zhao-qi

    2011-06-01

    The quantitative analysis of the effect of aberrations in human eye on vision has important clinical value in the correction of aberrations. The wave-front aberrations of human eyes were measured with the Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor and modulation transfer function (MTF) was computed from the wave-front aberrations. Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was obtained from MTF and the retinal aerial image modulation (AIM). It is shown that the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Zernike aberrations deteriorate contrast sensitivity function. When the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th Zernike aberrations are corrected high contrast sensitivity function can be obtained.

  5. Effect of static scatterers in laser speckle contrast imaging: an experimental study on correlation and contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro G.; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Figueiras, Edite; Correia, Carlos; Cardoso, João

    2018-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive microvascular blood flow assessment technique with good temporal and spatial resolution. Most LSCI systems, including commercial devices, can perform only qualitative blood flow evaluation, which is a major limitation of this technique. There are several factors that prevent the utilization of LSCI as a quantitative technique. Among these factors, we can highlight the effect of static scatterers. The goal of this work was to study the influence of differences in static and dynamic scatterer concentration on laser speckle correlation and contrast. In order to achieve this, a laser speckle prototype was developed and tested using an optical phantom with various concentrations of static and dynamic scatterers. It was found that the laser speckle correlation could be used to estimate the relative concentration of static/dynamic scatterers within a sample. Moreover, the speckle correlation proved to be independent of the dynamic scatterer velocity, which is a fundamental characteristic to be used in contrast correction.

  6. Half-dose non-contrast CT in the investigation of urolithiasis: image quality improvement with third-generation integrated circuit CT detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Kang, Tony; Arepalli, Chesnal; Barrett, Sarah; O'Connell, Tim; Louis, Luck; Nicolaou, Savvakis; McLaughlin, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the effect of third-generation integrated circuit (IC) CT detector on objective image quality in full- and half-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract. 51 consecutive patients with acute renal colic underwent non-contrast CT of the urinary tract using a 128-slice dual-source CT before (n = 24) and after (n = 27) the installation of third-generation IC detectors. Half-dose images were generated using projections from detector A using the dual-source RAW data. Objective image noise in the liver, spleen, right renal cortex, and right psoas muscle was compared between DC and IC cohorts for full-dose and half-dose images reconstructed with FBP and IR algorithms using 1 cm(2) regions of interest. Presence and size of obstructing ureteric calculi were also compared for full-dose and half-dose reconstructions using DC and IC detectors. No statistical difference in age and lateral body size was found between patients in the IC and DC cohorts. Radiation dose, as measured by size-specific dose estimates, did not differ significantly either between the two cohorts (10.02 ± 4.54 mGy IC vs. 12.28 ± 7.03 mGy DC). At full dose, objective image noise was not significantly lower in the IC cohort as compared to the DC cohort for the liver, spleen, and right psoas muscle. At half dose, objective image noise was lower in the IC cohort as compared to DC cohort at the liver (21.32 IC vs. 24.99 DC, 14.7% decrease, p 0.05 for all comparisons). Third-generation IC detectors result in lower objective image noise at full- and half-radiation dose levels as compared with traditional DC detectors. The magnitude of noise reduction was greater at half-radiation dose indicating that the benefits of using novel IC detectors are greater in low and ultra-low-dose CT imaging.

  7. MR imaging in recurrent pain after back surgery. A comparative study using standard and high doses of gadolinium contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakeson, P. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Annertz, M. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology; Kristoffersen, D.T. [Nycomed Imaging AS, Oslo (Norway); Jonsson, E. [Nycomed AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Holtaas, S. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-11-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic results following injection of (a) a high dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) of gadodiamide injection and (b) the standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) of Gd-DTPA, in patients with recurrent symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with recurrent or sustained symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniations were examined. MR imaging (0.3 T) was first performed before and after Gd-DTPA at 0.1 mmol/kg b.w., and then within one month (17 patients) or within 3 months (3 patients) before and after gadodiamide injection at 0.3 mmol/kg b.w. The examinations were first evaluated by 2 neuroradiologists blinded to dose but not to patient as the images were presented in pairs. Six months later the same investigators evaluated the examinations again, this time blinded to both dose and patient. Results: At the evaluation in pairs (with the investigators blinded to dose only) the high-dose examinations were considered the most informative (p=0.05). However, at the later evaluation (with the investigators blinded both to dose and patient) no significant difference between high and standard dose was found regarding diagnosis or diagnostic certainty. Conclusion: In this study the high-dose contrast enhancement of MR imaging at 0.3 T did not increase the diagnostic information for differentiating between scar and recurrent hernia. The high-dose images were considered more informative when evaluated in pairs, but gave no additional or different information when evaluated separately. The study also indicated that comparisons in pairs should be interpreted with caution. (orig.).

  8. MR imaging in recurrent pain after back surgery. A comparative study using standard and high doses of gadolinium contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakeson, P.; Jonsson, E.; Holtaas, S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic results following injection of (a) a high dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) of gadodiamide injection and (b) the standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) of Gd-DTPA, in patients with recurrent symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with recurrent or sustained symptoms after surgery for lumbar disc herniations were examined. MR imaging (0.3 T) was first performed before and after Gd-DTPA at 0.1 mmol/kg b.w., and then within one month (17 patients) or within 3 months (3 patients) before and after gadodiamide injection at 0.3 mmol/kg b.w. The examinations were first evaluated by 2 neuroradiologists blinded to dose but not to patient as the images were presented in pairs. Six months later the same investigators evaluated the examinations again, this time blinded to both dose and patient. Results: At the evaluation in pairs (with the investigators blinded to dose only) the high-dose examinations were considered the most informative (p=0.05). However, at the later evaluation (with the investigators blinded both to dose and patient) no significant difference between high and standard dose was found regarding diagnosis or diagnostic certainty. Conclusion: In this study the high-dose contrast enhancement of MR imaging at 0.3 T did not increase the diagnostic information for differentiating between scar and recurrent hernia. The high-dose images were considered more informative when evaluated in pairs, but gave no additional or different information when evaluated separately. The study also indicated that comparisons in pairs should be interpreted with caution. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of excretory urographic contrast effects of dimeric and monomeric non-ionic iodinated contrast media in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Yamada, K.; Watanabe, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Miyake, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In excretory urography, the osmolarity of contrast media has rarely been treated as important in veterinary medicine. In this study, the contrast effect of two contrast media (monomeric iohexol and dimeric iodixanol) in the renal cortex and aorta were compared using computed tomography (CT). Five beagle dogs were used and the study employed a cross-over method for each contrast media. The results showed that there was no difference between the media in the aorta, but iodixanol showed higher CT value and a longer contrast effect than iohexol in the renal cortex, in spite of having the same iodine dosage. It is believed that iodixanol, with its low osmolarity, is diluted less by osmotic diuresis than monomeric iohexol. It is important to consider the osmolarity of the contrast media when evaluating the contrast effect, and it is essential to use the same contrast media for each examination, or the renal excretory speed will be under/overestimated

  10. Effects of small doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty remains about the quantitative effects of doses of ionising radiation less than 0.2 Sv. Estimates of hereditary effects, based on the atomic bomb survivors, suggest that the mutation doubling dose is about 2 Sv for acute low LET radiation, but the confidence limits are wide. The idea that paternal gonadal irradiation might explain the Seascale cluster of childhood leukaemia has been disproved. Fetal irradiation may lead to a reduction in IQ and an increase in seizures in childhood proportional to dose. Estimates that doses to a whole population cause a risk of cancer proportional to dose, with 0.1 Sv given acutely causing a risk of 1%, will need to be modified as more information is obtained, but the idea that there is a threshold for risk above this level is not supported by observations on the irradiated fetus or the effect of fallout. The idea, based on ecological observations, that small doses protect against the development of cancer is refuted by the effect of radon in houses. New observations on the atomic bomb survivors have raised afresh the possibility that small doses may also have other somatic effects. (author)

  11. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh; Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim; Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 ± 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  12. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: m_bazeed@yahoo.com; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh (Cardiology Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal Univ. (Egypt)); Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim (Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aim Shams Univ. (Egypt)); Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh (Dept. of Cardiac Services, Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 +- 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  13. Supra-aortic low-dose contrast-enhanced time-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) angiography at 3 T: comparison with time-of-flight MR angiography and high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Joo; Kim, Bum-soo; Koo, Ja-Sung; Kim, Bom-Yi; Jang, Jinhee; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose, time-resolved, contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance angiography (TR-CEMRA) has been described previously; however, a comparative study between low dose TR-CEMRA and time-of-flight MRA (TOF-MRA) in the diagnosis of supra-aortic arterial stenosis has not yet been published. To demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of low-dose TR-CEMRA compared with TOF-MRA, using high-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (HR-CEMRA) as the reference standard. This prospective study consisted of 30 consecutive patients. All patients underwent TOF-MRA of the neck and circle of Willis and supra-aortic HR-CEMRA, followed by supra-aortic low-dose TR-CEMRA. Gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®), Guerbet, Roissy CdG Cedex, France) was injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg for HR-CEMRA, followed by a 0.03 mmol/kg bolus for low-dose TR-CEMRA. Three readers evaluated the assessibility and image quality, and then two readers classified each stenosis into the following categories: normal (0-30%), mild stenosis (31-50%), moderate (51-70%), severe (71-99%), and occlusion. TR-CEMRA and HR-CEMRA showed a greater number of assessable arterial segments than TOF-MRA (P supra-aortic arterial stenosis, and could be more useful option than TOF-MRA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  15. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  16. Ultralow dose dentomaxillofacial CT imaging and iterative reconstruction techniques: variability of Hounsfield units and contrast-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischel, Alexander; Stratis, Andreas; Kakar, Apoorv; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Gassner, Eva-Maria; Puelacher, Wolfgang; Pauwels, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether application of ultralow dose protocols and iterative reconstruction technology (IRT) influence quantitative Hounsfield units (HUs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Methods: A phantom with inserts of five types of materials was scanned using protocols for (a) a clinical reference for navigated surgery (CT dose index volume 36.58 mGy), (b) low-dose sinus imaging (18.28 mGy) and (c) four ultralow dose imaging (4.14, 2.63, 0.99 and 0.53 mGy). All images were reconstructed using: (i) filtered back projection (FBP); (ii) IRT: adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-50 (ASIR-50), ASIR-100 and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR); and (iii) standard (std) and bone kernel. Mean HU, CNR and average HU error after recalibration were determined. Each combination of protocols was compared using Friedman analysis of variance, followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test. Results: Pearson's sample correlation coefficients were all >0.99. Ultralow dose protocols using FBP showed errors of up to 273 HU. Std kernels had less HU variability than bone kernels. MBIR reduced the error value for the lowest dose protocol to 138 HU and retained the highest relative CNR. ASIR could not demonstrate significant advantages over FBP. Conclusions: Considering a potential dose reduction as low as 1.5% of a std protocol, ultralow dose protocols and IRT should be further tested for clinical dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Advances in knowledge: HU as a surrogate for bone density may vary significantly in CT ultralow dose imaging. However, use of std kernels and MBIR technology reduce HU error values and may retain the highest CNR. PMID:26859336

  17. Incidence of immediate adverse effects of gadolinium contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Kouishi; Matsui, Satomi; Oikawa, Satoko; Habano, Youji; Ozaki, Daisuke; Ootake, Hidenori; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the adverse effects of intravenous injection of one of 4 types of gadolinium contrast media in 6550 patients: gadopentate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA), 4299 patients; gadodiamide (Gd-DTPA-BMA), 1612; gadoteridol (Gd (HP-DO3A)), 565; and gadoterate meglumin (Gd-DOTA), 74. Thirty-two (0.49%) patients experienced adverse effects, which included rash (18.8%), nausea (40.6%), vomiting (34.4%), and an unpleasant sensation in the throat (6.3%). No patient required hospitalization. We compared the incidence of adverse effects from the 4 types of contrast media and found no difference in sex, age, body region examined, or method of contrast administration. Incidence was significantly higher for Gd (HP-DO3A) than Gd-DTPA and Gd-DTPA-BMA (P<0.000001). (author)

  18. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  19. Spontaneous recovery of effects of contrast adaptation without awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxing eMei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to a high contrast stimulus reduces the neural sensitivity to subsequent similar patterns. Recent work has disclosed that contrast adaptation is controlled by multiple mechanisms operating over differing timescales. Adaptation to high contrast for a relatively longer period can be rapidly eliminated by adaptation to a lower contrast (or meanfield in the present study. Such rapid deadaptation presumably causes a short-term mechanism to signal for a sensitivity increase, cancelling ongoing signals from long-term mechanisms. Once deadaptation ends, the short-term mechanism rapidly returns to baseline, and the slowly decaying effects in the long-term mechanisms reemerge, allowing the perceptual aftereffects to recover during continued testing. Although this spontaneous recovery effect is considered strong evidence supporting the multiple mechanisms theory, it remains controversial whether the effect is mainly driven by visual memory established during the initial longer-term adaptation period. To resolve this debate, we used a modified Continuous Flash Suppression (CFS and visual crowding paradigms to render the adapting stimuli invisible, but still observed the spontaneous recovery phenomenon. These results exclude the possibility that spontaneous recovery found in the previous work was merely the consequence of explicit visual memory. Our findings also demonstrate that contrast adaptation, even at the unconscious processing levels, is controlled by multiple mechanisms.

  20. Low-tube-voltage selection for non-contrast-enhanced CT: Comparison of the radiation dose in pediatric and adult phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonobo, Toshiaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kiguchi, Masao; Masuda, Takanori; Sakabe, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We used pediatric and adult anthropomorphic phantoms to compare the radiation dose of low- and standard tube voltage chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans. We also discuss the optimal low tube voltage for non-contrast-enhanced CT. Using a female adult- and three differently-sized pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms we acquired chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced scans on a 320-multidetector CT volume scanner. The tube voltage was set at 80-, 100-, and 120 kVp. The tube current was automatically assigned on the CT scanner in response to the set image noise level. On each phantom and at each tube voltage we measured the surface and center dose using high-sensitivity metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. The mean surface dose of chest and abdominal CT scans in 5-year olds was 4.4 and 5.3 mGy at 80 kVp, 4.5 and 5.4 mGy at 100 kV, and 4.0 and 5.0 mGy at 120 kVp, respectively. These values were similar in our 3-pediatric phantoms (p > 0.05). The mean surface dose in the adult phantom increased from 14.7 to 19.4 mGy for chest- and from 18.7 to 24.8 mGy for abdominal CT as the tube voltage decreased from 120 to 80 kVp (p voltage and the low tube voltage technique can be used for non-contrast-enhanced chest- and abdominal scanning. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low tube voltage dual source computed tomography to reduce contrast media doses in adult abdomen examinations: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thor, Daniel [Department of Diagnostic Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 14186 (Sweden); Brismar, Torkel B., E-mail: torkel.brismar@gmail.com; Fischer, Michael A. [Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet and Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm 14186 (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of low tube voltage dual source (DS) single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) to reduce contrast media (CM) dose in adult abdominal examinations of various sizes while maintaining soft tissue and iodine contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Methods: Four abdominal phantoms simulating a body mass index of 16 to 35 kg/m{sup 2} with four inserted syringes of 0, 2, 4, and 8 mgI/ml CM were scanned using a 64-slice DS-CT scanner. Six imaging protocols were used; one single source (SS) reference protocol (120 kV, 180 reference mAs), four low kV SE protocols (70 and 80 kV using both SS and DS), and one DE protocol at 80/140 kV. Potential CM reduction with unchanged CNRs relative to the 120 kV protocol was calculated along with the corresponding increase in radiation dose. Results: The potential contrast media reductions were determined to be approximately 53% for DS 70 kV, 51% for SS 70 kV, 44% for DS 80 kV, 40% for SS 80 kV, and 20% for DE (all differences were significant, P < 0.05). Constant CNR could be achieved by using DS 70 kV for small to medium phantom sizes (16–26 kg/m{sup 2}) and for all sizes (16–35 kg/m{sup 2}) when using DS 80 kV and DE. Corresponding radiation doses increased by 60%–107%, 23%–83%, and 6%–12%, respectively. Conclusions: DS single energy CT can be used to reduce CM dose by 44%–53% with maintained CNR in adult abdominal examinations at the cost of an increased radiation dose. DS dual-energy CT allows reduction of CM dose by 20% at similar radiation dose as compared to a standard 120 kV single source.

  2. The effects of water soluble contrast agents on the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovett, I.; Donchey, S.; Doust, B.; Branson, J.; Munro, V.

    1989-01-01

    The water soluble contrast agents Gastrografin R (Sodium diatrizoate and meglumine diatrizoate, Schering, Berlin), Iopamiro 300 R (Iopamidol, Schering, Berlin), and Dionosil Aqueous R (propyliodone BP, Glaxo, England) were instilled into the tracheobronchial tree of rats in doses of either 0.1 ml and 0.25 ml. Rats being used as controls, underwent sham operations with the instillation of air instead of contrast agent. In all, 85 rats were used. All rats that had not already died from the effects of contrast agent were sacrificed 30 minutes after instillation. The relative effects of the contrast agents were measured by comparing: survival time; radiographic effects of the contrast agents on the lungs; and pathological changes as estimated by post mortem lung section and microscopy. The least toxic agent was the one with the lowest osmotic activity, namely Aqueous Dionosil. It is therefore recommended that Aqueous Dionosil be used in preference to Gastrografin or Iopamidol for studies of the oesophagus whenever there is a danger of aspiration of contrast agent into the tracheobronchial tree. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  4. Effect of contrast leakage on the detection of abnormal brain tumor vasculature in high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaViolette, Peter S; Daun, Mitchell K; Paulson, Eric S; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal brain tumor vasculature has recently been highlighted by a dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI processing technique. The technique uses independent component analysis (ICA) to separate arterial and venous perfusion. The overlap of the two, i.e. arterio-venous overlap or AVOL, preferentially occurs in brain tumors and predicts response to anti-angiogenic therapy. The effects of contrast agent leakage on the AVOL biomarker have yet to be established. DSC was acquired during two separate contrast boluses in ten patients undergoing clinical imaging for brain tumor diagnosis. Three components were modeled with ICA, which included the arterial and venous components. The percentage of each component as well as a third component were determined within contrast enhancing tumor and compared. AVOL within enhancing tumor was also compared between doses. The percentage of enhancing tumor classified as not arterial or venous and instead into a third component with contrast agent leakage apparent in the time-series was significantly greater for the first contrast dose compared to the second. The amount of AVOL detected within enhancing tumor was also significantly greater with the second dose compared to the first. Contrast leakage results in large signal variance classified as a separate component by the ICA algorithm. The use of a second dose mitigates the effect and allows measurement of AVOL within enhancement.

  5. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  6. Immediate hypersensitivity to iodinated contrast media: diagnostic accuracy of skin tests and intravenous provocation test with low dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesé, L; Gaouar, H; Autegarden, J-E; Alari, A; Amsler, E; Vial-Dupuy, A; Pecquet, C; Francès, C; Soria, A

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of HSR to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is challenging based on clinical history and skin tests. This study evaluates the negative predictive value (NPV) of skin tests and intravenous provocation test (IPT) with low-dose ICM in patients with suspected immediate hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) to ICM. Thirty-seven patients with suspected immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ICM were included retrospectively. Skin tests and a single-blind placebo-controlled intravenous provocation test (IPT) with low-dose iodinated contrast media (ICM) were performed. Skin tests with ICM were positive in five cases (one skin prick test and five intradermal test). Thirty-six patients were challenged successfully by IPT, and only one patient had a positive challenge result, with a grade I reaction by the Ring and Messmer classification. Ten of 23 patients followed up by telephone were re-exposed to a negative tested ICM during radiologic examination; two experienced a grade I immediate reaction. For immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ICM, the NPV for skin tests and IPT with low dose was 80% (95% CI 44-97%). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  8. Contrasting ecosystem-effects of morphologically similar copepods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Matthews

    Full Text Available Organisms alter the biotic and abiotic conditions of ecosystems. They can modulate the availability of resources to other species (ecosystem engineering and shape selection pressures on other organisms (niche construction. Very little is known about how the engineering effects of organisms vary among and within species, and, as a result, the ecosystem consequences of species diversification and phenotypic evolution are poorly understood. Here, using a common gardening experiment, we test whether morphologically similar species and populations of Diaptomidae copepods (Leptodiaptomus ashlandi, Hesperodiaptomus franciscanus, Skistodiaptomus oregonensis have similar or different effects on the structure and function of freshwater ecosystems. We found that copepod species had contrasting effects on algal biomass, ammonium concentrations, and sedimentation rates, and that copepod populations had contrasting effects on prokaryote abundance, sedimentation rates, and gross primary productivity. The average size of ecosystem-effect contrasts between species was similar to those between populations, and was comparable to those between fish species and populations measured in previous common gardening experiments. Our results suggest that subtle morphological variation among and within species can cause multifarious and divergent ecosystem-effects. We conclude that using morphological trait variation to assess the functional similarity of organisms may underestimate the importance of species and population diversity for ecosystem functioning.

  9. Contrast, contours and the confusion effect in dazzle camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Benedict G; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Cuthill, Innes C

    2016-07-01

    'Motion dazzle camouflage' is the name for the putative effects of highly conspicuous, often repetitive or complex, patterns on parameters important in prey capture, such as the perception of speed, direction and identity. Research into motion dazzle camouflage is increasing our understanding of the interactions between visual tracking, the confusion effect and defensive coloration. However, there is a paucity of research into the effects of contrast on motion dazzle camouflage: is maximal contrast a prerequisite for effectiveness? If not, this has important implications for our recognition of the phenotype and understanding of the function and mechanisms of potential motion dazzle camouflage patterns. Here we tested human participants' ability to track one moving target among many identical distractors with surface patterns designed to test the influence of these factors. In line with previous evidence, we found that targets with stripes parallel to the object direction of motion were hardest to track. However, reduction in contrast did not significantly influence this result. This finding may bring into question the utility of current definitions of motion dazzle camouflage, and means that some animal patterns, such as aposematic or mimetic stripes, may have previously unrecognized multiple functions.

  10. In an animal model nephrogenic systemic fibrosis cannot be induced by intraperitoneal injection of high-dose gadolinium based contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, R.D.; Lorke, D.E.; Neidl van Gorkom, K.F.; Petroianu, G.; Azimullah, S.; Nurulain, S.M.; Singh, S.; Fuchsjäger, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim and objective: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has been reported in humans to be most likely induced by gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA), namely by gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadoversetamide, rarely by other GBCA. The pathogenesis of NSF remains unclear; different hypotheses are under discussion. The objective of the study is to assess if in the animal model human-like NSF changes can be induced by high-dose, intraperitoneal GBCA injections over four weeks. Materials and methods: After approval by the institutional animal ethics committee, six rats each were randomly assigned to groups, and treated with seven different GBCA. Intraperitoneal (IP) injections – proven in the animal model to be effective – were chosen to prolong the animals’ exposure to the respective GBCA. GBCA doses of previous intravenous (IV) animal studies were applied. After five weeks all rats were sacrificed. Sham controls were treated with IP saline injections, employing the same regimen. Results: No findings comparable with human NSF were observed in all animals after IP treatment with all seven GBCA at daily doses of 2.5 and 5.0 mmol/kg body weight (BW). No histopathological abnormalities of all examined organs were noted. Weight loss was stated in weeks three and four with GBCA injections at doses of 5.0 mmol/kg BW, but rats regained weight after cessation of GBCA treatment. Conclusions: NSF-comparable pathological findings could not be induced by high dose intraperitoneal injection of seven GBCA

  11. In an animal model nephrogenic systemic fibrosis cannot be induced by intraperitoneal injection of high-dose gadolinium based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, R.D., E-mail: rlanger@uaeu.ac.ae [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Lorke, D.E. [Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Neidl van Gorkom, K.F. [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Petroianu, G. [Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Azimullah, S.; Nurulain, S.M.; Singh, S. [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Fuchsjäger, M. [Al Ain Hospital, MUV-VAMED, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2012-10-15

    Aim and objective: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has been reported in humans to be most likely induced by gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA), namely by gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadoversetamide, rarely by other GBCA. The pathogenesis of NSF remains unclear; different hypotheses are under discussion. The objective of the study is to assess if in the animal model human-like NSF changes can be induced by high-dose, intraperitoneal GBCA injections over four weeks. Materials and methods: After approval by the institutional animal ethics committee, six rats each were randomly assigned to groups, and treated with seven different GBCA. Intraperitoneal (IP) injections – proven in the animal model to be effective – were chosen to prolong the animals’ exposure to the respective GBCA. GBCA doses of previous intravenous (IV) animal studies were applied. After five weeks all rats were sacrificed. Sham controls were treated with IP saline injections, employing the same regimen. Results: No findings comparable with human NSF were observed in all animals after IP treatment with all seven GBCA at daily doses of 2.5 and 5.0 mmol/kg body weight (BW). No histopathological abnormalities of all examined organs were noted. Weight loss was stated in weeks three and four with GBCA injections at doses of 5.0 mmol/kg BW, but rats regained weight after cessation of GBCA treatment. Conclusions: NSF-comparable pathological findings could not be induced by high dose intraperitoneal injection of seven GBCA.

  12. Estimation of effective dose during hysterosalpingography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzimamil, K.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.; Alsafi, K.; Omer, H.

    2014-08-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is the most frequently used diagnostic tool to evaluate the endometrial cavity and fallopian tube by using conventional x-ray or fluoroscopy. Determination of the patient radiation doses values from x-ray examinations provides useful guidance on where best to concentrate efforts on patient dose reduction in order to optimize the protection of the patients. The aims of this study were to measure the patients entrance surface air kerma doses (ESA K), effective doses and to compare practices between different hospitals in Sudan. ESA K were measured for patient using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters (TLDs, Gr-200A). Effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. This study was conducted in five radiological departments: Two Teaching Hospitals (A and D), two private hospitals (B and C) and one University Hospital (E). The mean ESD was 20.1 mGy, 28.9 mGy, 13.6 mGy, 58.65 mGy, 35.7, 22.4 and 19.6 mGy for hospitals A,B,C,D, and E), respectively. The mean effective dose was 2.4 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 1.6 mSv, 7.1 mSv and 4.3 mSv in the same order. The study showed wide variations in the ESDs with three of the hospitals having values above the internationally reported values. Number of x-ray images, fluoroscopy time, operator skills x-ray machine type and clinical complexity of the procedures were shown to be major contributors to the variations reported. Results demonstrated the need for standardization of technique throughout the hospital. The results also suggest that there is a need to optimize the procedures. Local DRLs were proposed for the entire procedures. (author)

  13. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  14. Measurement of exposure dose and its reduction design for nurses in charge in FDG-PET/CT with contrast reviewing the manual and staff flow line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwazaki, Rie; Tochigi, Shigeko; Onuki, Michiko; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Sakamoto, Setsu

    2013-01-01

    Nurses in charge received additional radiation exposure from the patients with intravenous FDG injection when FDG-PET/CT with contrast media was performed. The exposure dose was measured about 1.5μSv per examination on average. There was not a large difference among those when the mean exposure dose of each nurse was compared. There was a tendency that the exposure dose was less, as work years of the nurses in charge of PET/CT with contrast were longer. Consideration of radioactivity distribution in the PET/CT examination room has a potential to reduce radiation exposure dose of the nurses in charge. (author)

  15. The benefits of folic acid-modified gold nanoparticles in CT-based molecular imaging: radiation dose reduction and image contrast enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beik, Jaber; Jafariyan, Maryam; Montazerabadi, Alireza; Ghadimi-Daresajini, Ali; Tarighi, Parastoo; Mahmoudabadi, Alireza; Ghaznavi, Habib; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali

    2017-12-12

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) requires an optimal compromise between image quality and patient dose. While high image quality is an important requirement in CT, the radiation dose must be kept minimal to protect the patients from ionizing radiation-associated risks. The use of probes based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) along with active targeting ligands for specific recognition of cancer cells may be one of the balanced solutions. Herein, we report the effect of folic acid (FA)-modified AuNP as a targeted nanoprobe on the contrast enhancement of CT images as well as its potential for patient dose reduction. For this purpose, nasopharyngeal KB cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors were incubated with AuNPs with and without FA modification and imaged in a CT scanner with the following X-ray tube parameters: peak tube voltage of 130 KVp, and tube current-time products of 60, 90, 120, 160 and 250 mAs. Moreover, in order to estimate the radiation dose to which the patient was exposed during a head CT protocol, the CT dose index (CTDI) value was measured by an X-ray electrometer by changing the tube current-time product. Raising the tube current-time product from 60 to 250 mAs significantly increased the absorbed dose from 18 mGy to 75 mGy. This increase was not associated with a significant enhancement of the image quality of the KB cells. However, an obvious increase in image brightness and CT signal intensity (quantified by Hounsfield units [HU]) were observed in cells exposed to nanoparticles without any increase in the mAs product or radiation dose. Under the same Au concentration, KB cells exposed to FA-modified AuNPs had significantly higher HU and brighter CT images than those of the cells exposed to AuNPs without FA modification. In conclusion, FA-modified AuNP can be considered as a targeted CT nanoprobe with the potential for dose reduction by keeping the required mAs product as low as possible while enhancing image contrast.

  16. Committed effective dose from thoron daughters inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M.P.; Pecequilo, B.R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Mankind's interest in natural radiation exposure levels has increased over the past fifty years and it is now recognized that the most significant contributors to human irradiation by natural sources are the short-lived decay products of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn). Despite the thoron short half-life of 55 s, effective dose from inhalation of thoron an its progeny ( 212 Pb and 212 Bi) must be considered, owing to the high thorium background in countries like Brazil, China and India, for example. The indoor committed effective dose was assessed by air sampling at the thorium purification plant and the nuclear materials storage site of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares; Sao Paulo, Brazil. A total of 21 glass fiber filter samples was analyzed by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry in order to obtain the 212 Pb and 212 Bi activities. The equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) varied from 0.3 Bq/m 3 to 6.8 Bq/m 3 for the storage site air samples and from 9.9 Bq/m 3 to 249.8 Bq/m 3 for the thorium purification plant air samples. As retention studies indicate a biological half-life of a few hours inhaled thoron progeny in the human lungs, the main fraction of the potential alpha energy (PAEC) deposited is absorbed in the lungs, meaning negligible to the effective dose the contribution of the dose in other times. The committed effective dose due thoron progeny was performed by compartimental analysis following the ICRP 66 lung compartimental model and ICRP 67 lead compartimental model. The values obtained varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a for the storage site air samples and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.00 mSv/a for the thorium purification plant air samples. (author)

  17. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  18. Radiation and contrast agent doses reductions by using 80-kV tube voltage in coronary computed tomographic angiography: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Jian-xin [Department of Radiology, Wuhan 161th Hospital, Wuhan (China); Wang, Yi-min, E-mail: wym6669@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Wuhan 161th Hospital, Wuhan (China); Lu, Jin-guo [Department of Cardiology, Asia Heart Hospital, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Yu; Wang, Peng; Yang, Cheng [Department of Radiology, Wuhan 161th Hospital, Wuhan (China)

    2014-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the effects of 80-kilovoltage (kV) tube voltage coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) with a reduced amount of contrast agent on qualitative and quantitative image quality parameters and on radiation dose in patients with a body mass index (BMI) <23.0 kg/m{sup 2}. Methods: One hundred and twenty consecutive patients with a BMI <23.0 kg/m{sup 2} and a low calcium load undergoing retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated dual-source CCTA were randomized into two groups [standard-tube voltage (120-kV) vs. low-tube voltage (80-kV)]. The injection flow rate of contrast agent (350 mg I/mL) was adjusted to body weight of each patient (4.5–5.5 mL/s in the 120-kV group and 2.8–3.8 mL/s in the 80-kV group). Radiation and contrast agent doses were evaluated. Quantitative image quality parameters and figure of merit (FOM) of coronary artery were evaluated. Each coronary segment was evaluated for image quality on a 4-point scale. Results: Compared with the 120-kV group, effective dose and amount of contrast agent in the 80-kV group were decreased by 57.8% and 30.5% (effective dose:2.7 ± 0.5vs. 6.4 ± 1.3 mSv; amount of contrast agent:57.1 ± 3.2 vs. 82.1 ± 6.1 mL; both p < 0.0001), respectively. Image noise was 22.7 ± 2.1 HU for 120-kV images and 33.2 ± 5.2 HU for 80-kV images (p < 0.0001). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the proximal right coronary artery (RCA) and left main coronary artery (LMA) were all lower in 80-kV than 120-kV images (SNR in the proximal RCA: 16.5 ± 1.8 vs. 19.4 ± 2.8; SNR in the LMA: 16.3 ± 2.0 vs.19.6 ± 2.7; CNR in the proximal RCA: 19.4 ± 2.3 vs.22.9 ± 3.0; CNR in the LMA: 18.8 ± 2.4 vs. 22.7 ± 2.9; all p < 0.0001). FOM were all significantly higher in 80-kV than 120-kV images (proximal RCA: 146.7 ± 45.1 vs. 93.4 ± 32.0; LMA: 139.1 ± 47.2 vs. 91.6 ± 31.1; all p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in image quality score between the two groups (3.3 ± 0

  19. Radiation and contrast agent doses reductions by using 80-kV tube voltage in coronary computed tomographic angiography: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Jian-xin; Wang, Yi-min; Lu, Jin-guo; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Peng; Yang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of 80-kilovoltage (kV) tube voltage coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) with a reduced amount of contrast agent on qualitative and quantitative image quality parameters and on radiation dose in patients with a body mass index (BMI) <23.0 kg/m 2 . Methods: One hundred and twenty consecutive patients with a BMI <23.0 kg/m 2 and a low calcium load undergoing retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated dual-source CCTA were randomized into two groups [standard-tube voltage (120-kV) vs. low-tube voltage (80-kV)]. The injection flow rate of contrast agent (350 mg I/mL) was adjusted to body weight of each patient (4.5–5.5 mL/s in the 120-kV group and 2.8–3.8 mL/s in the 80-kV group). Radiation and contrast agent doses were evaluated. Quantitative image quality parameters and figure of merit (FOM) of coronary artery were evaluated. Each coronary segment was evaluated for image quality on a 4-point scale. Results: Compared with the 120-kV group, effective dose and amount of contrast agent in the 80-kV group were decreased by 57.8% and 30.5% (effective dose:2.7 ± 0.5vs. 6.4 ± 1.3 mSv; amount of contrast agent:57.1 ± 3.2 vs. 82.1 ± 6.1 mL; both p < 0.0001), respectively. Image noise was 22.7 ± 2.1 HU for 120-kV images and 33.2 ± 5.2 HU for 80-kV images (p < 0.0001). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the proximal right coronary artery (RCA) and left main coronary artery (LMA) were all lower in 80-kV than 120-kV images (SNR in the proximal RCA: 16.5 ± 1.8 vs. 19.4 ± 2.8; SNR in the LMA: 16.3 ± 2.0 vs.19.6 ± 2.7; CNR in the proximal RCA: 19.4 ± 2.3 vs.22.9 ± 3.0; CNR in the LMA: 18.8 ± 2.4 vs. 22.7 ± 2.9; all p < 0.0001). FOM were all significantly higher in 80-kV than 120-kV images (proximal RCA: 146.7 ± 45.1 vs. 93.4 ± 32.0; LMA: 139.1 ± 47.2 vs. 91.6 ± 31.1; all p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in image quality score between the two groups (3.3 ± 0.8 vs. 3

  20. Dose and diagnostic performance comparison between phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation and digital mammography: a clinical study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedon, Christian; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Tonutti, Maura; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria Assunta; Longo, Renata

    2018-01-01

    Two dosimetric quantities [mean glandular dose (MGD) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK)] and the diagnostic performance of phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation (MSR) are compared to conventional digital mammography (DM). Seventy-one patients (age range, 41 to 82 years) underwent MSR after a DM examination if questionable or suspicious breast abnormalities were not clarified by ultrasonography. The MGD and the ESAK delivered in both examinations were evaluated and compared. Two on-site radiologists rated the images in consensus according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System assessment categories, which were then correlated with the final diagnoses by means of statistical generalized linear models (GLMs). Receiver operating characteristic curves were also used to assess the diagnostic performance by comparing the area under the curve (AUC). An important MGD and ESAK reduction was observed in MSR due to the monoenergetic beam. In particular, an average 43% reduction was observed for the MGD and a reduction of more than 50% for the ESAK. GLM showed higher diagnostic accuracy, especially in terms of specificity, for MSR, confirmed by AUC analysis ([Formula: see text]). The study design implied that the population was characterized by a high prevalence of disease and that the radiologists, who read the DM images before referring the patient to MSR, could have been influenced in their assessments. Within these limitations, the use of synchrotron radiation with the phase-contrast technique applied to mammography showed an important dose reduction and a higher diagnostic accuracy compared with DM. These results could further encourage research on the translation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging into the clinics.

  1. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Rosen, Gerald M. [University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  2. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J.; Schneider, Erika; Rosen, Gerald M.; Winalski, Carl S.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  3. The Effect of Low‑Dose Ketamine (Preemptive Dose) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Average dosage of diclofenac suppository and mean time for taking the first dosage of opioids have not statistical difference too (respectively; P = 0.76, P = 0.87). Average dose of pethidine was lesser than placebo statistically. It means, the case group did not take pethidine but this amount was 6 (20%) in the control one (P ...

  4. Effects of ocular aberrations on contrast detection in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Liu, Rong; Dai, Yun; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2012-08-06

    We use adaptive optics (AO) techniques to manipulate the ocular aberrations and elucidate the effects of these ocular aberrations on contrast detection in a noisy background. The detectability of sine wave gratings at frequencies of 4, 8, and 16 circles per degree (cpd) was measured in a standard two-interval force-choice staircase procedure against backgrounds of various levels of white noise. The observer's ocular aberrations were either corrected with AO or left uncorrected. In low levels of external noise, contrast detection thresholds are always lowered by AO correction, whereas in high levels of external noise, they are generally elevated by AO correction. Higher levels of external noise are required to make this threshold elevation observable when signal spatial frequencies increase from 4 to 16 cpd. The linear-amplifier-model fit shows that mostly sampling efficiency and equivalent noise both decrease with AO correction. Our findings indicate that ocular aberrations could be beneficial for contrast detection in high-level noises. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, P D

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR).

  6. Effect of atorvastatin on preventing contrast-induced nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongya; Zhu Jing; Chen Jianchang; Xu Weiting; Luo Xiaoyu; Zhao Liangping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of atorvastatin on contrast-induced renal function and urinary protein change in patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic coronary intervention. Methods: Two hundred and forty-six patients who underwent coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized to receive atorvastatin (40 mg, qn, n=123) or no atorvastatin (n=123) treatment 3 days before coronary angiography. All patients received hydrated therapy. Serum creatinine (Scr), urinary αl-microglobulin (α l -MG), and urinary albumin (mALB) were checked for evidence of tubular or glomerular damage at start, and 36 to 48 hours after the administration of a radiocontrast agent. High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, urinary α l -MG/ urinary creatinine(Ucr) and mALB/ Ucr were also assessed at the same time. Creatinine clearance(Ccr) was calculated according to Cockcroft-Gault formulas basing on serum creatinine. Results: (1) In the control group and atorvastatin-treated group, comparison with the value before coronary angiography or PCI, urinary α l -MG/ Ucr, mALB/ Ucr, Scr and hsCRP significantly increased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (P l -MG/ Ucr significantly increased at the 2nd day after angiography or PCI in the control group (P<0.05), incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) significantly increased too (8.13% vs 0.81%, P<0.05). Conclusions: Contrast media induces light renal function damage. Pretreatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/qn for 3 days could significantly reduce procedural inflammatory reaction and prevent contrast-induced nephropathy. (authors)

  7. Effect of atorvastatin on preventing contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongya, Zhang; Jing, Zhu; Jianchang, Chen; Weiting, Xu; Xiaoyu, Luo; Liangping, Zhao [Dept of Cardiology, the Second Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: To study the effects of atorvastatin on contrast-induced renal function and urinary protein change in patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic coronary intervention. Methods: Two hundred and forty-six patients who underwent coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized to receive atorvastatin (40 mg, qn, n=123) or no atorvastatin (n=123) treatment 3 days before coronary angiography. All patients received hydrated therapy. Serum creatinine (Scr), urinary {alpha}l-microglobulin ({alpha}{sub l}-MG), and urinary albumin (mALB) were checked for evidence of tubular or glomerular damage at start, and 36 to 48 hours after the administration of a radiocontrast agent. High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, urinary {alpha}{sub l}-MG/ urinary creatinine(Ucr) and mALB/ Ucr were also assessed at the same time. Creatinine clearance(Ccr) was calculated according to Cockcroft-Gault formulas basing on serum creatinine. Results: (1) In the control group and atorvastatin-treated group, comparison with the value before coronary angiography or PCI, urinary {alpha}{sub l}-MG/ Ucr, mALB/ Ucr, Scr and hsCRP significantly increased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (P<0.05). Ccr significantly decreased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (P<0.05). (2) Compared the atorvastatin-treated group, the values of hsCRP, urinary {alpha}{sub l}-MG/ Ucr significantly increased at the 2nd day after angiography or PCI in the control group (P<0.05), incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) significantly increased too (8.13% vs 0.81%, P<0.05). Conclusions: Contrast media induces light renal function damage. Pretreatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/qn for 3 days could significantly reduce procedural inflammatory reaction and prevent contrast-induced nephropathy. (authors)

  8. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-01-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H E , as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Sun; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Young Il; Choi, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent

  11. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  12. Modifying effect of low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalendo, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that irradiation of Hela cells with stimulating doses of 0,1 Gy changes the cells' response to the subsequent radiation effect of greater value: instead of DNA synthesis inhibition stimulation takes place. Modifying effect of preliminary irradiation with 0,1 Gy manifests it self only in case if there is a certain time interval not less than 3 minutes and not more than 10 minutes (3-5 minutes is optimal interval). Data on modifying effect with 0,1 Gy at subcellular and cellular-population levels are presented. 21 refs.; 6 figs

  13. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  14. Medical irradiation and the use of the ''effective dose equivalent'' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B.R.R.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the effective dose for all kinds of medical irradiation. In order to estimate the 'somatic effective dose' the weighting factors recommended by ICRP 26 have been separated into those for somatic effects and for genetic effects. Calculation of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology procedures must consider the various technical parameters which determine the absorbed dose in the various organs, i.e. beam quality, typical entrance dose and the number of films of each view. Knowledge about these parameters is not always well established and therefore the effective dose estimates are very uncertain. The average dose absorbed by various organs in the case of administration of radionuclides to the body depends to a much higher degree on biological parameters than in the case of external irradiation. In contrast to the variability and lack of reliability of biological data, the physical methods for internal dose calculation are quite elaborate. However, these methods have to be extended to involve the target dose from the radioactivity distributed within the remaining parts of the body. An attempt was made to estimate the somatic effective dose for the most common diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. This would make it possible to compare the risk of X-ray and nuclear medicine techniques on a more equitable basis. The collective effective dose from medical irradiation is estimated for various countries on the basis of reported statistical data. (H.K.)

  15. Effective dose to radon considering people's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Seki, K.; Kikuchi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The tidal volume was estimated for evaluating the effective dose due to radon concentration in the atmosphere. In this study regional population was separated to vocation and non-vocation. The occupancy time and the breathing rate for both vocation and non-vocation groups were estimated, and the annual tidal volume for both groups were calculated. Human actions were separated to 18 activities in the process for estimating the breathing rate. It was clear that the breathing rate depended on human activity and that the human activity changed with its age, so the breathing rate varied with age. Finally the effective doses due to radon and radon progeny indoors and outdoors were evaluated. The maximum annual effective dose was estimated to be 1.2 mSv, minimum 0.2 mSv, and mean 0.51 mSv for vocation. For non-vocation, the male maximum value 0.43 mSv was obtained at the 16 age and the minimum 0.12 mSv at the 70 age, whereas female maximum 0.26 mSv was obtained at the 12 age and the minimum 0.11 mSv at the 70 age. In addition in this study objective areas are Aichi, Gifu, and Mie prefectures for vocation and only Aichi prefecture for non-vocation. (author)

  16. Influence of contrast materials on dose calculation in radiotherapy planning using computed tomography for tumors at various anatomical regions: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Naruse, Asaka; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Ayakawa, Shiho; Sugie, Chikao; Tomita, Natsuo

    2007-01-01

    Influences of iodinated contrast media on dose calculation were studied in 26 patients. Mean increases in monitor units by contrast media administration were less than 1% and considered negligible in planning of whole-brain, whole-neck, mediastinal, and whole-pelvic irradiation. However, mean increases over 2% were seen in planning of upper-abdominal radiotherapy

  17. Memory interfering effects of chlordiazepoxide on consummatory successive negative contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Leonardo A; Glueck, Amanda C; Daniel, Alan M; Prado-Rivera, Mayerli A; White, Michelle M; Papini, Mauricio R

    2014-01-01

    Long-Evans rats downshifted from 32% to 4% sucrose solution exhibit lower consummatory behavior during downshift trials than rats exposed only to 4% sucrose. In Experiment 1, this effect, called consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC), was attenuated by administration of the benzodiazepine anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5mg/kg, ip) before the second downshift trial (Trial 12), but was not affected when CDP was administered before the first downshift trial (Trial 11). In Experiment 2, CDP administered after Trial 11 actually enhanced the cSNC effect on Trial 12. This posttrial effect of CDP was reduced by delayed administration (Experiment 3). This CDP effect was not present in the absence of incentive downshift (Experiments 4-5), or when animals were tested with the preshift incentive (Experiment 6) or after complete recovery from cSNC (Experiment 7). The posttrial CDP effect was observed after an 8-day interval between Trials 11 and 12 (Experiment 8) and when administered after Trial 12, rather than Trial 11 (Experiment 9). Experiment 10 extended the effect to Wistar rats. Because CDP is a memory interfering drug, it was hypothesized that its posttrial administration interferes with the consolidation of the memory of the downshifted incentive, thus prolonging the mismatch between expected (32% sucrose) and obtained (4% sucrose) incentives that leads to the cSNC effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of detomidine on equine oesophageal function as studied by contrast radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, T.D.G.; Sullivan, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of sedation with detomidine on oesophageal function were assessed by contrast radiography in 10 healthy adult thoroughbred horses. Barium swallows were monitored by means of image intensification, first without sedation and then after the intravenous administration of detomidine at doses of 10 and 20 micrograms/kg bodyweight. The transit time of contrast agent to the oesophageal hiatus was recorded and each swallow was scored for markers of oesophageal dysfunction. Analysis of the data indicated that there were highly significant dose dependent increases in the transit time, the retention of barium within the longitudinal mucosal folds, and retrograde peristalsis and pooling of contrast agent within the oesophagus at both the thoracic inlet and caudal to the base of the heart. The degree of gastrooesophageal reflux was not affected at either dosage. These changes in oesophageal function were similar to those recorded from cases of grass sickness and indicate that care should be taken in the interpretation of studies of swallowing in animals that have been given detomidine before a radiographic examination

  19. Pediatric Patients Demonstrate Progressive T1-Weighted Hyperintensity in the Dentate Nucleus following Multiple Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D R; Chatterjee, A R; Yazdani, M; Marebwa, B; Brown, T; Collins, H; Bolles, G; Jenrette, J M; Nietert, P J; Zhu, X

    2016-12-01

    While there have been recent reports of brain retention of gadolinium following gadolinium-based contrast agent administration in adults, a retrospective series of pediatric patients has not previously been reported, to our knowledge. We investigated the relationship between the number of prior gadolinium-based contrast agent doses and increasing T1 signal in the dentate nucleus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. We hypothesized that despite differences in pediatric physiology and the smaller gadolinium-based contrast agent doses that pediatric patients are typically administered based on weighted-adjusted dosing, the pediatric brain would also demonstrate dose-dependent increasing T1 signal in the dentate nucleus. We included children with multiple gadolinium-based contrast agent administrations at our institution. A blinded reader placed ROIs within the dentate nucleus and adjacent cerebellar white matter. To eliminate reader bias, we also performed automated ROI delineation of the dentate nucleus, cerebellar white matter, and pons. Dentate-to-cerebellar white matter and dentate-to pons ratios were compared with the number of gadolinium-based contrast agent administrations. During 20 years at our institution, 280 patients received at least 5 gadolinium-based contrast agent doses, with 1 patient receiving 38 doses. Sixteen patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria for ROI analysis. Blinded reader dentate-to-cerebellar white matter ratios were significantly associated with gadolinium-based contrast agent doses (r s = 0.77, P = .001). The dentate-to-pons ratio and dentate-to-cerebellar white matter ratios based on automated ROI placement were also significantly correlated with gadolinium-based contrast agent doses (t = 4.98, P contrast agent doses is significantly correlated with progressive T1-weighted dentate hyperintensity. Definitive confirmation of gadolinium deposition requires tissue analysis. Any potential clinical sequelae of gadolinium retention in

  20. Automatic individualized contrast medium dosage during hepatic computed tomography by using computed tomography dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Anders; Cederlund, Kerstin; Aspelin, Peter; Brismar, Torkel B. [Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Bjoerk, Jonas [FoU-centrum Skaane Skaanes Universitetssjukhus i Lund, Lund (Sweden); Nyman, Ulf [University of Lund, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    To compare hepatic parenchymal contrast media (CM) enhancement during multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) and its correlation with volume pitch-corrected computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and body weight (BW). One hundred patients referred for standard three-phase thoraco-abdominal MDCT examination were enrolled. BW was measured in the CT suite. Forty grams of iodine was administered intravenously (iodixanol 320 mg I/ml at 5 ml/s or iomeprol 400 mg I/ml at 4 ml/s) followed by a 50-ml saline flush. CTDI{sub vol} presented by the CT equipment during the parenchymal examination was recorded. The CM enhancement of the liver was defined as the attenuation HU of the liver parenchyma during the hepatic parenchymal phase minus the attenuation in the native phase. Liver parenchymal enhancement was negatively correlated to both CTDI{sub vol} (r = -0.60) and BW (r = -0.64), but the difference in correlation between those two was not significant. CTDI{sub vol} may replace BW when adjusting CM doses to body size. This makes it potentially feasible to automatically individualize CM dosage by CT. (orig.)

  1. A prospective evaluation of the contrast, radiation dose and image quality of contrast-enhanced CT scans of paediatric abdomens using a low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage combined with 70% ASIR algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Zhong, Yumin; Hu, Liwei; Xue, Lianyan; Shi, Meihua; Qiu, Haisheng; Li, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    To quantitatively and subjectively assess the image quality of and radiation dose for an abdominal enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan with a low tube voltage and a low concentration of iodinated contrast agent in children. Forty-eight patients were randomised to one of the two following protocols: Group A (n=24, mean age 46.96±44.65 months, mean weight 15.71±9.11 kg, BMI 16.48±2.40 kg/m(2) ) and Group B (n=24, mean age 41.33±44.59 months, mean weight 18.15±17.67 kg, BMI 17.50±3.73 kg/m(2) ). Group A: 80 kVp tube voltage, 270 mg iodine (I)/mL contrast agent (Visipaque, GE Healthcare) and images were reconstructed using 70% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Group B: 100 kVp tube voltage, 370 mg I/mL contrast agent (Iopamiro, Bracco) and images were reconstructed using 50% ASIR. The volume of the contrast agent was 1.30 mL/kg in both Groups A and B. The degree of enhancement and noise in the abdominal aorta (AO) in the arterial phase (AP) and the portal vein (PV) in the portal venous phase (PVP) was measured; while the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for the AO and PV were calculated. A 5-point scale was used to subjectively evaluate the image quality and image noise by two radiologists with more than 10 years of experience. Dose-length product (DLP) (mGy-cm) and CTDIvol (mGy) were calculated. Objective measurements and subjective quality scores for the two groups were compared using paired t-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, weight or body mass index (BMI) between the two groups (all P>.5). The iodine load in Group A (5517.3±3197.2 mg I) was 37% lower than that in Group B (8772.1±8474.6 mg I), although there was no significant difference between them (P=.111). The DLP and the CT dose index (CTDIvol ) for Group A were also lower than for Group B, but were not statistically significantly different (DLP, 104 mGy-cm±45.81 vs 224.5

  2. The effect of contrast media on the synovial membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papacharalampous, Xenophon [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: medgraph@otenet.gr; Patsouris, Efstratios [Department of Pathology, University of Athens, Mikras Asias 75 str., GR-115 27 Athens (Greece); Mundinger, Alexander [Clinic of Radiology, Marienhospital Osnabrueck, Johannisfreiheit 2-4, D-49074 Osnabruek (Germany); Beck, Andreas [Clinic of Radiology, Konstanz, Luisenstrasse 7, D-78461 Konstanz (Germany); Kouloulias, Vasilios [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece); Primetis, Elias [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece); Koureas, Andreas [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece); Vlahos, Lambros [Department of Radiology, University of Athens, Vasilissis Sofias 76 Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)

    2005-09-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of intra-articular injection of contrast media, sorbitol and normal saline on the synovial membrane. Materials and methods: Sixty three rabbits (126 knees) were used in this study. We injected the knees with amidotrizoate, ioxaglate, iopamidol, iotrol and diluted gadolinium-DTPA (2 mmol/l). Normal saline and sorbitol 27.25% were used for comparison. A histological and histochemical examination of the knees was carried out 1, 2, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 days after the injection. Results: On histological examination, the knees injected with normal saline, ioxaglate and gadolinium-DTPA had a normal appearance. Intra-articular injection of amidotrizoate, iopamidol, iotrol and sorbitol caused early, mild and transient histological changes of the synovium (synovial hyperplasia, infiltration by leucocytes). Furthermore, the knees injected with amidotrizoate presented with late, extensive histological changes (severe synovial hyperplasia, moderate vascular dilatation, severe infiltration by leukocytes). Conclusion: The results suggest that the chemical structure and not the osmolality of the contrast media is the main cause for the histological changes of the synovium.

  3. Standard effective doses for proliferative tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.C.; Hoban, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the treatment schedules used clinically for highly proliferative tumours, particularly with reference to the effects of fraction size, fraction number and treatment duration. The linear quadratic model (with time component) is used here to compare non-standard treatment regimens (e.g. accelerated and hyperfractionated schedules), currently the focus of randomized trials, with each other and some common 'standard regimens'. To ensure easy interpretation of results, two parameters known as proliferative standard effective dose one (PSED 1 ) and proliferative standard effective dose two (PSED 2 ) have been calculated for each regimen. Graphs of PSED 1 and PSED 2 versus potential doubling time (T p ) have been generated for a range of fractionation regimens which are currently under trial in various randomized studies. From these graphs it can be seen that the highly accelerated schedules (such as CHART) only show advantages for tumours with very short potential doubling times. Calculations for most of the schedules considered showed at least equivalent tumour control expected for the trial schedule compared with the control arm used and these values agree quite well with clinical results. These calculations are in good agreement with clinical results available at present. The greater the PSED 1 or PSED 2 for the schedule considered the greater the tumour control, which can be expected. However, as has been seen with clinical trials, this higher cell kill also results in higher acute effects which have proved too great for some accelerated schedules to continue. (author)

  4. Effects of contrast on smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spering, Miriam; Kerzel, Dirk; Braun, Doris I; Hawken, Michael J; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2005-05-20

    It is well known that moving stimuli can appear to move more slowly when contrast is reduced (P. Thompson, 1982). Here we address the question whether changes in stimulus contrast also affect smooth pursuit eye movements. Subjects were asked to smoothly track a moving Gabor patch. Targets varied in velocity (1, 8, and 15 deg/s), spatial frequency (0.1, 1, 4, and 8 c/deg), and contrast, ranging from just below individual thresholds to maximum contrast. Results show that smooth pursuit eye velocity gain rose significantly with increasing contrast. Below a contrast level of two to three times threshold, pursuit gain, acceleration, latency, and positional accuracy were severely impaired. Therefore, the smooth pursuit motor response shows the same kind of slowing at low contrast that was demonstrated in previous studies on perception.

  5. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  6. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  7. In-vitro effects of tri-iodinated X-ray contrast media on blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and complement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanke, D.

    1982-01-01

    In-vitro experiments with Jodipamid, Jothalamat and Diatrizoat served the purpose of determining influences of contrast media on blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and the complement system. For all three contrast media investigated the effect noted was dose-dependent and was only brought about by concentrations higher than physiological ones. Liver-pathway Jodipamid was seen to have a much stronger effect than the two renal-pathway contrast media Jothalamat and Diatrizoat, which is probably due to the different protein binding capacities. In detail, the results with Jodipamid were as follows: a sharp fall in thrombinogen, a distinct decrease in fibrinogen both in the immunological and functional test, but only delayed decrease in complement factor C 4. Fibrinolytic fission products were found after applying the dose of 30 mM, as compared to 400 mM for the renal-pathway contrast media. Furthermore the functional tests (F I and F II) with Jothalamat and Diatrizoat showed only slight effects, the immunological ones (F I and C 4) none at all. The influence of the contrast media on factors I and II is interpreted by the author as an inhibition of fibrin polymerization. What seems to be the verification of fibrinolytic fission products is explained by a non-specific agglutination reaction, the decrease in C 4 by contrast-medium-induced protein denaturation. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Effects of radiographic contrast media on the serum complement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirone, P.; Boldrini, E.

    1983-01-01

    The authors explored the activation of the complement system produced by a nonionic organic iodine compound, namely iopamidol, which is proposed as a contrast medium for radiographic examination by intravenous and intra-arterial injection. The study was conducted in vitro versus established ionic contrasts (diatrizoate, iothalamate, acetrizoate) and a nonionic compound (metrizamide). The adopted experimental model was the immunohemolytic detector system, in which the immune complex consisted of goat erythrocytes sensitized with the corresponding antibody (hemolysin), and complement (C') was supplied by guinea pig serum. All the products caused complement activation. The results show that nonionic contrast media produce less activation of the complement system than the traditional ionic contrast. Thus the use of nonionic contrast for radiological procedures necessitating the introduction of contrast material into the blood compartment would imply a reduced risk of anaphylactoid reactions. (orig.)

  9. Effect of contrast media iodine concentration on bolus tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Naoi, Kuniji; Ikeno, Naoya; Kobayashi, Tatsushi; Satake, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    Computer-assisted bolus tracking has been confirmed to be a useful technique in computed tomography (CT) imaging and allows images to be captured with automated timing. The inflow of the contrast medium is monitored, and when the contrast medium reaches a predetermined level, CT image capture starts automatically. However, it has been shown that the preset threshold value of contrast medium is affected by its iodine concentration, which causes variations in image capture times. Greater speed in current multislice CT imaging requires that medical technicians pay more attention to setting the timing of image capture during venous examinations by taking into account the iodine concentration in contrast media. (author)

  10. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    , suggesting that dose rate effect predicted by MOE model is dependent on DNA repair system. Dose rate effect in a resting normal fibroblast cultured in serum-depleted medium also followed MOE model. In contrast, dose-rate effect was observed in these cell lines deficient of DNA repair system, when they were cultured for more than several month. This dose rate effect did not fit MOE model, and followed a model based on elimination of damaged cells. In conclusion, dose rate effect in growth inhibition and micronucleus formation in cultured cell lines is dependent on dose rate and irradiation time: In higher range of dose rates and short irradiation time, biological effect is determined by dose but not dose rate, and dose rate effect is not observed. In middle range of dose rates and irradiation time, dose rate effect is dependent on DNA repair system, and follows MOE model. In low range of dose-rates and irradiation time longer than several months, dose rate effect is mainly dependent on elimination of damaged cells, and biological effect is determined by dose rate rather than total dose. Our results suggest that dose rate and irradiation time should be included in estimation of long-term radiation risk at low dose rates. (author)

  11. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis: optimization of beam quality for dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S Jr

    2011-01-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis is a promising technique to obtain three-dimensional functional information from the breast with high resolution and speed. To optimize this new method, this study searched for the beam quality that maximized image quality in terms of mass detection performance. A digital tomosynthesis system was modeled using a fast ray-tracing algorithm, which created simulated projection images by tracking photons through a voxelized anatomical breast phantom containing iodinated lesions. The single-energy images were combined into dual-energy images through a weighted log subtraction process. The weighting factor was optimized to minimize anatomical noise, while the dose distribution was chosen to minimize quantum noise. The dual-energy images were analyzed for the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) of iodinated masses. The fast ray-tracing explored 523 776 dual-energy combinations to identify which yields optimum mass SdNR. The ray-tracing results were verified using a Monte Carlo model for a breast tomosynthesis system with a selenium-based flat-panel detector. The projection images from our voxelized breast phantom were obtained at a constant total glandular dose. The projections were combined using weighted log subtraction and reconstructed using commercial reconstruction software. The lesion SdNR was measured in the central reconstructed slice. The SdNR performance varied markedly across the kVp and filtration space. Ray-tracing results indicated that the mass SdNR was maximized with a high-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 92.5 μm of copper filtration and a low-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 95 μm of tin filtration. This result was consistent with Monte Carlo findings. This mammographic technique led to a mass SdNR of 0.92 ± 0.03 in the projections and 3.68 ± 0.19 in the reconstructed slices. These values were markedly higher than those for non-optimized techniques. Our findings indicate that dual

  12. Nonlinear image blending for dual-energy MDCT of the abdomen: can image quality be preserved if the contrast medium dose is reduced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Marin, Daniele; Alfaro-Cordoba, Marcela; Eusemann, Christian D; Scribano, Emanuele; Blandino, Alfredo; Mazziotti, Silvio; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the image quality of a dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique at reduced load of contrast medium with a simulated 120-kVp linear blending technique at a full dose during portal venous phase MDCT of the abdomen. Forty-five patients (25 men, 20 women; mean age, 65.6 ± 9.7 [SD] years; mean body weight, 74.9 ± 12.4 kg) underwent contrast-enhanced single-phase dual-energy CT of the abdomen by a random assignment to one of three different contrast medium (iomeprol 400) dose injection protocols: 1.3, 1.0, or 0.65 mL/kg of body weight. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and noise at the portal vein, liver, aorta, and kidney were compared among the different datasets using the ANOVA. Three readers qualitatively assessed all datasets in a blinded and independent fashion. Nonlinear blended images at a 25% reduced dose allowed a significant improvement in CNR (p < 0.05 for all comparisons), compared with simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. No statistically significant difference existed in CNR and noise between the nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose and the simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. Nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose were considered in all cases to have acceptable image quality. The dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique allows reducing the dose of contrast medium up to 50% during portal venous phase imaging of the abdomen while preserving image quality.

  13. Contrast media effect on interleukin-2 levels in human plasma in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolov, Yu.K.; Borsukova, N.M.; Shimanovskij, N.L.

    1992-01-01

    As shown in the study of bilignost, iodamide and triombrast action on interleukin-2 (IL-2) level in human plasma in vitro, these contrast media (2.5x10 -2 -2.5x10 -4 M) elevate IL-2 content in blood plasma of sensitive to contrast media subjects in dose-dependent manner

  14. Quantitative dosimetric assessment for effect of gold nanoparticles as contrast media on radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Yang, Pei-Ying; Hong, Ji-Hong; Lo, Ching-Jung

    2013-07-01

    In CT planning for radiation therapy, patients may be asked to have a medical procedure of contrast agent (CA) administration as required by their physicians. CA media improve quality of CT images and assist radiation oncologists in delineation of the target or organs with accuracy. However, dosimetric discrepancy may occur between scenarios in which CA media are present in CT planning and absent in treatment delivery. In recent preclinical experiments of small animals, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been identified as an excellent contrast material of x-ray imaging. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate the effect of AuNPs to be used as a potential material of contrast enhancement in radiotherapy planning with an analytical phantom and clinical case. Conray 60, an iodine-based product for contrast enhancement in clinical uses, is included as a comparison. Other additional variables such as different concentrations of CA media, radiation delivery techniques and dose calculation algorithms are included. We consider 1-field AP, 4-field box, 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). CA media of AuNPs (Conray 60) with concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% containing 28.2, 56.4, 84.6, 112.8 and 141.0 mg of gold (iodine) per mL were prepared prior to CT scanning. A virtual phantom with a target where nanoparticle media are loaded and clinical case of gastric lymphoma in which the Conray 60 media were given to the patient prior to the CT planning are included for the study. Compared to Conray 60 media with concentration of 10%/50%, Hounsfield units for AuNP media of 10%/50% are 322/1608 higher due to the fact that atomic number of Au (Z=79) is larger than I (Z=53). In consequence, dosimetric discrepancy of AuNPs is magnified between presence and absence of contrast media. It was found in the phantom study that percent dose differences between presence and absence of CA media may be

  15. We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose concept was designed to compare the generic risks of exposure to different radiation fields. More commonly these days, it is used to estimate or compare radiation-induced cancer risks. For various reasons, effective dose represents flawed science: for instance, the tissue-specific weighting factors used to calculate effective dose are a subjective mix of different endpoints; and the marked and differing age and gender dependencies for different health detriment endpoints are not taken into account. This paper suggests that effective dose could be replaced with a new quantity, ‘effective risk’, which, like effective dose, is a weighted sum of equivalent doses to different tissues. Unlike effective dose, where the tissue-dependent weighting factors are a set of generic, subjective committee-defined numbers, the weighting factors for effective risk are simply evaluated tissue-specific lifetime cancer risks per unit equivalent dose. Effective risk, which has the potential to be age and gender specific if desired, would perform the same comparative role as effective dose, be just as easy to estimate, be less prone to misuse, be more directly understandable, and would be based on solid science. An added major advantage is that it gives the users some feel for the actual numerical values of the radiation risks they are trying to control.

  16. Efficacy of short-term high-dose statin in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchuan Li

    Full Text Available A few studies focused on statin therapy as specific prophylactic measures of contrast-induced nephropathy have been published with conflicting results. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of short-term high-dose statin treatment for the prevention of CIN and clinical outcomes and re-evaluate of the potential benefits of statin therapy.We searched PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, Web of science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials comparing short-term high-dose statin treatment versus low-dose statin treatment or placebo for preventing CIN. Our outcome measures were the risk of CIN within 2-5 days after contrast administration and need for dialysis.Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 1,399 patients were identified and analyzed. The overall results based on fixed-effect model showed that the use of short-term high-dose statin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of CIN (RR =0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76, p =0.001; I(2 = 0%. The incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis was not significant different after the use of statin (RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.05-2.10, p = 0.24; I(2 = 0%. The use of statin was not associated with a significant decrease in the plasma C-reactive protein level (SMD -0.64, 95% CI: -1.57 to 0.29, P = 0.18, I(2 = 97%.Although this meta-analysis supports the use of statin to reduce the incidence of CIN, it must be considered in the context of variable patient demographics. Only a limited recommendation can be made in favour of the use of statin based on current data. Considering the limitations of included studies, a large, well designed trial that incorporates the evaluation of clinically relevant outcomes in participants with different underlying risks of CIN is required to more adequately assess the role for statin in CIN prevention.

  17. A simplified edge illumination set-up for quantitative phase contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation at clinical doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, Mariaconcetta; Rigon, Luigi; Lopez, Frances C M; Longo, Renata; Chen, Rongchang; Dreossi, Diego; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the first study of x-ray phase contrast imaging based on a simple implementation of the edge illumination method (EIXPCi) in the field of mammography with synchrotron radiation. A simplified EIXPCi set-up was utilized to study a possible application in mammography at clinical doses. Moreover, through a novel algorithm capable of separating and quantifying absorption and phase perturbations of images acquired in EIXPCi modality, it is possible to extract quantitative information on breast images, allowing an accurate tissue identification. The study was carried out at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy), where a mastectomy specimen was investigated with the EIXPCi technique. The sample was exposed at three different energies suitable for mammography with synchrotron radiation in order to test the validity of the novel algorithm in extracting values of linear attenuation coefficients integrated over the sample thickness. It is demonstrated that the quantitative data are in good agreement with the theoretical values of linear attenuation coefficients calculated on the hypothesis of the breast with a given composition. The results are promising and encourage the current efforts to apply the method in mammography with synchrotron radiation. (note)

  18. Low-dose non-enhanced CT versus full-dose contrast-enhanced CT in integrated PET/CT studies for the diagnosis of uterine cancer recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Suzuki, Kayo [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Nakamoto, Yuji [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko; Sakamoto, Setsu; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Kita, Masato [Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kobe (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate low-dose non-enhanced CT (ldCT) and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in integrated {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT studies for restaging of uterine cancer. A group of 100 women who had undergone treatment for uterine cervical (n=55) or endometrial cancer (n=45) underwent a conventional PET/CT scans with ldCT, and then a ceCT scan. Two observers retrospectively reviewed and interpreted the PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT images in consensus using a three-point grading scale (negative, equivocal, or positive) per patient and per lesion. Final diagnoses were obtained by histopathological examination, or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months. Patient-based analysis showed that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/ceCT were 90% (27/30), 97% (68/70) and 95% (95/100), respectively, whereas those of PET/ldCT were 83% (25/30), 94% (66/70) and 91% (91/100), respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy did not significantly differ between two methods (McNemar test, p=0.48, p=0.48, and p=0.13, respectively). There were 52 sites of lesion recurrence: 12 pelvic lymph node (LN), 11 local recurrence, 8 peritoneum, 7 abdominal LN, 5 lung, 3 supraclavicular LN, 3 liver, 2 mediastinal LN, and 1 muscle and bone. The grading results for the 52 sites of recurrence were: negative 5, equivocal 0 and positive 47 for PET/ceCT, and negative 5, equivocal 4 and positive 43 for PET/ldCT, respectively. Four equivocal regions by PET/ldCT (local recurrence, pelvic LN metastasis, liver metastasis and muscle metastasis) were correctly interpreted as positive by PET/ceCT. PET/ceCT is an accurate imaging modality for the assessment of uterine cancer recurrence. Its use reduces the frequency of equivocal interpretations. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukhi, J.; Yusob, D.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Vuanghao, L.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging.

  20. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukhi, J; Yusob, D; Vuanghao, L; Zainon, R; Tajuddin, A A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging. (paper)

  1. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  2. Context effects on second-language learning of tonal contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Charles B; Bowles, Anita R

    2015-12-01

    Studies of lexical tone  learning generally focus on monosyllabic contexts, while reports of phonetic learning benefits associated with input variability are based largely on experienced learners. This study trained inexperienced learners on Mandarin tonal contrasts to test two hypotheses regarding the influence of context and variability on tone  learning. The first hypothesis was that increased phonetic variability of tones in disyllabic contexts makes initial tone  learning more challenging in disyllabic than monosyllabic words. The second hypothesis was that the learnability of a given tone varies across contexts due to differences in tonal variability. Results of a word learning experiment supported both hypotheses: tones were acquired less successfully in disyllables than in monosyllables, and the relative difficulty of disyllables was closely related to contextual tonal variability. These results indicate limited relevance of monosyllable-based data on Mandarin learning for the disyllabic majority of the Mandarin lexicon. Furthermore, in the short term, variability can diminish learning; its effects are not necessarily beneficial but dependent on acquisition stage and other learner characteristics. These findings thus highlight the importance of considering contextual variability and the interaction between variability and type of learner in the design, interpretation, and application of research on phonetic learning.

  3. The effects of aging vitreous on contrast sensitivity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Giancarlo A; Khoshnevis, Matin; Yee, Kenneth M P; Nguyen, Justin H; Nguyen-Cuu, Jeannie; Sadun, Alfredo A; Sebag, J

    2018-05-01

    Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) declines with age. When unassociated with cataracts, this is hypothesized to be due to macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thinning. However, other studies found associations with increased vitreous echodensity and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). We investigate the relationship between CSF, vitreous echodensity, PVD, and GCC thickness as related to age in the same subjects. Age, CSF (Weber index: %W), vitreous echodensity (quantitative ultrasonography [QUS]), lens status (phakia or pseudophakia), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and GCC thickness (SD-OCT) were evaluated in 57 eyes of 57 subjects with (n = 32, mean age = 62 years) and without (n = 25, mean age = 44 years) PVD (P PVD (2.98 ± 0.31 %W) compared to no PVD (1.97 ± 0.24 %W; P PVD than those without (P PVD status, vitreous echodensity, and age were the only independent variables demonstrating significant effects on CSF. Lens status, BCVA, and GCC thickness did not demonstrate association with CSF. PVD, vitreous echodensity, and age are determinants of CSF. PVD and increased vitreous echodensity are each associated with diminished CSF, independent of age. Thus, in the absence of GCC thinning and cataracts, vitreous changes may be a cause of decreased CSF with age.

  4. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  5. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  6. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shiri, Isaac; Salimi, Yazdan; Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi; Sohrabi, Ahmad; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  7. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid_rbp@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiri, Isaac [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Yazdan [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Deevband, Mohammad Reza [Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Biology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, Ahmad [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad, E-mail: bitarafan@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rajaei Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Aims: The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Material and methods: Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. Results: The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy ± 0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy ± 0.16. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean ± SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5 ± 1.4, 0.49 ± 0.11 and 12.67 ± 1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. Conclusion: The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks.

  8. Cerebral bone subtraction CT angiography using 80 kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction: contrast medium and radiation dose reduction with improvement of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Yasunori [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirarta, Kenichiro [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a contrast medium (CM), radiation dose reduction protocol for cerebral bone-subtraction CT angiography (BSCTA) using 80-kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Seventy-five patients who had undergone BSCTA under the 120- (n = 37) or the 80-kVp protocol (n = 38) were included. CM was 370 mgI/kg for the 120-kVp and 296 mgI/kg for the 80-kVp protocol; the 120- and the 80-kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and SAFIRE, respectively. We compared effective dose (ED), CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of two protocols. We also scored arterial contrast, sharpness, depiction of small arteries, visibility near skull base/clip, and overall image quality on a four-point scale. ED was 62% lower at 80- than 120-kVp (0.59 ± 0.06 vs 1.56 ± 0.13 mSv, p < 0.01). CT attenuation of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) was significantly higher on 80- than 120-kVp (ICA: 557.4 ± 105.7 vs 370.0 ± 59.3 Hounsfield units (HU), p < 0.01; MCA: 551.9 ± 107.9 vs 364.6 ± 62.2 HU, p < 0.01). The CNR was also significantly higher on 80- than 120-kVp (ICA: 46.2 ± 10.2 vs 36.9 ± 7.6, p < 0.01; MCA: 45.7 ± 10.0 vs 35.7 ± 9.0, p < 0.01). Visibility near skull base and clip was not significantly different (p = 0.45). The other subjective scores were higher with the 80- than the 120-kVp protocol (p < 0.05). The 80-kVp acquisition with SAFIRE yields better image quality for BSCTA and substantial reduction in the radiation and CM dose compared to the 120-kVp with FBP protocol. (orig.)

  9. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol.

  10. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhu

    Full Text Available To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values.26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22 underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A. Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22 were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B. GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD, signal-noise-ratio (SNR, contrast-noise-ratio (CNR of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis.As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684. CT dose index (CTDI values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000, respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B.The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol.

  11. Contrasting effects of climate change on rabbit populations through reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablado, Zulima; Revilla, Eloy

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is affecting many physical and biological processes worldwide. Anticipating its effects at the level of populations and species is imperative, especially for organisms of conservation or management concern. Previous studies have focused on estimating future species distributions and extinction probabilities directly from current climatic conditions within their geographical ranges. However, relationships between climate and population parameters may be so complex that to make these high-level predictions we need first to understand the underlying biological processes driving population size, as well as their individual response to climatic alterations. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the influence that climate change may have on species population dynamics through altering breeding season. We used a mechanistic model based on drivers of rabbit reproductive physiology together with demographic simulations to show how future climate-driven changes in breeding season result in contrasting rabbit population trends across Europe. In the Iberian Peninsula, where rabbits are a native species of high ecological and economic value, breeding seasons will shorten and become more variable leading to population declines, higher extinction risk, and lower resilience to perturbations. Whereas towards north-eastern countries, rabbit numbers are expected to increase through longer and more stable reproductive periods, which augment the probability of new rabbit invasions in those areas. Our study reveals the type of mechanisms through which climate will cause alterations at the species level and emphasizes the need to focus on them in order to better foresee large-scale complex population trends. This is especially important in species like the European rabbit whose future responses may aggravate even further its dual keystone/pest problematic. Moreover, this approach allows us to predict not only distribution shifts but also future

  12. Contrasting effects of climate change on rabbit populations through reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulima Tablado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate change is affecting many physical and biological processes worldwide. Anticipating its effects at the level of populations and species is imperative, especially for organisms of conservation or management concern. Previous studies have focused on estimating future species distributions and extinction probabilities directly from current climatic conditions within their geographical ranges. However, relationships between climate and population parameters may be so complex that to make these high-level predictions we need first to understand the underlying biological processes driving population size, as well as their individual response to climatic alterations. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the influence that climate change may have on species population dynamics through altering breeding season. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mechanistic model based on drivers of rabbit reproductive physiology together with demographic simulations to show how future climate-driven changes in breeding season result in contrasting rabbit population trends across Europe. In the Iberian Peninsula, where rabbits are a native species of high ecological and economic value, breeding seasons will shorten and become more variable leading to population declines, higher extinction risk, and lower resilience to perturbations. Whereas towards north-eastern countries, rabbit numbers are expected to increase through longer and more stable reproductive periods, which augment the probability of new rabbit invasions in those areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals the type of mechanisms through which climate will cause alterations at the species level and emphasizes the need to focus on them in order to better foresee large-scale complex population trends. This is especially important in species like the European rabbit whose future responses may aggravate even further its dual keystone/pest problematic. Moreover

  13. Contrasts and effect sizes in behavioral research: a correlational approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenthal, Robert; Rosnow, Ralph L; Rubin, Donald B

    2000-01-01

    .... Researchers, teachers of research methods, and graduate students will be familiar with the principles and procedures of contrast analysis but will also be introduced to a series of newly developed...

  14. Effects of two types of medical contrast media on routine chemistry results by three automated chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Jin; Rim, John Hoon; Yim, Jisook; Lee, Sang-Guk; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    The use of iodinated contrast media has grown in popularity in the past two decades, but relatively little attention has been paid to the possible interferential effects of contrast media on laboratory test results. Herein, we investigate medical contrast media interference with routine chemistry results obtained by three automated chemistry analyzers. Ten levels of pooled serum were used in the study. Two types of medical contrast media [Iopamiro (iopamidol) and Omnipaque (iohexol)] were evaluated. To evaluate the dose-dependent effects of the contrast media, iopamidol and iohexol were spiked separately into aliquots of serum for final concentrations of 1.8%, 3.6%, 5.5%, 7.3%, and 9.1%. The 28 analytes included in the routine chemistry panel were measured by using Hitachi 7600, AU5800, and Cobas c702 analyzers. We calculated the delta percentage difference (DPD) between the samples and the control, and examined dose-dependent trends. When the mean DPD values were compared with the reference cut-off criteria, the only uniformly interferential effect observed for all analyzers was in total protein with iopamidol. Two additional analytes that showed trends toward interferential effects only in few analyzers and exceeded the limits of the allowable error were the serum iron and the total CO 2 . The other combinations of analyzer and contrast showed no consistent dose-dependent propensity for change in any analyte level. Our study suggests that many of the analytes included in routine chemistry results, except total protein and serum iron, are not significantly affected by iopamidol and iohexol. These results suggest that it would be beneficial to apply a flexible medical evaluation process for patients requiring both laboratory tests and imaging studies, minimizing the need for strict regulations for sequential tests. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State. ... Therefore, the management of University of Port Harcourt teaching hospital ...

  16. Characteristics of natural background external radiation and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The two sources of natural radiation - cosmic rays and primordial radionuclides - are described. The factors affecting radiation doses received from natural radiation and the calculation of effective dose equivalent due to natural radiation are discussed. 10 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo; Mase, Naomichi.

    1993-01-01

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  18. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  19. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  20. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of intravenous contrast used in computed tomography on radiation dose to carotid arteries and thyroid in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Victor Ho Fun, E-mail: vhflee@hku.hk; Ng, Sherry Chor Yi; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Lam, Ka On; Leung, To Wai

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if intravenous contrast injection affected the radiation doses to carotid arteries and thyroid during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thirty consecutive patients with NPC underwent plain computed tomography (CT) followed by repeated scanning after contrast injection. Carotid arteries (common, external, internal), thyroid, target volumes, and other organs-at-risk (OARs), as well as IMRT planning, were based on contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images. All these structures and the IMRT plans were then copied and transferred to the non–contrast-enhanced CT (NCE-CT) images, and dose calculation without optimization was performed again. The radiation doses to the carotid arteries and the thyroid based on CE-CT and NCE-CT were then compared. Based on CE-CT, no statistical differences, despite minute numeric decreases, were noted in all dosimetric parameters (minimum, maximum, mean, median, D05, and D01) of the target volumes, the OARs, the carotid arteries, and the thyroid compared with NCE-CT. Our results suggested that compared with NCE-CT planning, CE-CT scanning should be performed during IMRT for better target and OAR delineation, without discernible change in radiation doses.

  2. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  3. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions. (paper)

  4. Quantitative dosimetric assessment for effect of gold nanoparticles as contrast media on radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Yang, Pei-Ying; Hong, Ji-Hong; Lo, Ching-Jung

    2013-01-01

    In CT planning for radiation therapy, patients may be asked to have a medical procedure of contrast agent (CA) administration as required by their physicians. CA media improve quality of CT images and assist radiation oncologists in delineation of the target or organs with accuracy. However, dosimetric discrepancy may occur between scenarios in which CA media are present in CT planning and absent in treatment delivery. In recent preclinical experiments of small animals, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been identified as an excellent contrast material of x-ray imaging. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate the effect of AuNPs to be used as a potential material of contrast enhancement in radiotherapy planning with an analytical phantom and clinical case. Conray 60, an iodine-based product for contrast enhancement in clinical uses, is included as a comparison. Other additional variables such as different concentrations of CA media, radiation delivery techniques and dose calculation algorithms are included. We consider 1-field AP, 4-field box, 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). CA media of AuNPs (Conray 60) with concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% containing 28.2, 56.4, 84.6, 112.8 and 141.0 mg of gold (iodine) per mL were prepared prior to CT scanning. A virtual phantom with a target where nanoparticle media are loaded and clinical case of gastric lymphoma in which the Conray 60 media were given to the patient prior to the CT planning are included for the study. Compared to Conray 60 media with concentration of 10%/50%, Hounsfield units for AuNP media of 10%/50% are 322/1608 higher due to the fact that atomic number of Au (Z=79) is larger than I (Z=53). In consequence, dosimetric discrepancy of AuNPs is magnified between presence and absence of contrast media. It was found in the phantom study that percent dose differences between presence and absence of CA media may be

  5. Submillisievert standard-pitch CT pulmonary angiography with ultra-low dose contrast media administration: A comparison to standard CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Mikat, Christian; Stenzel, Elena; Erfanian, Youssef; Wetter, Axel; Schlosser, Thomas; Forsting, Michael; Nassenstein, Kai

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of submillisievert standard-pitch CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) with ultra-low dose contrast media administration in comparison to standard CTPA. Hundred patients (56 females, 44 males, mean age 69.6±15.4 years; median BMI: 26.6, IQR: 5.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism were examined with two different protocols (n = 50 each, group A: 80 kVp, ref. mAs 115, 25 ml of contrast medium; group B: 100 kVp, ref. mAs 150, 60 ml of contrast medium) using a dual-source CT equipped with automated exposure control. Objective and subjective image qualities, radiation exposure as well as the frequency of pulmonary embolism were evaluated. There was no significant difference in subjective image quality scores between two groups regarding pulmonary arteries (p = 0.776), whereby the interobserver agreement was excellent (group A: k = 0.9; group B k = 1.0). Objective image analysis revealed that signal intensities (SI), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the pulmonary arteries were equal or significantly higher in group B. There was no significant difference in the frequency of pulmonary embolism (p = 0.65). Using the low dose and low contrast media protocol resulted in a radiation dose reduction by 71.8% (2.4 vs. 0.7 mSv; pcontrast agent volume can obtain sufficient image quality to exclude or diagnose pulmonary emboli while reducing radiation dose by approximately 71%.

  6. Dose enhancement effects of X ray radiation in bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Panxun

    1997-01-01

    The author has presented behaviour degradation and dose enhancement effects of bipolar transistors in X ray irradiation environment. The relative dose enhancement factors of X ray radiation were measured in bipolar transistors by the experiment methods. The mechanism of bipolar device dose enhancement was investigated

  7. Determination of effective dose of antimalarial from Cassia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, further investigation is required to determine an effective dose of the administered extract for a higher inhibitory effect and increasing effectiveness of the extract. Material and Methods: To determine the effective dose of ethanol extract of C. spectabilis leaves, a "4-day suppressive test"of Peter was performed with ...

  8. Effective dose equivalents from external radiation due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkin, V.G.; Debedev, O.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Parkhomenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized data on measurements of individual dose of external γ-sources in 1987-1990 of population of western areas of Bryansk region were presented. Type of distribution of effective dose equivalent, its significance for various professional and social groups of population depending on the type of the house was discussed. Dependences connecting surface soil activity in the populated locality with average dose of external radiation sources were presented. Tendency of dose variation in 1987-1990 was shown

  9. Sequential gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the aortoiliac and the femoropopliteal arteries with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koichiro; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    To obtain a wide-range contrast MR angiography in a single examination, we performed two sequential administrations of low-dose (0.08 mmol/kg) gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) with three dimensional inversion recovery prepared fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady-state (3D IR-fast SPGR) sequence. Signal characteristics of the sequence were estimated by computed simulations and an in vitro study. A clinical study of 19 examinations was done with sequential MR angiography of the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries. Great signal differences were observed between the high and low Gd concentrations. Higher Gd concentrations generated significantly stronger signals. Greater signals were produced at TIs of longer than 150 msec than at shorter than 100 msec. In the clinical study, the arteries were visualized with sufficient signals even with a small amount of contrast agent. Contrast-to-noise ratios between the arteries and surrounding skeletal muscles or fat tissues ranged from 10.5±9.6 to 4.7±2.2 and 6.6±2.8 to -3.1±11.2, respectively. No venous enhancement was found with diluted contrast agent on the second MR angiography. Two consecutive contrast MR angiographies can be obtained with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent. (author)

  10. Sequential gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the aortoiliac and the femoropopliteal arteries with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Koichiro [Nippon Medical School, Inba, Chiba (Japan). Chiba Hokusoh Hospital; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2000-12-01

    To obtain a wide-range contrast MR angiography in a single examination, we performed two sequential administrations of low-dose (0.08 mmol/kg) gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) with three dimensional inversion recovery prepared fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady-state (3D IR-fast SPGR) sequence. Signal characteristics of the sequence were estimated by computed simulations and an in vitro study. A clinical study of 19 examinations was done with sequential MR angiography of the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries. Great signal differences were observed between the high and low Gd concentrations. Higher Gd concentrations generated significantly stronger signals. Greater signals were produced at TIs of longer than 150 msec than at shorter than 100 msec. In the clinical study, the arteries were visualized with sufficient signals even with a small amount of contrast agent. Contrast-to-noise ratios between the arteries and surrounding skeletal muscles or fat tissues ranged from 10.5{+-}9.6 to 4.7{+-}2.2 and 6.6{+-}2.8 to -3.1{+-}11.2, respectively. No venous enhancement was found with diluted contrast agent on the second MR angiography. Two consecutive contrast MR angiographies can be obtained with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent. (author)

  11. Effect of contrast water therapy duration on recovery of running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versey, Nathan G; Halson, Shona L; Dawson, Brian T

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether contrast water therapy (CWT) assists acute recovery from high-intensity running and whether a dose-response relationship exists. Ten trained male runners completed 4 trials, each commencing with a 3000-m time trial, followed by 8 × 400-m intervals with 1 min of recovery. Ten minutes postexercise, participants performed 1 of 4 recovery protocols: CWT, by alternating 1 min hot (38°C) and 1 min cold (15°C) for 6 (CWT6), 12 (CWT12), or 18 min (CWT18), or a seated rest control trial. The 3000-m time trial was repeated 2 h later. 3000-m performance slowed from 632 ± 4 to 647 ± 4 s in control, 631 ± 4 to 642 ± 4 s in CWT6, 633 ± 4 to 648 ± 4 s in CWT12, and 631 ± 4 to 647 ± 4 s in CWT18. Following CWT6, performance (smallest worthwhile change of 0.3%) was substantially faster than control (87% probability, 0.8 ± 0.8% mean ± 90% confidence limit), however, there was no effect for CWT12 (34%, 0.0 ± 1.0%) or CWT18 (34%, -0.1 ± 0.8%). There were no substantial differences between conditions in exercise heart rates, or postexercise calf and thigh girths. Algometer thigh pain threshold during CWT12 was higher at all time points compared with control. Subjective measures of thermal sensation and muscle soreness were lower in all CWT conditions at some post-water-immersion time points compared with control; however, there were no consistent differences in whole body fatigue following CWT. Contrast water therapy for 6 min assisted acute recovery from high-intensity running; however, CWT duration did not have a dose-response effect on recovery of running performance.

  12. A PC program for estimating organ dose and effective dose values in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, W.A.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, M.; Zankl, M.

    1999-01-01

    Dose values in CT are specified by the manufacturers for all CT systems and operating conditions in phantoms. It is not trivial, however, to derive dose values in patients from this information. Therefore, we have developed a PC-based program which calculates organ dose and effective dose values for arbitrary scan parameters and anatomical ranges. Values for primary radiation are derived from measurements or manufacturer specifications; values for scattered radiation are derived from Monte Carlo calculations tabulated for standard anthropomorphic phantoms. Based on these values, organ doses can be computed by the program for arbitrary scan protocols in conventional and in spiral CT. Effective dose values are also provided, both with ICRP 26 and ICRP 60 tissue-weighting coefficients. Results for several standard CT protocols are presented in tabular form in this paper. In addition, potential for dose reduction is demonstrated, for example, in spiral CT and in quantitative CT. Providing realistic patient dose estimates for arbitrary CT protocols is relevant both for the physician and the patient, and it is particularly useful for educational and training purposes. The program, called WinDose, is now in use at the Erlangen University hospitals (Germany) as an information tool for radiologists and patients. Further extensions are planned. (orig.)

  13. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  14. Dose reconstruction in deforming lung anatomy: Dose grid size effects and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosu, Mihaela; Chetty, Indrin J.; Balter, James M.; Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigated the accumulation of dose to a deforming anatomy (such as lung) based on voxel tracking and by using time weighting factors derived from a breathing probability distribution function (p.d.f.). A mutual information registration scheme (using thin-plate spline warping) provided a transformation that allows the tracking of points between exhale and inhale treatment planning datasets (and/or intermediate state scans). The dose distributions were computed at the same resolution on each dataset using the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code. Two accumulation/interpolation approaches were assessed. The first maps exhale dose grid points onto the inhale scan, estimates the doses at the 'tracked' locations by trilinear interpolation and scores the accumulated doses (via the p.d.f.) on the original exhale data set. In the second approach, the 'volume' associated with each exhale dose grid point (exhale dose voxel) is first subdivided into octants, the center of each octant is mapped to locations on the inhale dose grid and doses are estimated by trilinear interpolation. The octant doses are then averaged to form the inhale voxel dose and scored at the original exhale dose grid point location. Differences between the interpolation schemes are voxel size and tissue density dependent, but in general appear primarily only in regions with steep dose gradients (e.g., penumbra). Their magnitude (small regions of few percent differences) is less than the alterations in dose due to positional and shape changes from breathing in the first place. Thus, for sufficiently small dose grid point spacing, and relative to organ motion and deformation, differences due solely to the interpolation are unlikely to result in clinically significant differences to volume-based evaluation metrics such as mean lung dose (MLD) and tumor equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). The overall effects of deformation vary among patients. They depend on the tumor location, field

  15. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. METHODS: In the North European Small......-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. RESULTS: The average dose during the second year of the randomised...... trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0...

  16. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of low-dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.; Muehlensiepen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The question of health effects from small radiation doses remains open. Individual cells, when being hit by single elemental doses - in low-dose irradiation - react acutely and temporarily by altering control of enzyme activity, as is demonstrated for the case of thymidine kinase. This response is not constant in that it provides a temporary protection of enzyme activity against a second irradiation, by a mechanism likely to be via improved detoxification of intracellular radicals. It must be considered that in the low-dose region radiation may also exert protection against other challenges involving radicals, causing a net beneficial effect by temporarily shielding the hit cell against radicals produced by metabolism. Since molecular alterations leading to late effects are considered a consequence of the initial cellular response, late effects from small radiation doses do not necessarily adhere to a linear dose-effect relationship. The reality of the linear relationship between the risk of late effects from high doses to small doses is an assumption, for setting dose limits, but it must not be taken for predicting health detriment from low doses. (author)

  17. Effects of contrast agents on the fallopian tube in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Selection of the optimal contrast agent for hysterosalpingography was the focus of this study. The authors have evaluated the effect of different iodinated contrast agents on the fallopian tube of a rabbit. Ethiodol (oil-soluble contrast agent), methylglucamine iothalomate (water-soluble ionic agent) 30% and 60%, and Ioxilan (water-soluble monionic contrast agent) were compared. The agents were introduced by fallopian tube catheterization. Findings suggested that nonionic water-soluble contrast agents were the least detrimental to the fallopian tube and surrounding tissue. Iothalomate 60% resulted in mild inflammatory changes. Oil-soluble contrast agents caused granulomatous reaction and fibrinous adhesions

  18. Effects of age and brightness contrast on perception of the Wundt-Hering illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astor-Stetson, E; Purnell, T G

    1990-10-01

    Susceptibility to the Wundt-Hering illusion was studied as a function of age and contrast. Preschoolers, third-graders and college students were shown light-grey, medium-grey, and black Wundt-Hering figures on white ground. Pre-schoolers were most susceptible to the illusion, differing from third graders in the medium and high contrast conditions and from college students in all contrast conditions. Low contrast figures resulted in significantly less distortion than did high contrast figures for the preschoolers. The significant interaction of age and contrast effects highlights the importance of a developmental approach to the study of illusions.

  19. γ-ray dose rate effect in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liya; Li Peiwen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the dose rate effect and potentially lethal damage repair in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells (SCID) irradiated by γ-ray. Methods: The wild type (CB.17+/+) and SCID cells were exposed to γ-ray at high and low dose rates. The high dose rate exposure was fractionated into two equal doses at 24 h intervals. The survival rates of irradiated cells were calculated by clone-forming analysis. Results: When γ-ray was given to wild type (CB.17+/+) cells in two fractions at 24 h intervals, the survival rate was significantly higher than that when the same total dose was given singly. In contrast, there was no difference in the survival rates between the single and fractionated exposure in SCID cells. SCID cells were more sensitive than CB.17+/+ cells to both low and high dose rates γ-ray exposure for cell killing. The survival rate by low dose rate exposure was significantly higher than that by high dose rate exposure, not only in CB.17+/+ cells but also in SCID cells. Conclusions: SCID cells are deficient in repairing γ-ray induced double-strand breaks. There is dose rate effect in both SCID and CB.17+/+ cells

  20. Low-tube-voltage (80 kVp) CT aortography using 320-row volume CT with adaptive iterative reconstruction: lower contrast medium and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Chu, Sung-Yu; Hsu, Ming-Yi [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou, College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Ying-Lan [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Tsai, Hui-Yu [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taoyuan (China)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate CT aortography at reduced tube voltage and contrast medium dose while maintaining image quality through iterative reconstruction (IR). The Institutional Review Board approved a prospective study of 48 patients who underwent follow-up CT aortography. We performed intra-individual comparisons of arterial phase images using 120 kVp (standard tube voltage) and 80 kVp (low tube voltage). Low-tube-voltage imaging was performed on a 320-detector CT with IR following injection of 40 ml of contrast medium. We assessed aortic attenuation, aortic attenuation gradient, image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}), and figure of merit (FOM) of image noise and CNR. Two readers assessed images for diagnostic quality, image noise, and artefacts. The low-tube-voltage protocol showed 23-31 % higher mean aortic attenuation and image noise (both P < 0.01) than the standard-tube-voltage protocol, but no significant difference in the CNR and aortic attenuation gradients. The low-tube-voltage protocol showed a 48 % reduction in CTDI{sub vol} and an 80 % increase in FOM of CNR. Subjective diagnostic quality was similar for both protocols, but low-tube-voltage images showed greater image noise (P = 0.01). Application of IR to an 80-kVp CT aortography protocol allows radiation dose and contrast medium reduction without affecting image quality. (orig.)

  1. Automated tube voltage selection for radiation dose and contrast medium reduction at coronary CT angiography using 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Poole, Zachary B.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the relationship between automated tube voltage selection (ATVS) and body mass index (BMI) and its effect on image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We evaluated 272 patients who underwent CCTA with 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Prospectively ECG-triggered spiral acquisition was performed with automated tube current selection and advanced iterative reconstruction. Tube voltages were selected by ATVS (70-120 kV). BMI, effective dose (ED), and vascular attenuation in the coronary arteries were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. Image quality was rated good to excellent in 98.9 % of examinations without significant differences for proximal and distal attenuation (all p ≥.0516), whereas image noise was rated significantly higher at 70 kV compared to ≥100 kV (all p <.0266). However, no significant differences were observed in SNR or CNR at 70-120 kV (all p ≥.0829). Mean ED at 70-120 kV was 1.5 ± 1.2 mSv, 2.4 ± 1.5 mSv, 3.6 ± 2.7 mSv, 5.9 ± 4.0 mSv, 7.9 ± 4.2 mSv, and 10.7 ± 4.1 mSv, respectively (all p ≤.0414). Correlation analysis showed a moderate association between tube voltage and BMI (r =.639). ATVS allows individual tube voltage adaptation for CCTA performed with 3{sup rd} generation DSCT, resulting in significantly decreased radiation exposure while maintaining image quality. (orig.)

  2. Impact of high dose versus low dose atorvastatin on contrast induced nephropathy in diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing early percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham Galal

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: No significant difference between high and low doses of atorvastatin in preventing CIN in diabetic patients with normal or mild renal impairment presenting with acute coronary syndrome who underwent early PCI.

  3. Variable effects of radiological contrast media on thrombus growth in a rabbit jugular vein thrombosis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Biemond, B. J.; Sturk, A.; Hoek, J.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effect of an ionic high osmolar contrast medium (Ioxitalamate), an ionic low osmolar contrast medium (Ioxaglate) and various nonionic low osmolar contrast media (Iopamidol, Iopromide and Iohexol) on thrombus growth in a rabbit jugular vein thrombosis model. Thrombus growth was

  4. Effective dose and cancer risk in PET/CT exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Gabriella M.; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de

    2013-01-01

    Due to the use of radiopharmaceutical positron-emitting in PET exam and realization of tomography by x-ray transmission in CT examination, an increase of dose with hybrid PET/CT technology is expected. However, differences of doses have been reported in many countries for the same type of procedure. It is expected that the dose is an influent parameter to standardize the protocols of PET/CT. This study aimed to estimate the effective doses and absorbed in 65 patients submitted to oncological Protocol in a nuclear medicine clinic in Rio de Janeiro, considering the risk of induction of cancer from the scan. The CT exam-related doses were estimated with a simulator of PMMA and simulated on the lmPACT resistance, which for program effective dose, were considered the weight factors of the lCRP 103. The PET exam doses were estimated by multiplying the activity administered to the patient with the ICRP dose 80 factors. The radiological risk for cancer incidence were estimated according to the ICRP 103. The results showed that the effective dose from CT exam is responsible for 70% of the effective total in a PET/CT scan. values of effective dose for the PET/CT exam reached average values of up to 25 mSv leading to a risk of 2, 57 x 10 -4 . Considering that in staging of oncological diseases at least four tests are performed annually, the total risk comes to 1,03x 10 -3

  5. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from cephalometric radiography to critical organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Sook; Cho, Bon Hae; Kim, Hyun Ja

    1995-01-01

    In head and neck region, the critical organ and tissue doses were determined, and the risks were estimated from lateral, posteroanterial and basilar cephalometric radiography. For each cephalometric radiography, 31 TLDs were placed in selected sites (18 internal and 13 external sites) in a tissue-equivalent phantom and exposed, then read-out in the TLD reader. The following results were obtained; 1. From lateral cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the salivary gland (3.6 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the bone marrow (3 μSv). 2. From posteroanterial cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the salivary gland (2 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the bone marrow (1.8 μSv). 3. From basilar cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the thyroid gland (31.4 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the salivary gland (13.3 μSv). 4. The probabilities of stochastic effect from lateral, posteroanterial and basilar cephalometric radiography were 0.72 X 10 -6 , 0.49 X 10 -6 and 3.51 X 10 -6 , respectively.

  6. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  7. Studies on image quality, high contrast resolution and dose for the axial skeleton and limbs with a new, dedicated CT system (ISO-C-3D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, C.; Kotsianos, D.; Linsenmaier, U.; Fischer, T.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of 3D-CT imaging of the axial skeleton and different joints of the lower and upper extremities with a new dedicated CT system (ISO-C-3D) based on a mobile isocentric C-arm image amplifier. Material and Methods: 27 cadaveric specimes of different joints of the lower and upper extremities and of the spinal column were examined with 3D-CT imaging (ISO-C-3d). All images were evaluated by 3 radiologists for image quality using a semiquantitative score (score value 1: poor quality; score value 4: excellent quality). In addition, dose measurements and measurements of high contrast resolution were performed in comparison to conventional and low-dose spiral CT using a high contrast phantom (Catphan, Phantom Laboratories). Results: Adequate image quality (mean score values 3-4) could be achieved with an applied dose comparable to low-dose CT in smaller joints such as wrist, elbow, ankle and knee. A remarkably inferior image quality resulted in imaging of the hip, lumbar and thoracic spine (mean score values 2-3) in spite of almost doubling the dose (dose increased by 85 percent). The image quality of shoulder examinations was insufficient (mean score value 1). Phantom studies showed a high-contrast resolution comparable to helical CT in the xy-axis (9 lp/cm). Conclusion: Preliminary results show, that image quality of C-arm-based CT-imaging (ISO-C-3D) seems to be adequate in smaller joints. ISO-C-3D images of the hip and axial skeleton show a decreased image quality, which does not seem to be sufficient for diagnosing subtle fractures. (orig.) [de

  8. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  9. Diagnostic Performance of an Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm for Low-Contrast Detectability with a Third-Generation Dual-Source Multidetector CT Scanner: Potential for Radiation Dose Reduction in a Multireader Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on low-contrast detectability by using an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) algorithm in a contrast-detail phantom with a third-generation dual-source multidetector computed tomography (CT) scanner. A proprietary phantom with a range of low-contrast cylindrical objects, representing five contrast levels (range, 5-20 HU) and three sizes (range, 2-6 mm) was fabricated with a three-dimensional printer and imaged with a third-generation dual-source CT scanner at various radiation dose index levels (range, 0.74-5.8 mGy). Image data sets were reconstructed by using different section thicknesses (range, 0.6-5.0 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (filtered back projection [FBP] and ADMIRE with a strength range of three to five). Eleven independent readers blinded to technique and reconstruction method assessed all data sets in two reading sessions by measuring detection accuracy with a two-alternative forced choice approach (first session) and by scoring the total number of visible object groups (second session). Dose reduction potentials based on both reading sessions were estimated. Results between FBP and ADMIRE were compared by using both paired t tests and analysis of variance tests at the 95% significance level. During the first session, detection accuracy increased with increasing contrast, size, and dose index (diagnostic accuracy range, 50%-87%; interobserver variability, ±7%). When compared with FBP, ADMIRE improved detection accuracy by 5.2% on average across the investigated variables (P material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  10. Dose and dose rate effects on coherent-to-incoherent transition of precipitates upon irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengchao

    2006-01-01

    A typical precipitation hardened alloy, Cu-Co dilute alloy was selected to study the precipitation behavior and irradiation effect on precipitates. It is found that the principal effect of ion irradiation on the coherent precipitates is loss of coherency, and TEM cross-section observations show that the fraction of the incoherent precipitates is dependent on dose but not on dose rate during heavy ion irradiation.

  11. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, P. D.; Murphy, K. P.; Hayes, S. A.; Carey, K.; Sammon, J.; Crush, L.; O’Neill, F.; Normoyle, B.; McGarrigle, A. M.; Barry, J. E.; Maher, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). Methods Thirty-three patients with clinically suspected renal colic were prospectively included. Conventional dose (CD-CT) and LD-CT data sets were contemporaneously acquired. LD-CT images were reconstructed with 40 %, 70 % and 90 % ASiR. Image quality was sub...

  12. uv keratoconjunctivitis vs. established dose effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulvady, N.U.

    1976-01-01

    A patient who received a uv dose to his eyes 11 times greater than the photokeratitic threshold of Pitts and 4 1 / 2 times the photokeratitic threshold as found by Leach. The patient had severe keratoconjunctivitis for 3 days and did not develop any keratitis

  13. Page 1 ~'----------------------------- Dose-dependent effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract We cOInpared the serwn levels of oestrogen and progesterone and the endoInetrial Inorphology of. nOrInal pregnant rats at 5,5 days' gestation ~th those of pregnant rats given either low (10 IU) or high (20 IU) doses of two gonadotrophins: follicle-. stiInulating hOrInone (FSH) and hwnan chorionic gonadotrophin ...

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA): evaluation of three different contrast agents at two different doses (0.05 and 0.1 mmol/kg) in pigs at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, M.; Vos, B.; Pietsch, H. [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany); Michaely, Henrik J. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Schwenke, C. [ScoSSiS - Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    To compare the image quality of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the supra-aortic vessels at 0.05 mmol/kg bw and 0.1 mmol/kg bw, between gadobutrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA quantitatively and qualitatively a total of eight pigs were evaluated intraindividually at 1.5 T. Each pig was examined using 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA on day one and 0.05 mmol/kg on day two. MRA datasets for the carotid artery and the infraorbital artery were qualitatively assessed regarding overall image quality on an ordinal four-point scale (4-excellent, 1-non-diagnostic). The signal-to noise-ratio (SNR) was measured. The qualitative assessment of the carotid artery showed a higher median image quality for the 0.1 mmol dose than for the 0.05 mmol dose for all three compounds. No difference was found for the infraorbital artery. Mean SNR of Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, gadobutrol at 0.05 mmol/kg were 36.0 {+-} 13.4/37.9 {+-} 16.3/43.7 {+-} 0.4 and at 0.1 mmol/kg they were 50.1 {+-} 12.4/46.6 {+-} 6.5 / 54.6 {+-} 10.2. Gd-BOPTA 0.05 revealed a significantly lower SNR than all other agents at normal dose. Full-dose gadolinium MRA results in higher image quality and significantly higher SNR compared with the half dose. Gadobutrol and Gd-BOPTA have similar enhancement properties at full dose but at half dose, gadobutrol appears superior. (orig.)

  15. Effects of contrast improvement on high voltage rectification type of x-ray diagnostic apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hoo Min; Yoon, Joon [Dept. of Radiological technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Buchen, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect on the selectivity on of high-voltage rectification device that measured the performance of the grid, and the contrast improvement ability (K factor) by measuring the scattered radiation content of the transmitted X-rays. The scattered radiation generated when the X-ray flux comes from the diagnostic X-ray generator that passes through an object. Targeting four different rectifications of X-ray generators, the mean value of the tube voltage and the tube current was measured in order to maximize the accuracy of the generating power dose within the same exposure condition. Using fluorescence meter, the content of the scattered rays that are transmitted through the acrylic was measured depending on the grid usage. When grid is not used, the content of the scattered rays was the lowest (34.158%) with the single-phase rectifier, was increased with the inverter rectifier (37.043%) and the three-phase 24-peak rectification method (37.447%). The difference of the scattered radiation content of each device was significant from the lowest 0.404% to the highest 3.289% while using 8:1 grid, the content of the scattered ray was the lowest with the single content of the scattered ray was the lowest with the single-phase rectifier (18.258%), was increased with the rectifier (25.502%) and the 24-peaks rectification (24.217%). Furthermore, there was difference up to content 7.244% to the lowest content 1.285% within three-phase 24-peaks rectification, inverter rectifications, and single-phase rectifier depending on the selectivity of the grid. Drawn from the statistical analysis, there was a similar relationship between the contrast improvement factor and the K factor. As a result, the grid selectivity and the contrast were increased within the single-phase rectifier rather than the constant voltage rectifier.

  16. Effects of contrast improvement on high voltage rectification type of x-ray diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hoo Min; Yoon, Joon; Kim, Hyun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect on the selectivity on of high-voltage rectification device that measured the performance of the grid, and the contrast improvement ability (K factor) by measuring the scattered radiation content of the transmitted X-rays. The scattered radiation generated when the X-ray flux comes from the diagnostic X-ray generator that passes through an object. Targeting four different rectifications of X-ray generators, the mean value of the tube voltage and the tube current was measured in order to maximize the accuracy of the generating power dose within the same exposure condition. Using fluorescence meter, the content of the scattered rays that are transmitted through the acrylic was measured depending on the grid usage. When grid is not used, the content of the scattered rays was the lowest (34.158%) with the single-phase rectifier, was increased with the inverter rectifier (37.043%) and the three-phase 24-peak rectification method (37.447%). The difference of the scattered radiation content of each device was significant from the lowest 0.404% to the highest 3.289% while using 8:1 grid, the content of the scattered ray was the lowest with the single content of the scattered ray was the lowest with the single-phase rectifier (18.258%), was increased with the rectifier (25.502%) and the 24-peaks rectification (24.217%). Furthermore, there was difference up to content 7.244% to the lowest content 1.285% within three-phase 24-peaks rectification, inverter rectifications, and single-phase rectifier depending on the selectivity of the grid. Drawn from the statistical analysis, there was a similar relationship between the contrast improvement factor and the K factor. As a result, the grid selectivity and the contrast were increased within the single-phase rectifier rather than the constant voltage rectifier

  17. Epidemiological methods for assessing dose-response and dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellström, Tord; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Selected Molecular Mechanisms of Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity General Considerations of Dose-Effect and Dose-Response Relationships Interactions in Metal Toxicology Epidemiological Methods for Assessing Dose-Response and Dose-Effect Relationships Essential Metals: Assessing Risks from Deficiency......Description Handbook of the Toxicology of Metals is the standard reference work for physicians, toxicologists and engineers in the field of environmental and occupational health. This new edition is a comprehensive review of the effects on biological systems from metallic elements...... access to a broad range of basic toxicological data and also gives a general introduction to the toxicology of metallic compounds. Audience Toxicologists, physicians, and engineers in the fields of environmental and occupational health as well as libraries in these disciplines. Will also be a useful...

  18. Digital breast tomosynthesis: studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Chan, Heang-Ping; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C; Carson, Paul L; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Watcharotone, Kuanwong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ∼1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R = 0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R = 0.83). (paper)

  19. Digital breast tomosynthesis: Studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Helvie, Mark A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C.; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ~1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R=0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R=0.83). PMID:25211509

  20. Dose Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography provide more information additive to contrast enhanced MRI in highly suspected breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki; Bae, Young Tae

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography (SMM) provide more information than contrast enhanced MRI in highly suspected breast cancer patients. This study included 32 breast lesions of 29 highly suspected patients having breast cancer. All patients were performed SMM and contrast enhanced MRI. The SMMs and contrast enhanced MRI were correlated with histopathologic results. Thirty breast lesions were diagnosed malignant diseases and 2 were diagnosed benign diseases. SMM showed 29 true positives (TP), 1 true negative (TN), 1 false positive (FP), and 1 false negative (FN). The sensitivity was 96.6%. Contrast enhanced MRI revealed 24 TP, 0 TN, 1 FP, 3 FN and 4 indeterminate cases. The sensitivity was 88.8%. In the assessment of axillary lymph node metastasis, SMM showed 9 TP, 10 TN, 0 FP, and 3 FN. The sensitivity and specificity were 75% and 100%. Contrast enhanced MRI revealed 6 TP, 9 TN, 1 FP, and 6 FN. The sensitivity and specificity were 50% and 90%. Among 4 indeterminate cases with MRI findings, SMM correctly diagnosed malignant breast diseases in 3 lesions. However, SMM showed false positive in 1 lesion. SMM could correctly diagnosed malignant breast diseases more 5 lesions than contrast enhanced MRI. SMM revealed higher sensitivity in detection of primary breast cancer and axillary LN metastasis than contrast enhanced MRI. SMMs could correctly diagnosed malignant breast diseases even if the MRI showed indeterminate findings. In highly suspected patients having breast cancer, SMM may provide additive information in detection of breast cancer if contrast enhanced MRI showed indeterminate findings but this is to be determined later by large population based study

  1. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  2. Evaluation of a High Concentrated Contrast Media Injection Protocol in Combination with Low Tube Current for Dose Reduction in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: A Randomized, Two-center Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yibo; Hua, Yanqing; Wang, Mingpeng; Mao, Dingbiao; Jin, Xiu; Li, Cheng; Shi, Kailei; Xu, Jianrong

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to prospectively evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential and image quality (IQ) of a high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) injection protocol in combination with a low tube current (mAs) in coronary computed tomography angiography. Eighty-one consecutive patients (mean age: 62 years; 34 females; body mass index: 18-31) were included and randomized-assigned into two groups. All computed tomography (CT) examinations were performed in two groups with the same tube voltage (100 kV), flow rate of contrast medium (5.0 mL/s), and iodine dose (22.8 g). An automatic mAs and low concentration contrast medium (300 mgI/mL) were used in group A, whereas effective mAs was reduced by a factor 0.6 along with HCCM (400 mgI/mL) in group B. Radiation dose was assessed (CT dose index [CTDI vol ] and dose length product), and vessel-based objective IQ for various regions of interest (enhancement, noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio), subjective IQ, noise, and motion artifacts were analyzed overall and vessel-based with a 5-point Likert scale. The CT attenuation of coronary arteries and image noise in group B were significantly higher than those in group A (ranges: 507.5-548.1 Hounsfield units vs 407.5-444.5 Hounsfield units; and 20.3 ± 8.6 vs 17.7 ± 8.0) (P ≤ 0.0166). There was no significant difference between the two groups in signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, and subjective IQ of coronary arteries (29.4-31.7, 30.0-37.0, and medium score of 5 in group A vs 29.4-32.4, 27.7-36.3, and medium score of 5 in group B, respectively, P ≥ 0.1859). Both mean CTDI vol and dose length product in group B were 58% of those of group A. HCCM combined with low tube current allows dose reduction in coronary computed tomography angiography and does not compromise IQ. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determining effective radiation mutagen dose for garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taner, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to get database for future garlic mutation breeding studies. For this aim, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 Gy doses of Cs 137 (gamma-ray) were applied on garlic cloves as a physical mutagen. 50 cloves were used for each dose. Sixty days after treatment, germination rate and shoot development of cloves were determined. The Effective Mutagen Dose (ED 50 ) was calculated by regression analyses. According to the results, 4.455 Gy dose was found to be effective as ED 50 . (author)

  4. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age: the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M; Kirk, Jeremy; Donaldson, Malcolm; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Söder, Olle; Roche, Edna; Hoey, Hilary; Dunger, David B; Juul, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. In the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. The average dose during the second year of the randomised trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0.17 SDS, s.d. 0.18) during the second year of the randomised trial compared with the high-dose group (0.46 SDS, s.d. 0.25), but not significantly lower than the low-dose group (0.23 SDS, s.d. 0.15; P=0.17). The IGF1 titration group had lower IGF1 levels after 2 years of the trial (mean 1.16, s.d. 1.24) compared with both the low-dose (mean 1.76, s.d. 1.48) and the high-dose (mean 2.97, s.d. 1.63) groups. IGF1 titration of GH dose in SGA children proved less effective than current dosing strategies. IGF1 titration resulted in physiological IGF1 levels with a wide range of GH dose and a poorer growth response, which indicates the role of IGF1 resistance and highlights the heterogeneity of short SGA children. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  5. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56–0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose. - Highlights: • Dual-energy mammography based on a photon-counting detector was simulated. • Radiation dose and image quality were evaluated for optimizing the proposed technique. • The proposed technique reduced radiation dose as well as improved image quality. • The proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy.

  6. Effective dose delivered by conventional radiology to Aosta Valley population between 2002 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, F; Aimonetto, S; Catuzzo, P; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Marchisio, P; Natrella, M; Rosanò, A M; Meloni, T; Pasquino, M; Tofani, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective Medical diagnostic procedures can be considered the main man-made source of ionising radiation exposure for the population. Conventional radiography still represents the largest contribution to examination frequency. The present work evaluates procedure frequency and effective dose from the majority of conventional radiology examinations performed at the Radiological Department of Aosta Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Method Effective dose to the patient was evaluated by means of the software PCXMC. Data provided by the radiological information system allowed us to obtain collective effective and per caput dose. Results The biggest contributors to per caput effective dose from conventional radiology are vertebral column, abdomen, chest, pelvis and (limited to females) breast. Vertebral column, pelvis and breast procedures show a significant dose increment in the period of the study. The mean effective dose per inhabitant from conventional radiology increased from 0.131 mSv in 2002 to 0.156 mSv in 2009. Combining these figures with those from our study of effective dose from CT (0.55 mSv in 2002 to 1.03 mSv in 2009), the total mean effective dose per inhabitant increased from 0.68 mSv to 1.19 mSv. The contribution of CT increased from 81% to 87% of the total. In contrast, conventional radiology accounts for 85% of the total number of procedures, but only 13% of the effective dose. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that conventional radiography still represents the biggest contributor to examination frequency in Aosta Valley in 2009. However, the frequency of the main procedures did not change significantly between 2002 and 2009. PMID:21937611

  7. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 {mu}Sv and 37.8 {mu}Sv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 {mu}Sv, 27.6 {mu}Sv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 {mu}Sv, 15.9 {mu}Sv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom.

  8. Effective dose to patients from thoracic spine examinations with tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus; Soederman, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm -2 was obtained. (authors)

  9. EFFECTIVE DOSE TO PATIENTS FROM THORACIC SPINE EXAMINATIONS WITH TOMOSYNTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm(-2) was obtained. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  11. Guideline for determining the mean glandular dose according to DIN 6868-162 and threshold contrast visibility according to the quality assurance guideline for digital mammography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, A; Schopphoven, S; Land, I; Blaser, D; Sobczak, T

    2014-05-01

    As part of the physico-technical quality assurance of the German breast cancer screening program, the threshold contrast visibility and the average glandular dose of every digital mammography system have to fulfill the requirements of the "European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis" (4th Edition). To accomplish uniform measurements in all federal states of Germany, the physical board of the reference centers developed a special guideline in 2009. Due to recent changes in the guidelines and standards, a second version of the guideline was developed by the reference centers. This guideline describes the determination of the average glandular dose as well as the CDMAM image acquisition and the CDMAM image evaluation. The determination of the threshold contrast visibility can be performed visually or automatically. The determination of the average glandular dose is based on DIN 6868 - 162 and the threshold contrast visibility test is based on the German "Quality Assurance Guideline". © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of contrast materials on left ventricular angiography in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan

    1985-01-01

    The precise pathologic anatomy in complex congenital heart disease requires multiple injections of iodinated contrast materials into the cardiac chambers and/or great vessels. In the presence of intracardial shunts, more large volumes of contrast material is often required. In neonates and infants the total volume of contrast material during single angiographic procedure is limited up to 3-4ml/kg. This limitation results from the deleterious effects of systemic hyperosmolarity caused by the contrast materials and may be intensified in the neonate because of the relative immaturity of infants kidneys and delayed excretion of contrast materials. We therefore tried to compare the EKG and left ventricular pressure change with those of high osmolar and low osmolar contrast agent in experimental model. The purpose of the study is to determine and compare the effects of contrast materials on left ventricular hemodynamics

  13. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  14. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  15. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  16. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  17. CT contrasting theory. Effects of the concentration, volume and infusion rate of iodine contrast medium on TDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamachi, Jun

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects in the title on TDC (time-density curve) using a phantom. CT machine used was Toshiba Aquilion Multi 64, TDC phantom was the product of Nemoto-Kyorindo Co., and the contrast medium was Eisai iomeprol, in syringe-sealed formulations of 300 and 350 mg I/mL. The medium was infused at 1-5 mL/sec in the phantom equivalent to body weight of 78 kg (total water volume=1 min circulation=6,000 mL, 800 mL/heart) to obtain 30 TDCs. Evaluated were the relationships of the infusion rate (mL/sec), volume (mL) or time (sec) with TDC parameters of the detection time of the medium, slope, time to reach the maximum CT value, the maximum CT value, time to keep the CT concentration and its actual concentration. Results revealed that, regardless to the difference of formulations of the contrast medium, TDC with high reproducibility can be obtainable by making the infusion rate of I per unit time and body weight (mgI/sec/kg) constant when the infusion time is made identical for CT of the same diagnostic purpose. (R.T.)

  18. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-01

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  19. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  20. Dose-rate effects in external beam radiotherapy redux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Gerweck, Leo E.; Zaider, Marco; Yorke, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in external beam radiotherapy, both in technical advances and in clinical approaches, have prompted renewed discussions on the potential influence of dose-rate on radio-response in certain treatment scenarios. We consider the multiple factors that influence the dose-rate effect, e.g. radical recombination, the kinetics of sublethal damage repair for tumors and normal tissues, the difference in α/β ratio for early and late reacting tissues, and perform a comprehensive literature review. Based on radiobiological considerations and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model we estimate the influence of overall treatment time on radio-response for specific clinical situations. As the influence of dose-rate applies to both the tumor and normal tissues, in oligo-fractionated treatment using large doses per fraction, the influence of delivery prolongation is likely important, with late reacting normal tissues being generally more sensitive to the dose-rate effect than tumors and early reacting tissues. In conventional fractionated treatment using 1.8-2 Gy per fraction and treatment times of 2-10 min, the influence of dose-rate is relatively small. Lastly, the dose-rate effect in external beam radiotherapy is governed by the overall beam-on-time, not by the average linac dose-rate, nor by the instantaneous dose-rate within individual linac pulses which could be as high as 3 x 10 6 MU/min.

  1. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  2. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  3. CONTRAST IN CLAY MINERALOGY AND THEIR EFFECT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Clay minerals reduced the porosity and permeability of the Permo-Triassic sandstones. .... Lower Triassic-Lias .... and show high birefringence around the grains. ..... It is a regime after effective burial depth in which the solubility of minerals.

  4. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  5. Committed effective doses at various times after intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed effective doses at nine times after intake from intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu 1 AMAD particles by adults. Data are given for various chemical forms of 359 nuclides. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on committed equivalent doses to organs is given in NRPB-M288. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  6. Organ doses and effective doses in some medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavkumar, Biju

    2000-01-01

    The ICRP recommends radiation protection standards for the safe use of radiation and also prescribes the radiation protection quantities and periodically reviews them. In this context, the quantities like organ doses and effective doses are defined by ICRP. In this work we calculate these quantities and hence the conversion functions for the industrial radiation sources and those for CT and diagnostic X-ray exposures. Workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation are regularly monitored to evaluate the radiation dose received by them. It is quite possible that in an accident situation, the worker involved in the accident might not have worn a personal monitor, popularly known as the monitoring badge. In addition, even some non radiation workers (who are obviously not monitored) may also have received exposure. Under these circumstances, the persons involved are interviewed, the accident site inspected, and on the basis of realistic assumptions, the likely doses received by the exposed persons are estimated

  7. The Effect of NPP's Stack Height to Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandi, Liliana Yetta; Rohman, Budi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of dose calculation for accidents is to analyze the capability of NPP to maintain the safety of public and workers in case an accident occurs on the Plant in a site. This paper calculates the Loss of Coolant Accident in PWR plant. The calculation results shows that no risks of serious radiation exposure are given to the neighboring public even if such a large accident occurred, and the effect of stack height can be predicted by analysis of the calculation results. The whole dose is calculated for some location (100 m, 300 m, 500 m, 700 m, 900 m, 1500 m, and 2000 m) with three difference stack height i.e. 0 m, 40 m and 100 m. The result of the whole dose calculation is under permitted criteria for whole dose : 0.25 Sv and thyroid dose : 3.0 Sv. The calculation of radiation dose in this paper use EEDCDQ code

  8. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  9. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  10. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbergen, Erik F.M. van; Fowler, Jack F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  11. Building shielding effects on radiation doses from routine radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    In calculating population doses from the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere, it is usually assumed that man spends all of his time outdoors standing on a smooth infinite plane. Realistically, however, man spends most of the time indoors, so that substantial reductions in radiation doses may result compared with the usual estimates. Calculational models were developed to study the effects of building structures on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Both internal dose from inhaled radionuclides and external photon dose from airborne and surface-deposited radionuclides are considered. The effect of building structures is described quantitatively by a dose reduction factor, which is the ratio of the dose inside a structure to the corresponding dose with no structure present. The internal dose from inhaled radionuclides is proportional to the radionuclide concentration in the air. Assuming that the outdoor airborne concentration is constant with time, the time-dependence of the indoor airborne concentration in terms of the structure air ventilation rate, the deposition velocities for radionuclides on the inside floor, walls, and ceiling, and the radioactive decay constant, were calculated

  12. Stroboscopic effect : Contrast threshold function and dependence on illumination level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perz, M.; Sekulovski, D.; Vogels, I.; Heynderickx, I.

    2018-01-01

    The stroboscopic visibility measure (SVM) is a method used to quantify the stroboscopic effect visibility in general illumination application. SVM has been defined previously based on a limited number of frequencies and participants. To validate and extend SVM, five perception experiments are

  13. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A.; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Materials and Methods Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological

  14. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological nephrogenic systemic fibrosis-like skin

  15. The Contrast Effect in Temporal and Probabilistic Discounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; He, Guibing

    2016-01-01

    In this information age, messages related to time, and uncertainty surround us. At the same time, our daily lives are filled with decisions accompanied by temporal delay or uncertainty. Will such information influence our temporal and probabilistic discounting? The authors address this question from the perspectives of decision by sampling (DbS) theory and psychological distance theory. Studies 1 and 2 investigated the effect of contextual messages on temporal discounting and probabilistic discounting, respectively. The results indicated that participants who memorized messages about long-term and low-probability events rated delay or uncertainty as mentally closer and exhibited a less degree of value discounting than those who memorized messages regarding short-term and high-probability events. In addition, a sense of distance from present or reality mediated the effect of contextual messages on value discounting. The implications of the current findings for theory and applications are discussed. PMID:27014122

  16. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Hakim, R.; Schulman, G. [Department of Nephrology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significat activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these dsata serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  17. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernanz-Schulman, M.; Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A.; Hakim, R.; Schulman, G.

    2000-01-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significant activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these data serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  18. Adult head CT scans: the uncertainties of effective dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Kent J.; Bibbo, Giovanni; Pattison, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: CT scanning is a high dose imaging modality. Effective dose estimates from CT scans can provide important information to patients and medical professionals. For example, medical practitioners can use the dose to estimate the risk to the patient, and judge whether this risk is outweighed by the benefits of the CT examination, while radiographers can gauge the effect of different scanning protocols on the patient effective dose, and take this into consideration when establishing routine scan settings. Dose estimates also form an important part of epidemiological studies examining the health effects of medical radiation exposures on the wider population. Medical physicists have been devoting significant effort towards estimating patient radiation doses from diagnostic CT scans for some years. The question arises: How accurate are these effective dose estimates? The need for a greater understanding and improvement of the uncertainties in CT dose estimates is now gaining recognition as an important issue (BEIR VII 2006). This study is an attempt to analyse and quantify the uncertainty components relating to effective dose estimates from adult head CT examinations that are calculated with four commonly used methods. The dose estimation methods analysed are the Nagel method, the ImpaCT method, the Wellhoefer method and the Dose-Length Product (DLP) method. The analysis of the uncertainties was performed in accordance with the International Standards Organisation's Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement as discussed in Gregory et al (Australas. Phys. Eng. Sci. Med., 28: 131-139, 2005). The uncertainty components vary, depending on the method used to derive the effective dose estimate. Uncertainty components in this study include the statistical and other errors from Monte Carlo simulations, uncertainties in the CT settings and positions of patients in the CT gantry, calibration errors from pencil ionization chambers, the variations in the organ

  19. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D.

    2015-10-01

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  20. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  1. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  2. Estimation of the collective effective dose to the population from medical X-ray examinations in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenkanen-Rautakoskia, Petra; Jaervinen, Hannu; Bly, Ritva

    2008-01-01

    The collective effective dose to the population from all X-ray examinations in Finland in 2005 was estimated. The numbers of X-ray examinations were collected by a questionnaire to the health care units (response rate 100 %). The effective doses in plain radiography were calculated using a Monte Carlo based program (PCXMC), as average values for selected health care units. For computed tomography (CT), weighted dose length product (DLP w ) in a standard phantom was measured for routine CT protocols of four body regions, for 80 % of CT scanners including all types. The effective doses were calculated from DPL w values using published conversion factors. For contrast-enhanced radiology and interventional radiology, the effective dose was estimated mainly by using published DAP values and conversion factors for given body regions. About 733 examinations per 1000 inhabitants (excluding dental) were made in 2005, slightly less than in 2000. The proportions of plain radiography, computed tomography, contrast-enhanced radiography and interventional procedures were about 92, 7, 1 and 1 %, respectively. From 2000, the frequencies (number of examinations per 1000 inhabitants) of plain radiography and contrast-enhanced radiography have decreased about 8 and 33 %, respectively, while the frequencies of CT and interventional radiology have increased about 28 and 38 %, respectively. The population dose from all X-ray examinations is about 0.43 mSv per person (in 1997 0.5 mSv). About half of this is caused by CT (in 1997 only 20 %) although the relative number of CT examinations is only 7 %. The contribution by plain radiography is 19 %, interventional radiology 17 %, and contrast-enhanced radiology 14 %. It is concluded that CT examinations are the major source of the population dose, while interventional radiology gives about the same population dose as plain radiography. For plain radiography, body examinations cause the highest effective dose. (author)

  3. Towards a new dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF)? Some comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, K H

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this article is to offer a broader, mechanism-based, analytical tool than that used by (Rühm et al 2016 Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) for the interpretation of cancer induction relationships. The article explains the limitations of this broader analytical tool and the implications of its use in view of the publications by Leuraud et al 2015 (Lancet Haematol. 2 e276-81) and Richardson et al 2015 (Br. Med. J. 351 h5359). The publication by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79), which is clearly work in progress, reviews the current status of the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) as recommended by the ICRP. It also considers the issues which might influence a reassessment of both the value of the DDREF as well as its application in radiological protection. In this article, the problem is approached from a different perspective and starts by commenting on the limited scientific data used by Rühm et al 2016 (Ann. ICRP 45 262-79) to develop their analysis which ultimately leads them to use a linear-quadratic dose effect relationship to fit solid cancer mortality data from the Japanese life span study of atomic bomb survivors. The approach taken here includes more data on the induction of DNA double strand breaks and, using experimental data taken from the literature, directly relates the breaks to cell killing, chromosomal aberrations and somatic mutations. The relationships are expanded to describe the induction of cancer as arising from radiation induced cytological damage coupled to cell killing since the cancer mutated cell has to survive to express its malignant nature. Equations are derived for the induction of cancer after both acute and chronic exposure to sparsely ionising radiation. The equations are fitted to the induction of cancer in mice to illustrate a dose effect relationship over the total dose range. The 'DDREF' derived from the two equations varies with dose and the DDREF concept is called into question. Although the equation for

  4. Estimation of effective dose equivalente from external irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, T.

    1985-07-01

    A methodology for computing effective dose equivalent, derived from the computer code ALGAM: Monte Carlo Estimation of Internal Dose from Gamma-ray Sources in a Phantom Man, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is presented. The modified code was run for 12 different photon energy levels, from 0,010 Mev to 4.0 Mev, which provides computing the absorved dose, for these energy levels, in each one of the 97 organs of the original code. The code also was run for the principal energy levels used in the calibration of the dosimetric films. The results of the absorved doses per photon obtained for these levels of energy have been transformed in effective dose equivalents. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  6. SU-F-P-29: Impact of Oral Contrast Agent for Assisting in Outlining Small Intestine On Pelvic IMAT Dose in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Fan, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the advanced intensity modulated arc therapy(IMAT) delivery systems becoming a main role of treatment ways, which places even greater demands on delivering accuracy. The impact of oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) for assisting in outlining the small intestine on pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer was investigated. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans, and the planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (including the small intestine, rectum, bladder, colon and the left and right femoral head) were contoured. The IMAT plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system for each case, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel. The first plan (plan A) was the conventional IMAT plan (with oral contrast agent), and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel (without oral contrast agent). Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans. Results: The PTV’s D2, D50, D95, V110, conformity index, and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 5610.5 vs. 5611.4 cGy (P=0.175), 5348.5 vs. 5348.0 cGy (P=0.869), 5039 vs. 5042.3 (P=0.518), 6.0% vs. 6.1 %( P=0.886), 0.1269 vs. 0.1271 (P=0.34) and 0.8421 vs. 0.8416 (P=0.598), respectively. The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy (V30) and the minimum dose of 2% volume accepted (D2) for plans A and B were 31.6% vs. 31.9% (P=0.371) and 5067.8 vs. 5085.4 cGy (P=0.377), while rectum V50 of the two plans was 12.4% vs. 12.1% (P=0.489). Conclusion: The oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) filling the small intestine does not lead to a significant increase in the pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer.

  7. Effective dose for patient in multimode panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasaki, Shiro; Daibo, Motoji

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, multimode panoramic radiography has had various functions, such as the auto exposure function, auto focus function (auto function), TMJ radiography and tomogram radiography functions. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective dose for patients in each mode of the new multimode panoramic radiography (J. MORITA MFG. CORP. Dental Panorama X-ray Apparatus: Veraview Scope X 600). The absorbed doses in important organs involved in the causation of stochastic effects were measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter using RANDO phantom. The effective doses were calculated using modified tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1999. The mean field size over skin in typical panoramic and tomographic examinations was about 3% and 0.4% of the total body surface area of 15000 cm 2 . Assuming that the incidence of skin cancer is proportional to the area of skin exposed to ionizing radiation, the tissue weighting factor of skin can be estimated to be about 0.0003 and 0.00004. The estimate in effective dose was lower (5.3 μSv) in the panoramic auto function mode (an average exposure condition of 69 kV 7 mA) than that (6.5-13.8 μSv) in the linear tomogram modes. Since the linear tomogram mode requires a scout view, such as standard panoramic radiography, the dose in the linear tomogram mode becomes higher than other modes. A percentage of gonad doses in effective doses was negligible. (author)

  8. UV-radiation and skin cancer dose effect curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, T.; Dahlback, A.; Larsen, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Norwegian skin cancer data were used in an attempt to arrive at the dose effect relationship for UV-carcinogenesis. The Norwegian population is relatively homogenous with regard to skin type and live in a country where the annual effective UV-dose varies by approximately 40 percent. Four different regions of the country, each with a broadness of 1 o in latitude (approximately 111 km), were selected . The annual effective UV-doses for these regions were calculated assuming normal ozone conditions throughout the year. The incidence of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (mainly basal cell carcinoma) in these regions were considered and compared to the annual UV-doses. For both these types of cancer a quadratic dose effect curve seems to be valid. Depletions of the ozone layer results in larger UV-doses which in turn may yield more skin cancer. The dose effect curves suggest that the incidence rate will increase by an ''amplification factor'' of approximately 2

  9. Radiation dose reduction using 100-kVp and a sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm in adolescent head CT: Impact on grey-white matter contrast and image noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Yasunori [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakaura, Takeshi; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirarta, Kenichiro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro [Kumamoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of 100-kVp scans with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (IR) for unenhanced head CT in adolescents. Sixty-nine patients aged 12-17 years underwent head CT under 120- (n = 34) or 100-kVp (n = 35) protocols. The 120-kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), 100-kVp images with FBP (100-kVp-F) and sinogram-affirmed IR (100-kVp-S). We compared the effective dose (ED), grey-white matter (GM-WM) contrast, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between protocols in supratentorial (ST) and posterior fossa (PS). We also assessed GM-WM contrast, image noise, sharpness, artifacts, and overall image quality on a four-point scale. ED was 46% lower with 100- than 120-kVp (p < 0.001). GM-WM contrast was higher, and image noise was lower, on 100-kVp-S than 120-kVp at ST (p < 0.001). CNR of 100-kVp-S was higher than of 120-kVp (p < 0.001). GM-WM contrast of 100-kVp-S was subjectively rated as better than of 120-kVp (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the other criteria between 100-kVp-S and 120-kVp (p = 0.072-0.966). The 100-kVp with sinogram-affirmed IR facilitated dramatic radiation reduction and better GM-WM contrast without increasing image noise in adolescent head CT. (orig.)

  10. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  11. Effect of a therapeutic dose of pseudoephedrine on swimmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is thought to result from direct stimulation of post-synaptic receptors and inhibition ..... optimal effect could be extensive with the use of nutritional supplements; therefore ... These studies support the theory that higher doses of PSE may result in.

  12. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  13. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  14. Study of total ionization dose effects in electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidhin, T.S.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Gour, Aditya; Behera, R.P.; Jayanthi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation effects in electronic devices are a major challenge in the dependable application developments of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The main radiation effects are total ionization dose (TID) effects, displacement damage dose (DDD) effects and single event effects (SEE). In this study, we are concentrating on TID effects in electronic devices. The focus of the study is mainly on SRAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) along with that the devices of our interest are voltage regulators, flash memory and optocoupler. The experiments are conducted by exposing the devices to gamma radiation in power off condition and the degradation in the performances are analysed

  15. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-05-15

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose magnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. (author)

  16. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  17. The effects of X-ray energy and an iodine-based contrast agent on chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sho; Kubota, Nobuo; Katoh, Tsuguhisa; Yoshino, Norio; Sasaki, Takehito; Sasaki, Masao S.

    1994-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of combining irradiation with X rays of various energies and an iodine-based contrast agent on the induction of chromosome aberrations in the peripheral lymphocytes of blood samples taken from healthy young donors. Although no enhancement of the effect of radiation was induced when blood samples with the iodine-based contrast agent were given 35 kV X irradiation, an 80 kV X-ray exposure induced an enhanced level of chromosome aberrations, and a 250 kV X irradiation, an enhancement of the frequencies of chromosome aberrations was seen in blood samples with the iodine-based contrast agent, especially when a Lucite phantom was employed in studies to increase the scattered rays. It was thus shown by microdosimetric analysis that X irradiation combined with an iodine-based contrast agent causes an enhancement of the absorbed radiation dose, which is dependent on the X-ray energies employed. This phenomenon may have clinical use in the radiotherapeutic management of tumors, although further extensive studies of tumor vascularity must be pursued before this can be applied clinically. 21 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Reducing charging effects in scanning electron microscope images by Rayleigh contrast stretching method (RCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Ismail, W Z; Sim, K S; Tso, C P; Ting, H Y

    2011-01-01

    To reduce undesirable charging effects in scanning electron microscope images, Rayleigh contrast stretching is developed and employed. First, re-scaling is performed on the input image histograms with Rayleigh algorithm. Then, contrast stretching or contrast adjustment is implemented to improve the images while reducing the contrast charging artifacts. This technique has been compared to some existing histogram equalization (HE) extension techniques: recursive sub-image HE, contrast stretching dynamic HE, multipeak HE and recursive mean separate HE. Other post processing methods, such as wavelet approach, spatial filtering, and exponential contrast stretching, are compared as well. Overall, the proposed method produces better image compensation in reducing charging artifacts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Activation of platelets by low-osmolar contrast media: differential effects of ionic and nonionic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeman, M. R.; Konijnenberg, A.; Sturk, A.; Reekers, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effects of an ionic low-osmolar contrast medium (ioxaglate) and two nonionic low-osmolar contrast media (iohexol and iopamidol) on human platelet activation in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis subsequent to reaction with fluorescence-labeled monoclonal antibodies was used to detect

  20. Effect of X-ray Contrast Media, Chlorination, and Chloramination on Zebrafish Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of X-ray Contrast Media, Chlorination, and Chloramination on Zebrafish Development Little is known about the vertebrate developmental toxicity of chlorinated or chloraminated drinking water (DW), iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM, a common contaminate of DW) or how the c...

  1. An effective dose of ketamine for eliminating pain during injection of propofol: a dose response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Wang, Q; Yu, Y Y; Wang, W S

    2013-09-01

    Ketamine can completely eliminate pain associated with propofol injection. However, the effective dose of ketamine to eliminate propofol injection pain has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effective dose of ketamine needed to eliminate pain in 50% and 95% of patients (ED50 and ED95, respectively) during propofol injections. This study was conducted in a double-blinded fashion and included 50 patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy under general anesthesia. The initial dose of ketamine used in the first patient was 0.25mg/kg. The dosing modifications were in increments or decrements of 0.025 mg/kg. Ketamine was administered 15 seconds before injecting propofol (2.5mg/kg), which was injected at a rate of 1mL/s. Patients were asked to rate their pain during propofol injection every 5s econds using a 0-3 pain scale. The highest pain score was recorded. The ED50, ED95 and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined by probit analyses. The dose of ketamine ranged from 0.175 to 0.275 mg/kg. The ED50 and ED95 of ketamine for eliminating pain during propofol injection were 0.227 mg/kg and 0.283 mg/kg, respectively (95%CI: 0.211-0.243 mg/kg and 0.26-0.364 mg/kg, respectively). Ketamine at an approximate dose of 0.3mg/kg was effective in eliminating pain during propofol injection. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  3. Value of Single-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography Versus Intraarterial Digital Subtraction Angiography in Therapy Indications in Abdominal and Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Philipp J.; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Both, Markus; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to prove the value of single-dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography [three-dimensional (3D) ceMRA] in abdominal and iliac arteries versus the reference standard intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (i.a.DSA) when indicating a therapy. Patients suspected of having abdominal or iliac artery stenosis were included in this study. A positive vote of the local Ethics Committee was given. After written informed consent was obtained, 37 patients were enrolled, of which 34 were available for image evaluation. Both 3D ceMRA and i.a. DSA were performed for each patient. The dosage for 3D ceMRA was 0.1 mmol/kg body weight in a 1.5-T scanner with a phased-array coil. The parameters of the 3D-FLASH sequence were as follows: TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, effective thickness 3.5 mm, matrix 512 x 200, flip angle 30 o , field of view 420 mm, TA 23 s, coronal scan orientation. Totally, 476 vessel segments were evaluated for stenosis degree by two radiologists in a consensus fashion in a blinded read. For each patient, a therapy was proposed, if clinically indicated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for stenoses ≥50% were 68%, 92%, 44%, 97%, and 90%, respectively. In 13/34 patients, a discrepancy was found concerning therapy decisions based on MRA findings versus therapy decisions based on the reference standard DSA. The results showed that the used MRA imaging technique of abdominal and iliac arteries is not competitive to i.a. DSA, with a high rate of misinterpretation of the MRAs resulting in incorrect therapies

  4. An efficient dose-compensation method for proximity effect correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Han Weihua; Yang Xiang; Zhang Yang; Yang Fuhua; Zhang Renping

    2010-01-01

    A novel simple dose-compensation method is developed for proximity effect correction in electron-beam lithography. The sizes of exposed patterns depend on dose factors while other exposure parameters (including accelerate voltage, resist thickness, exposing step size, substrate material, and so on) remain constant. This method is based on two reasonable assumptions in the evaluation of the compensated dose factor: one is that the relation between dose factors and circle-diameters is linear in the range under consideration; the other is that the compensated dose factor is only affected by the nearest neighbors for simplicity. Four-layer-hexagon photonic crystal structures were fabricated as test patterns to demonstrate this method. Compared to the uncorrected structures, the homogeneity of the corrected hole-size in photonic crystal structures was clearly improved. (semiconductor technology)

  5. Behaviour of polymers in radioactive environments: Effects of dose speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docters, A.S.; Gonzalez, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The scope of this research is to determine the degradation of mechanical properties of cable insulating PVC after irradiation in air at a Cobalt-60 (γ-ray) facility. Amongst the mechanical properties elongation at break and tensile strength were chosen as they are the most sensible to radiation. The samples were exposed to combined radiation-thermal environments with constant airflow in order to obtain accelerated aging data a doses up to 50-300 kGy, with dose rates ranging between 1.3 and 5.6 kGy/h at temperatures from 60 degrees C to 100 degrees C. At lower dose rates the degradation of mechanical properties increased after the same total dose: elongation at break decreases sharply while tensile strength decreases to a less extent, showing dose rate effects. A strong synergy between irradiation and thermal processes was also observed. (author)

  6. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only under the

  7. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  8. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP1-02: Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Kang, S; Eom, J [Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Photon-counting detectors (PCDs) allow multi-energy X-ray imaging without additional exposures and spectral overlap. This capability results in the improvement of accuracy of material decomposition for dual-energy X-ray imaging and the reduction of radiation dose. In this study, the PCD-based contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (CEDM) was compared with the conventional CDEM in terms of radiation dose, image quality and accuracy of material decomposition. Methods: A dual-energy model was designed by using Beer-Lambert’s law and rational inverse fitting function for decomposing materials from a polychromatic X-ray source. A cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based PCD, which has five energy thresholds, and iodine solutions included in a 3D half-cylindrical phantom, which composed of 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissues, were simulated by using a Monte Carlo simulation tool. The low- and high-energy images were obtained in accordance with the clinical exposure conditions for the conventional CDEM. Energy bins of 20–33 and 34–50 keV were defined from X-ray energy spectra simulated at 50 kVp with different dose levels for implementing the PCD-based CDEM. The dual-energy mammographic techniques were compared by means of absorbed dose, noise property and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE). Results: Comparing to the conventional CEDM, the iodine solutions were clearly decomposed for the PCD-based CEDM. Although the radiation dose for the PCD-based CDEM was lower than that for the conventional CEDM, the PCD-based CDEM improved the noise property and accuracy of decomposition images. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the PCD-based CDEM allows the quantitative material decomposition, and reduces radiation dose in comparison with the conventional CDEM. Therefore, the PCD-based CDEM is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumor and enhancing diagnostic accuracy in mammography.

  9. Effect of sodium bicarbonate pretreatment on barium coating of mucosa during double contrast barium meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, J.; Toetterman, S.; Kaila, R.; Pietilae, J.; Linden, H.; Tervahartiala, P.

    1983-01-01

    The radiographic pattern of the areae gastricae is produced by barium lying in the intersecting furrows of the gastric mucosal surface. However, if the mucus layer on the gastric mucosa is thick, it interferes with the barium coating of the areae gastricae during double contrast barium meal. As sodium bicarbonate decreases the viscosity of mucus and thus may make the gastric mucus layer thinner, it was evaluated as a pretreatment agent in a routine double contrast upper-gastrointestinal study to improve the visualization of the areae gastricae. In a single blind study, 53 of 106 patients took sodium bicarbonate water mixtures at bedtime the day before and on the morning of the examination. According to the results of the present study mucolysis induced by the used doses of sodium bicarbonate does not significantly affect micromucosal visualization during double-contrast barium meal. (orig.) [de

  10. Effect of sodium bicarbonate pretreatment on barium coating of mucosa during double contrast barium meal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnunen, J.; Toetterman, S.; Kaila, R.; Pietilae, J.; Linden, H.; Tervahartiala, P.

    1983-08-01

    The radiographic pattern of the areae gastricae is produced by barium lying in the intersecting furrows of the gastric mucosal surface. However, if the mucus layer on the gastric mucosa is thick, it interferes with the barium coating of the areae gastricae during double contrast barium meal. As sodium bicarbonate decreases the viscosity of mucus and thus may make the gastric mucus layer thinner, it was evaluated as a pretreatment agent in a routine double contrast upper-gastrointestinal study to improve the visualization of the areae gastricae. In a single blind study, 53 of 106 patients took sodium bicarbonate water mixtures at bedtime the day before and on the morning of the examination. According to the results of the present study mucolysis induced by the used doses of sodium bicarbonate does not significantly affect micromucosal visualization during double-contrast barium meal.

  11. Estimates of effective dose in adult CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mustafa Awad Elhaj.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of study was to estimate effective dose (E) in adult CT examinations for Toshiba X64 slice using CT. Exp version 2.5 software in Sudan. Using of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. lack of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. In order to achieve these objectives, data of CT-scanner has been collected from three hospitals ( ANH, ZSH and MMH). Data collected included equipment information and scan parameters for individual patients, who were used to asses. 300 adult patients underwent head, chest, abdomen-pelvis and peivis CT examinations. The CT1_w , CTD1_vol, DLP, patient effective dos and organ doses were estimated, using CT exposure parameters and CT Exp version 2.5 software. A large variation of mean effective dose and organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scan length. The mean effective dose in this study in the Brain, PNS, Chest, pulmonary, Abdomen-pelvis, Pelvis, KUB and CTU were 3.2 mSv, 2.6 mSv, 18.9 mSv 17.6 mSv 27.1 mSv, 11.2 mSv, 9.6 mSv and 23.7 mSv respectively, and organ equivalent, doses presented in this study in this study for the eye lens (for head), lungs and thymus ( for chest) , liver, kidney and small intest ( for abdomen t-pelvis), bladder, uterus and gonads ( for pelvis), were 62.9 mSv, 39.5 mSv, 34.1 mSv, 53.9 mSv, 52.6 mSv, 58.1 mSv, 37 mSv, and 34.6 mSv, respectively. These values were mostly comparable to and slightly higher than the values of effective doses reported from similar studies the United Kingdom, Tanzania, Australia, Canada and Sudan. It was concluded that patient effective dose and organ doses could be substantially minimized through careful selection of scanning parameters based on clinical indications of study, patient size, and body

  12. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  13. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  14. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  15. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  16. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor control probability

  17. Differential Effect of Contrast Polarity Reversals in Closed Squares and open L-Junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark M Schira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Scene segmentation depends on interaction between geometrical and photometric factors. It has been shown that reversals in contrast polarity at points of highest orientation discontinuity along closed contours significantly impair shape discrimination performance, while changes in contrast polarity at straight(er contour segments do not have such deleterious effects (Spehar 2002. Here we employ (semi high resolution fMRI (1.5x1.5x1.5mm to investigate the neuronal substrate underlying these perception effects. Stimuli consisted of simple elements a squares with contrast reversals along straight segments; b squares with contrast reversals in the corner (highest orientation discontinuity; c L-Junctions with contrast reversals along the straight ends; d L-Junctions with contrast reversals in the corner. Element with contrast polarity reversals are easy to distinguish though appear geometrically equivalent. For squares with contrast polarity reversals only along straight lines we find significantly lower BOLD modulation compared to any of the control conditions, which show similar responses to each other. In the light of previous psychophysical work (Spehar 2002, Elder and Zucker, 1993 we speculate that this effect is due to closure perception. We observe this across a wide range of areas on occipital cortex.

  18. Radiation dose reduction using 100-kVp and a sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm in adolescent head CT: Impact on grey-white matter contrast and image noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yasunori; Nakaura, Takeshi; Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirarta, Kenichiro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-07-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of 100-kVp scans with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (IR) for unenhanced head CT in adolescents. Sixty-nine patients aged 12-17 years underwent head CT under 120- (n = 34) or 100-kVp (n = 35) protocols. The 120-kVp images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), 100-kVp images with FBP (100-kVp-F) and sinogram-affirmed IR (100-kVp-S). We compared the effective dose (ED), grey-white matter (GM-WM) contrast, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between protocols in supratentorial (ST) and posterior fossa (PS). We also assessed GM-WM contrast, image noise, sharpness, artifacts, and overall image quality on a four-point scale. ED was 46% lower with 100- than 120-kVp (p < 0.001). GM-WM contrast was higher, and image noise was lower, on 100-kVp-S than 120-kVp at ST (p < 0.001). CNR of 100-kVp-S was higher than of 120-kVp (p < 0.001). GM-WM contrast of 100-kVp-S was subjectively rated as better than of 120-kVp (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the other criteria between 100-kVp-S and 120-kVp (p = 0.072-0.966). The 100-kVp with sinogram-affirmed IR facilitated dramatic radiation reduction and better GM-WM contrast without increasing image noise in adolescent head CT. • 100-kVp head CT provides 46% radiation dose reduction compared with 120-kVp. • 100-kVp scanning improves subjective and objective GM-WM contrast. • Sinogram-affirmed IR decreases head CT image noise, especially in supratentorial region. • 100-kVp protocol with sinogram-affirmed IR is suited for adolescent head CT.

  19. Prophylaxis and treatment of side effects due to iodinated contrast media relevant to radiological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Increased utilization of iodinated contrast media may be associated with increased incidence of adverse events. The most important side effects include contrast-induced nephropathy, anaphylactoid reaction, thyrotoxicosis, and extravasation. In patients with moderate renal dysfunction, saline hydration and reduction of contrast media volume are recommended. No regime to prevent anaphylactoid reactions has yet proven to be efficient. If subclinical hyperthyroidism has been determined, prophylaxis with sodium perchlorate is advised. Contrast-induced nephropathy is commonly transient and needs to be followed over time. Mild general anaphylactoid reactions may be treated with antihistaminic drugs and corticosteroids. Furthermore the choice of the X-ray contrast media might influence the risk of any adverse effects. (orig.) [de

  20. Pediatric Obesity: Pharmacokinetic Alterations and Effects on Antimicrobial Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Stephanie; Bradley, John; Nguyen, William Huy; Tran, Tri; Ny, Pamela; La, Kirsten; Vivian, Eva; Le, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Limited data exist for appropriate drug dosing in obese children. This comprehensive review summarizes pharmacokinetic (PK) alterations that occur with age and obesity, and these effects on antimicrobial dosing. A thorough comparison of different measures of body weight and specific antimicrobial agents including cefazolin, cefepime, ceftazidime, daptomycin, doripenem, gentamicin, linezolid, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, tobramycin, vancomycin, and voriconazole is presented. PubMed (1966-July 2015) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using these key terms: children, pharmacokinetic, obesity, overweight, body mass index, ideal body weight, lean body weight, body composition, and specific antimicrobial drugs. PK studies in obese children and, if necessary, data from adult studies were summarized. Knowledge of PK alterations stemming from physiologic changes that occur with age from the neonate to adolescent, as well as those that result from increased body fat, become an essential first step toward optimizing drug dosing in obese children. Excessive amounts of adipose tissue contribute significantly to body size, total body water content, and organ size and function that may modify drug distribution and clearance. PK studies that evaluated antimicrobial dosing primarily used total (or actual) body weight (TBW) for loading doses and TBW or adjusted body weight for maintenance doses, depending on the drugs' properties and dosing units. PK studies in obese children are imperative to elucidate drug distribution, clearance, and, consequently, the dose required for effective therapy in these children. Future studies should evaluate the effects of both age and obesity on drug dosing because the incidence of obesity is increasing in pediatric patients. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  1. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low dose radiation, and low dose radiation could not induce adaptive response. But in vivo experience, low dose radiation could enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation and alleviated the injury of hematological system. (authors)

  2. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  3. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mintz, E. D.; Cartter, M. L.; Hadler, J. L.; Wassell, J. T.; Zingeser, J. A.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure ...

  4. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, O [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Health, Safety and Waste Disposal, Vienna (Austria)

    1959-04-15

    To establish the maximum permissible radiation doses for occupational and other kinds of radiation exposure, it is necessary to know those biological effects which can be produced by very small radiation doses. This particular field of radiation biology has not yet been sufficiently explored. This holds true for possible delayed damage after occupational radiation exposure over a period of many years as well as for acute reactions of the organism to single low level exposures. We know that irradiation of less than 25 Roentgen units (r) is unlikely to produce symptoms of radiation sickness. We have, however, found indications that even smaller doses may produce certain instantaneous reactions which must not be neglected

  5. The dose effect of irradiated rice pollen on double fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Houcong; Chen Zhengming; Chen Ruming; Qiu Simi; Yang Juemin; Yang Huijie

    1995-01-01

    The mature panicles of rice were treated with 60 Co γ-rays in the range of 0∼0.372 kGy. The male sterile line used as the female plants were fertilized with γ-irradiated pollen manually. The dose effect of the irradiated pollen on double fertilization was investigated. It was found that double fertilization of the irradiated pollen was suppressed to different degrees as compared with the control. The effect was noticeable as that the fusion time of the male nucleolus with the female one was delayed with the increasing of γ-radiation dose. The delayed time was less than 13 hours when the dose was below 0.186 kGy and it was more than 15 hours when the dose was above 0.279 kGy. Furthermore, several types of deformed embryonic cells and endosperm nuclei were observed

  6. Health effects of daily airborne particle dose in children: Direct association between personal dose and respiratory health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Marks, Guy B.; Morawska, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution is a widespread health problem associated with respiratory symptoms. Continuous exposure monitoring was performed to estimate alveolar and tracheobronchial dose, measured as deposited surface area, for 103 children and to evaluate the long-term effects of exposure to airborne particles through spirometry, skin prick tests and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). The mean daily alveolar deposited surface area dose received by children was 1.35 × 10 3 mm 2 . The lowest and highest particle number concentrations were found during sleeping and eating time. A significant negative association was found between changes in pulmonary function tests and individual dose estimates. Significant differences were found for asthmatics, children with allergic rhinitis and sensitive to allergens compared to healthy subjects for eNO. Variation is a child's activity over time appeared to have a strong impact on respiratory outcomes, which indicates that personal monitoring is vital for assessing the expected health effects of exposure to particles. -- Highlights: •Particle dose was estimated through personal monitoring on more than 100 children. •We focused on real-time daily dose of particle alveolar deposited surface area. •Spirometry, skin prick and exhaled Nitric Oxide tests were performed. •Negative link was found between changes in pulmonary functions and individual doses. •A child's lifestyle appeared to have a strong impact on health respiratory outcomes. -- The respiratory health effects of daily airborne particle dose on children through personal monitoring

  7. Effect on thrombus growth and thrombolysis of two types of osmolar contrast media in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Pascucci, C.; Agnelli, G.; Sturk, A.; Hoek, J.; ten Cate, J. Wouter

    1990-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications have been reported after diagnostic or interventional radiological procedures. However, contrast media inhibit platelet function and blood coagulation in vitro. To investigate these characteristics in vivo, we determined the effect of nonionic and ionic low osmolar

  8. Low-dose effects hypothesis and observations on NPP personal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, R.; Acheva, A.; Boteva, R.; Chobanova, N.; Djounova, J.; Gyuleva, I.; Ivanova, K.; Kurchatova, G.; Milchev, A.; Negoicheva, K.; Nikolov, V.; Panova, D.; Pejankov, I.; Rupova, I.; Stankova, K.; Zacharieva, E. [Radiobiology Department, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    In the modern world the use of various sources of ionizing radiation is nearly ubiquitous. They have numerous applications in industry, medicine, science, agriculture, etc. Radiation doses to workers nevertheless are commensurable to the natural background exposure. Published data on the health effects of occupational radiation exposure are often contradictory. Addressing the issue of „negative” (bystander effects, genomic instability) and „positive” (adaptive response, radiation hormesis) effects of low doses is important and has a significant social and economic impact. In this paper we summarize the results of our extensive monitoring of nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. We believe it is a cohort suitable for analysis of health effects at low doses, because of their good medical and dosimetric control. Our results rather support the idea of absence of adverse health effects in NPP workers. (author)

  9. Effective dose calculation in CT using high sensitivity TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To determine the effective dose for common paediatric CT examinations using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) mea surements. High sensitivity TLD chips (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-IOOH, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) were calibrated on a linac at an energy of 6 MY. A calibration was also performed on a superricial X-ray unit at a kilovoltage energy to validate the megavoltage cali bration for the purpose of measuring doses in the diagnostic energy range. The dose variation across large organs was assessed and a methodology for TLD placement in a 10 year old anthropomorphic phantom developed. Effective dose was calculated from the TLD measured absorbed doses for typical CT examinations after correcting for the TLD energy response and taking into account differences in the mass energy absorption coefficients for different tissues and organs. Results Using new tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 103, the effective dose for a CT brain examination on a 10 year old was 1.6 millisieverts (mSv), 4.9 mSv for a CT chest exa ination and 4.7 mSv for a CT abdomen/pelvis examination. These values are lower for the CT brain examination, higher for the CT chest examination and approximately the same for the CT abdomen/ pelvis examination when compared with effective doses calculated using ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors. Conclusions High sensitivity TLDs calibrated with a radiotherapy linac are useful for measuring dose in the diagnostic energy range and overcome limitations of output reproducibility and uniformity asso ciated with traditional TLD calibration on CT scanners or beam quality matched diagnostic X-ray units.

  10. A review of in vitro dose-effect relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolphin, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    One of the principal reasons for investigating the relationship between absorbed dose and the number of chromosome aberrations per cell in lymphocytes taken from samples of human peripheral blood is to obtain a calibration curve for biological dosimetry. Factors affecting the radiation-induced aberration yield in vitro of T lymphocytes are reviewed under the following heads: temperature, oxygen effect, inter-mitotic death, mitotic delay, dose rate background of aberrations in normal humans, mathematical representation. (U.K.)

  11. Simulation experiment on total ionization dose effects of linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Benqi; Zhang Yong; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    We carry out the ionization radiation experiment of linear CCDs operated in unbiased, biased, biased and driven mode respectively by Co-60 γ source with our self-designed test system, and offline test the Dark signal and Saturation voltage and SNR varied with total dose for TCD132D, and get some valuable results. On the basis of above work, we set forth a primary experiment approaches to simulate the total dose radiation effects of charge coupled devices. (authors)

  12. The effects of various doses of ovaprim on reproductive performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artificial spawning of two African Catfish species viz: C. gariepinus and H. longifilis of 0.18 – 0.64kg and 0.53 – 1.63 kg respectively were carried out using various doses of Ovaprim with carp pituitary extract (C.P.E.) as the control. Oocyte maturation and ovulation were successfully effected with Ovaprim doses of 0.2, 0.25, ...

  13. The effect of dosing regimen on the pharmacokinetics of risedronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David Y; Heise, Mark A; Pallone, Karen A; Clay, Marian E; Nesbitt, John D; Russell, Darrell A; Melson, Chad W

    1999-01-01

    Aims To examine the effect of timing of a risedronate dose relative to food intake on the rate and extent of risedronate absorption following single-dose, oral administration to healthy male and female volunteers. Methods A single-dose, randomized, parallel study design was conducted with volunteers assigned to four treatment groups (31 or 32 subjects per group, 127 subjects total). Each subject was orally administered 30 mg risedronate. Group 1 was fasted for 10 h prior to and 4 h after dosing (fasted group); Groups 2 and 3 were fasted for 10 h and were dosed 1 and 0.5 h, respectively, before a high-fat breakfast; and Group 4 was dosed 2 h after a standard dinner. Blood and urine samples were collected for 168 h after dosing. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by simultaneous analysis of risedronate serum concentration and urinary excretion rate-time data. Results Extent of risedronate absorption (AUC and Ae) was comparable (P = 0.4) in subjects dosed 2 h after dinner and 0.5 h before breakfast; however, a significantly greater extent of absorption occurred when risedronate was given 1 or 4 h prior to a meal (1.4- to 2.3-fold greater). Administration 0.5, 1, or 4 h prior to a meal resulted in a significantly greater rate of absorption (Cmax 2.8-, 3.5-, and 4.1-fold greater, respectively) when compared with 2 h after dinner. Conclusions The comparable extent of risedronate absorption when administered either 0.5–1 h before breakfast or 2 h after an evening meal support previous clinical studies where risedronate was found to have similar effectiveness using these dosing regimens. This flexibility in the timing of risedronate administration may provide patients an alternative means to achieve the desired efficacy while maintaining their normal daily routine. PMID:10583024

  14. Optimizing dose and administration regimen of a high-relaxivity contrast agent for myocardial MRI late gadolinium enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Papini, Giacomo D.E. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Milan (Italy); IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Giacomazzi, Francesca [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unit of Cardiac Surgery, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Di Donato, Marisa [University of Florence, Department of Critical Care Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.sardanelli@unimi.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Milan (Italy); IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Via Morandi 30, 20097 San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Objectives: To investigate the time-course of late gadolinium enhancement of infarcted myocardium using gadobenate dimeglumine at different dosages and administration regimens. Materials and methods: After institutional review board approval and informed consent, we studied 13 patients (aged 63 {+-} 11 years) with chronic myocardial infarction. They underwent two gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR examinations (interval 24-48 h) using short-axis inversion-recovery gradient-echo sequences, with the following two different protocols, in randomized order: 0.05 mmol/kg and imaging at the 2.5th, 5th, 7.5th and 10th minute plus 0.05 mmol/kg and imaging at the 12.5th, 15th, 17.5th and 20th minute; the same as before but using 0.1 mmol/kg for both contrast injections. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) between infarcted myocardium, non-infarcted myocardium and left ventricle cavity were calculated for each time-point (2.5-min steps). Friedman ANOVA was used for comparing the CNR time-course; Wilcoxon test for comparing CNR at the 10th and the 20th minute. Results: The CNR between infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium obtained at the 20th minute with 0.05 plus 0.05 mmol/kg resulted significantly higher than that obtained at the 10th minute with 0.05 mmol/kg (P = 0.033) while not significantly different from that obtained at the 10th (0.1 mm/kg) or at the 20th minute with 0.1 plus 0.1 mmol/kg. The CNR between infarcted myocardium and the left ventricle cavity obtained at the 20th minute with 0.05 plus 0.05 mmol/kg resulted significantly higher than all other measured values (P {<=} 0.017). Conclusion: Using gadobenate dimeglumine, 0.05 plus 0.05 mmol/kg allows for a higher CNR between infarcted myocardium and the left ventricle cavity allowing for reliable assessment of the sub-endocardial infarctions.

  15. Radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudan: CT dose, organ and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Khamis, H.M.; Ombada, T.H.; Alzimami, K.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudanese hospitals. Doses were determined from CT acquisition parameters using CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated for three patient ages (0-1, 1-5 and 5-10 y) and two common procedures (head and abdomen). For children aged 0-1 y, volume CT air kerma index (C vol ), air Kerma-length product and effective dose (E) values were 19.1 mGy, 265 mGy.cm and 3.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and those at abdominal CT were 8.8 mGy, 242 mGy.cm and 7.7 mSv, respectively. Those for children aged 1-5 y were 22.5 mGy, 305 mGy.cm and 1.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and 12.6 mGy, 317 mGy.cm, and 5.1 mSv, respectively, at abdominal CT. Dose values and variations were comparable with those reported in the literature. Organ equivalent doses vary from 7.5 to 11.6 mSv for testes, from 9.0 to 10.0 mSv for ovaries and from 11.1 to 14.3 mSv for uterus in abdominal CT. The results are useful for dose optimisation and derivation of national diagnostic reference levels. (authors)

  16. Low dose effects detected by micronucleus assay in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Bojtor, I.; Kubasova, T.; Horvath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low doses of X-rays between 0.01 and 1 Gy were studied on whole blood samples of various individuals using the cytokinesis-blocked lymphocyte micronucleus assay as an endpoint. The adaptive response could be induced in G 0 cells by 0.01 Gy followed by 1 Gy challenging dose within a time period of 8 hours, in vitro. The probability distribution of micronucleus increments in those samples which had received very low doses in the range 0.01-0.05 Gy proved to be of asymmetrical type (i.e. lognormal) -very likely to the same shape which has been verified for unirradiated (control) population - while the variable turned to be normally distributed at or above 1 Gy. Profound changes have been experienced in the main characteristics of the linear dose - response relationship and in regression parameters, as well, when successively lessened dose ranges were studied toward 0.01 Gy. In the range below ∼ 0.2 Gy the response were found to be unrelated to the absorbed dose. These findings suggest that in (very) low dose range a higher attention should be needed to biological parameters like repair, protective mechanisms and antioxidant capacities, rather than to the absorbed radiation energy only. (author)

  17. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  18. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The recent introduction of digital tomosynthesis imaging into routine clinical use has enabled the acquisition of volumetric patient data within a standard radiographic examination. Tomosynthesis requires the acquisition of multiple projection views, requiring additional dose compared to a standard projection examination. Knowledge of the effective dose is needed to make an appropriate decision between standard projection, tomosynthesis, and CT for thoracic x-ray examinations. In this article, the effective dose to the patient of chest tomosynthesis is calculated and compared to a standard radiographic examination and to values published for thoracic CT. Methods: Radiographic technique data for posterior-anterior (PA) and left lateral (LAT) radiographic chest examinations of medium-sized adults was obtained from clinical sites. From these data, the average incident air kerma for the standard views was determined. A commercially available tomosynthesis system was used to define the acquisition technique and geometry for each projection view. Using Monte Carlo techniques, the effective dose of the PA, LAT, and each tomosynthesis projection view was calculated. The effective dose for all projections of the tomosynthesis sweep was summed and compared to the calculated PA and LAT values and to the published values for thoracic CT. Results: The average incident air kerma for the PA and left lateral clinical radiographic examinations were found to be 0.10 and 0.40 mGy, respectively. The effective dose for the PA view of a patient of the size of an average adult male was determined to be 0.017 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.018 mSv (ICRP 103)]. For the left lateral view of the same sized patient, the effective dose was determined to be 0.039 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.050 mSv (ICRP 103)]. The cumulative mA s for a tomosynthesis examination is recommended to be ten times the mA s of the PA image. With this technique, the effective dose for an average tomosynthesis examination was

  19. Dose-effect relationships for the US radium dial painters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Dose-response data are presented from a large percentage of the US workers who were exposed to radium through the painting of luminous dials. The data in this paper are only from females, because very few males worked in this occupation. Log-normal analyses were done for radium-induced bone sarcomas and head carcinomas after the populations of the respective doses were first determined to be log-normally distributed. These populations included luminisers who expressed no radium-related cancerous condition. In this study of the female radium luminisers, the most important data concerning radiation protection are probably from workers who were exposed to radium but showed no cancer incidence. A total of 1391 subjects with average measured skeletal doses below 10 Gy are in this category. A primary purpose is to illustrate the strong case that 226,228 Ra is representative of those radionuclides that exemplify in humans a 'threshold' dose, a dose below which there has been no observed health effects on the exposed individual. Application of a threshold dose for radium deposited in the skeleton does not mean to imply that any other source of skeletal irradiation should be considered to follow a similar pattern. Second, a policy issue that begs for attention is the economic consequence of forcing radiation to appear as a highly toxic insult. It is time to evaluate the data objectively instead of formatting the extrapolation scheme beforehand and forcing the data to fit a preconceived pattern such as linearity through the dose-effect origin. In addition, it is time to re-evaluate (again) variations in background radiation levels throughout the world and to cease being concerned with, and regulating against, miniscule doses for which no biomedical effects on humans have ever been satisfactorily identified or quantified. (author)

  20. Contrast enhancement of focal hepatic lesions in CT: effect of size and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgener, F.A.; Hamlin, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of size and histology on the contrast enhancement of hepatic lesions has been analyzed in this clinical and experimental investigation yielding the following results: (1) The attenuation values of hepatic cysts in patients increase significantly and inversely with their size after contrast enhancement when the cysts measure less than twice the CT-slice thickness. This seems to be caused by partial-volume effect. (2) Experimental tumors of identical sizes and originating from the same cell line can demonstrate different contrast-enhancement patterns. (3) Peak contrast uptake in both experimental and human tumors seems to be inversely related to their size. (4) Compared to liver, contrast washout from experimental and human tumors (presumably the extravascular space) is delayed. The delay in the contrast washout from a tumor seems to correlate with tumor size. These findings suggest that in general, it is not possible to differentiate reliably among various hepatic neoplasms on the basis of their contrast enhancement patterns for the following reasons: (1) Attenuation values of small hepatic neoplasms are distorted by partial volume effect. (2) Tumors of different histologies can demonstrate the same enhancement pattern. (3) Tumors of identical histology and size can demonstrate different enhancement patterns. (4) The enhancement pattern of a tumor changes with growth or size

  1. The effect of contrast intensity and polarity in the achromatic watercolor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Mingolla, Ennio

    2011-03-24

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a filling-in phenomenon in a region demarcated by two thin abutting lines. The perceived chromaticity of the region is similar to that of the interior line. We develop a series of achromatic WCE stimuli to induce lightness changes analogous to the induced chromaticity in the chromatic version of the WCE. We use a variation of the paired-comparison paradigm to quantify the induced lightness of the filled-in regions to regions with real luminance variations. The luminance of the inner line is fixed, while the luminance of the outer line varies across stimuli. Data from seven subjects (five naive) confirm that an achromatic WCE exists. Moreover, outer lines with both high and low luminances can generate a WCE with an inner line of a moderate luminance. All subjects show a single peak of the effect strength for both polarity conditions, which is never at the extreme luminance levels. Most subjects show an inverted U curve for effect strength as a function of the contrast of the outer lines against the background. Results suggest that the contrast difference between the outer line and the inner line affects the existence and the strength of the achromatic WCE in a nonlinear way.

  2. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  3. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been devised to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats, and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines have been reviewed, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to human is discussed

  4. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have devised a method to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, researchers have reviewed some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to humans is discussed

  5. Effect of contrast enhancement and its indication for CT studies in geriatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hideo

    1979-01-01

    Contrast enhancement CT study after drip infusion of 3 ml of 30% Conray for 15 min proved a safe and effective procedure even in geriatric patients with an avarage age of 72.4 years old. Mild untoward effect by contrast agent was observed in 2.5% of cases examined. Contrast study was considered not necessarily to be needed in cases with cerebral infarction showing well defined low density lesion and for evaluation of degree of ventricle enlargement, cerebral atrophy and so forth. On the contrary, contrast infusion study is indispensable in such cases that show mass effect or edema which is frequently observed in fresh cerebral infarction, haemorrhagic infarction, bleeding or tumor. CT studies of the abdomen and thorax were also discussed. (author)

  6. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  7. Effects of developer exhaustion on DFL Contrast FV-58 and Kodak Insight dental films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabiano Pachêco; da Silveira, M M F; Frazão, M A G; de Santana, S T; dos Anjos Pontual, M L

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the DFL Contrast FV-58 F-speed film (DFL Co., Rio de Janerio, Brazil) with the Kodak Insight E/F speed film (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) in fresh and exhausted processing solutions. The parameters studied were the speed, average gradient and latitude. Five samples of each type of film were exposed under standardized conditions over 5 weeks. The films were developed in fresh and progressively exhausted processing solutions. Characteristic curves were constructed from values of optical density and radiation dose and were used to calculate the parameters. An analysis of variance was performed separately for film type and time. DFL Contrast FV-58 film has a speed and average gradient that is significantly higher than Insight film, whereas the values of latitude are lower. Exhausted processing solutions were not significant in the parameters studied. DFL Contrast FV-58 film has stable properties when exhausted manual processing solutions are used and can be recommended for use in dental practice, contributing to dose reduction.

  8. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  9. Review of time-dose effects in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E.; Fischer, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A historical review of conventional fractionation offers little confidence that such treatment is optimal for all tumors. Thus manipulation of time-dose schedules may provide a relatively inexpensive yet potentially useful technique for improving therapeutic results in radiation therapy. Consideration of basic radiobiological principles and animal model data illustrates the complex and heterogeneous nature of normal tissue and tumor response to time-dose effects and supports the hypothesis that better time-dose prescriptions can be found in clinical practice. The number of possible time-dose prescriptions is very large, and a review of the clinical trials using nonconventional fractionation demonstrates that the sampled portion of the total three-dimensional space of time, fraction number, and dose has been very small. Only carefully designed clinical trials can establish the therapeutic advantage of a new treatment schedule, and methods for selecting the most promising schedules are discussed. The use of simple data reduction formulas for time-dose effects should be discarded since they ignore the very complexity and heterogeneity of tissues and tumors which may form the basis of improved clinical results

  10. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of Silicon. We obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, we study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates.

  12. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  13. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The authors combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of silicon. They obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, the authors study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates

  14. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  15. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  16. Epidemiology and effects on health of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Artalejo, F.; Andres Manzano, B. de; Rel Calero, J. del

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the concept and aims of epidemiology, its methods and contribution to the knowledge of the effects of low ionizing radiation doses on health. The advantages of epidemiological studies for knowing the consequences of living near nuclear facilities and the effects of occupational exposure to radiations are also described. (Author) 43 refs

  17. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT DOSES OF NPK FERTILIZER ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECT OF DIFFERENT DOSES OF NPK FERTILIZER ON THE. INFECTION COEFFICIENT OF RICE (Orysa sativa L.) .... 2014) and the effect of plants extracts on rice seed fungi (Nguefack et al., 2013). Several authors work on ... separated by border rows of 1m wide. Four varieties of rice were used for this study. (NERICA ...

  18. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-M.; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD 5 dose of sarin (42 μg/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD 5 of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD 5 of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD 5 sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD 5 sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 and 0.5 x LD 5 doses of sarin failed to

  19. Estimating effective doses to children from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heron, J.C.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Assessing doses to patients in diagnostic radiology is an integral part of implementing optimisation of radiation protection. Sources of normalised data are available for estimating doses to adults undergoing CT examinations, but for children this is not the case. This paper describes a simple method for estimating effective doses arising from paediatric CT examinations. First the effective dose to an adult is calculated, having anatomically matched the scanned regions of the child and the adult and also matched the irradiation conditions. A conversion factor is then applied to the adult effective dose, based on the region of the body being scanned - head, upper or lower trunk. This conversion factor is the child-to-adult ratio of the ratios of effective dose per entrance air kerma (in the absence of the patient) at the FAD. The values of these conversion factors were calculated by deriving effective dose per entrance air kerma at the FAD for new-born, 1, 5, 10, 15 and adult phantoms using four projections (AP, PA, left and right laterals) over a range of beam qualities and FADs.The program PCXMC was used for this purpose. Results to date suggest that the conversion factors to give effective doses for children undergoing CT examinations of the upper trunk are approximately 1.3, 1.2, 1.15, 1.1 and 1.05 for ages 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years respectively; CT of the lower trunk - 1.4, 1.3, 1.2, 1.2, 1.1; and CT of the head - 2.3, 2.0, 1.5, 1.3, 1.1. The dependence of these factors on beam quality (HVL from 4 to 10 mm Al) is less than 10%, with harder beams resulting in slightly smaller conversion factors. Dependence on FAD is also less than 10%. Major sources of uncertainties in the conversion factors include matching anatomical regions across the phantoms, and the presence of beam divergence in the z-direction when deriving the factors. The method described provides a simple means of estimating effective doses arising from paediatric CT examinations with

  20. Cost-effectiveness of reduction of off-site dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, J.J.; Macphee, R.; Arbeau, N.; Miskin, J.; Scott, C.K.; Winters, E.

    1988-03-01

    Since the early 1970's, nuclear power plants have been designed and operated with a target of not releasing more than one percent of the licensed limits (derived emission limits) in liquid and gaseous effluents. The AECB initiated this study of the cost-effectiveness of the reduction of off-site doses as part of a review to determine if further measures to reduce off-site doses might be reasonably achievable. Atlantic Nuclear has estimated the cost of existing technology options that can be applied for a further reduction of radioactive effluents from future CANDU nuclear power plants. Detritiation, filtration, ion exchange and evaporation are included in the assessment. The costs are presented in 1987 Canadian dollars, and include capital and operating costs for a reference 50 year plant life. Darlington NGS and Point Lepreau NGS are the reference nuclear power plant types and locations. The effect resulting from the hypothetical application of each technology has been calculated as the resulting reduction in world collective radiation dose detriment. The CSA N288.1 procedure was used for local pathway analysis and the global dispersion model developed by the NEA (OECD) group of experts was used for dose calculations. The reduction in the 'collective effective dose equivalent commitment' was assumed to exist for 10,000 years, the expected life-span of solid waste repositories. No attempt was made to model world population dynamics. The collective dose reductions were calculated for a nominal world population of 10 billion persons. The estimated cost and effect of applying the technology options are summarized in a tabular form for input to further consideration of 'reasonably achievable off-site dose levels'

  1. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  2. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted of lectu...

  3. The diagnostic effectiveness of contrast media in the excretory urography in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velesova, M.; Ledecky, V.

    2005-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted to investigate the use of four different positive contrast media, Omnipaque (Nycomed Imaging As.), Optiray (Maliincrodt Medical GmbH), Ultravist (Schering AG), and Urografin (Schering AG) in normograde excretory urography. Investigations were carried out on thirteen dogs. Each group of dogs was administered a different contrast medium. Radiographs were obtained immediately after the administration of contrast media and after a lapse of 5, 10 and 15 minutes. The effectiveness of the application was evaluated by assessing the radiographs of abdominal cavities in ventro-dorsal and latero-lateral positions. None of the dogs showed pronounced side effect after the application of contrast media. Ectopic ureter was diagnosed in three and a prostate cyst in one of the patients. Our results showed that Omnipaque and Ultravist were the contrast agents most suitable for the examination of the urinary apparatus by intravenous contrast excretory urography. Their advantage is that visualisation of the kidneys and ureters achieved by these media are sufficiently long and contrastive

  4. Can contrast effects regulate emotions? A follow-up study of vital loss decisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    Full Text Available Although many studies focus on the how contrast effects can impact cognitive evaluations, the question of whether emotions are regulated by such contrast effects is still the subject of considerable debate, especially in the study of loss-related decisions. To address this gap in the literature, we designed three decision making loss conditions: (i both losses are trivial (TT, (ii one loss is trivial and the other loss is vital (TV, or (iii one loss is trivial and the other loss is routine (TR. In study 1, which compared the difference between the negative emotion ratings in TT and TV, we found that negative emotions were affected by the contrast effects. In study 2, which compared the difference between the importance of trivial options in TT and TV, we found that the contrast effects differentially changed the importance of trivial options in the two conditions, which in turn down-regulated negative emotions. In study 3, the impact of decision difficulty was controlled by predetermining the items to be lost. In this study, we found that, when comparing the differences between the negative emotions of losing trivial options in TV and TR, the contrast effects still modulated the loss-related emotions. We concluded that the contrast effects could down-regulate emotions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that contrast effects can alleviate negative affect in loss-related decision making. This study will enrich and extend the literature on emotion regulation theory, and it will provide a new cost-effective mitigation strategy for regulating negative emotions.

  5. Adverse effects in coronary angiography: a comparative study of different temperature contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Peng; Wang Qiulin; Cai Guocai; Li Lu; Jiang Licheng; Yang Zhen; Huang Xiuping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between different temperature contrast medium and the occurrence of adverse effects, including the chest discomfort, the changes of heart rate, ST segment and T wave, the operating time and the used dosage of contrast medium, in performing coronary angiography. Methods: According to the contrast medium temperature used in coronary angiography, the patients were randomly divided into two groups: room temperature group (n=521) and warm temperature group (n=522). The contrast medium used in warm temperature group was bathed in 37 ℃ water for 60 minutes when the coronary angiography was carried out. The T Wave amplitude changes ≥ 0.01 mv, ST segment depression ≥ 0.05 mv, changes in heart rate ≥ 10 times/min were brought into the positive accounting. The occurrence of adverse effects, such as palpitation, chest distress and pectoralgia, the operative time and the used dosage of contrast medium were recorded. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: Statistically significant differences in the changes of heart rate, ST segment deviation, T wave change and operating time existed between the two groups (P<0.05). And the difference in the occurrence of adverse effects between the two groups was also statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: When performing coronary angiography, warming of the contrast medium with water bath is greatly conducive to the prevention of cardiac adverse effects. (authors)

  6. Effects of radiographic contrast media on cellular electrophysiology in the beating heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolpers, H.G.; Baller, D.; Ensink, F.B.M.; Hoeft, A.; Korb, H.; Hellige, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrophysiological effects of intracoronarily administered contrast media have been documented in 12 thoracotomized dogs at the cellular level by use of a modified microelectrode technique. Injections (n = 63) of 4 different contrast media uniformly led to a temporary cellular hyperpolarisation of the resting potential and prolongation of the action potential. Additional experiments with intracoronary injections of several electrolyte concentrations, mainly by a local deficiency of potassium ions and an excess of sodium ions. The significance of the findings for mechanisms underlying ECG-changes and ventricular arrhythmia by radiographic contrasts media will be discussed.

  7. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric coronary computed tomography: assessment of effective dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Calmon, Raphael; Boddaert, Nathalie; Khraiche, Diala; Bonnet, Damien; Raimondi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of different protocols on radiation dose and image quality for paediatric coronary computed tomography (cCT). From January-2012 to June-2014, 140 children who underwent cCT on a 64-slice scanner were included. Two consecutive changes in imaging protocols were performed: 1) the use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR); 2) the optimization of acquisition parameters. Effective dose (ED) was calculated by conversion of the dose-length product. Image quality was assessed as excellent, good or with significant artefacts. Patients were divided in three age groups: 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years. The use of ASIR combined to the adjustment of scan settings allowed a reduction in the median ED of 58 %, 82 % and 85 % in 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years group, respectively (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.1 ± 0.7 mSv, 5.5 ± 1.6 vs 1 ± 1.9 mSv and 5.3 ± 5.0 vs 0.8 ± 2.0 mSv, all p < 0,05). Prospective protocol was used in 51 % of children. The reduction in radiation dose was not associated with reduction in diagnostic image quality as assessed by the frequency of coronary segments with excellent or good image quality (88 %). cCT can be obtained at very low radiation doses in children using ASIR, and prospective acquisition with optimized imaging parameters. (orig.)

  8. Visualization of endolymphatic hydrops in meniere's disease after single-dose intravenous gadolinium-based contrast medium. Timing of optimal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Kawai, Hisashi; Bokura, Kiminori; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Visualization of endolymphatic hydrops (EH) in patients with Meniere's disease (MD) is now possible by heavily T 2 -weighted 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (h T 2 W-3D-FLAIR) obtained 4 hours after intravenous (IV) administration of single dose gadolinium-based contrast medium (GBCM). Although maximum enhancement has been reported 4 hours after contrast administration in healthy volunteers, the timing of optimal enhancement in patients with MD is not reported. We investigated if that optimal timing is earlier or later than 4 hours. We evaluated 10 consecutive patients with suspected MD whom we randomly divided into 2 groups. We obtained h T 2 W-3D-FLAIR before GBCM administration and 10 min, 3.5 hours, and 4 hours after GBCM administration in Group A and before and 10 min, 4 hours, and 4.5 hours after GBCM administration in Group B. We compared signal intensity ratio (SIR) values of the perilymph and pons between 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and between 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B and evaluated grades of EH at 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and at 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B. SIR values did not differ significantly between 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and between 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B. However, SIR values at 4 hours were significantly higher in Group A than Group B. Grades of EH agreed between 3.5 and 4 hours in Group A and between 4 and 4.5 hours in Group B. The optimal timing of contrast enhancement in patients with suspected MD remains unclear, but evaluation of EH may be possible from 3.5 to 4.5 hours after contrast administration. (author)

  9. Immunomodulatory Properties and Molecular Effects in Inflammatory Diseases of Low-Dose X-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rödel, Franz; Frey, Benjamin; Manda, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Guido; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Keilholz, Ludwig; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Gaipl, Udo S.; Rödel, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are the result of complex and pathologically unbalanced multicellular interactions. For decades, low-dose X-irradiation therapy (LD-RT) has been clinically documented to exert an anti-inflammatory effect on benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders. By contrast, experimental studies to confirm the effectiveness and to reveal underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still at their early stages. During the last decade, however, the modulation of a multitude of immunological processes by LD-RT has been explored in vitro and in vivo. These include leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion, adhesion molecule and cytokine/chemokine expression, apoptosis induction, and mononuclear/polymorphonuclear cell metabolism and activity. Interestingly, these mechanisms display comparable dose dependences and dose-effect relationships with a maximum effect in the range between 0.3 and 0.7 Gy, already empirically identified to be most effective in the clinical routine. This review summarizes data and models exploring the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LD-RT that may serve as a prerequisite for further systematic analyses to optimize low-dose irradiation procedures in future clinical practice.

  10. Immunomodulatory Properties and Molecular Effects in Inflammatory Diseases of Low-Dose X-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rödel, Franz [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frey, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Manda, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Guido [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Rostock, Rostock (Germany); Hehlgans, Stephanie [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Keilholz, Ludwig [Department of Radiotherapy, Clinical Center Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum, Hamburg (Germany); Gaipl, Udo S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Rödel, Claus, E-mail: franz.roedel@kgu.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-09-25

    Inflammatory diseases are the result of complex and pathologically unbalanced multicellular interactions. For decades, low-dose X-irradiation therapy (LD-RT) has been clinically documented to exert an anti-inflammatory effect on benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders. By contrast, experimental studies to confirm the effectiveness and to reveal underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still at their early stages. During the last decade, however, the modulation of a multitude of immunological processes by LD-RT has been explored in vitro and in vivo. These include leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion, adhesion molecule and cytokine/chemokine expression, apoptosis induction, and mononuclear/polymorphonuclear cell metabolism and activity. Interestingly, these mechanisms display comparable dose dependences and dose-effect relationships with a maximum effect in the range between 0.3 and 0.7 Gy, already empirically identified to be most effective in the clinical routine. This review summarizes data and models exploring the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LD-RT that may serve as a prerequisite for further systematic analyses to optimize low-dose irradiation procedures in future clinical practice.

  11. Predicted effects of countermeasures on radiation doses from contaminated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Nielsen, S.P.; Nielsen, F.

    1993-02-01

    Quantitative assessments of the effects on radiation-dose reductions from nine typical countermeasures against accidental fod contamination have been carried out with dynamic radioecological models. The foodstuffs are assumed to be contaminated with iodine-131, caesium-134 and caesium-137 after a release of radioactive materials from the Ringhals nuclear power station in Sweden resulting from a hypothetical core melt accident. The release of activity of these radionuclides is assumed at 0.07% of the core inventory of the unit 1 reactor (1600 TBq of I-131, 220 TBq of Cs-134 and 190 TBq of Cs-137). Radiation doses are estimated for the 55,000 affected inhabitants along the south-eastern coast of Sweden eating locally produced foodstuffs. The average effective dose equivalent to an individual in the critical group is predicted to be 2.9 mSv from food consumption contaminated with I-131. An accident occurring during winter is estimated to cause average individual doses of 0.32 mSv from Cs-134 and 0.47 mSv from Cs-137, and 9.4 mSv and 6.8 mSv from Cs-134 and Cs-137, respectively, for an accident occurring during summer. Doses from the intake of radioiodine may be reduced by up to a factor of 60 by rejecting contaminated food for 30 days. For the doses from radiocaesium, the largest effect is found form deep ploughing which may reduce the dose by up to a factor of 80. (au) (12 tabs., 6 ills., 19 refs.)

  12. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  13. Effective dose measurement at workplaces within an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagrasa, C.; Darreon, J.; Martin-Burtat, N.; Clairand, I.; Colin, J.; Fontbonne, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the IRSN (France) is developing an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose for photon fields at workplaces. This anthropomorphic phantom will be equipped with small active detectors located inside at chosen positions. The aim of this paper is to present the development of these new detectors showing the results of the characterisation of the prototype under metrological conditions. New evaluations of the effective dose for standard and non-homogenous irradiation configurations taking into account the real constraints of the project have been done validating the feasibility and utility of the instrument. (authors)

  14. Pulsed total dose damage effect experimental study on EPROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yinhong; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Keying; Wang Yuanming; He Baoping

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, memory radiation effect study mainly focus on functionality measurement. Measurable parameters is few in china. According to the present situation, threshold voltage testing method was presented on floating gate EPROM memory. Experimental study of pulsed total dose effect on EPROM threshold voltage was carried out. Damage mechanism was analysed The experiment results showed that memory cell threshold voltage negative shift was caused by pulsed total dose, memory cell threshold voltage shift is basically coincident under steady bias supply and no bias supply. (authors)

  15. Effective dose to patient during cardiac interventional procedures (Prague workplaces)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stisova, V.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess effective dose to a patient during cardiac procedures, such as coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA). Measurements were performed on 185 patients in four catheterisation laboratories in three hospitals in Prague using the dose area product (DAP) meter. Calculations of surface and effective dose were performed with Monte-Carlo-based program PCXMC. The mean DAP value per procedure determined in all workplaces ranged between 25.0 and 54.5 Gy cm 2 for CA and 43.0-104.5 Gy cm 2 for PTCA. In three cases, the surface dose exceeded the 2 Gy level for occurrence of transient erythema. The mean effective dose per procedure in an workplaces was determined to be in the range of 2.7-8.8 mSv for CA and 5.7-15.3 mSv for CA + PTCA combined. The results presented are comparable with those published by other authors. (authors)

  16. Cocaine and Pavlovian fear conditioning: dose-effect analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Suzanne C; Fay, Jonathan; Sage, Jennifer R; Anagnostaras, Stephan G

    2007-01-25

    Emerging evidence suggests that cocaine and other drugs of abuse can interfere with many aspects of cognitive functioning. The authors examined the effects of 0.1-15mg/kg of cocaine on Pavlovian contextual and cued fear conditioning in mice. As expected, pre-training cocaine dose-dependently produced hyperactivity and disrupted freezing. Surprisingly, when the mice were tested off-drug later, the group pre-treated with a moderate dose of cocaine (15mg/kg) displayed significantly less contextual and cued memory, compared to saline control animals. Conversely, mice pre-treated with a very low dose of cocaine (0.1mg/kg) showed significantly enhanced fear memory for both context and tone, compared to controls. These results were not due to cocaine's anesthetic effects, as shock reactivity was unaffected by cocaine. The data suggest that despite cocaine's reputation as a performance-enhancing and anxiogenic drug, this effect is seen only at very low doses, whereas a moderate dose disrupts hippocampus and amygdala-dependent fear conditioning.

  17. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  18. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in μSv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  20. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  1. Red blood cell labeling with technetium-99m. Effect of radiopaque contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, J.; Chervu, L.R.; Bernstein, R.G.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiographic contrast agents have been reported in the literature to interfere significantly with red blood cell (RBC) labeling in vivo by Tc-99m. Moreover, in the presence of contrast agents, red cells have been known to undergo significant morphologic changes. These observations led to the current RBC labeling study in patients (N = 25) undergoing procedures with the administration of contrast media. Before and after contrast administration, blood samples were drawn from each patient into vacutainer tubes containing heparin and RBC labeling was performed using 1-ml aliquots of these samples following the Brookhaven National Laboratory protocol. The differences in average percentage labeling yield with and without contrast media were not significant. In vivo labeling in hypertensive rats with administration of contrast media up to 600 mg likewise consistently gave high labeling yields at all concentrations. Purported alterations in cell labeling attributed to contrast agents are not reflected in these studies, and other pathophysiologic factors need to be identified to substantiate the previous reports. In vitro study offers a potentially useful and simple method to delineate effects of various agents on cell labeling

  2. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L.

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 192 Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for lung, 0.9x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for oesophagus and 0.48x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for colon, 7.8x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for stomach and 1.7x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 , whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 ; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  3. Time improvement of photoelectric effect calculation for absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J M; Wainschenker, R S; Doorn, J H; Caselli, E E

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy is a very useful tool in cancer treatment. It is very important to determine absorbed dose in human tissue to accomplish an effective treatment. A mathematical model based on affected areas is the most suitable tool to estimate the absorbed dose. Lately, Monte Carlo based techniques have become the most reliable, but they are time expensive. Absorbed dose calculating programs using different strategies have to choose between estimation quality and calculating time. This paper describes an optimized method for the photoelectron polar angle calculation in photoelectric effect, which is significant to estimate deposited energy in human tissue. In the case studies, time cost reduction nearly reached 86%, meaning that the time needed to do the calculation is approximately 1/7 th of the non optimized approach. This has been done keeping precision invariant

  4. The Effect of Aquaplast on Surface Dose of Photon Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoon Sik

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effect on surface dose due to Aquaplast used for immobilizing the patients with head and neck cancers in photon beam radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : To assess surface and buildup region dose for 6MV X-ray from linear accelerator(Siemens Mevatron 6740), we measured percent ionization value with the Markus chamber model 30-329 manufactured by PTW Frieburg and Capintec electrometer, model WK92. For measurement of surface ionization value, the chamber was embedded in 25 X 25 X 3 cm 3 acrylic phantom and set on 25 X 25 X 5 cm 3 , polystyrene phantom to allow adequate scattering. The measurements of percent depth ionization were made by placing the polystyrene layers of appropriate thickness over the chamber. The measurements were taken at 10 cm SSD for 5 X 5 cm 2 , 10 X 10 cm 2 , and 15 X 15 cm 2 field sizes, respectively. Placing the layer of Aquaplast over the chamber, the same procedures were repeated. We evaluated two types o Aquaplast: 1.6mm layer of original Aquaplast(manufactured by WFR Aquaplast Corp.) and transformed Aquaplast similar to moulded one for immobilizing the patients practically. We also measured surface ionization values with blocking tray in presence or absence of transformed Aquaplast. In calculating percent depth dose, we used the formula suggested by Gerbi and khan to correct over response of the Markus chamber. Results : The surface doses for open fields of 5 X 5 cm 2 , 10 X 10 cm 2 , 15 X 15 cm 2 were 7.9%, 13.6%, and 18.7% respectively. He original Aquaplast increased the surface doses upto 38.4%, 43.6% and 47.4% respectively. There were little differences in percent depth dose values beyond the depth of Dmax. Increasing field size, the blocking tray caused increase of the surface dose by 0.2%, 1.7%, 3.0% without Aquaplast, 0.2%, 1.9%, 3.7% with transformed Aquaplast, respectively. Conclusion : The original and transformed Aquaplast increased the surface dose moderately. The percent depth doses beyond Dmax

  5. Medical effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ionising radiation is genotoxic and causes biological effects via a chain of events involving DNA strand breaks and 'multiply damaged sites' as critical lesions that lead to cell death. The acute health effects of radiation after doses of a few gray, are due to such cell death and consequent disturbance of cell population kinetics. Because of cellular repair and repopulation there is generally a threshold dose of about 1-2 Gy below which such severe effects are not inducible. However, more subtle, sub-lethal mutational DNA damage in somatic cells of the body and the germ cells of the ovary and testis cause the two major low dose health risks -cancer induction and genetic (heritable) effects. This paper discusses some of the epidemiological and experimental evidence regarding radiation genetic effects, carcinogenesis and CNS teratogenesis. It concludes that current risk estimates imply that about 3% of all cancers; 1% of genetic disorders and between 0% and 0.3% of severe mental subnormality in the UK is attributable to the ubiquitous background radiation. The health risks associated with the medical uses of radiation are smaller, whilst the nuclear industry causes perhaps 1% of the health detriment attributable to background doses. (author)

  6. Estimation of effective dose for children in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Sarycheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to the estimation of effective dose for children undergoing interventional cardiology examinations. The conversion coefficients (CC from directly measured dose area product (DAP value to effective dose (ED were calculated within the approved effective dose assessment methodology (Guidelines 2.6.1. 2944-11. The CC, Ed K , [mSv / (Gy • cm2] for newborn infants and children of 1, 5, 10 and 15 years old (main(range were calculated as 2.5 (1.8-3.2; 1.1 (0.8-1.3; 0.6 (0.4-0.7; 0.4 (0.3-0.5; and 0,22 (0,18-0,30 respectively. A special Finnish computer program PCXMC 2.0 was used for calculating the dose CC. The series of calculations were made for different values of the physical and geometrical parameters based on their real-existing range of values. The value of CC from DAP to ED were calculated for all pediatric age groups. This work included 153 pediatric interventional studies carried out in two hospitals of the city of St. Petersburg for the period of one year from the summer of 2015. The dose CC dependency from the patient’s age and parameters of the examinations were under the study. The dependence from the beam quality (filtration and tube voltage and age of the patient were found. The younger is the patient, stronger is the filtration and higher is the voltage, the higher is the CC value. The CC in the younger (newborn and older (15 years age groups are different by the factor of 10. It was shown that the changes of the geometric parameters (in the scope of their real existing range have small effect on the value of the effective dose, not exceed 30-50% allowable for radiation protection purpose. The real values of effective doses of children undergoing cardiac interventions were estimated. In severe cases, the values of ED can reach several tens of mSv.

  7. Effective doses to patients undergoing thoracic computed tomography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, W; Scalzetti, E M; Roskopf, M

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how x-ray technique factors and effective doses vary with patient size in chest CT examinations. Technique factors (kVp, mAs, section thickness, and number of sections) were recorded for 44 patients who underwent a routine chest CT examination. Patient weights were recorded together with dimensions and mean Hounsfield unit values obtained from representative axial CT images. The total mass of directly irradiated patient was modeled as a cylinder of water to permit the computation of the mean patient dose and total energy imparted for each chest CT examination. Computed values of energy imparted during the chest CT examination were converted into effective doses taking into account the patient weight. Patient weights ranged from 4.5 to 127 kg, and half the patients in this study were children under 18 years of age. All scans were performed at 120 kVp with a 1 s scan time. The selected tube current showed no correlation with patient weight (r2=0.06), indicating that chest CT examination protocols do not take into account for the size of the patient. Energy imparted increased with increasing patient weight, with values of energy imparted for 10 and 70 kg patients being 85 and 310 mJ, respectively. The effective dose showed an inverse correlation with increasing patient weight, however, with values of effective dose for 10 and 70 kg patients being 9.6 and 5.4 mSv, respectively. Current CT technique factors (kVp/mAs) used to perform chest CT examinations result in relatively high patient doses, which could be reduced by adjusting technique factors based on patient size.

  8. The estimation of occupational effective dose in diagnostic radiology with two dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklason, L.T.; Marx, M.V.; Chan, Heang-Ping

    1994-01-01

    Annual effective dose limits have been proposed by national and international radiation protection committees. Radiation protection agencies must decide upon a method of converting the radiation dose measured from dosimeters to an estimate of effective dose. A proposed method for the estimation of effective dose from the radiation dose to two dosimeters is presented. Correction factors are applied to an over-apron collar dose and an under-apron dose to estimate the effective dose. Correction factors are suggested for two cases, both with and without a thyroid shield. Effective dose may be estimated by the under-apron dose plus 6% of the over-collar dose if a thyroid shield is not worn or plus 2% of the over-collar dose if a thyroid shield is worn. This method provides a reasonable estimate of effective dose that is independent of lead apron thickness and accounts for the use of a thyroid shield. 17 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Relation between dose of bendrofluazide, antihypertensive effect, and adverse biochemical effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, J E; Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the relevant dose of bendrofluazide for treating mild to moderate hypertension. DESIGN--Double blind parallel group trial of patients who were given placebo for six weeks and then randomly allocated to various doses of bendrofluazide (1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg daily) or place...... of bendrofluazide to treat mild to moderate hypertension is 1.25-2.5 mg a day. Higher doses caused more pronounced adverse biochemical effects including adverse lipid effects. Previous trials with bendrofluazide have used too high doses....... relations between dose and effect were shown for potassium, urate, glucose, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations. The 1.25 mg dose increased only urate concentrations, whereas the 10 mg dose affected all the above biochemical variables. CONCLUSION--The relevant range of doses...

  10. Late effects of various dose-fractionation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.; Notter, G.

    1983-01-01

    These clinical investigations of various dose-fractionation regimens on human skin show that: The late reactions cannot be predicted from the early reactions; The dose-response curves for late reactions are much steeper than for early reactions; Equivalent doses for various fractionation schedules concerning late effects can be calculated by means of a corrected CRE (NSD) formula; the correction must be considered preliminary because further follow-up is needed. A clinical fractionation study of this type requires: Extremely careful dosimetry; Study of the same anatomical region; Very long follow-up; Studies at different effect levels; Skin reaction is the only end point we have studied systematically for different fractionation regimens. Experience with the CRE formula as a model for calculating isoeffect doses for different fractionation schedules in routine clinical use can be summarized as follows: The CRE formula has been used prospectively since 1972 in all patients; CRE-equivalent weekly doses to 5 x 2.0 Gy per week has been used. (Although the fractionation schedule is changed, the overall treatment time is still the same); The CRE range was 18 to 21 for curative radiotherapy on carcinomas; No irradiation was applied during pronounced acute reactions. No unexpected complications have been observed under these conditions

  11. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  12. The effects of luminance contrast, colour combinations, font, and search time on brand icon legibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ya-Hsien

    2017-11-01

    This study explored and identified the effects of luminance contrast, colour combinations, font, and search time on brand icon legibility. A total of 108 participants took part in the experiment. As designed, legibility was measured as a function of the following independent variables: four levels of luminance contrast, sixteen target/background colour combinations, two fonts, and three search times. The results showed that a luminance contrast of 18:1 provided readers with the best legibility. Yellow on black, yellow on blue, and white on blue were the three most legible colour combinations. One of this study's unique findings was that colour combinations may play an even more important role than luminance contrast in the overall legibility of brand icon design. The 12-s search time corresponded with the highest legibility. Arial font was more legible than Times New Roman. These results provide some guidance for brand icon and product advertisement design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antithrombotic effect of repeated doses of the ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antithrombotic effect of repeated doses of the ethanolic extract of local olive ( Olea europaea L.) leaves in rabbits. ... The incidence of thromboembolic diseases is increasing, and they are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Mediterranean diet is known for its high content of olive products, especially olive oil, ...

  14. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    variety (V), exposure time (T) and dose (D) on the tolerance of C. maculatus to both plant materials. The effect ... laboratories and institutions of higher education in several West .... Each value is the mean±S.E of 20 cowpea seeds. Means ...

  15. effect of population density and dose of nitrogen and potassium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Hussein

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... while, nitrogen consumption increased dry weight resulting in increased plant yield (Hatami et al., 2009). Vorob (2000) ... of this study was to investigate the effect of plant density and dose of nitrogen and potassium on Green bean Cv. ..... biogeochem. cycle., 2008, 22(1), 1022-1041. [11] Moniruzzaman M ...

  16. Effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron on the ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB_YOMI

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... eggs (Perveen, 2000a). The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron (LD10or LD30) on the amounts of ovarianprotein, lipid, carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA, and ecdysteroid titres in different developmental stages of S. litura, a major crop pest around the ...