WorldWideScience

Sample records for contrail particles formation

  1. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  2. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

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    Kogan, M.N.; Butkovsky, A.V.; Erofeev, A.I.; Freedlender, O.G.; Makashev, N.K. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  3. Formation, properties and climatic effects of contrails

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    Schumann, U.

    2005-05-15

    Condensation trails (contrails) are aircraft induced cirrus clouds, which may persist and grow to large cirrus cover in ice-supersaturated air, and may cause a warming of the atmosphere. This paper describes the formation, occurrence, properties and climatic effects of contrails. The global cover by lined-shaped contrails and the radiative impact of line-shaped contrails is smaller than assessed in an international assessment in 1999. Contrails trigger contrail cirrus with far larger coverage than observed for line-shaped contrails, but still unknown radiative properties. Some model simulations indicate an impact of particles and particle precursors emitted from aircraft engines on cirrus cloud properties. However, the magnitude of this effect cannot yet be assessed. Contrail formation can be avoided only by flying in sufficiently warm and dry air. The formation of contrail cirrus can be reduced by avoiding flights in ice-supersaturated regions of the atmosphere, e.g. by raising the flight level into the lower-most stratosphere. (orig.)

  4. Contrail ice particle formation in the wakes of airliners - insights from in-situ measurements and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Jeßberger, Philipp; Voigt, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    The role of soot and volatile aerosol in controlling ice particle formation in cirrus clouds is of global importance for climate. In particular, contrail studies may help to better understand the role of various aerosols in ice formation. Recent results suggest that contrails may contribute a large share to the climate impact of aviation. Hence, better knowledge on contrails is needed for developing a sustainable air transport system. So far, contrail models either specify the initial number of ice particles per flight distance or assume that the initial number of ice particles is determined by the number of soot particles emitted. Previous measurements were unable to decide conclusively whether the number of ice particles is directly related to the number of soot particles. Also information on the relative distribution of the mean ice particle concentration in the primary and secondary wakes is missing. Here, we analyze particle concentrations and trace gas mixing ratios, their dilution and their correlations in 2 min old contrails from four airliners of types A319, A340, B737, and A380 under similar meteorological conditions. The measurements were performed with the research aircraft Falcon above northern Germany during the CONCERT campaign in November 2008. The instrumentation and observation methods were described before (Voigt et al., 2010). The number of ice particles in contrails of the four airliners at cruise is determined from the measurements and a dilution model, and compared with estimated soot emissions. Dilution is derived from measured concentrations of NO, NOy, SO2 and HONO. The trace gas concentrations are largest in the primary wake and decrease with altitude in the secondary wake, consistent with emissions and aircraft-dependent dilution. In contrast, ice particle concentrations are slightly larger in the secondary wake than in the primary wake, and significantly larger than expected from dilution and emissions. The total particle concentration

  5. Aircraft measurements on the formation and dilution of contrails

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    Busen, R.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-01

    Different aspects connected with aircraft plumes, vortices, and condensation trails have been investigated experimentally in this project. Results cover the geometrical, physical, and dynamical characterisation as well as insights on chemical composition, chemical reactions, and the influence of sulfur contained in kerosene. The experimental data on cross section and descent speed of contrails agree well with theoretical models of contrail dynamics. The turbulence level inside of contrails is up to two orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding atmosphere, but in old contrails turbulence is not important for dissipating the exhaust gases. A differential water vapor absorption LIDAR was modified for detecting even small scale water vapor distributions connected with cirrus clouds and contrails. Measurements behind aircraft burning fuels with different fuel sulfur contents during the same flight have shown that the onset of contrail formation depends very little on the fuel sulfur content. High fuel sulfur content causes larger numbers of condensation nuclei in young contrails and slightly larger number of ice particles. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  6. The microphysical pathway to contrail formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kärcher, B.; Burkhardt, U.; Bier, A.; Bock, L.; Ford, I. J.

    2015-01-01

    A conceptual framework to predict microphysical and optical properties of contrail particles within a wingspan behind the source aircraft is developed. Results from two decades of contrail observations and numerical simulations are reviewed forming the basis of theoretical model development. The model utilizes cloud theory applied to the dynamics and thermodynamics of jet aircraft exhaust plumes in upper tropospheric conditions. Droplet nuclei include soot particles emitted from aircraft engi...

  7. Influence of propulsion efficiency on contrail formation

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    Schumann, U.

    2000-09-01

    Aircraft cause contrails when flying in an atmosphere colder than a threshold temperature which depends on the overall efficiency {eta} of propulsion of the aircraft/engine combination. Higher {eta} causes contrails at higher ambient temperatures and over a larger range of flight altitudes. The ratio of temperature increase relative to moisture increase in engine plumes is lower for engines with higher {eta}. Thermodynamic arguments are given for this fact and measurements and observations are reported which support the validity of the given criterion. The measurements include contrail observations for identified aircraft flying at ambient temperature and humidity conditions measured with high precision in-situ instruments, measurements of the temperature and humidity increases in an aircraft exhaust plume, and an observation of contrail formation behind two different four-engine jet aircraft with different engines flying wing by wing. The observations show that an altitude range exists in which the aircraft with high efficiency causes contrails while the other aircraft with lower efficiency causes none. Aircraft with more efficient propulsion cause contrails more frequently. The climatic impact depends on the relative importance of increased contrail frequency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions for increased efficiency, and on other parameters, and has not yet been quantified. (author)

  8. Experiments on contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur content

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    Busen, R.; Kuhn, M.; Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Baumgardner, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Borrmann, S. [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Hagen, D.; Whitefield, Ph. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Bureau of Mines; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    A series of both flight tests and ground experiments has been performed to evaluate the role of the sulfur contained in kerosene in condensation trail (contrail) formation processes. The results of the first experiments are compiled briefly. The last SULFUR 4 experiment dealing with the influence of the fuel sulfur content and different appertaining conditions is described in detail. Different sulfur mass fractions lead to different particle size spectra. The number of ice particles in the contrail increases by about a factor of 2 for 3000 ppm instead of 6 ppm sulfur fuel content. (author) 10 refs.

  9. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

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    K. Gierens

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  10. Susceptibility of contrail ice crystal numbers to aircraft soot particle emissions

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    Kärcher, B.; Voigt, C.

    2017-08-01

    We develop an idealized, physically based model describing combined effects of ice nucleation and sublimation on ice crystal number during persistent contrail formation. Our study represents the first effort to predict ice numbers at the point where contrails transition into contrail cirrus—several minutes past formation—by connecting them to aircraft soot particle emissions and atmospheric supersaturation with respect to ice. Results averaged over an observed exponential distribution of ice supersaturation (mean value 15%) indicate that large reductions in soot particle numbers are needed to lower contrail ice crystal numbers significantly for soot emission indices around 1015 (kg fuel)-1, because reductions in nucleated ice number are partially compensated by sublimation losses. Variations in soot particle (-50%) and water vapor (+10%) emission indices at threefold lower soot emissions resulting from biofuel blending cause ice crystal numbers to change by -35% and <5%, respectively. The efficiency of reduction depends on ice supersaturation and the size distribution of nucleated ice crystals in jet exhaust plumes and on atmospheric ice supersaturation, making the latter another key factor in contrail mitigation. We expect our study to have important repercussions for planning airborne measurements targeting contrail formation, designing parameterization schemes for use in large-scale models, reducing uncertainties in predicting contrail cirrus, and mitigating the climate impact of aviation.

  11. Air transport cruise altitude restrictions to minimize contrail formation

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    Williams, V.; Noland, R.B. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Transport Studies; Toumi, R. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2003-09-01

    While quantification of the effects of NO{sub x} and water vapor is still at an early stage there is evidence that contrail formation could make a significant contribution to global warming. This paper builds on previous research that analyzed a policy of restricting air transport cruise altitudes to eliminate contrail formation. Our previous work [Transport Res. D 7(6) (2002) 451] examined altitude restrictions in European airspace and concluded that this could be a beneficial policy for reducing climate change impacts from aviation. Since most of the flights in European airspace are short-haul flights, this paper evaluates the trade-offs between altitude restrictions, fuel burn and journey times for longer haul flights of up to 6000 nm. Our focus is on the North Atlantic and US airspace and we examine potential contrail fraction to determine optimal cruise altitudes for reducing contrail formation. Changes in fuel burn and travel times associated with flight levels of 18,000 and 31,000 ft for different aircraft types are analyzed. We find that, in most cases, CO{sub 2} emission increases would be unlikely to entirely counteract the benefit of possible reductions in contrail formation. For some aircraft types, the percentage increase in emitted CO{sub 2} was found to be strongly dependent on journey length. In general, journey times appear not to be a major issue except for some aircraft types. Our results suggest that reducing aircraft cruise altitudes could be a beneficial policy for mitigating climate change impacts from the aviation sector. This is clearly dependent on aircraft type and the distances traveled, but more importantly on ambient atmospheric conditions which can vary significantly between regions and due to daily variation. This suggests that real time flight planning to minimize contrail formation should be investigated as a possible climate mitigation policy. (author)

  12. A modelling study of the effects of different CCN on contrail formation

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    Gleitsmann, G.; Zellner, R. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    The formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the jet regime of a B747 airliner at cruise has been investigated by modelling calculations using the BOAT model. Both homogeneous condensation of H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-mixtures and heterogeneous deposition of H{sub 2}O on soot surfaces activated by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were taken into account. Whereas the heterogeneous condensation leads to particles with average diameters of about 1.3 {mu}m, the homogeneously condensed H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles are much smaller ({<=} 7 nm) and do not contribute to visible contrail formation. Nevertheless, they contribute to the atmospheric background aerosol. Using different SO{sub 2} emission indices, it is concluded that the contrail onset is essentially independent of this quantity and depends mainly on ambient temperature and soot activation kinetics. (author) 15 refs.

  13. Laboratory and modeling studies on the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the properties of contrail ice particles in the jet regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and contrail-induced cirrus clouds are identified as the most uncertain components in determining aviation impacts on global climate change. Parameters affecting contrail ice particle formation immediately after the engine exit plane (< 5 s in plume age may be critical to ice particle properties used in large-scale models predicting contrail radiative forcing. Despite this, detailed understanding of these parametric effects is still limited. In this paper, we present results from recent laboratory and modeling studies conducted to investigate the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on near-field formation of contrail ice particles and ice particle properties. The Particle Aerosol Laboratory (PAL at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Aerodyne microphysical parcel model for contrail ice particle formation were employed. Our studies show that exhaust water concentration has a significant impact on contrail ice particle formation and properties. When soot particles were introduced, ice particle formation was observed only when exhaust water concentration was above a critical level. When no soot or sulfuric acid was introduced, no ice particle formation was observed, suggesting that ice particle formation from homogeneous nucleation followed by homogeneous freezing of liquid water was unfavorable. Soot particles were found to compete for water vapor condensation, and higher soot concentrations emitted into the chamber resulted in smaller ice particles being formed. Chamber conditions corresponding to higher cruising altitudes were found to favor ice particle formation. The microphysical model captures trends of particle extinction measurements well, but discrepancies between the model and the optical particle counter measurements exist as the model predicts narrower ice particle size distributions and ice particle sizes nearly a factor of two larger than measured. These discrepancies are likely due to particle

  14. Effects of jet/vortex interaction on contrail formation in supersaturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, R.; Nybelen, L.; Picot, J.; Cariolle, D.

    2013-05-01

    The effects of the interaction between a model of aircraft trailing vortex and engine jets on the formation of a contrail in supersaturated ambient air are studied using Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase flows large-eddy simulations. The three-dimensional structure of the contrail, the mean flow properties, and the statistical correlations between ice and water vapor are analyzed for different jet and vortex parameters and different soot particle numbers. The interaction is characterized by the entrainment of the jets by the trailing vortex. In the four-engines case, particles exhausting the outboard jets are exposed to local higher supersaturation due to the temperature drop in the low-pressure vortex core region. The soot particle number affects both the structure and the global characteristics of the contrail. The increase in soot loading results in stronger vapor depletion - which leads to larger ice production - and to smaller ice particles for a given amount of vapor exhaust. The fraction of activated particles decreases with soot loading because of the increased competition for the vapor available for condensation. Of particular interest is the interaction between the jet/vortex turbulence and ice microphysics (activation, condensation, particle size distribution, and optical depth). It is found that the characteristic timescales of mixing and condensation can be of the same order in the jet regime. For the present high ambient supersaturation conditions, the competition between the entrainment of humid ambient air and vapor depletion plays an important role in determining the initial growth of the contrail and the spatial and size distributions of ice particles.

  15. CFD simulation of contrail formation in the near field of a commercial aircraft: Effect of fuel sulfur content

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    J.C. Khou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft contrails may contribute to the global radiative forcing. In this context, the investigation of contrail formation in the near field of an aircraft may be helpful in developing strategies to reduce undesirable impacts. In this study, three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulations of contrails produced by commercial aircraft during cruise flights were performed. A realistic geometry (herein a Boeing 737 was taken into account, including the engine core and bypass flows, which allows several parametrical studies and avoids using parameterizations to describe the plume's dilution. The objective was to simulate the early development of contrails in a fresh plume whose dilution was obtained with a spatial simulation of jet/vortex interaction. A coupling was carried out with a chemical and a microphysical model implemented in the numerical simulation code CEDRE to simulate particle growth using an Eulerian approach. The implemented microphysics model can simulate water condensation onto soot particles, taking into account their activation by adsorption of sulfur species. Our simulations show that sulfur dioxide is converted into sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid at a rate of conversion close to 3 %, which is in good agreement with other studies. Ice-crystal growth was faster when the fuel sulfur content (FSC increased, allowing a visible contrail to appear earlier. These promising results confirm in situ observations and highlight the model's ability to simulate typical plume chemistry and complex microphysics/chemistry interactions coupled with detailed jet/vortex dynamics.

  16. Factors controlling contrail cirrus optical depth

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    B. Kärcher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft contrails develop into contrail cirrus by depositional growth and sedimentation of ice particles and horizontal spreading due to wind shear. Factors controlling this development include temperature, ice supersaturation, thickness of ice-supersaturated layers, and vertical gradients in the horizontal wind field. An analytical microphysical cloud model is presented and validated that captures these processes. Many individual contrail cirrus are simulated that develop differently owing to the variability in the controlling factors, resulting in large samples of cloud properties that are statistically analyzed. Contrail cirrus development is studied over the first four hours past formation, similar to the ages of line-shaped contrails that were tracked in satellite imagery on regional scales. On these time scales, contrail cirrus optical depth and microphysical variables exhibit a marked variability, expressed in terms of broad and skewed probability distribution functions. Simulated mean optical depths at a wavelength of 0.55 μm range from 0.05-0.5 and a substantial fraction 20-50% of contrail cirrus stay subvisible (optical depth <0.02, depending on meteorological conditions.

    A detailed analysis based on an observational case study over the continental USA suggests that previous satellite measurements of line-shaped persistent contrails have missed about 89%, 50%, and 11% of contrails with optical depths 0-0.05, 0.05-0.1, and 0.1-0.2, respectively, amounting to 65% of contrail coverage of all optical depths. When comparing observations with simulations and when estimating the contrail cirrus climate impact, not only mean values but also the variability in optical depth and microphysical properties need to be considered.

  17. Variability of contrail formation conditions and the implications for policies to reduce the climate impacts of aviation

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    Williams, Victoria; Noland, Robert B. [Imperial Coll., Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-15

    This paper describes an approach to balance the climate benefits of contrail reduction against the penalties incurred when cruise altitudes are restricted. Altitude restrictions are targeted by selecting, for each 6-h period, the altitude that provides the greatest reduction in contrail for the lowest increase in carbon dioxide emission. Calculations are for western Europe. This paper discusses the variability in contrail formation conditions in the region and presents contrail reductions and carbon dioxide emission increases obtained with this optimised approach, which compare favourably with fixed altitude restrictions. A new method is also developed to estimate contrail fractions within three-dimensional grids. Conclusions discuss potential operational issues associated with a varying altitude restriction policy. (Author)

  18. Study of contrail microphysics in the vortex phase with a Lagrangian particle tracking model

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    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystal sublimation/loss is a dominant feature of the contrail evolution during the vortex phase and has a substantial impact on the later contrail-to-cirrus transition. Previous studies showed that the fraction of crystals surviving the vortex phase depends primarily on relative humidity, temperature and the aircraft type. An existing model for contrail vortex phase simulations (with a 2-moment bulk microphysics scheme was upgraded with a newly developed state-of-the-art microphysics module (LCM which uses Lagrangian particle tracking. This allows for explicit process-oriented modelling of the ice crystal size distribution in contrast to the bulk approach. We show that it is of great importance to employ an advanced microphysics scheme to determine the crystal loss during the vortex phase. The LCM-model shows even larger sensitivities to the above mentioned key parameters than previously estimated with the bulk model. The impact of the initial crystal number is studied and for the first time also the initial width of the crystal size distribution. Both are shown to be relevant. This corroborates the need for a realistic representation of microphysical processes and knowledge of the ice phase characteristics.

  19. Linear Contrail Coverage and Cloud Property Retrievals from 2012 MODIS Imagery over the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, D. P.; Minnis, P.; Chee, T.; Khlopenkov, K. V.; Bedka, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observation of linear contrail cirrus coverage and retrieval of their optical properties are valuable data for validating atmospheric climate models that represent contrail formation explicitly. These data can reduce our uncertainty of the regional effects of contrail-generated cirrus on global radiative forcing, and thus improve our estimation of the impact of aviation on climate change. We continue our work to create a multi-year climatology of the physical properties of linear contrails from multi-spectral satellite observations. We use an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) to determine the coverage of linear persistent contrails over the Northern Hemisphere during 2012. The contrail detection algorithm is a modified form of the Mannstein et al. (1999) method, and uses several channels from thermal infrared MODIS data to reduce the occurrence of false positive detections. Global aircraft emissions waypoint data provided by FAA allow comparison of detected contrails with commercial aircraft flight tracks. A pixel-level product based on the advected flight tracks defined by the waypoint data and U-V wind component profiles from the NASA GMAO MERRA reanalyses has been developed to assign a confidence of contrail detection for the contrail mask. To account for possible contrail cirrus missed by the CDA, a post-processing method based on the assumption that pixels adjacent to detected linear contrails will have radiative signatures similar to those of the detected contrails is applied to the Northern Hemisphere data. Results from MODIS measurements during 2012 will be presented, representing a near-global climatology of contrail coverage. Linear contrail coverage will be compared with coverage estimates determined previously from 2006 MODIS data and with maps of potential persistent contrail formation derived from MERRA reanalysis data for both 2006 and 2012. In addition, contrail physical properties such as optical depth and particle size derived from the

  20. Radiative forcing by contrails

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    R. Meerkötter

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm-2 daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · radiative processes

  1. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meerkötter

    Full Text Available A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm-2 daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · radiative processes

  2. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U. [DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Phys. der Atmosphaere; Doelling, D.R.; Minnis, P. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Center for Climate System Research

    1999-08-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, midlatitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm{sup -2} daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover. (orig.) 78 refs.

  3. Properties of individual contrails: a compilation of observations and some comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Baumann, Robert; Baumgardner, Darrel; Bedka, Sarah T.; Duda, David P.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Gayet, Jean-Francois; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Minnis, Patrick; Quante, Markus; Raschke, Ehrhard; Schlager, Hans; Vázquez-Navarro, Margarita; Voigt, Christiane; Wang, Zhien

    2017-01-01

    Mean properties of individual contrails are characterized for a wide range of jet aircraft as a function of age during their life cycle from seconds to 11.5 h (7.4-18.7 km altitude, -88 to -31 °C ambient temperature), based on a compilation of about 230 previous in situ and remote sensing measurements. The airborne, satellite, and ground-based observations encompass exhaust contrails from jet aircraft from 1972 onwards, as well as a few older data for propeller aircraft. The contrails are characterized by mean ice particle sizes and concentrations, extinction, ice water content, optical depth, geometrical depth, and contrail width. Integral contrail properties include the cross-section area and total number of ice particles, total ice water content, and total extinction (area integral of extinction) per contrail length. When known, the contrail-causing aircraft and ambient conditions are characterized. The individual datasets are briefly described, including a few new analyses performed for this study, and compiled together to form a contrail library (COLI). The data are compared with results of the Contrail Cirrus Prediction (CoCiP) model. The observations confirm that the number of ice particles in contrails is controlled by the engine exhaust and the formation process in the jet phase, with some particle losses in the wake vortex phase, followed later by weak decreases with time. Contrail cross sections grow more quickly than expected from exhaust dilution. The cross-section-integrated extinction follows an algebraic approximation. The ratio of volume to effective mean radius decreases with time. The ice water content increases with increasing temperature, similar to non-contrail cirrus, while the equivalent relative humidity over ice saturation of the contrail ice mass increases at lower temperatures in the data. Several contrails were observed in warm air above the Schmidt-Appleman threshold temperature. The emission index of ice particles, i.e., the number

  4. In-situ observations of interstitial aerosol particles and cloud residues found in contrails

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    Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1997-12-31

    In spring 1994 a series of flights were conducted in cirrus clouds and contrails over southern Germany. One of the aims of this campaign was to study the phase partitioning of aerosols and water in these clouds. To achieve this separation of particles two complementary sampling probes were mounted on the research aircraft Falcon. These are the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) or super-micrometer inlet, and the interstitial inlet or submicrometer inlet. The CVI is a device that inertially separates cloud elements larger than a certain aerodynamic size from the surrounding atmosphere into a warm, dry and particle free air. Assuming that each cloud element leaves behind only one residue particle, these measurements yield an equivalent number concentration for cloud particles having an aerodynamic diameter larger than the lower cut size of the CVI. The size distribution of the sampled aerosol and residual particles between 0.1 to 3.5 {mu}m diameter was measured by a PMS PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer) working alternatively on both inlets. The gas-phase water vapor content was measured by a cryogenic frost point mirror. (R.P.) 4 refs.

  5. Do supersonic aircraft avoid contrails?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a potential future fleet of supersonic aircraft on contrail coverage and contrail radiative forcing is investigated by means of simulations with the general circulation model ECHAM4.L39(DLR including a contrail parameterization. The model simulations consider air traffic inventories of a subsonic fleet and of a combined fleet of sub- and supersonic aircraft for the years 2025 and 2050, respectively. In case of the combined fleet, part of the subsonic fleet is replaced by supersonic aircraft. The combined air traffic scenario reveals a reduction in contrail cover at subsonic cruise levels (10 to 12 km in the northern extratropics, especially over the North Atlantic and North Pacific. At supersonic flight levels (18 to 20 km, contrail formation is mainly restricted to tropical regions. Only in winter is the northern extratropical stratosphere above the 100 hPa level cold enough for the formation of contrails. Total contrail coverage is only marginally affected by the shift in flight altitude. The model simulations indicate a global annual mean contrail cover of 0.372% for the subsonic and 0.366% for the combined fleet in 2050. The simulated contrail radiative forcing is most closely correlated to the total contrail cover, although contrails in the tropical lower stratosphere are found to be optically thinner than contrails in the extratropical upper troposphere. The global annual mean contrail radiative forcing in 2050 (2025 amounts to 24.7 mW m−2 (9.4 mW m−2 for the subsonic fleet and 24.2 mW m−2 (9.3 mW m−2 for the combined fleet. A reduction of the supersonic cruise speed from Mach 2.0 to Mach 1.6 leads to a downward shift in contrail cover, but does not affect global mean total contrail cover and contrail radiative forcing. Hence the partial substitution of subsonic air traffic leads to a shift of contrail occurrence from mid to low latitudes, but the resulting change in

  6. Airborne measurements of the nitric acid partitioning in persistent contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first systematic measurements of nitric acid (HNO3 uptake in contrail ice particles at typical aircraft cruise altitudes. During the CIRRUS-III campaign cirrus clouds and almost 40 persistent contrails were probed with in situ instruments over Germany and Northern Europe in November 2006. Besides reactive nitrogen, water vapor, cloud ice water content, ice particle size distributions, and condensation nuclei were measured during 6 flights. Contrails with ages up to 12 h were detected at altitudes 10–11.5 km and temperatures 211–220 K. These contrails had a larger ice phase fraction of total nitric acid (HNO3ice/HNO3tot = 6% than the ambient cirrus layers (3%. On average, the contrails contained twice as much HNO3ice as the cirrus clouds, 14 pmol/mol and 6 pmol/mol, respectively. Young contrails with ages below 1 h had a mean HNO3ice of 21 pmol/mol. The contrails had higher nitric acid to water molar ratios in ice and slightly higher ice water contents than the cirrus clouds under similar meteorological conditions. The differences in ice phase fractions and molar ratios between developing contrails and cirrus are likely caused by high plume concentrations of HNO3 prior to contrail formation. The location of the measurements in the upper region of frontal cirrus layers might account for slight differences in the ice water content between contrails and adjacent cirrus clouds. The observed dependence of molar ratios as a function of the mean ice particle diameter suggests that ice-bound HNO3 concentrations are controlled by uptake of exhaust HNO3 in the freezing plume aerosols in young contrails and subsequent trapping of ambient HNO3 in growing ice particles in older (age > 1 h contrails.

  7. Impact of biofuels on contrail warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, Fabio; Agarwal, Akshat; Speth, Raymond L.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2017-11-01

    Contrails and contrail-cirrus may be the largest source of radiative forcing (RF) attributable to aviation. Biomass-derived alternative jet fuels are a potentially major way to mitigate the climate impacts of aviation by reducing lifecycle CO2 emissions. Given the up to 90% reduction in soot emissions from paraffinic biofuels, the potential for a significant impact on contrail RF due to the reduction in contrail-forming ice nuclei (IN) remains an open question. We simulate contrail formation and evolution to quantify RF over the United States under different emissions scenarios. Replacing conventional jet fuels with paraffinic biofuels generates two competing effects. First, the higher water emissions index results in an increase in contrail occurrence (~ +8%). On the other hand, these contrails are composed of larger diameter crystals (~ +58%) at lower number concentrations (~ ‑75%), reducing both contrail optical depth (~ ‑29%) and albedo (~ ‑32%). The net changes in contrail RF induced by switching to biofuels range from ‑4% to +18% among a range of assumed ice crystal habits (shapes). In comparison, cleaner burning engines (with no increase in water emissions index) result in changes to net contrail RF ranging between ‑13% and +5% depending on habit. Thus, we find that even 67% to 75% reductions in aircraft soot emissions are insufficient to substantially reduce warming from contrails, and that the use of biofuels may either increase or decrease contrail warming—contrary to previous expectations of a significant decrease in warming.

  8. CURBING CONTRAILS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith Button

    2016-01-01

      Airliners leave high-altitude cirrus clouds in their wakes, and if these contrails could be reduced or eliminated, their climate warming contribution could instantly be erased from the climate change equation...

  9. Contrail: A Module from Physical Chemistry On-Line Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Franklin; Zielinski, Theresa Julia; Long, George

    2007-01-01

    The impact of contrails on Earth's climate is researched to understand the active area. It is suggested that the process of contrail formation involves combustion, cooling and ice formation, which are good comprehensive learning exercise for physical chemistry students.

  10. Contrail formation: Homogeneous nucleation of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. [Universitaet Muenchen, Freising (Germany); Peter, T. [MPI fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Ottmann, R. [MPI fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    1995-06-15

    The authors look at the possible nucleation of sub-nanometer sulfuric acid/water clusters, and the growth and possible freezing of such particles, in the exhaust gas stream from jets in the tropospause. Their studies imply that such droplets can condense, take up water, and dilute to the point that they will freeze. When they apply these results to what is known about the exhaust gas stream from a B747, they conclude that a visible contrail will not form under threshold conditions for such nucleation. More detailed microphysical data from exhaust gas measurements is necessary to overcome uncertainties in the modeled results.

  11. An automatic contrail tracking algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vazquez-Navarro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A method designed to track the life cycle of contrail-cirrus using satellite data with high temporal and spatial resolution, from its formation to the final dissolution of the aviation-induced cirrus cloud is presented. The method follows the evolution of contrails from their linear stage until they are undistinguishable from natural cirrus clouds. Therefore, the study of the effect of aircraft-induced clouds in the atmosphere is no longer restricted to linear contrails and can include contrail-cirrus. The method takes advantage of the high spatial resolution of polar orbiting satellites and the high temporal resolution of geostationary satellites to identify the pixels that belong to an aviation induced cloud. The high spatial resolution data of the MODIS sensor is used for contrail detection, and the high temporal resolution of the SEVIRI sensor in the Rapid Scan mode is used for contrail tracking. An example is included in which the method is applied to the study of a long lived contrail over the bay of Biscay.

  12. Microphysical properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, B.; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The radiative properties of a condensation trail (contrail) are determined by its microphysical properties. Therefore an understanding of the concentration, size distribution, and shapes of the particles is necessary for an estimation of the climatic impact of contrails. In-situ particle measurements by use of an ice replicator are presented for several contrail and cirrus events. Contrail particles aged about 2 minutes show shapes which are nearly spherical. Typical sizes are 5 to 10 {mu}m. Concentration values reach up to the order of 1000 cm{sup -3}. Aged contrail size distributions are within the variability of those found in natural cirrus clouds. (author) 2 refs.

  13. Relating observations of contrail persistence to numerical weather analysis output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Duda

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential for using high-resolution meteorological data from two operational numerical weather analyses (NWA to diagnose and predict persistent contrail formation is evaluated using two independent contrail observation databases. Contrail occurrence statistics derived from surface and satellite observations between April 2004 and June 2005 are matched to the humidity, vertical velocity, wind shear and atmospheric stability derived from analyses from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS models. The relationships between contrail occurrence and the NWA-derived statistics are analyzed to determine under which atmospheric conditions persistent contrail formation is favored within NWAs. Humidity is the most important factor determining whether contrails are short-lived or persistent, and persistent contrails are more likely to appear when vertical velocities are positive. The model-derived atmospheric stability and wind shear do not appear to have a significant effect on contrail occurrence.

  14. An upgraded estimate of the radiative forcing of cryoplane contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquart, S. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Umweltphysik; Ponater, M.; Gierens, K.; Stroem, L. [Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhaettan (Sweden)

    2004-04-01

    The radiative forcing of contrails is quantified for a hypothetical fleet of cryoplanes in comparison with a conventional aircraft fleet. The differences in bulk optical properties between conventional and cryoplane contrails are determined by numerical simulations, under several ambient conditions, of the microphysical evolution of conventional and cryoplane contrails, respectively. Both types of contrails contain about the same ice mass, but the mean effective particle radius is found to be smaller by about a factor of 0.3 in conventional contrails than in cryoplane ones. Hence, in case of cryoplanes the contrail optical depth is lower, which counteracts (with respect to radiative forcing) the effect of increased contrail cover due to the higher specific emission of water vapour. If the information gained from the microphysical simulations is translated to the framework of a global climate model, the global mean radiative forcing of cryoplane contrails is simulated to be between about 30% lower and 30% higher compared to the radiative forcing of conventional contrails, depending on the quantitative assumptions made for the mean particle properties and also depending on the time slice considered. Our results suggest that the effect of decreased optical depth is around the same magnitude as the effect of increased contrail cover. Cryoplane contrails should therefore no longer be regarded as the main ecological hindrance for establishing cryoplane technology. Uncertainty with respect to radiative forcing arises mainly from insufficient knowledge regarding the mean effective ice crystal radius within both conventional and especially cryoplane contrails. (orig.)

  15. Long-lived contrails and convective cirrus above the tropical tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Kiemle, Christoph; Schlager, Hans; Weigel, Ralf; Borrmann, Stephan; D'Amato, Francesco; Krämer, Martina; Matthey, Renaud; Protat, Alain; Voigt, Christiane; Volk, C. Michael

    2017-02-01

    This study has two objectives: (1) it characterizes contrails at very low temperatures and (2) it discusses convective cirrus in which the contrails occurred. (1) Long-lived contrails and cirrus from overshooting convection are investigated above the tropical tropopause at low temperatures down to -88 °C from measurements with the Russian high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica, as well as related observations during the SCOUT-O3 field experiment near Darwin, Australia, in 2005. A contrail was observed to persist below ice saturation at low temperatures and low turbulence in the stratosphere for nearly 1 h. The contrail occurred downwind of the decaying convective system Hector of 16 November 2005. The upper part of the contrail formed at 19 km altitude in the tropical lower stratosphere at ˜ 60 % relative humidity over ice at -82 °C. The ˜ 1 h lifetime is explained by engine water emissions, slightly enhanced humidity from Hector, low temperature, low turbulence, and possibly nitric acid hydrate formation. The long persistence suggests large contrail coverage in case of a potential future increase of air traffic in the lower stratosphere. (2) Cirrus observed above the strongly convective Hector cloud on 30 November 2005 was previously interpreted as cirrus from overshooting convection. Here we show that parts of the cirrus were caused by contrails or are mixtures of convective and contrail cirrus. The in situ data together with data from an upward-looking lidar on the German research aircraft Falcon, the CPOL radar near Darwin, and NOAA-AVHRR satellites provide a sufficiently complete picture to distinguish between contrail and convective cirrus parts. Plume positions are estimated based on measured or analyzed wind and parameterized wake vortex descent. Most of the non-volatile aerosol measured over Hector is traceable to aircraft emissions. Exhaust emission indices are derived from a self-match experiment of the Geophysica in the polar stratosphere

  16. Parametrization of contrails in a comprehensive climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponater, M.; Brinkop, S.; Sausen, R.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    A contrail parametrization scheme for a general circulation model (GCM) is presented. Guidelines for its development were that it should be based on the thermodynamic theory of contrail formation and that it should be consistent with the cloud parametrization scheme of the GCM. Results of a six-year test integration indicate reasonable results concerning the spatial and temporal development of both contrail coverage and contrail optical properties. Hence, the scheme forms a promising basis for the quantitative estimation of the contrail climatic impact. (author) 9 refs.

  17. An upgraded estimate of the radiative forcing of cryoplane contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquart, S. [DLR-Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Inst. fuer Umweltphysik, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Ponater, M.; Gierens, K. [DLR-Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Stroem, L. [DLR-Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Volvo Aero Corp., Trollhaettan (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    The radiative forcing of contrails is quantified for a hypothetical fleet of cryoplanes in comparison with a conventional aircraft fleet. The differences in bulk optical properties between conventional and cryoplane contrails are determined by numerical simulations of the microphysical evolution of conventional and cryoplane contrails, under several ambient conditions. Both types of contrails contain about the same ice mass, but the mean effective particle radius is found to be smaller by about a factor of 0.3 in conventional contrails than in cryoplane ones. Hence, in case of cryoplanes the contrail optical depth is lower, which counteracts (with respect to radiative forcing) the effect of increased contrail cover due to the higher specific emission of water vapour. If the information gained from the microphysical simulations is translated to the framework of a global climate model, the global mean radiative forcing of cryoplane contrails is simulated to be between about 30% lower and 30% higher compared to the radiative forcing of conventional contrails, depending on the quantitative assumptions made for the mean particle properties and also depending on the time slice considered. Our results indicate that the effect of decreased optical depth is about the same magnitude as the effect of increased contrail cover. Current state of knowledge does not allow a conclusive assessment whether the net radiative impact of cryoplane contrails will be smaller or larger than that of conventional contrails. Uncertainty with respect to radiative forcing arises mainly from insufficient knowledge regarding the mean effective ice crystal radius for both conventional and, especially, cryoplane contrails. (orig.)

  18. Aircraft produced particles and their interaction with contrails, cirrus clouds and climate (PAZI); Partikel aus Flugzeugtriebwerken und ihr Einfluss aus Kondensstreifen, Zirruswolken und Klima (PAZI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Schumann, U. (eds.)

    2003-07-01

    PAZI is a national research project supported by the German Secretary of Education and Research (BMBF) through the Helmholtz-Gesellschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren (HGF). Research in PAZI is performed in concert with the projects SiA, INCA, PartEmis, and PARTS funded by the European Commission. PAZI investigates the interaction of aerosols with cirrus clouds, with an emphasis on aviation-produced aerosols and contrails, and their impact on atmospheric composition, radiation, clouds, and climate. Besides presenting summaries of individual workpackages, this final project report summarizes important results obtained and highlights the following issues: Formation and evolution of black carbon (BC) particles in burners and jet engines; physico-chemical characterization of aircraft-produced BC particles; measured freezing properties of liquid and BC particles; calculated global atmospheric distribution of BC; observed differences in cirrus properties between clean and polluted air masses; correlations between air traffic and cirrus cloud cover deduced from satellite observations; process studies of aerosol-cirrus interactions; parameterization of cirrus cloud formation; representation of ice supersaturation and cirrus clouds in a climate model and possible aviation impact on global cirrus properties. (orig.) [German] PAZI ist ein vom Bundesministerium fuer Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) gefoerdertes und im Rahmen der Helmholtz-Gesellschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren (HGF) durchgefuehrtes Verbundprojekt. In PAZI sind Teile der von der Europaeischen Kommission gefoerderten Vorhaben SiA, INCA, PartEmis, and PARTS integriert. Es wird die Aerosol-Zirruswolken-Wechselwirkung untersucht, mit einem Schwerpunkt aus Partikeln aus dem Luftverkehr und Kondensstreifen sowie deren Einfluss auf Spurenstoffverteilung, Strahlung, Wolken und Klima. Neben den Berichten einzelner Arbeitsgruppen gibt dieser Endbericht eine Zusammenschau und Bewertung folgender Hauptergebnisse: Bildung und

  19. A numerical simulation of a contrail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levkov, L.; Boin, M.; Meinert, D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The formation of a contrail from an aircraft flying near the tropopause is simulated using a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model including a very complex scheme of parameterized cloud microphysical processes. The model predicted ice concentrations are in very good agreement with data measured during the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE), 1989. Sensitivity simulations were run to determine humidity forcing on the life time of contrails. (author) 4 refs.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlond, A. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A large eddy simulation (LES) model has been used to investigate the role of various external parameters and physical processes in the life-cycle of contrails. The model is applied to conditions that are typical for those under which contrails could be observed, i.e. in an atmosphere which is supersaturated with respect to ice and at a temperature of approximately 230 K or colder. The sensitivity runs indicate that the contrail evolution is controlled primarily by humidity, temperature and static stability of the ambient air and secondarily by the baroclinicity of the atmosphere. Moreover, it turns out that the initial ice particle concentration and radiative processes are of minor importance in the evolution of contrails at least during the 30 minutes simulation period. (author) 9 refs.

  1. Contrail cloud cover from NOAA-AVHRR images over Central Europe and in situ measurements of microphysical contrail properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendling, P.; Buell, R.; Kaestner, M.; Mannstein, H.; Meyer, R.; Schroeder, F.; Strauss, B. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-01

    A fully automated scheme for the detection of contrails using the infrared window channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) was developed and applied for the derivation of regional patterns and a time series of contrail cloudiness over Central and Western Europe. Daily analysis of noon scenes in 1996 indicates that the average of daytime contrail coverage over Central Europe was 0.5%{+-}0.25% with regional maxima of 1.2%. Further, in situ-measurements of the ice particle concentration and size distribution were performed in contrails and natural cirrus clouds. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  2. A contrail cirrus prediction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new model to simulate and predict the properties of a large ensemble of contrails as a function of given air traffic and meteorology is described. The model is designed for approximate prediction of contrail cirrus cover and analysis of contrail climate impact, e.g. within aviation system optimization processes. The model simulates the full contrail life-cycle. Contrail segments form between waypoints of individual aircraft tracks in sufficiently cold and humid air masses. The initial contrail properties depend on the aircraft. The advection and evolution of the contrails is followed with a Lagrangian Gaussian plume model. Mixing and bulk cloud processes are treated quasi analytically or with an effective numerical scheme. Contrails disappear when the bulk ice content is sublimating or precipitating. The model has been implemented in a "Contrail Cirrus Prediction Tool" (CoCiP. This paper describes the model assumptions, the equations for individual contrails, and the analysis-method for contrail-cirrus cover derived from the optical depth of the ensemble of contrails and background cirrus. The model has been applied for a case study and compared to the results of other models and in-situ contrail measurements. The simple model reproduces a considerable part of observed contrail properties. Mid-aged contrails provide the largest contributions to the product of optical depth and contrail width, important for climate impact.

  3. Properties of Linear Contrails Detected in 2012 Northern Hemisphere MODIS Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David P.; Chee, Thad; Khlopenkov, Konstantin; Bedka, Sarah; Spangenberg, Doug; Minnis, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Observation of linear contrail cirrus coverage and retrieval of their optical properties are valuable data for validating atmospheric climate models that represent contrail formation explicitly. These data can reduce our uncertainty of the regional effects of contrail-generated cirrus on global radiative forcing, and thus improve our estimation of the impact of commercial aviation on climate change. We use an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) to determine the coverage of linear persistent contrails over the Northern Hemisphere during 2012. The contrail detection algorithm is a modified form of the Mannstein et al. (1999) method, and uses several channels from thermal infrared MODIS data to reduce the occurrence of false positive detections. A set of contrail masks of varying sensitivity is produced to define the potential range of uncertainty in contrail coverage estimated by the CDA. Global aircraft emissions waypoint data provided by FAA allow comparison of detected contrails with commercial aircraft flight tracks. A pixel-level product based on the advected flight tracks defined by the waypoint data and U-V wind component profiles from the NASA GMAO GEOS-4 reanalysis has been developed to assign a confidence of contrail detection for the contrail mask. To account for possible contrail cirrus missed by the CDA, a post-processing method based on the assumption that pixels adjacent to detected linear contrails will have radiative signatures similar to those of the detected contrails is applied to the Northern Hemisphere data. Results from several months of MODIS observations during 2012 will be presented, representing a near-global climatology of contrail coverage. Linear contrail coverage will be compared with coverage estimates determined previously from 2006 MODIS data.

  4. Relating Satellite-Based Contrail Detection to NWA Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David P.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Minnis, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Contrail-induced cloud cover has been shown to be a significant factor in regional climate change over the United States of America. As air traffic increases, the potential for globally significant impacts also rises. To better understand and predict these potential climatic effects, it is necessary to develop models that can accurately represent contrail properties based on ambient atmospheric variables including temperature, relative humidity and winds. Several high-resolution numerical weather analyses (NWA) including the 20-km Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) and the University of Oklahoma Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) can provide the temperature, humidity and wind information necessary to diagnose contrail formation. One outstanding problem that must be addressed to achieve a realistic simulation of contrails is the large uncertainties in upper tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) in numerical weather analyses. Current numerical weather analyses tend to underestimate UTH due to large dry biases in the balloon soundings used to construct the analyses. To evaluate each of the models, we match several months of contrail properties derived from satellite and surface observations to the NWA-derived humidity, vertical velocity, wind shear and atmospheric stability. The relationships between several contrail properties (including optical depth and areal contrail coverage) and the NWA-derived statistics will be analyzed to determine under which atmospheric conditions widespread contrail outbreaks are favored.

  5. Estimated contrail frequency and coverage over the contiguous United States from numerical weather prediction analyses and flight track data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, D.P.; Minnis, P. [Science Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton (United States); Palikonda, R. [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Estimates of contrail frequency and coverage over the contiguous United States (CONUS) are developed using hourly meteorological analyses from the rapid update cycle (RUC) numerical weather prediction model and commercial air traffic data for 2 months during 2001. The potential contrail frequency over the CONUS is computed directly from RUC analyses using several modified forms of the classical Appleman criteria for persistent contrail formation. Various schemes for diagnosing contrails from the RUC analyses were tested by first tuning each model to mean satellite estimates of contrail coverage for the domain and then comparing the resulting distributions to those from the satellite retrievals. The most accurate method for forming persistent contrails for both months uses a fourth root relationship between flight lengths and contrail coverage, accounts for contrail overlap and for the dry bias in the humidity profiles, and assumes that contrails can be detected in all cloudiness conditions. The differences between the simulated and satellite-derived contrail amounts are due to errors in the satellite observations, possible diurnally dependent saturation effects, and uncertainties in the numerical weather analysis humidity fields and other input variables. The algorithms developed here are suitable for eventual application to real-time predictions of potential contrail outbreaks. When refined, the methodology could be useful for both contrail mitigation and for contrail-climate effects assessment. (orig.)

  6. A diagnostic study of the global coverage by contrails. Pt. 1. Present day climate. Revised version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausen, R.; Gierens, K.; Ponater, M.; Schumann, U.

    1998-03-01

    The global distribution of the contrail formation potential and the contrail cloud coverage are estimated using meteorological analysis data for temperature and humidity (ECMWF re-analyses) and a data base on aircraft fuel consumption. Regions with humidity between ice and liquid saturation and with temperature low enough to let aircraft trigger contrail formation are identified as regions in which persistent contrails may be formed. The frequency with which a region is conditioned for such persistent contrail formation measures the contrail formation potential. The mean contrail cloud coverage is computed by multiplying this frequency with a suitable function of fuel consumption (linear or non-linear). The product is normalized such that the contrail coverage equals the observed value of 0.5% in a domain between 30 W to 30 E, 35 N to 75 N. The results show a large potential for contrail formation in the upper troposphere, in particular in the tropics but also at mid-latitudes. At northern mid-latitudes about 20% of the upper tropospheric air is conditioned to form persistent contrails. Part of this region may be covered by otherwise forming cirrus clouds. When multiplied with fuel consumption of 1992 aviation, large cover by persistent contrail clouds is computed over Europe, the North Atlantic, the continental USA, and south-east Asia. The computed contrail coverage reaches 2% over the USA, and is larger in winter than in summer. The global mean contrail coverage is about 0.11% for linear fuel dependence and the given normalization. The result is only weakly sensitive to the propulsion efficiency of aircraft, but strongly sensitive to aircraft flight altitude. (orig.)

  7. Influence of particle size and shape on the backscattering linear depolarisation ratio of small ice crystals – cloud chamber measurements in the context of contrail and cirrus microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the laser scattering and depolarisation instrument SIMONE that is installed at the large aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. SIMONE uses a 488 nm cw laser to probe simulated atmospheric clouds by measuring the scattered light from the 1.8° and 178.2° directions. At 178.2°, the scattered light is analysed for the linear polarisation state to deduce the particle linear depolarisation ratio δp which is a common measurement parameter of atmospheric lidar applications. The optical setup and the mathematical formalism of the depolarisation detection concept are given. SIMONE depolarisation measurements in spheroidal hematite aerosol and supercooled liquid clouds are used to validate the instrument. SIMONE data from a series of AIDA ice nucleation experiments at temperatures between 195 and 225 K were analysed in terms of the impact of the ice particle microphysics on δp. We found strong depolarisation values of up to 0.4 in case of small growing and sublimating ice particles with volume equivalent diameters of only a few micrometers. Modelling runs with the T-matrix method showed that the measured depolarisation ratios can be accurately reproduced assuming spheroidal and cylindrical particles with a size distribution that has been constrained by IR extinction spectroscopy. Based on the T-matrix modelling runs, we demonstrate that in case of small ice crystals the SIMONE depolarisation results are representative for the lidar depolarisation ratio which is measured at exact backscattering direction of 180°. The relevance of our results for the interpretation of recent lidar observations in cirrus and contrails is discussed. In view of our results, the high depolarisation ratios observed by the spaceborne lidar CALIOP in the tropical upper troposphere might be a hint for the presence of small (sublimating ice particles in the outflows of deep convective systems.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent jet and a vortex sheet interaction: particle formation and evolution in the near field of an aircraft wake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Paoli

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft are prolific sources of particles (soot, liquid aerosols and contrails that can impact cloudiness and affect the Earth's radiative budget balance. In order to study the formation and evolution of these particles, a numerical approach has been developed combining large-eddy simulation (LES and a detailed microphysical model. Generally very detailed microphysical models are run along a single average trajectory, without any temperature fluctuation. However, this approach may lead to significant differences in particle properties and particle size distribution as it oversimplifies dynamical and mixing processes compared to multidimensional descriptions of aircraft wakes. This may affect the initialisation of meso-scale models, such as, for example, the formation of cloud condensation nuclei from persistent contrails, and heterogeneous chemical reactions. In this paper, we present the results of detailed microphysical processes calculations applied to a large number of fluid parcels trajectories, generated by a LES two-phase flow solver.

  9. Dehydration effects from contrails in a coupled contrail–climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of water by contrails in ice-supersaturated air and the release of water after ice particle advection and sedimentation dehydrates the atmosphere at flight levels and redistributes humidity mainly to lower levels. The dehydration is investigated by coupling a plume-scale contrail model with a global aerosol–climate model. The contrail model simulates all the individual contrails forming from global air traffic for meteorological conditions as defined by the climate model. The computed contrail cirrus properties compare reasonably with theoretical concepts and observations. The mass of water in aged contrails may exceed 106 times the mass of water emitted from aircraft. Many of the ice particles sediment and release water in the troposphere, on average 700 m below the mean flight levels. Simulations with and without coupling are compared. The drying at contrail levels causes thinner and longer-lived contrails with about 15 % reduced contrail radiative forcing (RF. The reduced RF from contrails is on the order of 0.06 W m−2, slightly larger than estimated earlier because of higher soot emissions. For normal traffic, the RF from dehydration is small compared to interannual variability. A case with emissions increased by 100 times is used to overcome statistical uncertainty. The contrails impact the entire hydrological cycle in the atmosphere by reducing the total water column and the cover by high- and low-level clouds. For normal traffic, the dehydration changes contrail RF by positive shortwave and negative longwave contributions on the order of 0.04 W m−2, with a small negative net RF. The total net RF from contrails and dehydration remains within the range of previous estimates.

  10. Contrails over the U.S. and their potential impact on the radiation budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnis, P. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Ayers, J.K.; Doelling, D.R. [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A methodology for assessing the contrail impact on the radiation budget is developed to use data characterizing the frequency, areal coverage, optical depth, particle size, and altitude of contrails with observations of cloud and surface properties. The method is tested using various scenarios over the United States to estimate contrail-induced albedo changes based on current aircraft fuel usage statistics. The technique can be used for estimating infrared effects and the impact of future fuel-use rates. (author) 11 refs.

  11. Volatile particles formation during PartEmis: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vancassel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study of the formation of volatile particles in a combustor exhaust has been carried out in the frame of the PartEmis European project. A kinetic model has been used in order to investigate nucleation efficiency of the H2O-H2SO4 binary mixture in the sampling system. A value for the fraction of the fuel sulphur S(IV converted into S(VI has been indirectly deduced from comparisons between model results and measurements. In the present study, ranges between roughly 2.5% and 6%, depending on the combustor settings and on the value assumed for the parameter describing sulphuric acid wall losses. Soot particles hygroscopicity has also been investigated as their activation is a key parameter for contrail formation. Growth factors of monodisperse particles exposed to high relative humidity (95% have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The modelling study confirms that the growth factor increases as the soot particle size decreases.

  12. Selected topics on the interaction between cirrus clouds and embedded contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent contrails and natural cirrus clouds often coexist in the upper troposphere and contrails can be embedded within cirrus clouds. The present paper deals with some questions regarding the interaction of cirrus clouds and embedded contrails. I have selected only questions that can be answered by analytical means. I find that (1 the emission index for water vapour is only slightly changed when an aircraft crosses a cirrus cloud, (2 that contrail formation is not affected by an ambient cirrus, (3 that cirrus ice crystals entrained into the trailing wing tip vortex do not efficiently retard the sublimation of contrail ice crystals, and (4 that cirrus can start to dissolve an embedded contrail after a couple of hours by aggregation.

  13. Solid Particle Formation Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    3421. Kuka , K., N. Wads, and A. Tasaki, "Magnetic Properties of Ferromagnetic Metal Alloy Flue Particles Prepared by Evaporation In Inert Gases," Japanese J. Applied Physics, Vol. 8, 1969, p. 603. [ II 7-- IATI.

  14. A numerical study of contrail development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boin

    Full Text Available In this study, the formation of a contrail from an aircraft flying near the tropopause is simulated using a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model including a very complex scheme of parameterized cloud microphysical processes. Two different primary ice nucleation parameterizations for deposition nucleation, condensation freezing, and contact freezing are applied. The model-predicted ice concentrations are compared to data measured during the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE, 1989.

  15. A numerical study of contrail development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boin

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the formation of a contrail from an aircraft flying near the tropopause is simulated using a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model including a very complex scheme of parameterized cloud microphysical processes. Two different primary ice nucleation parameterizations for deposition nucleation, condensation freezing, and contact freezing are applied. The model-predicted ice concentrations are compared to data measured during the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE, 1989.

  16. Evaluation of Contrail Reduction Strategies Based on Environmental and Operational Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Neil Y.; Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok K.; Li, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates a set of contrail reduction strategies based on environmental and operational costs. A linear climate model was first used to convert climate effects of carbon dioxide emissions and aircraft contrails to changes in Absolute Global Temperature Potential, a metric that measures the mean surface temperature change due to aircraft emissions and persistent contrail formations. The concept of social cost of carbon and the carbon auction price from recent California's cap-and-trade system were then used to relate the carbon dioxide emissions and contrail formations to an environmental cost index. The strategy for contrail reduction is based on minimizing contrail formations by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude. The strategy uses a user-defined factor to trade off between contrail reduction and additional fuel burn and carbon dioxide emissions. A higher value of tradeoff factor results in more contrail reduction but also more fuel burn and carbon emissions. The strategy is considered favorable when the net environmental cost benefit exceeds the operational cost. The results show how the net environmental benefit varies with different decision-making time-horizon and different carbon cost. The cost models provide a guidance to select the trade-off factor that will result in the most net environmental benefit.

  17. Ground-based observations for the validation of contrails and cirrus detection in satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mannstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and additional cirrus clouds caused by air traffic have a potential warming effect due to their optical properties and their location in the upper troposphere. The effect of contrails is directly related to their coverage and optical properties, which both can be derived from satellite observations. However, considerable local and global uncertainties remain, as detection limits and efficiency are still unknown. A six months time series of the occurrence of high-level clouds and contrails was analysed visually using an all-sky camera situated at Oberpfaffenhofen (Southern Germany. It shows a contrail occurrence of 21% (fraction of time with visible contrails during one hour which is nearly constant over daytime and a cirrus occurrence that increases from 27% in the morning to 48% in the evening, suggesting a possible influence of air traffic or, more probably, convective cloud formation. Furthermore, we compared selected all-sky camera images with data of the satellite instruments NOAA/AVHRR and MSG/SEVIRI. As expected, the fraction of contrails visible and detectable in satellite images depends strongly on their width. Of the contrails observed with the all-sky camera of 1–5 km width 60–65% are visually detectable in AVHRR data while only 17% are identified by an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA. This means that the automated CDA detects approx. 28% of the contrails which are identified by visual inspection in AVHRR data alone. As far as SEVIRI is concerned, visual inspection yields 48% of the contrails of 1–5 km width, the CDA 19%. That means 40% of all contrails visually identifiable in SEVIRI data are found by the automated algorithm. As far as cirrus detection using SEVIRI data is concerned, an automated algorithm tends to overestimate cirrus occurrence but correctly measures cirrus changes during the day compared to visual inspection.

  18. Near field measurements on contrail properties from fuels with different sulfur content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Busen, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Schroeder, F.P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Baumann, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Kuhn, M. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Hagen, D.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Whitefield, P.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Baumgardner, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Arnold, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany). Bereich Atmosphaerenphysik; Borrmann, S. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-08-01

    Microphysical properties of jet engine exhaust aerosol and contrails were studied in the near field of the emitting aircraft for different fuel sulfur contents. Measurements were performed behind the research aircraft ATTAS of DLR and an Airbus A310-300 using fuels with different sulfur contents of 6 ppm and 2700 ppm. The major differences in accumulation mode aerosol and microphysical contrail properties between the used aircraft were an increased number concentration of both the accumulation mode aerosol and the contrail particles in the Airbus A310-300 plume compared to the ATTAS plume. Part of the difference in contrail particles may be caused by different ambient conditions, but the major differences are assumed to be caused by different engine properties. (orig.)

  19. In-situ observations of young contrails – overview and selected results from the CONCERT campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Voigt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lineshaped contrails were detected with the research aircraft Falcon during the CONCERT – CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT – campaign in October/November 2008. The Falcon was equipped with a set of instruments to measure the particle size distribution, shape, extinction and chemical composition as well as trace gas mixing ratios of sulfur dioxide (SO2, reactive nitrogen and halogen species (NO, NOy, HNO3, HONO, HCl, ozone (O3 and carbon monoxide (CO. During 12 mission flights over Europe, numerous contrails, cirrus clouds and a volcanic aerosol layer were probed at altitudes between 8.5 and 11.6 km and at temperatures above 213 K. 22 contrails from 11 different aircraft were observed near and below ice saturation. The observed NO mixing ratios, ice crystal and soot number densities are compared to a process based contrail model. On 19 November 2008 the contrail from a CRJ-2 aircraft was penetrated in 10.1 km altitude at a temperature of 221 K. The contrail had mean ice crystal number densities of 125 cm−3 with effective radii reff of 2.6 μm. The presence of particles with r>50 μm in the less than 2 min old contrail suggests that natural cirrus crystals were entrained in the contrail. Mean HONO/NO (HONO/NOy ratios of 0.037 (0.024 and the fuel sulfur conversion efficiency to H2SO4S of 2.9 % observed in the CRJ-2 contrail are in the range of previous measurements in the gaseous aircraft exhaust. On 31 October 2010 aviation NO emissions could have contributed by more than 40% to the regional scale NO levels in the mid-latitude lowest stratosphere. The CONCERT observations help to better quantify the climate impact from contrails and will be used to investigate the chemical processing of trace gases on contrails.

  20. Investigation of the effect of contrails on global irradiance and solar energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, Philipp; Rennhofer, Marcus; Baumgartner, Dietmar; Wagner, Jochen; Laube, Wolfgang; Gadermaier, Josef

    2013-04-01

    In the present study we investigate the effect of contrails on global shortwave radiation and on Photovoltaic module performance. This investigation is performed using continuous hemispherical fish eye photographs of the sky, diffuse and direct shortwave measurements and short circuit current measurements of a-Si, c-Si and CdTe PV modules. These measurements have been performed at the solar observatory Kanzelhöhe (1540 m.a.s.l) located in the southern part of Austria during a period of one and half year. The time resolution of the measurements is one minute, which allows to accurately follow the formation-eventually the disappearance- or the movement of the contrails in the sky. Using the fish eye photographs we identified clear sky days with a high contrail persistence. We especially look at situations where the contrails were shading the sun. Results show that contrails shading the sun may reduce the global radiation by up to 60%. In general we however observe that during days with a high contrail persistence the diffuse irradiance is slightly increased. Finally a statistic of the contrail persistence during the period of measurement is presented and conclusions as to the relevance for the solar energy production are drawn.

  1. Global contrail coverage simulated by CAM5 with the inventory of 2006 global aircraft emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Craig

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the incorporation of an inventory of the AEDT (Aviation Environmental Design Tool global commercial aircraft emissions for the year of 2006 into the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Earth System Model (CESM version 1. The original dataset reports aircraft emission mass of ten specieson an hourly basis which is converted to monthly emission mixing ratio tendencies as the released version of the dataset. We also describe how the released aircraft emission dataset is incorporated into CESM.A contrail parameterization is implemented in the CESM in which it isassumed that persistent contrails initially form when aircraft water vapor emissions experience a favorable atmospheric environment. Both aircraft emissions and ambient humidity are attributed to the formation of contrails. The ice water content of contrails is assumed to follow an empirical function of atmospheric temperature which determines the cloud fraction associated with contrails.Our modeling study indicates that the simulated global contrail coverage is sensitive to the vertical resolution of the GCMsin the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere because of modelassumptions about the vertical overlap structure of clouds.Futhermore, the extent of global contrail coverage simulated by CESM exhibits a seasonal cycle which is in broad agreement with observations.

  2. Basic Diagnosis and Prediction of Persistent Contrail Occurrence using High-resolution Numerical Weather Analyses/Forecasts and Logistic Regression. Part II: Evaluation of Sample Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that probabilistic forecasting may be a useful method for predicting persistent contrail formation. A probabilistic forecast to accurately predict contrail formation over the contiguous United States (CONUS) is created by using meteorological data based on hourly meteorological analyses from the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) and from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) as well as GOES water vapor channel measurements, combined with surface and satellite observations of contrails. Two groups of logistic models were created. The first group of models (SURFACE models) is based on surface-based contrail observations supplemented with satellite observations of contrail occurrence. The second group of models (OUTBREAK models) is derived from a selected subgroup of satellite-based observations of widespread persistent contrails. The mean accuracies for both the SURFACE and OUTBREAK models typically exceeded 75 percent when based on the RUC or ARPS analysis data, but decreased when the logistic models were derived from ARPS forecast data.

  3. Towards a Model Climatology of Relative Humidity in the Upper Troposphere for Estimation of Contrail and Contrail-Induced Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, M.; Ott, L.; Oman, L.; Benson, C.; Pawson, S.; Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of contrails and contrail cirrus is very sensitive to the relative humidity of the upper troposphere. To reduce uncertainty in an estimate of the radiative impact of aviation-induced cirrus, a model must therefore be able to reproduce the observed background moisture fields with reasonable and quantifiable fidelity. Here we present an upper tropospheric moisture climatology from a 26-year ensemble of simulations using the GEOS CCM. We compare this free-running model's moisture fields to those obtained from the MLS and AIRS satellite instruments, our most comprehensive observational databases for upper tropospheric water vapor. Published comparisons have shown a substantial wet bias in GEOS-5 assimilated fields with respect to MLS water vapor and ice water content. This tendency is clear as well in the GEOS CCM simulations. The GEOS-5 moist physics in the GEOS CCM uses a saturation adjustment that prevents supersaturation, which is unrealistic when compared to in situ moisture observations from MOZAIC aircraft and balloon sondes as we will show. Further, the large-scale satellite datasets also consistently underestimate super-saturation when compared to the in-situ observations. We place these results in the context of estimates of contrail and contrail cirrus frequency.

  4. A methodology for in-situ and remote sensing of microphysical and radiative properties of contrails as they evolve into cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Jones

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and especially their evolution into cirrus-like clouds are thought to have very important effects on local and global radiation budgets, though are generally not well represented in global climate models. Lack of contrail parameterisations is due to the limited availability of in situ contrail measurements which are difficult to obtain. Here we present a methodology for successful sampling and interpretation of contrail microphysical and radiative data using both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation on board the FAAM BAe146 UK research aircraft as part of the COntrails Spreading Into Cirrus (COSIC study.

    Forecast models were utilised to determine flight regions suitable for contrail formation and sampling; regions that were both free of cloud but showed a high probability of occurrence of air mass being supersaturated with respect to ice. The FAAM research aircraft, fitted with cloud microphysics probes and remote sensing instruments, formed a distinctive spiral-shaped contrail in the predicted area by flying in an orbit over the same ground position as the wind advected the contrails to the east. Parts of these contrails were sampled during the completion of four orbits, with sampled contrail regions being between 7 and 30 min old. Lidar measurements were useful for in-flight determination of the location and spatial extent of the contrails, and also to report extinction values that agreed well with those calculated from the microphysical data. A shortwave spectrometer was also able to detect the contrails, though the signal was weak due to the dispersion and evaporation of the contrails. Post-flight the UK Met Office NAME III dispersion model was successfully used as a tool for modelling the dispersion of the persistent contrail; determining its location and age, and determining when there was interference from other measured aircraft contrails or when cirrus encroached on the area later in the flight.

    The

  5. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. We consider contrails in various radiation scenarios herein defined by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness which controls the radiance incident on the contrail layer. Under suitable conditions, controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification, radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation is investigated. We consider homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores released from sublimated contrail ice crystals. In our model the contrail dynamics triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Furthermore, our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail. A cut of the soot particle emission by two orders of magnitude can reduce the contrail timescale by one hour and the optical thickness by a factor of 5. Hence future engines with lower soot particle emissions could potentially lead to a reduction of the climate impact of aviation.

  6. On the regional climatic impact of contrails: microphysical and radiative properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Strauss

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of contrail-induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for mean atmospheric conditions of southern Germany in the months of July and October. This is done by use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM. The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results representing climatological values with a modified case. In order to study the sensitivity of this effect on the radiative characteristics of the ice cloud, two types of additional ice clouds were modelled: cirrus and contrails, the latter cloud type containing a higher number of smaller and less of the larger cloud particles. Ice cloud parameters are calculated on the basis of a particle size distribution which covers the range from 2 to 2000 µm, taking into consideration recent measurements which show a remarkable amount of particles smaller than 20 µm. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase in the order of 1K, ranging from 1.1 to 1.2K in July and from 0.8 to 0.9K in October depending on the radiative characteristics of the air-traffic-induced ice clouds. Modelling the current contrail cloud cover which is near 0.5% over Europe yields a surface temperature increase in the order of 0.05K.

  7. On the regional climatic impact of contrails: microphysical and radiative properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Strauss

    Full Text Available The impact of contrail-induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for mean atmospheric conditions of southern Germany in the months of July and October. This is done by use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM. The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results representing climatological values with a modified case. In order to study the sensitivity of this effect on the radiative characteristics of the ice cloud, two types of additional ice clouds were modelled: cirrus and contrails, the latter cloud type containing a higher number of smaller and less of the larger cloud particles. Ice cloud parameters are calculated on the basis of a particle size distribution which covers the range from 2 to 2000 µm, taking into consideration recent measurements which show a remarkable amount of particles smaller than 20 µm. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase in the order of 1K, ranging from 1.1 to 1.2K in July and from 0.8 to 0.9K in October depending on the radiative characteristics of the air-traffic-induced ice clouds. Modelling the current contrail cloud cover which is near 0.5% over Europe yields a surface temperature increase in the order of 0.05K.

  8. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN; McMurry, PH [University of Minnesota

    2015-01-01

    The scientific foci of the New Particle Formation Study were the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols and the impacts of newly formed particles on cloud processes. Specifically, we planned to: (1) to identify the species and mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of new particle formation, i.e., the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters; (2) investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth; (4) create a comprehensive dataset related to new particle formation and growth that can be used as input for our own thermodynamic models as well as the modeling efforts by our Department of Energy (DOE) Aerosol Life Cycle working group collaborators; (5) characterize the increase of the number and activity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) due to particle formation and growth; (6) determine the regional extent of new particle formation to address the role that atmospheric transport plays in determining the impacts, if any, of new particle formation on cloud number and properties.

  9. Explosive formation of coherent particle jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David; Ruel, Jean-Frederic; Zarei, Zouya; Goroshin, Sam; Gregoire, Yann; Zhang, Fan; Milne, Alec; Longbottom, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    A high-speed jet of solid particles may be formed by detonating an explosive layer lining the outside of a conically-shaped volume of particles. Experiments have been carried out to determine the velocity history and the coherency of a particle jet formed using this shaped-charge arrangement. Important parameters include the cone angle, the ratio of the masses of the explosive and particles, and the particle size and density. Dense particles (e.g., iron) form thin, stable, coherent jets, whereas lighter particles (e.g., glass or Al) lead to more diffuse jets. The jet velocities observed experimentally were close to the predictions from a Gurney velocity formulation for conical geometry. The effects of cone angle and particle density on the jet formation and development were explored with calculations using a multimaterial hydrocode. The simulations indicate that the converging shock and Mach disk within the particle bed have a strong influence on the uniformity of the particle density field. With iron particles, the particle volume remains coherent whereas for glass particles, during the particle acceleration phase, the shock interactions within the particle bed cause the particles to be concentrated in a thin shell surrounding a low density region.

  10. MDF: Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format

    CERN Document Server

    Knopp, Tobias; Bringout, Gael; Ahlborg, Mandy; Rahmer, Jürgen; Hofmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a tomographic method to determine the spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles. In this document a file format for the standardized storage of MPI data is introduced. The aim of the Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format (MDF) is to provide a coherent way of exchanging MPI data acquired with different MPI scanners worldwide. The focus of the file format is on sequence parameters, raw measurement data, calibration data, and reconstruction data. The format is based on the hierarchical document format (HDF) in version 5 (HDF5).

  11. Aircraft induced contrail cirrus over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannstein, H.; Schumann, U. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Condensation trails (contrails) and aircraft induced cirrus are nowadays a common feature at the mid latitude skies. Previously the impact of aircraft induced cirrus changes has been roughly estimated from observed decadal trends in cirrus cover but the direct attribution of observed cirrus changes to changes in aviation activity remains uncertain. In this paper the amount of additional cirrus induced from spreading contrails in humid air is estimated from the direct correlation between observed cirrus cover derived with suitable methods from METEOSAT data and aviation flight density reported by EUROCONTROL at high spatial and temporal resolution from June 22 to July 27, 1998 and September 27 to October 21, 2000. The results indicate that the aircraft induced cirrus cover over Europe is about ten times larger than that of linear contrails in the same region. Radiative forcing from the additional cirrus may be more than 10 times higher than that of linear contrails and aviation induced CO{sub 2} increases. (orig.)

  12. LES and radiative properties of contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlond, A.; Schulz, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    A large eddy simulation (LES) model has been used to investigate the role of various external parameters and physical processes in the life-cycle of contrails. The model simulations indicate that the contrail evolution is controlled primarily by humidity, temperature and static stability of the ambient air and secondarily by the baroclinicity of the atmosphere. Moreover, the contrails generated from LESs have been used within a two-dimensional radiative transfer scheme to elucidate the effect of cloud inhomogeneity on the area averaged radiative properties of contrails. The results obtained indicate that differences in shortwave cloud albedo between homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions remain small as long as the optical depth is smaller than one. For higher optical depths larger differences were obtained at which the albedo for horizontally homogeneous conditions is always larger than the corresponding value for inhomogeneous conditions. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  13. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Homburg

    Full Text Available Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to investigate depolarization and wavelength dependencies of the light backscattered from ice crystals. These investigations are aimed at the formation and life cycles of contrails, their optical properties, and their climatological consequences in areas of dense air traffic. The experimental lidar setup is described and a sample measurement is shown.

  14. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Freudenthaler

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to investigate depolarization and wavelength dependencies of the light backscattered from ice crystals. These investigations are aimed at the formation and life cycles of contrails, their optical properties, and their climatological consequences in areas of dense air traffic. The experimental lidar setup is described and a sample measurement is shown.

  15. Spatial and optical parameters of contrails in the vortex and dispersion regime determined by means of a ground-based scanning lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenthaler, V.; Homburg, F.; Jaeger, H. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung (IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The spatial growth of individual condensation trails (contrails) of commercial aircrafts in the time range from 15 s to 60 min behind the aircraft is investigated by means of a ground-based scanning backscatter lidar. The growth in width is mainly governed by wind shear and varies between 18 m/min and 140 m/min. The growth of the cross-section varies between 3500 m{sup 2}/min and 25000 m{sup 2}/min. These values are in agreement with results of model calculations and former field measurements. The vertical growth is often limited by boundaries of the humid layer at flight level, but values up to 18 m/min were observed. Optical parameters like depolarization, optical depth and lidar ratio, i.e. the extinction-to-backscatter ratio, have been retrieved from the measurements at a wavelength of 532 nm. The linear depolarization rises from values as low as 0.06 for a young contrail (10 s old) to values around 0.5, typical for aged contrails. The latter indicates the transition from non-crystalline to crystalline particles in persistent contrails within a few minutes. The scatter of depolarization values measured in individual contrails is narrow, independent of the contrails age, and suggests a rather uniform growth of the particles inside a contrail. (author) 18 refs.

  16. Remote sensing of contrails and aircraft altered cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palikonda, R.; Nguyen, L.; Garber, D.P.; Smith, W.L. Jr [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Minnis, P.; Young, D.F. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1997-12-31

    Analyses of satellite imagery are used to show that contrails can develop into fully extended cirrus cloud systems. Contrails can be advective on great distances, but would appear to observers as natural cirrus clouds. The conversion of simple contrails into cirrus may help explain the apparent increase of cloudiness over populated areas since the beginning of commercial jet air travel. Statistics describing the typical growth, advection, and lifetime of contrail cirrus is needed to evaluate their effects on climate. (author) 4 refs.

  17. Microphysical and optical properties of contrails and cirrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayet, J.F.; Febvre, G. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferand (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Brogniez, G. [Universite des Sciences et Techniques de Lille, (France). Lab. d`Optique Atmospherique; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Larsen, H. [National Inst. for Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington (New Zealand)

    1997-12-31

    Aircraft contrails have significantly different properties to natural cirrus clouds. Their local and global climate impact cannot be assessed without consideration of these differences. Microphysical data were obtained from the Merlin aircraft equipped with a PMS FSSP-100 for particle spectrum measurements over the 3 {mu}m to 45 {mu}m diameter range; a PMS 2D-C for particle size spectrum and particle shape over the size range from 25 {mu}m to 800 {mu}m and a Johnson-Williams cloud liquid-water probe. Radiative measurements were obtained from a Do228 aircraft which carried the upward looking ALEX-F Lidar operating at a wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m and a Barnes PRT-5 radiometer aligned parallel to the lidar and with a 9 to 11 {mu}m spectral range. The limitation in accuracy of cloud microphysical sensor used in contrail studies are also discussed with subsequent errors on description of cloud radiative properties. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  18. Contrail Coverage Over the USA Derived from NOAA and EOS Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palikonda, Rabindra; Minnis, Patrick; Duda, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Contrails, like natural cirrus clouds, can cause a warming of the Earth-atmospheric system by absorbing longwave radiation from the surface and lower troposphere and radiating additional radiation back to the surface. They can also produce some cooling of the surface during the daytime by reflecting some sunlight back to space. Recently, Minnis et al. (2004) determined from surface observations of cirrus cloud cover that the overall impact appears to be a warming that is consistent with theoretical calculations, at least over the United States of America (USA) and surrounding areas. This finding highlights the need to better understand the formation and persistence of contrails and their radiative properties. To better assess the climatic impact of contrails, it is essential to determine the variability of the contrail microphysical properties, their impact on the atmospheric radiation budget, and their relationship to the atmospheric state. To that end, this paper continues the analyses of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data from the NOAA-15 (N15), NOAA-16 (N16), and NOAA-17 (N17) satellites, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the Terra and Aqua satellites. The combination of these satellites provides a relatively comprehensive coverage of the daily cycle of air traffic. Thus, it should be possible to use these data to help understand the impact of air traffic on the upper tropospheric humidity during the day as well as determine the local-time variability of contrail coverage. The results will be valuable for developing models of contrail effects and methods for mitigating the impact of aviation on climate.

  19. Basic Diagnosis and Prediction of Persistent Contrail Occurrence using High-resolution Numerical Weather Analyses/Forecasts and Logistic Regression. Part I: Effects of Random Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Straightforward application of the Schmidt-Appleman contrail formation criteria to diagnose persistent contrail occurrence from numerical weather prediction data is hindered by significant bias errors in the upper tropospheric humidity. Logistic models of contrail occurrence have been proposed to overcome this problem, but basic questions remain about how random measurement error may affect their accuracy. A set of 5000 synthetic contrail observations is created to study the effects of random error in these probabilistic models. The simulated observations are based on distributions of temperature, humidity, and vertical velocity derived from Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) weather analyses. The logistic models created from the simulated observations were evaluated using two common statistical measures of model accuracy, the percent correct (PC) and the Hanssen-Kuipers discriminant (HKD). To convert the probabilistic results of the logistic models into a dichotomous yes/no choice suitable for the statistical measures, two critical probability thresholds are considered. The HKD scores are higher when the climatological frequency of contrail occurrence is used as the critical threshold, while the PC scores are higher when the critical probability threshold is 0.5. For both thresholds, typical random errors in temperature, relative humidity, and vertical velocity are found to be small enough to allow for accurate logistic models of contrail occurrence. The accuracy of the models developed from synthetic data is over 85 percent for both the prediction of contrail occurrence and non-occurrence, although in practice, larger errors would be anticipated.

  20. Moisture Sensitivity of Contrail Forecast Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Special care must be taken to select a representative first guess for all values of the array or MATHCAD will not converge to the proper root. Profile 2A T...air must reach saturation in the wake for a contrail to form. Therefore, the saturation process within the wake is dependent on the amount of heat and...combustion would be added to the wake so contrail factor was a constant. He also believed the heat and moisture liberated by the combustion process was

  1. A Linear Programming Approach to the Development of Contrail Reduction Strategies Satisfying Operationally Feasible Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Yi-Nan; Sun, Dengfent

    2012-01-01

    A class of strategies has been proposed to reduce contrail formation in the United States airspace. A 3D grid based on weather data and the cruising altitude level of aircraft is adjusted to avoid the persistent contrail potential area with the consideration to fuel-efficiency. In this paper, the authors introduce a contrail avoidance strategy on 3D grid by considering additional operationally feasible constraints from an air traffic controller's aspect. First, shifting too many aircraft to the same cruising level will make the miles-in-trail at this level smaller than the safety separation threshold. Furthermore, the high density of aircraft at one cruising level may exceed the workload for the traffic controller. Therefore, in our new model we restrict the number of total aircraft at each level. Second, the aircraft count variation for successive intervals cannot be too drastic since the workload to manage climbing/descending aircraft is much larger than managing cruising aircraft. The contrail reduction is formulated as an integer-programming problem and the problem is shown to have the property of total unimodularity. Solving the corresponding relaxed linear programming with the simplex method provides an optimal and integral solution to the problem. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the methodology.

  2. Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    During recent years interest in the impact of commercial aircraft on the climate has increased. Aircraft might impact climate in a number of ways. Contrails are clearly a direct radiative forcing mechanism. Exhaust emissions, principally soot and sulfate, might indirectly radiative force the climate by modifying the properties of cirrus clouds. The SUCCESS program was carried out to investigate these issues. It also had several other goals including: better understanding the emissions from aircraft, better understanding the formation of cirrus clouds: better understanding the radiative properties of contrail and clouds and their remote sensing; better understanding the heterogeneous chemistry in the upper atmosphere; and developing new instruments of importance to atmospheric chemistry and cloud physics. SUCCESS took place during April and May of 1996. The NASA DC-8, ER-2, T-39, and 757 aircraft were used as in situ sampling, remote sensing, near field sampling, and emission sources respectively. Most of the operations occurred near the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site in Northern Oklahoma. The DOE operated several other aircraft so that on some days as many as six research aircraft operated together. Numerous new instruments operated during the mission. This talk will present an overview of SUCCESS from the operational point of view, and provide some of the overall scientific highlights.

  3. Contrail observations from space using NOAA-AVHRR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannstein, H. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The infrared channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard of the weather satellites of the NOAA series allow the detection of contrails. An automated detection scheme is described and tested against computer aided visual classifications by two experts. The algorithm seems to identify contrails within the satellite data with a skill comparable to the human observers. Clusters of contrails within the satellite images are connected to outline regions where the atmospheric properties are favourable for the existence of observable contrails. Air traffic data shows that, over Middle Europe at least, in the main flight levels most of these regions should be marked by detectable contrails. The mean areal coverage of these regions is estimated to be in the range of 10% to 20%, the cloud coverage by detected contrails was 0.9% in 60 AVHRR scenes covering Central Europe. (author) 3 refs.

  4. In situ observations of contrail micro-physics and implications for their radiative impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellot, M.R. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States); Arnott, W.P.; Hallett, J. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    1997-12-31

    Increasing levels of air traffic have raised concerns about the potential effects of aircraft exhaust on the climate. Current knowledge is expanded by examining in situ data from 21 contrails sampled at altitudes of 9.3 - 12.5 km and temperatures of -47 deg C to -66 deg C. The airborne equipment allowed measurements of particles as small as 2 {mu}m in diameter, which have not previously been reported. The microphysical characteristics of the contrails, which occurred in both clear and cloudy air, are presented and compared with natural cirrus properties. Computations of the wavelength-dependent radiative properties of the sampled particle distributions are also presented and compared with laboratory measurements. Finally, implications of these findings for climatic assessment are discussed. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  5. PENTACLE: Parallelized particle-particle particle-tree code for planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Oshino, Shoichi; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hori, Yasunori

    2017-10-01

    We have newly developed a parallelized particle-particle particle-tree code for planet formation, PENTACLE, which is a parallelized hybrid N-body integrator executed on a CPU-based (super)computer. PENTACLE uses a fourth-order Hermite algorithm to calculate gravitational interactions between particles within a cut-off radius and a Barnes-Hut tree method for gravity from particles beyond. It also implements an open-source library designed for full automatic parallelization of particle simulations, FDPS (Framework for Developing Particle Simulator), to parallelize a Barnes-Hut tree algorithm for a memory-distributed supercomputer. These allow us to handle 1-10 million particles in a high-resolution N-body simulation on CPU clusters for collisional dynamics, including physical collisions in a planetesimal disc. In this paper, we show the performance and the accuracy of PENTACLE in terms of \\tilde{R}_cut and a time-step Δt. It turns out that the accuracy of a hybrid N-body simulation is controlled through Δ t / \\tilde{R}_cut and Δ t / \\tilde{R}_cut ˜ 0.1 is necessary to simulate accurately the accretion process of a planet for ≥106 yr. For all those interested in large-scale particle simulations, PENTACLE, customized for planet formation, will be freely available from https://github.com/PENTACLE-Team/PENTACLE under the MIT licence.

  6. Ground-based lidar remote sensing of contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, H.; Freudenthaler, V.; Homburg, F.; Sussmann, R. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung (IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    A ground-based scanning lidar system with built-in CCD camera has been developed to investigate aerosols and persistent contrails in air traffic corridors with respect to growth and microphysical and optical properties. By calibrating CCD camera images with lidar information the optical depth of larger areas of contrail cover within the 40 degree viewing angle of the camera can be determined. This technique has been extended to investigate contrails in AVHRR satellite images. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  7. Measurement of Contrails Using ADS-B Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Voráček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air transport contributes to climate changes not only by greenhouse gas production but also because of production of contrails. The effect of contrails is less scientifically understood compared to greenhouse gases according to IPCC [3]. In order to be able to research the effect of contrails on the atmosphere, it is necessary to identify their realistic frequency of occurrence and to define the relationship between their occurrence and other factors. The effort to identify and monitor contrails and their dependence on the type of air traffic is the objective of SGS project.

  8. Thin and subvisible cirrus and contrails in a subsaturated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kübbeler

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of occurrence of cirrus clouds and contrails, their life time, ice crystal size spectra and thus their radiative properties depend strongly on the ambient distribution of the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice. Ice clouds do not form below a certain supersaturation and both cirrus and contrails need at least saturation conditions to persist over a longer period. Under subsaturated conditions, cirrus and contrails should dissipate. During the mid-latitude aircraft experiment CONCERT 2008 (CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT, RHice and ice crystals were measured in cirrus and contrails. Here, we present results from 2.3/1.7 h of observation in cirrus/contrails during 6 flights. Thin and subvisible cirrus with contrails embedded therein have been detected frequently in a subsaturated environment. Nevertheless, ice crystals up to radii of 50 μm and larger, but with low number densities were often observed inside the contrails as well as in the cirrus. Analysis of the meteorological situation indicates that the crystals in the contrails were entrained from the thin/subvisible cirrus clouds, which emerged in frontal systems with low updrafts. From model simulations of cirrus evaporation times it follows that such thin/subvisible cirrus can exist for time periods of a couple of hours and longer in a subsaturated environment and thus may represent a considerable part of the cirrus coverage.

  9. Climate impact of contrails: investigations by means of an atmospheric general circulation model; Klimawirkung von Kondensstreifen: Untersuchungen mit einem globalen atmosphaerischen Zirkulationsmodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquart, S. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    2003-07-01

    A parameterization of line-shaped contrails for use within the framework of a general circulation model (ECHAM) was developed for the first time. Contrail coverage, optical properties and radiative forcing are calculated at any model time step depending in a physically based manner on the respective conditions in the ambient air. In addition, possible effects on atmospheric parameters can be simulated, allowing for the determination of a climate sensitivity parameter especially for line-shaped contrails. Regional contrail cover as well as the large range of simulated optical depth values show a fair qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Sensitivity studies result in a lower global radiative forcing of line-shaped contrails than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (1999). Remaining uncertainties are mainly associated with poor knowledge of microphysical properties such as ice water content, particle shape and size. Considering future changes in air traffic density, and aircraft technology, as well as anthropogenic climate change, an increase of global contrail cover and radiative forcing by roughly a factor of four between 1992 and 2050 is simulated. (orig.)

  10. Determination of humidity and temperature fluctuations based on MOZAIC data and parametrisation of persistent contrail coverage for general circulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Gierens

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Humidity and temperature fluctuations at pressure levels between 166 and 290 hPa on the grid scale of general circulation models for a region covered by the routes of airliners, mainly over the Atlantic, have been determined by evaluation of the data obtained with almost 2000 flights within the MOZAIC programme. It is found that the distributions of the fluctuations cannot be modelled by Gaussian distributions, because large fluctuations appear with a relatively high frequency. Lorentz distributions were used for the analytical representation of the fluctuation distributions. From these a joint probability distribution has been derived for simultaneous temperature and humidity fluctuations. This function together with the criteria for the formation and persistence of contrails are used to derive the maximum possible fractional coverage of persistent contrails in a grid cell of a GCM. This can be employed in a statistical formulation of contrail appearance in a climate model.

  11. Determination of humidity and temperature fluctuations based on MOZAIC data and parametrisation of persistent contrail coverage for general circulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Gierens

    Full Text Available Humidity and temperature fluctuations at pressure levels between 166 and 290 hPa on the grid scale of general circulation models for a region covered by the routes of airliners, mainly over the Atlantic, have been determined by evaluation of the data obtained with almost 2000 flights within the MOZAIC programme. It is found that the distributions of the fluctuations cannot be modelled by Gaussian distributions, because large fluctuations appear with a relatively high frequency. Lorentz distributions were used for the analytical representation of the fluctuation distributions. From these a joint probability distribution has been derived for simultaneous temperature and humidity fluctuations. This function together with the criteria for the formation and persistence of contrails are used to derive the maximum possible fractional coverage of persistent contrails in a grid cell of a GCM. This can be employed in a statistical formulation of contrail appearance in a climate model.

  12. Contrail properties over the eastern North Pacific from AVHRR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnis, P. [Sciences Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center (United States); Palikonda, R.; Walter, B.J.; Kirk Ayers, J. [AS and M, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Mannstein, H. [DLR Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    An increase of air traffic over the North Pacific during the last 30 years has been accompanied by an increase in cirrus coverage. To help alleviate the uncertainty in the contribution of air traffic to the cirrus increase, an analysis of linear contrail coverage over the region has been initiated using afternoon NOAA-16 AVHRR data taken during 4 months in 2002 and 2003. Manual evaluation of the automated contrail detection method revealed that it misclassified, on average, 32% of the pixels as contrails and missed 15% of the contrail pixels. After correction for detection errors, the contrail coverage over the domain between 25 and 55 N and between 120 and 150 W varied from a minimum of 0.37% in February to a maximum of 0.56% in May, respectively. The annual mean coverage, after correcting for the diurnal cycle of air traffic, is 0.31%, a value very close to earlier theoretical estimates for the region. Contrail optical depths for the 4 months average 0.24 resulting in a mean unit contrail longwave radiative forcing of 14.2 Wm{sup -2}. The contrail optical depths are twice the mean value expected from theoretical estimates. (orig.)

  13. Particles formation in an expanding plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescoute, E.; Hallo, L.; Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Stenz, C. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CELIA, CNRS-CEA, 33 - Talence (France); Hebert, D.; Chevalier, J.M.; Rullier, J.L.; Palmier, S. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France)

    2009-08-15

    Interaction of a laser beam with a target generates a high velocity expanding plasma plume, solid debris and liquid nano- and micro-particles. They are produced from plasma recombination and vapor condensation and can be deposited on optical elements located nearby the target. Two distinct kinds of particles were observed depending on the temperature achieved in the plasma plume: large micrometer-size fragments for temperatures lower than the critical temperature, and very small nanometer-size particles for higher temperatures. The paper presents experimental observations of fragments and nano-particles in plasma plumes and a comparison with models. A good agreement has been found for nano-particle sizes and distributions. This simple modeling can also be used for nuclei production in the nanosecond time scale. Our estimates show that particle size can be correlated to laser wavelength and fluences.

  14. New insights on the formation of colloidal whey protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van L.E.; Snoeren, J.P.M.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Hamer, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the formation and properties of whey protein particle suspensions having different particle sizes and different abilities to form S–S bridges. Simple shear flow was used to control the protein particles size. The ability to form S–S bridges was steered by blocking the reactive

  15. On the climatic impact of contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, B.; Meerkoetter, R.; Wissinger, B.; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The impact of contrail induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for atmospheric conditions of Southern Germany that are typical for the months of July and October. This is done by the use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM). The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results using averaged climatological values of cloudiness with those of a case with modified cloudiness. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase of 1.4 K and 1.2 K for the months of July and October, respectively. (author) 14 refs.

  16. A multi-approach to the optical depth of a contrail cirrus cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Navarro, Margarita; Bugliaro, Luca; Schumann, Ulrich; Strandgren, Johan; Wirth, Martin; Voigt, Christiane

    2017-04-01

    Amongst the individual aviation emissions, contrail cirrus contribute the largest fraction to the aviation effects on climate. To investigate the optical depth from contrail cirrus, we selected a cirrus and contrail cloud outbreak on the 10th April 2014 between the North Sea and Switzerland detected during the ML-CIRRUS experiment (Voigt et al., 2017). The outbreak was not forecast by weather prediction models. We describe its origin and evolution using a combination of in-situ measurements, remote sensing approaches and contrail prediction model prognosis. The in-situ and lidar measurements were carried out with the HALO aircraft, where the cirrus was first identified. Model predictions from the contrail prediction model CoCiP (Schumann et al., 2012) point to an anthropogenic origin. The satellite pictures from the SEVIRI imager on MSG combined with the use of a contrail cluster tracking algorithm enable the automatic assessment of the origin, displacement and growth of the cloud and the correct labeling of cluster pixels. The evolution of the optical depth and particle size of the selected cluster pixels were derived using the CiPS algorithm, a neural network primarily based on SEVIRI images. The CoCiP forecast of the cluster compared to the actual cluster tracking show that the model correctly predicts the occurrence of the cluster and its advection direction although the cluster spreads faster than simulated. The optical depth derived from CiPS and from the airborne high spectral resolution lidar WALES are compared and show a remarkably good agreement. This confirms that the new CiPS algorithm is a very powerful tool for the assessment of the optical depth of even optically thinner cirrus clouds. References: Schumann, U.: A contrail cirrus prediction model, Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 543-580, doi: 10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012, 2012. Voigt, C., Schumann, U., Minikin, A., Abdelmonem, A., Afchine, A., Borrmann, S., Boettcher, M., Buchholz, B., Bugliaro, L., Costa, A

  17. Kinetic nucleation and ions in boreal forest particle formation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain a more comprehensive picture on different mechanisms behind atmospheric particle formation, measurement results from QUEST 2-campaign are analyzed with an aid of an aerosol dynamic model. A special emphasis is laid on air ion and charged aerosol dynamics. Model simulations indicate that kinetic nucleation of ammonia and sulphuric acid together with condensation of sulphuric acid and low-volatile organic vapours onto clusters and particles explain basic features of particle formation events as well as ion characteristics. However, an observed excess of negative ions in the diameter range 1.5-3nm and overcharge of 3-5nm particles demonstrate that ions are also involved in particle formation. These observations can be explained by preferential condensation of sulphuric acid onto negatively charged clusters and particles and/or contribution of ion-induced nucleation on particle formation. According to model simulations, which assume that the nucleation rate is equal to the sulfuric acid collision rate, the relative contribution of ion-based particle formation seems to be smaller than kinetic nucleation of neutral clusters. Conducted model simulations also corroborate the recently-presented hypothesis according to which a large number of so-called thermodynamically stable clusters (TSCs having a diameter between 1-3nm exist in the atmosphere. TSCs were found to grow to observable sizes only under favorable conditions, e.g. when the pre-existing particle concentration was low.

  18. Observations of particles at their formation sizes in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Rohan; Pushpawela, Buddhi; He, Congrong; Li, Hui; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-07-01

    New particle formation (NPF) has been observed in many highly polluted environments of South East Asia, including Beijing, where the extent of its contribution to intense haze events is still an open question. Estimated characteristics of NPF events, such as their starting times and formation and growth rates of particles, are more accurate when the detection range of particles extends to smaller sizes. In order to understand the very first steps of particle formation, we used a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) to investigate particle characteristics at sizes exactly at which atmospheric nucleation and cluster activity occurs. Observations over a continuous 3-month period in Beijing showed 26 NPF events. These events generally coincided with periods with relatively clean air when the wind direction was from the less industrialised north. No NPF events were observed when the daily mean PM2. 5 concentration exceeded 43 µg m-3, which was the upper threshold for particle formation in Beijing. The fraction of particles that are charged in the size range 2-42 nm was normally about 15 %. However, this fraction increased to 20-30 % during haze events and decreased to below 10 % during NPF events. With the NAIS, we very precisely determined the starting times of NPF to a greater accuracy than has been possible in Beijing before and provided a temporal distribution of NPF events with a maximum at about 08:30 LT. Particle formation rates varied between 12 and 38 cm-3 s-1. Particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range of 0.5-9.0 nm h-1. These results are more reliable than previous studies in Beijing as the measurements were conducted for the first time at the exact sizes at which clusters form into particles and provide useful insight into the formation of haze events.

  19. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation – knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  20. Contrail frequency over Europe from NOAA-satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gayler

    Full Text Available Contrail cloudiness over Europe and the eastern part of the North Atlantic Ocean was analyzed for the two periods September 1979 - December 1981 and September 1989 - August 1992 by visual inspection of quicklook photographic prints of NOAA/AVHRR infrared images. The averaged contrail cover exhibits maximum values along the transatlantic flight corridor around 50 °N (of almost 2% and over western Europe resulting in 0.5% contrail cloudiness on average. A strong yearly cycle appears with a maximum (<2% in spring and summer over the Atlantic and a smaller maximum (<1% in winter over southwestern Europe. Comparing the two time periods, which are separated by one decade, shows there is a significant decrease in contrail cloudiness over western Europe and a significant increase over the North Atlantic between March and July. Contrail cloud cover during daytime is about twice as high as during nighttime. Contrails are found preferentially in larger fields of 1000 km diameter which usually last for more than a day. Causes, possible errors and consequences are discussed.

  1. Contrail frequency over Europe from NOAA-satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bakan

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Contrail cloudiness over Europe and the eastern part of the North Atlantic Ocean was analyzed for the two periods September 1979 - December 1981 and September 1989 - August 1992 by visual inspection of quicklook photographic prints of NOAA/AVHRR infrared images. The averaged contrail cover exhibits maximum values along the transatlantic flight corridor around 50 °N (of almost 2% and over western Europe resulting in 0.5% contrail cloudiness on average. A strong yearly cycle appears with a maximum (<2% in spring and summer over the Atlantic and a smaller maximum (<1% in winter over southwestern Europe. Comparing the two time periods, which are separated by one decade, shows there is a significant decrease in contrail cloudiness over western Europe and a significant increase over the North Atlantic between March and July. Contrail cloud cover during daytime is about twice as high as during nighttime. Contrails are found preferentially in larger fields of 1000 km diameter which usually last for more than a day. Causes, possible errors and consequences are discussed.

  2. Influence of weather conditions on the distribution of persistent contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaestner, M.; Meyer, R.; Wendling, P.

    1998-11-01

    An automated contrail detection algorithm has been applied to AVHRR data to obtain the position of contrails. Nearly simultaneous data from the Europe model of the Deutscher Wetterdienst have been used to find typical weather conditions associated with 742 persistent contrails. Further, a flow pattern analysis identifies in typical regions where the occurrence of contrails was above average. These regions are in the upper atmosphere: (a) ahead of a surface warm front either in moist warm layers before the cirrus clouds arrive or more likely with the cirrus in a warm conveyor belt and (b) ahead of a surface cold front in rapidly moving cold air in the turbulent regions near a band of strong wind (though the speed is not necessarily as high as in a jet). Usually, the atmosphere is baroclinic in the contrail region. Most of the detected contrails occur in divergent flow patterns in the upper troposphere in slowly rising warm or locally turbulent cold air masses. (orig.) 23 refs.

  3. Ice Formation by Soot-Containing Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Carrico, C. M.; Bennett, M. R.; Stanglmaier, R.; Volckens, J.; Popovicheva, O. B.

    2006-12-01

    A role for soot particles as atmospheric ice forming nuclei remains highly uncertain and poorly quantified. A relatively small amount of data exists and most of this is for laboratory surrogates that may not be well characterized or of assured relevance to the atmosphere. It is important to constrain the role of soot particles as ice nuclei due to their abundance in the atmosphere and the large contribution from anthropogenic activities. Further, global climate models are beginning to be capable of treating the impact of different aerosol types, including soot particles. This paper reports on studies of ice formation by or within surrogates for hydrophobic soot and realistic carbonaceous particles from combustion of fuel in a diesel engine, burning of an assortment biomass materials, and real jet fuel combustor particles. Measurements of primarily monodisperse particles were focused below -30°C to emphasize the transition between temperatures where heterogeneous ice nucleation is required for ice formation and those for which homogeneous freezing processes are also possible. Ice nucleation measurements were made with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. Simultaneous measurements of hygroscopic water uptake and cloud condensation nucleation behavior were also made at 30°C for each aerosol type. Small fractions of hydrophobic soot particles are found capable of initiating heterogeneous ice formation at low temperatures. Results of studies of more realistic particles suggest that any process that increases hygroscopicity tends to limit the conditions for ice formation within soot particles. Most biomass burning particles, showing a range of dry/wet diameter hygroscopic growth factors (1.03 activity as CCN to 102% RH, yet behaved as particles containing solutions in which homogeneous freezing was supported at temperatures below -38°C. This is tentatively attributed to condensation of semi-volatiles during cooling. Ice forming ability as warm as -30°C was limited to

  4. Particle formation with supercritical fluids challenges and limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Türk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Particle formation with supercritical fluids is a promising alternative to conventional precipitation processes as it allows the reduction of particle size and control of morphology and particle size distribution without degradation or contamination of the product. The book comprehensively examines the current status of research and development and provides perspectives and insights on promising future directions. The introduction to high pressure and high temperature phase equilibria and nucleation phenomena provides the basic principles of the underlying physical and chemical phenomena, allowing the reader an understanding of the relationship between process conditions and particle characteristics. Bridging the gap between theory and application, the book imparts the scientific and engineering fundamentals for innovative particle formation processes. The interdisciplinary "modus operandi" will encourage cooperation between scientists and researchers from different but complementary disciplines. Focuses on ...

  5. CONTRAIL - Architecture design and QoS constraints matching algorithms in Federations

    OpenAIRE

    Coppola, Massimo; Dazzi, Patrizio; Carlini, Emanuele; Righetti, Giacomo; et al.

    2011-01-01

    This deliverable analyses both functionality and algorithms for Contrail Federations and provides an architectural design which takes into account aspects of Identity management and Security. The Federation plays a central role in Contrail: users access Contrail resources through the Federation, which is one the main selling points of Contrail. A Federation can be seen as a bridge between cloud users and cloud providers, since it mediates between users' requests and providers owning the resou...

  6. How do organic vapors contribute to new-particle formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Riipinen, Ilona; Riccobono, Francesco; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Highly oxidised organic vapors can effectively stabilize sulphuric acid in heteronuclear clusters and drive new-particle formation. We present quantum chemical calculations of cluster stability, showing that multifunctional species can stabilize sulphuric acid and also present additional polar functional groups for subsequent cluster growth. We also model the multi-generation oxidation of vapors associated with secondary organic aerosol formation using a two-dimensional volatility basis set. The steady-state saturation ratios and absolute concentrations of extremely low volatility products are sufficient to drive new-particle formation with sulphuric acid at atmospherically relevant rates.

  7. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  8. On the transition of contrails into cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.; Kaercher, B.; Petzold, A.; Srauss, B.; Wendling, P. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Duroure, C.; Gayet, J.F. [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France). Lab. Associe de Meteorologie Physique; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1998-07-01

    In situ observations of the microphysical properties of upper tropospheric contrails and cirrus clouds have been performed during more than 15 airborne missions over Central Europe. Experimental and technical aspects concerning in situ characterization of ice clouds with the help of optical and nonoptical detection methods (preferably FSSP-300 and Hallet-replicator) are addressed. The development of contrails into cirrus clouds on the time scale of 1 hour is discussed in terms of a representative set of number densities, size- and surface area distributions of aerosols and cloud elements, with special emphasis on small ice crystals (diameter <20 {mu}m). Contrails are dominated by high concentrations (>100/cm{sup 3}) of nearly spherical ice crystals with mean diameters in the range 1-10 {mu}m. Young cirrus clouds which mostly contain small regularly shaped ice crystals in the range 10-20 {mu}m diameter and typical concentrations 2-5/cm{sup 3} have been observed. Measurement results are compared to simple parcel model calculations to identify parameters relevant for the contrail-cirrus transition. Observations and model estimates suggest that contrail growth is only weakly, if at all, affected by pre-existing cirrus clouds. (orig.) 57 refs.

  9. BMP-2 and titanium particles synergistically activate osteoclast formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S.X.; Guo, H.H.; Zhang, J.; Yu, B.; Sun, K.N.; Jin, Q.H.

    2014-01-01

    A previous study showed that BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2) and wear debris can separately support osteoclast formation induced by the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). However, the effect of BMP-2 on wear debris-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. In this study, we show that neither titanium particles nor BMP-2 can induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cells but that BMP-2 synergizes with titanium particles to enhance osteoclast formation in the presence of RANKL, and that at a low concentration, BMP-2 has an optimal effect to stimulate the size and number of multinuclear osteoclasts, expression of osteoclast genes, and resorption area. Our data also clarify that the effects caused by the increase in BMP-2 on phosphorylated SMAD levels such as c-Fos expression increased throughout the early stages of osteoclastogenesis. BMP-2 and titanium particles stimulate the expression of p-JNK, p-P38, p-IkB, and P50 compared with the titanium group. These data suggested that BMP-2 may be a crucial factor in titanium particle-mediated osteoclast formation. PMID:24820069

  10. Observation of new particle formation in subtropical urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the new particle formation events in a subtropical urban environment in the Southern Hemisphere. The study measured the number concentration of particles and its size distribution in Brisbane, Australia during 2009. The variation of particle number concentration and nucleation burst events were characterised as well as the particle growth rate which was first reported in urban environment of Australia. The annual average NUFP, NAitken and NNuc were 9.3×103, 3.7×103 and 5.6×103 cm−3, respectively. Weak seasonal variation in number concentration was observed. Local traffic exhaust emissions were a major contributor of the pollution (NUFP observed in morning which was dominated by the Aitken mode particles, while particles formed by secondary formation processes contributed to the particle number concentration during afternoon. Overall, 65 nucleation burst events were identified during the study period. Nucleation burst events were classified into two groups, with and without particles growth after the burst of nucleation mode particles observed. The average particle growth rate of the nucleation events was 4.6 nm h−1 (ranged from 1.79–7.78 nm h−1. Case studies of the nucleation burst events were characterised including (i the nucleation burst with particle growth which is associated with the particle precursor emitted from local traffic exhaust emission, (ii the nucleation burst without particle growth which is due to the transport of industrial emissions from the coast to Brisbane city or other possible sources with unfavourable conditions which suppressed particle growth and (iii interplay between the above two cases which demonstrated the impact of the vehicle and industrial emissions on the variation of particle number concentration and its size

  11. Preparation of janus particles with different stabilizers and formation of one-dimensional particle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Shohei; Tokuda, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Toyoko; Minami, Hideto

    2015-01-20

    Janus particles with two hemispheres having different stabilizers, a polystyrene (PS) phase stabilized by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (PS(PAA)) and a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) phase stabilized by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) (PMMA(PVP)), were synthesized by the solvent-absorbing/releasing method of PS(PAA)/PMMA(PVP) composite particles with a core-shell structure. The PS(PAA)/PMMA(PVP) composite particles were prepared by seeded dispersion polymerization of MMA using PVP as stabilizer in the presence of PS seed particles stabilized by PAA. We also demonstrated the facile formation of the colloidal chains via hydrogen bonding interaction between different stabilizers.

  12. Modelling the formation of organic particles in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Anttila

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle formation resulting from activation of inorganic stable clusters by a supersaturated organic vapour was investigated using a numerical model. The applied aerosol dynamic model included a detailed description of the activation process along with a treatment of the appropriate aerosol and gas-phase processes. The obtained results suggest that both gaseous sulphuric acid and organic vapours contribute to organic particle formation in continental background areas. The initial growth of freshly-nucleated clusters is driven mainly by condensation of gaseous sulphuric acid and by a lesser extent self-coagulation. After the clusters have reached sizes of around 2 nm in diameter, low-volatile organic vapours start to condense spontaneously into the clusters, thereby accelerating their growth to detectable sizes. A shortage of gaseous sulphuric acid or organic vapours limit, or suppress altogether, the particle formation, since freshly-nucleated clusters are rapidly coagulated away by pre-existing particles. The obtained modelling results were applied to explaining the observed seasonal cycle in the number of aerosol formation events in a continental forest site.

  13. Gold particle formation via photoenhanced deposition on lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniewski, A. M.; Meeks, V.; Nemanich, R. J.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we report on a technique to reduce gold chloride into sub-micron particles and nanoparticles. We use photoelectron transfer from periodically polarized lithium niobate (PPLN) illuminated with above band gap light to drive the surface reactions required for the reduction and particle formation. The particle sizes and distributions on the PPLN surface are sensitive to the solution concentration, with inhibited nucleation and large particles (>150 nm) for both low (2E-8M to 9E-7M) and high (1E-5M to 1E-3M) concentrations of gold chloride. At midrange values of the concentration, nucleation is more frequent, resulting in smaller sized particles (<150 nm). We compare the deposition process to that for silver, which has been previously studied. We find that the reduction of gold chloride into nanoparticles is inhibited compared to silver ion reduction, due to the multi-step reaction required for gold particle formation. This also has consequences for the resulting deposition patterns: while silver deposits into nanowires along boundaries between areas with opposite signed polarizations, such patterning of the deposition is not observed for gold, for a wide range of concentrations studied (2E-8 to 1E-3M).

  14. Gold particle formation via photoenhanced deposition on lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaniewski, A.M., E-mail: azaniews@asu.edu; Meeks, V.; Nemanich, R.J.

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Gold chloride is reduced into solid gold nanoparticles at the surface of a polarized semiconductor. • Reduction processes are driven by ultraviolet light. • Gold nanoparticle and silver nanoparticle deposition patterns are compared. - Abstract: In this work, we report on a technique to reduce gold chloride into sub-micron particles and nanoparticles. We use photoelectron transfer from periodically polarized lithium niobate (PPLN) illuminated with above band gap light to drive the surface reactions required for the reduction and particle formation. The particle sizes and distributions on the PPLN surface are sensitive to the solution concentration, with inhibited nucleation and large particles (>150 nm) for both low (2E−8M to 9E−7M) and high (1E−5M to 1E−3M) concentrations of gold chloride. At midrange values of the concentration, nucleation is more frequent, resulting in smaller sized particles (<150 nm). We compare the deposition process to that for silver, which has been previously studied. We find that the reduction of gold chloride into nanoparticles is inhibited compared to silver ion reduction, due to the multi-step reaction required for gold particle formation. This also has consequences for the resulting deposition patterns: while silver deposits into nanowires along boundaries between areas with opposite signed polarizations, such patterning of the deposition is not observed for gold, for a wide range of concentrations studied (2E−8 to 1E−3M).

  15. Formation mechanism of the shock-induced particle jetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kun

    Granular shells or rings dispersed by the impulsive shock loadings disintegrate into macroscopic particle agglomerates which soon protrude into particle jets. Predicting the number of shock-induced particle jets requires the knowledge of the formation mechanism of the particle jetting. We carried out the numerical simulations of the shock dispersal of the semi-two dimensional particle rings using the discrete element method. The simulations reveal a two-staged jetting formation process. The first phase features the transition of the homogeneous particle flows to the localized shear flows which are the precursors of the incipient jets. The incipient jets undergo the substantial annihilation. The number of jets equals to the number of incipient jets subtracted by that of eliminated ones. The former depends on the heterogeneous structure of the network of force chains which is a function of the perimeter of the inner surface, the packing density and the material properties. The latter is determined by the shock loading, the packing density and the thickness of the ring. A physics based model has been proposed to account for the number of jet, which formularizes the initiation and the elimination processes of the incipient jets.

  16. Direct observation of new particle formation during ozonolysis of isoprene and ethene competing against the growth of preexisting particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Sato, Kei; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation during the ozonolysis of isoprene and ethene in the presence of ammonium nitrate seed particles (surface area concentrations = (0.8-3) × 107 nm2 cm-3) was investigated using a 1 nm scanning mobility particle sizer. Based on the size distribution of formed particles, particles with a diameter smaller than the minimum diameter of the seed particles (less than ∼6 nm) formed under dry conditions, but the formation of such particles was substantially suppressed during isoprene ozonolysis and was not observed during ethane ozonolysis under humid conditions. We propose that oligomeric hydroperoxides generated by stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs), including C1-sCI (CH2OO), contribute to new particle formation while competing to be taken up onto preexisting particles. The OH reaction products of isoprene and ethene seem to not contribute to new particle formation; however, they are taken up onto preexisting particles and contribute to particle growth.

  17. DEM Simulation of Particle Stratification and Segregation in Stockpile Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dizhe; Zhou, Zongyan; Pinson, David

    2017-06-01

    Granular stockpiles are commonly observed in nature and industry, and their formation has been extensively investigated experimentally and mathematically in the literature. One of the striking features affecting properties of stockpiles are the internal patterns formed by the stratification and segregation processes. In this work, we conduct a numerical study based on DEM (discrete element method) model to study the influencing factors and triggering mechanisms of these two phenomena. With the use of a previously developed mixing index, the effects of parameters including size ratio, injection height and mass ratio are investigated. We found that it is a void-filling mechanism that differentiates the motions of particles with different sizes. This mechanism drives the large particles to flow over the pile surface and segregate at the pile bottom, while it also pushes small particles to fill the voids between large particles, giving rise to separate layers. Consequently, this difference in motion will result in the observed stratification and segregation phenomena.

  18. New particle formation in the Svalbard region 2006-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzenberg, Jost; Tunved, Peter; Galí, Martí; Leck, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Events of new particle formation (NPF) were analyzed in a 10-year data set of hourly particle size distributions recorded on Mt. Zeppelin, Spitsbergen, Svalbard. Three different types of NPF events were identified through objective search algorithms. The first and simplest algorithm utilizes short-term increases in particle concentrations below 25 nm (PCT (percentiles) events). The second one builds on the growth of the sub-50 nm diameter median (DGR (diameter growth) events) and is most closely related to the classical banana type of event. The third and most complex, multiple-size approach to identifying NPF events builds on a hypothesis suggesting the concurrent production of polymer gel particles at several sizes below ca. 60 nm (MEV (multi-size growth) events). As a first and general conclusion, we can state that NPF events are a summer phenomenon and not related to Arctic haze, which is a late winter to early spring feature. The occurrence of NPF events appears to be somewhat sensitive to the available data on precipitation. The seasonal distribution of solar flux suggests some photochemical control that may affect marine biological processes generating particle precursors and/or atmospheric photochemical processes that generate condensable vapors from precursor gases. Notably, the seasonal distribution of the biogenic methanesulfonate (MSA) follows that of the solar flux although it peaks before the maxima in NPF occurrence. A host of ancillary data and findings point to varying and rather complex marine biological source processes. The potential source regions for all types of new particle formation appear to be restricted to the marginal-ice and open-water areas between northeastern Greenland and eastern Svalbard. Depending on conditions, yet to be clarified new particle formation may become visible as short bursts of particles around 20 nm (PCT events), longer events involving condensation growth (DGR events), or extended events with elevated

  19. Antarctic new particle formation from continental biogenic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-M. Kyrö

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over Antarctica, aerosol particles originate almost entirely from marine areas, with minor contribution from long-range transported dust or anthropogenic material. The Antarctic continent itself, unlike all other continental areas, has been thought to be practically free of aerosol sources. Here we present evidence of local aerosol production associated with melt-water ponds in continental Antarctica. We show that in air masses passing such ponds, new aerosol particles are efficiently formed and these particles grow up to sizes where they may act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The precursor vapours responsible for aerosol formation and growth originate very likely from highly abundant cyanobacteria Nostoc commune (Vaucher communities of local ponds. This is the first time freshwater vegetation has been identified as an aerosol precursor source. The influence of the new source on clouds and climate may increase in future Antarctica, and possibly elsewhere undergoing accelerating summer melting of semi-permanent snow cover.

  20. First star formation in ultralight particle dark matter cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Sullivan, James M.; Bromm, Volker

    2018-01-01

    The formation of the first stars in the high-redshift Universe is a sensitive probe of the small-scale, particle physics nature of dark matter (DM). We carry out cosmological simulations of primordial star formation in ultralight, axion-like particle DM cosmology, with masses of 10-22 and 10-21 eV, with de Broglie wavelengths approaching galactic scales (∼ kpc). The onset of star formation is delayed, and shifted to more massive host structures. For the lightest DM particle mass explored here, first stars form at z ∼ 7 in structures with ∼109 M⊙, compared to the standard minihalo environment within the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, where z ∼ 20-30 and ∼105-106 M⊙. Despite this greatly altered DM host environment, the thermodynamic behaviour of the metal-free gas as it collapses into the DM potential well asymptotically approaches a very similar evolutionary track. Thus, the fragmentation properties are predicted to remain the same as in ΛCDM cosmology, implying a similar mass scale for the first stars. These results predict intense starbursts in the axion cosmologies, which may be amenable to observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  1. The Use of Meteorlogical Data to Improve Contrail Detection in Thermal Imagery over Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Gillian M.; Cawkwell, Fiona; Mannstein, Hermann; Minnis, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft induced contrails have been found to have a net warming influence on the climate system, with strong regional dependence. Persistent linear contrails are detectable in 1 Km thermal imagery and, using an automated Contrail Detection Algorithm (CDA), can be identified on the basis of their different properties at the 11 and 12 m w av.el enTgthshe algorithm s ability to distinguish contrails from other linear features depends on the sensitivity of its tuning parameters. In order to keep the number of false identifications low, the algorithm imposes strict limits on contrail size, linearity and intensity. This paper investigates whether including additional information (i.e. meteorological data) within the CDA may allow for these criteria to be less rigorous, thus increasing the contrail-detection rate, without increasing the false alarm rate.

  2. Quantification of key parameters for treating contrails in a large scale climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponater, M.; Gierens, K. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-01

    The general objective of this project, to determine contrail key parameters with respect to their climate effect, has been approached by three tasks: (1) quantification of microphysical key parameters, (2) development of a contrail coverage parametrization for climate models, and (3) determination of the worldwide coverage with persistent contrails due to present day air traffic. The microphysical key parameters are determined using microphysical box model simulations. The contrail parametrization was achieved by deriving (from aircraft measurements) the instantaneous fluctuations of temperature and relative humidity that occur on spatial scales beyond the resolution of climate models. The global and annual mean coverage by persistent contrails was calculated from ECMWF numerical analyses and from actual air traffic density. It was found to be currently about 0.1%, though the atmosphere has the potential to form persistent contrails over a much larger area. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  3. Identification and quantification of particle growth channels during new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Pennington

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF is a key source of ambient ultrafine particles that may contribute substantially to the global production of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. While NPF is driven by atmospheric nucleation, its impact on CCN concentration depends strongly on atmospheric growth mechanisms since the growth rate must exceed the loss rate due to scavenging in order for the particles to reach the CCN size range. In this work, chemical composition measurements of 20 nm diameter particles during NPF in Hyytiälä, Finland, in March–April 2011 permit identification and quantitative assessment of important growth channels. In this work we show the following: (A sulfuric acid, a key species associated with atmospheric nucleation, accounts for less than half of particle mass growth during this time period; (B the sulfate content of a growing particle during NPF is quantitatively explained by condensation of gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules (i.e., sulfuric acid uptake is collision-limited; (C sulfuric acid condensation substantially impacts the chemical composition of preexisting nanoparticles before new particles have grown to a size sufficient to be measured; (D ammonium and sulfate concentrations are highly correlated, indicating that ammonia uptake is driven by sulfuric acid uptake; (E sulfate neutralization by ammonium does not reach the predicted thermodynamic end point, suggesting that a barrier exists for ammonia uptake; (F carbonaceous matter accounts for more than half of the particle mass growth, and its oxygen-to-carbon ratio (~ 0.5 is characteristic of freshly formed secondary organic aerosol; and (G differences in the overall growth rate from one formation event to another are caused by variations in the growth rates of all major chemical species, not just one individual species.

  4. Characterization of particle number size distribution and new particle formation in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Chuan; Peng, Jianfei; He, Lingyan; Cao, Liming; Zhu, Qiao; Cui, Jie; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of particle number size distribution (PND) and new particle formation (NPF) events in Southern China is essential for mitigation strategies related to submicron particles and their effects on regional air quality, haze, and human health. In this study, seven field measurement campaigns were conducted from December 2013 to May 2015 using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) at four sites in Southern China, including three urban sites and one background site. Particles were measured in the size range of 15-615nm, and the median particle number concentrations (PNCs) were found to vary in the range of 0.3×104-2.2×104cm-3 at the urban sites and were approximately 0.2×104cm-3 at the background site. The peak diameters at the different sites varied largely from 22 to 102nm. The PNCs in the Aitken mode (25-100nm) at the urban sites were up to 10 times higher than they were at the background site, indicating large primary emissions from traffic at the urban sites. The diurnal variations of PNCs were significantly influenced by both rush hour traffic at the urban sites and NPF events. The frequencies of NPF events at the different sites were 0%-30%, with the highest frequency occurring at an urban site during autumn. With higher SO2 concentrations and higher ambient temperatures being necessary, NPF at the urban site was found to be more influenced by atmospheric oxidizing capability, while NPF at the background site was limited by the condensation sink. This study provides a unique dataset of particle number and size information in various environments in Southern China, which can help understand the sources, formation, and the climate forcing of aerosols in this quickly developing region, as well as help constrain and validate NPF modeling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The evolution of contrail microphysics in the vortex phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterstrasser, S.; Gierens, K. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Spichtinger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. for Atmospheric and Climate Science

    2008-04-15

    We investigate the evolution of contrails during the vortex phase using numerical simulations. Emphasis is placed on microphysical properties and on the vertical distribution of ice mass and number concentration at the end of the vortex phase. Instead of using a 3D model which would be preferable but computationally too costly, we use a 2D model equipped with a special tool for controlling vortex decay. We conduct a great number of sensitivity studies for one aircraft type. It turns out that atmospheric parameters, namely supersaturation, temperature, stability and turbulence level have the biggest impact on the number of ice crystals and on the ice mass that survives until vortex breakup and that therefore makes up the persistent contrail in supersaturated air. The initial ice crystal number density and its distribution in the vortex, are of minor importance. (orig.)

  6. The evolution of contrail microphysics in the vortex phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Unterstrasser

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the evolution of contrails during the vortex phase using numerical simulations. Emphasis is placed on microphysical properties and on the vertical distribution of ice mass and number concentration at the end of the vortex phase. Instead of using a 3D model which would be preferable but computationally too costly, we use a 2D model equipped with a special tool for controlling vortex decay. We conduct a great number of sensitivity studies for one aircraft type. It turns out that atmospheric parameters, namely supersaturation, temperature, stability and turbulence level have the biggest impact on the number of ice crystals and on the ice mass that survives until vortex breakup and that therefore makes up the persistent contrail in supersaturated air. The initial ice crystal number density and its distribution in the vortex, are of minor importance.

  7. Star-forming galactic contrails as a source of metal enrichment and ionizing radiation at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Michael; Becker, George D.; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Gauthier, Jean-Rene

    2014-06-01

    A spectroscopically detected Lyman α emitting halo at redshift 3.216 in the GOODS-N field is found to reside at the convergence of several line-emitting filaments. Spatially extended emission apparently by He II 1640 Å and several metal transitions is seen within several arcseconds from the position of the central galaxy. The V = 24.9 galaxy mainly responsible for the continuum emission at the centre of the halo has broad-band colours and spectral features consistent with a z = 3.216 star-forming galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope images show that some of the filaments coincide, in projection, with several, mostly blue galaxies, with pronounced head-tail structures partly aligned with each other. These objects, for which we cannot rule that they are foreground, chance projections in front of the high-redshift halo, are seen over an area with a linear extent of at least 12 arcsec. The broad-band images of some galaxies suggest the presence of ram-pressure stripping, including possible evidence for recent star formation in the stripped contrails. Spatial gradients in the appearance of several galaxies may represent a stream of galaxies passing from a colder to a hotter intergalactic medium. The release of the enriched interstellar medium from galaxies and the occurrence of star formation and stellar feedback in the galactic contrails suggest a mechanism for the metal enrichment of the high-redshift intergalactic medium that does not require long-range galactic winds. If these galaxies are at the same redshift as the Lyα halo, their very blue colours may be a consequence of the stripping of gas. A stripped stellar population and star formation in galactic contrails suggest promising sites for the escape of ionizing radiation from high-redshift galaxies.

  8. Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing from contrails and aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The radiative forcing from aviation-induced cloudiness is investigated by using the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5 in the present (2006 and the future (through 2050. Global flight distance is projected to increase by a factor of 4 between 2006 and 2050. However, simulated contrail cirrus radiative forcing in 2050 can reach 87 mW m−2, an increase by a factor of 7 from 2006, and thus does not scale linearly with fuel emission mass. This is due to non-uniform regional increase in air traffic and different sensitivities for contrail radiative forcing in different regions. CAM5 simulations indicate that negative radiative forcing induced by the indirect effect of aviation sulfate aerosols on liquid clouds in 2050 can be as large as −160 mW m−2, an increase by a factor of 4 from 2006. As a result, the net 2050 radiative forcing of contrail cirrus and aviation aerosols may have a cooling effect on the planet. Aviation sulfate aerosols emitted at cruise altitude can be transported down to the lower troposphere, increasing the aerosol concentration, thus increasing the cloud drop number concentration and persistence of low-level clouds. Aviation black carbon aerosols produce a negligible net forcing globally in 2006 and 2050 in this model study. Uncertainties in the methodology and the modeling are significant and discussed in detail. Nevertheless, the projected percentage increase in contrail radiative forcing is important for future aviation impacts. In addition, the role of aviation aerosols in the cloud nucleation processes can greatly influence on the simulated radiative forcing from aircraft-induced cloudiness and even change its sign. Future research to confirm these results is necessary.

  9. New Particle Formation and Secondary Organic Aerosol in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M.; Yue, D.; Guo, S.; Hu, W.; Huang, X.; He, L.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.

    2011-12-01

    Air pollution in Beijing has been a major concern due to being a mega-city and green Olympic Games requirements. Both long term and intensive field measurements have been conducted at an Urban Air Quality Monitoring Station in the campus of Peking University since 2004. Aerosol characteristics vary seasonally depending on meteorological conditions and source emissions. Secondary compositions of SNA (sum of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) and SOA (secondary organic aerosol) become major fraction of fine particles, which may enhance aerosol impacts on visibility and climate change. The transformation processes of new particle formation (NPF) and secondary organic aerosol have been focused on. It was found that gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, and organic compounds are important precursors to NPF events in Beijing and H2SO4-NH3-H2O ternary nucleation is one of the important mechanisms. The contributions of condensation and neutralization of sulfuric acid, coagulation, and organics to the growth of the new particles are estimated as 45%, 34%, and 21%, respectively. Tracer-based method to estimate biogenic and anthropogenic SOA was established by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary organic tracers derived from biogenic (isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene) and anthropogenic (toluene) contributed 32% at urban site and 35% at rural site, respectively. Other source apportionment techniques were also used to estimate secondary organic aerosols, including EC tracer method, water soluble organic carbon content, chemical mass balance model, and AMS-PMF method.

  10. Iridescent aerodynamic contrails. The Norderney case of 27 June 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, Klaus; Kaestner, Martina [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Klatt, Dieter [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oldenburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    2011-06-15

    An iridescent aerodynamic contrail (AerC) of a 2-engine aircraft flying from Amsterdam to Copenhagen was observed and photographed at Norderney on 27 June 2008, 14:06 UTC. In order to see whether this event was caused by an unusual weather situation we investigate the meteorological situation. It turns out that the situation allows AerC to become visible because it was warm enough and sufficiently moist. The dynamical situation is studied, and it seems that the stable stratification at the flight level of 350 hPa supports the appearance of an AerC. Additionally we investigate the ambient cloudiness where interesting halo features have been displayed in cirrus clouds. We examine the special colours of the Norderney aerodynamic contrail which allows to conclude that the width of the ice crystal size distribution is the factor directly relevant for iridescence, in this case representing a mixture from different growth histories. Finally we present an argumentation that AerC can be differentiated from jet contrails as soon as they display iridescence which requires an angular distance from the sun of less than about 30 . (orig.)

  11. Extrapolation of contrail investigations by LIDAR to larger scale measurements. Analysis and calibration of CCD camera and satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, R.; Homburg, F.; Freudenthaler, V.; Jaeger, H. [Frauenhofer Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The CCD image of a persistent contrail and the coincident LIDAR measurement are presented. To extrapolate the LIDAR derived optical thickness to the video field of view an anisotropy correction and calibration has to be performed. Observed bright halo components result from highly regular oriented hexagonal crystals with sizes of 200 {mu}m-2 mm. This explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation threshold of natural cirrus. Optical thickness from LIDAR shows significant discrepancies to the result from coincident NOAA-14 data. Errors result from anisotropy correction and parameterized relations between AVHRR channels and optical properties. (author) 28 refs.

  12. Sensitivity of radiative properties of persistent contrails to the ice water path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. De León

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the radiative properties of persistent linear contrails on the variability of their ice water path is assessed in a two-stream radiative transfer model. It is assumed that the ice water content and the effective size of ice crystals in aged contrails do not differ from those observed in natural cirrus; the parameterization of these two variables, based on a correlation with ambient temperature derived from in situ observations, allows a more realistic representation than the common assumption of fixed values for the contrail optical depth and ice crystal effective radius.

    The results show that the large variability in ice water content that aged contrails may share with natural cirrus, together with an assumed contrail vertical thickness between 220 and 1000 m, translate into a wider range of radiative forcings from linear contrails [1 to 66 m Wm−2] than that reported in previous studies, including IPCC's [3 to 30 m Wm−2]. Further field and modelling studies of the temporal evolution of contrail properties will thus be needed to reduce the uncertainties associated with the values assumed in large scale contrail studies.

  13. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Eimear M.; Gordon, Hamish; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2017-04-01

    New particle formation (or nucleation) is acknowledged as a significant source of climate-relevant aerosol throughout the atmosphere. However, performing atmospherically relevant nucleation experiments in a laboratory setting is extremely challenging. As a result, until now, the parameterisations used to represent new particle formation in global aerosol models were largely based on in-situ observations or theoretical nucleation models, and usually only represented the binary H2SO4-H2O system. Several different chemicals can affect particle formation rates, even at extremely low trace concentrations, which are technically challenging to measure directly. Nucleation rates also respond to environmental changes in e.g. temperature in a highly non-linear fashion. The CERN CLOUD experiment was designed to provide the most controlled and accurate nucleation rate measurements to date, over the full range of free tropospheric temperatures and down to sulphuric acid concentrations of the order of 105 cm-3. We will present a parameterisation of inorganic nucleation rates for use in global models, based on these measurements, which includes four separate nucleation pathways: binary neutral, binary ion-induced, ternary neutral, and ternary ion-induced. Both inorganic and organic nucleation parameterisations derived from CLOUD measurements have been implemented in the GLOMAP global aerosol model. The parameterisations depend on temperature and on concentrations of sulphuric acid, ammonia, organic vapours, and ions. One of CLOUD's main original goals was to determine the sensitivity of atmospheric aerosol to changes in the nucleation rate over a solar cycle. We will show that, in a present-day atmosphere, the changes in climate-relevant aerosol (in the form of cloud-level cloud condensation nuclei) over a solar cycle are on average about 0.1%, with local changes of less than 1%. In contrast, anthropogenic changes in ammonia since pre-industrial times were estimated to have a

  14. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 1: An extensive parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition over up to 6 h were performed using a LES-model. The sensitivity of microphysical, optical and geometric contrail properties to relative humidity RHi, temperature T and vertical wind shear s was investigated in an extensive parametric study. The dominant parameter for contrail evolution is relative humidity. Substantial spreading is only visible for RHi≳120%. Vertical wind shear has a smaller effect on optical properties than human observers might expect from the visual impression. Our model shows that after a few hours the water vapour removed by falling ice crystals from the contrail layer can be several times higher than the ice mass that is actually present in the contrail at any instance.

  15. Verification for Different Contrail Parameterizations Based on Integrated Satellite Observation and ECMWF Reanalysis Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aviation induced cloud termed contrail plays a more and more important role in the climate change, which makes a significant contribution to anthropogenic climate forcing through impacting the coverage of cirrus in the intersection of troposphere and stratosphere. In this paper, we propose one novel automatic contrail detecting method based on Himawari-8 stationary satellite imagery and two kinds of potential contrail coverage (PCC1 and PCC2 from contrail parameterization in ECHAM4 and HadGEM2. In addition, we propose one new climatological index called contrail occurrence and persistence (COP. According to the algorithm identification (AI and artificial visual inspection (AVI, COP measured from Himawari-8 stationary satellite imagery is related to upper tropospheric relative humidity over ice (RHI computed with the ECMWF reanalysis data by simple linear regression. Similarly, we compared the linear correlation between COP and PCCs fractions and found that PCC1 has better correspondence with COP than PCC2.

  16. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Eimear M.; Gordon, Hamish; Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, João; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Ortega, Ismael K.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Adamov, Alexey; Baltensperger, Urs; Barmet, Peter; Benduhn, Francois; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Clarke, Antony; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lawler, Michael J.; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mann, Graham; Mathot, Serge; Merikanto, Joonas; Miettinen, Pasi; Nenes, Athanasios; Onnela, Antti; Rap, Alexandru; Reddington, Carly L. S.; Riccobono, Francesco; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N.; Stozkhov, Yuri; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds, in addition to sulfuric acid. A considerable fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied, variations in cosmic ray intensity do not appreciably affect climate through nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  17. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dunne, E M; Kurten, A; Almeida, J; Duplissy, J; Williamson, C; Ortega, I K; Pringle, K J; Adamov, A; Baltensperger, U; Barmet, P; Benduhn, F; Bianchi, F; Breitenlechner, M; Clarke, A; Curtius, J; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Ehrhart, S; Flagan, R C; Franchin, A; Guida, R; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Heinritzi, M; Jokinen, T; Kangasluoma, J; Kirkby, J; Kulmala, M; Kupc, A; Lawler, M J; Lehtipalo, K; Makhmutov, V; Mann, G; Mathot, S; Merikanto, J; Miettinen, P; Nenes, A; Onnela, A; Rap, A; Reddington, C L S; Riccobono, F; Richards, N A D; Rissanen, M P; Rondo, L; Sarnela, N; Schobesberger, S; Sengupta, K; Simon, M; Sipila, M; Smith, J N; Stozkhov, Y; Tome, A; Trostl, J; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Winkler, P M; Worsnop, D R; Carslaw, K S

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. Here we build a global model of aerosol formation using extensive laboratory-measured nucleation rates involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions and organic compounds. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds in addition to sulfuric acid. A significant fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied variations in cosmic ray intensity do not significantly affect climate via nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of contrail evolution in the vortex phase and its interaction with atmospheric turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. In this paper, fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The initial flow field is composed of the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail descent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex breakup dominates over background turbulence until the end of the vortex regime and controls the mixing with ambient air. This results in mean microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. However, the background humidity and temperature have a first-order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent studies.

  19. Particle pollution in Beijing: features, source and secondary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Yue, Dingli; Hu, Weiwei; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Yuanhang; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kondo, Yutaka

    2010-05-01

    As the capital of China and a major mega city, Beijing has been experiencing great changes the last few years. Particulate pollution is reported to be the major air pollutant in Beijing for about 85% of days in the last 5 years (Beijing Environmental Bulletin, 2004-2008). Meanwhile totally 15 stages control measures for air pollution have been taken since 1998, and enhanced strongly for the 2008 Olympic Games. Although great effort has been made by Beijing's government to mitigate atmospheric particulate pollution, PM10 levels are still over the target levels and have become the major air pollution problem in Beijing. Moreover, the presence of regional and secondary pollution has been recently recognized. Organic matter constitutes a major fraction of PM2.5 mass, and the difference in OC/EC ratios from other cities indicates a distinct source in Beijing. A two-year measurement of organic species and source apportionment by receptor models showed that coal combustion and cooking emissions are unique in Beijing. Coal combustion and vehicle emissions as well as various dusts are important sources for particle pollution in China. Secondary organic carbon comprises a major fraction of OC, with the highest contribution to total OC in summer (45%) and the lowest in winter (19%). However, because some uncertainties still exist, the contributions and formation mechanisms of secondary compounds will require intense investigation in the future. New particle formation events as a source of secondary aerosol are observed on about 20% of the days each year in Beijing, with the highest frequency in spring and lowest in summer. An optical closure study showed that a Mie model can acceptably reproduce the aerosol optical properties in Beijing. This study also highlights the importance of coating on soot in enhancing the aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients.

  20. Arctic sea ice melt leads to atmospheric new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall Osto, M; Beddows, D C S; Tunved, P; Krejci, R; Ström, J; Hansson, H-C; Yoon, Y J; Park, Ki-Tae; Becagli, S; Udisti, R; Onasch, T; O Dowd, C D; Simó, R; Harrison, Roy M

    2017-06-12

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) and growth significantly influences climate by supplying new seeds for cloud condensation and brightness. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of whether and how marine biota emissions affect aerosol-cloud-climate interactions in the Arctic. Here, the aerosol population was categorised via cluster analysis of aerosol size distributions taken at Mt Zeppelin (Svalbard) during a 11 year record. The daily temporal occurrence of NPF events likely caused by nucleation in the polar marine boundary layer was quantified annually as 18%, with a peak of 51% during summer months. Air mass trajectory analysis and atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur tracers link these frequent nucleation events to biogenic precursors released by open water and melting sea ice regions. The occurrence of such events across a full decade was anti-correlated with sea ice extent. New particles originating from open water and open pack ice increased the cloud condensation nuclei concentration background by at least ca. 20%, supporting a marine biosphere-climate link through sea ice melt and low altitude clouds that may have contributed to accelerate Arctic warming. Our results prompt a better representation of biogenic aerosol sources in Arctic climate models.

  1. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical...

  2. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the simulated...

  3. Aircraft exhaust aerosol formation and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1997-12-31

    Aerosol formation and growth in the exhaust plume of the ATTAS aircraft at an altitude of approximately 9 km, burning fuels with 2 ppmm sulfur (`low`) and 266 ppmm (`high`) sulfur has been modeled using an aerosol dynamics model for nucleation, vapor condensation and coagulation, coupled to a 2-dimensional, axisymmetric flow code to treat plume dilution and turbulent mixing. For both the `low` and `high` sulfur fuels, approximately 60% of the available water had condensed within the first 200 m downstream of the exhaust exit. The contrail particle diameters ranged between 0.4 to 1.6 {mu}m. However, the size distributions as a function of radial position for the `low` sulfur plume were broader than the corresponding distributions for the `high` sulfur plume. The model results indicate for a fuel sulfur mass loading of 2 ppmm, sulfuric acid remains a viable activating agent and that the differences in the contrail particle size distributions for sulfur mass loadings between 2 ppmm and 260 ppmm would be difficult to detect. (author) 12 refs.

  4. Particle number size distribution and new particle formation: new characteristics during the special pollution control period in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Tao; Wang, Shulan; Wang, Wenxing

    2012-01-01

    New particle formation is a key process in shaping the size distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere. We present here the measurement results of number and size distribution of aerosol particles (10-10000 nm in diameter) obtained in the summer of 2008, at a suburban site in Beijing, China. We firstly reported the pollution level, particle number size distribution, diurnal variation of the particle number size distribution and then introduced the characteristics of the particle formation processes. The results showed that the number concentration of ultrafine particles was much lower than the values measured in other urban or suburban areas in previous studies. Sharp increases of ultrafine particle count were frequently observed at noon. An examination of the diurnal pattern suggested that the burst of ultrafine particles was mainly due to new particle formation promoted by photochemical processes. In addition, high relative humidity was a key factor driving the growth of the particles in the afternoon. During the 2-month observations, new particle formation from homogeneous nucleation was observed for 42.7% of the study period. The average growth rate of newly formed particles was 3.2 nm/hr, and varied from 1.2 to 8.0 nm/hr. The required concentration of condensable vapor was 4.4 x 10(7) cm(-3), and its source rate was 1.2 x 106 cm(-3) sec(-1). Further calculation on the source rate of sulphuric acid vapor indicated that the average participation of sulphuric acid to particle growth rates was 28.7%.

  5. Modelling Collective Opinion Formation by Means of Active Brownian Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, F; Schweitzer, Frank; Holyst, Janusz

    1999-01-01

    The concept of active Brownian particles is used to model a collective opinion formation process. It is assumed that individuals in community create a two-component communication field that influences the change of opinions of other persons and/or can induce their migration. The communication field is described by a reaction-diffusion equation, meaning that it has a certain lifetime, which models memory effects, further it can spread out in the community. Within our stochastic approach, the opinion change of the individuals is described by a master equation, while the migration is described by a set of Langevin equations, coupled by the communication field. In the mean-field limit which holds for fast communication, we derive a critical population size, above which the community separates into a majority and a minority with opposite opinions. The existence of external support (e.g. from mass media) can change the ratio between minority and majority, until above a critical external support the supported subpop...

  6. Magnetic particle diverter in an integrated microfluidic format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekas, Nikola [Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3111 (United States); Granger, Michael [Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3111 (United States); Tondra, Mark [NVE Corporation, Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344 (United States); Popple, Anthony [NVE Corporation, Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55344 (United States); Porter, Marc D. [Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3111 (United States)]. E-mail: mporter@porter1.ameslab.gov

    2005-05-15

    A fully integrated micromagnetic particle diverter and microfluidic system are described. Particles are diverted via an external uniform magnetic field perturbed at the microscale by underlying current straps. The resulting magnetic force deflects particles across a flow stream into one of the two channels at a Y-shaped junction. The basic theoretical framework, design, and operational demonstration of the device are presented.

  7. The recent changes and topics in CONTRAIL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Toshinobu; Umezawa, Taku; Sawa, Yousuke; Niwa, Yosuke; Matsueda, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner) project has been conducted since 2005 with Continuous CO2 Measuring Equipment (CME) and Automatic air Sampling Equipment (ASE) onboard commercial airliners for observations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Japan Airlines (JAL) offers eight Boeing 777-200ER airplanes modified for CONTRAIL; CME and ASE can be installed on all and five of them, respectively. ASE measurements have provided the long records of greenhouse gases in the upper troposphere along the flight route between Japan and Australia. In addition, we started a new sampling program between Japan and Europe in 2012 to obtain data at higher latitudes and the UT/LS region. When the 777-200ER airplane was not operated for the observation route, we used Manual air Sampling Equipment (MSE) for taking air onboard as substitute for ASE. Since flight routes with 777-200ER have been restricted only to Asian countries and Hawaii in the last few years, additional two Boeing 777-300ERs were modified to install CME and expand area coverage of CO2 observations to Europe, Australia and the east coast of US in 2015-2016. We also present our recent data analysis for intensive CME observations over Delhi, India, which indicates a significant impact of Indian wintertime agriculture on the regional carbon budget.

  8. Sub 2 nm Particle Characterization in Systems with Aerosol Formation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang

    Aerosol science and technology enable continual advances in material synthesis and atmospheric pollutant control. Among these advances, one important frontier is characterizing the initial stages of particle formation by real time measurement of particles below 2 nm in size. Sub 2 nm particles play important roles by acting as seeds for particle growth, ultimately determining the final properties of the generated particles. Tailoring nanoparticle properties requires a thorough understanding and precise control of the particle formation processes, which in turn requires characterizing nanoparticle formation from the initial stages. The knowledge on particle formation in early stages can also be applied in quantum dot synthesis and material doping. This dissertation pursued two approaches in investigating incipient particle characterization in systems with aerosol formation and growth: (1) using a high-resolution differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to measure the size distributions of sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, and (2) analyzing the physical and chemical pathways of aerosol formation during combustion. Part. 1. Particle size distributions reveal important information about particle formation dynamics. DMAs are widely utilized to measure particle size distributions. However, our knowledge of the initial stages of particle formation is incomplete, due to the Brownian broadening effects in conventional DMAs. The first part of this dissertation studied the applicability of high-resolution DMAs in characterizing sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, including a flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) and a furnace aerosol reactor (FUAR). Comparison against a conventional DMA (Nano DMA, Model 3085, TSI Inc.) demonstrated that the increased sheath flow rates and shortened residence time indeed greatly suppressed the diffusion broadening effect in a high-resolution DMA (half mini type). The incipient particle

  9. Control of protein particle formation during ultrafiltration/diafiltration through interfacial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel J; Stanley, Bradford; Li, Yuling

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of protein particle formation during ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF), finding that agitation drives particle formation by promoting protein-interface adsorption and desorption. Low conductivity and the presence of surfactant reduced the level of particle formation in small-scale stirring studies, and the same trends were observed in pumping and UF/DF. Polysorbate 80 (PS80) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) reduced particle formation in UF/DF by factors of 15 and 4, respectively. Measurements of conformational stability, colloidal stability, and surface tension demonstrated that PS80 protects against particle formation by preventing protein-interface adsorption, low conductivity improves the colloidal stability of the protein, and the mechanism of action of HPβCD remains unclear. This work demonstrates that interfacial adsorption-desorption of the protein during UF/DF is the principal cause of particle formation, that the level of surfactant-free particle formation depends on the colloidal stability of the protein, and that the inclusion of surfactant greatly reduces in-process particle formation during UF/DF. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Hygroscopicity and chemical composition of Antarctic sub-micrometre aerosol particles and observations of new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic near-coastal sub-micrometre aerosol particle features in summer were characterised based on measured data on aerosol hygroscopicity, size distributions, volatility and chemical ion and organic carbon mass concentrations. Hysplit model was used to calculate the history of the air masses to predict the particle origin. Additional measurements of meteorological parameters were utilised. The hygroscopic properties of particles mostly resembled those of marine aerosols. The measurements took place at 130 km from the Southern Ocean, which was the most significant factor affecting the particle properties. This is explained by the lack of additional sources on the continent of Antarctica. The Southern Ocean was thus a likely source of the particles and nucleating and condensing vapours. The particles were very hygroscopic (HGF 1.75 at 90 nm and very volatile. Most of the sub-100 nm particle volume volatilised below 100 °C. Based on chemical data, particle hygroscopic and volatile properties were explained by a large fraction of non-neutralised sulphuric acid together with organic material. The hygroscopic growth factors assessed from chemical data were similar to measured. Hygroscopicity was higher in dry continental air masses compared with the moist marine air masses. This was explained by the aging of the marine organic species and lower methanesulphonic acid volume fraction together with the changes in the inorganic aerosol chemistry as the aerosol had travelled long time over the continental Antarctica. Special focus was directed in detailed examination of the observed new particle formation events. Indications of the preference of negative over positive ions in nucleation could be detected. However, in a detailed case study, the neutral particles dominated the particle formation process. Freshly nucleated particles had the smallest hygroscopic growth factors, which increased subsequent to particle aging.

  11. Properties of young contrails – a parametrisation based on large-eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2016-02-01

    adiabatic heating. The geometric depth H and total ice crystal number N of young contrails are highly variable and depend on many environmental and aircraft parameters. Both properties, H and N, affect the later properties of the evolving contrail–cirrus, as they control the extent of shear-induced spreading and sedimentation losses. In this study, we provide parametrisations of H and N after 5 min taking into account the effects of temperature, relative humidity, thermal stratification and aircraft type (mass, wing span, fuel burn. The parametrisations rely on a large data set of recent large-eddy simulations of young contrails. They are suited to be incorporated in larger-scale models in order to refine the present-day contrail initialisations by considering the processes that strongly affect the contrail evolution during the vortex phase.

  12. Particle formation events measured at a semirural background site in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fenjuan; Zhang, Zhenyi; Massling, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The particle formation and growth events observed at a semirural background site in Denmark were analyzed based on particle number size distribution data collected during the period from February 2005 to December 2010. The new particle formation (NPF) events have been classified visually in detai....... An analysis of a 3-day backward trajectories revealed that NW air masses from the North Sea were giving the highest probability of NPF events, namely between 20 and 40 %....

  13. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  14. New aerosol particles formation in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Angel; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Ynoue, Rita

    2016-04-01

    performance. For secondary aerosols, a simulation scenario (Case_1) with only emission of primary gases (biogenic and anthropogenic) is performed to evaluate its formation potential. The study period from 7th August to 6th September 2012 has been selected due to the avaliability of experimental data from the Narrowing the Uncertainties on Aerosol and Climate Changes in Sao Paulo State (NUANCE) project. Aerosol measurements consist basically on PM2.5 and PM10 concentration. OC, EC, ion, and aerosol mass size distribution measurements were also carried out in one of the measurement sites (IAG-USP). Results show that overall the emissions of primary gases coming mainly from vehicles have a potential to form new particles between 20 and 30% in relation to the baseline PM2.5 mass concentration found in the downtown SPMA. In addition, both the observed and predicted OC and EC at the IAG-USP measurement site make up the largest fraction of PM2.5 mass with contributions around 55 and 40%, respectively.

  15. The impact of cruise altitude on contrails and related radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichter, C. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany); Dalton Research Inst., Manchester Metropolitan Univ., Manchester (United Kingdom); Marquart, S. [Inst. fuer Umweltphysik, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Sausen, R. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany); Lee, D.S. [Dalton Research Inst., Manchester Metropolitan Univ., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    Within the framework of the European Fifth Framework Project TRADEOFF, the impact of changing cruise altitudes on contrail coverage and corresponding radiative forcing was investigated. On the basis of the reference year 1992, a series of aircraft emissions inventories with changed flight altitudes was prepared. These emission scenarios provide flown distances, fuel consumption and NO{sub x} emissions on a three-dimensional grid. The vertical resolution of these inventories was significantly increased over that used in former inventories. With a downshift of cruise altitude by 2000 ft (Throughout this paper we denote flight levels in ft. 2000 ft convert to approximately 610 m.), 4000 ft, and 6000 ft global annual mean contrail coverage is reduced in an approximately linear manner, reaching a maximum decrease of almost 45% for a 6000 ft lower cruise altitude. Contrary to this, a slight increase by 6% of global annual mean contrail coverage resulted for a 2000 ft higher maximum flight altitude. Relative changes of corresponding radiative forcing were shown to be very similar to those of contrail coverage. For changes in contrail coverage and radiative forcing associated with changes in flight altitudes, a strong seasonal and regional variability was found. This study only considers contrail radiative forcing. Trade-offs from other aviation related radiative impacts, e.g., from CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3}, have not been studied. (orig.)

  16. Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) Level-1B Data Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) was to use scientifically instrumented aircraft and ground based...

  17. Pattern formation in annular systems of repulsive particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschler, Christian; Starke, Jens; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2016-01-01

    General particle models with symmetric and asymmetric repulsion are studied and investigated for finite-range and exponential interaction in an annulus. In the symmetric case transitions from one- to multi-lane behavior including multistability are observed for varying particle density...... and for a varying curvature with fixed density. Hence, the system cannot be approximated by a periodic channel. In the asymmetric case, which is important in pedestrian dynamics, we reveal an inhomogeneous new phase, a traveling wave reminiscent of peristaltic motion....

  18. Contribution of mixing in the ABL to new particle formation based on observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The connection between new particle formation and micro- and mesoscale meteorology was studied based on measurements at SMEAR II station in Southern Finland. We analyzed turbulent conditions described by sodar measurements and utilized these combined with surface layer measurements and a simple model to estimate the upper boundary layer conditions. Turbulence was significantly stronger on particle formation days and the organic vapor saturation ratio increase due to large eddies was stronger on event than nonevent days. We examined which variables could be the best indicators of new particle formation and concluded that the formation probability depended on the condensation sink and temporal temperature change at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer. Humidity and heat flux may also be good indicators for particle formation.

  19. Particle contamination formation and detection in magnetron sputtering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selwyn, G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Weiss, C.A. [Materials Research Corp., Congers, NY (United States). Sputtering Systems Div.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C. [Seagate Peripherals Disk Div., Milpitas, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination can cause electrical shorting, pin holes, problems with photolithography, adhesion failure, as well as visual and cosmetic defects. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique that provides real-time, {ital in-situ} imaging of particles > 0.3 {mu}m in diameter. Using this technique, the causes, sources and influences on particles in plasma and non-plasma and non-plasma processes may be independently evaluated and corrected. Several studies employing laser light scattering have demonstrated both homogeneous and heterogeneous causes of particle contamination. In this paper, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. In this region, film redeposition is followed by filament or nodule growth and enhanced trapping which increases filament growth. Eventually the filaments effectively ``short circuit`` the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes heating failure of the filament fracturing and ejecting the filaments into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor (IC) fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests that this mechanism may be universal to many sputtering processes.

  20. Biogenic particle formation and growth in an isoprene dominated ecosystem in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Ortega, J.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.; You, Y.; Karl, T.; Seco, R.; Turnipseed, A.; Kim, S.; Harley, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Forests are an important source of atmospheric aerosol particles. While many studies have shown that oxidation products of biogenic VOCs can produce secondary aerosol particles, some studies have also suggested that isoprene, the most dominant VOC from forests, can suppress new particle formation, but the mechanism behind these suppression effects is unknown. To investigate potential isoprene suppression effects related to new particle formation and possible chemical mechanisms responsible for biogenic secondary aerosol formation, we have conducted measurements of aerosol sizes and chemical analysis of VOCs in a Missouri forest during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower: NOx, Oxidant, Isoprene Research) in the summer of 2012. Biogenic VOCs in this ecosystem are dominated by isoprene. Aerosol number concentrations of particles larger than 1 nm and larger than 3 nm were measured with a particle sizing magnifier (PSM) and a condensation particle counter (CPC). Aerosol sizes from 5 to 200 nm were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizing magnifier (SMPS). Key biogenic VOCs, such as isoprene and monoterpenes, were measured with a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOFMS), a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS) and gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). From these results, we will discuss how oxidation products of biogenic VOCs produce newly formed sub-3 nm particles and how the growth of these new particles is enhanced or suppressed by possible chemical species.

  1. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in an urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan, during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM1 (d ≤ 1 μm, and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D. The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal, accumulation mode (Nacu, Aitken mode (NAitken, and nucleation mode (Nnuc particles were 13.9 × 103 cm−3, 1.2 × 103 cm−3, 6.1 × 103 cm−3, and 6.6 × 103 cm−3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm accounted for 91% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm, indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc / NOx ratio of 192.4 cm−3 ppbv−1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times of the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Averages (± 1σ of the diameter growth rate (GR and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10, were 11.9 ± 10.6 nm h−1 and 6.9 ± 3.0 cm−3 s−1, respectively. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB · SO2/CS, for new particle formation (NPF events suggested that photooxidation of SO2 was likely one of the major mechanisms for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover

  2. Silver nano particle formation on Ar plasma - treated cinnamyl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, S. [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Hochschule fuer Angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst, Fakultaet fuer Naturwissenschaften und Technik, Von-Ossietzky-Strasse 99, 37085 Goettingen (Germany); Marschewski, M. [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wegewitz, L.; Maus-Friedrichs, W. [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Vioel, W. [Hochschule fuer Angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst, Fakultaet fuer Naturwissenschaften und Technik, Von-Ossietzky-Strasse 99, 37085 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Metastable induced electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy are employed to study the adsorption of silver on cinnamyl alcohol films prepared on Au(111) substrates by thermal evaporation. Additionally, the impact of an Ar atmosphere dielectric barrier discharge plasma applied to the cinnamyl alcohol film preliminary to the Ag adsorption is investigated. In both cases silver nano particles with an average diameter of 9 nm are formed. These particles do not interact chemically with the underlying cinnamyl alcohol film. We do not find any influence of the preliminary Ar plasma-treatment on the adsorption behavior at all.

  3. New particle formation by ion-induced nucleation during dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    various parts of the world at different atmospheric conditions. The mechanism and atmospheric con- ditions controlling the onset of such events are not yet clearly understood. The gas-to-particle con- version (GPC) process, in which small clusters of molecules form through binary homogeneous nucle- ation of sulphuric acid ...

  4. New particle formation by ion-induced nucleation during dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reduced background aerosol concentration after heavy rain,; high humidity condition, and; increased ion concentration during the dissipation stage by corona discharges, favoured generation of new particles by ion-induced nucleation (IIN). Observations also suggest that generation of unipolar ions by corona discharges ...

  5. Particle segregation during pressure filtration for cast formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten

    2000-01-01

    When pressure filtration is used to produce composite materials from a mixed suspension, segregation of the different particle types is apt to occur due to different sedimentation velocities. This results in an inhomogeneous, thus inferior product. To understand and reduce segregation, a model is

  6. SYSTEMS OF PARTICLES WITH INTERACTION AND THE CLUSTER FORMATION IN CONDENSED MATTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Krasnoholovets

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the behaviour of a system of particles with the different character of interaction. The approach makes it possible to describe systems of interacting particles by statistical methods taking into account a spatial nonhomogeneous distribution of particles, i.e. cluster formation. For these clusters are evaluated: their size, the number of particles in a cluster, and the temperature of phase transition to the cluster state. Three systems are under consideration: electrons on the liquid helium surface, particles interacting by the shielding Coulomb potential, which are found under the effect of an elastic field (e.g. nucleons in a nucleus, and gravitating masses with the Hubble expansion.

  7. Using satellite-based measurements to explore spatiotemporal scales and variability of drivers of new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    New particle formation (NPF) can potentially alter regional climate by increasing aerosol particle (hereafter particle) number concentrations and ultimately cloud condensation nuclei. The large scales on which NPF is manifest indicate potential to use satellite-based (inherently ...

  8. Properties of young contrails – a parametrisation based on large-eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contrail–cirrus is probably the largest climate forcing from aviation. The evolution of contrail–cirrus and its radiative impact depends not only on a multitude of atmospheric parameters, but also on the geometric and microphysical properties of the young contrails evolving into contrail–cirrus. The early evolution of contrails (t  <  5 min is dominated by an interplay of ice microphysics and wake vortex dynamics. Young contrails may undergo a fast vertical expansion due to a descent of the wake vortices and may lose a substantial fraction of their ice crystals due to adiabatic heating. The geometric depth H and total ice crystal number N of young contrails are highly variable and depend on many environmental and aircraft parameters. Both properties, H and N, affect the later properties of the evolving contrail–cirrus, as they control the extent of shear-induced spreading and sedimentation losses. In this study, we provide parametrisations of H and N after 5 min taking into account the effects of temperature, relative humidity, thermal stratification and aircraft type (mass, wing span, fuel burn. The parametrisations rely on a large data set of recent large-eddy simulations of young contrails. They are suited to be incorporated in larger-scale models in order to refine the present-day contrail initialisations by considering the processes that strongly affect the contrail evolution during the vortex phase.

  9. Canonical free-energy barrier of particle and polymer cluster formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, Johannes; Schierz, Philipp; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-02-27

    A common approach to study nucleation rates is the estimation of free-energy barriers. This usually requires knowledge about the shape of the forming droplet, a task that becomes notoriously difficult in macromolecular setups starting with a proper definition of the cluster boundary. Here we demonstrate a shape-free determination of the free energy for temperature-driven cluster formation in particle as well as polymer systems. Combined with rigorous results on equilibrium droplet formation, this allows for a well-defined finite-size scaling analysis of the effective interfacial free energy at a fixed density. We first verify the theoretical predictions for the formation of a liquid droplet in a supersaturated particle gas by generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones system. Going one step further, we then generalize this approach to cluster formation in a dilute polymer solution. Our results suggest an analogy with particle condensation, when the macromolecules are interpreted as extended particles.

  10. A dedicated study of new particle formation and fate in the coastal environment (PARFORCE): overview of objectives and achievements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dowd, C.D.; Haemeri, K.; Maekelae, J.M.; Pirjola, L.; Kulmala, M.; Jennings, S.G.; Berresheim, H.; Hansson, H-C.; Leeuw, G. de; Kunz, G.J.; Allen, A.G.; Hewitt, C.N.; Jackson, A.; Viisanen, Y.; Hoffman, T.

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated study into the formation of new particles, New Particle Formation and Fate in the Coastal Environment (PARFORCE), was conducted over a period from 1998 to 1999 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the western coast of Ireland. Continuous measurements of new particle formation

  11. Real-time monitoring of in situ polyethyleneimine-silica particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Frances; Seyfaee, Ahmad

    2013-11-26

    Silica particles are traditionally made via the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraalkoxysilanes with the use of methanol and ammonia as a basic catalyst. More recently, bioinspired polyamines have been used in place of ammonia. Particle formation via the use of tetraalkoxysilanes typically occurs extremely quickly with cloudy precipitates forming immediately, making it practically impossible to characterize the reaction in real time. Our study uses trimethoxymethylsilane (TMOMS) and the polyamine polyethyleneimine (PEI) to form PEI-silica particles via a reaction that takes place over several minutes, allowing us to study the reaction in real time. The acidic hydrolysis of TMOMS and basic polymerization condensation of TMOMS via PEI to form solid PEI-silica particles were observed in situ over time using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) for the first time. The ATR-FTIR data suggest that dimer formation occurs during acidic hydrolysis followed by PEI-catalyzed condensation to form silsesquioxane structures. The results for the particles formed in situ were then compared with those for particle samples that had been washed to remove excess reactants. The ATR-FTIR results were corroborated via scanning electron microscopy and DLS, which suggest that the growth of PEI-silica particles occurs by aggregation of smaller particles to larger ones, because the data show the presence of small particles and much larger particles at the same time throughout the whole particle growth process.

  12. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  13. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  14. A new balance formula to estimate new particle formation rate: reevaluating the effect of coagulation scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Runlong; Jiang, Jingkun

    2017-10-01

    A new balance formula to estimate new particle formation rate is proposed. It is derived from the aerosol general dynamic equation in the discrete form and then converted into an approximately continuous form for analyzing data from new particle formation (NPF) field campaigns. The new formula corrects the underestimation of the coagulation scavenging effect that occurred in the previously used formulae. It also clarifies the criteria for determining the upper size bound in measured aerosol size distributions for estimating new particle formation rate. An NPF field campaign was carried out from 7 March to 7 April 2016 in urban Beijing, and a diethylene glycol scanning mobility particle spectrometer equipped with a miniature cylindrical differential mobility analyzer was used to measure aerosol size distributions down to ˜ 1 nm. Eleven typical NPF events were observed during this period. Measured aerosol size distributions from 1 nm to 10 µm were used to test the new formula and the formulae widely used in the literature. The previously used formulae that perform well in a relatively clean atmosphere in which nucleation intensity is not strong were found to underestimate the comparatively high new particle formation rate in urban Beijing because of their underestimation or neglect of the coagulation scavenging effect. The coagulation sink term is the governing component of the estimated formation rate in the observed NPF events in Beijing, and coagulation among newly formed particles contributes a large fraction to the coagulation sink term. Previously reported formation rates in Beijing and in other locations with intense NPF events might be underestimated because the coagulation scavenging effect was not fully considered; e.g., estimated formation rates of 1.5 nm particles in this campaign using the new formula are 1.3-4.3 times those estimated using the formula neglecting coagulation among particles in the nucleation mode.

  15. The impact of diurnal variations of air traffic on contrail radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Stuber

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We combined high resolution aircraft flight data from the EU Fifth Framework Programme project AERO2k with analysis data from the ECMWF's integrated forecast system to calculate diurnally resolved 3-D contrail cover. We scaled the contrail cover in order to match observational data for the Bakan area (eastern-Atlantic/western-Europe.

    We found that less than 40% of the global distance travelled by aircraft is due to flights during local night time. Yet, due to the cancellation of shortwave and longwave effects during daytime, night time flights contribute a disproportional 60% to the global annual mean forcing. Under clear sky conditions the night flights contribute even more disproportionally at 76%. There are pronounced regional variations in night flying and the associated radiative forcing. Over parts of the North Atlantic flight corridor 75% of air traffic and 84% of the forcing occurs during local night, whereas only 35% of flights are during local night in South-East Asia, yet these contribute 68% of the radiative forcing. In general, regions with a significant local contrail radiative forcing are also regions for which night time flights amount to less than half of the daily total of flights. Therefore, neglecting diurnal variations in air traffic/contrail cover by assuming a diurnal mean contrail cover can over-estimate the global mean radiative forcing by up to 30%.

  16. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paugam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distribution of ice crystals. The atmospheric turbulence is synthesized using a methodology developed to force anisotropic turbulent fluctuations. The results show the feasibility of three-dimensional simulations of the early development of a contrail in supersaturated conditions before its transition into a contrail-cirrus. %(when radiative heating and sedimentation are no more negligible. It is shown that in case of strongly supersaturated and shear-free atmosphere the optical depth is maintained as the contrail spreads by turbulent diffusion in the late dissipation regime.

  17. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2016-01-01

    Oil–particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual–numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil–particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil–particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil–particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil–particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil–particle aggregation.

  18. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A...... that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction....

  19. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-02-01

    High concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere during exhaust cools and dilutes have hazardous health effects and impair visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulphur content (FSC), under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested; based on the measured gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrierless heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between GSA and semi-volatile organic vapour (for example adipic acid) combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur by the same organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) ×1012cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had opposite trend on the NUP formation, and maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, NUP formation was ceased if the GSA concentration was less than 1010cm-3 which suggests, based on the measurements, the usage of biofuel to prevent volatile particles in diesel exhaust.

  20. Isoprene suppression of new particle formation in a mixed deciduous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Kanawade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of new particles over forests is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei that can affect climate. While such particle formation events have been widely observed, their formation mechanisms over forests are poorly understood. Our observations made in a mixed deciduous forest with large isoprene emissions during the summer displayed a surprisingly rare occurrence of new particle formation (NPF. Typically, NPF events occur around noon but no NPF events were observed during the 5 weeks of measurements. The exceptions were two evening ultrafine particle events. During the day, sulfuric acid concentrations were in the 106 cm−3 range with very low preexisting aerosol particles, a favorable condition for NPF to occur even during the summer. The ratio of emitted isoprene carbon to monoterpene carbon at this site was similar to that in Amazon rainforests (ratio >10, where NPF events are also very rare, compared with a ratio <0.5 in Finland boreal forests, where NPF events are frequent. Our results suggest that large isoprene emissions can suppress NPF formation in forests although the underlying mechanism for the suppression is unclear. The two evening ultrafine particle events were associated with the transported anthropogenic sulfur plumes and ultrafine particles were likely formed via ion-induced nucleation. Changes in landcover and environmental conditions could modify the isoprene suppression of NPF in some forest regions resulting in a radiative forcing that could have influence on the climate.

  1. Isoprene Suppression of New Particle Formation in a Mixed Deciduous Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, V. P.; Jobson, B. T.; Guenther, A. B.; Erupe, M.; Pressley, S. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Lee, S.; Cabinex Team

    2011-12-01

    Production of new particles over forests is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei that can affect climate. While such particle formation events have been widely observed, their formation mechanisms over forests are poorly understood. Our observations made in a mixed deciduous forest with large isoprene emissions during the summer displayed a surprisingly rare occurrence of new particle formation (NPF). Typically, NPF events occur around noon but no NPF events were observed during the 5 weeks of measurements. The exceptions were two evening ultrafine particle events. During the day, sulfuric acid concentrations were in the 10^6 cm^-3 range with very low preexisting aerosol particles, a favorable condition for NPF to occur even during the summer. The ratio of emitted isoprene carbon to monoterpene carbon at this site was similar to that in Amazon rainforests (ratio >10), where NPF events are also very rare, compared with a ratio <0.5 in Finland boreal forests, where NPF events are frequent. Our results suggest that large isoprene emissions can suppress NPF formation in forests although the underlying mechanism for the suppression is unclear. The two evening ultrafine particle events were associated with the transported anthropogenic sulfur plumes and ultrafine particles were likely formed via ion-induced nucleation. Changes in landcover and environmental conditions could modify the isoprene suppression of NPF in some forest regions resulting in a radiative forcing that could have influence on the climate.

  2. Direct measurement of particle formation and growth from the oxidation of biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. VanReken

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new facility has been developed to investigate the formation of new particles from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds emitted from vegetation. The facility consists of a biogenic emissions enclosure, an aerosol growth chamber, and the associated instrumentation. Using the facility, new particle formation events have been induced through the reaction of ozone with three different precursor gas mixtures: an α-pinene test mixture and the emissions of a Holm oak (Quercus ilex specimen and a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda specimen. The results demonstrate the variability between species in their potential to form new aerosol products. The emissions of Q. ilex specimen resulted in fewer particles than did α-pinene, although the concentration of monoterpenes was roughly equal in both experiments before the addition of ozone. Conversely, the oxidation of P. taeda specimen emissions led to the formation of more particles than either of the other two gas mixtures, despite a lower initial terpenoid concentration. These variations can be attributed to differences in the speciation of the vegetative emissions with respect to the α-pinene mixture and to each other. Specifically, the presence of β-pinene and other slower-reacting monoterpenes probably inhibited particle formation in the Q. ilex experiment, while the presence of sesquiterpenes, including β-caryophyllene, in the emissions of the P. taeda specimen were the likely cause of the more intense particle formation events observed during that experiment.

  3. Growth rates during coastal and marine new particle formation in western Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Mikael; Vuollekoski, Henri; PetäJä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Vana, Marko; Aalto, Pasi; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Ceburnis, Darius; Dupuy, Regis; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Kulmala, Markku

    2010-09-01

    Growth rates of new particles during coastal and marine secondary aerosol particle formation events were studied in western Ireland, both at the Mace Head atmospheric research station and onboard the R/V Celtic Explorer as part of the Marine Aerosol Production project. Strong new particle formation events are frequently detected at Mace Head caused by the emission of precursor gases from exposed seaweed during low tide. Although these events were usually only detected as a mode of particles at a certain size, we were able to link the size of the mode to the growth time of these particles after the initial formation by combining data from several events measured between January 2006 and November 2007 with an air ion spectrometer. Typically, the early growth rates were extremely high, reaching values of several hundred nanometers per hour during the first seconds. The growth rates rapidly decreased and reached values below 1 nm h-1 within 1 h after nucleation. Our results were reproduced with box model calculations. All the obtained growth rates could be explained by the model either by varying the precursor formation time (typically a few seconds) or allowing multiple precursor vapor additions. From the ship-borne measurements, we report the first observations of purely open ocean new particle formation detected in this region. In total, four events were detected during this period, with three having a variable continental influence. An estimated average growth rate in marine conditions was 3 nm h-1 for these events.

  4. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  5. Comparison of laser and charged particle induced DSB formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splinter, Joern; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [GSI - Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA damage response processes like the fast accumulation of early repair-related proteins can be observed in real time by our newly developed beamline microscope. For this purpose ion beams offer the advantage to generate strictly localized DNA lesions in cell nuclei, thus inducing distinguishable spots of protein formation. In addition to our beamline microscope, we established a laser system for localized generation of DSBs to look for differences in the recruitment and spatiotemporal behaviour of repair related proteins due to differences in the radiation quality. Therefore we tested the Laser Microdissection System Leica AS LMD and its VSL-337ND-S nitrogen laser ({lambda} = 337.1 nm) for its ability to produce DSBs. The emerging problems indicate that a laser system is not the simple and predictable DSB-inducing system people want it to be. Accompanied by temperature dependent variation of the laser power and the intermittent understandings of the mechanisms of UV-laser-induced DSB formation, the main problem are the complications in dosimetry. A discussion of these complications is done on the vivid example of the only known approach of a visual based comparing dosimetry of {gamma}H2AX signals first introduced by Bekker-Jensen.

  6. Atmospheric data over a solar cycle: no connection between galactic cosmic rays and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, through their activation into cloud droplets. Both effects are known with considerable uncertainty only, and translate into even bigger uncertainties in future climate predictions. More than a decade ago, variations in galactic cosmic rays were suggested to closely correlate with variations in atmospheric cloud cover and therefore constitute a driving force behind aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Later, the enhancement of atmospheric aerosol particle formation by ions generated from cosmic rays was proposed as a physical mechanism explaining this correlation. Here, we report unique observations on atmospheric aerosol formation based on measurements at the SMEAR II station, Finland, over a solar cycle (years 1996–2008 that shed new light on these presumed relationships. Our analysis shows that none of the quantities related to aerosol formation correlates with the cosmic ray-induced ionisation intensity (CRII. We also examined the contribution of ions to new particle formation on the basis of novel ground-based and airborne observations. A consistent result is that ion-induced formation contributes typically significantly less than 10% to the number of new particles, which would explain the missing correlation between CRII and aerosol formation. Our main conclusion is that galactic cosmic rays appear to play a minor role for atmospheric aerosol formation events, and so for the connected aerosol-climate effects as well.

  7. New particle formation from sulfuric acid and amines: Similarities and differences between mono-, di-, and trimethylamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenius, Tinja; Halonen, Roope; Kurtén, Theo; Henschel, Henning; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Ortega, Ismael K.; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Riipinen, Ilona

    2017-04-01

    Amines are organic base species that are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. Both theoretical and laboratory studies suggest that mono-, di-, and trimethylamines (MMA, DMA, and TMA, respectively) are capable of enhancing the initial steps of sulfuric acid-driven aerosol particle formation much more strongly than ammonia (Kurtén et al., 2008; Jen et al., 2014). Despite the potential importance for atmospheric new particle formation, quantitative estimates on the emissions and thermochemical properties of amines remain relatively uncertain. Because of this and also due to computational reasons, recent large-scale modeling studies have treated sulfuric acid-amine nucleation by introducing a single surrogate amine species, the total emissions of which combine together MMA, DMA and TMA but which resembles DMA or TMA in its various properties (e.g. Bergman et al., 2015). On the other hand, there are likely to be differences in the potentials of the three amines to enhance particle formation, causing uncertainties to the lumping approach. Systematic comparisons are needed to evaluate how to treat these species in atmospheric models and to assess what level of simplification is justifiable. In this work, we study the differences and similarities of MMA, DMA and TMA by modeling nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid, water, and each of the three amines. We simulate molecular cluster concentrations and formation rates at boundary layer conditions with a dynamic cluster population model using quantum chemistry-based cluster evaporation rates, and study the dependence of particle formation rate on precursor vapor concentrations, temperature and relative humidity. The results suggest that for the three amines, there are differences in the nucleation mechanism and hygroscopicity of molecular clusters. However, for DMA and TMA, formation of nanometer-sized particles and its dependence on ambient conditions is roughly similar: both

  8. The roles of organics in New particle formation in the Megacity of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Wang, Zhibin; Wu, Zhijun; Yue, Dingli; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi; Boy, Michael; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2013-04-01

    The new particle formation (NPF) has been investigated in the high aerosol loading environment of Beijing since March 2004. The occurrence frequency is comparable with less aerosol loading environment, whereas the monthly or seasonal variations indicate location dependency. Simultaneously measurements of gaseous precursors of H2SO4 vapor and ammonia proved that the H2SO4-NH3-H2O ternary nucleation is an important mechanism for Beijing NPF, which is mainly constrained by the concentrations of the gaseous sulfuric acid and total particle surface area. The higher particle formation rates were observed on high aerosol loading days, followed up NPF, then high organic matter observed by AMS, which indicated the organic vapors should be involved in the new particle formation process. The roles of organics in the formation and growth of the NPF were focused on in the case of summer 2008, Olympic Games period, the particle formation rates show good correlations with sulfuric acid and organic vapors implying that both play an important role in the atmospheric new particle formation. The best fit between observed and modelled particle formation rates is achieved with the homogenous nucleation theory of sulfuric acid (both homomolecularly and hetermolecularly) with separate coefficients in J = KSA1[H2SO4]2 + KSA2[H2SO4][Org], in which the contributions of the sulfuric acid and the organics involving terms have been estimated as 43% and 57%, respectively. The growth of new particles contributed by condensation and neutralization of sulfuric acid, coagulation as well as organic compounds involved growth are discussed. The apparent growth rates vary from 3 to 11 nm h-1. Condensation of sulfuric acid and its subsequent neutralization by ammonia and coagulation contribute to the apparent particle growth on average 45±18% and 34±17%, respectively. The 30% higher concentration of sulfate than organic compounds in particles during the sulfur-rich NPF events but 20% lower

  9. Carbon balance of China constrained by CONTRAIL aircraft CO2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H. M.; Chen, J. M.; Machida, T.; Zhou, L. X.; Ju, W. M.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) flux estimates in China using atmospheric inversion method are beset with considerable uncertainties because very few atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements are available. In order to improve these estimates, nested atmospheric CO2 inversion during 2002-2008 is performed in this study using passenger aircraft-based CO2 measurements over Eurasia from the Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airliner (CONTRAIL) project. The inversion system includes 43 regions with a focus on China, and is based on the Bayesian synthesis approach and the TM5 transport model. The terrestrial ecosystem carbon flux modeled by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) model and the ocean exchange simulated by the OPA-PISCES-T model are considered as the prior fluxes. The impacts of CONTRAIL CO2 data on inverted China terrestrial carbon fluxes are quantified, the improvement of the inverted fluxes after adding CONTRAIL CO2 data are rationed against climate factors and evaluated by comparing the simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations with three independent surface CO2 measurements in China. Results show that with the addition of CONTRAIL CO2 data, the inverted carbon sink in China increases while those in South and Southeast Asia decrease. Meanwhile, the posterior uncertainties over these regions are all reduced (2-12%). CONTRAIL CO2 data also have a large effect on the inter-annual variation of carbon sinks in China, leading to a better correlation between the carbon sink and the annual mean climate factors. Evaluations against the CO2 measurements at three sites in China also show that the CONTRAIL CO2 measurements may have improved the inversion results.

  10. Technetium sulfide - formation kinetics, structure and particle speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, Konstantin E.; Safonov, Alexey V.; Ilin, Viktor A.; Tregubova, Varvara E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Moscow Medical Institute REAVIZ, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shiryaev, Andrey A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Obruchnikova, Yana A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Mendeleev Russian Chemical Technology Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Medical Institute REAVIZ, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    Technetium sulfide formation kinetics was studied in the pH range 8 - 12 in presence of Na{sub 2}S and phosphate buffer solution. The conditions for separation of Tc sulfide micro and nanoparticles were found with ultra-microcentrifugation and the values of Tc sulfide solubility were demonstrated to be dependent on the Na{sub 2}S concentration as C(Tc{sub 3}S{sub 10+x}) = -9 x 10{sup -5} ln [Na{sub 2}S] - 2 x 10{sup -5} M. The composition of Tc sulfide precipitate was elucidated with EXAFS, RBS and chemical analyses as Tc{sub 3}S{sub 10+x} or [Tc{sub 3}(μ{sup 3} - S)(S{sub 2}){sub 3}(S{sub 2}){sub 3/3}]{sub n} in agreement with recent Lukens data.

  11. Contribution of sulfuric acid and oxidized organic compounds to particle formation and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Riccobono

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lack of knowledge about the mechanisms underlying new particle formation and their subsequent growth is one of the main causes for the large uncertainty in estimating the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols in global models. We performed chamber experiments designed to study the contributions of sulfuric acid and organic vapors to the formation and early growth of nucleated particles. Distinct experiments in the presence of two different organic precursors (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and α-pinene showed the ability of these compounds to reproduce the formation rates observed in the low troposphere. These results were obtained measuring the sulfuric acid concentrations with two chemical ionization mass spectrometers confirming the results of a previous study which modeled the sulfuric acid concentrations in presence of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene.

    New analysis methods were applied to the data collected with a condensation particle counter battery and a scanning mobility particle sizer, allowing the assessment of the size resolved growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The effect of organic vapors on particle growth was investigated by means of the growth rate enhancement factor (Γ, defined as the ratio between the measured growth rate in the presence of α-pinene and the kinetically limited growth rate of the sulfuric acid and water system. The observed Γ values indicate that the growth is already dominated by organic compounds at particle diameters of 2 nm. Both the absolute growth rates and Γ showed a strong dependence on particle size, supporting the nano-Köhler theory. Moreover, the separation of the contributions from sulfuric acid and organic compounds to particle growth reveals that the organic contribution seems to be enhanced by the sulfuric acid concentration. Finally, the size resolved growth analysis indicates that both condensation of oxidized organic compounds and reactive uptake contribute to particle growth.

  12. The role of extraterrestrial particles in the formation of the ozone hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, J. [Ferrara Univ., Ferrara (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Kerrigan, T.C. [Intel Corporation, EY2-E3, Hillsboro, OR (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The object of Part I of this paper is to estimate the concentration of extraterrestrial particles in the ozone layer over South Pole, Antarctica, during zone hole formation. This estimate is based on an analysis of microscopic magnetic spherules collected in an extended program of atmospheric sampling. Spherules are shown to be of extraterrestrial origin and serve as markers for the larger class of less distinguished extraterrestrial particles. These particles settle to ground level as aggregates formed in a stratospheric ice crystal coalescence process. Specific spherules arrivals at ground level are strongly associated with apparent ozone depletion episodes during formation of the ozone hole. The origin of these spherules is a major stream of extraterrestrial particles independent of known meteor showers. The variability in its intensity from year to year corresponds to the variability in ozone depletion in the ozone hole itself. A quantitative theory based on these spherules arrivals and this coalescence process implies that the concentration of extraterrestrial particles at ozone hole formation lies between 500 and 2000/m{sup 3}. A mechanism is proposed in Part II of this paper by which particle concentrations in this range are sufficient to produce the ozone hole.

  13. New-particle formation events in a continental boundary layer: first results from the SATURN experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stratmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the SATURN experiment, which took place from 27 May to 14 June 2002, new particle formation in the continental boundary layer was investigated. Simultaneous ground-based and tethered-balloon-borne measurements were performed, including meteorological parameters, particle number concentrations and size distributions, gaseous precursor concentrations and SODAR and LIDAR observations. Newly formed particles were observed inside the residual layer, before the break-up process of the nocturnal inversion, and inside the mixing layer throughout the break-up of the nocturnal inversion and during the evolution of the planetary boundary layer.

  14. Rutile nanopowders for pigment production: Formation mechanism and particle size prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Tang, Hongxin

    2018-01-01

    Formation mechanism and particle size prediction of rutile nanoparticles for pigment production were investigated. Anatase nanoparticles were observed by oriented attachment with parallel lattice fringe spaces of 0.2419 nm. Upon increasing the calcination temperature, the (1 1 0) plane of rutile was gradually observed, suggesting that the anatase (1 0 3) planes undergo internal structural rearrangement of oxygen and titanium ions into rutile phase due to ionic diffusion. Backpropagation neural network was used to predict particle size of rutile nanopowders, the prediction errors were all smaller than 2%, providing an efficient method to control particle size in pigment production.

  15. An LES-PBE-PDF approach for modeling particle formation in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewerin, Fabian; Rigopoulos, Stelios

    2017-10-01

    Many chemical and environmental processes involve the formation of a polydispersed particulate phase in a turbulent carrier flow. Frequently, the immersed particles are characterized by an intrinsic property such as the particle size, and the distribution of this property across a sample population is taken as an indicator for the quality of the particulate product or its environmental impact. In the present article, we propose a comprehensive model and an efficient numerical solution scheme for predicting the evolution of the property distribution associated with a polydispersed particulate phase forming in a turbulent reacting flow. Here, the particulate phase is described in terms of the particle number density whose evolution in both physical and particle property space is governed by the population balance equation (PBE). Based on the concept of large eddy simulation (LES), we augment the existing LES-transported probability density function (PDF) approach for fluid phase scalars by the particle number density and obtain a modeled evolution equation for the filtered PDF associated with the instantaneous fluid composition and particle property distribution. This LES-PBE-PDF approach allows us to predict the LES-filtered fluid composition and particle property distribution at each spatial location and point in time without any restriction on the chemical or particle formation kinetics. In view of a numerical solution, we apply the method of Eulerian stochastic fields, invoking an explicit adaptive grid technique in order to discretize the stochastic field equation for the number density in particle property space. In this way, sharp moving features of the particle property distribution can be accurately resolved at a significantly reduced computational cost. As a test case, we consider the condensation of an aerosol in a developed turbulent mixing layer. Our investigation not only demonstrates the predictive capabilities of the LES-PBE-PDF model but also

  16. A phenomenological particle-based platelet model for simulating filopodia formation during early activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothapragada, Seetha; Zhang, Peng; Sheriff, Jawaad; Livelli, Mark; Slepian, Marvin J; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a phenomenological three-dimensional platelet model to characterize the filopodia formation observed during early stage platelet activation. Departing from continuum mechanics based approaches, this coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) particle-based model can deform to emulate the complex shape change and filopodia formation that platelets undergo during activation. The platelet peripheral zone is modeled with a two-layer homogeneous elastic structure represented by spring-connected particles. The structural zone is represented by a cytoskeletal assembly comprising of a filamentous core and filament bundles supporting the platelet's discoid shape, also modeled by spring-connected particles. The interior organelle zone is modeled by homogeneous cytoplasm particles that facilitate the platelet deformation. Nonbonded interactions among the discrete particles of the membrane, the cytoskeletal assembly, and the cytoplasm are described using the Lennard-Jones potential with empirical constants. By exploring the parameter space of this CGMD model, we have successfully simulated the dynamics of varied filopodia formations. Comparative analyses of length and thickness of filopodia show that our numerical simulations are in agreement with experimental measurements of flow-induced activated platelets. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Variations in Aerosol Chemical Composition during New Particle Formation and Growth Events Downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    New particle formation and growth has been characterized through various field studies using scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). However, there is insufficient knowledge of the variation of aerosol chemical compositions during those events. We investigated the variation of aerosol chemical composition during new particle formation and growth events downwind of Seoul. New particle formation and growth events were identified based on the evolution of the number size distribution measured by SMPS. The concentrations of inorganic ions and black carbon were measured using a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) coupled with an ion chromatograph (IC) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), respectively. We also measured concentrations of gaseous precursors (SO2, NO2) along with meteorological parameters using an automatic weather station. The measurements were conducted on the rooftop of a five-story building on a hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) at the Global Campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. The measurement periods were from February 12 to April 1, 2015 and from April 13 to June 12, 2016. We investigated the difference in chemical compositions between event and non-event days and its association with the variations in precursor concentrations and meteorological parameters.

  18. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  19. The formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerrild Zeuthen, J.

    2007-05-15

    This thesis describes the formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. The formation of aerosol particles is investigated by studying condensation of alkali salts from synthetic flue gasses in a laboratory tubular furnace. In this so-called laminar flow aerosol condenser-furnace gaseous alkali chlorides are mixed with sulphur dioxide, water vapour and oxygen. At high temperatures the alkali chloride reacts with sulphur dioxide to form alkali sulphate. During subsequent cooling of the synthetic flue gas the chlorides and sulphates condense either as deposits on walls or on other particles or directly from the gas phase by homogenous nucleation. A previously developed computer code for simulation of one-component nucleation of particles in a cylindrical laminar flow is extended to include a homogeneous gas phase reaction to produce gaseous alkali sulphate. The formation of aerosol particles during full-scale combustion of wheat straw is investigated in a 100 MW grate-fired boiler. Finally, aerosols from incineration of waste are investigated during full-scale combustion of municipal waste in a 22 MW grate-fired unit. (BA)

  20. Influence of composite particle formation on the performance and economics of grit removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, S J; Khraisheh, M; Al-Jaml, K L; Jarman, D M; Jahfer, T

    2017-01-01

    Grit is routinely removed at the headworks of municipal wastewater treatment works to limit its onerous impact on downstream processes. Grit separation technologies are normally based on sedimentation of a homogeneous material (usually sand). However, in practice inorganic grit particles are likely to be combined with organic matter, such as fats oils and grease (FOG), producing a composite particle whose settling properties vary with the inorganic/organic content. A study of the impact of particle composition on its sedimentation has been conducted encompassing theoretical description (for particle settling in transitional flow), practical measurement and economic analysis. Practical measurement included sedimentation tests of homogeneous and composite particles along with characterisation of accumulated granular material sampled from actual municipal wastewater treatment works. The economic assessment was based on data from full-scale installations in the UK and US pertaining to remedial measures undertaken as a result of grit impacts, primarily accumulation in vessels and channels and damage of mechanical equipment through abrasion. Practical tests revealed coating of the sand grains with a FOG analogue (candlewax) to generate composite particles containing 45% wax by weight. The coated particles were then 30% less dense, 22% larger and 14% less settleable, on average, than the uncoated particles. Samples of accumulated grit taken from anaerobic digesters and aeration lanes from a full-scale plant indicated a FOG content (43%) similar to that of the waxed particles in the bench-scale tests, thus leading to a similar grain retardation of 14% assuming the FOG to be entirely associated with the grit. An assessment of the impact of the consequential breakthrough of grit particles due to buoyancy generated by composite particle formation indicated a $1.1 increase in operating costs per megalitre (ML) wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty J; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-10-25

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by [Formula: see text] (27%) to [Formula: see text] Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  2. T-body formation precedes virus-like particle maturation in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malagon, Francisco; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2011-01-01

    T-bodies are localized S. cerevisiae RNPs containing Ty1 retroviral components and speculated to play a role in the assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs). Mapping requirements for T-body formation, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of immature TyA1/Gag (Gag-p49), a structural component of ...

  3. Cold oceans enhance terrestrial new-particle formation in near-coastal forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The world's forests produce atmospheric aerosol by emitting volatile organic compounds (VOC which, after being oxidized in the atmosphere, readily condense on the omnipresent nanometer-sized nuclei and grow them to climatically relevant sizes. The cooling effect of aerosols is the greatest uncertainty in current climate models and estimates of radiative forcing. Therefore, identifying the environmental factors influencing the biogenic formation of aerosols is crucial. In this paper, we connected biogenic aerosol formation events observed in a Eucalypt forest in South-East Australia during July 2005–December 2006 to air mass history using 96-h back trajectories. Formation of new particles was most frequent in the dry westerly and south-westerly air masses. According to NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index measurements, photosynthesis was not significantly higher in this direction compared to the north-east direction. It is unlikely, therefore, that differences in photosynthesis-derived organic precursor emissions would have been significant enough to lead to the clear difference in NPF frequency between these two directions. Instead, the high evaporation rates above the Pacific Ocean resulted in humid winds from the north-east that effectively suppressed new-particle formation in the forest hundreds of kilometers inland. No other factor varied as significantly in tune with new-particle formation as humidity and we concluded that, in addition to local meteorological factors in the forest, the magnitude of evaporation from oceans hundreds of kilometers upwind can effectively suppress or enhance new-particle formation. Our findings indicate that, unlike warm waters, the cold polar oceans provide excellent clean and dry background air that enhances aerosol formation above near-coastal forests in Fennoscandia and South-East Australia.

  4. Effect of reaction time on formation of silica core/shell particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan P. Nikolić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The silica core/shell nanostructures were prepared by a wet-chemical process. Silica core particles were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. The obtained particles (average size ∼0.4 µm were used as templates for assembling of silica nanoparticles generated from highly basic sodium silicate solution. The silica core particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES to allow electrostatic assembling of silica nanoparticles on the surface of silica core particles. In order to find the optimal conditions for synthesis of silica core/shell particles with mesoporous shells, the effect of reaction time on formation of silica nanoparticles was investigated. The effect of process parameters on generation and aggregation of silica nanoparticles prepared from highly basic sodium silicate solution was also investigated. It was shown that the size of silica nanoparticles and tendency towards aggregation increase with increasing the reaction time and temperature. These behaviours were reflected on the formation of mesoporous silica shell around silica core particles. Thin and uniform mesoporous silica layers were obtained if reaction times were kept short. When the reaction time was prolonged, the thicker and non-uniform shells were obtained.

  5. New particle formation events measured on board the ATR-42 aircraft during the EUCAARI campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Crumeyrolle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol properties were studied during an intensive airborne measurement campaign that took place at Rotterdam in Netherlands in May 2008 within the framework of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI. The objective of this study is to illustrate seven events of new particle formation (NPF observed with two Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs operated on board the ATR-42 research aircraft in airsectors around Rotterdam, and to provide information on the spatial extent of the new particle formation phenomenon based on 1-s resolution measurements of ultra-fine particle (in the size range 3–10 nm diameter, denoted N3-10 hereafter concentrations. The results show that particle production occurred under the influence of different air mass origins, at different day times and over the North Sea as well as over the continent. The number concentration of freshly nucleated particles (N3-10 varied between 5000 and 100 000 cm−3 within the boundary layer (BL. Furthermore the vertical extension for all nucleation events observed on the ATR-42 never exceeded the upper limit of the BL. The horizontal extent of N3-10 could not be delimited due to inflexible flight plans which could not be modified to accommodate real-time results. However, the NPF events were observed over geographically large areas; typically the horizontal extension was about 100 km and larger.

  6. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  7. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: are organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-09-01

    A high concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere when the exhaust cools and dilutes has hazardous health effects and it impairs the visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulfur content (FSC) fuel, under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested. Based on the measured gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrier-free heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between the GSA and a semi-volatile organic vapour combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur due to the similar organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) × 1012 cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had an opposite trend on the NUP formation, and the maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, the model predicted that the NUP formation ceased if the GSA concentration in the raw exhaust was less than 1010 cm-3, which was the case when biofuel was used.

  8. Endochondral bone formation in gelatin methacrylamide hydrogel with embedded cartilage-derived matrix particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jetze; Gawlitta, Debby; Benders, Kim E M; Toma, Selynda M H; Pouran, Behdad; van Weeren, P René; Dhert, Wouter J A; Malda, Jos

    2015-01-01

    The natural process of endochondral bone formation in the growing skeletal system is increasingly inspiring the field of bone tissue engineering. However, in order to create relevant-size bone grafts, a cell carrier is required that ensures a high diffusion rate and facilitates matrix formation, balanced by its degradation. Therefore, we set out to engineer endochondral bone in gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogels with embedded multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) particles. CDM particles were found to stimulate the formation of a cartilage template by MSCs in the GelMA hydrogel in vitro. In a subcutaneous rat model, this template was subsequently remodeled into mineralized bone tissue, including bone-marrow cavities. The GelMA was almost fully degraded during this process. There was no significant difference in the degree of calcification in GelMA with or without CDM particles: 42.5 ± 2.5% vs. 39.5 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), respectively. Interestingly, in an osteochondral setting, the presence of chondrocytes in one half of the constructs fully impeded bone formation in the other half by MSCs. This work offers a new avenue for the engineering of relevant-size bone grafts, by the formation of endochondral bone within a degradable hydrogel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical characterization and in silico modeling of inulin polymer conformation during vaccine adjuvant particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Thomas G; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Thilagam, Alagu; Qian, Gujie; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Cooper, Peter D; Gerson, Andrea; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-06-05

    This study combined physical data from synchrotron SAXS, FTIR and microscopy with in-silico molecular structure predictions and mathematical modeling to examine inulin adjuvant particle formation and structure. The results show that inulin polymer chains adopt swollen random coil in solution. As precipitation occurs from solution, interactions between the glucose end group of one chain and a fructose group of an adjacent chain help drive organized assembly, initially forming inulin ribbons with helical organization of the chains orthogonal to the long-axis of the ribbon. Subsequent aggregation of the ribbons results in the layered semicrystalline particles previously shown to act as potent vaccine adjuvants. γ-Inulin adjuvant particles consist of crystalline layers 8.5 nm thick comprising helically organized inulin chains orthogonal to the plane of the layer. These crystalline layers alternate with amorphous layers 2.4 nm thick, to give overall particle crystallinity of 78%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  11. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  12. New particle formation in air mass transported between two measurement sites in Northern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Komppula

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study covers four years of aerosol number size distribution data from Pallas and Värriö sites 250 km apart from each other in Northern Finland and compares new particle formation events between these sites. In air masses of eastern origin almost all events were observed to start earlier at the eastern station Värriö, whereas in air masses of western origin most of the events were observed to start earlier at the western station Pallas. This demonstrates that particle formation in a certain air mass type depends not only on the diurnal variation of the parameters causing the phenomenon (such as photochemistry but also on some properties carried by the air mass itself. The correlation in growth rates between the two sites was relatively good, which suggests that the amount of condensable vapour causing the growth must have been at about the same level in both sites. The condensation sink was frequently much higher at the downwind station. It seems that secondary particle formation related to biogenic sources dominate in many cases over the particle sinks during the air mass transport between the sites. Two cases of transport from Pallas to Värriö were further analysed with an aerosol dynamics model. The model was able to reproduce the observed nucleation events 250 km down-wind at Värriö but revealed some differences between the two cases. The simulated nucleation rates were in both cases similar but the organic concentration profiles that best reproduced the observations were different in the two cases indicating that divergent formation reactions may dominate under different conditions. The simulations also suggested that organic compounds were the main contributor to new particle growth, which offers a tentative hypothesis to the distinct features of new particles at the two sites: Air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean typically spent approximately only ten hours over land before arriving at Pallas, and thus the time for the

  13. Formation and stability of small well-defined Cu- and Ni oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalinger, Ramona [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Heggen, Marc; Stroppa, Daniel G. [Ernst Ruska Zentrum und Peter Grünberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Stöger-Pollach, Michael [University Service Facility for Transmission Electron Microscopy (USTEM), Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Klötzer, Bernhard [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Penner, Simon, E-mail: simon.penner@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-12-16

    Well-defined and -structured Cu/Cu{sub 2}O and Ni/NiO composite nanoparticles have been prepared by physical-vapor deposition on vacuum-cleaved NaCl(001) single crystal facets. Epitaxial growth has been observed due to the close crystallographic matching of the respective cubic crystal lattices. Distinct particle morphologies have only been obtained for the Ni/NiO particles, comprising truncated half-octahedral, rhombohedral- and pentagonal-shaped outlines. Oxidation of the particles in the temperature range 473–673 K in both cases led to the formation of well-defined CuO and NiO particles with distinct morphologies. Whereas CuO possibly adopts its thermodynamical equilibrium shape, NiO formation is accompanied by entering a Kirkendall-like state, that is, a hollow core–shell structure is obtained. The difference in the formation of the oxides is also reflected by their stability under reducing conditions. CuO transforms back to a polycrystalline mixture of Cu metal, Cu{sub 2}O and CuO after reduction in hydrogen at 673 K. In contrast, as expected from theoretical stability considerations, the formation of the hollow NiO structure is reversed upon annealing in hydrogen at 673 K and moreover results in the formation of a Ni-rich silicide structure Ni{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. The discussed systems present a convenient way to tackle and investigate various problems in nanotechnology or catalysis, including phase transformations, establishing structure/activity relationships or monitoring intermetallic particles, starting from well-defined and simple models. - Highlights: • Preparation of epitaxial Cu/Cu{sub 2}O and Ni/NiO composite nanoparticles on NaCl(001). • Distinct Ni/NiO particle morphologies. • Formation of well-shaped CuO and NiO particles upon oxidation. • Reversal of Kirkendall-NiO-state upon reduction/annealing in hydrogen.

  14. Effect of graphite particle size and content on the formation mechanism of detonation polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Y.; Cao, Y.; Liu, R.; Shang, S. Y.; Huang, F. L.

    2017-05-01

    The formation mechanism of detonation polycrystalline diamond (DPD) generated from the detonation of a mixed RDX/graphite explosive is investigated. It is found experimentally that the DPD conversion rate decreases with both the content and the particle size of the graphite. Moreover, the particle sizes of the generated DPD powder are analyzed, which shows that, with the decrease in the graphite particle size, the mean number diameter of DPD decreases, but the mean volume diameter increases. In addition, with the help of scanning electron microscopy, it is observed that the in situ phase change occurs in the graphite particles, by which the small particles combine to form numerous large DPD particles. Based on both the experimental data and the classical ZND detonation model, we divide such a DPD synthesis process into two stages: In the first stage, the in situ phase change from graphite to diamond is dominant, supplemented by some coalescence growth at high pressure and temperature, which is affected mainly by the detonation performance of the mixed explosive under consideration. In the second stage, the graphitization of DPD caused by the residual heat is dominant, which is affected mainly by the unloading rate of the particle temperature.

  15. EFFECT OF PARTICLE TYPE ON CYCLONE FORMATION INSIDE A SOLAR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hsiu Chien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar reactors featuring a circulating cyclone flow pattern provide enhanced heat transfer and longer residence time increasing conversion efficiency. Cyclone flow also works in reducing particle deposition on solar reactor walls and exit which is particularly important issue in solar cracking reactors to avoid clogging. This paper focuses on the physics of cyclone formation inside a solar cracking reactor and experimentally analyzes the effect of particle entrainment on the flow pattern via two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. The cyclone flow structure in the reactor is reconstructed by capturing images from orientations perpendicular or parallel to the geometrical axis of the reactor. In order to conduct PIV measurements and to reconstruct the cyclone structure inside the solar reactor, the experiment was operated at room temperature with the flow configuration matching that of a solar reactor operating at high temperatures. Two types of seeding particles were tested, namely tri-ethylene glycol (TEG and solid carbon. The effectiveness of the screening flow was evaluated by measuring the quantity of solid particles deposit on the reactor walls. The Stokes flow analysis of each particle species was performed and the cyclone vector fields generated by using different particles are compared.

  16. Synergetic formation of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol: effect of SO2 and NH3 on particle formation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Biwu; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Jingkun; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-01

    The effects of SO2 and NH3 on secondary organic aerosol formation have rarely been investigated together, while the interactive effects between inorganic and organic species under highly complex pollution conditions remain uncertain. Here we studied the effects of SO2 and NH3 on secondary aerosol formation in the photooxidation system of toluene/NOx in the presence or absence of Al2O3 seed aerosols in a 2 m3 smog chamber. The presence of SO2 increased new particle formation and particle growth significantly, regardless of whether NH3 was present. Sulfate, organic aerosol, nitrate, and ammonium were all found to increase linearly with increasing SO2 concentrations. The increases in these four species were more obvious under NH3-rich conditions, and the generation of nitrate, ammonium, and organic aerosol increased more significantly than sulfate with respect to SO2 concentration, while sulfate was the most sensitive species under NH3-poor conditions. The synergistic effects between SO2 and NH3 in the heterogeneous process contributed greatly to secondary aerosol formation. Specifically, the generation of NH4NO3 was found to be highly dependent on the surface area concentration of suspended particles, and increased most significantly with SO2 concentration among the four species under NH3-rich conditions. Meanwhile, the absorbed NH3 might provide a liquid surface layer for the absorption and subsequent reaction of SO2 and organic products and, therefore, enhance sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. This effect mainly occurred in the heterogeneous process and resulted in a significantly higher growth rate of seed aerosols compared to without NH3. By applying positive matrix factorisation (PMF) analysis to the AMS data, two factors were identified for the generated SOA. One factor, assigned to less-oxidised organic aerosol and some oligomers, increased with increasing SO2 under NH3-poor conditions, mainly due to the well-known acid catalytic effect of

  17. A review of the effects of particle types on oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Andrew; Yim, Un Hyuk

    2016-12-01

    Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate (OSA) can form naturally when oil and particles interact. The interaction between oil and suspended particulate matter makes oil less sticky, and facilitates its dispersion in the water column. The high oil-water surface contact enhances the biodegradation of oil and thus increases the efficiency of remediation processes. There are many factors that affect OSA formation, but, particle type is one of the most important. Because different particle types have different physical, chemical, and biological properties, their interactions with oil differ greatly. Particle properties such as interlayer spaces, hydrophobicity, surface charges, polarity, organic content, and size affect the interactions between materials and oil. These different interactions determine the type, buoyancy, size, and stability of OSA that forms, thus determining its fate in the environment. This review provides a current understanding of (1) OSA formation mechanisms, (2) sources and classes of marine materials, (3) oil-particle interactions, (4) material properties and their effects on oil interaction, and (5) future research needs.

  18. Investigation of sulfate and nitrate formation on mineral dust particles by receptor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, P.D.; Bac, V.T.; Thinh, N.T.H. [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, Hanoi (Vietnam)

    2005-12-01

    The formation of sulfate and nitrate by heterogeneous reactions of gaseous precursors on mineral dust particles was investigated using positive matrix factorization (PMF) of coarse PM10 (particulate diameters from 2.2 to 10 {mu} m) collected at urban (Hanoi) and rural (Lucnam) sites in northern Vietnam. Air samples were analyzed for ionic and elemental components using ion chromatography and proton induced X-ray emission methods. PMF revealed six similar sources/types of coarse PM10 at the two sites, namely soil dust containing nitrate and sulfate, coal fly ash from distant and local sources, soil dust containing organic matter and ammonium sulfate and marine aerosol. Traffic (road) dust was found only at the urban site. From the PMF factor models, the yields of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} can be estimated and their possible chemical forms in different particulate types can be suggested. The yields of nitrate and sulfate formation on mineral dust particles increase with the (Ca)/(Si) ratio, which is greater in soil dust than in coal fly ash. Nitrate is bound to Ca-richest soil dust particles. Ammonium was found in dust particles containing soil organic matter, which also hold the largest amount of sulfate. The comparison of urban and rural receptor models provided synergy for the source identification and insights into the properties of mineral dust particles relevant to their interactions with acidic gases in ambient air.

  19. Formation of monodisperse hierarchical lipid particles utilizing microfluidic droplets in a nonequilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masahiro; Toyota, Taro; Konishi, Miki; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Masumi; Seki, Minoru

    2015-03-03

    A new microfluidic process was used to generate unique micrometer-sized hierarchical lipid particles having spherical lipid-core and multilamellar-shell structures. The process includes three steps: (1) formation of monodisperse droplets in a nonequilibrium state at a microchannel confluence, using a phospholipid-containing water-soluble organic solvent as the dispersed phase and water as the continuous phase; (2) dissolution of the organic solvent of the droplet into the continuous phase and concentration of the lipid molecules; and (3) reconstitution of multilamellar lipid membranes and simultaneous formation of a lipid core. We demonstrated control of the lipid particle size by the process conditions and characterized the obtained particles by transmission electron microscopy and microbeam small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. In addition, we prepared various types of core-shell and core-core-shell particles incorporating hydrophobic/hydrophilic compounds, showing the applicability of the presented process to the production of drug-encapsulating lipid particles.

  20. The role of ions in new particle formation in the CLOUD chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of secondary particles in the atmosphere accounts for more than half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Experiments at the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets chamber have underlined the importance of ions for new particle formation, but quantifying their effect in the atmosphere remains challenging. By using a novel instrument setup consisting of two nanoparticle counters, one of them equipped with an ion filter, we were able to further investigate the ion-related mechanisms of new particle formation. In autumn 2015, we carried out experiments at CLOUD on four systems of different chemical compositions involving monoterpenes, sulfuric acid, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia. We measured the influence of ions on the nucleation rates under precisely controlled and atmospherically relevant conditions. Our results indicate that ions enhance the nucleation process when the charge is necessary to stabilize newly formed clusters, i.e., in conditions in which neutral clusters are unstable. For charged clusters that were formed by ion-induced nucleation, we were able to measure, for the first time, their progressive neutralization due to recombination with oppositely charged ions. A large fraction of the clusters carried a charge at 1.5 nm diameter. However, depending on particle growth rates and ion concentrations, charged clusters were largely neutralized by ion–ion recombination before they grew to 2.5 nm. At this size, more than 90 % of particles were neutral. In other words, particles may originate from ion-induced nucleation, although they are neutral upon detection at diameters larger than 2.5 nm. Observations at Hyytiälä, Finland, showed lower ion concentrations and a lower contribution of ion-induced nucleation than measured at CLOUD under similar conditions. Although this can be partly explained by the observation that ion-induced fractions decrease towards lower ion concentrations, further investigations

  1. The role of ions in new particle formation in the CLOUD chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Yan, Chao; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Duplissy, Jonathan; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kangasluoma, Juha; Ahonen, Lauri R.; Dada, Lubna; Kontkanen, Jenni; Manninen, Hanna E.; Dias, Antonio; Amorim, Antonio; Bauer, Paulus S.; Bergen, Anton; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Brilke, Sophia; Buenrostro Mazon, Stephany; Chen, Xuemeng; Draper, Danielle C.; Fischer, Lukas; Frege, Carla; Fuchs, Claudia; Garmash, Olga; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Heikkinen, Liine; Heinritzi, Martin; Hofbauer, Victoria; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kvashnin, Alexander N.; Laurila, Tiia; Lawler, Michael J.; Mai, Huajun; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mauldin, Roy L., III; Molteni, Ugo; Nichman, Leonid; Nie, Wei; Ojdanic, Andrea; Onnela, Antti; Piel, Felix; Quéléver, Lauriane L. J.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Stolzenburg, Dominik; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tröstl, Jasmin; Viisanen, Yrjö; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Xiao, Mao; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Gallagher, Martin; Hansel, Armin; Smith, James N.; Tomé, António; Winkler, Paul M.; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael; Sipilä, Mikko; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2017-12-01

    The formation of secondary particles in the atmosphere accounts for more than half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Experiments at the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber have underlined the importance of ions for new particle formation, but quantifying their effect in the atmosphere remains challenging. By using a novel instrument setup consisting of two nanoparticle counters, one of them equipped with an ion filter, we were able to further investigate the ion-related mechanisms of new particle formation. In autumn 2015, we carried out experiments at CLOUD on four systems of different chemical compositions involving monoterpenes, sulfuric acid, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia. We measured the influence of ions on the nucleation rates under precisely controlled and atmospherically relevant conditions. Our results indicate that ions enhance the nucleation process when the charge is necessary to stabilize newly formed clusters, i.e., in conditions in which neutral clusters are unstable. For charged clusters that were formed by ion-induced nucleation, we were able to measure, for the first time, their progressive neutralization due to recombination with oppositely charged ions. A large fraction of the clusters carried a charge at 1.5 nm diameter. However, depending on particle growth rates and ion concentrations, charged clusters were largely neutralized by ion-ion recombination before they grew to 2.5 nm. At this size, more than 90 % of particles were neutral. In other words, particles may originate from ion-induced nucleation, although they are neutral upon detection at diameters larger than 2.5 nm. Observations at Hyytiälä, Finland, showed lower ion concentrations and a lower contribution of ion-induced nucleation than measured at CLOUD under similar conditions. Although this can be partly explained by the observation that ion-induced fractions decrease towards lower ion concentrations, further investigations are needed to resolve the origin of

  2. New particle formation in Remote Northern American Forests under the Sulfur Plume Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, V. P.; Erupe, M.; Lefer, B. L.; Jobson, B. T.; Tripathi, S. N.; Pressley, S. N.; Khosrawi, F.; Lee, S.

    2010-12-01

    About 30% of the Earth’s land surface is covered by various types of forests. Forest emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) affect atmospheric photochemistry, aerosol loading, and radiative forcing over forests. Many forests are experiencing rapid changes in environmental conditions as a result of forest succession due to climate change. This also affects local BVOC chemistry and aerosol formation and growth in near canopy environments, thereby altering the climatic effects of forests. We observed aerosol sizes and nucleation precursors during Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiments (CABINEX) collaborative research in the remote Michigan forests in the summer 2009, in order to understand the new particle formation processes in BVOC rich, remote northern American forests. Our observations show that occurrence of ultrafine particles in the remote Michigan forest site was rare, even in the presence of high concentrations of biogenically emitted isoprene and its oxidation products during the summer 2009. NPF was observed on two occasions during 4 weeks of measurements. Analysis based on both the ground- and satellite-based measurements of key trace gas species show that these two events were strongly influenced by anthropogenic SO2 plumes transported from regional power plants. Microphysical box modeling simulations, constrained by the measured SO2, OH, and H2SO4 and other key atmospheric parameters, show that ion nucleation involving high concentrations of SO2 and/or H2SO4 is a likely pathway to explain the observed ultrafine particles, while binary and ternary homogeneous nucleation processes failed to reproduce atmospheric observations. Our results indicate that despite stringent air quality regulations in North America, the threat to remote forests from air pollution still persist, contributing to formation of aerosol particles over forested areas and must be accounted for in models to accurately predict the impact of new particle

  3. Simulating the global atmospheric response to aircraft water vapour emissions and contrails: a first approach using a GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ponater

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of contrails and aircraft water vapour emissions on global climate is studied by means of a general circulation model (GCM. In a first approach water vapour emissions and mean contrail coverage within the main flight routes are prescribed according to current observations in a simplified manner. A hierarchic experiment strategy with gradual increase of the forcing is applied to identify the resulting climate signals. The water vapour increase to be expected from air traffic is too small to force a detectable radiative or climatic response. The sensitivity of the model climate to the occurrence of contrails appears to be higher. For mid-latitude summer conditions, the high cloud increase experiments show a consistent temperature response pattern. However, its magnitude is statistically significant only for a mean contrail coverage exceeding present-day amounts. Moreover, the magnitude of the contrail climate signal is highly sensitive to the details of the experimental setup due to several non-linearities of the cloud-radiative interaction. Hence, the prescription of contrails in the GCM has to be as careful as possible for an optimal treatment of the problem. Respective recommendations are given.

  4. Simulating the global atmospheric response to aircraft water vapour emissions and contrails: a first approach using a GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ponater

    Full Text Available The effect of contrails and aircraft water vapour emissions on global climate is studied by means of a general circulation model (GCM. In a first approach water vapour emissions and mean contrail coverage within the main flight routes are prescribed according to current observations in a simplified manner. A hierarchic experiment strategy with gradual increase of the forcing is applied to identify the resulting climate signals. The water vapour increase to be expected from air traffic is too small to force a detectable radiative or climatic response. The sensitivity of the model climate to the occurrence of contrails appears to be higher. For mid-latitude summer conditions, the high cloud increase experiments show a consistent temperature response pattern. However, its magnitude is statistically significant only for a mean contrail coverage exceeding present-day amounts. Moreover, the magnitude of the contrail climate signal is highly sensitive to the details of the experimental setup due to several non-linearities of the cloud-radiative interaction. Hence, the prescription of contrails in the GCM has to be as careful as possible for an optimal treatment of the problem. Respective recommendations are given.

  5. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-04

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels.

  6. Simulating Marine New Particle Formation and Growth Using the M7 Modal Aerosol Dynamics Modal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran Monahan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A modal atmospheric aerosol model (M7 is evaluated in terms of predicting marine new particle formation and growth. Simulations were carried out for three different nucleation schemes involving (1 kinetic self-nucleation of OIO (2 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 and (3 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 plus condensation of a low-volatility organic vapour. Peak OIO and H2SO4 vapour concentrations were both limited to 6×106 molecules cm-3 at noontime while the peak organic vapour concentration was limited to 12×106 molecules cm-3. All simulations produced significant concentrations of new particles in the Aitken mode. From a base case particle concentration of 222 cm-3 at radii >15 nm, increases in concentrations to 366 cm-3 were predicted from the OIO-OIO case, 722 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case, and 1584 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case with additional condensing organic vapours. The results indicate that open ocean new particle production is feasible for clean conditions; however, new particle production becomes most significant when an additional condensable organic vapour is available to grow the newly formed particles to larger sizes. Comparison to sectional model for a typical case study demonstrated good agreement and the validity of using the modal model.

  7. Formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high-temperature environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Du, Shan-Wen; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Wu, Jheng-Syun

    2008-05-01

    The formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high temperatures are studied experimentally. By conducting a drop-tube furnace, fuel pyrolysis processes in industrial furnaces are simulated in which three different reaction temperatures of 1000, 1200, and 1400 degrees C are considered. Experimental observations indicate that when the reaction temperature is 1000 degrees C, submicron particles are produced, whereas the particle size is dominated by nanoscale for the temperature of 1400 degrees C. Thermogravimetric analysis of the aerosol particles stemming from the pyrolysis temperature of 1000 degrees C reveals that the thermal behavior of the aerosol is characterized by a three-stage reaction with increasing heating temperature: (1) a volatile-reaction stage, (2) a weak-reaction stage, and (3) a soot-reaction stage. However, with the pyrolysis temperature of 1400 degrees C, the volatile- and weak-reaction stages almost merge together and evolve into a chemical-frozen stage. The submicron particles (i.e., 1000 degrees C) are mainly composed of volatiles, tar, and soot, with the main component of the nanoscale particles (i.e., 1400 degrees C) being soot. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in the aerosols are also analyzed. It is found that the PAH content in generated aerosols decreases dramatically as the pyrolysis temperature increases.

  8. Formation of DNA-network embedding ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Shirakawa, Hideaki; Sacho, Yu; Taniguchi, Masateru; Lee, Hea-Yeon; Kawai, Tomoji; Kang, Nam-Jung; Chen, Jinwoo

    2002-03-01

    Formation of DNA-network embedding ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-particles T. Kanki, Hidekazu. Tanaka, H. Shirakawa, Y. Sacho, M. Taniguchi, H. Lee, T. Kawai The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Japan and Nam-Jung Kang, Jinwoo Chen Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea DNA can be regarded as a naturally occurring and highly specific functional biopolymer and as a fine nano-wire. Moreover, it was found that large-scale DNA networks can be fabricated on mica surfaces. By using this network structure, we can expect to construct nano-scale assembly of functional nano particle, for example ferromagnetic Co nano particles, toward nano scale spin-electronics based on DNA circuits. When we formed DNA network by 250mg/ml DNA solution of poly(dG)-poly(dC) including ferromagnetic Co nano particles (diameter of 12nm), we have conformed the DNA network structure embedding Co nano-particles (height of about 12nm) by atomic force microscopy. On the other hand, we used 100mg/ml DNA solution, DNA can not connect each other, and many Co nano-particles exist without being embedded.

  9. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles cloud formation and potential

  10. The role of sulfur emission in volatile particle formation in jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärcher, B.; Fahey, D. W.

    Recent in-situ emission measurements of the Concorde in the lower stratosphere point to a surprisingly efficient conversion of fuel sulfur to H2SO4 in the exhaust plume. By means of a comprehensive model, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles and precursors are calculated in the diluting aircraft wake. The results provide strong evidence that high levels of SO3 present in the nascent plume are required to explain the observations of large numbers of nanometer-sized aerosols. Limiting particle formation at emission to keep potential chemical effects on stratospheric ozone small will require control of the sulfur oxidation kinetics during fuel combustion. The similarities between super- and subsonic exhaust plumes suggest that the presence of SO3 in the latter will also be a key limiting factor in new aerosol production.

  11. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  12. Control of lignin solubility and particle formation modulates its antioxidant efficiency in lipid medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Sanadi, Anand Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an abundant plant polymer usually regarded as waste material. In the present work, antioxidant properties of lignin preparations with differing lipid solubility were studied using biodiesel as a convenient lipid test substrate. In place of formerly used assays, we used attenuated total...... reflectance (ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy to follow in situ biodiesel autoxidation on a heated ATR crystal as a function of time. The study demonstrates that a complex balance between intrinsic (chemical) efficiency, solubility, and particle formation controls the antioxidant efficiency of differently prepared...... lignin fractions. It was found that solubility and particle formation of lignin preparations strongly modulate its antioxidant efficiency and that these properties might depend on the presence of lipid components within the original lignin source....

  13. Characterization of new particle and secondary aerosol formation during summertime in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, J. Y.; Lin, W. L.; Gong, S. L.; Shen, X. J.; Yang, S.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved aerosol number and mass concentrations and the mixing ratios of O3 and various trace gases were continuously measured at an urban station before and during the Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games (5 June to 22 September, 2008). 23 new particle formation (NPF) events were identified; these usually were associated with changes in wind direction and/or rising concentrations of gas-phase precursors or after precipitation events. Most of the NPF events started in the morning and continued to noon as particles in the nucleation mode grew into the Aitken mode. From noon to midnight, the aerosols grew into the accumulation mode through condensation and coagulation. Ozone showed a gradual rise starting around 10:00 local time, reached its peak around 15:00 and then declined as the organics increased. The dominant new particle species were organics (40-75% of PM1) and sulphate; nitrate and ammonium were more minor contributors.

  14. Formation of classical crystals of dipolar particles in a helical geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K. Pedersen, J.; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    We consider crystal formation of particles with dipole-dipole interactions that are confined to move in a one-dimensional helical geometry with their dipole moments oriented along the symmetry axis of the confining helix. The stable classical lowest energy configurations are found to be chain str......-to-tail attraction in the system. The speed of sound propagates along the chains. It is independent of the number of chains although depending on geometry....

  15. Formation of correlated states and tunneling for a low energy and controlled pulsed action on particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotskii, V. I.; Vysotskyy, M. V.

    2017-08-01

    We consider a method for optimizing the tunnel effect for low-energy particles by using coherent correlated states formed under controllable pulsed action on these particles. Typical examples of such actions are the effect of a pulsed magnetic field on charged particles in a gas or plasma. Coherent correlated states are characterized most comprehensively by the correlation coefficient r( t); an increase of this factor elevates the probability of particle tunneling through a high potential barrier by several orders of magnitude without an appreciable increase in their energy. It is shown for the first time that the formation of coherent correlated states, as well as maximal | r( t)|max and time-averaged 〈| r( t)|〉 amplitudes of the correlation coefficient and the corresponding tunneling probability are characterized by a nonmonotonic (oscillating) dependence on the forming pulse duration and amplitude. This result makes it possible to optimize experiments on the realization of low-energy nuclear fusion and demonstrates the incorrectness of the intuitive idea that the tunneling probability always increases with the amplitude of an external action on a particle. Our conclusions can be used, in particular, for explaining random (unpredictable and low-repeatability) experimental results on optimization of energy release from nuclear reactions occurring under a pulsed action with fluctuations of the amplitude and duration. We also consider physical premises for the observed dependences and obtain optimal relations between the aforementioned parameters, which ensure the formation of an optimal coherent correlated state and optimal low-energy tunneling in various physical systems with allowance for the dephasing action of a random force. The results of theoretical analysis are compared with the data of successful experiments on the generation of neutrons and alpha particles in an electric discharge in air and gaseous deuterium.

  16. submitter On the composition of ammonia–sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, S; Bianchi, F; Rondo, L; Duplissy, J; Kürten, A; Ortega, I K; Metzger, A; Schnitzhofer, R; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Dunne, E M; Ehn, M; Gagné, S; Ickes, L; Junninen, H; Hansel, A; Kerminen, V -M; Kirkby, J; Kupc, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Mathot, S; Onnela, A; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Santos, F D; Sipilä, M; Tomé, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Viisanen, Y; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Curtius, J; Donahue, N M; Baltensperger, U; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia $(NH_3)$ and sulfuric acid $(H-2SO_4)$. Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small $NH_3–H_2SO_4$ clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm/Δn = 1.05 and were only observed at sufficiently high $[NH_3]$ / $[H_2SO_4]$. The $H_2SO_4$ molecules of these clusters are partially neutralized by $NH_3$, in close resemblance...

  17. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, S; Bianchi, F; Rondo, L; Duplissy, J; Kürten, A; Ortega, I K; Metzger, A; Schnitzhofer, R; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Dunne, E M; Ehn, M; Gagné, S; Ickes, L; Junninen, H; Hansel, A; Kerminen, V-M; Kirkby, J; Kupc, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Mathot, S; Onnela, A; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Santos, F D; Sipilä, M; Tomé, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Viisanen, Y; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Curtius, J; Donahue, N M; Baltensperger, U; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2014-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm / Δn = 1.05 and were only observed at sufficiently high [NH3] / [H2SO4]. The H2SO4 molecules of these clusters are partially neutralized by NH3, in close resemblance to the acid-base bindings ...

  18. On the formation of sulphuric acid – amine clusters in varying atmospheric conditions and its influence on atmospheric new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulphuric acid is a key component in atmospheric new particle formation. However, sulphuric acid alone does not form stable enough clusters to initiate particle formation in atmospheric conditions. Strong bases, such as amines, have been suggested to stabilize sulphuric acid clusters and thus participate in particle formation. We modelled the formation rate of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules (JA2B2 at varying atmospherically relevant conditions with respect to concentrations of sulphuric acid ([H2SO4], dimethylamine ([DMA] and trimethylamine ([TMA], temperature and relative humidity (RH. We also tested how the model results change if we assume that the clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules would act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of organic vapours (other than amines with higher atmospheric concentrations than sulphuric acid. The modelled formation rates JA2B2 were functions of sulphuric acid concentration with close to quadratic dependence, which is in good agreement with atmospheric observations of the connection between the particle formation rate and sulphuric acid concentration. The coefficients KA2B2 connecting the cluster formation rate and sulphuric acid concentrations as JA2B2=KA2B2[H2SO4]2 turned out to depend also on amine concentrations, temperature and relative humidity. We compared the modelled coefficients KA2B2 with the corresponding coefficients calculated from the atmospheric observations (Kobs from environments with varying temperatures and levels of anthropogenic influence. By taking into account the modelled behaviour of JA2B2 as a function of [H2SO4], temperature and RH, the atmospheric particle formation rate was reproduced more closely than with the traditional semi-empirical formulae based on sulphuric acid concentration only. The formation rates of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules with different amine compositions (DMA or TMA or one of both had

  19. The formation of molecular hydrogen from water ice in the lunar regolith by energetic charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-06-01

    On 9 October 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket into the permanently shadowed region (PSR) within Cabeus crater and detected water vapor and ice, as well as other volatiles, in the ejecta plume. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), observed this plume as FUV emissions from the fluorescence of sunlight by molecular hydrogen (H2) and other constituents. Energetic charged particles, such as galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), can dissociate the molecules in water ice to form H2. We examine how much H2can be formed by these types of particle radiation interacting with water ice sequestered in the regolith within PSRs, and we assess whether it can account for the H2 observed by LAMP. To estimate H2formation, we use the GCR and SEP radiation dose rates measured by the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER). The exposure time of the ice is calculated by considering meteoritic gardening and the penetration depth of the energetic particles. We find that GCRs and SEPs could convert at least 1-7% of the original water molecules into H2. Therefore, given the amount of water detected by LCROSS, such particle radiation‒induced dissociation of water ice could likely account for a significant percentage (10-100%) of the H2measured by LAMP.

  20. Characterization of subvisible particle formation during the filling pump operation of a monoclonal antibody solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Arpan; Colandene, James; Bradford, Victor; Perkins, Melissa

    2011-10-01

    Characterization and control of aggregate and subvisible particle formation during fill-finish process steps are important for biopharmaceutical products. The filling step is of key importance as there is no further filtration of the drug product beyond sterile filtration. Filling processes can impact product quality by introducing physical stresses such as shear, friction, and cavitation. Other detrimental factors include temperature generated in the process of filling, foaming, and contact with filling system materials, including processing aids such as silicone oil. Certain pumps may shed extrinsic particles that may lead to heterogeneous nucleation-induced aggregation. In this work, microflow imaging, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), and turbidimetry were utilized to quantify subvisible particles, aggregation, and opalescence, respectively. The filling process was performed using several commonly used filling systems, including rotary piston pump, rolling diaphragm pump, peristaltic pump, and time-pressure filler. The rolling diaphragm pump, peristaltic pump, and time-pressure filler generated notably less protein subvisible particles than the rotary piston pump, although no change in aggregate content by SEC was observed by any pump. An extreme increase in subvisible particles was also reflected in an increase in turbidity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Collisions of massive particles, timelike thin shells and formation of black holes in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Jonathan [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and the International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles,Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2016-12-13

    We study collisions of massive pointlike particles in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space, generalizing the work on massless particles in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/33/14/145009. We show how to construct exact solutions corresponding to the formation of either a black hole or a conical singularity from the collision of an arbitrary number of massive particles that fall in radially and collide at the origin of AdS. No restrictions on the masses or the angular and radial positions from where the particles are released, are imposed. We also consider the limit of an infinite number of particles, obtaining novel timelike thin shell spacetimes. These thin shells have an arbitrary mass distribution as well as a non-trivial embedding where the radial location of the shell depends on the angular coordinate, and we analyze these shells using the junction formalism of general relativity. We also consider the massless limit and find consistency with earlier results, as well as comment on the stress-energy tensor modes of the dual CFT.

  2. A WRF Simulation of an Episode of Contrails Covering the Entire Sky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Mazon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available On 21 September 2012 the entire sky was covered by contrails over the Gulf of Lyon (NW of the Mediterranean basin. These clouds were well recorded by ground observers as well as by Meteosat imagery. The atmospheric characteristics at the levels where these anthropic clouds formed are analyzed by performing a WRF simulation in the area where Meteosat recorded contrail clouds. According to the vertical profiles of temperature and the relative humidity respect to the ice (RHI, the environmental condition favors that the water vapor exhaust emitted by the aircraft engines reaches the deposition point and form crystal clouds, which spread out because the temperature remained below 230 K and the RHI was higher than 70% during the whole episode.

  3. Spatial distribution and occurrence probability of regional new particle formation events in eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Shen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the spatial extent of new particle formation (NPF events and the relative probability of observing particles originating from different spatial origins around three rural sites in eastern China were investigated using the NanoMap method, using particle number size distribution (PNSD data and air mass back trajectories. The length of the datasets used were 7, 1.5, and 3 years at rural sites Shangdianzi (SDZ in the North China Plain (NCP, Mt. Tai (TS in central eastern China, and Lin'an (LAN in the Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China, respectively. Regional NPF events were observed to occur with the horizontal extent larger than 500 km at SDZ and TS, favoured by the fast transport of northwesterly air masses. At LAN, however, the spatial footprint of NPF events was mostly observed around the site within 100–200 km. Difference in the horizontal spatial distribution of new particle source areas at different sites was connected to typical meteorological conditions at the sites. Consecutive large-scale regional NPF events were observed at SDZ and TS simultaneously and were associated with a high surface pressure system dominating over this area. Simultaneous NPF events at SDZ and LAN were seldom observed. At SDZ the polluted air masses arriving over the NCP were associated with higher particle growth rate (GR and new particle formation rate (J than air masses from Inner Mongolia (IM. At TS the same phenomenon was observed for J, but GR was somewhat lower in air masses arriving over the NCP compared to those arriving from IM. The capability of NanoMap to capture the NPF occurrence probability depends on the length of the dataset of PNSD measurement but also on topography around the measurement site and typical air mass advection speed during NPF events. Thus the long-term measurements of PNSD in the planetary boundary layer are necessary in the further study of spatial extent and the probability of NPF events. The spatial

  4. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kiendler-Scharr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC emissions from transgenic Grey poplar modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m−2 s−1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m−2 s−1 in isoprene emission-repressed plants (line RA22, respectively. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm−3 s−1 were observed in our experiments. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8 was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3% of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  5. Boundary layer new particle formation over East Antarctic sea ice – possible Hg-driven nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol observations above the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice are scarce. Measurements of aerosols and atmospheric composition were made in East Antarctic pack ice on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis during the spring of 2012. One particle formation event was observed during the 32 days of observations. This event occurred on the only day to exhibit extended periods of global irradiance in excess of 600 W m−2. Within the single air mass influencing the measurements, number concentrations of particles larger than 3 nm (CN3 reached almost 7700 cm−3 within a few hours of clouds clearing, and grew at rates of 5.6 nm h−1. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were in the range of those measured at other Antarctic locations at 0.2–1.1 ± 0.1 cm−3 s−1. Our investigations into the nucleation chemistry found that there were insufficient precursor concentrations for known halogen or organic chemistry to explain the nucleation event. Modelling studies utilising known sulfuric acid nucleation schemes could not simultaneously reproduce both particle formation or growth rates. Surprising correlations with total gaseous mercury (TGM were found that, together with other data, suggest a mercury-driven photochemical nucleation mechanism may be responsible for aerosol nucleation. Given the very low vapour pressures of the mercury species involved, this nucleation chemistry is likely only possible where pre-existing aerosol concentrations are low and both TGM concentrations and solar radiation levels are relatively high (∼ 1.5 ng m−3 and ≥ 600 W m−2, respectively, such as those observed in the Antarctic sea ice boundary layer in this study or in the global free troposphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere.

  6. A model for thin layer formation by delayed particle settling at sharp density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prairie, Jennifer C.; White, Brian L.

    2017-02-01

    Thin layers - regions where plankton or particles accumulate vertically on scales of a few meters or less - are common in coastal waters, and have important implications for both trophic dynamics and carbon cycling. These features can form by a variety of biological and physical mechanisms, including localized growth, shear-thinning, and directed swimming. An additional mechanism may result in the formation of thin layers of marine aggregates, which have been shown to decrease their settling velocity when passing through sharp density gradients, a behavior termed delayed settling. Here, we apply a simple vertical advection-diffusion model to predict the properties of aggregate thin layers formed by this process. We assume a constant vertical flux of particles from the surface, which is parameterized by observations from laboratory experiments with marine aggregates. The formation, maintenance, and shape of the layers are described in relation to non-dimensional numbers that depend on environmental conditions and particle settling properties. In particular, model results demonstrate layer intensity and sharpness both increase with higher Péclet number (Pe), that is, under conditions with weaker mixing relative to layer formation. Similarly, more intense and sharper layers are found when the delayed settling behavior of aggregates is characterized by a lower velocity minimum. The model also predicts layers that are vertically asymmetric and highly "peaky" when compared with a Gaussian distribution, features often seen in thin layers in natural environments. Lastly, by comparing model predictions with observations of thin layers in the field, we are able to gain some insight into the applicability of delayed settling as a thin layer formation mechanism in different environmental conditions.

  7. Effects of meteorology and secondary particle formation on visibility during heavy haze events in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Quan, Jiannong; Tie, Xuexi; Li, Xia; Liu, Quan; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Delong

    2015-01-01

    The causes of haze formation in Beijing, China were analyzed based on a comprehensive measurement, including PBL (planetary boundary layer), aerosol composition and concentrations, and several important meteorological parameters such as visibility, RH (relative humidity), and wind speed/direction. The measurement was conducted in an urban location from Nov. 16, 2012 to Jan. 15, 2013. During the period, the visibility varied from >20 km to less than a kilometer, with a minimum visibility of 667 m, causing 16 haze occurrences. During the haze occurrences, the wind speeds were less than 1m/s, and the concentrations of PM2.5 (particle matter with radius less than 2.5 μm) were often exceeded 200 μg/m(3). The correlation between PM2.5 concentration and visibility under different RH values shows that visibility was exponentially decreased with the increase of PM2.5 concentrations when RH was less than 80%. However, when RH was higher than 80%, the relationship was no longer to follow the exponentially decreasing trend, and the visibility maintained in very low values, even with low PM2.5 concentrations. Under this condition, the hygroscopic growth of particles played important roles, and a large amount of water vapor acted as particle matter (PM) for the reduction of visibility. The variations of meteorological parameters (RH, PBL heights, and WS (wind speed)), chemical species in gas-phase (CO, O3, SO2, and NOx), and gas-phase to particle-phase conversions under different visibility ranges were analyzed. The results show that from high visibility (>20 km) to low visibility (<2 km), the averaged PBL decreased from 1.24 km to 0.53 km; wind speeds reduced from 1m/s to 0.5m/s; and CO increased from 0.5 ppmv to 4.0 ppmv, suggesting that weaker transport/diffusion caused the haze occurrences. This study also found that the formation of SPM (secondary particle matter) was accelerated in the haze events. The conversions between SO2 and SO4 as well as NOx to NO3(-) increased

  8. Revised paradigm of aquatic biofilm formation facilitated by microgel transparent exopolymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Edo; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Girshevitz, Olga; Berman, Tom

    2012-06-05

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEPs) are planktonic, organic microgels that are ubiquitous in aqueous environments. Increasing evidence indicates that TEPs play an active role in the process of aquatic biofilm formation. Frequently, TEPs are intensely colonized by bacteria and other microorganisms, thus serving as hot spots of intense microbial activity. We introduce the term "protobiofilm" to refer to TEPs with extensive microbial outgrowth and colonization. Such particles display most of the characteristics of developing biofilm, with the exception of being attached to a surface. In this study, coastal seawater was passed through custom-designed flow cells that enabled direct observation of TEPs and protobiofilm in the feedwater stream by bright-field and epifluorescence microscopy. Additionally, we could follow biofilm development on immersed surfaces inside the flow cells. Within minutes, we observed TEP and protobiofilm patches adhering to these surfaces. By 30 min, confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed numerous patches of Con A and SYTO 9 staining structures covering the surfaces. Atomic force microscopy showed details of a thin, highly sticky, organic conditioning layer between these patches. Bright-field and epifluorescence microscopy and CLSM showed that biofilm development (observed until 24 h) was profoundly inhibited in flow cells with seawater prefiltered to remove most large TEPs and protobiofilm. We propose a revised paradigm for aquatic biofilm development that emphasizes the critical role of microgel particles such as TEPs and protobiofilm in facilitating this process. Recognition of the role of planktonic microgels in aquatic biofilm formation can have applied importance for the water industry.

  9. Laboratory Studies of the Role of Amines in Particle Formation, Growth and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-02-07

    Organosulfur compounds have a variety of sources, particularly biological processes in the oceans. Their oxidation in air forms sulfur dioxide, which is further oxidized to sulfuric acid, as well as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). While sulfuric acid is a well known precursor to particles in air, MSA had not been regarded as a source of new particle formation. Laboratory studies were carried out under this project that showed MSA forms new particles quite efficiently in the presence of amines and water vapor. The data could be reproduced with a relatively simple kinetics model representing cluster formation and growth, which is promising for representing this chemistry in global climate models. The initial steps in the kinetics scheme are based on quantum chemical calculations of likely clusters. The organosulfur chemistry was introduced into an atmospheric model for southern California and used to predict the impact of going to a fossil-fuel free world in which anthropogenic emissions of SO2 are removed, but the natural processes remain.

  10. An improved criterion for new particle formation in diverse atmospheric environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kuang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A dimensionless theory for new particle formation (NPF was developed, using an aerosol population balance model incorporating recent developments in nucleation rates and measured particle growth rates. Based on this theoretical analysis, it was shown that a dimensionless parameter LΓ, characterizing the ratio of the particle scavenging loss rate to the particle growth rate, exclusively determined whether or not NPF would occur on a particular day. This parameter determines the probability that a nucleated particle will grow to a detectable size before being lost by coagulation with the pre-existing aerosol. Cluster-cluster coagulation was shown to contribute negligibly to this survival probability under conditions pertinent to the atmosphere. Data acquired during intensive measurement campaigns in Tecamac (MILAGRO, Atlanta (ANARChE, Boulder, and Hyytiälä (QUEST II, QUEST IV, and EUCAARI were used to test the validity of LΓ as an NPF criterion. Measurements included aerosol size distributions down to 3 nm and gas-phase sulfuric acid concentrations. The model was applied to seventy-seven NPF events and nineteen non-events (characterized by growth of pre-existing aerosol without NPF measured in diverse environments with broad ranges in sulfuric acid concentrations, ultrafine number concentrations, aerosol surface areas, and particle growth rates (nearly two orders of magnitude. Across this diverse data set, a nominal value of LΓ=0.7 was found to determine the boundary for the occurrence of NPF, with NPF occurring when LΓ<0.7 and being suppressed when LΓ>0.7. Moreover, nearly 45% of measured LΓ values associated with NPF fell in the relatively narrow range of 0.1<LΓ<0.3.

  11. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  12. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS), northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number...... size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking. A clear accumulation...... of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air...

  13. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; Schum, Simeon; Dzepina, Katja; Wright, Kendra; Owen, R. Chris; Fialho, Paulo; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition between samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. This study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.

  14. Investigation of flow regime in debris bed formation behavior with nonspherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songbai Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available It is important to clarify the characteristics of flow regimes underlying the debris bed formation behavior that might be encountered in core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors. Although in our previous publications, by applying dimensional analysis technique, an empirical model, with its reasonability confirmed over a variety of parametric conditions, has been successfully developed to predict the regime transition and final bed geometry formed, so far this model is restricted to predictions of debris mixtures composed of spherical particles. Focusing on this aspect, in this study a new series of experiments using nonspherical particles have been conducted. Based on the knowledge and data obtained, an extension scheme is suggested with the purpose of extending the base model to cover the particle-shape influence. Through detailed analyses and given our current range of experimental conditions, it is found that, by coupling the base model with this scheme, respectable agreement between experiments and model predictions for the regime transition can be achieved for both spherical and nonspherical particles. Knowledge and evidence from our work might be utilized for the future improvement of design of an in-vessel core catcher as well as the development and verification of sodium-cooled fast reactor severe accident analysis codes in China.

  15. Influence of PEG Stoichiometry on Structure-Tuned Formation of Self-Assembled Submicron Nickel Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxue Pu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled submicron nickel particles were successfully synthesized via the one-step surfactant-assisted solvothermal method. The impact of surfactant and reducing agent stoichiometry is investigated in this manuscript. Different morphologies and structures of Ni particles, including flower-like nanoflakes, hydrangea-like structures, chain structures, sphere-like structures, and hollow structures were prepared through different processing conditions with two parameters such as temperature and time. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, the submicron nickel particles show good saturation magnetization and excellent thermal stabilities with a possible growth mechanism for the variety of the structure-tuned formation. Importantly, the microwave absorption properties of the submicron nickel particles were studied. The lowest reflection loss of Ni-P9/T200/H15 with a thin layer thickness of 1.7 mm can reach −42.6 dB at 17.3 GHz.

  16. Comprehensive modelling study on observed new particle formation at the SORPES station in Nanjing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation (NPF has been investigated intensively during the last 2 decades because of its influence on aerosol population and the possible contribution to cloud condensation nuclei. However, intensive measurements and modelling activities on this topic in urban metropolitan areas in China with frequent high-pollution episodes are still very limited. This study provides results from a comprehensive modelling study on the occurrence of NPF events in the western part of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD region, China. The comprehensive modelling system, which combines the WRF-Chem (the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry regional chemical transport model and the MALTE-BOX sectional box model (the model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere, was shown to be capable of simulating atmospheric nucleation and subsequent growth. Here we present a detailed discussion of three typical NPF days, during which the measured air masses were notably influenced by either anthropogenic activities, biogenic emissions, or mixed ocean and continental sources. Overall, simulated NPF events were generally in good agreement with the corresponding measurements, enabling us to get further insights into NPF processes in the YRD region. Based on the simulations, we conclude that biogenic organic compounds, particularly monoterpenes, play an essential role in the initial condensational growth of newly formed clusters through their low-volatility oxidation products. Although some uncertainties remain in this modelling system, this method provides a possibility to better understand particle formation and growth processes.

  17. Contrail coverage derived from 2001 AVHRR data over the continental United States of America and surrounding areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palikonda, R. [Analytical Sciences and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Minnis, P. [Science Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Duda, D.P. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Mannstein, H. [DLR Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Linear contrail coverage, optical depth, and longwave radiative forcing are derived from NOAA-15 and NOAA-16 advanced very high resolution radiometer data taken during daytime over the continental United States of America (USA), southern Canada, northern Mexico, and the adjacent oceans. Analyses were performed for all available overpasses during 2001, but for NOAA-15 were primarily limited to the eastern half and the northwestern corner of the domain. Contrail coverage averaged 1.17% and 0.65% from the early morning NOAA-15 and midafternoon NOAA-16, respectively, for the areas and month common to both satellites. The NOAA-16 contrail coverage and radiative properties for the limited NOAA-15 domain are, on average, nearly identical to those for the entire domain. The estimated combined maximum coverage for the entire domain was {proportional_to}1.05% during February, while the minimum of 0.57% occurred during August. Mean optical depths varied by {proportional_to}20% with winter minima and summer maxima. The annual mean optical depth of 0.27 translated to a normalized contrail longwave radiative forcing of 15.5 Wm{sup -2}. The overall daytime long-wave radiative forcing for the domain is 0.11 Wm{sup -2}. The normalized radiative forcing peaked during summer while the overall forcing was at a maximum during winter because of the greater contrail coverage. A detailed error analysis showed that the linear contrail coverage was overestimated by {proportional_to}40% for both satellites the true coverage is closer to 0.70 and 0.40% for NOAA-15 and 16, respectively. Errors in the mean NOAA-15 optical depths and radiative forcing were negligible while their NOAA-16 counterparts were overestimated by approximately 13%. Contrail coverage was dramatically lower than expected from previous studies, but is most likely due to the significant decrease in upper tropospheric humidity observed in numerical weather analysis data. Contrail optical depths are much greater than both

  18. Vortex Formation in a Shock-Accelerated Gas Induced by Particle Seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobieff, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Conroy, Joseph; White, Ross; Truman, C. Randall; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-05-01

    An instability forms in gas of constant density (air) with an initial nonuniform seeding of small particles or droplets as a planar shock wave passes through the two-phase medium. The seeding nonuniformity is produced by vertical injection of a slow-moving jet of air premixed with glycol droplets or smoke particles into the test section of a shock tube, with the plane of the shock parallel to the axis of the jet. After the shock passage, two counterrotating vortices form in the plane normal to that axis. The physical mechanism of the instability we observe is peculiar to multiphase flow, where the shock acceleration causes the second (embedded) phase to move with respect to the embedding medium. With sufficient seeding concentration, this leads to entrainment of the embedding phase that acquires a relative velocity dependent on the initial seeding, resulting in vortex formation in the flow.

  19. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  20. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  1. FORMATION OF MULTIPLE-SATELLITE SYSTEMS FROM LOW-MASS CIRCUMPLANETARY PARTICLE DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takeda, Takaaki, E-mail: ryukih@stu.kobe-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ohtsuki@tiger.kobe-u.ac.jp [VASA Entertainment Co. Ltd. (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    Circumplanetary particle disks would be created in the late stage of planetary formation either by impacts of planetary bodies or disruption of satellites or passing bodies, and satellites can be formed by accretion of disk particles spreading across the Roche limit. Previous N-body simulation of lunar accretion focused on the formation of single-satellite systems from disks with large disk-to-planet mass ratios, while recent models of the formation of multiple-satellite systems from disks with smaller mass ratios do not take account of gravitational interaction between formed satellites. In the present work, we investigate satellite accretion from particle disks with various masses, using N-body simulation. In the case of accretion from somewhat less massive disks than the case of lunar accretion, formed satellites are not massive enough to clear out the disk, but can become massive enough to gravitationally shepherd the disk outer edge and start outward migration due to gravitational interaction with the disk. When the radial location of the 2:1 mean motion resonance of the satellite reaches outside the Roche limit, the second satellite can be formed near the disk outer edge, and then the two satellites continue outward migration while being locked in the resonance. Co-orbital satellites are found to be occasionally formed on the orbit of the first satellite. Our simulations also show that stochastic nature involved in gravitational interaction and collision between aggregates in the tidal environment can lead to diversity in the final mass and orbital architecture, which would be expected in satellite systems of exoplanets.

  2. Formation of magnetite nanoparticles at low temperature: from superparamagnetic to stable single domain particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Baumgartner

    Full Text Available The room temperature co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric iron under alkaline conditions typically yields superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles below a size of 20 nm. We show that at pH  =  9 this method can be tuned to grow larger particles with single stable domain magnetic (> 20-30 nm or even multi-domain behavior (> 80 nm. The crystal growth kinetics resembles surprisingly observations of magnetite crystal formation in magnetotactic bacteria. The physicochemical parameters required for mineralization in these organisms are unknown, therefore this study provides insight into which conditions could possibly prevail in the biomineralizing vesicle compartments (magnetosomes of these bacteria.

  3. Clusters Formation of Drops from Many Droplets Collisions: A 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Here the SPH method is applied to simulate in the three-dimensional space the multiple hydrodynamics collisions and formation of clusters of equal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. For a range of velocity values from 0.2 mm/ms to 30.0 mm/ms we observe three possible scenarios, such as: coalescence and cluster formation of drops. When the collision velocity is too low the droplets interact only through their deformed surfaces. If this velocity is around 15.0 mm/ms the coalescence of the drops is observed, and after some time starting on t=0 a flat circular section is observed between the colliding drops. This interface disappears when the dynamics runs and the drops finally coalesce. The velocity vector fields were computed for the different scenarios showing some zones inside the drops where the fluid velocity is diminished and other zones where the SPH particles are accelerated.

  4. Air pollution control and decreasing new particle formation lead to strong climate warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makkonen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The number concentration of cloud droplets determines several climatically relevant cloud properties. A major cause for the high uncertainty in the indirect aerosol forcing is the availability of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, which in turn is highly sensitive to atmospheric new particle formation. Here we present the effect of new particle formation on anthropogenic aerosol forcing in present-day (year 2000 and future (year 2100 conditions. The present-day total aerosol forcing is increased from −1.0 W m−2 to −1.6 W m−2 when nucleation is introduced into the model. Nucleation doubles the change in aerosol forcing between years 2000 and 2100, from +0.6 W m−2 to +1.4 W m−2. Two climate feedbacks are studied, resulting in additional negative forcings of −0.1 W m−2 (+10% DMS emissions in year 2100 and −0.5 W m−2 (+50% BVOC emissions in year 2100. With the total aerosol forcing diminishing in response to air pollution control measures taking effect, warming from increased greenhouse gas concentrations can potentially increase at a very rapid rate.

  5. Experimental shock metamorphism of terrestrial basalts: Agglutinate-like particle formation, petrology, and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyukov, Dmitrii D.; Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Kars, Myriam; Egli, Ramon; Raitala, Jouko; Kuzina, Dilyara M.

    2018-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts occur on bodies throughout our solar system, and play an important role in altering the mineralogy, texture, and magnetic properties in target rocks at nanometer to planetary scales. Here we present the results of hypervelocity impact experiments conducted using a two-stage light-gas gun with 5 mm spherical copper projectiles accelerated toward basalt targets with 6 km s-1 impact velocities. Four different types of magnetite- and titanomagnetite-bearing basalts were used as targets for seven independent experiments. These laboratory impacts resulted in the formation of agglutinate-like particles similar in texture to lunar agglutinates, which are an important fraction of lunar soil. Materials recovered from the impacts were examined using a suite of complementary techniques, including optical and scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and high- and low-temperature magnetometry, to investigate the texture, chemistry, and magnetic properties of newly formed agglutinate-like particles and were compared to unshocked basaltic parent materials. The use of Cu-projectiles, rather than Fe- and Ni-projectiles, avoids magnetic contamination in the final shock products and enables a clearer view of the magnetic properties of impact-generated agglutinates. Agglutinate-like particles show shock features, such as melting and planar deformation features, and demonstrate shock-induced magnetic hardening (two- to seven-fold increases in the coercivity of remanence Bcr compared to the initial target materials) and decreases in low-field magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization.

  6. Development of local interfacial strains and stresses in the formation of asymmetric particle-stabilized capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Shelley; Sharkey, Charles

    2017-11-01

    Particles adsorbed at fluid interfaces can stabilize bubbles and droplets against coalescence. However, the method of generating the interface strongly impacts interparticle interactions, and in turn, interfacial microstructure, rheology, and stability. By controlling the adsorbed concentration of particles via residence time in a long channel, we generate non-spherical capsules that retain their shape for at least tens of hours. The capsule shape is in part determined by the dynamics of the bubble as it exits the tube. In this talk, we use image analysis to examine the development of interfacial strains during capsule formation at the channel exit. Tracking the bubble radius profile as a function of time allows us to examine the evolution of interfacial area and bubble volume, as well as the dilation rate profile along the interface. These observations allow us to infer the development of interfacial dilational and buckling stresses that lead to the capsule shape stability. We compare the interfacial strain evolution for clean, surfactant, and particle-laden interfaces as a function of the composition of the interfacially active component. These observations provide a direct connection between colloidal and production factors, and interfacial mechanics and capsule stability. NSF CBET Grant No. 1511016.

  7. Insight into the in-cloud formation of oxalate based on in situ measurement by single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohua; Lin, Qinhao; Peng, Long; Yang, Yuxiang; Fu, Yuzhen; Bi, Xinhui; Li, Mei; Chen, Duohong; Chen, Jianxin; Cai, Zhang; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-11-01

    While ground-based works suggest the significance of in-cloud production (or aqueous formation) to oxalate, direct evidence is rare. With the in situ measurements performed at a remote mountain site (1690 m above sea level) in southern China, we first reported the size-resolved mixing state of oxalate in the cloud droplet residual (cloud RES), the cloud interstitial (cloud INT), and ambient (cloud-free) particles by single particle mass spectrometry. The results support the growing evidence that in-cloud aqueous reactions promote the formation of oxalate, with ˜ 15 % of the cloud RES and cloud INT particles containing oxalate in contrast to only ˜ 5 % of the cloud-free particles. Furthermore, individual particle analysis provides unique insight into the formation of oxalate during in-cloud processing. Oxalate was predominantly (> 70 % in number) internally mixed with the aged biomass-burning particles, highlighting the impact of biomass burning on the formation of oxalate. In contrast, oxalate was underrepresented in aged elemental carbon particles, although they represented the largest fraction of the detected particles. It can be interpreted by the individual particle mixing state that the aged biomass-burning particles contained an abundance of organic components serving as precursors for oxalate. Through the analysis of the relationship between oxalate and organic acids (-45[HCO2]-, -59[CH3CO2]-, -71[C2H3CO2]-, -73[C2HO3]-), the results show that in-cloud aqueous reactions dramatically improved the conversion of organic acids to oxalate. The abundance of glyoxylate associated with the aged biomass-burning particles is a controlling factor for the in-cloud production of oxalate. Since only limited information on oxalate is available in the free troposphere, the results also provide an important reference for future understanding of the abundance, evolution, and climate impacts of oxalate.

  8. Frequent ultrafine particle formation and growth in Canadian Arctic marine and coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Douglas B.; Burkart, Julia; Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Lizotte, Martine; Boivin-Rioux, Aude; Blais, Marjolaine; Mungall, Emma L.; Boyer, Matthew; Irish, Victoria E.; Massé, Guillaume; Kunkel, Daniel; Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Papakyriakou, Tim; Bertram, Allan K.; Bozem, Heiko; Gosselin, Michel; Levasseur, Maurice; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-11-01

    The source strength and capability of aerosol particles in the Arctic to act as cloud condensation nuclei have important implications for understanding the indirect aerosol-cloud effect within the polar climate system. It has been shown in several Arctic regions that ultrafine particle (UFP) formation and growth is a key contributor to aerosol number concentrations during the summer. This study uses aerosol number size distribution measurements from shipboard expeditions aboard the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen in the summers of 2014 and 2016 throughout the Canadian Arctic to gain a deeper understanding of the drivers of UFP formation and growth within this marine boundary layer. UFP number concentrations (diameter > 4 nm) in the range of 101-104 cm-3 were observed during the two seasons, with concentrations greater than 103 cm-3 occurring more frequently in 2016. Higher concentrations in 2016 were associated with UFP formation and growth, with events occurring on 41 % of days, while events were only observed on 6 % of days in 2014. Assessment of relevant parameters for aerosol nucleation showed that the median condensation sink in this region was approximately 1.2 h-1 in 2016 and 2.2 h-1 in 2014, which lie at the lower end of ranges observed at even the most remote stations reported in the literature. Apparent growth rates of all observed events in both expeditions averaged 4.3 ± 4.1 nm h-1, in general agreement with other recent studies at similar latitudes. Higher solar radiation, lower cloud fractions, and lower sea ice concentrations combined with differences in the developmental stage and activity of marine microbial communities within the Canadian Arctic were documented and help explain differences between the aerosol measurements made during the 2014 and 2016 expeditions. These findings help to motivate further studies of biosphere-atmosphere interactions within the Arctic marine environment to explain the production of UFP and their growth to sizes

  9. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan, E-mail: xyeypd@163.com

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.

  10. Formation and degradation of multicomponent multicore micelles: insights from dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2013-05-07

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation is employed to examine (i) the multicomponent multicore micelle (MMM) formation from two kinds of star-shaped copolymers: A2B4B4 and C2B4B4 where A, B, and C are the segments of the copolymers and (ii) the degradation of multicomponent multicore micelles. Regarding the micelle formation, single-core micelles with the core composed of two components (SCII), multicomponent multicore micelles with each core composed of two components (MMII), multicomponent multicore micelles with each of the cores composed of one component (MMI), and multicomponent multicore rod micelles (MMRI) are considered. By changing the ratio between the number of segments of one of the polymers and the total number of segments of the two copolymers, the number of cores generated and their composition can be controlled. Considering that only C2B4B4 is degraded to 2C1 + 2B4, it was found that SCII, MMII, and MMI micelles degraded to a single irregular network core, to multicores with cores formed of loose aggregates, and to multicore micelles, respectively. The dynamics of micelle formation has several stages (small aggregates (nuclei) → growth of aggregates → micellization) whereas the dynamics of degradation involves the diffusion of the degraded components inside and outside micelles and the rearrangement of the cores of the micelles into new cores.

  11. Aerosol surface area concentration: a governing factor in new particle formation in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The predominating role of aerosol Fuchs surface area, AFuchs, in determining the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF events in Beijing was elucidated in this study. The analysis was based on a field campaign from 12 March to 6 April 2016 in Beijing, during which aerosol size distributions down to  ∼  1 nm and sulfuric acid concentrations were simultaneously monitored. The 26 days were classified into 11 typical NPF days, 2 undefined days, and 13 non-event days. A dimensionless factor, LΓ, characterized by the relative ratio of the coagulation scavenging rate over the condensational growth rate (Kuang et al., 2010, was applied in this work to reveal the governing factors for NPF events in Beijing. The three parameters determining LΓ are sulfuric acid concentration, the growth enhancement factor characterized by contribution of other gaseous precursors to particle growth, Γ, and AFuchs. Different from other atmospheric environments, such as in Boulder and Hyytiälä, the daily-maximum sulfuric acid concentration and Γ in Beijing varied in a narrow range with geometric standard deviations of 1.40 and 1.31, respectively. A positive correlation between the estimated new particle formation rate, J1.5, and sulfuric acid concentration was found with a mean fitted exponent of 2.4. However, the maximum sulfuric acid concentrations on NPF days were not significantly higher (even lower, sometimes than those on non-event days, indicating that the abundance of sulfuric acid in Beijing was high enough to initiate nucleation, but may not necessarily lead to NPF events. Instead, AFuchs in Beijing varied greatly among days with a geometric standard deviation of 2.56, whereas the variabilities of AFuchs in Tecamac, Atlanta, and Boulder were reported to be much smaller. In addition, there was a good correlation between AFuchs and LΓ in Beijing (R2 = 0.88. Therefore, it was AFuchs that fundamentally determined the occurrence of NPF events

  12. Aerosol surface area concentration: a governing factor in new particle formation in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Runlong; Yang, Dongsen; Fu, Yueyun; Wang, Xing; Li, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Yan; Hao, Jiming; Zheng, Jun; Jiang, Jingkun

    2017-10-01

    The predominating role of aerosol Fuchs surface area, AFuchs, in determining the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events in Beijing was elucidated in this study. The analysis was based on a field campaign from 12 March to 6 April 2016 in Beijing, during which aerosol size distributions down to ˜ 1 nm and sulfuric acid concentrations were simultaneously monitored. The 26 days were classified into 11 typical NPF days, 2 undefined days, and 13 non-event days. A dimensionless factor, LΓ, characterized by the relative ratio of the coagulation scavenging rate over the condensational growth rate (Kuang et al., 2010), was applied in this work to reveal the governing factors for NPF events in Beijing. The three parameters determining LΓ are sulfuric acid concentration, the growth enhancement factor characterized by contribution of other gaseous precursors to particle growth, Γ, and AFuchs. Different from other atmospheric environments, such as in Boulder and Hyytiälä, the daily-maximum sulfuric acid concentration and Γ in Beijing varied in a narrow range with geometric standard deviations of 1.40 and 1.31, respectively. A positive correlation between the estimated new particle formation rate, J1.5, and sulfuric acid concentration was found with a mean fitted exponent of 2.4. However, the maximum sulfuric acid concentrations on NPF days were not significantly higher (even lower, sometimes) than those on non-event days, indicating that the abundance of sulfuric acid in Beijing was high enough to initiate nucleation, but may not necessarily lead to NPF events. Instead, AFuchs in Beijing varied greatly among days with a geometric standard deviation of 2.56, whereas the variabilities of AFuchs in Tecamac, Atlanta, and Boulder were reported to be much smaller. In addition, there was a good correlation between AFuchs and LΓ in Beijing (R2 = 0.88). Therefore, it was AFuchs that fundamentally determined the occurrence of NPF events. Among 11 observed NPF events, 10

  13. Investigation of new particle formation at the summit of Mt. Tai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lv

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, few comprehensive field observations of new particle formation (NPF have been carried out at mountaintop sites in China. In this study, simultaneous measurements of particle size distribution, trace gases, meteorological parameters, and mass concentration and chemical composition of PM2.5 were performed at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l. from 25 July to 24 August 2014 (Phase I, 21 September to 9 December 2014 (Phase II, and 16 June to 7 August 2015 (Phase III to investigate characteristics and favorable conditions of NPF in a relatively clean mountaintop environment. The NPF events were identified based on particle size distribution measured by the neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS, and 66 such events were observed during a period of 164 days – corresponding to an occurrence frequency of 40 %. The formation rates of 3 nm particles (J3 and growth rates were in the ranges of 0.82–25.04 cm−3 s−1 and 0.58–7.76 nm h−1, respectively. On average, the condensation sink (CS, O3 concentration, air temperature, and relative humidity were lower, whereas the SO2 concentration was higher on NPF days than that on non-NPF days. The CS on Mt. Tai was at a low level and lower CS was critical for NPF. NPF events were common when wind came from the east-southeast and west-southwest, which was probably associated with relatively lower CS in the east-southeast and higher SO2 concentration in the west-southwest. O3 was not a governing factor for NPF in this study, and a high level of NOx concentration might be responsible for the decreased O3 concentration on NPF days. Three categories of backward trajectories were classified, among which the continental air mass was the majority. The continental air mass passing through more polluted areas (denoted as Type I favored NPF because of enhanced SO2 concentration and potential ammonia with it. An in-depth analysis of SO2 indicated that sulfuric acid

  14. Measurements of hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles during ultrafine particle formation events at urban, industrial, and coastal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kihong; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Seung Ho

    2009-09-01

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique was applied to determine the hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles in three sites of urban Gwangju, industrial Yeosu, and coastal Taean in South Korea. A database for the hygroscopicity and volatility of the known compositions and sizes of the laboratory-generated particles wasfirst constructed for comparison with the measured properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles. Distinct differences in hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles werefound between a "photochemical event" and a "combustion event" as well as among different sites. At the Gwangju site, ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" were determined to be more hygroscopic (growth factor (GF) = 1.05-1.33) than those in the "combustion event" (GF = 1.02-1.12), but their hygroscopicity was not as high as pure ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the laboratory-generated database, suggesting they were internally mixed with less soluble species. Ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" at the Yeosu site, having a variety of SO2, CO, and VOC emission sources, were more hygroscopic (GF = 1.34-1.60) and had a higher amount of volatile species (47-75%)than those observed at the Gwangju site. Ultrafine particle concentration at the Taean site increased during daylight hours with low tide, having a higher GF (1.34-1.80) than the Gwangju site and a lower amount of volatile species (17-34%) than the Yeosu site. Occasionally ultrafine particles were externally mixed according to their hygroscopicity and volatility, and TEM/EDS data showed that each type of particle had a distinct morphology and elemental composition.

  15. New particle formation in the free troposphere: A question of chemistry and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, F; Tröstl, J; Junninen, H; Frege, C; Henne, S; Hoyle, C R; Molteni, U; Herrmann, E; Adamov, A; Bukowiecki, N; Chen, X; Duplissy, J; Gysel, M; Hutterli, M; Kangasluoma, J; Kontkanen, J; Kürten, A; Manninen, H E; Münch, S; Peräkylä, O; Petäjä, T; Rondo, L; Williamson, C; Weingartner, E; Curtius, J; Worsnop, D R; Kulmala, M; Dommen, J; Baltensperger, U

    2016-05-27

    New particle formation (NPF) is the source of over half of the atmosphere's cloud condensation nuclei, thus influencing cloud properties and Earth's energy balance. Unlike in the planetary boundary layer, few observations of NPF in the free troposphere exist. We provide observational evidence that at high altitudes, NPF occurs mainly through condensation of highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs), in addition to taking place through sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation. Neutral nucleation is more than 10 times faster than ion-induced nucleation, and growth rates are size-dependent. NPF is restricted to a time window of 1 to 2 days after contact of the air masses with the planetary boundary layer; this is related to the time needed for oxidation of organic compounds to form HOMs. These findings require improved NPF parameterization in atmospheric models. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Particle formation and plasma radiative losses during laser ablation suitability of the Sedov-Taylor scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanco, Santiago; Marino, Salvatore; Gabás, Mercedes; Bijani, Shanti; Ayala, Luis; Ramos-Barrado, José R

    2014-06-30

    Deviations of the Sedov-Taylor scaling at three different laser ablation regimes (500 mJ in a 0.8 mm spot, 50 mJ in a 0.8 mm spot and 500 mJ in a 2.5 mm spot) were investigated using Schlieren photography in combination with optical scattering and optical emission spectrometry, among others. For each case, the time evolution of the shock front was related to the formation, expansion and properties of the plasma. Both, the time scale of the different radiative processes and that observed for vapor condensation into nanoparticles and sub-micron particles are compatible with the divergences found between the model and experimental data.

  17. Cluster model of amorphized particles formation by plasma spraying of metallic powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakhtin, Boris K.; Nesterova, E. V.

    1999-05-01

    dispersed particles of the size 3 - 70 mcm were generating at the coating surface, which differed significantly in morphology, crystallinity degree and chemical composition. Thus, equiaxial and scaly particles stand out in their morphologic characteristics among particles. Scales are fixed as isolated aggregates on the whole coating, including the surface of equiaxial formations. It has been determined the internal structure of thin scales is amorphous of they contain above 50 vol.% Ni. This fact is illustrated by a typical diffusion halo around the central reflex in microdiffractional picture. Massive scales and equiaxial particles are classified as nano- and microcrystalline objects of variable chemical composition. On the basis of the obtained experimental data it is possible to state that the amorphized state can be detected with a high probability in particles containing above 50 vol.% Ni, having a scaly appearance and relief contour with a fractional space dimensionality. The latter agrees with the principle of the existence of a close correlation between stoichiometry and geometrical peculiarities of the phase solidified. The experimental results were used as the base of formation process model for amorphized particles.

  18. Formation and relaxation of quasistationary states in particle systems with power-law interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, B.; Gabrielli, A.; Joyce, M.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the formation and relaxation of the so-called quasistationary states (QSS) for particle distributions in three dimensions interacting via an attractive radial pair potential V (r →∞ ) ˜1 /rγ with γ >0 , and either a soft core or hard core regularization at small r . In the first part of the paper, we generalize, for any spatial dimension d ≥2 , Chandrasekhar's approach for the case of gravity to obtain analytic estimates of the rate of collisional relaxation due to two-body collisions. The resultant relaxation rates indicate an essential qualitative difference depending on the integrability of the pair force at large distances: for γ >d -1 , the rate diverges in the large particle number N (mean-field) limit, unless a sufficiently large soft core is present; for γ soft cores leading to the formation of QSS. We find, just as for the previously well studied case of gravity (which we also revisit), excellent agreement between the parametric dependence of the observed relaxation times and our analytic predictions. Further, as in the case of gravity, we find that the results indicate that, when large impact factors dominate, the appropriate cutoff is the size of the system (rather than, for example, the mean interparticle distance). Our results provide strong evidence that the existence of QSS is robust only for long-range interactions with a large distance behavior γ

  19. Stochastic-hydrodynamic model of halo formation in charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Cufaro Petroni

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the beam halo in charged particle accelerators is studied in the framework of a stochastic-hydrodynamic model for the collective motion of the particle beam. In such a stochastic-hydrodynamic theory the density and the phase of the charged beam obey a set of coupled nonlinear hydrodynamic equations with explicit time-reversal invariance. This leads to a linearized theory that describes the collective dynamics of the beam in terms of a classical Schrödinger equation. Taking into account space-charge effects, we derive a set of coupled nonlinear hydrodynamic equations. These equations define a collective dynamics of self-interacting systems much in the same spirit as in the Gross-Pitaevskii and Landau-Ginzburg theories of the collective dynamics for interacting quantum many-body systems. Self-consistent solutions of the dynamical equations lead to quasistationary beam configurations with enhanced transverse dispersion and transverse emittance growth. In the limit of a frozen space-charge core it is then possible to determine and study the properties of stationary, stable core-plus-halo beam distributions. In this scheme the possible reproduction of the halo after its elimination is a consequence of the stationarity of the transverse distribution which plays the role of an attractor for every other distribution.

  20. ETHOS—an effective theory of structure formation: From dark particle physics to the matter distribution of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris; Zavala, Jesús; Bringmann, Torsten; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS) that enables cosmological structure formation to be computed in almost any microphysical model of dark matter physics. This framework maps the detailed microphysical theories of particle dark matter interactions into the physical effective parameters that shape the linear matter power spectrum and the self-interaction transfer cross section of nonrelativistic dark matter. These are the input to structure formation simulations, which follow the evolution of the cosmological and galactic dark matter distributions. Models with similar effective parameters in ETHOS but with different dark particle physics would nevertheless result in similar dark matter distributions. We present a general method to map an ultraviolet complete or effective field theory of low-energy dark matter physics into parameters that affect the linear matter power spectrum and carry out this mapping for several representative particle models. We further propose a simple but useful choice for characterizing the dark matter self-interaction transfer cross section that parametrizes self-scattering in structure formation simulations. Taken together, these effective parameters in ETHOS allow the classification of dark matter theories according to their structure formation properties rather than their intrinsic particle properties, paving the way for future simulations to span the space of viable dark matter physics relevant for structure formation.

  1. Simulating ultrafine particle formation in Europe using a regional CTM: Contribution of primary emissions versus secondary formation to aerosol number concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountoukis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.; Charalampidis, P.E.; Pilinis, C.; Wiedensohler, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Putaud, J.P.; Moerman, M.; Pandis, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (CTM) with detailed aerosol microphysics, PMCAMx-UF, was applied to the European domain to simulate the contribution of direct emissions and secondary formation to total particle number concentrations during May 2008. PMCAMx-UF uses the Dynamic

  2. Solar eclipse demonstrating the importance of photochemistry in new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Tuija; Kontkanen, Jenni; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Manninen, Hanna E.; Aalto, Juho; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Garmash, Olga; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ehn, Mikael; Kangasluoma, Juha; Junninen, Heikki; Levula, Janne; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ahonen, Lauri R.; Rantala, Pekka; Heikkinen, Liine; Yan, Chao; Sipilä, Mikko; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku

    2017-01-01

    Solar eclipses provide unique possibilities to investigate atmospheric processes, such as new particle formation (NPF), important to the global aerosol load and radiative balance. The temporary absence of solar radiation gives particular insight into different oxidation and clustering processes leading to NPF. This is crucial because our mechanistic understanding on how NPF is related to photochemistry is still rather limited. During a partial solar eclipse over Finland in 2015, we found that this phenomenon had prominent effects on atmospheric on-going NPF. During the eclipse, the sources of aerosol precursor gases, such as sulphuric acid and nitrogen- containing highly oxidised organic compounds, decreased considerably, which was followed by a reduced formation of small clusters and nanoparticles and thus termination of NPF. After the eclipse, aerosol precursor molecule concentrations recovered and re-initiated NPF. Our results provide direct evidence on the key role of the photochemical production of sulphuric acid and highly oxidized organic compounds in maintaining atmospheric NPF. Our results also explain the rare occurrence of this phenomenon under dark conditions, as well as its seemingly weak connection with atmospheric ions. PMID:28374761

  3. Formation of fine particles in co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel in a pulverized coal-fired power station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    appear to be an important formation mechanism. The elemental composition of the particles from coal combustion showed that S and Ca were significantly enriched in ultrafine particles and P was also enriched considerably. However, compared with supermicron particles, the contents of Al, Si and K were...... showed an ultrafine mode centered at approximately 0.1 μm. Compared with coal combustion, co-combustion of coal and SRF increased the formation of submicron particles, especially ultrafine particles below 0.2 μm. The morphology of the particles indicated that supermicron particles were primarily formed...

  4. Laboratory investigations of Titan haze formation: In situ measurement of gas and particle composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, Sarah M.; Yoon, Y. Heidi; Ugelow, Melissa S.; Parker, Alex H.; Li, Rui; de Gouw, Joost A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2018-02-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan's atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, measurements taken by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) indicate that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere where there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan's atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini. The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan's atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (Tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ real-time measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase products. These two techniques allow us to investigate the effect of energy source and initial CH4 concentration on the degree of nitrogen incorporation in both the gas and solid phase products. The results presented here confirm that FUV photons produce not only solid phase nitrogen bearing products but also gas phase nitrogen species. We find that in both the gas and solid phase, nitrogen is found in nitriles rather than amines and that both the

  5. Frequent ultrafine particle formation and growth in Canadian Arctic marine and coastal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Collins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The source strength and capability of aerosol particles in the Arctic to act as cloud condensation nuclei have important implications for understanding the indirect aerosol–cloud effect within the polar climate system. It has been shown in several Arctic regions that ultrafine particle (UFP formation and growth is a key contributor to aerosol number concentrations during the summer. This study uses aerosol number size distribution measurements from shipboard expeditions aboard the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen in the summers of 2014 and 2016 throughout the Canadian Arctic to gain a deeper understanding of the drivers of UFP formation and growth within this marine boundary layer. UFP number concentrations (diameter > 4 nm in the range of 101–104 cm−3 were observed during the two seasons, with concentrations greater than 103 cm−3 occurring more frequently in 2016. Higher concentrations in 2016 were associated with UFP formation and growth, with events occurring on 41 % of days, while events were only observed on 6 % of days in 2014. Assessment of relevant parameters for aerosol nucleation showed that the median condensation sink in this region was approximately 1.2 h−1 in 2016 and 2.2 h−1 in 2014, which lie at the lower end of ranges observed at even the most remote stations reported in the literature. Apparent growth rates of all observed events in both expeditions averaged 4.3 ± 4.1 nm h−1, in general agreement with other recent studies at similar latitudes. Higher solar radiation, lower cloud fractions, and lower sea ice concentrations combined with differences in the developmental stage and activity of marine microbial communities within the Canadian Arctic were documented and help explain differences between the aerosol measurements made during the 2014 and 2016 expeditions. These findings help to motivate further studies of biosphere–atmosphere interactions within the Arctic marine environment to

  6. Post-adsorption process of Yb phosphate nano-particle formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, MingYu; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Kamiishi, Eigo; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the post-adsorption process of ytterbium (Yb) phosphate nano-particle formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The yeast grown in P-rich medium were exposed to 1.44 × 10-4 mol/L Yb(III) solution for 2-120 h, and 2 months at 25 ± 1 °C at an initial pH of 3, 4, or 5, respectively. Ytterbium concentrations in solutions decreased as a function of exposure time. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses revealed that nano-sized blocky Yb phosphate with an amorphous phase formed on the yeast cells surfaces in the solutions with Yb. These nano-sized precipitates that formed on the cell surfaces remained stable even after 2 months of exposure at 25 ± 1 °C around neutral pHs. The EXAFS data revealed that the chemical state of the accumulated Yb on the cell surfaces changed from the adsorption on both phosphate and carboxyl sites at 30 min to Yb phosphate precipitates at 5 days, indicating the Yb-phosphate precipitation as a major post-adsorption process. In addition, the precipitation of Yb phosphate occurred on cell surfaces during 7 days of exposure in Yb-free solution after 2 h of exposure (short-term Yb adsorption) in Yb solution. These results suggest that the released P from the inside of yeast cells reacted with adsorbed Yb on cell surfaces, resulting in the formation of Yb precipitates, even though no P was added to the exposure solution. In an abiotic system, the EXAFS data showed that the speciation of sorbed Yb on the reference materials, carboxymethyl cellulose and Ln resin, did not change even when the Yb was exposed to P solution, without forming Yb phosphate precipitates. This result strongly suggests that the cell surface of the yeast plays an important role in the Yb-phosphate precipitation process, not only as a carrier of the

  7. The effect of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the formation and properties of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyuk, Alla [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Imre, Dan G. [Imre Consulting; USA; Wilson, Jacqueline [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Bell, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Suski, Kaitlyn J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Shrivastava, Manish [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Beránek, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Alexander, M. Lizabeth [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; USA; Kramer, Amber L. [Department of Chemistry; Oregon State University; USA; Massey Simonich, Staci L. [Department of Chemistry; Oregon State University; USA; Environmental and Molecular Toxicology; Oregon State University

    2017-01-01

    When secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are formed by ozonolysis in the presence of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), their formation and properties are significantly different from SOA particles formed without PAHs. For all SOA precursors and all PAHs, discussed in this study, the presence of the gas-phase PAHs during SOA formation significantly affects particle mass loadings, composition, growth, evaporation kinetics, and viscosity. SOA particles formed in the presence of PAHs have, as part of their compositions, trapped unreacted PAHs and products of heterogeneous reactions between PAHs and ozone. Compared to ‘pure’ SOA particles, these particles exhibit slower evaporation kinetics, have higher fractions of non-volatile components, like oligomers, and higher viscosities, assuring their longer atmospheric lifetimes. In turn, the increased viscosity and decreased volatility provide a shield that protects PAHs from chemical degradation and evaporation, allowing for the long-range transport of these toxic pollutants. The magnitude of the effect of PAHs on SOA formation is surprisingly large. The presence of PAHs during SOA formation increases mass loadings by factors of two to five, and particle number concentrations, in some cases, by more than a factor of 100. Increases in SOA mass, particle number concentrations, and lifetime have important implications to many atmospheric processes related to climate, weather, visibility, and human health, all of which relate to the interactions between biogenic SOA and anthropogenic PAHs. The synergistic relationship between SOA and PAHs presented here are clearly complex and call for future research to elucidate further the underlying processes and their exact atmospheric implications.

  8. The roles of sulfuric acid in new particle formation and growth in the mega-city of Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Yue

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of gaseous sulfuric acid and particle number size distributions were performed to investigate aerosol nucleation and growth during CAREBeijing-2008. The analysis of the measured aerosols and sulfuric acid with an aerosol dynamic model shows the dominant role of sulfuric acid in new particle formation (NPF process but also in the subsequent growth in Beijing. Based on the data of twelve NPF events, the average formation rates (2–13 cm−3 s−1 show a linear correlation with the sulfuric acid concentrations (R2=0.85. Coagulation seems to play a significant role in reducing the number concentration of nucleation mode particles with the ratio of the coagulation loss to formation rate being 0.41±0.16. The apparent growth rates vary from 3 to 11 nm h−1. Condensation of sulfuric acid and its subsequent neutralization by ammonia and coagulation contribute to the apparent particle growth on average 45±18% and 34±17%, respectively. The 30% higher concentration of sulfate than organic compounds in particles during the seven sulfur-rich NPF events but 20% lower concentration of sulfate during the five sulfur-poor type suggest that organic compounds are an important contributor to the growth of the freshly nucleated particles, especially during the sulfur-poor cases.

  9. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  10. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ Grown Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper J S; Birkedal, Henrik; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects of repeated ex vivo treatment with calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles were observed. Particle treatment resulted in a 32% lower amount of biofilm formed (p Biofilm pH was significantly higher upon particle treatment, both shortly after the addition of glucose and after 30 min of incubation with glucose (p biofilms as well as the remineralizing potential of the particles. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Factors controlling deposits in recovery boilers -particle formation and deposition; Soodakattilan likaantuminen ja siihen vaikuttavien tekijoeiden hallinta. Hiukkasten muodostuminen ja depositio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, E.I.; Mikkanen, P.; Tapper, U.; Ylaetalo, S.; Jaervinen, R. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Jokiniemi, J.K.; Pyykoenen, J.; Eskola, A. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In this project the aim is to find critical factors controlling the deposit formation in the recovery boilers. Focus is on particle formation, growth and deposition. During year 1995 the aerosol particle formation was studied by an experimental study within the recovery boiler furnace and by a sensitivity study with the ABC (Aerosol Behaviour in Combustion) computer code. During year 1996 the experimental studies on the aerosol particle formation continued within the furnace and the deposition mechanisms for carry over particles were included in the ABC code and sensitivity studies of the deposition were carried out. The experimental study confirmed the fact that the particles are already formed in the recovery boiler furnace. The particle formation is initiated in the boundary layer of the burning droplet or char bed, where metals are vaporised and oxidised to form tiny seed particles

  12. New insights into transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) formation from precursor materials at various Na+/Ca2+ ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shujuan; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) are planktonic, organic microgels which play significant roles in cycling of carbon and trace elements, aggregation of particles, feeding and accommodating microbes as well as development of biofilms. However, few studies are available on the mechanism of TEP formation in various water environments. Here we investigate the formation of TEP with alginate blocks as precursors at various Na+/Ca2+ ratios to simulate the situations in different aquatic environments (e.g. freshwater and seawater). We found that the formation of TEP from precursor materials studied was essentially determined by the Ca2+ concentration at a fixed sodium concentration, while Na+ at high Na+/Ca2+ ratio out-competed Ca2+ for the binding sites on the precursor molecules, leading to a significantly decreased trend of TEP formation. Our results indicate that a more abundant TEP could be expected in freshwater than in seawater, and we also discuss the engineering implications of the findings.

  13. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  14. Observation of aerosol number size distribution and new particle formation at a mountainous site in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Yin, Yan; Lin, Zhenyi; Han, Yongxiang; Hao, Jian; Yuan, Liang; Chen, Kui; Chen, Jinghua; Kong, Shaofei; Shan, Yunpeng; Xiao, Hui; Tan, Wen

    2017-01-01

    To quantify the physical/chemical properties, and the formation and growth processes of aerosol particles on mountainous regions in Southeast China, an intensive field campaign was conducted from April to July 2008 on the top of Mt. Huang (1840m above mean sea level). The average particle number concentration was 2.35×103cm-3, and the ultrafine particles (particle number concentration. Excluding the accumulation mode particles, the average daytime particle number concentrations were prominently higher than those measured at nighttime, suggesting there was a diurnal pattern of changes between planetary boundary layer and free troposphere air. The aerosol spectra were classified into two categories: the first category (FCS) exhibited a clear diurnal cycle, with relatively higher number concentration (3.19×103cm-3), smaller sizes and air masses from the inland; the second category (SCS) presented less obvious diurnal cycle, with lower number concentration (1.88×103cm-3), larger sizes and air masses from coastal regions. Air mass sources, weather conditions, and new particle formation (NPF) events were responsible for the differences of these two particle spectra. Six NPF events were identified, which usually began at 10:00-11:00 LT, with the estimated formation rate J10 in the range of 0.09-0.30cm-3s-1 and the growth rate at 1.42-4.53nmh-1. Wind speed, sulfur dioxide and ozone concentrations were higher on NPF days than those on non-NPF days, whereas temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of nitrogen oxide and carbonic oxide were lower on NPF days. Sulfur dioxide and ozone might be main potentially precursor gases for those NPF events. The NPF events at Mt. Huang corresponded closely to a southwest winds. These results are useful for improving our understanding of the main factors controlling the variation of aerosol size distribution and NPF events in this region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-08-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments.

  16. Formation and emission of fine particles from two coal-fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.T.; Livbjerg, H.; Fogh, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    , before the desulfurisation plant, and in the stack. The following sampling techniques are used: scanning mobility particle sizer, low pressure cascade impactor, dichotomous PM2.5 sampler, and total particle filter. The so-called multi-platform method used in this work Proves useful for gaining insight...... are in the PM2.5 range. The emitted particles primarily stern from the coal ash with a minor contribution of particles of entrained, dried-out droplets of scrubber slurry. The large emitted particles are compact, almost-spherical single particles originating from the ash mineral inclusions in the coal...

  17. New particle formation in the fresh flue-gas plume from a coal-fired power plant: effect of flue-gas cleaning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    F. Mylläri; E. Asmi; T. Anttila; E. Saukko; V. Vakkari; L. Pirjola; R. Hillamo; T. Laurila; A. Häyrinen; J. Rautiainen; H. Lihavainen; E. O'Connor; V. Niemelä; J. Keskinen; M. Dal Maso; T. Rönkkö

    2016-01-01

    .... Experiments were conducted under two different flue-gas cleaning conditions. The results were utilized in a plume dispersion and dilution model taking into account particle formation precursor...

  18. Phase segregation through transient network formation in a binary particle suspension in simple shear: Application to dough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opheusden, van J.H.J.; Molenaar, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a viscoelastic type of phase separation in a simulated binary fluid with a sticky and an inert component, without any external gradients. Phase segregation under simple shear occurs due to transient network formation of the sticky component, expelling the inert particles

  19. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ-Grown Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper Jon Steenberg; Birkedal, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    -coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either...

  20. Dense CO₂ as a Solute, Co-Solute or Co-Solvent in Particle Formation Processes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ana V M; Duarte, Catarina M M

    2011-11-16

    The application of dense gases in particle formation processes has attracted great attention due to documented advantages over conventional technologies. In particular, the use of dense CO₂ in the process has been subject of many works and explored in a variety of different techniques. This article presents a review of the current available techniques in use in particle formation processes, focusing exclusively on those employing dense CO₂ as a solute, co-solute or co-solvent during the process, such as PGSS (Particles from gas-saturated solutions®), CPF (Concentrated Powder Form®), CPCSP (Continuous Powder Coating Spraying Process), CAN-BD (Carbon dioxide Assisted Nebulization with a Bubble Dryer®), SEA (Supercritical Enhanced Atomization), SAA (Supercritical Fluid-Assisted Atomization), PGSS-Drying and DELOS (Depressurization of an Expanded Liquid Organic Solution). Special emphasis is given to modifications introduced in the different techniques, as well as the limitations that have been overcome.

  1. Dense CO2 as a Solute, Co-Solute or Co-Solvent in Particle Formation Processes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. M. Nunes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of dense gases in particle formation processes has attracted great attention due to documented advantages over conventional technologies. In particular, the use of dense CO2 in the process has been subject of many works and explored in a variety of different techniques. This article presents a review of the current available techniques in use in particle formation processes, focusing exclusively on those employing dense CO2 as a solute, co-solute or co-solvent during the process, such as PGSS (Particles from gas-saturated solutions®, CPF (Concentrated Powder Form®, CPCSP (Continuous Powder Coating Spraying Process, CAN-BD (Carbon dioxide Assisted Nebulization with a Bubble Dryer®, SEA (Supercritical Enhanced Atomization, SAA (Supercritical Fluid-Assisted Atomization, PGSS-Drying and DELOS (Depressurization of an Expanded Liquid Organic Solution. Special emphasis is given to modifications introduced in the different techniques, as well as the limitations that have been overcome.

  2. Re-activation of degraded nickel cermet anodes - Nano-particle formation via reverse current pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauch, A.; Marchese, M.; Lanzini, A.; Graves, C.

    2018-02-01

    The Ni/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) cermet is the most commonly applied fuel electrode for solid oxide cells (SOCs). Loss of Ni/YSZ electrode activity is a key life-time limiting factor of the SOC. Developing means to mitigate this loss of performance or re-activate a fuel electrode is therefore important. In this work, we report a series of five tests on state-of-the-art Ni/YSZ-YSZ-CGObarrier-LSC/CGO cells. All cells were deliberately degraded via gas stream impurities in CO2/CO or harsh steam electrolysis operation. The cells were re-activated via a variety of reverse current treatments (RCTs). Via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we found that the Ni/YSZ electrode performance could be recovered via RCT, but not via constant fuel cell operation. For optimized RCT, we obtained a lower Ni/YSZ electrode resistance than the initial resistance. E.g. at 700 °C we measured fuel electrode resistance of 180 mΩ cm2, 390 mΩ cm2, and 159 mΩ cm2 before degradation, after degradation and after re-activation via RCT, respectively. Post-test SEM revealed that the RCT led to formation of nano-particles in the fuel electrode. Besides the remarkable improvement, the results also showed that RCTs can weaken Ni/YSZ interfaces and the electrode/electrolyte interface. This indicates that finding an optimum RCT profile is crucial for achieving maximum benefit.

  3. Oxy-fuel combustion of millimeter-sized coal char: Particle temperatures and NO formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Navascués, Leyre Gómez; Nielsen, Joachim Bachmann

    2013-01-01

    coal char and lignite char, respectively, cannot be fully explained. Char/NO interactions appear to be quite complex, and mineral catalysis and release to the gas-phase of volatile N-species such as HCN, either from secondary pyrolysis or as a product of the char–N + O2 reaction, may play a role.......In this work, differences in particle temperature and NO yield during char oxidation in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres, respectively, have been examined. A laboratory scale fixed bed reactor, operated isothermally at 1073 K, was used for combustion of millimeter-sized lignite and bituminous coal char...... increased with mass loading, by as much as 700 K above the furnace set point. The formation of NO from lignite char was not influenced by the change from N2 to CO2 whereas the NO yield from bituminous coal char was considerably lower in O2/CO2 compared O2/N2. For both chars the conversion to NO decreased...

  4. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Jenni; Simonen, Pauli; Saarikoski, Sanna; Timonen, Hilkka; Kangasniemi, Oskari; Saukko, Erkka; Hillamo, Risto; Lehtoranta, Kati; Murtonen, Timo; Vesala, Hannu; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2017-07-01

    Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6-268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential was measured to be 9-20 mg kgfuel-1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize - more than half an hour - which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission source and system temperatures. Sulfate was

  5. Role of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with peroxy radicals in particle formation and growth in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Wingen, Lisa M; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-05-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. However, the mechanisms by which stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) react to form and grow the particles, and in particular the contributions from oligomers, are not well understood. In this study, ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene (C6H12), as a proxy for small alkenes, was investigated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of particle formation and growth. Ozonolysis experiments were carried out both in static Teflon chambers (18-20 min reaction times) and in a glass flow reactor (24 s reaction time) in the absence and presence of OH or SCI scavengers, and under different relative humidity (RH) conditions. The chemical composition of polydisperse and size-selected SOA particles was probed using different mass spectrometric techniques and infrared spectroscopy. Oligomers having SCI as the chain unit are found to be the dominant components of such SOA particles. The formation mechanism for these oligomers suggested by our results follows the sequential addition of SCI to organic peroxy (RO2) radicals, in agreement with previous studies by Moortgat and coworkers. Smaller particles are shown to have a relatively greater contribution from longer oligomers. Higher O/C ratios are observed in smaller particles and are similar to those of oligomers resulting from RO2 + nSCI, supporting a significant role for longer oligomers in particle nucleation and early growth. Under atmospherically relevant RH of 30-80%, water vapor suppresses oligomer formation through scavenging SCI, but also enhances particle nucleation. Under humid conditions, or in the presence of formic or hydrochloric acid as SCI scavengers, peroxyhemiacetals are formed by the acid-catalyzed particle phase reaction between oligomers from RO2 + nSCI and a trans-3-hexene derived carbonyl product. In contrast to the ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene, oligomerization involving RO2 + nSCI does not appear to be prevalent in the

  6. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alanen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6–268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation potential was measured to be 9–20 mg kgfuel−1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize – more than half an hour – which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission

  7. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16 mm s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens

  8. Morphology and film formation of poly(butyl methacrylate)-polypyrrole core-shell latex particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, F; Lang, J

    Core-shell latex particles made of a poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) core and a thin polypyrrole (PPy) shell were synthesized by two-stage polymerization. In the first stage, PBMA latex particles were synthesized in a semicontinuous process by free-radical polymerization. PBMA latex particles were

  9. Simultaneous measurements of new particle formation at 1 s time resolution at a street site and a rooftop site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yujiao; Yan, Caiqing; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Zifa; Zheng, Mei; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Yang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2017-08-01

    This study is the first to use two identical Fast Mobility Particle Sizers for simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions (PNSDs) at a street site and a rooftop site within 500 m distance in wintertime and springtime to investigate new particle formation (NPF) in Beijing. The collected datasets at 1 s time resolution allow deduction of the freshly emitted traffic particle signal from the measurements at the street site and thereby enable the evaluation of the effects on NPF in an urban atmosphere through a site-by-site comparison. The number concentrations of 8 to 20 nm newly formed particles and the apparent formation rate (FR) in the springtime were smaller at the street site than at the rooftop site. In contrast, NPF was enhanced in the wintertime at the street site with FR increased by a factor of 3 to 5, characterized by a shorter NPF time and higher new particle yields than at the rooftop site. Our results imply that the street canyon likely exerts distinct effects on NPF under warm or cold ambient temperature conditions because of on-road vehicle emissions, i.e., stronger condensation sinks that may be responsible for the reduced NPF in the springtime but efficient nucleation and partitioning of gaseous species that contribute to the enhanced NPF in the wintertime. The occurrence or absence of apparent growth for new particles with mobility diameters larger than 10 nm was also analyzed. The oxidization of biogenic organics in the presence of strong photochemical reactions is suggested to play an important role in growing new particles with diameters larger than 10 nm, but sulfuric acid is unlikely to be the main species for the apparent growth. However, the number of datasets used in this study is relatively small, and larger datasets are essential to draw a general conclusion.

  10. Quercetagetin-Loaded Zein-Propylene Glycol Alginate Ternary Composite Particles Induced by Calcium Ions: Structure Characterization and Formation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuixia; Wei, Yang; Li, Ruirui; Dai, Lei; Gao, Yanxiang

    2017-05-17

    The complexation of zein and propylene glycol alginate (PGA) was confirmed to improve the entrapment efficiency and loading capacity of quercetagetin (Q) in our previous study. The present work focused on the influence and induction mechanism of calcium ions on structures of Q-loaded zein-PGA ternary composite particles. The incorporation of Ca 2+ resulted in the formation of aggregates with a large dimension between zein particles, led to obvious conformational, secondary, and tertiary structural changes of zein, and caused the disappearance of crystalline structure of zein. PGA exhibited a fine filamentous network structure and became much thicker and stronger in the presence of Ca 2+ . The presence of Q promoted the affinity and binding capacity of Ca 2+ to zein and PGA. An interwoven network structure with enhanced firmness and density was observed in Q-loaded zein-PGA composite particles, leading to improved thermal stability. Three potential mechanisms were proposed to explain the structural characteristics induced by Ca 2+ , including particle-particle collision for zein particles, chain-chain association for PGA molecules, and simultaneous cross-linking coupled with aggregating for Q-loaded zein-PGA composite particles.

  11. Making the material: The formation of silt sized primary mineral particles for loess deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Ian

    In 1911 E.E. Free wrote... "it may be well to point out that there are really two problems of the loess—a problem of the origin of material and a problem of deposition". The problem of the 'origin of material' has been relatively neglected, in comparison to problems of deposition. of the formation of deposits, and latterly in comparison to studies of loess stratigraphy. If we are to understand the true nature of loess, this fascinating material, we need to be aware of all the significant events in the processing of the particles which form a deposit. A large amount of silt-sized primary mineral material has to be produced to make a loess deposit. Loess is a Quaternary phenomenon and we see the entire process being completed in Quaternary times. Some powerful Quaternary forces are able to produce very large amounts of granular material. 'Glacial grinding', vigorously supported by Smalley (1966a), provides an obvious source for some loess material, but the vast deposits of North China and Central Asia have no obvious glacial connection. However they are adjacent to 'High Asia', a region of vast tectonic activity and an enormous release of terrestrial energy in the last several million years. 'High Asia' is a large producer of loess silt, much of which finds its way south to make the Ganges delta but large amounts are moved north and east to make huge loess deposits. Africa presents a problem. Recent work (e.g. Coudé-Gaussen, 1987) suggests that there is a region of 'peri-Saharan' loess but earlier observations (e.g. Penck) indicate quite clearly that the Sahara region is free of loess. Rathjens (1928) in his study of Tripolitania indicated the presence of loess-like deposits and described their nature, but he did point out that 90% of the granular material was greater than 100 pm in diameter—which would remove it from a strict loess definition. On the Soil Taxonomy map of Africa there is a belt of soil D3 which could include considerable loess deposits; it

  12. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  13. Online differentiation of mineral phase in aerosol particles by ion formation mechanism using a LAAP-TOF single-particle mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Nicholas A.; Flynn, Michael J.; Allan, James D.; Coe, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    Mineralogy of silicate mineral dust has a strong influence on climate and ecosystems due to variation in physiochemical properties that result from differences in composition and crystal structure (mineral phase). Traditional offline methods of analysing mineral phase are labour intensive and the temporal resolution of the data is much longer than many atmospheric processes. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) is an established technique for the online size-resolved measurement of particle composition by laser desorption ionisation (LDI) followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). Although non-quantitative, the technique is able to identify the presence of silicate minerals in airborne dust particles from markers of alkali metals and silicate molecular ions in the mass spectra. However, the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate particles by traditional mass spectral peak area measurements is not possible. This is because instrument function and matrix effects in the ionisation process result in variations in instrument response that are greater than the differences in composition between common mineral phases.In this study, we introduce a novel technique that enables the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate mineral particles by ion formation mechanism measured from subtle changes in ion arrival times at the TOF-MS detector. Using a combination of peak area and peak centroid measurements, we show that the arrangement of the interstitial alkali metals in the crystal structure, an important property in silicate mineralogy, influences the ion arrival times of elemental and molecular ion species in the negative ion mass spectra. A classification scheme is presented that allowed for the differentiation of illite-smectite, kaolinite and feldspar minerals on a single-particle basis. Online analysis of mineral dust aerosol generated from clay mineral standards produced mineral fractions that are in agreement with bulk measurements reported by

  14. Particle image velocimetry for mixture formation investigation in a GDI prototype engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gerardo

    2003-11-01

    The present work aims at providing information about the spray structure and its interaction with the tumble motion generated by the intake ducts of a prototype gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine. The investigation was carried out characterizing the fuel evolution within a prototype cylinder, under steady state flow conditions, by the 2-D laser imaging and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques. The results offer a database about the spatial and temporal evolution of fuel spray that can validate numerical simulation for prediction of mixture formation and combustion in direct injection gasoline engines. Experiments were taken using a common rail injection system able to work at a maximum pressure of 12 MPa, a swirled type injector with a nozzle diameter of 0.55 mm and a nominal cone angle of 50°. The investigation was conducted by applying the 2-D imaging and the PIV techniques in a flow test rig, designed for capturing the tumble motion in a prototype cylinder. The system included a blower, which supplied the intake flow rate, and a prototype 4-valve direct injection gasoline engine head modified to lay down the swirled-type injector. Tests were taken, on a plane crossing the cylinder and the injector axes, spraying the fuel at Pinj = 5, 8, and 10 MPa for an injection interval of Δt=3 ms. The results provided detailed information on the pre- and main spray evolution. At the first stage of injection, the fuel jet depicted a dense liquid column with a very small cone angle while a transition to a spray hollow-cone structure was observed at later injection time. Images of the interaction of the fuel with the tumble motion displayed, firstly, a fuel jet that traveled as a compact liquid column not affected by the tumble motion within the cylinder because of its high momentum. At later injection time, the fuel was strongly distorted by the tumble motion with the formation of secondary droplets clusters that detached from the main jet and were dispersed

  15. TIME VARIABLE BROAD-LINE EMISSION IN NGC 4203: EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR CONTRAILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, Nick, E-mail: devereux@erau.edu [Department of Physics, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ 86301 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    Dual epoch spectroscopy of the lenticular galaxy, NGC 4203, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope has revealed that the double-peaked component of the broad H{alpha} emission line is time variable, increasing by a factor of 2.2 in brightness between 1999 and 2010. Modeling the gas distribution responsible for the double-peaked profiles indicates that a ring is a more appropriate description than a disk and most likely represents the contrail of a red supergiant star that is being tidally disrupted at a distance of {approx}1500 AU from the central black hole. There is also a bright core of broad H{alpha} line emission that is not time variable and identified with a large-scale inflow from an outer radius of {approx}1 pc. If the gas number density is {>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, as suggested by the absence of similarly broad [O I] and [O III] emission lines, then the steady state inflow rate is {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which exceeds the inflow requirement to explain the X-ray luminosity in terms of radiatively inefficient accretion by a factor of {approx}6. The central active galactic nucleus (AGN) is unable to sustain ionization of the broad-line region; the discrepancy is particularly acute in 2010 when the broad H{alpha} emission line is dominated by the contrail of the infalling supergiant star. However, ram pressure shock ionization produced by the interaction of the infalling supergiant with the ambient interstellar medium may help alleviate the ionizing deficit by generating a mechanical source of ionization supplementing the photoionization provided by the AGN.

  16. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers - particle formation and deposition; Soodakattilan likaantuminen ja siihen vaikuttavien tekijoeiden hallinta - hiukkasten muodostuminen ja depositio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, E.I.; Mikkanen, P.; Ylaetalo, S. [VTT Chemistry, Espoo (Finland); Jokiniemi, J.K.; Lyyraenen, J.; Pyykoenen, J.; Saastamoinen, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project, the aim was to find out those critical factors that control the deposit formation in the recovery boilers. We focus on the particle formation, growth and deposition as well as the single black liquor particle combustion behaviour. The final goal is the development of the predictive model to be used to describe deposit growth and subsequent behaviour as well as the dependence of deposition on black liquor characteristics and boiler operation conditions. During year 1995 an experimental study on the aerosol particle formation within the recovery boiler furnace and a sensitivity study with the Aerosol Behaviour in Combustion (ABC) code were carried out. The experimental study confirmed the fact that the particles are already formed in the recovery boiler furnace. The particle formation is initiated in the boundary layer of the burning droplet or smelt bed, where metals are vaporised and oxidised to form tiny seed particles. Trace amounts of metals were measured in all particle sizes and the sensitivity study with the ABC model gave further evidence of the seed formation was necessary primary step in the particle formation. At the furnace outlet the sintration ratio and the sulfation ratio of the particles were dependent on the furnace temperature and the residence time in the furnace. At ESP inlet three types of particles were observed (1) fine particles with the major mass mode at about 1-2 {mu}m, (2) large agglomerates in sizes larger than 8 {mu}m, and (3) spherical particles about 2-4 {mu}m in size. The fine particles were formed from vapours and the large agglomerates were formed from fine particles agglomerated on heat exchanger surfaces and re-entrained back to flue gas flow. The large agglomerates also contain vapours that have directly condensed to surfaces. The large spherical particles contain silicon and pass the process almost unchanged. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Ultrafine and fine particle formation in a naturally ventilated office as a result of reactions between ozone and scented products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Dijken, F. v.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafine and fine particle formation as a result of chemical reactions between ozone and four different air fresheners and a typical lemon-scented domestic cleaner was studied in a fully furnished, naturally ventilated office. The study showed that under conditions representative of those...... occurring in such offices, air fresheners or scented cleaners may react with ozone to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The tested air fresheners were relatively small sources of SOA with detectable increases occurring only in the ultrafine particle number concentration. With the cleaner, also...

  18. Columnar structure formation of a dilute suspension of settling spherical particles in a quiescent fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Sander G.; Barois, Thomas; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Chouippe, Agathe; Doychev, Todor; Huck, Peter; Morales, Carla E. Bello; Uhlmann, Markus; Volk, Romain

    2016-11-01

    The settling of heavy spherical particles in a column of quiescent fluid is investigated. The performed experiments cover a range of Galileo numbers (110 ≤Ga≤310 ) for a fixed density ratio of Γ =ρp/ρf=2.5 . In this regime the particles are known to show a variety of motions [Jenny, Dušek, and Bouchet, Instabilities and transition of a sphere falling or ascending freely in a Newtonian fluid, J. Fluid Mech. 508, 201 (2004), 10.1017/S0022112004009164]. It is known that the wake undergoes several transitions for increasing Ga resulting in particle motions that are successively vertical, oblique, oblique oscillating, and finally chaotic. Not only does this change the trajectory of single, isolated, settling particles, but it also changes the dynamics of a swarm of particles as collective effects become important even for dilute suspensions with volume fraction up to ΦV=O (10-3) , which are investigated in this work. Multicamera recordings of settling particles are recorded and tracked over time in three dimensions. A variety of analyses are performed and show a strong clustering behavior. The distribution of the cell areas of the Voronoï tessellation in the horizontal plane is compared to that of a random distribution of particles and shows clear clustering. Moreover, a negative correlation was found between the Voronoï area and the particle velocity; clustered particles fall faster. In addition, the angle between adjacent particles and the vertical is calculated and compared to a homogeneous distribution of particles, clear evidence of vertical alignment of particles is found. The experimental findings are compared to simulations.

  19. Formation Of Emergent Universe in Brane Scenario as a Consequence of Particle Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Jibitesh; Haldar, Sourav; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-01-01

    Here we formulate scenario of emergent universe from particle creation mechanism in spatially flat braneworld models. We consider an isotropic and homogeneous universe in Braneworld cosmology and universe is considered as a non-equilibrium thermodynamical system with dissipation due to particle creation mechanism. Assuming the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter , we formulate emergent scenario in RS2 and DGP models of Braneworld.

  20. Effect of reaction time on formation of silica core/shell particles

    OpenAIRE

    Milan P. Nikolić; Radoslav Filipović; Slobodanka Stanojević-Nikolić

    2015-01-01

    The silica core/shell nanostructures were prepared by a wet-chemical process. Silica core particles were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. The obtained particles (average size ∼0.4 µm) were used as templates for assembling of silica nanoparticles generated from highly basic sodium silicate solution. The silica core particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to allow electrostatic assembling of silica nanoparticles on the surface o...

  1. Biofuel blending reduces particle emissions from aircraft engines at cruise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H; Thornhill, Kenneth L; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; D'Ascoli, Eugenio; Kim, Jin; Lichtenstern, Michael; Scheibe, Monika; Beaton, Brian; Beyersdorf, Andreas J; Barrick, John; Bulzan, Dan; Corr, Chelsea A; Crosbie, Ewan; Jurkat, Tina; Martin, Robert; Riddick, Dean; Shook, Michael; Slover, Gregory; Voigt, Christiane; White, Robert; Winstead, Edward; Yasky, Richard; Ziemba, Luke D; Brown, Anthony; Schlager, Hans; Anderson, Bruce E

    2017-03-15

    Aviation-related aerosol emissions contribute to the formation of contrail cirrus clouds that can alter upper tropospheric radiation and water budgets, and therefore climate. The magnitude of air-traffic-related aerosol-cloud interactions and the ways in which these interactions might change in the future remain uncertain. Modelling studies of the present and future effects of aviation on climate require detailed information about the number of aerosol particles emitted per kilogram of fuel burned and the microphysical properties of those aerosols that are relevant for cloud formation. However, previous observational data at cruise altitudes are sparse for engines burning conventional fuels, and no data have previously been reported for biofuel use in-flight. Here we report observations from research aircraft that sampled the exhaust of engines onboard a NASA DC-8 aircraft as they burned conventional Jet A fuel and a 50:50 (by volume) blend of Jet A fuel and a biofuel derived from Camelina oil. We show that, compared to using conventional fuels, biofuel blending reduces particle number and mass emissions immediately behind the aircraft by 50 to 70 per cent. Our observations quantify the impact of biofuel blending on aerosol emissions at cruise conditions and provide key microphysical parameters, which will be useful to assess the potential of biofuel use in aviation as a viable strategy to mitigate climate change.

  2. Biofuel blending reduces particle emissions from aircraft engines at cruise conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; D'Ascoli, Eugenio; Kim, Jin; Lichtenstern, Michael; Scheibe, Monika; Beaton, Brian; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Barrick, John; Bulzan, Dan; Corr, Chelsea A.; Crosbie, Ewan; Jurkat, Tina; Martin, Robert; Riddick, Dean; Shook, Michael; Slover, Gregory; Voigt, Christiane; White, Robert; Winstead, Edward; Yasky, Richard; Ziemba, Luke D.; Brown, Anthony; Schlager, Hans; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2017-03-01

    Aviation-related aerosol emissions contribute to the formation of contrail cirrus clouds that can alter upper tropospheric radiation and water budgets, and therefore climate. The magnitude of air-traffic-related aerosol-cloud interactions and the ways in which these interactions might change in the future remain uncertain. Modelling studies of the present and future effects of aviation on climate require detailed information about the number of aerosol particles emitted per kilogram of fuel burned and the microphysical properties of those aerosols that are relevant for cloud formation. However, previous observational data at cruise altitudes are sparse for engines burning conventional fuels, and no data have previously been reported for biofuel use in-flight. Here we report observations from research aircraft that sampled the exhaust of engines onboard a NASA DC-8 aircraft as they burned conventional Jet A fuel and a 50:50 (by volume) blend of Jet A fuel and a biofuel derived from Camelina oil. We show that, compared to using conventional fuels, biofuel blending reduces particle number and mass emissions immediately behind the aircraft by 50 to 70 per cent. Our observations quantify the impact of biofuel blending on aerosol emissions at cruise conditions and provide key microphysical parameters, which will be useful to assess the potential of biofuel use in aviation as a viable strategy to mitigate climate change.

  3. Metallorganic routes to nanoscale iron and titanium oxide particles encapsulated in mesoporous alumina: formation, physical properties, and chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J J; Czap, N; Hagen, J; Engstler, J; Ensling, J; Gütlich, P; Reinoehl, U; Bertagnolli, H; Luis, F; de Jongh, L J; Wark, M; Grubert, G; Hornyak, G L; Zanoni, R

    2000-12-01

    Iron and titanium oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized in parallel mesopores of alumina by a novel organometallic "chimie douce" approach that uses bis(toluene)iron(0) (1) and bis(toluene)titanium(0) (2) as precursors. These complexes are molecular sources of iron and titanium in a zerovalent atomic state. In the case of 1, core shell iron/iron oxide particles with a strong magnetic coupling between both components, as revealed by magnetic measurements, are formed. Mössbauer data reveal superparamagnetic particle behavior with a distinct particle size distribution that confirms the magnetic measurements. The dependence of the Mössbauer spectra on temperature and particle size is explained by the influence of superparamagnetic relaxation effects. The coexistence of a paramagnetic doublet and a magnetically split component in the spectra is further explained by a distribution in particle size. From Mössbauer parameters the oxide phase can be identified as low-crystallinity ferrihydrite oxide. In agreement with quantum size effects observed in UV-visible studies, TEM measurements determine the size of the particles in the range 5-8 nm. The particles are mainly arranged alongside the pore walls of the alumina template. TiO2 nanoparticles are formed by depositing 2 in mesoporous alumina template. This produces metallic Ti, which is subsequently oxidized to TiO2 (anatase) within the alumina pores. UV-visible studies show a strong quantum confinement effect for these particles. From UV-visible investigations the particle size is determined to be around 2 nm. XPS analysis of the iron- and titania- embedded nanoparticles reveal the presence of Fe2O3 and TiO2 according to experimental binding energies and the experimental line shapes. Ti4+ and Fe3+ are the only oxidation states of the particles which can be determined by this technique. Hydrogen reduction of the iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles at 500 degrees C under flowing H2/N2 produces a catalyst, which is active

  4. Fractal aggregation in relation to formation and properties of particle gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, L.G.B.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the conditions determining whether small particles in a liquid are able to jointly occupy the total volume thus forming a gel network. In order to build a network the colloidal particles have to be 'sticky', unstable. In the unassociated

  5. Electrophoretic deposition: a quantitative model for particle deposition and binder formation from alcohol-based suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, De E.; Duval, J.F.L.; Meulenkamp, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated electrophoretic deposition from a suspension containing positively charged particles, isopropanol, water, and Mg(NO3)2, with the aim of describing the deposition rates of the particles and Mg(OH)2, which is formed due to chemical reactions at the electrode, in terms of quantitative

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  7. The Formation of Porous Membranes by Filtration of Aerosol Nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Klint; Johannessen, Tue; Mosleh, Majid

    2002-01-01

    Flame-generated aerosol particles of Al2O3 were deposited by gas filtration on two types of porous and ceramic tubes of α-Al2O3 with mean pore diameters of 450 and 2700 nm, respectively. The particles were aggregates with average mobility diameters in the range of 30¨¢100 nm and primary particle...... diameters of 4¨¢8 nm. The particles are characterized by differential mobility analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and by their specific surface area. The deposited membranes are characterized by gas permeability measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and by their pore size distribution from...... nitrogen capillary condensation. The particles form a distinct, homogeneous membrane layer with a porosity of ∼90% on top of the substrate surface and only penetrate slightly into the substrate structure. The mean pore sizes of the deposited membranes determined by nitrogen condensation agree approximately...

  8. Formation of ZnO-SiO2 particle by spray decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomariyah, Lailatul; Aisah, Miftalia; Cahyando, Nico; Widiyastuti, W.; Winardi, Sugeng

    2017-05-01

    Zinc oxide-silicon dioxide (ZnO-SiO2) nanocomposite particle have been synthesized using spray decomposition method. This method is expected to produce nanoparticle in a continuous process, producing spherical particle, and high purity product. The influence of ratio precursor concentration was investigated in this experiment to know the characteristic of ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposite. The precursors were prepared by mixing zinc acetate and silicon dioxide solution using distilled water as a solvent. Compressor nebulizer was used to atomize a precursor solution into discrete droplets. ZnO-SiO2 particle was evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) to investigate their crystal structure, morphology, and composition. Particle ZnO-SiO2 obtained from this method have hexagonal crystals, the particle shape was spherical, and have a good dispersion of ZnO and SiO2.

  9. Simulating ultrafine particle formation in Europe using a regional CTM: contribution of primary emissions versus secondary formation to aerosol number concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (CTM with detailed aerosol microphysics, PMCAMx-UF, was applied to the European domain to simulate the contribution of direct emissions and secondary formation to total particle number concentrations during May 2008. PMCAMx-UF uses the Dynamic Model for Aerosol Nucleation and the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS algorithm to track both aerosol number and mass concentration using a sectional approach. The model predicts nucleation events that occur over scales of hundreds up to thousands of kilometers especially over the Balkans and Southeast Europe. The model predictions were compared against measurements from 7 sites across Europe. The model reproduces more than 70% of the hourly concentrations of particles larger than 10 nm (N10 within a factor of 2. About half of these particles are predicted to originate from nucleation in the lower troposphere. Regional nucleation is predicted to increase the total particle number concentration by approximately a factor of 3. For particles larger than 100 nm the effect varies from an increase of 20% in the eastern Mediterranean to a decrease of 20% in southern Spain and Portugal resulting in a small average increase of around 1% over the whole domain. Nucleation has a significant effect in the predicted N50 levels (up to a factor of 2 increase mainly in areas where there are condensable vapors to grow the particles to larger sizes. A semi-empirical ternary sulfuric acid-ammonia-water parameterization performs better than the activation or the kinetic parameterizations in reproducing the observations. Reducing emissions of ammonia and sulfur dioxide affects certain parts of the number size distribution.

  10. A numerical model for aggregations formation and magnetic driving of spherical particles based on OpenFOAM®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvelas, E G; Lampropoulos, N K; Sarris, I E

    2017-04-01

    This work presents a numerical model for the formation of particle aggregations under the influence of a permanent constant magnetic field and their driving process under a gradient magnetic field, suitably created by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device. The model is developed in the OpenFOAM platform and it is successfully compared to the existing experimental and numerical results in terms of aggregates size and their motion in water solutions. Furthermore, several series of simulations are performed for two common types of particles of different diameter in order to verify their aggregation and flow behaviour, under various constant and gradient magnetic fields in the usual MRI working range. Moreover, the numerical model is used to measure the mean length of aggregations, the total time needed to form and their mean velocity under different permanent and gradient magnetic fields. The present model is found to predict successfully the size, velocity and distribution of aggregates. In addition, our simulations showed that the mean length of aggregations is proportional to the permanent magnetic field magnitude and particle diameter according to the relation : l¯a=7.5B0di3/2. The mean velocity of the aggregations is proportional to the magnetic gradient, according to : u¯a=6.63G˜B0 and seems to reach a steady condition after a certain period of time. The mean time needed for particles to aggregate is proportional to permanent magnetic field magnitude, scaled by the relationship : t¯a∝7B0. A numerical model to predict the motion of magnetic particles for medical application is developed. This model is found suitable to predict the formation of aggregations and their motion under the influence of permanent and gradient magnetic fields, respectively, that are produced by an MRI device. The magnitude of the external constant magnetic field is the most important parameter for the aggregations formation and their driving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  11. Seasonality of New Particle Formation in Vienna, Austria - Influence of Air Mass Origin and Aerosol Chemical Composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wonaschütz, A.; Demattio, A.; Wagner, R.; Burkart, J.; Zíková, Naděžda; Vodička, Petr; Ludwig, W.; Steiner, G.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Hitzenberger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 118, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 118-126 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12AT021; GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Grant - others:FWF(AT) P19515-N20 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : urban aerosol * aerosol chemical composition * new particle formation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.459, year: 2015

  12. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  13. First-principles study on influence of molybdenum on acicular ferrite formation on TiC particles in microallyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guomin; Li, Changsheng; Cheng, Xiaonong; Zhao, Xinluo; Feng, Quan; Li, Zhijie; Li, Dongyang; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, influences of molybdenum on acicular ferrite formation on precipitated TiC particles are investigated from thermodynamic and kinetic respects. In thermodynamics, Segregation of Mo towards austenite/TiC interface releases the interfacial energy and induces phase transformation from austenite to acicular ferrite on the precipitated TiC particles. The Phase transformation can be achieved by displacive deformation along uniaxial Bain path. In addition, the segregation of Mo atom will also lead to the enhanced stability of ferrite in comparison with austenite no matter at low temperature or at high temperature. In kinetics, the Mo solute in acicular ferrite can effectively suppress the diffusion of carbon atoms, which ensures that orientation relationship between acicular ferrite and austenitized matrix can be satisfied during the diffusionless phase transformation. In contrast to ineffectiveness of TiC particles, the alloying Mo element can facilitate the formation of acicular ferrite on precipitated TiC particles, which is attributed to the above thermodynamic and kinetic reasons. Furthermore, Interfacial toughness and ductility of as-formed acicular ferrite/TiC interface can be improved simultaneously by segregation of Mo atom.

  14. A long-term study of new particle formation in a coastal environment: Meteorology, gas phase and solar radiation implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorribas, M., E-mail: sorribas@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain); Adame, J.A. [‘El Arenosillo’ — Atmospheric Sounding Station, Atmospheric Research and Instrumentation Branch, National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), Mazagón, Huelva, 21130 (Spain); Olmo, F.J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain); Vilaplana, J.M.; Gil-Ojeda, M. [‘El Arenosillo’ — Atmospheric Sounding Station, Atmospheric Research and Instrumentation Branch, National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), Mazagón, Huelva, 21130 (Spain); Alados-Arboledas, L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    New particle formation (NPF) was investigated at a coastal background site in Southwest Spain over a four-year period using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). The goals of the study were to characterise the NPF and to investigate their relationship to meteorology, gas phase (O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, CO and NO{sub 2}) and solar radiation (UVA, UVB and global). A methodology for identifying and classifying the NPF was implemented using the wind direction and modal concentrations as inputs. NPF events showed a frequency of 24% of the total days analysed. The mean duration was 9.2 ± 4.2 h. Contrary to previous studies conducted in other locations, the NPF frequency reached its maximum during cold seasons for approximately 30% of the days. The lowest frequency took place in July with 10%, and the seasonal wind pattern was found to be the most important parameter influencing the NPF frequency. The mean formation rate was 2.2 ± 1.7 cm{sup −3} s{sup −1}, with a maximum in the spring and early autumn and a minimum during the summer and winter. The mean growth rate was 3.8 ± 2.4 nm h{sup −1} with higher values occurring from spring to autumn. The mean and seasonal formation and growth rates are in agreement with previous observations from continental sites in the Northern Hemisphere. NPF classification of different classes was conducted to explore the effect of synoptic and regional-scale patterns on NPF and growth. The results show that under a breeze regime, the temperature indirectly affects NPF events. Higher temperatures increase the strength of the breeze recirculation, favouring gas accumulation and subsequent NPF appearance. Additionally, the role of high relative humidity in inhibiting the NPF was evinced during synoptic scenarios. The remaining meteorological variables (RH), trace gases (CO and NO), solar radiation, PM{sub 10} and condensation sink, showed a moderate or high connection with both formation and growth rates. - Highlights: • New

  15. The influence of emission control on particle number size distribution and new particle formation during China's V-Day parade in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X J; Sun, J Y; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, L; Fan, R X; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, X L; Zhou, H G; Zhou, L Y; Dong, F; Shi, Q F

    2016-12-15

    Temporary strict emission control strategies were conducted to ensure good air quality for China's V-Day parade (August 20-September 3, 2015) in Beijing and nearby cities. The influence of the emission control on particle number size distribution (PNSD) was evaluated based on the long-term measurements of PNSD at a rural site (Shangdianzi) located northeast of Beijing. This study also presented the comparison results of PNSD during the parade in 2015 and the Olympics in 2008 (August 8-23), as well as the same period without strict emission control in 2010-2013 (August 20-September 3). Compared with the same period in 2010-2013 and 2008 Olympics, the accumulation mode particle number concentration showed a significant reduction in 2015, and the PM1 mass concentration decreased by approximately 60-90%. The alleviation of the PM1 was also associated with the weather conditions. The back trajectories analysis results showed that the southerly air mass passing through the polluted areas accounted for 14% of the total back trajectories in 2015, which contributed to approximately 60% in the other years. During the control period in 2015, there were six new particle formation (NPF) events observed, with a higher frequency, but a lower formation rate and growth rate than the same period in 2010-2013. The comparison of the condensation sink (CS), sulfuric acid, solar radiation and relative humidity among the different years indicated that at Shangdianzi station, the first factor in determining the NPF occurrence was the CS, and the second factor could be the concentration level of precursor vapors participating in the NPF event (e.g., sulfuric acid). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  17. Particle-core analysis of beam halo formation in anisotropic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ikegami, M

    1999-01-01

    We have derived a method to apply the particle-core analysis to coasting beams executing general envelope oscillation which is a superposition of two normal modes. Applying this method to transversely isotropic and anisotropic beams, the effects of simultaneous excitation of two normal modes on halo development mechanism have been explored. We find that, in isotropic cases with the same emittance and external focusing strength in the two transverse directions, single-particle motion exhibits strong chaosity in wide parameter space due to the resonance overlap of two 2:1 particle-core resonances. The strong chaosity is expected to result in an increase of halo intensity enhancing the chance for the particles to gain excess energy through resonant interaction with the core. Of particular importance is the result that the resonance overlap can be avoided by introducing appropriate anisotropy provided that the beam density is lower than a certain threshold. The avoidance of the resonance overlap suppresses chaosi...

  18. Structure of ultradisperse nickel particles produced by the thermolysis of nickel formate-monoethanol amine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvorov, M.M.; Dudchenko, A.K.; Khimchenko, IU.I.

    1986-05-01

    Histograms of the size distribution of ultradisperse nickel particles produced by the thermolysis of amine complexes are plotted using dark-field and light-field electron microscopy data. It is found that the size distribution can be adequately approximated by logarithmically probabilistic functions. The ultradisperse nickel particles feature several types of structure, i.e., faceted stable single crystals coated by an organic film, small aggregates of such crystals, large stable globules, and hexahedral and trihedral crystals. 8 references.

  19. Particle formation of budesonide from alcohol-modified subcritical water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Adam G; Mammucari, Raffaella; Foster, Neil R

    2011-02-28

    Recently, subcritical water (SBCW: water that has been heated to a temperature between 100°C and 200°C at pressures of up to 70bar) has been used to dissolve several hydrophobic pharmaceutical compounds (Carr et al., 2010a). Furthermore, a number of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) have been rapidly precipitated from SBCW solutions (Carr et al., 2010b,c). It is possible to alter the precipitate morphology by altering the processing variables; including the SBCW-API solution injection temperature and adding impurities (such as pharmaceutical excipients, e.g. lactose) to the precipitation chamber. The work presented in this article demonstrates that the morphology of pharmaceutical particles can be tuned by adding organic solvents (ethanol and methanol) to the SBCW-API solutions. Particle morphology has also been tuned by adding different pharmaceutical excipients (polyethylene glycol 400 and lactose) to the precipitation chamber. Different morphologies of pharmaceutical particles were produced, ranging from nanospheres of 60nm diameter to 5μm plate particles. Budesonide was used as the model API in this study. Two experimental products were spray dried to form dry powder products. The aerodynamic particle size of the powder was established by running the powder through an Andersen Cascade Impactor. It has been shown that the drug particles produced from the SBCW micronization process, when coupled with a spray drying process, are suitable for delivery to the lungs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Abundance of fluorescent biological aerosol particles at temperatures conducive to the formation of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twohy, Cynthia H.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; DeMott, Paul J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Tanarhte, Meryem; Kafle, Durga N.; Toohey, Darin W.

    2016-01-01

    Some types of biological particles are known to nucleate ice at warmer temperatures than mineral dust, with the potential to influence cloud microphysical properties and climate. However, the prevalence of these particle types above the atmospheric boundary layer is not well known. Many types of biological particles fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet light, and the Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor takes advantage of this characteristic to perform real-time measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs). This instrument was flown on the National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V aircraft to measure concentrations of fluorescent biological particles from different potential sources and at various altitudes over the US western plains in early autumn. Clear-air number concentrations of FBAPs between 0.8 and 12 µm diameter usually decreased with height and generally were about 10–100 L-1 in the continental boundary layer but always much lower at temperatures colder than 255 K in the free troposphere. At intermediate temperatures where biological ice-nucleating particles may influence mixed-phase cloud formation (255 K ≤ T ≤ 270 K), concentrations of fluorescent particles were the most variable and were occasionally near boundary-layer concentrations. Predicted vertical distributions of ice-nucleating particle concentrations based on FBAP measurements in this temperature regime sometimes reached typical concentrations of primary ice in clouds but were often much lower. If convection was assumed to lift boundary-layer FBAPs without losses to the free troposphere, better agreement between predicted ice-nucleating particle concentrations and typical ice crystal concentrations was achieved. Ice-nucleating particle concentrations were also measured during one flight and showed a decrease with height, and concentrations were consistent with a relationship to FBAPs established previously at the forested surface

  1. In Situ Imaging of Particle Formation and Dynamics in Reactive Material Deflagrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kyle T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-12

    Reactive composites utilizing nanoparticles have been the topic of extensive research in the past two decades. The driver for this is that, as the particle size is decreased, the mixing scale between constituents is greatly reduced, which has long thought to increase the rate of chemical reaction. While a general trend of increased reactivity has been seen for metal / metal oxide, or thermite, reactive materials, some results have demonstrated diminishing returns as the particle size is further decreased. Recent results have shown that nanoparticles, which are typically aggregates of several primary particles, can undergo very rapid coalescence to form micron particles once a critical temperature is reached. Experiments on this topic to date have been performed on very small sample masses, and sometimes under vacuum; conditions which are not representative of the environment during a deflagration. In this feasibility study, a custom burn tube was used to ignite and react 100 mg powdered thermite samples in long acrylic tubes. X-ray imaging at APS Sector 32 was performed to image the particle field as a function of distance and time as the rarefied particle cloud expanded and flowed down the tube. Five different thermite formulations were investigated, Al / CuO, Al / Fe2O3, Al / SnO2, Al / WO3, and Al / Fe2O3, along with Al / CuO formulations with different sizes of Al particles ranging from 80 nm to approximate 10 μm. The results clearly show that the sample powder reacts and unloads into a distribution of larger micron-scale particles (~5-500 μm), which continue to react and propagate as the particle-laden stream flows down the tube. This was the first direct imaging of the particle field during a thermite deflagration, and gives significant insight into the evolution of reactants to products. Analysis of phase is currently being pursued to determine whether this method can be used to extract

  2. Direct deposition of gas phase generated aerosol gold nanoparticles into biological fluids--corona formation and particle size shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R Svensson

    Full Text Available An ongoing discussion whether traditional toxicological methods are sufficient to evaluate the risks associated with nanoparticle inhalation has led to the emergence of Air-Liquid interface toxicology. As a step in this process, this study explores the evolution of particle characteristics as they move from the airborne state into physiological solution. Airborne gold nanoparticles (AuNP are generated using an evaporation-condensation technique. Spherical and agglomerate AuNPs are deposited into physiological solutions of increasing biological complexity. The AuNP size is characterized in air as mobility diameter and in liquid as hydrodynamic diameter. AuNP:Protein aggregation in physiological solutions is determined using dynamic light scattering, particle tracking analysis, and UV absorption spectroscopy. AuNPs deposited into homocysteine buffer form large gold-aggregates. Spherical AuNPs deposited in solutions of albumin were trapped at the Air-Liquid interface but was readily suspended in the solutions with a size close to that of the airborne particles, indicating that AuNP:Protein complex formation is promoted. Deposition into serum and lung fluid resulted in larger complexes, reflecting the formation of a more complex protein corona. UV absorption spectroscopy indicated no further aggregation of the AuNPs after deposition in solution. The corona of the deposited AuNPs shows differences compared to AuNPs generated in suspension. Deposition of AuNPs from the aerosol phase into biological fluids offers a method to study the protein corona formed, upon inhalation and deposition in the lungs in a more realistic way compared to particle liquid suspensions. This is important since the protein corona together with key particle properties (e.g. size, shape and surface reactivity to a large extent may determine the nanoparticle effects and possible translocation to other organs.

  3. Soft matter strategies for controlling food texture: formation of hydrogel particles by biopolymer complex coacervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bi-cheng; Degner, Brian; McClements, David Julian

    2014-11-01

    Soft matter physics principles can be used to address important problems in the food industry. Starch granules are widely used in foods to create desirable textural attributes, but high levels of digestible starch may pose a risk of diabetes. Consequently, there is a need to find healthier replacements for starch granules. The objective of this research was to create hydrogel particles from protein and dietary fiber with similar dimensions and functional attributes as starch granules. Hydrogel particles were formed by mixing gelatin (0.5 wt%) with pectin (0 to 0.2 wt%) at pH values above the isoelectric point of the gelatin (pH 9, 30 °C). When the pH was adjusted to pH 5, the biopolymer mixture spontaneously formed micron-sized particles due to electrostatic attraction of cationic gelatin with anionic pectin through complex coacervation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed that the hydrogel particles were translucent and spheroid, and that their dimensions were determined by pectin concentration. At 0.01 wt% pectin, hydrogel particles with similar dimensions to swollen starch granules (D3,2 ≈ 23 µm) were formed. The resulting hydrogel suspensions had similar appearances to starch pastes and could be made to have similar textural attributes (yield stress and shear viscosity) by adjusting the effective hydrogel particle concentration. These hydrogel particles may therefore be used to improve the texture of reduced-calorie foods and thereby help tackle obesity and diabetes.

  4. Endochondral bone formation in gelatin methacrylamide hydrogel with embedded cartilage-derived matrix particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jetze; Gawlitta, Debby; Benders, Kim E. M.; Toma, Selynda M. H.; Pouran, Behdad; van Weeren, P. Rene; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Malda, J

    The natural process of endochondral bone formation in the growing skeletal system is increasingly inspiring the field of bone tissue engineering. However, in order to create relevant-size bone grafts, a cell carrier is required that ensures a high diffusion rate and facilitates matrix formation,

  5. Pattern formation with repulsive soft-core interactions: Discrete particle dynamics and Dean-Kawasaki equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Ollivier, Hélène; López, Cristóbal; Blasius, Bernd; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2016-10-01

    Brownian particles interacting via repulsive soft-core potentials can spontaneously aggregate, despite repelling each other, and form periodic crystals of particle clusters. We study this phenomenon in low-dimensional situations (one and two dimensions) at two levels of description: by performing numerical simulations of the discrete particle dynamics and by linear and nonlinear analysis of the corresponding Dean-Kawasaki equation for the macroscopic particle density. Restricting to low dimensions and neglecting fluctuation effects, we gain analytical insight into the mechanisms of the instability leading to clustering which turn out to be the interplay among diffusion, the intracluster forces, and the forces between neighboring clusters. We show that the deterministic part of the Dean-Kawasaki equation provides a good description of the particle dynamics, including width and shape of the clusters and over a wide range of parameters, and analyze with weakly nonlinear techniques the nature of the pattern-forming bifurcation in one and two dimensions. Finally, we briefly discuss the case of attractive forces.

  6. The Role of Colloidal Interactions on the Formation of Particle Stabilized Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Shelley; Sharkey, Charles; Kotula, Anthony

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles can adsorb to fluid-fluid interfaces to make stable foams and emulsions. Surfactants adsorbed to the nanoparticle surface modulate both particle wettability and interparticle interactions, altering the nanoparticle adsorption. We have shown that bubbles generated in a nanoparticle-surfactant mixture collect particles as they travel through a long microchannel. The particle stabilized region of the bubble grows in a manner consistent with convection and diffusion of particles in the fluid surrounding the bubble. If the bubble residence time is long enough compared with the adsorption timescales, a stable, non-spherical, gas-filled capsule emerges from the microchannel and retains its shape for tens of hours. We find that the nanoparticle-surfactant mixture composition can be used to tune the degree of capsule stabilization. Greater stabilization occurs with larger surfactant concentrations for a fixed nanoparticle volume fraction. These observations can be rationalized in terms of the particle wettability and electrostatic interactions as well as interfacial elasticity and bulk nanoparticle transport and adsorption. National Science Foundation Grant No. 1511016.

  7. Microscopic origin and macroscopic implications of lane formation in mixtures of oppositely-driven particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelam, Stephen

    Colloidal particles of two types, driven in opposite directions, can segregate into lanes. I will describe some results on this phenomenon obtained by simple physical arguments and computer simulations. Laning results from rectification of diffusion on the scale of a particle diameter: oppositely-driven particles must, in the time taken to encounter each other in the direction of the drive, diffuse in the perpendicular direction by about one particle diameter. This geometric constraint implies that the diffusion constant of a particle, in the presence of those of the opposite type, grows approximately linearly with Peclet number, a prediction confirmed by our numerics. Such environment-dependent diffusion is statistically similar to an effective interparticle attraction; consistent with this observation, we find that oppositely-driven colloids display features characteristic of the simplest model system possessing both interparticle attractions and persistent motion, the driven Ising lattice gas. Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Glyoxal processing by aerosol multiphase chemistry: towards a kinetic modeling framework of secondary organic aerosol formation in aqueous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a modeling framework based on laboratory data to describe the kinetics of glyoxal reactions that form secondary organic aerosol (SOA in aqueous aerosol particles. Recent laboratory results on glyoxal reactions are reviewed and a consistent set of empirical reaction rate constants is derived that captures the kinetics of glyoxal hydration and subsequent reversible and irreversible reactions in aqueous inorganic and water-soluble organic aerosol seeds. Products of these processes include (a oligomers, (b nitrogen-containing products, (c photochemical oxidation products with high molecular weight. These additional aqueous phase processes enhance the SOA formation rate in particles and yield two to three orders of magnitude more SOA than predicted based on reaction schemes for dilute aqueous phase (cloud chemistry for the same conditions (liquid water content, particle size.

    The application of the new module including detailed chemical processes in a box model demonstrates that both the time scale to reach aqueous phase equilibria and the choice of rate constants of irreversible reactions have a pronounced effect on the predicted atmospheric relevance of SOA formation from glyoxal. During day time, a photochemical (most likely radical-initiated process is the major SOA formation pathway forming ∼5 μg m−3 SOA over 12 h (assuming a constant glyoxal mixing ratio of 300 ppt. During night time, reactions of nitrogen-containing compounds (ammonium, amines, amino acids contribute most to the predicted SOA mass; however, the absolute predicted SOA masses are reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to day time production. The contribution of the ammonium reaction significantly increases in moderately acidic or neutral particles (5 < pH < 7.

    Glyoxal uptake into ammonium sulfate seed under dark conditions can be represented with a single reaction parameter keffupt that does not depend

  9. Does the particle creation mechanism favour the formation of a black hole or a naked singularity?

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharjee, Sudipto; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with collapse dynamics of a spherically symmetric massive star in the framework of non-equilibrium themodynamic prescription through particle creation mechanism. The matter content in the star is in the form of perfect uid with barotropic equation of state and the dissipative phenomena due to non-equilibrium thermodynamics is in the form of bulk viscosity. For simplicity, the thermodynamic system is chosen to be adiabatic (i.e., isentropic) so that the e?ective bulk viscous pressure is linearly related to the particle creation rate. As a result, the evolution of the collapsing star also depends on the particle creation rate. By proper choice of creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, it is found that the end state of the collapse may be either a black hole or a naked singularity.

  10. Nanostructural Features of Silver Nanoparticles Powder Synthesized through Concurrent Formation of the Nanosized Particles of Both Starch and Silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hebeish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green innovative strategy was developed to accomplish silver nanoparticles formation of starch-silver nanoparticles (St-AgNPs in the powder form. Thus, St-AgNPs were synthesized through concurrent formation of the nanosized particles of both starch and silver. The alkali dissolved starch acts as reducing agent for silver ions and as stabilizing agent for the formed AgNPs. The chemical reduction process occurred in water bath under high-speed homogenizer. After completion of the reaction, the colloidal solution of AgNPs coated with alkali dissolved starch was cooled and precipitated using ethanol. The powder precipitate was collected by centrifugation, then washed, and dried; St-AgNPs powder was characterized using state-of-the-art facilities including UV-vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, particle size analyzer (PS, Polydispersity index (PdI, Zeta potential (ZP, XRD, FT-IR, EDX, and TGA. TEM and XRD indicate that the average size of pure AgNPs does not exceed 20 nm with spherical shape and high concentration of AgNPs (30000 ppm. The results obtained from TGA indicates that the higher thermal stability of starch coated AgNPS than that of starch nanoparticles alone. In addition to the data obtained from EDX which reveals the presence of AgNPs and the data obtained from particle size analyzer and zeta potential determination indicate that the good uniformity and the highly stability of St-AgNPs.

  11. Critical solvent properties affecting the particle formation process and characteristics of celecoxib-loaded plga microparticles via spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Feng; Bohr, Adam; Maltesen, Morten Jonas; Bjerregaard, Simon; Foged, Camilla; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative to understand the particle formation mechanisms when designing advanced nano/microparticulate drug delivery systems. We investigated how the solvent power and volatility influence the texture and surface chemistry of celecoxib-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles prepared by spray-drying. Binary mixtures of acetone and methanol at different molar ratios were applied to dissolve celecoxib and PLGA prior to spray-drying. The resulting microparticles were characterized with respect to morphology, texture, surface chemistry, solid state properties and drug release profile. The evaporation profiles of the feed solutions were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Spherical PLGA microparticles were obtained, irrespectively of the solvent composition. The particle size and surface chemistry were highly dependent on the solvent power of the feed solution. An obvious burst release was observed for the microparticles prepared by the feed solutions with the highest amount of poor solvent for PLGA. TGA analysis revealed distinct drying kinetics for the binary mixtures. The particle formation process is mainly governed by the PLGA precipitation rate, which is solvent-dependent, and the migration rate of celecoxib molecules during drying. The texture and surface chemistry of the spray-dried PLGA microparticles can therefore be tailored by adjusting the solvent composition.

  12. Ambient observations of dimers from terpene oxidation in the gas phase: Implications for new particle formation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Claudia; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Heitto, Arto; Lutz, Anna; Hallquist, Mattias; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Hao, Liqing; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Mauldin, Roy L.; Makkonen, Ulla; Sipilä, Mikko; Petäjä, Tuukka; Thornton, Joel A.

    2017-03-01

    We present ambient observations of dimeric monoterpene oxidation products (C16-20HyO6-9) in gas and particle phases in the boreal forest in Finland in spring 2013 and 2014, detected with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer with a filter inlet for gases and aerosols employing acetate and iodide as reagent ions. These are among the first online dual-phase observations of such dimers in the atmosphere. Estimated saturation concentrations of 10-15 to 10-6 µg m-3 (based on observed thermal desorptions and group-contribution methods) and measured gas-phase concentrations of 10-3 to 10-2 µg m-3 ( 106-107 molecules cm-3) corroborate a gas-phase formation mechanism. Regular new particle formation (NPF) events allowed insights into the potential role dimers may play for atmospheric NPF and growth. The observationally constrained Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth indicates a contribution of 5% to early stage particle growth from the 60 gaseous dimer compounds.

  13. On the formation of sulfuric acid-water particles via homogeneous nucleation in the lower troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerminen, V.M.

    1995-12-31

    Production of new sulfur derived particles via homogeneous nucleation between sulfuric acid and water vapors, and other related aerosol processes taking place in a variety of tropospheric environments, were studied using theoretical and model approaches. For nucleation to occur in the lower troposphere, cool and humid conditions combined with relatively strong solar radiation were usually required. Regardless of the system concerned, production of nuclei was found to be favored also by high SO{sub 2}(g) to fine particulate matter ratios. Urban post-fog situations, which are encountered commonly during severe air pollution episodes, were shown to favor new particle production considerably above the corresponding `background` conditions. A simple procedure for evaluating post-fog nucleation probabilities from routinely obtained data was developed and applied to real aerosol systems. Nucleation in the remote marine environment, which is an essential phenomenon in linking natural sulfur emissions to global climate change, was studied from a dynamic point of view. It was demonstrated that new particle production occurs more often in association with relative humidity transitions typical for many boundary layer processes than under averaged or steady conditions of the kind assumed explicitly in most earlier model studies. Power plant plumes were shown to be a particularly significant source of atmospheric nuclei, due primarily to their frequently high SO{sub 2}-to-particulate matter ratios. Factors affecting the probability of nucleation during plume dispersion were examined in detail, and finally, strategies for the control of in-plume particle production were analyzed. (author)

  14. Particles in swimming pool filters – Does pH determine the DBP formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2012-01-01

    countries, and the non-regulated haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) were investigated at 6.0⩽pH⩽8.0, under controlled chlorination conditions. The investigated particles were collected from a hot tub with a drum micro filter. In two series of experiments with either constant initial active...

  15. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  16. Anthropogenic pollution elevates the peak height of new particle formation from planetary boundary layer to lower free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Jia, Xingcan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Ding, Deping; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa

    2017-07-01

    New particle formation (NPF) and subsequent growth are primary sources of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei. Previous studies have been conducted in relatively clean environments; investigation of NPF events over highly polluted megacities is still lacking. Here we show, based on a recent yearlong aircraft campaign conducted over Beijing, China, from April 2011 to June 2012, that NPF occurrence peaks in the lower free troposphere (LT), instead of planetary boundary layer (PBL), as most previous studies have found and that the distance of NPF peak to PBL top increases with increasing aerosol loading. Further analysis reveals that increased aerosols suppress NPF in PBL, but enhance NPF in LT due to a complex chain of aerosol-radiation-photochemistry interactions that affect both NPF sources and sinks. These findings shed new light on our understanding of NPF occurrence, NPF vertical distribution, and thus their effects on atmospheric photochemistry, clouds, and climate.

  17. Critical solvent properties affecting the particle formation process and characteristics of celecoxib-loaded PLGA microparticles via spray-drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Feng; Bohr, Adam; Maltesen, Morten Jonas

    2013-01-01

    ) microparticles prepared by spray-drying. METHODS: Binary mixtures of acetone and methanol at different molar ratios were applied to dissolve celecoxib and PLGA prior to spray-drying. The resulting microparticles were characterized with respect to morphology, texture, surface chemistry, solid state properties...... and drug release profile. The evaporation profiles of the feed solutions were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). RESULTS: Spherical PLGA microparticles were obtained, irrespectively of the solvent composition. The particle size and surface chemistry were highly dependent on the solvent...... power of the feed solution. An obvious burst release was observed for the microparticles prepared by the feed solutions with the highest amount of poor solvent for PLGA. TGA analysis revealed distinct drying kinetics for the binary mixtures. CONCLUSIONS: The particle formation process is mainly governed...

  18. Using satellite-based measurements to explore spatiotemporal scales and variability of drivers of new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Crippa, P.; Hallar, A. G.; Clarisse, L.; Whitburn, S.; Van Damme, M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Walker, J. T.; Khlystov, A.; Pryor, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    New particle formation (NPF) can potentially alter regional climate by increasing aerosol particle (hereafter particle) number concentrations and ultimately cloud condensation nuclei. The large scales on which NPF is manifest indicate potential to use satellite-based (inherently spatially averaged) measurements of atmospheric conditions to diagnose the occurrence of NPF and NPF characteristics. We demonstrate the potential for using satellite-based measurements of insolation (UV), trace gas concentrations (sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), formaldehyde (HCHO), and ozone (O3)), aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE)), and a proxy of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions (leaf area index (LAI) and temperature (T)) as predictors for NPF characteristics: formation rates, growth rates, survival probabilities, and ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations at five locations across North America. NPF at all sites is most frequent in spring, exhibits a one-day autocorrelation, and is associated with low condensational sink (AOD × AE) and HCHO concentrations, and high UV. However, there are important site-to-site variations in NPF frequency and characteristics, and in which of the predictor variables (particularly gas concentrations) significantly contribute to the explanatory power of regression models built to predict those characteristics. This finding may provide a partial explanation for the reported spatial variability in skill of simple generalized nucleation schemes in reproducing observed NPF. In contrast to more simple proxies developed in prior studies (e.g., based on AOD, AE, SO2, and UV), use of additional predictors (NO2, NH3, HCHO, LAI, T, and O3) increases the explained temporal variance of UFP concentrations at all sites.

  19. Inter-annual variations of CO2 observed by commercial airliner in the CONTRAIL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yousuke; Machida, Toshinobu; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Niwa, Yosuke; Umezawa, Taku

    2016-04-01

    Since 2005, we have conducted an observation program for greenhouse gases using the passenger aircraft of the Japan Airlines named Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner (CONTRAIL). Over the past 10 years, successful operation of Continuous CO2 Measuring Equipment (CME) has delivered more than 6 million in-situ CO2 data from about 12000 flights between Japan and Europe, Australia, North America, or Asia. The large number of CME data enable us to well characterize spatial distributions and seasonal changes of CO2 in wide regions of the globe especially the Asia-Pacific regions. While the mean growth rates for the past 10 years were about 2 ppm/year, large growth rates of about 3 ppm/year were found in the wide latitudinal bands from 30S to 70N from the second half of 2012 to the first half of 2013. The multiyear data sets have the potential to help understand the global/regional CO2 budget. One good example is the significant inter-annual difference in CO2 vertical profiles observed over Singapore between October 2014 and October 2015, which is attributable to the massive biomass burnings in Indonesia in 2015.

  20. Climatology of new particle formation at Izaña mountain GAW observatory in the subtropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M. I.; Rodríguez, S.; González, Y.; García, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    A climatology of new particle formation (NPF) events at high altitude in the subtropical North Atlantic is presented. A 4-year data set (June 2008-June 2012), which includes number size distributions (10-600 nm), reactive gases (SO2, NOx, and O3), several components of solar radiation and meteorological parameters, measured at Izaña Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) observatory (2373 m above sea level; Tenerife, Canary Islands) was analysed. NPF is associated with the transport of gaseous precursors from the boundary layer by orographic buoyant upward flows that perturb the low free troposphere during daytime. On average, 30% of the days contained an NPF event. Mean values of the formation and growth rates during the study period were 0.46 cm-3 s-1 and 0.42 nm h-1, correspondingly. There is a clearly marked NPF season (May-August), when these events account for 50-60% of the days per month. Monthly mean values of the formation and growth rates exhibit higher values in this season, 0.49-0.92 cm-3 s-1 and 0.48-0.58 nm h-1, respectively. During NPF events, SO2, UV radiation and upslope winds showed higher values than during non-events. The overall data set indicates that SO2 plays a key role as precursor, although other species seem to contribute during some periods. Condensation of sulfuric acid vapour accounts for most of the measured particle growth during most of the year (~70%), except for some periods. In May, the highest mean growth rates (~0.6 nm h-1) and the lowest contribution of sulfuric acid (~13%) were measured, suggesting a significant involvement of other condensing vapours. The SO2 availability seems also to be the most influencing parameter in the year-to-year variability in the frequency of NPF events. The condensation sink showed similar features to other mountain sites, showing high values during NPF events. Summertime observations, when Izaña is within the Saharan Air Layer, suggest that dust particles may play a significant role acting as

  1. Non-linear hydroxyl radical formation rate in dispersions containing mixtures of pyrite and chalcopyrite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2017-06-01

    The formation of hydroxyl radicals was studied in mixed pyrite-chalcopyrite dispersions in water using the conversion rate of adenine as a proxy for hydroxyl radical formation rate. Experiments were conducted as a function of pH, presence of phosphate buffer, surface loading, and pyrite-to-chalcopyrite ratio. The results indicate that hydroxyl radical formation rate in mixed systems is non-linear with respect to the rates in the pure endmember dispersions. The only exception is a set of experiments in which phosphate buffer is used. In the presence of phosphate buffer, the hydroxyl radical formation is suppressed in mixtures and the rate is close to that predicted based on the reaction kinetics of the pure endmembers. The non-linear hydroxyl radical formation in dispersions containing mixtures of pyrite and chalcopyrite is likely the result of two complementary processes. One is the fact that pyrite and chalcopyrite form a galvanic couple. In this arrangement, chalcopyrite oxidation is accelerated, while pyrite passes electrons withdrawn from chalcopyrite to molecular oxygen, the oxidant. The incomplete reduction of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. The galvanic coupling appears to be augmented by the fact that chalcopyrite generates a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide upon dispersal in water. This hydrogen peroxide is then available for conversion to hydroxyl radical, which appears to be facilitated by pyrite as chalcopyrite itself produces only minor amounts of hydroxyl radical. In essence, pyrite is a ;co-factor; that facilitates the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to hydroxyl radical. This conversion reaction is a surface-mediated reaction. Given that hydroxyl radical is one of the most reactive species in nature, the formation of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous systems containing chalcopyrite and pyrite has implications for the stability of organic molecules, biomolecules, the viability of microbes, and

  2. In situ observations of new particle formation in the tropical upper troposphere: the role of clouds and the nucleation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weigel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation (NPF, which generates nucleation mode aerosol, was observed in the tropical Upper Troposphere (UT and Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL by in situ airborne measurements over South America (January–March 2005, Australia (November–December 2005, West Africa (August 2006 and Central America (2004–2007. Particularly intense NPF was found at the bottom of the TTL. Measurements with a set of condensation particle counters (CPCs with different dp50 (50% lower size detection efficiency diameter or "cut-off diameter" were conducted on board the M-55 Geophysica in the altitude range of 12.0–20.5 km and on board the DLR Falcon-20 at up to 11.5 km altitude. On board the NASA WB-57F size distributions were measured over Central America in the 4 to 1000 nm diameter range with a system of nucleation mode aerosol spectrometers. Nucleation mode particle concentrations (NNM were derived from these measurements which allow for identifying many NPF events with NNM in the range of thousands of particles per cm3. Over Australia and West Africa, we identified NPF in the outflow of tropical convection, in particular of a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS. Newly formed particles with NNM > 1000 cm−3 were found to coexist with ice cloud particles (dp > 2 μm as long as cloud particle concentrations remained below 2 cm−3. The occurrence of NPF within the upper troposphere and the TTL was generally confined within 340 K to 380 K potential temperature, but NPF was of particular strength between 350 K and 370 K (i.e. ~1–4 km below the cold point tropopause. Analyses of the aerosol volatility (at 250 °C show that in the TTL on average 75–90% of the particles were volatile, compared to typically only 50% in the extra-tropical UT, indicative for the particles to mainly consist of H2SO4

  3. Proton-driven assembly of the Rous Sarcoma virus capsid protein results in the formation of icosahedral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Radjainia, Mazdak; Kingston, Richard L; Mitra, Alok K

    2010-05-14

    In a mature and infectious retroviral particle, the capsid protein (CA) forms a shell surrounding the genomic RNA and the replicative machinery of the virus. The irregular nature of this capsid shell precludes direct atomic resolution structural analysis. CA hexamers and pentamers are the fundamental building blocks of the capsid, however the pentameric state, in particular, remains poorly characterized. We have developed an efficient in vitro protocol for studying the assembly of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA that involves mild acidification and produces structures modeling the authentic viral capsid. These structures include regular spherical particles with T = 1 icosahedral symmetry, built from CA pentamers alone. These particles were subject to cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image processing, and a pseudo-atomic model of the icosahedron was created by docking atomic structures of the constituent CA domains into the cryo-EM-derived three-dimensional density map. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of CA forms pentameric turrets, which decorate the surface of the icosahedron, while the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA is positioned underneath, linking the pentamers. Biophysical analysis of the icosahedral particle preparation reveals that CA monomers and icosahedra are the only detectable species and that these exist in reversible equilibrium at pH 5. These same acidic conditions are known to promote formation of a RSV CA CTD dimer, present within the icosahedral particle, which facilitates capsid assembly. The results are consistent with a model in which RSV CA assembly is a nucleation-limited process driven by very weak protein-protein interactions.

  4. Proton-driven Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein Results in the Formation of Icosahedral Particles*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Radjainia, Mazdak; Kingston, Richard L.; Mitra, Alok K.

    2010-01-01

    In a mature and infectious retroviral particle, the capsid protein (CA) forms a shell surrounding the genomic RNA and the replicative machinery of the virus. The irregular nature of this capsid shell precludes direct atomic resolution structural analysis. CA hexamers and pentamers are the fundamental building blocks of the capsid, however the pentameric state, in particular, remains poorly characterized. We have developed an efficient in vitro protocol for studying the assembly of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA that involves mild acidification and produces structures modeling the authentic viral capsid. These structures include regular spherical particles with T = 1 icosahedral symmetry, built from CA pentamers alone. These particles were subject to cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image processing, and a pseudo-atomic model of the icosahedron was created by docking atomic structures of the constituent CA domains into the cryo-EM-derived three-dimensional density map. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of CA forms pentameric turrets, which decorate the surface of the icosahedron, while the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA is positioned underneath, linking the pentamers. Biophysical analysis of the icosahedral particle preparation reveals that CA monomers and icosahedra are the only detectable species and that these exist in reversible equilibrium at pH 5. These same acidic conditions are known to promote formation of a RSV CA CTD dimer, present within the icosahedral particle, which facilitates capsid assembly. The results are consistent with a model in which RSV CA assembly is a nucleation-limited process driven by very weak protein-protein interactions. PMID:20228062

  5. Formation and growth of sulfur derived particles in the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerminen, V.M.; Wexler, A.; Hillamo, R. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.

    1995-12-31

    Aerosol particles modify the Earth`s radiation balance directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly via their influence on cloud properties. The indirect climate forcing due to aerosols probably dominates over that of the direct forcing over global scale, and is induced primary by sulfate originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A large portion of the global sulfur flux is due to dimethylsulfide (DMS) released from the ocean surface, where it is produced in large quantities by various biogenic processes. DMS is believed to be the primary particulate precursor over vast oceanic regions, hence having a potential to modify aerosol climatic effects over a major portion of the Earth`s surface. The connection between marine DMS emissions and the resulting climate forcing involves several steps still not properly quantified. Among the open questions related to this system, perhaps the most critical ones are when and where the DMS-derived particles are formed in the atmosphere, and how these particles grow into sizes where they are able to alter cloud properties, such as cloud albedos, lifetimes and precipitation efficiencies, that are relevant to climate. In this work, production and growth of sulfur particles has been examined using a simple, yet realistic model that simulates the processes taking place in a remote marine boundary layer. The specific questions examined include: (1) what is the role of boundary layer dynamics in affecting the condensation nuclei (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production in this system, (2) what are the factors controlling the growth of fresh CN into CCN, and (3) how does the presence of boundary layer clouds interact with CN/CCN production

  6. Mixing state of oxalic acid containing particles in the rural area of Pearl River Delta, China: implications for the formation mechanism of oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chunlei; Li, Mei; Chan, Chak K.; Tong, Haijie; Chen, Changhong; Chen, Duohong; Wu, Dui; Li, Lei; Wu, Cheng; Cheng, Peng; Gao, Wei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhijuan; Fu, Zhong; Bi, Yanru; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-08-01

    The formation of oxalic acid and its mixing state in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) were studied using a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) in the summer and winter of 2014 in Heshan, a supersite in the rural area of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in China. Oxalic-acid-containing particles accounted for 2.5 and 2.7 % in total detected ambient particles in summer and winter, respectively. Oxalic acid was measured in particles classified as elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), elemental and organic carbon (ECOC), biomass burning (BB), heavy metal (HM), secondary (Sec), sodium-potassium (NaK), and dust. Oxalic acid was found predominantly mixing with sulfate and nitrate during the whole sampling period, likely due to aqueous-phase reactions. In summer, oxalic-acid-containing particle number and ozone concentration followed a very similar trend, which may reflect the significant contribution of photochemical reactions to oxalic acid formation. The HM particles were the most abundant oxalic acid particles in summer and the diurnal variations in peak area of iron and oxalic acid show opposite trends, which suggests a possible loss of oxalic acid through the photolysis of iron oxalato-complexes during the strong photochemical activity period. In wintertime, carbonaceous particles contained a substantial amount of oxalic acid as well as abundant carbon clusters and BB markers. The general existence of nitric acid in oxalic-acid-containing particles indicates an acidic environment during the formation process of oxalic acid. The peak areas of nitrate, sulfate and oxalic had similar temporal change in the carbonaceous type oxalic acid particles, and the organosulfate-containing oxalic acid particles correlated well with total oxalic acid particles during the haze episode, which suggests that the formation of oxalic acid is closely associated with the oxidation of organic precursors in the aqueous phase.

  7. Effect of process parameters on the phase formation, particle size and magnetic properties of MnBi nanoparticles prepared by mechanochemical synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rama Rao, N.V., E-mail: nvrrao@udel.edu; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Process parameters plays major role in controlling particle size, phase formation and magnetic properties. • Increase of the dispersant amount helps to decrease the particle size and make separated particles. • MnBi phase formation increases as the heat-treatment temperature increases. • Hc and Ms values are obtained in the range of 11–18.2 kOe and 13–32 emu/g, respectively. • Optimum magnetic properties with smaller particle size were obtained with 30 wt.% of CaO and at lower heat-treatment temperature. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of MnBi are obtained from Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Mn by mechanochemical synthesis. The effect of excess dispersant (CaO) in mechanochemical synthesis and the temperature of subsequent thermal treatment on phase formation, particle size and magnetic properties of MnBi nanoparticles is investigated by means of X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and magnetometry. With increase of excess dispersant, the average particle size decreases and the particles are observed to be more separated. Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) was found to decrease with increase of excess dispersant, while the coercivity (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of dispersant up to 40 wt.% and thereafter it decreases. The formation of MnBi phase increases as the heat-treatment temperature is increased; however, the average particle size increases from nano to micrometer (200 nm to 2 μm)

  8. Colloids in inhomogeneous external magnetic fields: particle tweezing, trapping and void formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froltsov, V. A.; Likos, C. N.; Löwen, H.

    2004-09-01

    Two-dimensional super-paramagnetic suspensions that are confined to a planar liquid-gas interface and exposed to an inhomogeneous external magnetic field directed perpendicular to the interface are studied by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations. The external field is a superposition of a homogeneous field and a localized inhomogeneity, modelled by a Gaussian function. The inhomogeneity causes two combined effects that compete against each other: it provides an external potential, modifying at the same time the mutual interparticle repulsion. If the inhomogeneity enhances the strength of the homogeneous profile, the inhomogeneous field is a 'magnetic tweezer' for low particle densities. At higher densities, on the other hand, there is a small accumulation in the centre of the inhomogeneous field, which leads to a depletion zone outside the inhomogeneity due to the mutual interparticle repulsion. Very large inhomogeneities produce local crystallites surrounded by a depletion ring. If the inhomogeneity reduces the total field strength, particles are repelled from the inhomogeneity and voids are generated in the suspension. Our predictions are of relevance to the direct transport of magnetic particles and can be verified in real-space experiments of super-paramagnetic suspensions.

  9. Immunosensor development formatting for tungro disease detection using nano-gold antibody particles application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, M. N. A.; Hasfalina, C. M.; Samsuzanaa, A. A.; Faridah, S.; Zamri, I.; Noraini, B. Siti; Sabrina, W. Nur; Hashim, U.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2017-03-01

    The plant disease such as Rice tungro disease (RTD) becomes a major problem in rice production and also will effect in the economy loss in the country. Therefore, to tackle this problem at early stages, the immunosensor application is a most reliable sensor nowadays because of advantages towards detecting biological molecule. Thus, in order to deal with immunosensor development, it can be done by undergoing the formation of immunosensor format on screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Results can be elaborated with the potential applications to detect the viruses.

  10. Synthetic virus-like particles prepared via protein corona formation enable effective vaccination in an avian model of coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Huang, Chen-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yi; Fang, Zih-Syun; Hsu, Chen-Hsuan; Lin, Jung-Chen; Chen, Yuan-I; Yao, Bing-Yu; Hu, Che-Ming J

    2016-11-01

    The ongoing battle against current and rising viral infectious threats has prompted increasing effort in the development of vaccine technology. A major thrust in vaccine research focuses on developing formulations with virus-like features towards enhancing antigen presentation and immune processing. Herein, a facile approach to formulate synthetic virus-like particles (sVLPs) is demonstrated by exploiting the phenomenon of protein corona formation induced by the high-energy surfaces of synthetic nanoparticles. Using an avian coronavirus spike protein as a model antigen, sVLPs were prepared by incubating 100 nm gold nanoparticles in a solution containing an optimized concentration of viral proteins. Following removal of free proteins, antigen-laden particles were recovered and showed morphological semblance to natural viral particles under nanoparticle tracking analysis and transmission electron microscopy. As compared to inoculation with free proteins, vaccination with the sVLPs showed enhanced lymphatic antigen delivery, stronger antibody titers, increased splenic T-cell response, and reduced infection-associated symptoms in an avian model of coronavirus infection. Comparison to a commercial whole inactivated virus vaccine also showed evidence of superior antiviral protection by the sVLPs. The study demonstrates a simple yet robust method in bridging viral antigens with synthetic nanoparticles for improved vaccine application; it has practical implications in the management of human viral infections as well as in animal agriculture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Airborne measurements over the boreal forest of southern Finland during new particle formation events in 2009 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobesberger, S.; Vaananen, R.; Leino, K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics, Division of Atmospheric Sciences] [and others

    2013-06-01

    We conducted airborne observations of aerosol physical properties over the southern Finland boreal forest environment. The aim was to investigate the lower tropospheric aerosol (up to 4-km altitude) over an area of 250 by 200 km, in particular during new particle formation (NPF) events, and to address the spatial variability of aerosol number concentration and number size distribution. The regional NPF events, detected both airborne and at the ground, with air masses originating from the Arctic or northern Atlantic Ocean were studied throughout the boundary layer and throughout the area covered. Three suitable case studies are presented in more detail. In two of these studies, the concentrations of nucleation mode particles (3-10 nm in diameter) were found considerably higher (up to a factor of 30) in the upper parts of the planetary boundary layer compared to ground-based measurements during the nucleation events. The observed vertical variation can be connected to boundary layer dynamics and interactions between the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere, likely yielding high concentrations of newly formed aerosol particles. Our results suggest that nucleation does not necessarily occur close to the surface. In one presented case we found evidence of NPF occurring in a limited area above cloud, in the complete absence of a regional NPF event. (orig.)

  12. Effect of particle water on ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation from benzene-NO2-NaCl irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujie; Luo, Hao; Jia, Long; Ge, Shuangshuang

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are important pollutants in the urban atmosphere. Benzene is one of the most important aromatic species in urban air, which could produce O3 and SOA in the presence of NOx (x = 1, 2) and UV light. A series of experiments was carried out to study the effect of particle water on O3 and SOA formation from benzene under various humid conditions in an indoor smog chamber. The results show that the peak O3 concentrations decreased with the increase of RH or the mass concentration of liquid NaCl particles. The peak O3 concentration reduced by 30% as RH increased from 9% to 87% with the similar initial concentrations of NaCl (about 46 μg m-3), and decreased by 10% as the initial NaCl concentrations increased from 36.0 μg m-3 to 152.1 μg m-3 at about 73% RH. The relationships between liquid water content (LWC) and O3 or SOA were investigated. The results show that LWC is the key factor that leads to an opposite effect on O3 and SOA formation from benzene. The peak O3 concentration exponentially decreased 37% as LWC0 increased from zero to 349.8 μg m-3. Heterogeneous reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) with particle water is the major reason for the decrease of O3. The yields of SOA increased from 5.2 to 10.5% as LWC0 increased from zero to 349.8 μg m-3. The relative intensities of bands Osbnd H, Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and NO3- increased by 22.9, 6.8, 6.7 and 13.1 times respectively as compared with dry condition. Alcohols or hydrates are confirmed to be the major contributors to SOA with increasing LWC.

  13. Monitoring early stages of silver particle formation in a polymer solution by in situ and time resolved small angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Gaetano; Mari, Alessandra; Amenitsch, Heinz; Pifferi, Augusto; Cannas, Carla; Suber, Lorenza

    2010-11-01

    Silver particles have been prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in acidic aqueous solution containing a low concentration of a commercial polynaphthalene sulfonate polymer (Daxad 19) as dispersant agent. The reduction has been induced and controlled by the slow addition of ascorbic acid at a fixed rate; in this way, we were able to monitor the formation of a silver crystalline colloidal dispersion by in situ and time resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurements. Modeling the scattering intensity with interacting spherical particles in a polymer-Ag like-fractal template allowed us to distinguish different stages involving liquid-like ordered cluster nucleation, cluster growth up to primary particle formation and particle coalescence. Between primary particle formation and particle coalescence, we observed the occurrence of a transient phase of core-shell type structures having primary particles as stable cores in expanding shells built by the organic polymer. We discuss these results in a twofold perspective pertaining both to technology, relative to controlled fabrication of metal nanoparticles and to basic chemical physics, dealing with non standard stepwise crystallization from solutions.Silver particles have been prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in acidic aqueous solution containing a low concentration of a commercial polynaphthalene sulfonate polymer (Daxad 19) as dispersant agent. The reduction has been induced and controlled by the slow addition of ascorbic acid at a fixed rate; in this way, we were able to monitor the formation of a silver crystalline colloidal dispersion by in situ and time resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurements. Modeling the scattering intensity with interacting spherical particles in a polymer-Ag like-fractal template allowed us to distinguish different stages involving liquid-like ordered cluster nucleation, cluster growth up to primary particle formation and particle

  14. Formation of raspberry like cobalt particles with hydrazine reduction in a polyol route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khe, Cheng Seong; Aziz, Azizan; Lockman, Zainovia; Rajalingam, Sokkalingam; Merican, Zulkifli; Vasant, Pandian

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the effect of hydrazine hydrate on the formation of the raspberry-like morphology of the cobalt nanomaterials in a polyol route. In the synthesis, the molar ratio of N2H4 to Co2+was varied from 2.5 to 10. At the beginning with low molar ratio, spherical microspheres were formed. When the molar ratio was increased to 5 and above, final morphology of the cobalt nanomaterials became raspberry-like. This might be attributed to the absorption of the hydrazine complex of cobalt nanoparticles at certain facets during their growth stage and later self-assembled into the raspberry shaped microparticles. The plausible formation mechanism were proposed.

  15. Momentum transfer across shear flows in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, T.; Jenkins, A.; Eke, V. R.; Quilis, V.; Frenk, C. S.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of angular momentum in SPH simulations of galaxy formation, paying particular attention to artificial numerical effects. We find that a cold gas disc forming in an ambient hot gas halo receives a strong hydrodynamic torque from the hot gas. By splitting the hydrodynamic force into artificial viscosity and pressure gradients, we find that the angular momentum transport is caused not by the artificial viscosity but by the pressure gradients. Using simple test simula...

  16. Formation of stable submicron peptide or protein particles by thin film freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Keith P.; Engstrom, Joshua; Williams, III, Robert O.

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes compositions and methods for preparing micron-sized or submicron-sized particles by dissolving a water soluble effective ingredient in one or more solvents; spraying or dripping droplets solvent such that the effective ingredient is exposed to a vapor-liquid interface of less than 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 200, 400 or 500 cm.sup.-1 area/volume to, e.g., increase protein stability; and contacting the droplet with a freezing surface that has a temperature differential of at least 30.degree. C. between the droplet and the surface, wherein the surface freezes the droplet into a thin film with a thickness of less than 500 micrometers and a surface area to volume between 25 to 500 cm.sup.-1.

  17. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  18. The dynamics of the formation of the edge particle transport barrier at TJ-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Carreras, B. A.; Estrada, T.; Alonso, J. A.; de Pablos, J. L.; Melnikov, A.; Krupnik, L.; Eliseev, L. G.; Perfilov, S. V.

    2011-11-01

    A large set of discharges with both spontaneous and forced confinement transitions at low electron density is studied at the stellarator TJ-II in different magnetic configurations. By means of a Bayesian technique, using reflectometry and interferometry, electron density profiles are reconstructed in the outer half of the plasma. A scanning heavy ion beam probe delivers information on the global evolution of the plasma potential. Langmuir probes are used to measure long-range correlations. Together, a comprehensive picture is obtained of the evolution of various key global plasma profiles and parameters across forward and backward transitions associated with the formation of an edge sheared flow layer. The impact of low-order rationals on the transition is elucidated.

  19. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ivankov, Olexandr I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskiy per. 9, Dolgoprudniy 141700 (Russian Federation); Feoktystov, Artem [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Technical University of Košice, Letná 9, 04200 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  20. A long-term study of new particle formation in a coastal environment: meteorology, gas phase and solar radiation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorribas, M; Adame, J A; Olmo, F J; Vilaplana, J M; Gil-Ojeda, M; Alados-Arboledas, L

    2015-04-01

    New particle formation (NPF) was investigated at a coastal background site in Southwest Spain over a four-year period using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). The goals of the study were to characterise the NPF and to investigate their relationship to meteorology, gas phase (O3, SO2, CO and NO2) and solar radiation (UVA, UVB and global). A methodology for identifying and classifying the NPF was implemented using the wind direction and modal concentrations as inputs. NPF events showed a frequency of 24% of the total days analysed. The mean duration was 9.2±4.2 h. Contrary to previous studies conducted in other locations, the NPF frequency reached its maximum during cold seasons for approximately 30% of the days. The lowest frequency took place in July with 10%, and the seasonal wind pattern was found to be the most important parameter influencing the NPF frequency. The mean formation rate was 2.2±1.7 cm(-3) s(-1), with a maximum in the spring and early autumn and a minimum during the summer and winter. The mean growth rate was 3.8±2.4 nm h(-1) with higher values occurring from spring to autumn. The mean and seasonal formation and growth rates are in agreement with previous observations from continental sites in the Northern Hemisphere. NPF classification of different classes was conducted to explore the effect of synoptic and regional-scale patterns on NPF and growth. The results show that under a breeze regime, the temperature indirectly affects NPF events. Higher temperatures increase the strength of the breeze recirculation, favouring gas accumulation and subsequent NPF appearance. Additionally, the role of high relative humidity in inhibiting the NPF was evinced during synoptic scenarios. The remaining meteorological variables (RH), trace gases (CO and NO), solar radiation, PM10 and condensation sink, showed a moderate or high connection with both formation and growth rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Variability in the primary emissions and secondary gas and particle formation from vehicles using bio-ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramsch, E; Papapostolou, V; Reyes, F; Vásquez, Y; Castillo, M; Oyola, P; López, G; Cádiz, A; Ferguson, S; Wolfson, M; Lawrence, J; Koutrakis, P

    2017-10-11

    Bioethanol for use in vehicles is becoming a substantial part of global energy infrastructure because it is renewable and some emissions are reduced. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and total hydrocarbons (THC) are reduced but there is still controversy regarding emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), aldehydes and ethanol, this may be a concern because all these compounds are precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The amount of emissions depends on the ethanol content, but also may depend on the engine quality and ethanol origin. Thus, a photochemical chamber was used to study secondary gas and aerosol formation from two flex-fueled vehicles using different ethanol blends in gasoline. One vehicle and the fuel used were made in USA and the others were made in Brazil. Primary emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), CO, carbon dioxide (CO2), and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from both vehicles decreased as the amount of ethanol in gasoline increased. NOx emissions in the American and Brazilian car decreased with ethanol content. However, emissions of THC, CO and NOx from the Brazilian car were markedly higher than those from the U. S. car showing high variability between vehicle technologies. In the Brazilian car, formation of secondary nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) was lower for higher ethanol content in the fuel. In the American car, NO2 and O3 had a small increase. Secondary particle (PM) formation in the chamber decreased for both vehicles as the fraction of ethanol in fuel increased, consistent with previous studies. Secondary to primary PM ratios for pure gasoline is 11, also consistent with previous studies. In addition, the time required to form secondary PM is longer for higher ethanol blends. These results indicate that using higher ethanol blends may have a positive impact on air quality. The use of bio-ethanol can significantly reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Given the extent of its use, it is important

  2. Iodine-mediated coastal particle formation: an overview of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe Roscoff coastal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFiggans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the measurements made during the heavily-instrumented Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe coastal study in Roscoff on the North West coast of France throughout September 2006. It was clearly demonstrated that iodine-mediated coastal particle formation occurs, driven by daytime low tide emission of molecular iodine, I2, by macroalgal species fully or partially exposed by the receding waterline. Ultrafine particle concentrations strongly correlate with the rapidly recycled reactive iodine species, IO, produced at high concentrations following photolysis of I2. The heterogeneous macroalgal I2 sources lead to variable relative concentrations of iodine species observed by path-integrated and in situ measurement techniques.

    Apparent particle emission fluxes were associated with an enhanced apparent depositional flux of ozone, consistent with both a direct O3 deposition to macroalgae and involvement of O3 in iodine photochemistry and subsequent particle formation below the measurement height. The magnitude of the particle formation events was observed to be greatest at the lowest tides with the highest concentrations of ultrafine particles growing to the largest sizes, probably by the condensation of anthropogenically-formed condensable material. At such sizes the particles should be able to act as cloud condensation nuclei at reasonable atmospheric supersaturations.

  3. Spatial extent of new particle formation events over the Mediterranean Basin from multiple ground-based and airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kevin; Rose, Clémence; Pey, Jorge; Culot, Anais; Freney, Evelyn; Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgios; Cerro, José Carlos; Mallet, Marc; Sartelet, Karine; Beckmann, Matthias; Bourriane, Thierry; Roberts, Greg; Marchand, Nicolas; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Sellegri, Karine

    2017-08-01

    Over the last two decades, new particle formation (NPF), i.e., the formation of new particle clusters from gas-phase compounds followed by their growth to the 10-50 nm size range, has been extensively observed in the atmosphere at a given location, but their spatial extent has rarely been assessed. In this work, we use aerosol size distribution measurements performed simultaneously at Ersa (Corsica) and Finokalia (Crete) over a 1-year period to analyze the occurrence of NPF events in the Mediterranean area. The geographical location of these two sites, as well as the extended sampling period, allows us to assess the spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric nucleation at a regional scale. Finokalia and Ersa show similar seasonalities in the monthly average nucleation frequencies, growth rates, and nucleation rates, although the two stations are located more than 1000 km away from each other. Within this extended period, aerosol size distribution measurements were performed during an intensive campaign (3 July to 12 August 2013) from a ground-based station on the island of Mallorca, as well as onboard the ATR-42 research aircraft. This unique combination of stationary and mobile measurements provides us with detailed insights into the horizontal and vertical development of the NPF process on a daily scale. During the intensive campaign, nucleation events occurred simultaneously both at Ersa and Mallorca over delimited time slots of several days, but different features were observed at Finokalia. The results show that the spatial extent of the NPF events over the Mediterranean Sea might be as large as several hundreds of kilometers, mainly determined by synoptic conditions. Airborne measurements gave additional information regarding the origin of the clusters detected above the sea. The selected cases depicted contrasting situations, with clusters formed in the marine boundary layer or initially nucleated above the continent or in the free troposphere (FT) and

  4. Damage to formation surrounding flooding wells: modelling of suspension filtration with account of particle trapping and mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronin, S. A.; Tolmacheva, K. I.; Osiptsov, A. A.; Sitnikov, A. N.; Yakovlev, A. A.; Belozerov, B. V.; Belonogov, E. V.; Galeev, R. R.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the filtration of raw water in a formation surrounding injection wells in oilfields of Western Siberia. The mathematical model for suspension filtration developed earlier on the basis of tree-continua approach allows to describe the permeability damage and recovery due to trapping and mobilization of externally-introduced fines. As compared to classical deep-bed filtration models, the proposed model takes into account the filtration of the carrier fluid through the pack of trapped fines and uses only two free parameters to describe the particle trapping and mobilization rates. It has gone through a thorough validation campaign against experimental data with contamination of porous samples by external fines and mobilization of pre-seeded particles in sand packs. Simulations of permeability dynamics in the zone surrounding injection wells are carried out using the values of free parameters obtained by tuning the model against available lab experiments. Both continuous and periodic water flooding/cleanup is modelled. It is found that there are periodic regimes of water injection, in which the permeability of the rock is not damaged. The study will be continued after the calibration of the model against thorough laboratory tests with natural cores and field tests of injection rate dynamics in flooding wells.

  5. Structural basis of calcification inhibition by alpha 2-HS glycoprotein/fetuin-A. Formation of colloidal calciprotein particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Alexander; DuChesne, Alexander; Denecke, Bernd; Grötzinger, Joachim; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Renné, Thomas; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2003-04-11

    Genetic evidence from mutant mice suggests that alpha(2)-HS glycoprotein/fetuin-A (Ahsg) is a systemic inhibitor of precipitation of basic calcium phosphate preventing unwanted calcification. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we demonstrate that precipitation inhibition by Ahsg is caused by the transient formation of soluble, colloidal spheres, containing Ahsg, calcium, and phosphate. These "calciprotein particles" of 30-150 nm in diameter are initially amorphous and soluble but turn progressively more crystalline and insoluble in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion. Solubilization in Ahsg-containing calciprotein particles provides a novel conceptual framework to explain how insoluble calcium precipitates may be transported and removed in the bodies of mammals. Mutational analysis showed that the basic calcium phosphate precipitation inhibition activity resides in the amino-terminal cystatin-like domain D1 of Ahsg. A structure-function analysis of wild type and mutant forms of cystatin-like domains from Ahsg, full-length fetuin-B, histidine-rich glycoprotein, and kininogen demonstrated that Ahsg domain D1 is most efficient in inhibiting basic calcium phosphate precipitation. The computer-modeled domain structures suggest that a dense array of acidic residues on an extended beta-sheet of the cystatin-like domain Ahsg-D1 mediates efficient inhibition.

  6. Formation of a disordered solid via a shock-induced transition in a dense particle suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, Oren E; Frost, David L; Higgins, Andrew J; Ouellet, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Shock wave propagation in multiphase media is typically dominated by the relative compressibility of the two components of the mixture. The difference in the compressibility of the components results in a shock-induced variation in the effective volume fraction of the suspension tending toward the random-close-packing limit for the system, and a disordered solid can take form within the suspension. The present study uses a Hugoniot-based model to demonstrate this variation in the volume fraction of the solid phase as well as a simple hard-sphere model to investigate the formation of disordered structures within uniaxially compressed model suspensions. Both models are discussed in terms of available experimental plate impact data in dense suspensions. Through coordination number statistics of the mesoscopic hard-sphere model, comparisons are made with the trends of the experimental pressure-volume fraction relationship to illustrate the role of these disordered structures in the bulk properties of the suspensions. A criterion for the dynamic stiffening of suspensions under high-rate dynamic loading is suggested as an analog to quasi-static jamming based on the results of the simulations. © 2012 American Physical Society

  7. Observation of aerosol size distribution and new particle formation at a coastal city in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijuan; Wang, Honglei; Lü, Sheng; Li, Li; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohan; Tian, Xudong; Tang, Qian

    2016-09-15

    Aerosol number size distribution in the range of 10nm-10μm, trace gases (O3, CO, SO2 and NO2), particular matter (PM: PM2.5 and PM10) and meteorological elements were measured from the 1st to the 31st of May, 2015, in the coastal city of Jiaxing in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD). The average number concentration and surface area concentration were 19,639cm(-3) and 427μm(2)cm(-3) during the observation period. The different mode particle concentrations ranked in the order of Aitken mode (12,361cm(-3))>nucleation (4926.7cm(-3))>accumulation (2349.3cm(-3))>coarse mode (1.7cm(-3)). The average concentrations of CO, SO2, NO2, O3, PM2.5 and PM10 were 0.545mgm(-3), 14.7, 35.1, 89.8, 43.5 and 64.6μgm(-3), respectively. Eight precipitation processes and 15 new particle formation (NPF) events (3 NPF events occurred on a rainy day) were observed. Results show that the precipitation process had greater scavenging effects on particles smaller than 120nm and larger than 2μm. The spectral distributions of number concentrations were unimodal at different weather conditions, with peaks at 20nm, 40-60nm, 50-80nm on NPF days, rainy days and normal days. During the NPF events, the formation rate (FR), growth rate (GR), condensational sink (CS), vapor source rate (Q) and condensing vapor concentration (C) were in the range of 4.0-17.0cm(-3)s(-1), 2.2-15.7nmh(-1), 1.5-5.8×10(-2)s(-1), 0.5-7.7×10(6)cm(-3)s(-1) and 3.0-21.5×10(7)cm(-3), with mean values of 9.6cm(-3)s(-1), 6.8nmh(-1), 3.4×10(-2)s(-1), 3.3×10(6)cm(-3)s(-1) and 9.4×10(7)cm(-3), respectively. NPF events normally occurred under clean atmospheric conditions with low PM concentrations but high levels of trace gases. It was also found that SO2 plays an important role in NPF and growth in Jiaxing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Connections between atmospheric sulphuric acid and new particle formation during QUEST III–IV campaigns in Heidelberg and Hyytiälä

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Riipinen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the connections between atmospheric sulphuric acid and new particle formation during QUEST III and BACCI/QUEST IV campaigns. The campaigns have been conducted in Heidelberg (2004 and Hyytiälä (2005, the first representing a polluted site surrounded by deciduous forest, and the second a rural site in a boreal forest environment. We have studied the role of sulphuric acid in particle formation and growth by determining 1 the power-law dependencies between sulphuric acid ([H2SO4], and particle concentrations (N3–6 or formation rates at 1 nm and 3 nm (J1 and J3; 2 the time delays between [H2SO4] and N3–6 or J3, and the growth rates for 1–3 nm particles; 3 the empirical nucleation coefficients A and K in relations J1=A[H2SO4] and J1=K[H2SO4]2, respectively; 4 theoretical predictions for J1 and J3 for the days when no significant particle formation is observed, based on the observed sulphuric acid concentrations and condensation sinks. In both environments, N3–6 or J3 and [H2SO4] were linked via a power-law relation with exponents typically ranging from 1 to 2. The result suggests that the cluster activation theory and kinetic nucleation have the potential to explain the observed particle formation. However, some differences between the sites existed: The nucleation coefficients were about an order of magnitude greater in Heidelberg than in Hyytiälä conditions. The time lags between J3 and [H2SO4] were consistently lower than the corresponding delays between N3–6 and [H2SO4]. The exponents in the J3∝[H2SO4 ]nJ3-connection were consistently higher than or equal to the exponents in the relation N3–6∝[H2SO4 ]nN36. In the J1 values, no significant differences were found between the observed rates on particle formation event days and the predictions on non-event days. The J3 values predicted by the cluster activation or kinetic nucleation hypotheses, on the other hand, were considerably lower on non-event days

  9. New particle formation in the fresh flue-gas plume from a coal-fired power plant: effect of flue-gas cleaning

    OpenAIRE

    Mylläri, Fanni; Asmi, Eija; Anttila, Tatu; Saukko, Erkka; Vakkari, Ville; Pirjola, Liisa; HILLAMO, RISTO; Laurila, Tuomas; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Lihavainen, Heikki; O'Connor, Ewan; Niemelä, Ville; Keskinen, Jorma; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric emissions, including particle number and size distribution, from a 726 MWth coal-fired power plant were studied experimentally from a power plant stack and flue-gas plume dispersing in the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted under two different flue-gas cleaning conditions. The results were utilized in a plume dispersion and dilution model taking into account particle formation precursor (H2SO4 resulted from the oxidation of emitted SO2) and assessment rela...

  10. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  11. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2 (MCMv3.2), an aerosol dynamics and particle-phase chemistry module (which considers acid-catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion-limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study (1) the evaporation of liquid dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, (2) the slow and almost particle-size-independent evaporation of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, (3) the mass-transfer-limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), and (4) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. In the smog chamber experiments, these salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar-like amorphous-phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if the concentration of low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material at the particle surface increases upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass-transfer-limited uptake of condensable organic compounds

  12. Sodium Caseinate-Carrageenan Biopolymeric Nanocomplexes as a Carrier of Vitamin D: Study of Complex Formation, Particles Size and Encapsulation Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoshmanzar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protein-polysaccharide complex-based nanocapsule is one type of polymeric nanocarrier which can be potentially useful for encapsulation of hydrophobic nutraceuticals. In this research, caseinate-carrageenan complex was used for encapsulation of vitamin D. The complex formation between caseinate and carrageenan was carried out by lowering the pH under isoelectric point of protein. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and differential scanning colorimetry (DSC confirmed complex formation between carrageenan, caseinate and vitamin D. The particle size of 1% caseinate particles was in the range of 150-300 nanometer and by addition of vitamin D the particle size increased to 450-750 nanometer. Moreover, carrageenan of all concentrations (at constant concentration of caseinate (1% and pH4.9 resulted in lower particle size below 100 nanometer. The stability of caseinate and its complex formation with carrageenan showed that encapsulation was achieved at 45% efficiency and also vitamin D stability (during 5 days storage was higher in nanocomplex compared to pure caseinate particles (60-63% compared to 53%. The complex formation between caseinate and carrageenan was carried out by pH decreasing under isoelectric point of protein. The FTIR and DSC confirmed complex formation between carrageenan, caseinate and vitamin D. The particle size of caseinate 1% particles were in the range of 150 -300 nanometer and with adding vitamin D, particle size increased to 450-750 nanometer. Moreover, adding carrageenan at all used concentration (at constant concentration of caseinate (1% and pH4.9 resulted in reduced particle size to less than 100 nanometer and vitamin D stability (during 5 days storage was higher (60-63% in nanocomplex compared to pure caseinate particles (53%.The protein-polysaccharide complex based nanocapsule is one type of the polymeric nanocarriers which can potentially be used for encapsulation of hydrophobic nutraceuticals. In

  13. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Z.H.; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, IK

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examined the co-formation of hydrogen peroxide and other hydroperoxides (collectively presented as H2O2*) as well as submicron particles, including ultra-fine particles (UFP), resulting from the reactions of ozone (O-3) with a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs...... in the O-3/23 VOCs system. The present study confirmed the findings of a previous study carried out in a real-world office and generated new findings regarding co-formation of UFP. Through a comparative analysis of H2O2* yields under different reaction conditions, this study demonstrates that VOCs co...

  14. Mechanistic Investigation on Grinding-induced Subvisible Particle Formation during Mixing and Filling of Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikanga, Benson; Hui, Ada; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2017-10-12

    Processing equipment involving grinding of two solid surfaces has been demonstrated to induce subvisible particle (SvP) formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug product manufacturing processes. This study elucidated potential stress types associated with grinding action to identify the stress mechanism responsible for SvP formation. Several potential stress types can be associated with the grinding action, including interfacial stresses (air-liquid and liquid-solid), hydraulic/mechanical shear stress, cavitation, nucleation of stressed protein molecules, and localized thermal stress. More than one stress type can synergically impact mAb product quality, making it challenging to determine the primary mode of stress. Our strategy was to assess and rule out some stress types through platform knowledge, rational judgments or via small-scale models, for example, rheometer/rotator-stator homogenizer for hydraulic/mechanical shear stress, sonicator for cavitation, etc. These models may not provide direct evidence but can offer rational correlations. Cavitation, as demonstrated by sonication, proved to be quite detrimental to mAb molecules in forming not just SvPs but also soluble high molecular-weight species (HMWs) as well as low molecular-weight species (LMWs). This outcome was not consistent with that of grinding mAbs between the impeller and the drive unit of a bottom-mounted mixer or between the piston and the housing of a rotary piston pump, both of which formed only SVPs without obvious HMWs and LMWs. In addition, a p-nitrophenol model suggested that cavitation in the bottom-mounted mixer is barely detectable. We attributed the grinding induced, localized thermal effect to be the primary stress to SvP formation based on a high-temperature, spray-drying model. The heat effect of spray drying also caused SvPs, in the absence of significant HMWS and LMWS in spray-dried mAb powders. This investigation provides a mechanistic understanding of the underlying stress

  15. Spatial extent of new particle formation events over the Mediterranean Basin from multiple ground-based and airborne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Berland

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, new particle formation (NPF, i.e., the formation of new particle clusters from gas-phase compounds followed by their growth to the 10–50 nm size range, has been extensively observed in the atmosphere at a given location, but their spatial extent has rarely been assessed. In this work, we use aerosol size distribution measurements performed simultaneously at Ersa (Corsica and Finokalia (Crete over a 1-year period to analyze the occurrence of NPF events in the Mediterranean area. The geographical location of these two sites, as well as the extended sampling period, allows us to assess the spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric nucleation at a regional scale. Finokalia and Ersa show similar seasonalities in the monthly average nucleation frequencies, growth rates, and nucleation rates, although the two stations are located more than 1000 km away from each other. Within this extended period, aerosol size distribution measurements were performed during an intensive campaign (3 July to 12 August 2013 from a ground-based station on the island of Mallorca, as well as onboard the ATR-42 research aircraft. This unique combination of stationary and mobile measurements provides us with detailed insights into the horizontal and vertical development of the NPF process on a daily scale. During the intensive campaign, nucleation events occurred simultaneously both at Ersa and Mallorca over delimited time slots of several days, but different features were observed at Finokalia. The results show that the spatial extent of the NPF events over the Mediterranean Sea might be as large as several hundreds of kilometers, mainly determined by synoptic conditions. Airborne measurements gave additional information regarding the origin of the clusters detected above the sea. The selected cases depicted contrasting situations, with clusters formed in the marine boundary layer or initially nucleated above the continent or in

  16. Regional coverage of contrails from satellite data and their radiative forcing; Regionale Kondensstreifen-Bedeckung aus Satellitendaten und ihr Einfluss auf den Strahlungshaushalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, R.

    2000-07-01

    An operational contrail detection algorithm is applied to day and night overpasses of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). From the classification results the daytime and nighttime coverage by linear shaped contrails over Western Europa is derived. The annual daytime average for the analyzed region of 0.75% shows a strong annual cycle with 1.0% coverage during winter and 0.4% during summer. The day/night ratio reaches the factor 3. Using the radiance contrasts in the 11 {mu}m channel for contrail and adjacent pixels an average visible optical depth for the observed contrails of 0.1 is derived. This leads to an annual mean top of atmosphere radiative forcing by contrails over Central Europe in the range of 0.03 W/m{sup 2} to 0.08 W/m{sup 2}, which is about one magnitude smaller than prior studies suggest. The highest annual mean contrail forcing exceeds 0.12 W/m{sup 2} over Northeastern France, Belgium, Great Britain and Hungary. (orig.) [German] Ein operationelles Kondensstreifen-Erkennungsverfahren wird auf Tag- und Nacht-Ueberfluege des Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) angewandt. Aus den Klassifizierungsergebnissen wird die mittaegliche und naechtliche Bedeckung durch linienhafte Kondensstreifen ueber Westeuropa abgeleitet. Das Jahresmittel der Bedeckung am Tag betraegt 0,75% und zeigt einen ausgepraegten Jahresgang mit 1% im Winter und 0,4% im Sommer, sowie einen starken Tag/Nacht-Unterschied mit einer Amplitude von 3. Mit Hilfe von Strahldichtekontrasten im 11 {mu}m Kanal zwischen Kondensstreifen und benachbarten Pixeln wird fuer die erkannten Kondensstreifen eine durchschnittliche optische Dicke im sichtbaren Spektralbereich von 0,1 abgeschaetzt. Daraus ergibt sich am Oberrand der Atmosphaere ein mittlerer auf Kondensstreifen zurueckzufuehrender Strahlungsantrieb zwischen 0,03 W/m{sup 2} und 0,08 W/m{sup 2}, was eine Groessenordnung unter den Ergebnissen bisheriger Studien liegt. Die hoechsten Jahresmittel mit mehr als 0,12 W

  17. Size-resolved aerosol emission factors and new particle formation/growth activity occurring in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kalafut-Pettibone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the aerosol size distribution from 11 nm to 2.5 microns were made in Mexico City in March 2006, during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations field campaign. Observations at the urban supersite, referred to as T0, could often be characterized by morning conditions with high particle mass concentrations, low mixing heights, and highly correlated particle number and CO2 concentrations, indicative that particle number is controlled by primary emissions. Average size-resolved and total number- and volume-based emission factors for combustion sources impacting T0 have been determined using a comparison of peak sizes in particle number and CO2 concentration. Peaks are determined by subtracting the measured concentration from a calculated baseline concentration time series. The number emission and volume emission factors for particles from 11 nm to 494 nm are 1.56 × 1015 particles, and 9.48 × 1011 cubic microns per kg of carbon, respectively. The uncertainty of the number emission factor is approximately plus or minus 50 %. The mode of the number emission factor was between 25 and 32 nm, while the mode of the volume factor was between 0.25 and 0.32 microns. These emission factors are reported as log normal model parameters and are compared with multiple emission factors from the literature. In Mexico City in the afternoon, the CO2 concentration drops during ventilation of the polluted layer, and the coupling between CO2 and particle number breaks down, especially during new particle formation events when particle number is no longer controlled by primary emissions. Using measurements of particle number and CO2 taken aboard the NASA DC-8, the determined primary emission factor was applied to the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA plume to quantify the degree of secondary particle formation in the plume; the primary emission

  18. Size-resolved aerosol emission factors and new particle formation/growth activity occurring in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalafut-Pettibone A. J.; Wang J.; Eichinger, W. E.; Clarke, A.; Vay, S. A.; Blake, D. R.; Stanier, C. O.

    2011-09-01

    Measurements of the aerosol size distribution from 11 nm to 2.5 microns were made in Mexico City in March 2006, during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign. Observations at the urban supersite, referred to as T0, could often be characterized by morning conditions with high particle mass concentrations, low mixing heights, and highly correlated particle number and CO{sub 2} concentrations, indicative that particle number is controlled by primary emissions. Average size-resolved and total number- and volume-based emission factors for combustion sources impacting T0 have been determined using a comparison of peak sizes in particle number and CO{sub 2} concentration. Peaks are determined by subtracting the measured concentration from a calculated baseline concentration time series. The number emission and volume emission factors for particles from 11 nm to 494 nm are 1.56 x 10{sup 15} particles, and 9.48 x 10{sup 11} cubic microns per kg of carbon, respectively. The uncertainty of the number emission factor is approximately plus or minus 50 %. The mode of the number emission factor was between 25 and 32 nm, while the mode of the volume factor was between 0.25 and 0.32 microns. These emission factors are reported as log normal model parameters and are compared with multiple emission factors from the literature. In Mexico City in the afternoon, the CO{sub 2} concentration drops during ventilation of the polluted layer, and the coupling between CO{sub 2} and particle number breaks down, especially during new particle formation events when particle number is no longer controlled by primary emissions. Using measurements of particle number and CO{sub 2} taken aboard the NASA DC-8, the determined primary emission factor was applied to the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) plume to quantify the degree of secondary particle formation in the plume; the primary emission factor accounts for less than 50 % of the total particle

  19. Radar chart array analysis to visualize effects of formulation variables on IgG1 particle formation as measured by multiple analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Cavan; Kumru, Ozan S; Kim, Jae Hyun; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B

    2013-12-01

    This study presents a novel method to visualize protein aggregate and particle formation data to rapidly evaluate the effect of solution and stress conditions on the physical stability of an immunoglobulin G (IgG) 1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Radar chart arrays were designed so that hundreds of microflow digital imaging (MFI) solution measurements, evaluating different mAb formulations under varying stresses, could be presented in a single figure with minimal loss of data resolution. These MFI radar charts show measured changes in subvisible particle number, size, and morphology distribution as a change in the shape of polygons. Radar charts were also created to visualize mAb aggregate and particle formation across a wide size range by combining data sets from size-exclusion chromatography, Archimedes resonant mass measurements, and MFI. We found that the environmental/mechanical stress condition (e.g., heat vs. agitation) was the most important factor in influencing the particle size and morphology distribution with this IgG1 mAb. Additionally, the presence of NaCl exhibited a pH and stress-dependent behavior resulting in promotion or inhibition mAb particle formation. This data visualization technique provides a comprehensive analysis of the aggregation tendencies of this IgG1 mAb in different formulations with varying stresses as measured by different analytical techniques. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  20. Application of radar chart array analysis to visualize effects of formulation variables on IgG1 particle formation as measured by multiple analytical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Cavan; Kumru, Ozan S.; Kim, Jae Hyun; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a novel method to visualize protein aggregate and particle formation data to rapidly evaluate the effect of solution and stress conditions on the physical stability of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Radar chart arrays were designed so that hundreds of Microflow Digital Imaging (MFI) solution measurements, evaluating different mAb formulations under varying stresses, could be presented in a single figure with minimal loss of data resolution. These MFI radar charts show measured changes in subvisible particle number, size and morphology distribution as a change in the shape of polygons. Radar charts were also created to visualize mAb aggregate and particle formation across a wide size range by combining data sets from size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Archimedes resonant mass measurements, and MFI. We found that the environmental/mechanical stress condition (e.g., heat vs. agitation) was the most important factor in influencing the particle size and morphology distribution with this IgG1 mAb. Additionally, the presence of NaCl exhibited a pH and stress dependent behavior resulting in promotion or inhibition mAb particle formation. This data visualization technique provides a comprehensive analysis of the aggregation tendencies of this IgG1 mAb in different formulations with varying stresses as measured by different analytical techniques. PMID:24122556

  1. The NO and N{sub 2}O formation mechanism under circulating fluidized bed combustor conditions: from the single particle to the pilot-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, F.; Loeffler, G.; Wartha, C.; Hofbauer, H. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, (Austria); Preto, F.; Anthony, E. J. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1999-04-01

    The mechanism of NO and N{sub 2}O formation is studied, starting with a single fuel particle burning under well-defined conditions up to a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). The single particle test was focused on the formation chemistry, and a single particle NO/N{sub 2}O formation model was developed and tested and incorporated into a CFBC NO/N{sub 2}O emission model. The fuel, petroleum coke, was the same in all tests and care has been taken to obtain chemical similarity between the different units, i.e. a formation rate unit, a laboratory-scale and a pilot-scale CFBC. To thoroughly test the modeled NO/N{sub 2}O mechanism and to confirm that chemical similarity exists between the different units, the iodine addition method has been used in the single particle tests, in the batch tests, in the laboratory-scale and the pilot-scale CFBC tests. 52 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  2. Formation of hydroxyl radical from San Joaquin Valley particles extracted in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM are linked to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by PM in cardiopulmonary tissues. While hydroxyl radical (OH is the most reactive of the ROS species, there are few quantitative studies of OH generation from PM. Here we report on OH formation from PM collected at an urban (Fresno and rural (Westside site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV of California. We quantified OH in PM extracts using a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc. The results show that generally the urban Fresno PM generates much more OH than the rural Westside PM. The presence of Asc at a physiologically relevant concentration in the extraction solution greatly enhances OH formation from all the samples. Fine PM (PM2.5 generally makes more OH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e. with diameters of 2.5 to 10 μm normalized by air volume collected, while the coarse PM typically generates more OH normalized by PM mass. OH production by SJV PM is reduced on average by (97 ± 6 % when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF is added to the extraction solution, indicating a dominant role of transition metals. By measuring calibration curves of OH generation from copper and iron, and quantifying copper and iron concentrations in our particle extracts, we find that PBS-soluble copper is primarily responsible for OH production by the SJV PM, while iron often makes a significant contribution. Extrapolating our results to expected burdens of PM-derived OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily PM exposures in the San Joaquin Valley are unlikely to result in a high amount of pulmonary OH, although high

  3. Formation of flower- or cake-shaped stereocomplex particles from the stereo multiblock copoly(rac-lactide)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junli; Tang, Zhaohui; Qiu, Xueyu; Pang, Xuan; Yang, Yongkun; Chen, Xuesi; Jing, Xiabin

    2005-01-01

    Flower- or cake-shaped particles with uniform particle size ranging from nanometers to micrometers were prepared from the stereo multiblock copoly(rac-lactide)s (smb-PLAs) by precipitating the polymer from its solution in methylene chloride/ethanol via three different methods: slowly lowering the solution temperature, slowly evaporating the solvent, and slowly adding a nonsolvent. Under the same condition, sheet-shaped crystals in 10 mum size but not particles were obtained from the pure PLLA with almost the same molecular weight. Electron diffraction and WAXD data demonstrated that the stereocomplex particles belonged to the monoclinic system. All three methods resulted in particles with identical morphology and almost the same particle size. At a given stereoregularity of 88%, as the molecular weight of the polymer increased from 8700 to 23,200 Da, the crystallinity decreased, the particle morphology changed from flower-shaped to cake-shaped, and the diameter and height of the particles increased from 0.8 and 0.45 to 3.6 microm and 2.0 microm, respectively. The initial concentration of the polymer solution influenced the particle size slightly but affected the morphology markedly. On the basis of the above experimental observations, it was proposed that the smb-PLA particles of flower- or cake-shape were formed in four steps: (1) complexation in solution of the smb-PLA chains; (2) particle nucleation; (3) particle growth in the width direction; and (4) particle growth in the height direction. The curvature of the paired smb-PLA chains and the inner stress governed the particle size, and the interconnection between the neighboring particles determined the layered structure and the package density of the particles formed.

  4. CONTRAILS: A tool for rapid identification of transgene integration sites in complex, repetitive genomes using low-coverage paired-end sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambirth, Kevin C.; Whaley, Adam M.; Schlueter, Jessica A.; Bost, Kenneth L.; Piller, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crops have become a staple in modern agriculture, and are typically characterized using a variety of molecular techniques involving proteomics and metabolomics. Characterization of the transgene insertion site is of great interest, as disruptions, deletions, and genomic location can affect product selection and fitness, and identification of these regions and their integrity is required for regulatory agencies. Here, we present CONTRAILS (Characterization of Transgene Insertion Locations with Sequencing), a straightforward, rapid and reproducible method for the identification of transgene insertion sites in highly complex and repetitive genomes using low coverage paired-end Illumina sequencing and traditional PCR. This pipeline requires little to no troubleshooting and is not restricted to any genome type, allowing use for many molecular applications. Using whole genome sequencing of in-house transgenic Glycine max, a legume with a highly repetitive and complex genome, we used CONTRAILS to successfully identify the location of a single T-DNA insertion to single base resolution. PMID:26697366

  5. Simultaneous measurements of new particle formation at 1 s time resolution at a street site and a rooftop site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is the first to use two identical Fast Mobility Particle Sizers for simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions (PNSDs at a street site and a rooftop site within 500 m distance in wintertime and springtime to investigate new particle formation (NPF in Beijing. The collected datasets at 1 s time resolution allow deduction of the freshly emitted traffic particle signal from the measurements at the street site and thereby enable the evaluation of the effects on NPF in an urban atmosphere through a site-by-site comparison. The number concentrations of 8 to 20 nm newly formed particles and the apparent formation rate (FR in the springtime were smaller at the street site than at the rooftop site. In contrast, NPF was enhanced in the wintertime at the street site with FR increased by a factor of 3 to 5, characterized by a shorter NPF time and higher new particle yields than at the rooftop site. Our results imply that the street canyon likely exerts distinct effects on NPF under warm or cold ambient temperature conditions because of on-road vehicle emissions, i.e., stronger condensation sinks that may be responsible for the reduced NPF in the springtime but efficient nucleation and partitioning of gaseous species that contribute to the enhanced NPF in the wintertime. The occurrence or absence of apparent growth for new particles with mobility diameters larger than 10 nm was also analyzed. The oxidization of biogenic organics in the presence of strong photochemical reactions is suggested to play an important role in growing new particles with diameters larger than 10 nm, but sulfuric acid is unlikely to be the main species for the apparent growth. However, the number of datasets used in this study is relatively small, and larger datasets are essential to draw a general conclusion.

  6. New particle formation in the fresh flue-gas plume from a coal-fired power plant: effect of flue-gas cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mylläri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric emissions, including particle number and size distribution, from a 726 MWth coal-fired power plant were studied experimentally from a power plant stack and flue-gas plume dispersing in the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted under two different flue-gas cleaning conditions. The results were utilized in a plume dispersion and dilution model taking into account particle formation precursor (H2SO4 resulted from the oxidation of emitted SO2 and assessment related to nucleation rates. The experiments showed that the primary emissions of particles and SO2 were effectively reduced by flue-gas desulfurization and fabric filters, especially the emissions of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Primary pollutant concentrations reached background levels in 200–300 s. However, the atmospheric measurements indicated that new particles larger than 2.5 nm are formed in the flue-gas plume, even in the very early phases of atmospheric ageing. The effective number emission of nucleated particles were several orders of magnitude higher than the primary particle emission. Modelling studies indicate that regardless of continuing dilution of the flue gas, nucleation precursor (H2SO4 from SO2 oxidation concentrations remain relatively constant. In addition, results indicate that flue-gas nucleation is more efficient than predicted by atmospheric aerosol modelling. In particular, the observation of the new particle formation with rather low flue-gas SO2 concentrations changes the current understanding of the air quality effects of coal combustion. The results can be used to evaluate optimal ways to achieve better air quality, particularly in polluted areas like India and China.

  7. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for human serum albumin based nanoparticle characterisation and a deeper insight into particle formation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C; Langer, K

    2014-06-13

    Nanoparticles used as drug delivery systems are of growing interest in the pharmaceutical field. Understanding the behaviour and effects of nanosystems in the human body is dependent on comprehensive characterisation of the systems especially with regard to size and size distribution. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) is a promising method for this challenge as this technique enables chromatographic separation of particles and solute molecules according to their respective size. Within this study AF4 was used for the characterisation of human serum albumin (HSA) based nanoparticles. In a first part, the most important aspects of method development like the choice of cross flow rate, focusing and the increase of sample concentration via outlet stream splitting on the sample separation were evaluated. Sample fractionation was controlled by inline-coupling of a dynamic light scattering detector (DLS, Zetasizer) and was confirmed by DLS batch mode measurements. In a second part the applicability of field-flow fractionation for characterisation of the HSA particle formation process by a desolvation method was evaluated. A time dependent particle formation was observed which was controlled by the amount of desolvating agent. Furthermore, field-flow fractionation in combination with in-line dynamic light scattering was used to monitor the increase of particle diameter during PEGylation of the resulting HSA nanoparticles. The separation of nanoparticles from dissolved polyethylene glycol (PEG) could successfully be used for determination of the particles' PEGylation degree. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. FORMATION OF THE INITIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PLASMA COMPONENTS ON THE PHASE PLANE OF LARGE PARTICLES METHOD IN ELECTRIC ARC SYNTHESIS CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Abramov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the modeling of charged particles in a multicomponent plasma of electric arc discharge with binary collisions in the synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNS. One of the common methods of obtaining the quality of fullerenes and nanotubes is arc synthesis under inert gas (helium. The determination of the necessary conditions and the mechanism of formation of carbon clusters in the plasma forming set CNS will more effectively and efficiently manage this process. Feature of the problem is that in a plasma arc discharge is a large number of particle interactions and on the cathode surface. Due to the high temperatures and high energy concentration in plasma detailed experimental investigation difficult to carry out. With the aim of avoiding difficult and costly physical experiments developed numerical methods for the analysis of plasma processes. In this article to solve a system of equations of Maxwell - Boltzmann basis for the authors had taken the method of large particles, which reduces the amount of computation and reduce the demands on computing resources. The authors cites the general design scheme of the large particles, and the algorithm of particle distribution of a multicomponent plasma in the phase plane at the initial time. In conclusion, the author argues that the results in the future will define the zone satisfies the energy conditions, the probability of formation of a plasma cluster groups of carbon involved in the synthesis of the CNS.

  9. Secondary Organic Aerosol Coating Formation and Evaporation: Chamber Studies Using Black Carbon Seed Aerosol and the Single-Particle Soot Photometer

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, Andrew R.; Loza, Christine L.; Coggon, Matthew M.; Craven, Jill S; Haflidi H. Jonsson; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02786826.2012.750712 We report a protocol for using black carbon (BC) aerosol as the seed for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in an environmental chamber. We employ a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) to probe single-particle SOA coating growth dynamics and find that SOA growth on nonspherical BC aerosol is diffusion- limited. Aerosol composition measurements with an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-...

  10. Impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: a numerical study with the WRF-Chem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Vela, A.; Andrade, M. F.; Kumar, P.; Ynoue, R. Y.; Muñoz, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 µm in diameter) in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) in Brazil, where ethanol is used intensively as a fuel in road vehicles. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model, which simulates feedbacks between meteorological variables and chemical species, is used as a photochemical modelling tool to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to the evolution of number and mass size distribution of particles through gas-to-particle conversion. A vehicular emission model based on statistical information of vehicular activity is applied to simulate vehicular emissions over the studied area. The simulation has been performed for a 1-month period (7 August-6 September 2012) to cover the availability of experimental data from the NUANCE-SPS (Narrowing the Uncertainties on Aerosol and Climate Changes in Sao Paulo State) project that aims to characterize emissions of atmospheric aerosols in the SPMA. The availability of experimental measurements of atmospheric aerosols and the application of the WRF-Chem model made it possible to represent some of the most important properties of fine particles in the SPMA such as the mass size distribution and chemical composition, besides allowing us to evaluate its formation potential through the gas-to-particle conversion processes. Results show that the emission of primary gases, mostly from vehicles, led to a production of secondary particles between 20 and 30 % in relation to the total mass concentration of PM2.5 in the downtown SPMA. Each of PM2.5 and primary natural aerosol (dust and sea salt) contributed with 40-50 % of the total PM10 (i.e. those ≤ 10 µm in diameter) concentration. Over 40 % of the formation of fine particles, by mass, was due to the emission of hydrocarbons, mainly aromatics. Furthermore, an increase in the number of small particles impaired the

  11. Effect of primary particle size on spray formation, morphology and internal structure of alumina granules and elucidation of flowability and compaction behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandu Ramavath

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Three different alumina powders with varying particle sizes were subjected to spray drying under identical conditions and effect of particle size on heat transfer efficiency and mechanism of formation of granules was elucidated. Morphology, internal structure and size distribution of granules were studied and evaluated with respect to their flow behaviour. In order to estimate the elastic interaction of granules, the granules were subjected to compaction under progressive loading followed by periodic unloading. Compaction curves were plotted and compressibility factor was estimated and correlated with predicted and measured green density values.

  12. Non-hydrolytic formation of silica and polysilsesquioxane particles from alkoxysilane monomers with formic acid in toluene/tetrahydrofuran solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boday, Dylan J.; Tolbert, Stephanie; Keller, Michael W.; Li, Zhe; Wertz, Jason T.; Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A.

    2014-03-01

    Silica and polysilsesquioxane particles are used as fillers in composites, catalyst supports, chromatographic separations media, and even as additives to cosmetics. The particles are generally prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraalkoxysilanes and/or organotrialkoxysilanes, respectively, in aqueous alcohol solutions. In this study, we have discovered a new, non-aqueous approach to prepare silica and polysilsesquioxane particles. Spherical, nearly monodisperse, silica particles (600-6,000 nm) were prepared from the reaction of tetramethoxysilane with formic acid (4-8 equivalents) in toluene or toluene/tetrahydrofuran solutions. Polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes with formic acid failed to afford particles, but bridged polysilsesquioxane particles were obtained from monomers with two trialkoxysilyl group attached to an organic-bridging group. The mild acidic conditions allowed particles to be prepared from monomers, such as bis(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)tetrasulfide, which are unstable to Stöber or base-catalyzed emulsion polymerization conditions. The bridged polysilsesquioxane particles were generally less spherical and more polydisperse than silica particles. Both silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles could be prepared in good yields at monomer concentrations considerably higher than used in Stöber or emulsion approaches.

  13. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION IN THE RAT LUNG AFTER EXPOSURE TO AN EMISSION SOURCE AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to air pollution particles can be associated with increased human morbidity and mortality. The mechanism(s) of lung injury remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that lung exposure to oil fly ash (an emission source air pollution particle) causes in vivo free radical ...

  14. Existence Conditions and Formation Process of Second Type of Spiral Loop Particle Accumulation Structure (SL-2 PAS) in Half-zone Liquid Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, A.; Gotoda, M.; Kaneko, T.; Ueno, I.

    2017-08-01

    We focus on unique phenomena known as particle accumulation structure (PAS), especially on the conditions of the existence for second-type spiral loop PAS (SL-2 PAS) and on their formation processes under normal gravity. We investigate the existence conditions as functions the aspect ratio of the liquid bridge and the Marangoni number, the intensity of the thermocapillary effect. We discuss the differences among SL-1 PAS, SL-2 PAS and the flow field without PAS through observation of the solid-like structures of the PAS in a rotating frame of reference with the hydrothermal wave, and through monitoring of the surface temperature by infrared camera. We evaluate the formation time of PAS by employing a modified accumulation measure by considering the effect of the particles' size.

  15. The effect of the electronic structure, phase transition, and localized dynamics of atoms in the formation of tiny particles of gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Mubarak, E-mail: mubarak74@comsats.edu.pk, E-mail: mubarak74@mail.com [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Lin, I-Nan [Tamkang University, Department of Physics (China)

    2017-01-15

    In addition to self-governing properties, tiny-sized particles of metallic colloids are the building blocks of large-sized particles; thus, their study has been the subject of a large number of publications. In the present work, it has been discussed that geometry structure of tiny particle made through atom-to-atom amalgamation depends on attained dynamics of gold atoms along with protruded orientations. The localized process conditions direct two-dimensional structure of a tiny particle at atomically flat air-solution interface while heating locally dynamically approached atoms, thus, negate the role of van der Waals interactions. At electronphoton-solution interface, impinging electrons stretch or deform atoms of tiny particles depending on the mechanism of impingement. In addition, to strike regular grid of electrons ejected on split of atoms not executing excitations and de-excitations of their electrons, atoms of tiny particles also deform or stretch while occupying various sites depending on the process of synergy. Under suitable impinging electron streams, those tiny particles in monolayer two-dimensional structure electron states of their atoms are diffused in the direction of transferred energy, thus, coincide to the next adjacent atoms in each one-dimensional array dealing the same sort of behavior. Instantaneously, photons of adequate energy propagate on the surfaces of such electronic structures and modify those into smooth elements, thus, disregard the phenomenon of localized surface plasmons. This study highlights the fundamental process of formation of tiny particles where the role of localized dynamics of atoms and their electronic structure along with interaction to light are discussed. Such a tool of processing materials, in nonequilibrium pulse-based process, opens a number of possibilities to develop engineered materials with specific chemical, optical, and electronic properties.

  16. Aerosol vertical distribution, new particle formation, and jet aircraft particle emissions in the free troposhere and tropopause region; Vertikalverteilung und Neubildungsprozesse des Aerosols und partikelfoermige Flugzeugemissionen in der freien Troposphaere und Tropopausenregion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.P.

    2000-07-01

    A contribution to the understanding of natural and anthropogenously induced particle formation as well as aerosol physical transformation processes within the free troposphere (FT) is introduced. Documentation and interpretation of empirical data relevant with respect to possible climatologic impact of anthropogenous aerosol emissions into the atmosphere is presented. The first section describes new technique for high spatial resolution measurements of ultrafine aerosol particles by condensation nucleus counters (CNCs), a necessary prerequisite for the observation of natural particle formation and jet aircraft emissions. The second section illustrates vertical distribution and variability ranges of the aerosol in the FT and the tropopause region (TP). Typical microphysical states of the atmospheric aerosol within the Northern Hemisphere are documented by means of systematic measurements during more than 60 flight missions. Simple mathematical parameterizations of the aerosol vertical distribution and aerosol size distributions are developed. Important aerosol sources within the FT are localized and possible aerosol formation processes are discussed. The third section is focussed on jet-engine particle emissions within the FT and TP. A unique inflight experiment for detection of extremely high concentrations (>10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}) of extremely small (donw to <3 nm) aerosols inside the exhaust plumes of several jet aircraft is described. Particle emission indices and emission-controlling parameters are deduced. Most important topic is the impact of fuel sulfur content of kerosine on number, size and chemical composition of jet particle emissions. Generalized results are parameterized in form of lognormal aerosol particle size distributions. (orig.) [German] Ein Beitrag zum Verstaendnis natuerlicher und anthropogen induzierter Aerosolneubildung sowie physikalischer Aerosolumwandlung in der freien Troposphaere wird vorgestellt. Empirisch gewonnenes Datenmaterial wird

  17. Black Anatase Formation by Annealing of Amorphous Nanoparticles and the Role of the Ti2O3Shell in Self-Organized Crystallization by Particle Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mengkun; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Wang, Kai; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Tennyson, Wesley D; Cross, Nicholas; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Duscher, Gerd; Eres, Gyula

    2017-07-05

    We use amorphous titania nanoparticle networks produced by pulsed laser vaporization at room temperature as a model system for understanding the mechanism of formation of black titania. Here, we characterize the transformation of amorphous nanoparticles by annealing in pure Ar at 400 °C, the lowest temperature at which black titania was observed. Atomic resolution electron microscopy methods and electron energy loss spectroscopy show that the onset of crystallization occurs by nucleation of an anatase core that is surrounded by an amorphous Ti 2 O 3 shell. The formation of the metastable anatase core before the thermodynamically stable rutile phase occurs according to the Ostwald phase rule. In the second stage the particle size increases by coalescence of already crystallized particles by a self-organized mechanism of crystallization by particle attachment. We show that the Ti 2 O 3 shell plays a critical role in both black titania transformation and functionality. At 400 °C, Ti 2 O 3 hinders the agglomeration of neighboring particles to maintain a high surface-to-volume ratio that is beneficial for enhanced photocatalytic activity. In agreement with previous results, the thin Ti 2 O 3 surface layer acts as a narrow bandgap semiconductor in concert with surface defects to enhance the photocatalytic activity. Our results demonstrate that crystallization by particle attachment can be a highly effective mechanism for optimizing photocatalytic efficiency by controlling the phase, composition, and particle size distribution in a wide range of self-doped defective TiO 2 architectures simply by varying the annealing conditions of amorphous nanoparticles.

  18. Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 observations for the period 2006 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Labuschagne, C.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.

    2013-10-01

    Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into Boreal Eurasia, Temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the period 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and crop lands, accounting for -0.44 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with summer flood/autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of Boreal Eurasia, southeast of Temperate Eurasia and most Tropical Asian areas.

  19. On the roles of sulphuric acid and low-volatility organic vapours in the initial steps of atmospheric new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulphuric acid and organic vapours have been identified as the key components in the ubiquitous secondary new particle formation in the atmosphere. In order to assess their relative contribution and spatial variability, we analysed altogether 36 new particle formation events observed at four European measurement sites during EUCAARI campaigns in 2007–2009. We tested models of several different nucleation mechanisms coupling the formation rate of neutral particles (J with the concentration of sulphuric acid ([H2SO4] or low-volatility organic vapours ([org] condensing on sub-4 nm particles, or with a combination of both concentrations. Furthermore, we determined the related nucleation coefficients connecting the neutral nucleation rate J with the vapour concentrations in each mechanism. The main goal of the study was to identify the mechanism of new particle formation and subsequent growth that minimizes the difference between the modelled and measured nucleation rates. At three out of four measurement sites – Hyytiälä (Finland, Melpitz (Germany and San Pietro Capofiume (Italy – the nucleation rate was closely connected to squared sulphuric acid concentration, whereas in Hohenpeissenberg (Germany the low-volatility organic vapours were observed to be dominant. However, the nucleation rate at the sulphuric acid dominant sites could not be described with sulphuric acid concentration and a single value of the nucleation coefficient, as K in J=K [H2SO4]2, but the median coefficients for different sites varied over an order of magnitude. This inter-site variation was substantially smaller when the heteromolecular homogenous nucleation between H2SO4 and organic vapours was assumed to take place in addition to homogenous nucleation of H2SO4 alone, i.e., J=KSA1[H2SO4

  20. Properties of individual contrails: a compilation of observations and some comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-01-01

    1015 kg−1. The dependence of the data on the observation methods is discussed. We find no obvious indication for significant contributions from spurious particles resulting from shattering of ice crystals on the microphysical probes.

  1. Glass formation and unusual hygroscopic growth of iodic acid solution droplets with relevance for iodine mediated particle formation in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iodine oxide particles are known to nucleate in the marine boundary layer where gas phase molecular iodine and organoiodine species are produced by macroalgae. These ultra-fine particles may then grow through the condensation of other materials to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. There has been some debate over the chemical identity of the initially nucleated particles. In laboratory simulations, hygroscopic measurements have been used to infer that they are composed of insoluble I2O4, while elemental analysis of laboratory generated particles suggests soluble I2O5 or its hydrated form iodic acid, HIO3 (I2O5·H2O. In this paper we explore the response of super-micron sized aqueous iodic acid solution droplets to varying humidity using both Raman microscopy and single particle electrodynamic traps. These measurements reveal that the propensity of an iodic acid solution droplet to crystallise is negligible on drying to ~0% relative humidity (RH. On applying mechanical pressure to these droplets they shatter in a manner consistent with an ultra-viscous liquid or a brittle glass. Water retention in amorphous material at low RH is important for understanding the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles and uptake of other condensable material. Subsequent water uptake between 10 and 20% RH causes their viscosity to reduce sufficiently that the cracked droplets flow and merge. The persistence of iodic acid solution in an amorphous state, rather than a crystalline state, suggests they will more readily accommodate other condensable material and are therefore more likely to grow to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. On increasing the humidity to ~90% the mass of the droplets only increases by ~20% with a corresponding increase in radius of only 6%, which is remarkably small for a highly soluble material. We suggest that the

  2. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA): a study on ultra-fine particle formation and time-resolved chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A; Held, Andreas; Lendl, Bernhard; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    The concurrent presence of high values of organic SOA precursors and reactive halogen species (RHS) at very low ozone concentrations allows the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol, so-called XOA, in maritime areas where high concentrations of RHS are present, especially at sunrise. The present study combines aerosol smog-chamber and aerosol flow-reactor experiments for the characterization of XOA. XOA formation yields from alpha-pinene at low and high concentrations of chlorine as reactive halogen species (RHS) were determined using a 700 L aerosol smog-chamber with a solar simulator. The chemical transformation of the organic precursor during the aerosol formation process and chemical aging was studied using an aerosol flow-reactor coupled to an FTIR spectrometer. The FTIR dataset was analysed using 2D correlation spectroscopy. Chlorine induced homogeneous XOA formation takes place at even 2.5 ppb of molecular chlorine, which was photolysed by the solar simulator. The chemical pathway of XOA formation is characterized by the addition of chlorine and abstraction of hydrogen atoms, causing simultaneous carbon-chlorine bond formation. During further steps of the formation process, carboxylic acids are formed, which cause a SOA-like appearance of XOA. During the ozone-free formation of secondary organic aerosol with RHS a special kind of particulate matter (XOA) is formed, which is afterwards transformed to SOA by atmospheric aging or degradation pathways.

  3. A CFD-DEM study of single bubble formation in gas fluidization of spherical and non-spherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha Siddhartha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble dynamics significantly affect the hydrodynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed since they influence the gas-solid mixing. In this study, simulations using CFD-DEM were carried out to characterize the bubble size and shape for a bubble formed at a single orifice in gas-solid fluidized bed. Impact of parameters such as jet velocity, orifice size and particle shape on bubble equivalent diameter and bubble aspect ratio were analysed and discussed. Bubble equivalent diameter was found to increase with increasing jet velocity, decreasing bed width to orifice width ratio, and particle shape deviating from spherical. The bubble shape illustrated by aspect ratio, was found to elongate more as it rise through the bed and then commence to expand horizontally after it was detached from the orifice. Aspect ratio was found to be closer to a circle for the bubble at higher jet velocity, lower orifice width to bed ratio and for non-spherical particles.

  4. A CFD-DEM study of single bubble formation in gas fluidization of spherical and non-spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Siddhartha; Zhou, Zongyan

    2017-06-01

    Bubble dynamics significantly affect the hydrodynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed since they influence the gas-solid mixing. In this study, simulations using CFD-DEM were carried out to characterize the bubble size and shape for a bubble formed at a single orifice in gas-solid fluidized bed. Impact of parameters such as jet velocity, orifice size and particle shape on bubble equivalent diameter and bubble aspect ratio were analysed and discussed. Bubble equivalent diameter was found to increase with increasing jet velocity, decreasing bed width to orifice width ratio, and particle shape deviating from spherical. The bubble shape illustrated by aspect ratio, was found to elongate more as it rise through the bed and then commence to expand horizontally after it was detached from the orifice. Aspect ratio was found to be closer to a circle for the bubble at higher jet velocity, lower orifice width to bed ratio and for non-spherical particles.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF DISPERSION OF FLOUR’S PARTICLES FROM WHOLE-GRAIN WHEAT AND DISPERSED GRAIN MASS ON STRUCTURE FORMATION OF DOUGH AND BREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Cheshinskii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. On structure of "whipped" bread and dough is influenced by many factors, one of which is a dispersion of particles of flour. In this regard, was determined to investigate the structure formation processes of bread depending on the dispersity of the particles of flour. For this I have chosen two parties coarse whole meal flour from wheat grains with different grain size, select different modes humidity test and the experiment in the mixing-whipping-forming installation. The results of the experiment were obtained graphs showing the dependence of the current strength of the drive and volume weight on the duration of the process of churning the dough. At the stage deposits with increasing wetness of the dough decreases its viscosity and decreases the value of the current intensity. At the stage of churning Pro-comes a saturation test the air, thus decreasing its viscosity and current drive. Properties of dough and bread from different batches were compared. The dough obtained from flour II party, i.e., low dispersion, has a small viscosity, and the bread is slightly moist to the touch. . Thus, the results of the experiment showed that the physic-chemical and colloidal processes in structure formation of dough and bread is higher, the higher dispersity particles of flour, and, consequently, improves the quality of "whipped" bread.

  6. DNA adduct formation and oxidative stress in colon and liver of Big Blue rats after dietary exposure to diesel particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) via the gastrointestinal route may impose risk of cancer in the colon and liver. We investigated the effects of DEP given in the diet to Big Blue rats by quantifying a panel of markers of DNA damage and repair, mutation, oxidative damage to proteins and ...

  7. Removal of Particles from the Supply Air of Ventilation Systems Avoiding the Formation of Sensory Pollution Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    an important role. Sensory pollutants emitted from used filters can have significant adverse impact on occupant performance. Therefore, removal of particles from the supply air of ventilation systems without the subsequent emission of pollutants into the airstream seems to be essential. Correct maintenance...

  8. The relative importance of competing pathways for the formation of high-molecular-weight peroxides in the ozonolysis of organic aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mochida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available High-molecular-weight (HMW organic compounds are an important component of atmospheric particles, although their origins, possibly including in situ formation pathways, remain incompletely understood. This study investigates the formation of HMW organic peroxides through reactions involving stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI's. The model system is methyl oleate (MO mixed with dioctyl adipate (DOA and myristic acid (MA in submicron aerosol particles, and Criegee intermediates are formed by the ozonolysis of the double bond in methyl oleate. An aerosol flow tube coupled to a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS is employed to determine the relative importance of different HMW organic peroxides following the ozonolysis of different mixing mole fractions of MO in DOA and MA. Possible peroxide products include secondary ozonides (SOZ's, α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxides and α-acyloxyalkyl alkyl peroxides (αAAHP-type compounds, diperoxides, and monoperoxide oligomers. Of these, the AMS data identify two SOZ's as major HMW products in the ozonolysis of pure methyl oleate as well as in an inert matrix of DOA to as low as 0.04 mole fraction MO. In comparison, in mixed particles of MO and MA, αAAHP-type compounds form in high yields for MO mole fractions of 0.5 or less, suggesting that SCI's efficiently attack the carboxylic acid group of myristic acid. The reactions of SCI's with carboxylic acid groups to form αAAHP-type compounds therefore compete with those of SCI's with aldehydes to form SOZ's, provided that both types of functionalities are present at significant concentrations. The results therefore suggest that SCI's in atmospheric particles contribute to the transformation of carboxylic acids and other protic groups into HMW organic peroxides.

  9. Intracellular formation of α-synuclein oligomers and the effect of heat shock protein 70 characterized by confocal single particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Johannes [Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases – DZNE, Site Munich, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 17, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hillmer, Andreas S. [Center for Neuropathology and Prion Research, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 23, 81377 Munich (Germany); Högen, Tobias [Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); McLean, Pamela J. [Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Giese, Armin, E-mail: armin.giese@med.uni-muenchen.de [Center for Neuropathology and Prion Research, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 23, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2016-08-12

    Synucleinopathies such as dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson’s disease are characterized by intracellular deposition of pathologically aggregated α-synuclein. The details of the molecular pathogenesis of PD and especially the conditions that lead to intracellular aggregation of α-synuclein and the role of these aggregates in cell death remain unknown. In cell free in vitro systems considerable knowledge about the aggregation processes has been gathered. In comparison, the knowledge about these aggregation processes in cells is far behind. In cells α-synuclein aggregates can be toxic. However, the crucial particle species responsible for decisive steps in pathogenesis such as seeding a continuing aggregation process and triggering cell death remain to be identified. In order to understand the complex nature of intracellular α-synuclein aggregate formation, we analyzed fluorescent particles formed by venus and α-synuclein-venus fusion proteins and α-synuclein-hemi-venus fusion proteins derived from gently lyzed cells. With these techniques we were able to identify and characterize α-synuclein oligomers formed in cells. Especially the use of α-synuclein-hemi-venus fusion proteins enabled us to identify very small α-synuclein oligomers with high sensitivity. Furthermore, we were able to study the molecular effect of heat shock protein 70, which is known to inhibit α-synuclein aggregation in cells. Heat shock protein 70 does not only influence the size of α-synuclein oligomers, but also their quantity. In summary, this approach based on fluorescence single particle spectroscopy, that is suited for high throughput measurements, can be used to detect and characterize intracellularly formed α-synuclein aggregates and characterize the effect of molecules that interfere with α-synuclein aggregate formation. - Highlights: • Single particle spectroscopy detects intracellular formed α-synuclein aggregates. • Fusion proteins allow detection of protein

  10. Continuous syntheses of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles using microwave-assisted core particle formation coupled with galvanic metal displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Masato; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Nishioka, Masateru; Koda, Hidekazu; Sato, Koichi; Miyazawa, Akira; Suzuki, Toshishige M.

    2014-07-01

    Continuous synthesis of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles was performed using flow processes including microwave-assisted Pd (or Cu) core-nanoparticle formation followed by galvanic displacement with a Pt (or Ag) shell. The core-shell structure and the nanoparticle size were confirmed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) observation and EDS elemental mapping. The Pd@Pt nanoparticles with a particle size of 6.5 +/- 0.6 nm and a Pt shell thickness of ca. 0.25 nm were synthesized with appreciably high Pd concentration (Pd 100 mM). This shell thickness corresponds to one atomic layer thickness of Pt encapsulating the Pd core metal. The particle size of core Pd was controlled by tuning the initial concentrations of Na2[PdCl4] and PVP. Core-shell Cu@Ag nanoparticles with a particle size of 90 +/- 35 nm and an Ag shell thickness of ca. 3.5 nm were obtained using similar sequential reactions. Oxidation of the Cu core was suppressed by the coating of Cu nanoparticles with the Ag shell.Continuous synthesis of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles was performed using flow processes including microwave-assisted Pd (or Cu) core-nanoparticle formation followed by galvanic displacement with a Pt (or Ag) shell. The core-shell structure and the nanoparticle size were confirmed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) observation and EDS elemental mapping. The Pd@Pt nanoparticles with a particle size of 6.5 +/- 0.6 nm and a Pt shell thickness of ca. 0.25 nm were synthesized with appreciably high Pd concentration (Pd 100 mM). This shell thickness corresponds to one atomic layer thickness of Pt encapsulating the Pd core metal. The particle size of core Pd was controlled by tuning the initial concentrations of Na2[PdCl4] and PVP. Core-shell Cu@Ag nanoparticles with a particle size of 90 +/- 35 nm and an Ag shell thickness of ca. 3.5 nm were obtained using similar sequential

  11. Seasonal variations of ultra-fine and submicron aerosols in Taipei, Taiwan: implications for particle formation processes in a subtropical urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2016-02-01

    , which was characterized by average particle growth and formation rates of 4.0 ± 1.1 nm h−1 and 1.4 ± 0.8 cm−3 s−1, respectively. The prevalence of new particle formation (NPF in summer was suggested as a result of seasonally enhanced photochemical oxidation of SO2 that contributed to the production of H2SO4, and a low level of PM10 (d ≤ 10 µm that served as the condensation sink. Regarding the sources of aerosol particles, correlation analysis of the PNCs against NOx revealed that the local vehicular exhaust was the dominant contributor of the UFPs throughout the year. Conversely, the Asian pollution outbreaks had significant influence in the PNC of accumulation-mode particles during the seasons of winter monsoons. The results of this study implied the significance of secondary organic aerosols in the seasonal variations of UFPs and the influences of continental pollution outbreaks in the downwind areas of Asian outflows.

  12. Extrusion of single-wall carbon nanotubes via formation of small particles condensed near an arc evaporation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yahachi; Okuda, Mitsumasa; Tomita, Masato; Hayashi, Takayoshi

    1995-04-01

    Single-wall (SW) tubes were produced by co-evaporation of carbon and lanthanum in helium gas and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM samples were collected directly from a space near the arc evaporation source during evaporation. SW tubes growing radially from compound particles were observed 4 cm above the source, but not 2 cm. The 'sea urchin'-like morphology of these tubes were similar to those observed for soot deposited on the inner walls of the reaction chamber, suggesting that soot particles were formed first in the gas phase and SW tubes grew from them before deposition on the chamber wall. The temperature distribution and flow velocity of convection around the source are used for discussion of the growth mechanism of the SW tubes.

  13. Impact of fiber source and feed particle size on swine manure properties related to spontaneous foam formation during anaerobic decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weelden, M B; Andersen, D S; Kerr, B J; Trabue, S L; Pepple, L M

    2016-02-01

    Foam accumulation in deep-pit manure storage facilities is of concern for swine producers because of the logistical and safety-related problems it creates. A feeding trial was performed to evaluate the impact of feed grind size, fiber source, and manure inoculation on foaming characteristics. Animals were fed: (1) C-SBM (corn-soybean meal): (2) C-DDGS (corn-dried distiller grains with solubles); and (3) C-Soybean Hull (corn-soybean meal with soybean hulls) with each diet ground to either fine (374 μm) or coarse (631 μm) particle size. Two sets of 24 pigs were fed and their manure collected. Factors that decreased feed digestibility (larger grind size and increased fiber content) resulted in increased solids loading to the manure, greater foaming characteristics, more particles in the critical particle size range (2-25 μm), and a greater biological activity/potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental evidence of formation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and POC export provoked by dust addition under current and high pCO2 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Justine; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Gazeau, Frédéric; Guieu, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of organic carbon export to the deep ocean, under anthropogenic forcing such as ocean warming and acidification, needs to be investigated in order to evaluate potential positive or negative feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and therefore on climate. As such, modifications of aggregation processes driven by transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) formation have the potential to affect carbon export. The objectives of this study were to experimentally assess the dynamics of organic matter, after the simulation of a Saharan dust deposition event, through the measurement over one week of TEP abundance and size, and to evaluate the effects of ocean acidification on TEP formation and carbon export following a dust deposition event. Three experiments were performed in the laboratory using 300 L tanks filled with filtered seawater collected in the Mediterranean Sea, during two 'no bloom' periods (spring at the start of the stratification period and autumn at the end of this stratification period) and during the winter bloom period. For each experiment, one of the two tanks was acidified to reach pH conditions slightly below values projected for 2100 (~ 7.6-7.8). In both tanks, a dust deposition event of 10 g m-2 was simulated at the surface. Our results suggest that Saharan dust deposition triggered the abiotic formation of TEP, leading to the formation of organic-mineral aggregates. The amount of particulate organic carbon (POC) exported was proportional to the flux of lithogenic particles to the sediment traps. Depending on the season, the POC flux following artificial dust deposition ranged between 38 and 90 mg m-2 over six experimental days. Such variability is likely linked to the seasonal differences in the quality and quantity of TEP-precursors initially present in seawater. Finally, these export fluxes were not significantly different at the completion of the three experiments between the two pH conditions.

  15. Study on the synthesis and formation mechanism of flower-like Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} particles via microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guilin, E-mail: glchen@fjnu.edu.cn [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Manipulation and New Energy Materials, College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 350007 (China); Fujian Provincial Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Semiconductors and Efficient Devices, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Wang, Weihuang; Zhao, Jifu; Yang, Wenyu [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Manipulation and New Energy Materials, College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 350007 (China); Chen, Shuiyuan; Huang, Zhigao [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Manipulation and New Energy Materials, College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 350007 (China); Fujian Provincial Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Semiconductors and Efficient Devices, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Jian, Rongkun; Ruan, Huirong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 350007 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The future development of Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} as an alternative absorber for low cost and high efficiency thin film solar cell depends strongly on the understanding of the formation of mechanism in this system. With this aim, a detailed characterization of Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} particles prepared by microwave irradiation is presented, combining XRD, SEM, and EDX. The development of Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} formation with the increasement of temperature and the prolongation of time are investigated by depth-resolved analysis. Under such conditions, a reaction pathway for the formation of Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} from binary and CuSbS{sub 2} compounds as intermediates is proposed. The experimental data supports a formation mechanism of Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} that proceeds rapidly when the CuSbS{sub 2} react with the remaining binary phases CuS. During reaction Cu is completely consumed, while Sb is lost through the way of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} vapor. - Highlights: • Flower-like Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4} particles were synthesized by microwave irradiation route. • A series of time-dependent experiments were designed to study the growth mechanism of the Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4}. • During reaction, the phase content transitions from rich-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and CuS, through to CuSbS{sub 2}, and finally Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4}. • This work provides a solid platform for further preparation of pure Cu{sub 3}SbS{sub 4}.

  16. Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by Thermal Decomposition: Elucidating Particle Formation by Second-Resolved in Situ Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) by thermal decomposition of iron precursors using oleic acid as surfactant has evolved to a state-of-the-art method to produce monodisperse, spherical NPs. The principles behind such monodisperse syntheses are well-known: the key is a separation between burst nucleation and growth phase, whereas the size of the population is set by the precursor-to-surfactant ratio. Here we follow the thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl in the presence of oleic acid via in situ X-ray scattering. This method allows reaction kinetics and precursor states to be followed with high time resolution and statistical significance. Our investigation demonstrates that the final particle size is directly related to a phase of inorganic cluster formation that takes place between precursor decomposition and particle nucleation. The size and concentration of clusters were shown to be dependent on precursor-to-surfactant ratio and heating rate, which in turn led to differences in the onset of nucleation and concentration of nuclei after the burst nucleation phase. This first direct observation of prenucleation formation of inorganic and micellar structures in iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis by thermal decomposition likely has implications for synthesis of other NPs by similar routes. PMID:28572705

  17. An approach to investigate new particle formation in the vertical direction on the basis of high time-resolution measurements at ground level and sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, H.; Zhu, Y.; Evans, G. J.; Yao, X.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated new particle formation (NPF) in the vertical direction using high time-resolution (1 s) measurements made by Fast Mobility Particle Sizers at ground level and at sea level. The coefficient of variation (CV), i.e., the ratio of standard deviation to mean value for percentiles of CVs associated with horizontal transport were 1-13 times smaller than those during strong vertical transport. We then compared the N100, GMD55 (geometric mean diameter of percentiles of CVs with those corresponding to the 95-100thpercentiles of CVs in five NPF events (Fig. 1). The comparative results are discussed in terms of different formation and growth rates in the vertical direction. The similar analysis was also conducted in various marine atmospheres. We found that the CV metric can improve our understanding of NPF in the vertical direction. Fig. 1 Time series of N100, GMD55, GMD100 corresponding to 95-100th percentile (left panel) and 0-5th percentile of CVs (right panel) for N100 in five NPF events (Case 5-9).

  18. Formation of the texture of fermented milk and cereal product by varying the particle size distribution of cereal compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pas'ko O. V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Combining animal and plant components is a promising direction of creating specialized foods of high biological and nutritional value. In this regard, research aimed at developing a fermented product technology based on combination of raw milk and grain products is relevant. In researches a set of generally accepted standard methods including physical-chemical, microbiological, biochemical, rheological, and mathematical methods of statistical processing of research results and development of mathematical models has been applied. The paper presents the results of research aimed at developing the technology of fermented milk – cereal product. In the first phase of research to substantiate product composition the systematic approach has been applied considering components of the product, changes of their status and properties as the current biotechnological systems (BPS. Selection of the grains' optimum ratio in the composition has been carried out on the basis of a set of indicators: the chemical composition and energy value, the content of B vitamins and dietary fibers, the indicator of biological value, organoleptic characteristics. Analysis of the combined results allows choose cereal flakes composition ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 (Oatmeal : Barley : Rye for further studies. As the main source of carbohydrate honey is used, it also improves the organoleptic properties of the product. Nutritional supplement glycine is used as a modifier of taste and smell. It has been found that introduction of glycine at 0.1 % in the BPS "milk – cereal composition" naturally decreases the intensity of taste and smell of cereal composition. The effect of particle size distribution of cereal composition on properties of the biotechnological system of milky cereal product has been established as well. For technology of the developed product the fraction selected cereal composition (Oatmeal : Barley : Rye as a 1 : 1 : 1 with a particle size of 670–1 000 microns has

  19. Effect of MgCl2 addition on the sintering behavior of MgAl2O4 spinel and formation of nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of MgCl2 addition on the sintering behavior of MgAl2O4 spinel produced via oxide mixture method was investigated. For this reason, the stoichiometric mixture of magnesite and calcined alumina as raw materials was calcined at 1100°C. The calcined mixture was milled, pressed and then, fired at 1300 and 1500°C after addition of various amounts of MgCl2. Besides, the physical properties, phase composition and microstructure of fired samples were investigated. The results showed that MgCl2 addition has great effect on the densification and particle size of spinel. Besides, MgCl2 addition increases the amount of spinel phase at all firing temperatures. Due to the decomposition of MgCl2 and then formation of ultra-fine MgO particles, the nano-sized spinel is formed on the surface of the larger spinel particles.

  20. Is Large-Scale-Structure formation a new probe of the Dark Matter interactions with Standard Model particles?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been extensive efforts made to discover dark matter particles through a significant experimental program based on direct and indirect detection techniques. However so far these searches remain unsuccessful, thus questioning our ability to elucidate one of the biggest challenges of modern Cosmology. In this talk I will review some of the key aspects of these techniques and present a new strategy to characterise the dark matter interactions with the visible sector without having to rely on critical assumptions.

  1. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nanometer-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T>210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and reductions in ozone levels. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  2. Effect of particle size reduction and ensiling fermentation on biogas formation and silage quality of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Daniela; Wedwitschka, Harald; Moeller, Lucie; Zehnsdorf, Andreas; Stinner, Walter

    2017-08-24

    The effect of ensiling fermentation and mechanical pretreatment on the methane yield of lignocellulosic biomass was investigated in order to determine the optimum pretreatment conditions for biogas production. Wheat straw was treated using the following techniques: mechanical disintegration by chopping and extruder-grinding to particle sizes of 2.0 and 0.2cm, respectively, and ensiling by 30% and 45% total solids with addition of enzymatic, chemical and biological silage additives individually and in combination. The total and volatile solid content, biochemical methane potential and products of silage fermentation of 32 variants were tested. The results indicate that the methane potential increased by 26% (from 179 to 244mLCH4g(-1)VS) by reducing particle size. The maximum methane potential of 275mLCH4g(-1)VS was obtained from silage with 30% total solids and extruder grinding. However, the effect of the addition of silage additives on the methane potential was limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of sheath formation around biased interconnectors in a low-earth-orbit plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between satellite solar arrays and the LEO plasma is presently studied with particle-in-cell simulations in which an electrical potential was suddenly applied to the solar cell interconnector. T