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Sample records for contract workers case

  1. Protecting Contract Workers: Case Study of the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear and Chemical Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochfeld, Michael; Mohr, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Increased reliance on subcontractors in all economic sectors is a serious occupational health and safety challenge. Short-term cost savings are offset by long-term liability. Hiring subcontractors brings specialized knowledge but also young, inexperienced, inadequately trained workers onto industrial and hazardous waste sites, which leads to increased rates of accidents and injuries. Reliable data on subcontractor occupational health and safety programs and performance are sparse. The US Department of Energy has an excellent safety culture on paper, but procurement practices and contract language deliver a mixed message—including some safety disincentives. Its biphasic safety outcome data are consistent with underreporting by some subcontractors and underachievement by others. These observations are relevant to the private and public sectors. Occupational health and safety should be viewed as an asset, not merely a cost. PMID:17666686

  2. Dual Support in Contract Workers' Triangular Employment Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Robert; Kuvaas, Bard; Dysvik, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the interplay between perceived investment in contract worker development by the "client" organization and contract workers' perceived organizational support from their temporary employment "agency." A study among 2021 contract workers from three temporary employment agencies in Norway showed that the…

  3. Safety and health education and training of contract workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akikuni; Hara, Hisayuki; Nawata, Kazumitsu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have used many contract workers. Their safety and health conditions are very important in Japan. Several amendments, which deregulate temporary personnel service and employment agency markets, have been done in recent years. The number of contract and temporary help agency workers have been rapidly increasing especially since the 1990s. As a result, ensuring the level of safety and health education and training of workers becomes a serious problem. This paper examines the possibility that the level of safety training of the contract workers is less than that of the direct-hire employees in nuclear power plants. We show that (1) the use of contract workers could be less efficient for ensuring the level of safety training, and (2) nuclear power plants still use contract workers in some situations in spite of the loss of efficiency. We also study legislations and past cases relating to nuclear power generation. We find that there are some structural problems that might make the contract workers less trained. (author)

  4. Migrant Workers and the Changing Psychological Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Arthur; Finniear, Jocelyn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The influx of migrant workers in the UK has widespread interest. This group's experience of the British work place has evoked considerable debate ranging from the potential to be exploited through unscrupulous practices to allegations about taking away jobs from British workers. The purpose of this paper is to extend knowledge about the…

  5. Safety Case for Service Contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Israel L.

    2014-07-01

    Safety cases developed for the Facilities Management and Operations Center (FMOC) are based on the requirements in MN471021, Work Planning and Control Criteria for Safe Design and Operations. The FMOC performs maintenance activities in various locations at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). SNL/NM consists of more than 6,000,000 square feet of buildings, structures, and site infrastructure on approximately 13,000 acres of land. The FMOC performs approximately 7500 service contract work orders a year to assist with operations and maintenance at the SNL/NM site and facilities. As part of the continual improvement process, this Safety Case will be reviewed and updated, as needed, or at a minimum every three years.

  6. The impact of employment statutes on independent contract workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, L.F.

    1999-01-01

    The minimum statutory entitlements that apply to employees and independent contractors engaged in Alberta's petroleum industry were reviewed. The importance of employers being aware of the potential applications of these statutes to its independent contractors was emphasized. The employment relationship between independent contractors and employers are regulated by the Employment Standards Code and the Human Rights, Citizenship and Multiculturalism Act. The paper also described the obligations that the Occupational Health and Safety Act and the Workers' Compensation Act impose on both employers and independent contractors. This presentation also listed the criteria used in determining if a person is performing a contract of employment or a contract for service. An employee/non-employee questionnaire was also included

  7. Court Cases Involving Contracts for School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, L. Hank

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze trends in the United States regarding contract disputes that exist in school districts. Court cases were identified at the state and federal level to determine the outcomes and the fact patterns of contract disputes. To gain the knowledge of how courts handle cases of contractual breach, contracts…

  8. Second-Class Citizen? Contract Workers' Perceived Status, Dual Commitment and Intent to Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Wendy R.; Watkins, Maria Baskerville; Triana, Maria del Carmen; Zardkoohi, Asghar; Ren, Run; Umphress, Elizabeth E.

    2012-01-01

    Outsourcing of jobs to contract workers who work alongside a client's employees has changed the human resource landscape of many organizations. In this study we examine how a contract worker's perceived employment status similarity to the client's own standard employees influences his/her affective commitment to both the client and the employer…

  9. The Role of Future Time Perspective in Psychological Contracts: A Study among Older Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, P. Matthijs; Jansen, Paul G. W.; van der Velde, Mandy E. G.; de Lange, Annet H.; Rousseau, Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of post-retirement workers (N = 176), this study investigated the role of future time perspective (FTP) in psychological contracts. The study aimed to test: (i) whether future time perspective is related to employer psychological contract fulfillment and (ii) whether it moderates relations between psychological contract fulfillment…

  10. A Business Case for Home Performance Contracting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Sevigny, Maureen; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.

    2012-10-01

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the DOE Building America program. The report provides information for businesses considering entering the home performance contracting industry. Metrics discussed include industry trends and drivers, specific points of entry, business models, startup costs, and marketing strategies. The report includes detailed analysis of eight businesses around the country that have successfully entered the home performance contracting industry. Data is provided on their financial structures, program participation, marketing efforts, and staff training. This report will be distributed via the DOE Building America website, www.buildingamerica.gov. Individual case studies will also be cleared separately.

  11. The role of future time perspective in psychological contracts : A study among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P. Matthijs; Jansen, Paul G. W.; van der Velde, Mandy E. G.; de Lange, Annet H.; Rousseau, Denise M.

    Using a sample of post-retirement workers (N = 176), this study investigated the role of future time perspective (FTP) in psychological contracts. The study aimed to test: (i) whether future time perspective is related to employer psychological contract fulfillment and (ii) whether it moderates

  12. The role of future time perspective in psychological contracts: a study among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; Jansen, P.G.W.; van der Velde, M.E.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183262107; de Lange, A.H.; Rousseau, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of post-retirement workers (N = 176), this study investigated the role of future time perspective (FTP) in psychological contracts. The study aimed to test: (i) whether future time perspective is related to employer psychological contract fulfillment and (ii) whether it moderates

  13. The role of future time perspective in psychological contracts. A study among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; Jansen, P.G.W.; van der Velde, E.G.; de Lange, A.H.; Rousseau, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of post-retirement workers (N=176), this study investigated the role of future time perspective (FTP) in psychological contracts. The study aimed to test: (i) whether future time perspective is related to employer psychological contract fulfillment and (ii) whether it moderates

  14. The role of future time perspective in psychological contracts: A study among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; Jansen, P.G.W.; Velde, M.E.G. van der; Lange, A.H. de; Rousseau, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of post-retirement workers (N = 176), this study investigated the role of future time perspective (FTP) in psychological contracts. The study aimed to test: (i) whether future time perspective is related to employer psychological contract fulfillment and (ii) whether it moderates

  15. Are flexible contracts bad for workers? Evidence from job satisfaction data

    OpenAIRE

    Green, C; Heywood, J S

    2007-01-01

    If workers can choose between permanent and flexible contracts, compensating wage differentials should arise to equalize on-the-job utility in the two types of contracts. Estimating job satisfaction using the British Household Panel Survey shows that agency and casual contracts are associated with routinely lower satisfaction. This results because the low job satisfaction associated with less job security is not offset by higher compensation or other job characteristics. Job security is suffi...

  16. 75 FR 13381 - Nondisplacement of Qualified Workers Under Service Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... contractor and its subcontractors shall, except as otherwise provided by the clause, in good faith offer... English and translated versions available in a poster format to contracting agencies via the Internet, in...

  17. Contract Hog Production: A Case Study of Financial Arrangements

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Brent; Barry, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A case study is presented about the financing arrangements, contract terms, and business relationships of a set of contract hog producers whose loans from community banks have been guaranteed by the Illinois Farm Development Authority. The results reflect the maturity and stability of contract hog production, although agribusiness and farmer integrators largely fill different market niches and contract with different types of producers.

  18. 76 FR 53719 - Nondisplacement of Qualified Workers Under Service Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    .... Subpart A--General Executive Order 13495 does not establish wage or fringe benefit rates. The minimum wage... misplaced. As noted, the SCA establishes the minimum wage rates and fringe benefits to be paid to service employees on a contract for services. These minimum wage rates and fringe benefits can result from the SCA...

  19. Incidence and mortality by cancer among French nuclear workers of contracting companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, S.; Haddy, N.; Giardini, M.; Paoletti, C.; De Vathaire, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Current radiation protection standards of occupationally exposed workers are based on an extrapolation of cancer risks estimates derived from studies of the survivors of atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In order to confirm these standards, International Agency for Research Cancer coordinated a retrospective cohort study to estimate the risk of cancer death after low-level exposure to gamma-ray, in a worldwide population of 400 000 nuclear industry workers in 15 countries. Methods: The present study is part of the international study and includes about 13,000 French nuclear industry workers of 10 contracting companies and subsidiary companies. This study was restricted to workers who wore a radiation dosimeter or badge. Contracting companies were selected on the basis of at least 100 workers in activity in 1996. A retrospective cohort was constituted. For each worker, we collected data concerning personal identifiers, occupational history, exposure history, vital status and cause of death. In order to guarantee the reliability of dosimetry data, we confronted monthly doses of X and gamma rays obtained from each company with monthly doses obtained from the National Institute of Radio Protection (I.R.S.N.). The cut off date was the 31 December of 2000. An incidence study is running within this cohort. Data relatives to poly-exposures, incident cancers and other pathologies, have being collected through a questionnaire form. Results: A total of 12,690 workers were included in the cohort, 1,457 could not be identified. Among the 11,233 identified workers, 280 deaths were recorded and 36% of them were cancer. Most of the workers were men (96%) and the median age at cut off date was equal to 41 years old. Only 25% of workers were exposed seven years or more. The median cumulative dose was equal to 3.1 mSv and 25% of workers had a cumulative dose superior to 22 mSv. Conclusion: Median cumulative dose was lower than expected as

  20. Return-to-work of sick-listed workers without an employment contract – what works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Sylvia J; Tamminga, Sietske J; Schellart, Antonius JM; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Anema, Johannes R

    2009-01-01

    Background In the past decade flexible labour market arrangements have emerged as a significant change in the European Union labour market. Studies suggest that these new types of labour arrangements may be linked to ill health, an increased risk for work disability, and inadequate vocational rehabilitation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were: 1. to examine demographic characteristics of workers without an employment contract sick-listed for at least 13 weeks, 2. to describe the content and frequency of occupational health care (OHC) interventions for these sick-listed workers, and 3. to examine OHC interventions as possible determinants for return-to-work (RTW) of these workers. Methods A cohort of 1077 sick-listed workers without an employment contract were included at baseline, i.e. 13 weeks after reporting sick. Demographic variables were available at baseline. Measurement of cross-sectional data took place 4–6 months after inclusion. Primary outcome measures were: frequency of OHC interventions and RTW-rates. Measured confounding variables were: gender, age, type of worker (temporary agency worker, unemployed worker, or remaining worker without employment contract), level of education, reason for absenteeism (diagnosis), and perceived health. The association between OHC interventions and RTW was analysed with a logistic multiple regression analysis. Results At 7–9 months after the first day of reporting sick only 19% of the workers had (partially or completely) returned to work, and most workers perceived their health as fairly poor or poor. The most frequently reported (49%) intervention was 'the OHC professional discussed RTW'. However, the intervention 'OHC professional made and discussed a RTW action plan' was reported by only 19% of the respondents. The logistic multiple regression analysis showed a significant positive association between RTW and the interventions: 'OHC professional discussed RTW'; and 'OHC professional made and discussed a

  1. Return-to-work of sick-listed workers without an employment contract--what works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Sylvia J; Tamminga, Sietske J; Schellart, Antonius Jm; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Anema, Johannes R

    2009-07-14

    In the past decade flexible labour market arrangements have emerged as a significant change in the European Union labour market. Studies suggest that these new types of labour arrangements may be linked to ill health, an increased risk for work disability, and inadequate vocational rehabilitation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were: 1. to examine demographic characteristics of workers without an employment contract sick-listed for at least 13 weeks, 2. to describe the content and frequency of occupational health care (OHC) interventions for these sick-listed workers, and 3. to examine OHC interventions as possible determinants for return-to-work (RTW) of these workers. A cohort of 1077 sick-listed workers without an employment contract were included at baseline, i.e. 13 weeks after reporting sick. Demographic variables were available at baseline. Measurement of cross-sectional data took place 4-6 months after inclusion. Primary outcome measures were: frequency of OHC interventions and RTW-rates. Measured confounding variables were: gender, age, type of worker (temporary agency worker, unemployed worker, or remaining worker without employment contract), level of education, reason for absenteeism (diagnosis), and perceived health. The association between OHC interventions and RTW was analysed with a logistic multiple regression analysis. At 7-9 months after the first day of reporting sick only 19% of the workers had (partially or completely) returned to work, and most workers perceived their health as fairly poor or poor. The most frequently reported (49%) intervention was 'the OHC professional discussed RTW'. However, the intervention 'OHC professional made and discussed a RTW action plan' was reported by only 19% of the respondents. The logistic multiple regression analysis showed a significant positive association between RTW and the interventions: 'OHC professional discussed RTW'; and 'OHC professional made and discussed a RTW action plan'. The

  2. Return-to-work of sick-listed workers without an employment contract – what works?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade flexible labour market arrangements have emerged as a significant change in the European Union labour market. Studies suggest that these new types of labour arrangements may be linked to ill health, an increased risk for work disability, and inadequate vocational rehabilitation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were: 1. to examine demographic characteristics of workers without an employment contract sick-listed for at least 13 weeks, 2. to describe the content and frequency of occupational health care (OHC interventions for these sick-listed workers, and 3. to examine OHC interventions as possible determinants for return-to-work (RTW of these workers. Methods A cohort of 1077 sick-listed workers without an employment contract were included at baseline, i.e. 13 weeks after reporting sick. Demographic variables were available at baseline. Measurement of cross-sectional data took place 4–6 months after inclusion. Primary outcome measures were: frequency of OHC interventions and RTW-rates. Measured confounding variables were: gender, age, type of worker (temporary agency worker, unemployed worker, or remaining worker without employment contract, level of education, reason for absenteeism (diagnosis, and perceived health. The association between OHC interventions and RTW was analysed with a logistic multiple regression analysis. Results At 7–9 months after the first day of reporting sick only 19% of the workers had (partially or completely returned to work, and most workers perceived their health as fairly poor or poor. The most frequently reported (49% intervention was 'the OHC professional discussed RTW'. However, the intervention 'OHC professional made and discussed a RTW action plan' was reported by only 19% of the respondents. The logistic multiple regression analysis showed a significant positive association between RTW and the interventions: 'OHC professional discussed RTW'; and 'OHC

  3. The influence of zero-hours contracts on care worker well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravalier, J M; Fidalgo, A R; Morton, R; Russell, L

    2017-07-01

    Care workers have an important social role which is set to expand with the increasing age of the UK population. However, the majority of care workers are employed on zero-hours contracts. Firstly, to investigate the relationship between working conditions and employee outcomes such as engagement and general mental well-being in a sample of UK care workers and management. Secondly, to assess whether the use of zero-hours contracts affects employee well-being. A cross-sectional survey of domiciliary care and care home employees, undertaken using the Management Standards Indicator Tool (MSIT), Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). T-tests and multivariate linear regression evaluated the differences in scoring between those with differing contractual conditions and job roles, and associations of MSIT scores with UWES and GHQ factors. Employee understanding of their role and job control were found to be priority areas for improvement in the sample. Similarly, care workers reported greater occupational demands and lower levels of control than management. However, while zero-hours contracts did not significantly influence employee well-being, these employees had greater levels of engagement in their jobs. Despite this, a greater proportion of individuals with zero-hours contracts had scores above accepted mental health cut-offs. Individual understanding of their role as care workers appears to play an important part in determining engagement and general mental well-being. However, more research is needed on the influence of zero-hours contracts on well-being, particularly in groups with increased likelihood of developing mental health disorders. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Bye bye! : Exploring the psychological contract and commitment of different generations of hospitality workers

    OpenAIRE

    Nije Bijvank, M.; Lub, X.D.

    2010-01-01

    High turnover rates are a common and costly problem for hospitality companies, even more so as a new generation of workers, Generation Y, enters the workforce. The present study explores a number of antecedents to this turnover in the light of generational differences. Data was collected in 20 hotels (N=359) of a hotel chain using an online survey. Results show generational differences in psychological contract, with Baby Boomers valuing work-life balance, Generation X job security and Genera...

  5. Psychological Contract in High Performance Companies: The Pain and the Pleasure of being a Contemporary Worker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rebello Neves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Broader changes in capitalist production structure outlined a scenario marked by fierce competition between companies, which is demanding a workforce increasingly committed and willing to devote much of his time to organizations (GREEN, 2001. This intense dedication of the worker involves aspects ranging from the increase in working hours, through the way of thinking in the organization, seen as an extension of their lives, until the option for work at the expense of personal life. It is in this context that organizations of traditional work have given way to organizations using the systems characterized by high work performance. These systems provide workers greater autonomy and control over their work processes, which give them greater responsibilities to solve technical and operational problems (APPELBAUM, 2002. Although there are many recent studies that address this new dynamic work (HUGHES, 2008; WOOD and MENEZES, 2011 they mostly tend to focus on explaining the characteristics of high performance work systems. However, few studies are devoted to better understand the motivations that lead individuals to work intensified pace and long hours, apparently voluntarily. Evidence of the growing adoption of high performance work systems, in the current context of labor relations, as well as the attractiveness that organizations adopting the exercise over a significant group of workers, motivated this research aimed to know the terms psychological contracts established between professional and high performance organizations.

  6. Workers' compensation in Pennsylvania: the effects of delayed contested cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, S E

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the effects of delayed workers' compensation cases in the Pennsylvania system. Forty-five claimants of a workers' compensation support group responded to interviews. Delay periods averaged two years with a 68.4% drop in income. Results indicate that claimants endured financial and emotional stress, exhausted personal assets, relied on assistance from relatives, and received public assistance. Implications for social work practice include educating workers about benefits, counseling claimants with delayed claims, and advocating for administrative reforms.

  7. Impact of employment contract changes on workers' quality of working life, job insecurity, health and work-related attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Alfred F; Kompier, Michiel A J; Houtman, Irene L D; van den Bossche, Seth N J; Taris, Toon W

    2012-01-01

    Changes in employment contracts may impact the quality of working life, job insecurity, health and work-related attitudes. We examined the validity of two partly competing theoretical approaches. Based upon a segmentation approach, we expected no change in scores among stable trajectories, whereas upward trajectories were expected to be for the better and downward trajectories to be for the worse (Hypothesis 1). As turnover theories suggest that this hypothesis may only apply to workers who do not change employer, we also examined these contract trajectories stratified for a change of employer (Hypothesis 2). Drawing on the 2007 and 2008 waves of the Netherlands Working Conditions Cohort Study (N=9,688), repeated measures analysis of covariance showed little across-time change in the criterion variables, thus largely disconfirming our first hypothesis. These results could (at least partly) be explained by employer change; this was generally associated with improved scores among all contract trajectories (Hypothesis 2). However, workers receiving a less stable contract from the same employer were found to be at risk for health and well-being problems. Segmentation theory-based assumptions on contract trajectories primarily apply to stable and downward contract trajectories at the same employer, whereas assumptions from turnover theories better apply to contract trajectories combined with a change of employer. Future research should focus more closely on factors predicting "involuntary" downward trajectories into precarious temporary employment or unemployment.

  8. Relationship Contracting: The South Australian Experience - A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry has long been accusedof poor performance. The confrontational attitudeof its members and the resultant adversarial atmosphere has been identified as a major factor responsible for this poor performance. A cultural change is required to remove these barriers and to promote optimum project outcomes. Relationship contracting is promoted as a way to support the shift from the adversarial culture to the co-operative and collaborative culture within the industry and the project team.The Adelaide Convention Centre Extensions project was the first in South Australia to be procure und r the principles of relationship contract1ng. Usmg the case study approach, this paper reviews the form of relationship contracting used in this milestone project. The paper documents the lessons learned from this project and makes recommendations that can lead to improvements for future projects.

  9. Gender, Cross-border Migrant Workers and Citizenship : Case Study ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... of the Burmese-Thai border; final technical report. Documents. Border industrialization and labour mobility : a case of Burmese migrant workers in border area factories. Rapports. Round Table Discussion on Past and Current Research on Migrant Workers in Thailand, Miracle Grand Convention Hotel, 17 January 2007 ...

  10. a case study of Ede north local government workers.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Risky behaviours and attitudes of healthy Nigerians towards kidney failure: a case ... attitudes of healthy populace of workers of Ede North Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria. .... exercise 247 (74.6%), use of alcohol 239 (72.2%).

  11. Contract employment policy and research productivity of knowledge workers: An analysis of Spanish universities

    OpenAIRE

    Lafuente González, Esteban Miguel; Berbegal-Mirabent, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates how contract employment practices adopted by universities—fixed-term contracts and permanent contracts—impact research productivity measured in terms of publications in scholarly journals. The empirical application considers the Spanish public higher education system for the period 2002-2008. We report an inverse U-shaped relationship between the rate fixed-term contracts and the research productivity of Spanish universities. That is, contract policies based on fixed...

  12. Pacta sunt servanda versus the social role of contracts: the case of Brazilian agriculture contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Leles Rezende

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the instability created by contradictory court decisions related with contract breaches. Forward marketing contracts represent an important source of resources to finance Brazilian agriculture, however a large number of contract breaches were observed during a period of marked increase in soy prices. The study analyzed 161 judicial appeal decisions and a survey was carried with 70 farmers. The results show the difference of judges' interpretation and the existence of second order effects. The effects of court decisions were more requirements of guarantees and the reduction in the number of contracts. Those soybean farmers who did not breach their contracts have also been negatively affected by the strategic reactions of trading and processing companies. The concept of "social function of the contract" introduced in Brazilian civil code led to a higher degree of instability in contracts, raising transaction costs and motivating private economic sanctions.

  13. Contract Monitoring in Agent-Based Systems: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodík, Jiří; Vokřínek, Jiří; Jakob, Michal

    Monitoring of fulfilment of obligations defined by electronic contracts in distributed domains is presented in this paper. A two-level model of contract-based systems and the types of observations needed for contract monitoring are introduced. The observations (inter-agent communication and agents’ actions) are collected and processed by the contract observation and analysis pipeline. The presented approach has been utilized in a multi-agent system for electronic contracting in a modular certification testing domain.

  14. Motivation Of Health Care Workers In Tanzania: A Case Study Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Motivation Of Health Care Workers In Tanzania: A Case Study Of Muhimbili National Hospital. ... workers were female. ... between workers and management, lack of participation in decision-making processes, and a general lack of concern for ...

  15. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among farm workers: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders among farm workers: A case study of an agricultural college in Zimbabwe. ... hazards, therefore a need for intervention to protect them from musculoskeletal complaints. Improvement in farm work practices through ergonomic training might help reduce musculoskeletal complaints.

  16. Training and the Commitment of Outsourced Information Technologies' Workers: Psychological Contract Fulfillment as a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontinha, Rita; Chambel, Maria José; De Cuyper, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Outsourced workers in information technologies (IT) generally have high skills and a high value on the job market. Their IT outsourcing organizations are likely to provide them with training, in the first place for skill development, but perhaps also as a way to bind the workers to them. This can be understood along the role of the psychological…

  17. 77 FR 26232 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Nondisplacement of Qualified Workers Under Service Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... role. H. Contract clause: The sources of this coverage are section 5 of E.O. 13495 and Appendix A of 29... successor contractor and its subcontractors are required to offer those employees (other than managerial and... managerial and supervisory employees) employed under the predecessor contract whose employment will be...

  18. Context matters in NGO-government contracting for health service delivery: a case study from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Shehla; Mayhew, Susannah H; Cleland, John; Green, Andrew T

    2012-10-01

    Contracting non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for health service provision is gaining increasing importance in low- and middle-income countries. However, the role of the wider context in influencing the effectiveness of contracting is not well studied and is of relevance given that contracting has produced mixed results so far. This paper applies a policy analysis approach to examine the influence of policy and political factors on contracting origin, design and implementation. Evidence is drawn from a country case study of Pakistan involving extensive NGO contracting for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention services supported by international donor agencies. A multilevel study was conducted using 84 in-depth interviews, 22 semi-structured interviews, document review and direct observation to examine the national policy design, provincial management of contracting and local contract implementation. There were three main findings. First, contracting origin and implementation was an inherently political process affected by the wider policy context. Although in Pakistan a combination of situational events successfully managed to introduce extensive and sophisticated contracting, it ran into difficulties during implementation due to ownership and capacity issues within government. Second, wide-scale contracting was mis-matched with the capacity of local NGOs, which resulted in sub-optimal contract implementation challenging the reliance on market simulation through contracting. Third, we found that contracting can have unintended knock-on effects on both providers and purchasers. As a result of public sector contracts, NGOs became more distanced from their grounded attributes. Effects on government purchasers were more unpredictable, with greater identification with contracting in supportive governance contexts and further distancing in unsupportive contexts. A careful approach is needed in government contracting of NGOs, taking into account acceptance of

  19. 77 FR 75766 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Nondisplacement of Qualified Workers Under Service Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... invention, imagination, originality or talent in a recognized field of artistic or creative endeavor'' (29... recommended the final rule include language allowing contracting officers to submit a negative performance...

  20. Case studies on the success or failure of futures contracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Till

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Why do some futures contracts succeed and others fail? Although the U.S. futures markets have evolved in a trial-and-error fashion, research suggests key elements have determined whether particular futures contracts succeeded or failed. This knowledge could be useful for new financial centers as they build successful futures markets. This paper shows that there are three elements that determine whether a futures contract succeeds or not: 1. There must be a commercial need for hedging; 2. A pool of speculators must be attracted to a market; and 3. Public policy should not be too adverse to futures trading

  1. 20 CFR 663.705 - What are the requirements for OJT contracts for employed workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for employed workers? 663.705 Section 663.705 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... INVESTMENT ACT On-the-Job Training (OJT) and Customized Training § 663.705 What are the requirements for OJT... production or service procedures, upgrading to new jobs that require additional skills, workplace literacy...

  2. Bye bye! : Exploring the psychological contract and commitment of different generations of hospitality workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nije Bijvank, M.; Lub, X.D.

    2010-01-01

    High turnover rates are a common and costly problem for hospitality companies, even more so as a new generation of workers, Generation Y, enters the workforce. The present study explores a number of antecedents to this turnover in the light of generational differences. Data was collected in 20

  3. Invisible, scattered, difficult to contact: union challenges and strategies to engage contract workers in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, N.; Keijser, C.; Tesorio, J.

    2013-01-01

    This report is the result of a study of how trade unions can respond to the challenges of dealing with an increasingly flexible and fragmented labour force. A literature study, a survey and open interviews in four countries were carried out to identify how CNV partner unions can support workers who

  4. Prevention and nursing care in the first case of Ebola virus disease contracted outside Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Serrano, Alicia; Jiménez-Castellano, Rafael; Gómez-Campos, Ana María

    After the evacuation from Africa to Western hospitals of several international workers with the Ebola virus disease, the first case of contagion outside Africa occurred in Madrid, Spain. A nursing care assistant who had attended a missionary repatriated from Sierra Leone contracted the disease. On October 7 th 2014, the patient arrived at the University Hospital La Paz-Carlos III in Madrid. She remained in the hospital for 30 days, 25 of which were in strict isolation in a negative pressure room with air lock anteroom; personal protective equipment was required. During the last five days, the patient was moved to a standard room. Protection measures were used in accordance with the Hospital Occupational Health Department. According to its evolution, we differentiate three phases with specific care demands which were conditioned by the risk of transmission, forcing extreme measures of prevention. The largest numbers of direct interventions fall within the realm of the nursing profession. It is essential that specialized units with regular training be created for highly contagious diseases. In addition, this and other cases should be analyzed from the point of view of nursing, to allow standardized care. We also recognize the importance of managing communication to prevent social unrest and stigmatization of staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. "Contract to Volunteer": South African Community Health Worker Mobilization for Better Labor Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafford, Zara; Swartz, Alison; Colvin, Christopher J

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we explore the increasing activity around labor rights for South African community health workers (CHWs). Contextualizing this activity within broader policy and legal developments, we track the emergence of sporadic mobilizations for decent work (supported by local health activist organizations) and subsequently, the formation of a CHW union. The National Union of Care Workers of South Africa (NUCWOSA) was inaugurated in 2016, hoping to secure formal and secure employment through government and the consequent labor and occupational health protections. Various tensions were observed during fieldwork in the run up to NUCWOSA's formation and raise important questions about representation, legitimacy, and hierarchies of power. We close by offering suggestions for future research in this developing space.

  6. Factors influencing mode of claims settlement in workers' compensation cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D L; Wood, G A; MacDonald, S

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the variables that influence the means by which 10,192 injured workers settled their compensation claims during 1990. The data on which this study is based come from a state in Australia where there are three means by which workers' compensation claims can be settled by lump sum payment: settlement following a specific injury payment, early settlement payment and settlement following a common law payment. This paper is specifically concerned with identifying the variables that determine whether the claim will be settled by a lump sum payment and whether different modes of claims settlement by lump sum are unique and predictable from a range of variables that include injury characteristics and demographics. The results of logistic regression modelling revealed that those who received a lump sum settlement could be reliably distinguished from those who did not receive such a payment. Each mode of settlement varied in the extent to which it could be predicted. Contrary to expectations, the most difficult form of settlement mode to predict was that of specific injury payments (4% accurate) with the most predictive being early settlement payments (81% accurate). Common law payments were also highly predictable (48% accurate). The form of lump sum payment received by injured workers was found to depend on a range of injury characteristics, indices of severity and for common law payments, gender and potential income loss. It is argued that although injury characteristics play a part in the process of claims settlement, personal circumstances and insurance company policies are influential in dictating the form by which workers compensation cases are finalized.

  7. Modification of Personal Hygiene and Grooming Behaviors with Contingency Contracting: A Brief Review and Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sarah J.; Kramer, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Presents discussion of basic components and characteristics of contingency contracts. Includes case study in which contingency contracting procedures were integrated within a behavioral consultation model used by a school psychologist consulting with a classroom teacher to modify personal hygiene of 12-year-old male. (Author/ABL)

  8. A case study on electronic contracting in on-line advertising - status and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelov, S.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Camarinha-Matos, L.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Ollus, M.

    2006-01-01

    Business-to-business electronic contracting has gained attention in recent years as a way to improve traditional contracting practices as well as a paradigm that allows the support of new business models in an enterprise. This paper presents the business case of the Dutch news medium Telegraaf for

  9. Experiencing different generations in the hospitality workplace : An exploratory study into generational differences in the content of the psychological contract for workers in the hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lub, X.D.; Blomme, R.J.; Muijen, van J.J.

    2009-01-01

    High levels of turnover remain a challenge for the hospitality industry. Earlier research links turnover problems to psychological contract breach, and popular literature on generations suggests a new generation of workers is likely to further aggravate problems with turnover. This study explores

  10. [Analysis of a case series of workers with mobbing syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, B; Minelli, C M; Franzina, B; Martellosio, V; Scafa, F; Giorgi, I; Mazzacane, F; Stancanelli, M; Mennoia, N V; Candura, S M

    2007-01-01

    Mobbing represents nowadays a major challenge for Occupational Medicine. We examined, during the last seven years, 253 patients who asked medical assistance for psychopathological problems by them ascribed to mobbing in the working environment. All patients underwent occupational health visit, psychological counselling (including personality tests administration), and psychiatric evaluation. A clinical picture probably due to mobbing was diagnosed in 37 workers: 2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), 33 of Adjustment Disorder (AD), and 2 of anxiety disorder. Regarding mobbing typology, we found 19 cases of vertical mobbing (by an employer/manager to employees), 14 cases of strategic mobbing, 3 cases of horizontal mobbing (among colleagues), and one non intentional mobbing. In conclusion, a pure mobbing syndrome was diagnosed in a lower proportion than that reported by other investigators. The described interdisciplinary approach appears useful for the diagnostic assessment of suspect mobbing cases, that in turn is crucial for prognosis and treatment, as well as in relation to medico-legal issues and work-related compensation claims.

  11. Who gets fired, who gets re-hired: the role of workers' contract, age, health, work ability, performance, work satisfaction and employee investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Alfred F; Kompier, Michiel A J; Houtman, Irene L D; van den Bossche, Seth N J; Taris, Toon W

    2015-04-01

    Many workers have been dismissed in the past few years, either becoming unemployed or finding re-employment. The current study examined whether dismissal and its follow-up for the employee (re-employment versus unemployment) could be predicted from workers' employment contract and age, and their health status, work ability, work performance, work satisfaction and employee investments at baseline. Our sample comprised a selection of participants from the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2010 who participated in a follow-up questionnaire in 2012 (N = 2,644). We used logistic regression analyses to test our hypotheses. Temporary employment, low health status, low work ability, poor work performance, low work satisfaction and no employee investments in terms of training predicted future dismissal. Furthermore, older workers and workers reporting decreased work performance due to impaired health at baseline had a lower chance of re-employment after being dismissed. Interestingly, after taking into account all predictors, former temporary workers without permanent employment prospects had much better chances of re-employment after their dismissal than former permanent workers. Temporary, less healthy, low work ability, poor performing, dissatisfied and "under-invested" workers are at risk for dismissal, whereas older and less healthy workers are (also) at risk for long-term unemployment after being dismissed.

  12. Operation Arctic Heat Case and Exercise for Advanced Contingency Contracting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    QDR or as required. They aJie intentionru]y focused on "ends" - the ways and means to achieve these ends will !be analyzed and determined in the...establishing a base on Little Diomede Island or improving Kivalina Lagoon (near Red Dog Mine) As the region grows more accessible to human traffic and...may be requ i red from t he host base or cont ractor sources , if avai l abl e . (NOTE: Contracts awarded throughout the deployment should be tailored

  13. New Perils for the Contract Ethnographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, David M.

    1981-01-01

    Conditions of contract research may lead some workers to ignore publication rights of colleagues whose reports are of limited circulation. The author presents a case example of how this process occurred with the use of his own work and argues for rigorous ethical standards in the publication of contract research results. (Author/GC)

  14. Assessing the remedy: the case for contracts in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah J L

    2011-04-01

    Current orthodoxy in research ethics assumes that subjects of clinical trials reserve rights to withdraw at any time and without giving any reason. This view sees the right to withdraw as a simple extension of the right to refuse to participate all together. In this paper, however, I suggest that subjects should assume some responsibilities for the internal validity of the trial at consent and that these responsibilities should be captured by contract. This would allow the researcher to impose a penalty on the subject if he were to withdraw without good reason and on a whim. This proposal still leaves open the possibility of withdrawing without penalty when it is in the subject's best interests to do so. Giving researchers recourse to legal remedy may now be necessary to protect the science, as existing methods used to increase retention are inadequate for one reason or another.

  15. Rural recruitment and retention of health workers across cadres and types of contract in north-east India: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbangshi, Preety R; Nambiar, Devaki; Choudhury, Nandini; Rao, Krishna D

    2017-09-01

    Background Like many other low- and middle-income countries, India faces challenges of recruiting and retaining health workers in rural areas. Efforts have been made to address this through contractual appointment of health workers in rural areas. While this has helped to temporarily bridge the gaps in human resources, the overall impact on the experience of rural services across cadres has yet to be understood. This study sought to identify motivations for, and the challenges of, rural recruitment and retention of nurses, doctors and specialists across types of contract in rural and remote areas in India's largely rural north-eastern states of Meghalaya and Nagaland. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken, in which 71 semi-structured interviews were carried out with doctors (n = 32), nurses (n = 28) and specialists (n = 11). In addition, unstructured key informant interviews (n = 11) were undertaken, along with observations at health facilities and review of state policies. Data were analysed using Ritchie and Spencer's framework method and the World Health Organization's 2010 framework of factors affecting decisions to relocate to, stay in or leave rural areas. Results It was found that rural background and community attachment were strongly associated with health workers' decision to join rural service, regardless of cadre or contract. However, this aspiration was challenged by health-systems factors of poor working and living conditions; low salary and incentives; and lack of professional growth and recognition. Contractual health workers faced unique challenges (lack of pay parity, job insecurity), as did those with permanent positions (irrational postings and political interference). Conclusion This study establishes that the crisis in recruiting and retaining health workers in rural areas will persist until and unless health systems address the core basic requirements of health workers in rural areas, which are related to health-sector policies

  16. How Law and Institutions Shape Financial Contracts: The Case of Bank Loans

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Qian; Philip E. Strahan

    2005-01-01

    We examine empirically how legal origin, creditor rights, property rights, legal formalism, and financial development affect the design of price and non-price terms of bank loans in almost 60 countries. Our results support the law and finance view that private contracts reflect differences in legal protection of creditors and the enforcement of contracts. Loans made to borrowers in countries where creditors can seize collateral in case of default are more likely to be secured, have longer mat...

  17. Building America Energy Renovations. A Business Case for Home Performance Contracting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Antonopoulos, C. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevigny, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilbride, T. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hefty, M. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This research report gives an overview of the needs and opportunities that exist in the U.S. home performance contracting industry. The report discusses industry trends, market drivers, different business models, and points of entry for existing and new businesses hoping to enter the home performance contracting industry. Case studies of eight companies who successfully entered the industry are provided, including business metrics, start-up costs, and marketing approaches.

  18. Health, safety, and environmental management system operation in contracting companies: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Parvin; Yarahmadi, Rasoul; Gholami, Pari Shafaei; Hamidi, Abdolamir; Mirkazemi, Roksana

    2016-05-03

    Systematic and cooperative interactions among parent industry and contractors are necessary for a successful health, safety, and environmental management system (HSE-MS). This study was conducted to evaluate the HSE-MS performance in contracting companies in one of the petrochemical industries in Iran during 2013. Managers of parent and contracting companies participated in this study. The data collection forms included 7 elements of an integrated HSE-MS (leadership and commitment; policy and strategic objectives; organization, resources, and documentation; evaluation and risk management; planning; implementation and monitoring; auditing and reviewing). The results showed that mean percentage of the total scores in seven elements of HSE-MS was 85.7% and 87.0% based on self-report and report of parent company, respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that HSE-MS was desirably functioning; however, improvement to ensure health and safety of workers is still required.

  19. The use of micro-plasma radiofrequency technology in secondary skin graft contraction: 2 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jin-Ping; Fang, Lin; Wang, Lian-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Secondary skin graft contraction leading to cosmetic deformity remains a great challenge. These two case reports present serious skin graft contraction and the treatment with micro-plasma radiofrequency technology. Two patients presented with complaints of post-burn depigmentation on the forehead and the hand, respectively, and received dermabrasion and thin split-thickness skin grafting. Then, many localized contraction lesions occurred after 4 weeks. The treatment selected was non-surgical removal using micro-plasma radiofrequency technology with the following energy parameters: a roller tip at 80 watts, three passes in different directions. No complications were observed. The contracted skin was ablated without affecting the pigment distribution. The consequents were that the color, appearance, and texture of the grafted skin matched the adjacent skin well and had better patient acceptance.

  20. Estimates and Predictions of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis Cases among Redeployed Coal Workers of the Fuxin Mining Industry Group in China: A Historical Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Hongbo; Zhai, Guojiang; Wang, Qun; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Mengcang; Cui, Kai; Shen, Fuhai; Yi, Hongbo; Li, Yuting; Zhai, Yuhan; Sheng, Yang; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at estimating possible Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) cases as of 2012, and predicting future CWP cases among redeployed coal workers from the Fuxin Mining Industry Group. This study provided the scientific basis for regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis and labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted mines. The study cohort included 19,116 coal workers. The cumulative incidence of CWP was calculated by the life-table method. Possible CWP cases by occupational category were estimated through the average annual incidence rate of CWP and males' life expectancy. It was estimated that 141 redeployed coal workers might have suffered from CWP as of 2012, and 221 redeployed coal workers could suffer from CWP in the future. It is crucial to establish a set of feasible and affordable regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis as well as labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted coal mines in China.

  1. 27 CFR 70.164 - Surrender of property subject to levy in the case of life insurance and endowment contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the case of life insurance and endowment contracts. (a) In general. This section provides special rules relating to the surrender of property subject to levy in the case of life insurance and endowment... subject to levy in the case of life insurance and endowment contracts. 70.164 Section 70.164 Alcohol...

  2. A new method to solve anophthalmic contracted socket in embedding orbital implant in 114 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To perform a new method for orbital implant and contracted socket through one time and its results.METHODS: Totally 114 patients 114 eyes, from January 2008 to June 2014, with contracted socket participated in this study. We incised the bulbar conjunctiva horizontally and excised scar tissue, then implanted the hydroxyapatite in the four extraocular muscles and tightly sutured the Tenon' capsule. After that, we put the superior and inferior conjunctival petals backwards and sutured them to the Tenon's capsule. All the patients were divided into four groups according to the vertical diameter length of the conjunctival defect area: Group Ⅰ: ≤5mm; Group Ⅱ: 6-10mm; Group Ⅲ: 11-15mm; and Group Ⅳ: ≥16mm. These patients were followed up for 6mo to 3y to observe the conjunctival sac shaping and growth of conjunctiva.RESULTS: There were 64 cases in Group Ⅰ, 31 cases in Group Ⅱ, 16 cases in Group Ⅲ and 3 cases in Group Ⅳ. All patients' conjunctival defect was covered by new conjunctiva and scar tissue 4 to 6wk after surgeries. Ten cases had contracted socket; 2 cases had orbital implant exposure, requiring reoperation. Of the 114 cases, 8 had contracted socket and could use a smaller conformer, 106 could use a normal size conformer.CONCLUSION: When the conjunctival defect was ≤15mm, this new method can address the orbital implant and contracted socket at the same time. While it was ≥16mm, flap transplantation is necessary.

  3. A Qualitative Exploration of Multiple Case Studies of the Perception of School Social Workers Concerning Their Roles in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alesha Nicole

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative exploration in the form of multiple case studies interviewed a group of seven social workers from the St. Louis Metropolitan area to gain their perception as school social workers concerning their roles in public schools. The literature on school social workers indicated that school social workers brought unique knowledge and…

  4. Effective Teaching Strategies: Case Studies from the Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Lizbeth; Herlich, Stephanie A.; Sacks, Sharon Zell

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses some of the qualitative data that were documented during the Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study. Two case studies of students are described, highlighting many effective teaching strategies used by their teachers of students with visual impairments that resulted in the students' successful academic progress.…

  5. 75 FR 26916 - Federal Acquisition Regulation: FAR Case 2009-004, Enhancing Contract Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Regulation: FAR Case 2009-004, Enhancing Contract Transparency AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General... commercial or financial information. This transparency effort is intended to promote efficiency in Government... the Administration's memorandum entitled Transparency and Open Government (January 21, 2009...

  6. Study about the Right to the Factoring Contract in Case Law STJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Moraes do Espírito Santo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay aims to examine the right of recourse in commercial development contract in the case law of the Supreme Court. In order to reach an appropriate response, the paper investigates the problem from Hans Kelsen's teachings to theory of law and legal interpretation as may be adopted in the Brazilian legal system.

  7. Risk factors for non-fatal occupational injuries among construction workers: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashaba, E; El-Helaly, M; El-Gilany, A H; Motawei, S M; Foda, S

    2018-02-01

    Substance abuse is a serious problem, because it affects both workers and young people. Prevalence and consequences of cannabis abuse among construction workers in particular are not well studied in Egypt. To determine the association between non-fatal occupational injuries among construction workers and their demographic and occupational factors and to assess the frequency of cannabis abuse and its relationship to injury severity and workdays lost. A case-control study was conducted at Mansoura Emergency Hospital. Cases were 100 acutely injured male workers. A control group of 90 healthy age-matched workers was selected from 8 construction sites. Workers were interviewed, and a questionnaire was completed that included socio-demographic data, full occupational history, and causes and type of injury. Injury outcome measures included lost workdays and the injury severity score (ISS). Cannabis abuse in injured workers was monitored by preliminary testing of urine and confirmatory testing of blood. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent predictors of occupational injuries were rural residence, being a carpenter or painter and past history of injuries. The most common accidents were slipping falls (62%). Confirmed cannabis test was positive in 51.1% of the injured workers. Median days away from work were greater among cannabis users than non-users. The ISS was significantly higher among users compared to non-users ( p construction workers with inadequate safety measures.

  8. Analysis of overexposure cases for female radiation workers in medical and research institutions in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation Protection Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for 40,000 radiation workers, of which about 22,000 radiation workers are from industrial, medical and research institutions. The number of female radiation workers constitute about 5% of the total radiation workers monitored. Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that for men except for pregnant women (foetus). Equivalent dose above 10 mSv in a service period is investigated as to the causes of exposure whether the exposure was really received by the worker (genuine) or only the monitoring badge received the exposure due to other reasons (non-genuine) and necessary remedial actions are taken. Analysis of overexposure cases in female radiation workers as a group has been done for the period of four years (1990-1993) and the conclusions are presented. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  9. Case note: ECJ (case C-372/99, Commission v. Italian Republic: Collective action under the Unfair Contract Terms Directive)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, M.

    2003-01-01

    Case C-372/99 concerns an infringement procedure under Article 226 EC against the Italian Republic (hereinafter also referred to as: Italy) for failing to adopt the necessary measures to enable (consumer) organisations to prevent the use of unfair contract terms. In its ruling, the ECJ reiterated

  10. Managing resistance to change: the social worker's role in case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan-Stern, Mary

    2005-01-01

    From time to time in my responsibilities as a medical social worker, I become involved with a "complicated" case. Translation: a case was referred to the social worker to intervene and "fix" the problem because no one else knew what to do with the client or the issues surrounding the client. Necessity is the mother of invention, so when all else failed, that was my cue to be creative.

  11. Attrition and Rape Case Characteristics: A Profile and Comparison of Female Sex Workers and Non-Sex Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Susan J; Callaghan, Lynne; Grafton, Iain; Falcone, M Aurora; Shaw, Steve

    2016-07-01

    The attrition of rape cases from the criminal justice system (CJS) remains high and there is a paucity of research in relation to marginalized groups. Sex workers (SWs) are vulnerable to sexual violence due to the nature of their work. They are also unlikely to report such violence to police for a range of reasons. Two stages of research sought to describe the victim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics of SW rape and to examine the attrition of these cases. All rapes and attempted rapes (N = 1,146) reported to police in a large city in the South West of England over a 21-year period were examined; 67 cases involved SWs. Data were extracted from police files in line with the variables of interest. Secondary analysis of the total number of SW rapes (n = 67) resulted in a profile of these cases. A matched pairs study revealed significant differences in victim, perpetrator, and assault characteristics between SW (n = 62) and non-sex-worker (NSW) samples (n = 62). Although no significant difference was found in terms of attrition from the CJS, SW cases were observed to secure more convictions for rape than NSW cases. The implications of the findings for practice and future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. PREPARING SOCIAL WORKERS FOR ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN CARE AND PROTECTION CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias, Carmel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Children’s Act 38 of 2005 contains provisions enabling utilisation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR in cases involving children. This article focuses on the specialised training required to prepare social workers to be effective ADR practitioners. By drawing on comparative data, the article demonstrates that it is essential for social workers to receive such training in South Africa. The nature of the training that would be required to empower South African social workers to be effective ADR facilitators in care and protection cases is explored. Proposals for a South African training programme are put forward.

  13. Social Workers in Home Care: The Israeli Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    In Israel, the government partially supports personal home care services (grooming, feeding, assistance with transfers) as a means to maintain frail individuals in their home environment for as long as possible. Social workers capture a prominent position in these arrangements as initiators and supervisors of personal home care services. This…

  14. Gender, Cross-border Migrant Workers and Citizenship : Case Study ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Burmese women workers in Thai border factories are generally excluded from the benefits and protection that define citizenship entitlements. ... have little or no access to basic services, including health and education for themselves or their dependents. ... New funding opportunity for gender equality and climate change.

  15. a case study of Ede north local government workers.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    failure of these groups of workers and the healthy populace. Keywords:Kidney failure, risk behaviours, attitude, healthy populace. *Corresponding author: Tijani K.I.A (Mrs); Email: sholashewa@gmail.com. Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Faculty of Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

  16. On becoming a domestic worker the case of Mpumalanga Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the labour market and economy. However, this work is often gender biased. The research pursued a gendered approach in an attempt to examine the challenges faced by domestic workers in the area. A qualitative research approach was used in the investigation. The findings of the study are that harassment of domestic ...

  17. Return to work of workers without a permanent employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; Vermeulen, Sylvia J; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2014-06-12

    Workers without a permanent employment contract represent a vulnerable group within the working population. Mental disorders are a major cause of sickness absence within this group. Common mental disorders are stress-related, depressive and anxiety disorders. To date, little attention has been paid to effective return to work interventions for this type of sick-listed workers. Therefore, a participatory supportive return to work program has been developed. It combines elements of a participatory return to work program, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job.The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this program compared to care as usual. The cost-effectiveness of the participatory supportive return to work program will be examined in a randomised controlled trial with a follow-up of twelve months.The program strongly involves the sick-listed worker in the identification of obstacles for return to work and possible solutions, resulting in a consensus based action plan. This plan will be used as a starting point for the search of suitable competitive employment with support of a rehabilitation agency. During this process the insurance physician of the sick-listed worker contacts other caregivers to promote integrated care.Workers eligible to participate in this study have no permanent employment contract, have applied for a sickness benefit at the Dutch Social Security Agency and are sick-listed between two and fourteen weeks due to mental health problems.The primary outcome measure is the duration until first sustainable return to work in a competitive job. Outcomes are measured at baseline and after three, six, nine and twelve months. If the participatory supportive return to work program proves to be cost-effective, the social security system, the sick-listed worker and society as a whole will benefit. A cost-effective return to work program will lead to a

  18. High Seroprevalence of Leptospira Exposure in Meat Workers in Northern Mexico: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro; Martinez-Ramirez, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in workers occupationally exposed to raw meat has been poorly studied. This work aimed to determine the association between Leptospira exposure and the occupation of meat worker, and to determine the seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, work, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the meat workers studied. Methods We performed a case-control study in 124 meat workers and 124 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico. Sera of cases and controls were analyzed for anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Data of meat workers were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The association of Leptospira exposure with the characteristics of meat workers was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 22 (17.7%) of 124 meat workers and in eight (6.5%) of 124 controls (OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 1.33 - 7.33; P = 0.006). Seroprevalence of Leptospira infection was similar between male butchers (17.6%) and female butchers (18.2%) (P = 1.00). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, work and behavioral variables showed that Leptospira exposure was associated with duration in the activity, rural residence, and consumption of snake meat and unwashed raw fruits. Conclusions This is the first case-control study of the association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of meat worker. Results indicate that meat workers represent a risk group for Leptospira exposure. Risk factors for Leptospira exposure found in this study may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Leptospira infection. PMID:26858797

  19. Risk Factors for Heat-related Illness in U.S. Workers: An OSHA Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Aaron W; Cannon, Dawn L; Arbury, Sheila B; Thomas, Richard J; Hodgson, Michael J

    2018-05-30

    The aim of this study was to describe risk factors for heat-related illness (HRI) in U.S. workers. We reviewed a subset of HRI enforcement investigations conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) from 2011 through 2016. We assessed characteristics of the workers, employers, and events. We stratified cases by severity to assess whether risk factors were more prevalent in fatal HRIs. We analyzed 38 investigations involving 66 HRIs. Many workers had predisposing medical conditions or used predisposing medications. Comorbidities were more prevalent in workers who died. Most (73%) fatal HRIs occurred during the first week on the job. Common clinical findings in heat stroke cases included multiorgan failure, muscle breakdown, and systemic inflammation. Severe HRI is more likely when personal susceptibilities coexist with work-related and environmental risk factors. Almost all HRIs occur when employers do not adhere to preventive guidelines.

  20. The case of royalties in utilizations contracts; O caso dos royalties nos contratos de utilizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoel, Cacio Oliveira; Santos, Edmilson Moutinho dos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Programa Interunidades de Pos-Graduacao em Energia

    2004-07-01

    This paper aims to discuss issues related to royalties payment in cases of oil and natural gas fields unitization. Those case were already registered in Brazil although the generic legislation regulating royalties payment does not contemplating them specifically. The contractual concepts of fields unitization are initially presented, highlighting the difficulties of implementing those contractual models and including the discussion regarding royalties payment. The doctrinal understanding of royalty is considered to demonstrate the possible difficulties that unitizations contracts impose for those royalties payment in the Brazilian legislation. In the end, the authors suggest exploring ideas for solving the issues raised by paper. (author)

  1. 25 CFR 20.318 - What case management responsibilities does the social services worker have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What case management responsibilities does the social... HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Employment Requirements § 20.318 What case management responsibilities does the social services worker have? In working...

  2. Determining the optimal mix of federal and contract fire crews: a case study from the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan

    2006-01-01

    Federal land management agencies in the United States are increasingly relying on contract crews as opposed to agency fire crews. Despite this increasing reliance on contractors, there have been no studies to determine what the optimal mix of contract and agency fire crews should be. A mathematical model is presented to address this question and is applied to a case...

  3. Impact of employment contract changes on workers' quality of working life, job insecurity, health and work-related attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, A.F.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Bossche, S.N.J.van den; Taris, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Changes in employment contracts may impact the quality of working life, job insecurity, health and work-related attitudes. We examined the validity of two partly competing theoretical approaches. Based upon a segmentation approach, we expected no change in scores among stable

  4. Work activities and workers' health in broiler production: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M do CB de Alencar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of health related symptoms and to analyze the work activities of workers in contracted non-mechanized broiler farms in two regions of the state of Paraná in order to determine possible factors associated to those symptoms. The methods consisted in selecting the houses and the workers, and to apply a questionnaire that included demographic data, questions related to work, the Nordic Questionnaire for Musculoskeletal Symptoms, other symptoms (runny nose, skin itching, throat and eye irritation. In addition, workers were asked if they enjoyed their job, if the supervisor motivated them to work, and if they were afraid to lose their job. Activities were submitted to systematic observations, adapted from Ergonomics, and the loads carried were analyzed and some instruments weighted. The study included 80 workers of both genders between 16 and 59 years, being 40 from each region. There were evidences of low back pain risk in the activities of filling drinkers and washing bell drinkers, with a higher prevalence in region A, where automated systems were less frequently used. The study suggests that mechanized filling of feeders, and the use of nipple drinkers may prevent health problems. It was also found that psychosocial aspects were associated to musculoskeletal symptoms. Promoting better working conditions is essential, as these aspects can affect human behavior at work.

  5. Entamoeba histolytica Infection in Female Sex Workers: A Matched Case-Control Study in Durango, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Estrada-Martinez, Sergio; Perez-Alamos, Alma Rosa; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2017-07-01

    Infection with Entamoeba histolytica ( E. histolytica ) can be potentially transmitted by sexual contact. The seroepidemiology of E. histolytica in female sex workers has not been studied. The aim of the study was to determine whether E. histolytica is associated with the occupation of female sex work. In addition, the correlates of E. histolytica seroprevalence in female sex workers were also investigated. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study of 187 female sex workers and 374 women without sex work. Cases and controls were tested for the presence of E. histolytica IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassay. Seroprevalence association with the characteristics of female sex workers was determined by bivariate analysis. Anti- E. histolytica IgG antibodies were found in five (2.7%) of 187 female sex workers and in 16 (4.3%) of 374 controls (odds ratios (OR) = 0.61; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.22 - 1.70; P = 0.34). Mean optical density of the immunoassay in seropositive cases and controls was 1.35 ± 0.93 and 0.73 ± 0.45, respectively (P = 0.05). Seroprevalence of E. histolytica infection did not vary significantly with age, education, socioeconomic level, or health status of sex workers. Seropositivity to E. histolytica did not correlate with work characteristics such as duration in the occupation, condom use, type of sex, or a history of sexually transmitted diseases, or with behavioral variables such as washing hands before eating, or consumption of untreated water. Results indicate that female sex workers do not have an increased risk for E. histolytica infection in Durango City, Mexico. Further studies to determine the risk of infection with E. histolytica by sexual contact should be conducted.

  6. Land lease contract and prior right of lessee to concluding the new land lease contract - case of Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bandlerová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Land lease is one of the few possible ways to use the agricultural land effectively. This is caused by problems in the proprietary and user relationships, therefore the agricultural land lease and its legal regulation is especially important for Slovakia. This paper deals with the selected legal arrangements related to the agricultural land lease in Slovakia with an objective to identify application problems faced by lessees and lessors of agricultural land. When regulating the agricultural land lease relationships, the Slovak law maker prefers dispositive legal norms. However, this method is rarely used in the application practice. Contracting parties often focus only on obligatory characters of the contract, relying on the legal text of dispositive provisions. The legal arrangement of the lessee’s prior right to sign the new lease contract attracts a particular attention. Current legal regulation of this lessee’s right seems to be unenforceable; on the other hand, it collides with the basic human rights. This provision needs to be either cancelled or adjusted so that it achieves the objective defined by the law maker and so that it is legally enforceable in compliance with superior legal norms.

  7. Estimates and Predictions of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis Cases among Redeployed Coal Workers of the Fuxin Mining Industry Group in China: A Historical Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at estimating possible Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP cases as of 2012, and predicting future CWP cases among redeployed coal workers from the Fuxin Mining Industry Group. This study provided the scientific basis for regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis and labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted mines. The study cohort included 19,116 coal workers. The cumulative incidence of CWP was calculated by the life-table method. Possible CWP cases by occupational category were estimated through the average annual incidence rate of CWP and males' life expectancy. It was estimated that 141 redeployed coal workers might have suffered from CWP as of 2012, and 221 redeployed coal workers could suffer from CWP in the future. It is crucial to establish a set of feasible and affordable regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis as well as labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted coal mines in China.

  8. The effect of expedited rotator cuff surgery in injured workers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmjou, Helen; Lincoln, Sandra; Boljanovic, Dragana; Gallay, Stephen; Henry, Patrick; Richards, Robin R; Holtby, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Expediting rotator cuff surgery is expected to facilitate recovery and return to work in injured workers. This case-control study examined the effect of expedited rotator cuff surgery on recovery and work status in injured workers. Injured workers who had undergone an expedited rotator cuff surgery funded by parallel-pay insurance (study group) were compared with workers who had used the public health insurance (control group) while adjusting for sex, age, severity of pathology, and follow-up period. Disability was measured by the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Standardized Assessment Form score. The percentage of patients who exceeded the minimal clinically important difference of 17 points in the ASES was calculated. The study group waited less time to have surgery than the control group (P workers who underwent expedited rotator cuff surgery reported less disability and had a more successful return to work after surgery than injured workers who waited longer for specialist assessment and surgery within the public health system. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contract engineers cut costs, and flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, V.M.

    1991-01-01

    Today's rapid expansion of technology is an important reason for considering hiring contract engineering labor for your power plant because technical specialization is an important aspect of the contract engineering industry. This paper reports that another reason is addressing peak work loads. Any amount of technical assistance is available to assist in meeting schedules. Although a typical human resources department of a utility or architect/engineer may contain a few hundred active resumes, a contract engineering firm may have upwards of 40,000 resumes on file from all parts of the country. Because contract workers know that contract agencies keep abreast of client needs, they are more apt to forward updated resumes to such agencies. Used properly, a contract engineering company's services will augment the efforts of a human resources group and, in the case of some smaller companies, actually take the place of all internal recruiting efforts

  10. Esophageal cancer among Brazilian agricultural workers: case-control study based on death certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Armando; Alexandre, Pedro Celso Braga; Chrisman, Juliana de Rezende; Markowitz, Steven B; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge; Koifman, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    Several studies suggest that agricultural workers are at higher risk to develop and die by certain types of cancer. Esophageal cancer is not commonly listed among these types. However, some recent studies indicated that if there is an association between agricultural working and esophageal cancer, it s more likely to be observed among workers highly exposed to pesticides. In the present study, the magnitude of the association between agricultural working and esophageal cancer mortality was evaluated in a high pesticide use area in Brazil, through a death certificate-based case-control study. Cases were individuals from both genders, 30-59 years old, for whom basic cause of death was ascertained as cancer of the esophagus. For each case, one control was randomly selected from all possible controls for which the basic cause of death was ascertained as different from neoplasm and diseases of the digestive system. In addition, controls matched their cases by sex, age, year of death, and state of residence. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were then calculated to estimate the magnitude of the risk. Results showed that, in general, agricultural workers were at significantly higher risk to die by esophageal cancer, when compared to non-agricultural workers. Stratified analysis also revealed that the magnitude of such risk was slightly higher among illiterate agricultural workers, and simultaneous adjustment for several covariates showed that the risk was quantitatively higher among younger southern agricultural workers. These results suggest the esophageal cancer may be included among those types of cancer etiologically associated to agricultural working. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of the safety evaluation system in the respects of organizational factors and workers' consciousness. Pt. 4. Application of the system for contract companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Naoko; Hirose, Ayako; Hayase, Kenichi; Tsuge, Tadafumi; Sasou, Kunihide; Takano, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop a safety evaluation system which clarifies the safety level of an organization. As a basic method of evaluation using a questionnaire had been established, now that the generalization is needed for the system. Hence, this paper is intended to consider the applicability of the system for contract companies. Subjects were workers who belonged to contract companies engaging in the maintenance of power plants in regular inspections. The following results were obtained: 1) The Comprehensive Safety Index (CSI) taking into account individual and organizational factors was identified using the principal component analysis. 2) The validity of CSI was confirmed with significant correlations between the CSI score and the rate of accidents. 3) Careful consideration should be provided for individual factors especially when evaluating the safety level of subcontract companies. 4) It seemed necessary to take into account the influence of parent companies and occupational hazards level. 5) The comparison among different industries should be avoided because of the difference in organizational structures and subjects of attention for keeping safety. (author)

  12. Return of overseas contract workers and their rehabilitation and development in Kerala (India). A critical account of policies, performance and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, P R

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the situation of labor migrants from Kerala state, India, who were 40-60% of all contract workers in the Middle East and who returned after the mid-1980s. Descriptions are provided of the characteristics of return migrants, the Kerala economy, return migration policies, and impact studies of returnees. About 500,000 returned to Kerala. Returnees were middle aged, with low levels of education, skills, and experience. About 50% of returnees remained unemployed. The other 50% either retired or sought self-employment or other wage labor. Surveys conducted in 1985, 1987, 1993-93, and 1997 reveal that returnees peaked during the 1990s. By 1997, returnees to the Kadinamkulam panchayat included about one-sixth who were women. Most returnees had worked in Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Kuwait. The reasons for return were poor working and living conditions, lack of opportunity or contract for staying longer, or forced repatriation. Upon return, 50% of the women and about 16% of the men remained unemployed. Return wages were about the same as before the migration. Returnees complained about the lack of support from government and society. Impact studies do not differentiate migration effects from development effects in general. Evaluation should focus on multidimensional impacts and individual attainment of emigration goals.

  13. Effectiveness of a return-to-work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Bonefaas-Groenewoud, Karin; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    Both the presence of mental health problems and the absence of an employment contract have been related to long-term sickness absence and unemployment, indicating a need for return-to-work (RTW) interventions. Our aim was to study the effectiveness of a new participatory, supportive RTW program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed 2-14 weeks due to a common mental disorder, in comparison with usual care. A participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job were part of the new program. The primary outcome measure was duration until first sustainable RTW in competitive employment. Cox regression analysis was applied to study this outcome. Secondary outcome measures were average working hours, duration until any type of employment, sickness benefit duration, and perceived health and functioning. In total, 186 participants were included in the study and randomly allocated to an intervention group (N=94), or control group (N= 92). A hazard ratio (HR) of 1.15 (95% CI 0.61-2.16) for duration until first sustainable RTW indicated no significant effect of allocation to the new program, compared to usual care. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in favor of the intervention group on any secondary outcome. Compared to usual care, the new program did not result in a significant shorter duration until first sustainable RTW. However, due to low protocol adherence, it remains unclear what the results would have been if the program had been executed according to protocol.

  14. Bedford v. Canada: a paradigmatic case toward ensuring the human and health rights of sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galldin, Karin; Robertson, Leslie; Wiseman, Charlene

    2011-10-01

    The Criminal Code of Canada prohibits certain aspects of sex work: the keeping of a common bawdy-house, living off the avails of prostitution and communicating for the purposes of prostitution in a public place. These legal constraints impede sex workers' ability to practise their profession safely and without risk to their bodily integrity; they also impair their personal autonomy and can lead to their stigmatization. Bedford v. Canada is a groundbreaking case, since the applicants and intervening organizations seek to overturn aspects of Canadian law that specifically put the health and human rights of sex workers at risk.

  15. A participatory supportive return to work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts, L.; van Dongen, J.M.; Schaafsma, F.G.; van Mechelen, W.; Anema, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental disorders are associated with high costs for productivity loss, sickness absence and unemployment. A participatory supportive return to work (RTW) program was developed in order to improve RTW among workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental

  16. Take-or-pay contract robustness: A three step story told by the Brazil-Bolivia gas case?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glachant, Jean-Michel; Hallack, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Neo-institutional economics (NEI) has long shown that take-or-pay (ToP) long-term contracts provide a robust framework for safeguarding the interests of both upstream and downstream parties in the gas industry. The case of gas trade between Brazil and Bolivia presents an opportunity to re-examine empirically and to review the robust nature of the ToP framework over time. This case reveals that the positions of the contractors actually change giving rise to a veritable lifecycle of the contractual arrangement. Such a contract can be seen to span three successive phases. The first phase of the contract cycle begins when it is signed; allowing the investments to begin. The second phase starts when investments have been completed and the actual trade in gas begins. The third phase of the contract cycle comes when the increasing flow of gas comes close to saturating capacity and the volume levels for downstream market volume have been reached. These three contract phases are thus distinguished by how robust the alignment of the parties' interests is. The added value of the paper is then both empirical and analytical: the case study provides a brand new lifecycle analysis of the performance of ToP long-term contracting into an NEI framework

  17. Leukemia and brain tumors in Norwegian railway workers, a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynes, T; Jynge, H; Vistnes, A I

    1994-04-01

    In an attempt to assess whether exposure to electromagnetic fields on Norwegian railways induces brain tumors or leukemia, the authors conducted a nested case-control study of railway workers based on incident cases from the Cancer Registry of Norway in a cohort of 13,030 male Norwegian railway workers who had worked on either electric or non-electric railways. The cohort comprised railway line, outdoor station, and electricity workers. The case series comprised 39 men with brain tumors and 52 men with leukemia (follow-up, 1958-1990). Each case was matched on age with four or five controls selected from the same cohort. The exposure of each study subject to electric and magnetic fields was evaluated from cumulative exposure measures based on present measurements and historical data. Limited information on potential confounders such as creosote, solvents, and herbicides was also collected; information on whether the subject had smoked was obtained by interviews with the subjects or work colleagues. The case-control analysis showed that men employed on electric railways, compared with non-electric ones, had an odds ratio for leukemia of 0.70 (adjusted for smoking) and an odds ratio for brain tumor of 0.87. No significant trend was shown for exposure to either magnetic or electric fields. These results do not support an association between exposure to 16 2/3-Hertz electric or magnetic fields and the risk for leukemia or brain tumors.

  18. Co-operation and conflict under hard and soft contracting regimes: case studies from England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David; Allen, Pauline; Doheny, Shane; Petsoulas, Christina; Vincent-Jones, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines NHS secondary care contracting in England and Wales in a period which saw increasing policy divergence between the two systems. At face value, England was making greater use of market levers and utilising harder-edged service contracts incorporating financial penalties and incentives, while Wales was retreating from the 1990 s internal market and emphasising cooperation and flexibility in the contracting process. But there were also cross-border spill-overs involving common contracting technologies and management cultures that meant that differences in on-the-ground contracting practices might be smaller than headline policy differences suggested. The nature of real-world contracting behaviour was investigated by undertaking two qualitative case studies in England and two in Wales, each based on a local purchaser/provider network. The case studies involved ethnographic observations and interviews with staff in primary care trusts (PCTs) or local health boards (LHBs), NHS or Foundation trusts, and the overseeing Strategic Health Authority or NHS Wales regional office, as well as scrutiny of relevant documents. Wider policy differences between the two NHS systems were reflected in differing contracting frameworks, involving regional commissioning in Wales and commissioning by either a PCT, or co-operating pair of PCTs in our English case studies, and also in different oversight arrangements by higher tiers of the service. However, long-term relationships and trust between purchasers and providers had an important role in both systems when the financial viability of organisations was at risk. In England, the study found examples where both PCTs and trusts relaxed contractual requirements to assist partners faced with deficits. In Wales, news of plans to end the purchaser/provider split meant a return to less precisely-specified block contracts and a renewed concern to build cooperation between LHB and trust staff. The interdependency of local

  19. Health worker perceptions of integrating mobile phones into community case management of malaria in Saraya, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanas, Demetri A; Ndiaye, Youssoupha; MacFarlane, Matthew; Manga, Isaac; Siddiqui, Ammar; Velez, Olivia; Kanter, Andrew S; Nichols, Kim; Hennig, Nils

    2015-05-01

    Although community case management of malaria increases access to life-saving care in isolated settings, it contends with many logistical challenges. Mobile phone health information technology may present an opportunity to address a number of these barriers. Using the wireless adaptation of the technology acceptance model, this study assessed availability, ease of use, usefulness, and job relevance of mobile phones by health workers in Saraya, Senegal. This study conducted seven key informant interviews with government health workers, and three focus groups and 76 surveys with lay health workers. Principal findings included that mobile phones are already widely available and used, and that participants valued using phones to address training, stock management, programme reporting, and transportation challenges. By documenting widespread use of mobile phones and health worker perceptions of their most useful applications, this paper provides a framework for their integration into the community case management of malaria programme in Saraya, Senegal. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A case-control study of airways obstruction among construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, John; Welch, Laura; Ringen, Knut; Quinn, Patricia; Chen, Anna; Haas, Scott

    2015-10-01

    While smoking is the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), occupational exposures to vapors, gases, dusts, and fumes (VGDF) increase COPD risk. This case-control study estimated the risk of COPD attributable to occupational exposures among construction workers. The study population included 834 cases and 1243 controls participating in a national medical screening program for older construction workers between 1997 and 2013. Qualitative exposure indices were developed based on lifetime work and exposure histories. Approximately 18% (95% CI = 2-24%) of COPD risk can be attributed to construction-related exposures, which are additive to the risk contributed by smoking. A measure of all VGDF exposures combined was a strong predictor of COPD risk. Construction workers are at increased risk of COPD as a result of broad and complex effects of many exposures acting independently or interactively. Control methods should be implemented to prevent worker exposures, and smoking cessation should be promoted. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. H. Beale et al., Cases, Materials and Texts on Contract Law, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2010; and T. K. Graziano, Comparative Contract Law: Cases, Materials and Exercises (Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael L. Johnstone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available view essay of the following books on comparative law: Hugh Beale, Bénédicte Fauvarque-Cosson, Jacobien Rutgers, Denis Tallon and Stefan Vogenauer, Cases, Materials and Text on Contract Law, 2nd ed. (Ius Commune Casebooks for the Common Law of Europe No. 6 (Oxford, United Kingdom: Hart Publishing, 2010 lxxxiv + 1358 pp. paper. 38.95 GBP; and Thomas Kadner Graziano, Comparative Contract Law: Cases, Materials and Exercises (Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrage MacMillan, 2009 xi + 510 pp. paper. 34.99 GBP

  2. 76 FR 11411 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Multiyear Contracting (DFARS Case 2009-D026)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... economic order quantity procurement, are merged into 217.170, General, and 217.172, Multiyear contracts for... guided by the following principles when entering into a multiyear contract for services: (1) The portion... authorized by law (10 U.S.C. 2306b and 10 U.S.C. 2306c). A multiyear supply contract may be authorized by an...

  3. The use of the case study method in radiation worker continuing training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    Typical methods of continuing training are often viewed by employees as boring, redundant and unnecessary. It is hoped that the operating experience lesson in the required course, Radiation Worker Requalification, will be well received by employees because actual RFP events will be presented as case studies. The interactive learning atmosphere created by the case study method stimulates discussion, develops analytical abilities, and motivates employees to use lessons learned in the workplace. This problem solving approach to continuing training incorporates cause and effect analysis, a technique which is also used at RFP to investigate events. A method of designing the operating experience lesson in the Radiation Worker Requalification course is described in this paper. 7 refs., 2 figs

  4. Why haven’t weather derivatives been more successful as futures contracts? A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Till

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Why have some seemingly promising futures contracts not succeeded in the recent past? In this paper, we examine one such example, the weather derivatives market. In two companion working papers, we also analyze two other futures market failures: namely, in the pulp market and in the uranium market. The structure of this paper is as follows. First we provide a brief history of weather derivatives contracts as well as a description of these contracts. Next we review customized over-the-counter (OTC weather derivatives contracts, as provided by reinsurers, and then we review why futures contracts are not as successful a method of risk transfer. Lastly we describe how weather exposures do not sufficiently match up against the criteria for the successful launch of a futures contract

  5. Does Contract Farming Improve Smallholder Farmers Income? The Case of Avocado Farming in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Mwambi, Mercy; Oduol, Judith; Mshenga, Patience M.; Mwanarusi, Saidi

    2013-01-01

    Contract farming is seen by its proponents as a tool for creating new market opportunities as well as for providing credit and training, leading to increased incomes of smallholder farmers. Critics, however, argue that contract farming encourages unequal bargaining relationships with agribusiness firms and is likely to pass risks to farmers, thus favouring large scale farmers at the expense of smallholders. Another school of thought contends that the effect of contract farming on the liveliho...

  6. Lessons learned from case studies of worker exposures to radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Guilmette, R.A.; Scott, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Considerable efforts in the aerosol science and health protection communities are devoted to developing a defensible technical basis for measuring, modeling, and mitigating toxic aerosols. These efforts involve understanding aerosol source terms, projecting potential aerosol releases, describing their behavior in the workplace and environment, developing instruments and techniques to measure the aerosols, designing ways to contain or control the aerosols, modeling and measuring uptake by workers and other people, estimating health effects, and planning appropriate responses. To help in this effort, we have compiled a data base of case studies involving releases of aerosols and worker exposures in a wide range of industries. Sources of information have included personal communications, limited distribution reports, open literature publications, and reports of abnormal occurrences in U.S. Department of Energy facilities and among licensees of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data base currently includes more than 100 cases. The case studies have been organized according to the radionuclides involved and the circumstances and consequences of the release. This information has been used to address a number of important questions, such as the adequacy of current aerosol sampling and monitoring procedures, areas needing improvement, and strategies for planning for or responding to accidents. One area of particular interest is related to strategies for prospective or retrospective characterization of aerosol source terms. In some cases, worker exposures have involved aerosols that are similar in particle size distribution, composition, and solubility to aerosols routinely produced in the normal process activities. In such cases, prospective characterization of aerosol source terms has provided relevant and useful information

  7. The roles and needs of community health workers in developing countries: an exploratory case study in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khalala, G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available counseling and testing. Community Health Workers play a significant role in primary health care provision to vulnerable communities[5][6]. Although the importance of Community Health Workers in the provision of primary health care to rural... slightly urbanized (Soweto). In terms of data collection, group interviews and questionnaires were used as data collection tools. 1) Selection of case studies Case study was chosen as an appropriate approach as this study sought to explore...

  8. Outdoor workers and sun protection strategies: two case study examples in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendall, Marguerite C; Stoneham, Melissa; Crane, Phil; Fleming, MaryLou; Janda, Monika; Tenkate, Thomas; Youl, Philippa; Kimlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor workers are at risk of developing skin cancer because they are exposed to high levels of harmful ultraviolet radiation. The Outdoor Workers Sun Protection Project investigated sun protection strategies for high risk outdoor workers in rural and regional Australia. Fourteen workplaces (recruitment rate 37%) across four industries in rural and regional Queensland, Australia were recruited to the OWSPP. In 2011-2012, data were collected using pre- and post-intervention interviews and discussion groups. This article presents two workplaces as case study examples. The flat organisational structure of workplace 1 supported the implementation of the Sun Safety Action Plan (SSAP), whilst the hierarchical organisational nature of workplace 2 delayed implementation of the SSAP. Neither workplace had an existing sun protection policy but both workplaces adopted one. An effect related to the researchers' presence was seen in workplace 1 and to a lesser degree in workplace 2. Overt reciprocity was seen between management and workers in workplace 1 but this was not so evident in workplace 2. In both workplaces, the role of the workplace champion was pivotal to SSAP progression. These two case studies highlight a number of contextually bound workplace characteristics related to sun safety. These issues are (1) the structure of workplace, (2) policy, (3) an effect related to the researchers' presence, (4) the workplace champion and (5) reciprocity. There are several recommendations from this article. Workplace health promotion strategies for sun safety need to be contextualised to individual workplaces to take advantage of the strengths of the workplace and to build capacity.

  9. Contract Formation and Performance under the UCC and CISG: A Comparative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kurt M.; Rymsza, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Contracts for the sale of goods in the United States are governed by the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) in every state but one. When one of the parties to the contract is based in another country, however, the conflict of laws principles that will determine which country's law governs the transaction can be confounding. In addition, the commercial…

  10. A Social Contract for University-Industry Collaboration: A Case of Project-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Tero

    This study determines a social contract for a form of university-industry collaboration to a project-based learning environment in close collaboration with industry. The author's previous studies on moral conflicts in a project-based learning (PjBL) environment and his 5-year engagement in the PjBL environment are used as background knowledge, and John Rawls' veil of ignorance is used as a method in the contract formulation. Fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for with the contract which constitutes of sets of obligations for each party, students, clients, and university (instructors) in the chosen project course. With the contract fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for and the most dilemmatic moral conflicts are tried to be avoided. The forming of the social contract is evaluated, and implications for research and collaborations in practice are offered.

  11. Availability and the use of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code among workers employed on the basis of employment contracts in small and medium enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Andysz; Aleksandra Jacukowicz; Aleksander Stańczak; Marcin Drabek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Polish Labour Code provides employees with a range of solutions (benefits) supporting them in achieving balance between work and private life. This paper was aimed at indicating availability and the use of legal benefits supporting work-life balance (WLB) among Polish workers of small and medium enterprises. Material and Methods: The study sample included 219 respondents, aged 22–64, working in small and medium enterprises and employed on the basis of employment contracts for at l...

  12. The Court of Justice of the European Union and Fixed-term Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Porte, Caroline; Emmenegger, Patrick

    Fixed-term work benefits employers and increases the prospects of employability of various categories of workers, but it is inherently precarious with regard to dismissal protection and the risk of recurrent fixed-term contracts. Furthermore, workers on this type of contract are vulnerable also...... that the fixedterm work directive is used as an entry point to address the equal treatment of workers, and that it is the principle of anti-discrimination that provides the legal basis for judgements. Equal treatment is affirmed, in the cases analysed, in relation to different provisions of labour contracts...

  13. Case-control study of lung cancer among workers at a uranium processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cookfair, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to radiation resulting from the inhalation of uranium dust and the dust of uranium-bearing compounds and death due to lung cancer. Cases and controls were chosen from a cohort of white male workers employed at one uranium processing plant during World War II. The 330 cases consisted of all lung cancer deaths occurring in the cohort between 1943 and 1973. Level of exposure to radiation and other potential workplace carcinogens was determined for each worker using process manuals, industrial hygiene reports, air monitoring data and individual work histories. Smoking status and information regarding medical variables was determined from employee medical records. Cumulative radiation lung dose among study population members ranged from 0 to 75 rads. Data were analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis and logistic regression. Relative risk was found to increase with increasing level of lung dose exposure even after controlling for age, smoking status and other workplace exposures, but only for those who were over the age of 44 when first exposed. A statistically significant excess in risk was found for men in this hire age group with a cumulative lung dose of 20 rads or more. The risk associated with the overall work environment was also investigated using a summary measure of total workplace exposure called chemical rank. A similar relationship existed between chemical rank and lung cancer to that found for cumulative lung dose and lung cancer

  14. Sexual behaviour among casual workers in an international nightlife resort: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellis Mark A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young holidaymakers report increased sexual risk-taking abroad, yet little is currently known about the sexual behaviour of those who extend time abroad through casual work. Methods Information on sexual behaviour was collected via an anonymous questionnaire administered to British bar and nightclub workers in Ibiza (cases, n = 92 and British people visiting Ibiza for holiday purposes only (controls, n = 868. Results Four in five (80.5% cases who arrived in Ibiza without a partner had sex during their stay and of these two thirds (65.5% had unprotected sex. Cases were more likely to report sexual risk-taking in Ibiza than controls and reported greater numbers of sexual partners prior to their visit. However, they had fewer sexual partners per week of stay. Conclusion Casual workers in bars and nightclubs abroad are a key risk group for sexual health and a potential conduit for the international spread of sexually transmitted infections. While they are an important target group for sexual health promotion, appropriately trained they are also ideally placed to deliver sexual health interventions to other young travellers.

  15. A Case-Crossover Study of Heat Exposure and Injury Risk in Outdoor Agricultural Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, June T; Bonauto, David K; Sheppard, Lianne; Busch-Isaksen, Tania; Calkins, Miriam; Adams, Darrin; Lieblich, Max; Fenske, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that heat exposure may increase the risk of traumatic injuries. Published heat-related epidemiological studies have relied upon exposure data from individual weather stations. To evaluate the association between heat exposure and traumatic injuries in outdoor agricultural workers exposed to ambient heat and internal heat generated by physical activity using modeled ambient exposure data. A case-crossover study using time-stratified referent selection among 12,213 outdoor agricultural workers with new Washington State Fund workers' compensation traumatic injury claims between 2000 and 2012 was conducted. Maximum daily Humidex exposures, derived from modeled meteorological data, were assigned to latitudes and longitudes of injury locations on injury and referent dates. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios of injury for a priori daily maximum Humidex categories. The mean of within-stratum (injury day and corresponding referent days) standard deviations of daily maximum Humidex was 4.8. The traumatic injury odds ratio was 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.22), 1.15 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.25), and 1.10 (95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.20) for daily maximum Humidex of 25-29, 30-33, and ≥34, respectively, compared to < 25, adjusted for self-reported duration of employment. Stronger associations were observed during cherry harvest duties in the June and July time period, compared to all duties over the entire study period. Agricultural workers laboring in warm conditions are at risk for heat-related traumatic injuries. Combined heat-related illness and injury prevention efforts should be considered in high-risk populations exposed to warm ambient conditions in the setting of physical exertion.

  16. A Case-Crossover Study of Heat Exposure and Injury Risk in Outdoor Agricultural Workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June T Spector

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that heat exposure may increase the risk of traumatic injuries. Published heat-related epidemiological studies have relied upon exposure data from individual weather stations.To evaluate the association between heat exposure and traumatic injuries in outdoor agricultural workers exposed to ambient heat and internal heat generated by physical activity using modeled ambient exposure data.A case-crossover study using time-stratified referent selection among 12,213 outdoor agricultural workers with new Washington State Fund workers' compensation traumatic injury claims between 2000 and 2012 was conducted. Maximum daily Humidex exposures, derived from modeled meteorological data, were assigned to latitudes and longitudes of injury locations on injury and referent dates. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios of injury for a priori daily maximum Humidex categories.The mean of within-stratum (injury day and corresponding referent days standard deviations of daily maximum Humidex was 4.8. The traumatic injury odds ratio was 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.22, 1.15 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.25, and 1.10 (95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.20 for daily maximum Humidex of 25-29, 30-33, and ≥34, respectively, compared to < 25, adjusted for self-reported duration of employment. Stronger associations were observed during cherry harvest duties in the June and July time period, compared to all duties over the entire study period.Agricultural workers laboring in warm conditions are at risk for heat-related traumatic injuries. Combined heat-related illness and injury prevention efforts should be considered in high-risk populations exposed to warm ambient conditions in the setting of physical exertion.

  17. Preventing Factory Fires through Contracts: Case study of Garment Factories in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Hideki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Following a multi-decade history of lethal fires in the Bangladeshi garment industry, Sato (2012 proposed a contract framework that encourages manufacturers to adopt measures that reduce loss of life. Apart from the humanitarian imperative, the manufacturer has an incentive to sign the contract and adopt its preventative measures because an industrial disaster will cancel its relationship with its global retailer and end the related profits. This theoretical study specifies the optimal contract that incentivizes manufacturers and reduces the occurrence of garment industry fires.

  18. Case-control study of pleural mesothelioma in workers with social security in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Robles-Pérez, Eduardo; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc Arturo; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Rico-Méndez, Flavio Gerardo; Javier, Kelly-García

    2010-03-01

    Environmental and occupational exposure to asbestos in Mexico in the past has been a cause of deaths and health damages. Its magnitude is unknown to date. Our objective was to identify the proportion of cases of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) that can be attributed to and occupational exposure to asbestos. We carried out a case-control study of MPM in 472 workers insured by the Mexican Institute of Social Security, all Valley of Mexico residents, with 119 incident cases and 353 controls. Cases were histologically confirmed. Participants were questioned concerning their occupational history and sociodemographic data. Assignment to one of the four exposures was performed qualitatively by an expert hygienist. Odds ratios (ORs) and attributable risks (ARs) were calculated using a non-conditional logistic regression model. A total of 80.6% of cases and 31.5% of controls had occupational exposure to asbestos. ORs were adjusted for age and gender and by exposure category, and exhibited an increase with probability of exposure as follows: 3.7(95% CI 1.3-10.4) for the likely category and 14.3(95% CI 8-26) for the certain category; AR in the group occupationally exposed to asbestos was 83.2%, and the population AR was 44%. Our results show that the relationship between industrial uses of all forms of asbestos is generating an increase in mesothelioma-related diseases and deaths among Mexican workers. As a public health policy, Mexico should prohibit the use of asbestos in all production processes with the aim of controlling the epidemic and preventing the occurrence of new cases of MPM. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Aerial medical evacuation of health workers with suspected Ebola virus disease in Guinea Conakry-interest of a negative pressure isolation pod-a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindart, Jean-Michel; Peyrouset, Olivier; Palich, Romain; Bing, Abdoul; Kojan, Richard; Barbe, Solenne; Harouna, Souley; Blackwell, Nikki

    2017-03-11

    We report 4 cases of Health Workers (HW) suspected of having contracted Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), transported from the Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA) Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) in N'Zerekore, Guinea to the Treatment Centre for Carers run by the medical corps of the French army in Conakry, the capital of Guinea, which was established on 17 January 2015 and closed on 7 July 2015. In total more than 500 HWs have died from EVD since the epidemic began. This mortality has had significant effects on the ability of local services to respond appropriately to the disaster. The HWs were transported by air in the "Human Stretcher Transit Isolator-Total Containment (Oxford) Limited" (HSTI-TCOL) negative pressure isolation pod. Medical evacuation of patients with suspected, potentially fatal, infectious diseases is feasible with the use of a light isolator for patients without critical dysfunctions.

  20. Epidemiological profile of tuberculosis cases reported among health care workers at the University Hospital in Vitoria, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Galavote, Heleticia Scabelo; Brioshi, Ana Paula; Lacerda, Thamy; Fregona, Geisa; Detoni, Valdério do Valle; Lima, Rita de Cássia Duarte; Dietze, Reynaldo; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2008-08-01

    To describe the epidemiological profile of tuberculosis cases reported among health care workers in the Tuberculosis Control Program of the Cassiano Antonio of Moraes University Hospital in Vitoria, Brazil. A retrospective descriptive study of secondary data was conducted between 2002 and 2006. Twenty-five cases of health care workers with tuberculosis were reported: 8 in nursing technicians (32%); 4 in doctors (16%); 3 in nurses (12%); 2 in radiology technicians (8%) and 8 in professionals from other categories (32%). Of those 25 health care workers, 14 (56%) were male and 11 (44%) were female. The incidence of the disease was highest among those from 35 to 39 years of age. The predominant clinical presentation was extrapulmonary (12 cases, 48%), followed by pulmonary (11 cases, 44%) and a combination of the two (2 cases, 8%). Regarding comorbidities, AIDS, alcoholism and smoking, respectively, were present in 33.3% of the study population. Outcomes were as follows: 22 cases of cure (88%); 2 transfers (8%); and 1 death (4%). The proportion of health care workers diagnosed with tuberculosis in the period studied was 2.53%. The results show the need for heath care workers who work in the tuberculosis control program to fill out the field "professional occupation" on the tuberculosis case registry database reporting forms. In addition, this situation draws attention to the need to implement an occupational tuberculosis control program.

  1. Political consciousness and political action of industrial workers in Ghana : a case study of VALCO workers at Tema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, P.J.J.

    1978-01-01

    What is the political consciousness of Ghanaian workers in large-scale foreign and state enterprises and what action have they engaged in? The present study, based on fieldwork in Ghana in 1975, attempts to answer these questions with regard to answer these questions with regard to industrial

  2. Consequence in Law of the Original Contract Obligation in Case of Recovery of Losses Incurred by Nonfulfillment or Improper Fulfillment of the Contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov I. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the obligations structure concerning the breach of a contract is considered in the article. According to the author’s opinion there simultaneously exists the initial obligation in conformity with the contract and obligation of losses compensation for the contract breach. Such an approach allows to recover damages before the moment when the initial obligation is discontinued by law or by a contract provision. The correlation between the initial obligation and the obligation to compensate losses because of the contract breach is being analyzed here.

  3. Utah Department of Transportation I-15 Case Study (Design-Build Contracting Strategy)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimball, Donna

    1999-01-01

    .... In addition, if the contract continues on its successful path additional progressive legislation may be petitioned from state agencies seeking to increase the construction value for tax dollars expended...

  4. A Collection of JPME Operational Contract Support Case Studies and Vignettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Contracting for goods and services in the contingency operational environment is a mission-enabling necessity; however, analyzing the strategic effects...choosing to contract for goods or services are largely ignored. This project explores the use of OCS in contingency environments, and the positive and...think of the costs literally, as tax dollars spent to enhance mission effectiveness. However, the less literal costs and the associated effects of

  5. Agile Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Pries-Heje, Lene

    2014-01-01

    with “endless” re-negotiation of the requirements; you need a more flexible way to develop IS. A new way of coping with many changes is to use an agile development approach and a fixed budget and resources contract. This paper presents an example case. We analyse the case and design a guideline for how......When you have stable and non-ambiguous requirements then a classic contract for IS between a supplier and a public sector institution based on a requirements specification may be well suited. However, if you have to accept many changes or have ambiguous requirements then you may end up...... to implement a fixed budget and resources contract in the public sector. The guideline includes elements to cope with challenges in a tender process such as transparency, criteria for supplier selection, and live assessment of resource skills and capabilities, as well as achieving the flexibility for change...

  6. Lung cancer risk among workers in the construction industry: results from two case-control studies in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Aude; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Richardson, Lesley; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2015-09-22

    Given the large number of workers in the construction industry, it is important to derive accurate and valid estimates of cancer risk, and in particular lung cancer risk. In most previous studies, risks among construction workers were compared with general populations including blue and white collar workers. The main objectives of this study were to assess whether construction workers experience excess lung cancer risk, and whether exposure to selected construction industry exposures carries excess risks. We wished to address these objectives within the sub-population of blue collar workers. Two case-control studies were conducted in Montreal. Combined, they included 1593 lung cancer cases and 1427 controls, of whom 1304 cases and 1081 controls had been blue collar workers. Detailed lifetime job histories were obtained and translated by experts into histories of exposure to chemical agents. The two key analyses were to estimate odds ratio (OR) estimates of lung cancer risk: a) for all blue-collar construction workers compared with other blue-collar workers, and b) for construction workers exposed to each of 20 exposure agents found in the construction industry compared with construction workers unexposed to those agents. All analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for socio-demographic factors and smoking history. The OR for all construction workers combined was 1.11 (95 % CI: 0.90-1.38), based on 381 blue collar construction workers. Analyses of specific exposures were hampered by small numbers and imprecise estimates. While none of 20 occupational agents examined was significantly associated with lung cancer, the following agents manifested non-significantly elevated ORs: asbestos, silica, Portland cement, soil dust, calcium oxide and calcium sulfate. Compared with other blue collar workers, there was only a slight increased risk of lung cancer for subjects who ever held an occupation in the construction industry. The analyses of

  7. Recognition For Index Option Contracts U nder IAS 39 And IFRS 9 – The Case Of Option Contracts Bound To BIST 30 Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevran Karaca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a limited number of academic studies about accoun ting for derivative products but non of them relating to the accounting for index option contracts. Within the scope of the study, it is aimed to indicate accounting regulations and procedures to be followed under IAS 39 and IFRS 9 for option contracts whi ch traded in Futures and Options Exchange. The BIST 30 index option contracts having the highest volume of transaction and traded in VIOP is the main subject of the study via this objective. It is aimed to make the issue explicit by the help of a fictional ized example about these contracts.

  8. When passion becomes a nightmare: the burnout syndrome in healthcare workers. A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Gitto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of burnout is constantly increasing and the healthcare professionals are more exposed to burnout than other workers, given their close and continuous relationship with disadvantaged customers. An analysis of this phenomenon aimed at identifying the variables that are correlated with a higher probability to develop burnout may allow to recognize those workers who are likely to suffer from this syndrome, suggesting appropriate intervention strategies. This study has been carried out on a sample of 50 professional and pediatric nurses through the submission of a brief test aimed at measuring the risk of burnout. 26 per cent of the people in the sample of 50 nurses, working at different hospitals and public clinics in Messina, Italy, present a high risk of burnout; they would, therefore, benefit from the introduction of preventive measures aimed at contrasting this syndrome. Several variables are correlated positively and significantly with a high level of risk: age, marital status, the circumstance of having children, the years of activity and the type of employment are among these ones. Preventive measures should be implemented in the most critical cases: such measures have some costs, that are, however, lower than the pharmacological and psychological treatment of exhaustion. Hence, it should be advisable favoring direct strategies to identify and eliminate, as far as possible, the causes of burnout, rather than treating its consequences.

  9. Discomforts of tasks video users: The case of workers of ENEA area in Bologna (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenni, P.; Varasano, R.; Cavallaro, E.; Arduini, R.; Mattioli, S.; Tuozzi, G.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the subjective musculoskeletal discomfort in a sample of 334 workers (204 males and 130 females) of the ENEA area in Bologna, using for different periods and tasks video display units (VDU). On a preliminary self report questionnaire the workers have reported: hours at VDU per day, type of task type of hardware, physical-ergonomic environmental conditions, equipment and layout of the work station. Then, on a case-history form, the researcher has recorded for each subject: anamnesis, fatigue symptoms, discomfort and pain perceived in the back, shoulder, hand and arm regions. The results have shown that, in this sample, the main cause for potential musculoskeletal problems is related to aging whereas the women mainly engaged in repetitive jobs seem to be more likely subject to these troubles. About the correlation between type of task and musculoskeletal discomfort, the females refer more complaints than the males, especially when the task is repetitive. Also the number of hours spent at VDU per day is higher in the females. Finally, about physical-ergonomic environmental conditions, most users have not referred discomforts related to lighting, noise, micro climate or to work station (equipment and layout)

  10. A contract-law perspective on legal cases in financial reporting: the Netherlands, 1880-1970

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camfferman, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for the historical analysis of judicial decisions in financial reporting that may provide a basis for comparative research in the historical relation between the law and accounting. It is suggested that contract law may have been the dominant legal domain in which

  11. Take Me Out to the Ballgame, but Keep Me away from the Concession Stand Workers: A Hypothetical Case Involving Negligent Volunteers at Ballparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Jennifer Cordon; York, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothetical case presented in this article challenges students in a legal environment of business course to answer that question by examining key legal concepts in agency and contract law, and to conduct an ethical analysis in a case involving volunteers. Although the events in the following case are hypothetical, the contract that the…

  12. Case report: a work simulation program for a manual worker with a fracture injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Chung; Chow, Jonathan H.W.

    2000-01-01

    Work rehabilitation programs targeting different client groups are available in nearly all major hospital occupational therapy departments in Hong Kong. Clients receiving work rehabilitation are referred from various out-patient clinics and other occupational therapists. Those clients experience limitation in work after their injuries or diseases and plan to return to work after rehabilitation. Program objectives are 1) to assist clients to reach maximum work capacity as rapidly as possible 2) to ensure clients return to work safely 3) to improve clients' work readiness. This case report describes an individualized work simulation program at a general hospital in Hong Kong provided for a typical client who is preparing to return to his worker role. Specific job analysis, goals and program rationale for the client are discussed.

  13. [Respiratory manifestations after exposure to sulfurous anhydride in wine-cellar workers: 6 case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, F; Matray, D; Lambert, R; Hillion, B; Blanchet, C; Teisseire, C; Thibaudier, J M; Raoux, C; Pacheco, Y

    2000-02-01

    Sulfite treatment of wine [a process exploiting the biocidal and anti-oxidant properties of sulfur dioxide (SO2)] involves the use of liquified gas, aqueous solutions or bisulfites, i.e. the salts of sulfurous acid which slowly release SO2. This procedure can result in repeated exposures of operators to significant amounts of SO2. However, risks associated with the use of SO2 are greatly under-estimated by wine producers and wine-cellar workers. We report on 6 cases of respiratory symptoms attributable to SO2 identified during a survey of wine-cellars in the French Beaujolais district. Their pathogenesis is discussed after an overview of the occupational toxicology of SO2.

  14. Working hours and cardiovascular disease in Korean workers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Inchul; Rhie, Jeongbae; Kim, Inah; Ryu, Innshil; Jung, Pil Kyun; Park, Yoo Seok; Lim, Yong-Su; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Park, Shin-Goo; Im, Hyoung-June; Lee, Mi-Young; Won, Jong-Uk

    2014-01-01

    Long working hours can negatively impact a worker's health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between working hours and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and compare the degree of risk based on CVD subtypes in Korean workers. This study was a case-control study of the patients registered in the Occupational Cardiovascular Diseases Surveillance 2010. The cases included 348 patients diagnosed with a CVD (123 cerebral infarction, 69 intracerebral hemorrhage, 57 subarachnoid hemorrhage, 99 acute myocardial infarction). Controls were 769 participants with no history of CVDs matched for gender, age, type of occupation, and region. Participants' working hours in the previous week and the average working hours over the past three months were assessed to examine short-term and long-term effects. After adjusting for confounding factors, the odds ratios (ORs) for CVDs in the short-term were 2.66 (95% Confidence interval (CI) :1.78-3.99) for working ≤40 hours, 1.85 (95% CI: 1.22-2.81) for working 50.1-60 hours and 4.23 (95% CI: 2.81-6.39) for working >60 hours compared with the 40.1-50-hour working group. The ORs in the long-term were 2.90 (95% CI: 1.86-4.52) for working ≤40 hours, 1.73 (95% CI: 1.03-2.90) for working 48.1-52 hours and 3.46 (95% CI: 2.38-5.03) for working >52 hours compared with the 40.1-48-hour working group. Long working hours are related to an increased risk of CVDs, and the degree of risk differs based on CVD subtype. Short working hours are also related to an increased risk for CVDs. More prospective studies targeting specific disease risks are required.

  15. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AMONG WORKERS IN INDUSTRIAL UNITS (A CASE STUDY OF INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN ARDABIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Abdollahi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional ethics is a factor that is under the influence of external factors and with the help of individual conscience causes adherence in a person. As professional ethics is properly guided and strengthened by social or environmental elements, its effects will appear on the output or final product in a desirable way. The present study examines the social influential factors on individual’s level of professional ethics in the workplace. For this purpose, 400 workers in both branches of industrial townships of Ardabil participated in this study. The data for this study was collected from administering a researcher-made questionnaire (consisting of 78 questions, interview, and observation. The findings revealed that socio-cultural factors primarily and individual-personality factors secondarily, affect the person’s work ethics. In addition, social factors such as intimate relationship, gender, education, skill, income, religious belief, and job stability have a positive impact on a person's work ethics.

  16. [Cases of pertussis among healthcare workers in a maternity ward: management of a health alert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjak, D; Delaporte, M F; Bonmarin, I; Levardon, M; Fantin, B

    2006-03-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious acute respiratory tract infection, with a poor prognosis in non-vaccinated new-borns. The authors had for aim to investigate an epidemic of 5 pertussis cases among health care workers (HCW) in our maternity ward with potential exposure of new-borns and to evaluate HCW compliance and experience gain. A retrospective study was made using a questionnaire with HCW on preventive measures taken (antibiotic prophylaxis with erythromycin and wearing a mask). Two hundred and thirty-eight patients were warned of a potential pertussis contamination. No nosocomial case was detected among patients or their new borns. Ten proved or probable cases were identified among 101 HCW having answered (N=101/210, 48%). Sixty percent of HCW people followed the antibiotic treatment and 85% wore a mask among whom 46% adequately. Non-compliance factors were mainly related to adverse effects (41%), delayed information (41%), and false vaccine protection (22%). Crisis communication was felt as unsatisfactory for 72% of HCW and recommendations not adapted for 39% of the staff. This survey points out the difficulty of managing a pertussis alert in a medical ward.

  17. (Meth)Acrylate Occupational Contact Dermatitis in Nail Salon Workers: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKoven, Samuel; DeKoven, Joel; Holness, D Linn

    Recently, many cases of acrylate-associated allergic contact dermatitis have appeared among nail salon workers. Common acrylate-containing products in nail salons include traditional nail polish, ultraviolet-cured shellac nail polish, ultraviolet-cured gel nails, and press-on acrylic nails. Nail salon technicians seen in the occupational medicine clinic in 2015 and 2016 were identified, and their patch test results and clinical features were summarized. Patch testing was done with the Chemotechnique (Meth)Acrylate nail series, and either the North American Standard series or the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening series. Six patients were identified, all women, ages 38 to 58. Common presentations included erythematous dermatitis of the dorsa of the hands, palms, and forearms and fissures on the fingertips. Less common sites of eruptions included the periorbital region, cheeks, posterior ears, neck, sacral area, lateral thighs, and dorsa of the feet. All patients reacted to hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and 5 patients reacted to ethyl acrylate. Each patient also reacted to (meth)acrylates that are not found on either standard series, including ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate. The authors report 6 cases of allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates in nail technicians seen over the past year, representing a new trend in their clinic. These cases are reflective of a growing trend of nail technicians with allergic contact dermatitis associated with occupational (meth)acrylate exposure. Efforts to improve prevention are needed.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Inc., Hickory Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2017-09-01

    Greenhill Contracting built this 3,912-ft2 house in Gardiner, New York, to the high-performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. A highly efficient air-source heat pump heats and cools the home’s interior, while the roof-mounted photovoltaic system offsets electricity usage to cut energy bills to nearly zero. Many months the home owners see a credit on their utility bill.

  19. Procurement of construction services: a case study on bidding competition in Singapore public sector contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, B. L.; Yan, Y.

    2018-04-01

    There are many variables that public clients need to consider in their bidding procedure to enhance efficiency in their procurement for construction services. This paper focusses on the competitive bidding process for public sector procurement of construction services in Singapore. A distinctive feature of the Singapore government competitive bidding process is that full bidding feedback information is released to all competing bidders (and public). The specific objectives are: (i) to examine the degree of competition in the construction markets; and (ii) to examine the bidding performance of competing bidders. Based on a collection of bidding data for a 15-month period, the results show the market environment of the Singapore public sector construction contracting is highly competitive with long bidder lists. In selection of contractors, only 50% of the contracts were awarded to lowest bidders. The results also show that the competing contractors can be broadly classified into three groups based on their bidding performance in terms of number of bidding attempts, bidding success rate and bidding competitiveness. These results provide a useful insight into the bidding competition in the Singapore public sector construction contracting, especially to new market entrants and foreign contractors who want to bid for jobs in Singapore.

  20. Teaching about Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froman, Michael; Kosnoff, Kathy

    1978-01-01

    Presents teaching strategies for introducing high school students to contract law. Offers as a case study a contract agreement between pro football players and team owners. Stresses basic elements of contracts (offer, acceptance, consideration, and understanding the bargaining process). Journal available from the American Bar Association, 1155…

  1. 3 CFR - Government Contracting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... contract oversight could reduce such sums significantly. Government outsourcing for services also raises... a risk that taxpayer funds will be spent on contracts that are wasteful, inefficient, subject to... mission. In such cases, the agency must ensure that the risks associated with noncompetitive contracts are...

  2. The Suitability of the Remedy of Specific Performance to Breach of a "Player's Contract" with Specific Reference to the Mapoe and Santos cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Mould

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During the 1990s, rugby union formation in the Republic of South Africa developed rapidly from a system of strict amateurism to one of professionalism. Professional participants in the sport received salaries for participation, and rugby became a business like any other. As in all forms of business, rugby had to be regulated moreefficiently than had previously been the case. Tighter regulations were instituted by governing bodies, and ultimately labour legislation became applicable to professional rugby. A professional sportsman or woman participating in a team sport is generallyconsidered an employee. This means that the same principles that govern employees in general should also apply to professional sportsmen and women. The exact nature of the "player's contract", a term generally used to describe the contract of employment between a professional sportsman or sportswoman and his or her employer, deserves closer attention. It has been argued with much merit that the "player's contract", while in essence a contract of employment, possesses certain sui generis characteristics. The first aim of this article is to demonstrate how this statement is in fact a substantial one. If it is concluded that the "player's contract" isin fact a sui generis contract of employment, the most suitable remedy in case of breach of contract must be determined. The second aim of this article is to indicate why the remedy of specific performance, which is generally not granted in cases where the defaulting party has to provide services of a personal nature, is the most suitable remedy in case of breach of "player's contracts". To substantiate this statement, recent applicable case law is investigated and discussed, particularly the recent case of Vrystaat Cheetahs (Edms Beperk v Mapoe. Suggestions are finally offered as to how breach of "player's contracts" should be approached by South African courts in future.

  3. Reemployment of Displaced Workers – The Case of a Plant Closing on a Remote Region in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja Jolkkonen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this article are to examine the reemployment of displaced workers and individual factors that predict reemployment and education, earnings in new jobs, and paths to reemployment. This article is based on a case study of the closing down of the Perlos Ltd plants in North Karelia in eastern Finland. From the 1990s, the Perlos Corporation grew from a Nokia subcontractor into a globally operating limited company with a global workforce of over 13,000 workers and almost 2,000 workers in North Karelia. In 2007, the corporation closed down all its production activities in Finland. In the case study, various data sources were used but this article is based mainly on the questionnaire conducted in 2008 among 1,217 trade union members. Logistic and multinomial regression analyses are used as analysis methods. Against expectations, the fast reemployment of the displaced workers was a surprise, which can be explained by the good demand and hidden need for labor in other firms in this region. However, the demand was specific and differentiated between the workers’ job opportunities. White-collar workers had better chances of reemployment. Gender, next to the occupational status, was an important predictor for reemployment. On the other hand, education, the willingness to move, and family status were not statistically significant explanatory factors for reemployment. The age of the job seekers was one important factor predicting unemployment.

  4. Acceptability by community health workers in Senegal of combining community case management of malaria and seasonal malaria chemoprevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine, Roger Ck; Ndiaye, Pascal; Ndour, Cheikh T

    2013-01-01

    Community case management of malaria (CCMm) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) are anti-malarial interventions that can lead to substantial reduction in malaria burden acting in synergy. However, little is known about the social acceptability of these interventions. A study was undertaken...... to assess whether combining the interventions would be an acceptable approach to malaria control for community health workers (CHWs)....

  5. Cancer patients' motives for psychosocial consultation-Oncology social workers' perceptions of 226 patient cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Joakim; Lilliehorn, Sara; Salander, Pär

    2018-04-01

    Although oncology social workers (OSWs) have emerged as a core profession in the provision of psychosocial services, there is a lack of empirical studies that describe their daily clinical work with patients. The overall aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' motives for consulting an OSW. From a nationwide survey, we used data from 226 patient cases that OSWs met face to face. The OSWs were asked to describe how the case was referred to them, the patient's characteristics, and what they perceived as the patient's motives for contacting them as well as additional motives that came up during the consultations. Patients have different motives for consulting an OSW, and these motives change over the course of consultations; while feelings associated with being diagnosed with cancer were often the initial motive, questions associated with moving on in life and dealing with relationships and the overall life situation were added over time. The results show that Swedish OSWs' function is multifaceted and that the initial motives among patients rarely predict the content in consultations over time. Based on the diversity of motives, it seems obvious that OSWs (at least in Sweden) need a broad education in the psychology of counselling. It also seems obvious that even if patients initially were referred by health care staff to the OSW due to psychological reactions to being ill, staff should also be attentive to the fact that relational and socio-economic/juridical issues are of great concern for the patients. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Agribusiness and Contract Farming: the Case of Small-Scale Cucumber Producers in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Echánove Huacuja

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available La agricultura por contrato constituye un mecanismo de abasto de las agroindustrias que se ha expandido rápidamente en los últimos años. Entre los factores que han motivado esta expansión se encuentran los cambios en el consumo alimentario, el crecimiento y fortalecimiento de las agroindustrias y otros distribuidores y la aplicación de políticas de ajuste estructural. El objetivo de este artículo es el análisis de las características del régimen contractual bajo el cual se produce cierta hortaliza de exportación ('el pepinillo', así como sus efectos en los productores, en los mercados de trabajo y tierras, y en el medio ambiente. Encontramos que el ingreso obtenido por los productores contratados no los ha exentado de la necesidad de diversificar sus actividades y que, en general, su situación como productores de bienes no-tradicionales es vulnerable y dependiente de los cambios en los mercados mundiales. English: Contract farming comprises an agribusiness supply mechanism that has undergone rapid expansion in recent years. Among the factors influencing that expansion are changes in consumption, the growth and strengthening of agribusinesses and other distributors, and the application of structural adjustment policies. The objective of this article is the analysis of the characteristics of the type of contract farming practiced with regard to the production of an export vegetable crop (pickling cucumbers, as well as its effects on producers, labor and land markets, and the environment. We find that the income obtained by contracted producers has not freed them from the necessity of diversifying their activities, and that in general, their situation as producers of non-traditional commodities is vulnerable and dependent upon the changing scenarios of global markets.

  7. INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT SUSPENSION IN CASE OF ACTIVITY INTERRUPTION AND / OR THE TEMPORARY ACTIVITY REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia-Monica Matiaş

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The economic and financial reasons determined by the current crisis have imposed to the Romanian legislator that, in the flexible regulatory context concerning the labour reports, has to intervene to reduce the loss. The legal framework available to the employer in this situation refers to the provisions of the art. 52, 1st paragraph, letter c, art.52, 3rd paragraph, art.53 and 122, 3rd paragraph, all from Law no.40/20111, for Law no.53/2003 modification and amendment concerning the Labour code. Under conditions of economic crisis, it is natural that employers have the necessary means to efficiently organize their activity, meanwhile keeping its staff on these periods. This does not mean that, during the suspension period the employees can not resign, no need to terminate the suspension provided for in Article 52 line 3 of the Labour Code in order to intervene in the individual labor contract termination. From the employer’s perspective there is no ban imposed to him by art. 60 of the Labour Code in relation to this type of suspension, so that the latter may proceed to dismiss the employee during the unilateral suspension of his labor contract arranged under Article 52 line 3 of the Labour Code.

  8. Estimates and Predictions of Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis Cases among Redeployed Coal Workers of the Fuxin Mining Industry Group in China: A Historical Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Hongbo; Zhai, Guojiang; Wang, Qun; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Mengcang; Cui, Kai; Shen, Fuhai; Yi, Hongbo; Li, Yuting; Zhai, Yuhan; Sheng, Yang; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at estimating possible Coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) cases as of 2012, and predicting future CWP cases among redeployed coal workers from the Fuxin Mining Industry Group. This study provided the scientific basis for regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis and labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted mines. The study cohort included 19,116 coal workers. The cumulative incidence of CWP was calculated by the life-table method. Possible CWP cases by occupational category were estimated through the average annual incidence rate of CWP and males’ life expectancy. It was estimated that 141 redeployed coal workers might have suffered from CWP as of 2012, and 221 redeployed coal workers could suffer from CWP in the future. It is crucial to establish a set of feasible and affordable regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis as well as labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted coal mines in China. PMID:26845337

  9. Radiation exposure and central nervous system cancers: A case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Fry, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities to investigate the possible association of primary malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. Eighty-nine white male and female workers, who according to the information on death certificates dies of primary CNS cancers, were identified as cases. Four matched controls were selected for each case. External radiation exposure data were available from film badge readings for individual workers, whereas radiation dose to lung from internally deposited radionuclides, mainly uranium, was estimated from area and personnel monitoring data and was used in analyses in lieu of the dose to the brain. Matched sets were included in the analyses only if information was available for the case and at least one of the corresponding controls. Thus, the analyses of external radiation included 27 cases and 90 matched controls, and 47 cases and 120 matched controls were analyzed for the effects of radiation from internally deposited uranium. No association was observed between deaths fron CNS cancers and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external or internal sources. However, due to the small number of monitored subjects and low doses, a weak association could not be ruled out. 43 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs

  10. Banking contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Durčáková, Klára

    2010-01-01

    Resumé - Bank Contracts Bank Contracts are an integral part of our everyday lives. Citizen and bussines entities used bank contracts very often. Despite this fact we can't find legal definition in the Czech law. Banking contracts understand contracts that are signed by banks in their business activities and obligations under these contracts arise. While the banking contracts have been widely used, in Czech law there is not too much literature and judgements abou this issue. Lack of legislatio...

  11. Community perceptions and attitudes on malaria case management and the role of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owek, Collins J; Oluoch, Elizabeth; Wachira, Juddy; Estambale, Benson; Afrane, Yaw A

    2017-07-04

    Community Case Management of malaria (CCMm) is one of the new approaches adopted by the World Health Organization for malaria endemic countries to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable populations. It is based on the evidence that well-trained and supervised community health workers (CHWs) can provide prompt and adequate treatment to fever cases within 24 h to help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with malaria among under-five children. The perception and attitudes of the community members on the CHWs' role is of greater importance for acceptance of their services. The aim of the study was to assess community's perception and attitude towards CCMm and on CHWs who undertake it. This study was conducted in five districts in western Kenya where Community Case Management was being undertaken. This was a qualitative cross-sectional study in which in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with mothers of under-five children and key stakeholders. Overall, there were more positive expressions of perceptions and attitudes of the community members towards the CCMm programme and the role of CHWs. The positive perceptions included among others; recognition and appreciation of services of CHWs, bringing health services to close proximity to the community, avoiding long queues in the health facilities, provision of health education that encourages good health practices, and promotion of positive health-seeking behaviour from within the communities. This programme is not without challenges as some of the negative perceptions expressed by the community members included the fact that some clinicians doubt the capacity of CHWs on dispensing drugs in the community, some CHWs do not keep client's secrets and mistrust of CHWs due to conflicting information by government. It was evident that the community had more positive perceptions and attitudes towards the role of CHWs in CCMm than negative ones. There should however, be deliberate efforts

  12. Dynamic Changes of QRS Morphology of Premature Ventricular Contractions During Ablation in the Right Ventricular Outflow Tract: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue-Chun, Li; Jia-Feng, Lin; Jia-Xuan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Electrocardiographic characteristics can be useful in differentiating between right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) and aortic sinus cusp (ASC) ventricular arrhythmias. Ventricular arrhythmias originating from ASC, however, show preferential conduction to RVOT that may render the algorithms of electrocardiographic characteristics less reliable. Even though there are few reports describing ventricular arrhythmias with ASC origins and endocardial breakout sites of RVOT, progressive dynamic changes in QRS morphology of the ventricular arrhythmias during ablation obtained were rare.This case report describes a patient with symptomatic premature ventricular contractions of left ASC origin presenting an electrocardiogram (ECG) characteristic of right ventricular outflow tract before ablation. Pacing at right ventricular outflow tract reproduced an excellent pace map. When radiofrequency catheter ablation was applied to the right ventricular outflow tract, the QRS morphology of premature ventricular contractions progressively changed from ECG characteristics of right ventricular outflow tract origin to ECG characteristics of left ASC origin.Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation was achieved at the site of the earliest ventricular activation in the left ASC. The distance between the successful ablation site of the left ASC and the site with an excellent pace map of the RVOT was 20 mm.The ndings could be strong evidence for a preferential conduction via the myocardial bers from the ASC origin to the breakout site in the right ventricular outflow tract. This case demonstrates that ventricular arrhythmias with a single origin and exit shift may exhibit QRS morphology changes.

  13. Collective memory in labour identifications in the present. A study based on the case of young precarious workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Adamini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the impact of collective memory in labour identifications in the present, through the study of young precarious workers. It develops a theoretical approach on youth identifications, precarious work and collective memory, a thematic linking that is rare in Labour Sociology. Willing to fill such vacancy area, we conducted a case study focused on young precarious workers who did internships in the call center of a public office in the period 2008-2012. From a qualitative approach we analyzed the discourses of interns as space crystallization of their identity forms. As a result we found that the conditions of precariousness in which these young were built as workers did not lead to their naturalization, but instead their identifications were crossed by the imagination of a wage society past, with stabilities and labor securities, which mobilized their protests against precarious work.

  14. Conundrums in the legal protection of migrant workers' health rights and relative resolutions: implications from the case of Tseng Hei-tao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The deteriorating situation of migrant workers' health rights protection was once again highlighted in the case of Tseng Hei-tao. This case explicitly and implicitly showed that four conundrums--the Employment Restriction Conundrum, the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Legal Conundrum, the Morality Conundrum and the Identity Conundrum--are barriers to migrant workers' right protection. The health rights of migrant workers could be safeguarded by abolishing the outdated household registration system designed in the planned economy era, improving the rule of law, and strengthening administrative supervisions. This would fundamentally remove these barriers and thus contribute to migrant workers' health rights protection.

  15. Coevolution of Interorganizational Psychological Contract and Interorganizational Relationship: A Case Study of Manufacturing Company in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the belief of the beholder in an exchange about the obligations that another party should have, interorganizational psychological contract (IPC from a micro perspective provides a new angle to study interorganizational relationship (IOR. This paper studies the interrelation and coevolution of IORs and IPCs by building a system dynamics (SD model. Firstly based on the structural analysis of the interrelations of IPC and IOR, this paper builds the qualitative causal loop diagram of the interrelations. Based on investigation of 55 manufacturing enterprises in China we further draw the stock and flow diagram. Then we apply the data of Jiangxi Motors Co., Ltd., to simulate the model. The results reveal the development and evolution of IORs and IPCs and their interrelations. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis is conducted and the influences of trust on IORs and IPCs are discussed. Finally managerial implications and some recommendations are provided for the decision-making of developing IORs.

  16. Why Workers Are Reluctant Learners: The Case of the Canadian Pulp and Paper Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, John A.

    2001-01-01

    In the Canadian pulp/paper industry, management is focused on worker flexibility for productivity. Unions view workplace learning as a threat to job control and security. Although learning new skills enhances individual workers' flexibility and employability, collectively it weakens the union through job losses. (Contains 56 references.) (SK)

  17. Leukaemia incidence among workers in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forand Steven P

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have indicated an excess of leukaemia in Broome County, New York, particularly in the Town of Union. Surveillance of cancer incidence data indicates that a large proportion of these cases occurred among males ages 65 and older. Shoe and boot manufacturing has been the largest single industry in this area throughout much of the past century. Occupational studies from Europe suggest a link between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. However, researchers have not found a positive association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe industry among workers in the United States. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the association between leukaemia incidence among males 65 and older and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. Thirty-six cases of leukaemia occurring between 1981–1990; among males age 65 and older; residing in the town of Union met the study case criteria. Death certificates were obtained for each of the cases. These were matched to death certificates of 144 controls on date of death and date of birth +/- 1 year. Death certificates were then examined to determine the employer and occupation of each study subject. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of leukaemia among those working in the industry. Results The risk of both leukaemia (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 0.70, 3.09 and acute myeloid leukaemia (OR = 1.19; 95% CI 0.33, 4.28 were elevated among those employed in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, however neither was statistically significant. Conclusion The results, though suggestive of an association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, were not statistically conclusive due mainly to limited study power. Several additional limitations may also have prevented the observance of more conclusive findings. Better exposure assessment, information on

  18. Improving the seniors' transition from hospital to the community: a case for intensive geriatric service workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAiney, Carrie A; Hillier, Loretta M; Paul, Janice; McKinnon Wilson, Jane; Tersigni Phelan, Anna; Wagner, Fred; O'Connor, Sheli

    2017-01-01

    Limited continuity of care, poor communication between healthcare providers, and ineffective self-management are barriers to recovery as seniors transition back to the community following an Emergency Department (ED) visit or hospitalization. The intensive geriatric service worker (IGSW) role is a new service developed in southern Ontario, Canada to address gaps for seniors transitioning home from acute care to prevent rehospitalization and premature institutionalization through the provision of intensive support and follow-up to ensure adherence to care plans, facilitate communication with care providers, and promote self-management. This study describes the IGSW role and provides preliminary evidence of its impact on clients, caregivers and the broader health system. This mixed methods evaluation included a chart audit of all clients served, tracking of the achievement of goals for IGSW involvement, and interviews with clients and caregivers and other key informants. During the study period, 632 clients were served. Rates of goal achievement ranged from 25%-87% and in cases where achieved, the extent of IGSW involvement mostly exceeded recommendations. IGSWs were credited with improving adherence with treatment recommendations, increasing awareness and use of community services, and improving self-management, which potentially reduced ED visits and hospitalizations and delayed institutionalization. The IGSW role has the potential to improve supports for seniors and facilitate more appropriate use of health system resources, and represents a promising mechanism for improving the integration and coordination of care across health sectors.

  19. Mobile instant messaging for rural community health workers: a case from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Mhango, Susan; Mzumara, Alfred; Mbvundula, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Mobile instant messaging (MIM) tools, such as WhatsApp, have transformed global communication practice. In the field of global health, MIM is an increasingly used, but little understood, phenomenon. It remains unclear how MIM can be used by rural community health workers (CHWs) and their facilitators, and what are the associated benefits and constraints. To address this gap, WhatsApp groups were implemented and researched in a rural setting in Malawi. The multi-site case study research triangulated interviews and focus groups of CHWs and facilitators with the thematic qualitative analysis of the actual conversations on WhatsApp. A survey with open questions and the quantitative analysis of WhatsApp conversations were used as supplementary triangulation sources. The use of MIM was differentiated according to instrumental (e.g. mobilising health resources) and participatory purposes (e.g. the enactment of emphatic ties). The identified benefits were centred on the enhanced ease and quality of communication of a geographically distributed health workforce, and the heightened connectedness of a professionally isolated health workforce. Alongside minor technical and connectivity issues, the main challenge for the CHWs was to negotiate divergent expectations regarding the social versus the instrumental use of the space. Despite some challenges and constraints, the implementation of WhatsApp was received positively by the CHWs and it was found to be a useful tool to support distributed rural health work.

  20. Primary Hydatid Cyst of the Kidney and Ureter with Hydatiduria in a Laboratory Worker: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Seetharam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is frequent in endemic regions and sheep farming areas. Most common localization of hydatid cyst occurs in liver followed by lungs. Renal hydatid cyst constitutes about 2–4% of all locations. We report a case of left renal hydatid from a laboratory technician admitted in a tertiary care hospital. There were few cases of renal hydatid disease reported in India among general population but to the best of our knowledge never reported from laboratory worker. The possibility of laboratory-acquired infection cannot be ruled out in this case due to lack of precautionary measures and containment facilities in resource-constrained setting.

  1. Retractable Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Barbanera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In calculi for modelling communication protocols, internal and external choices play dual roles. Two external choices can be viewed naturally as dual too, as they represent an agreement between the communicating parties. If the interaction fails, the past agreements are good candidates as points where to roll back, in order to take a different agreement. We propose a variant of contracts with synchronous rollbacks to agreement points in case of deadlock. The new calculus is equipped with a compliance relation which is shown to be decidable.

  2. On Frontline Workers as Bureau-Political Actors: The Case of Civil–Military Crisis Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, J.P.; Groenewegen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    We focus attention on the public policy-making influence of frontline bureaucrats. They are increasingly operating in interorganizational partnerships and networks in which they develop collaborative relations with frontline workers of other public organizations. We theorize that their embeddedness

  3. Trade reforms, mark-ups and bargaining power of workers: the case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Economics ... workers between 1996 and 2007, a model of mark-up with labor bargaining power was estimated using random effects and LDPDM. ... Keywords: Trade reform, mark-up, bargaining power, rent, trade unions ...

  4. DOTS for temporary workers in the agricultural sector. An exploratory study in Tuberculosis case detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Clarke

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in the Boland health district of the Cape Winelands of South Africa where there is a high tuberculosis incidence and prevalence. A survey conducted on 211 farms in the study district during 1998, reported that 65% (n = 9042 of all workers on these farms, were temporarily employed. Temporary farm workers live in communities either within or on the outskirts of the boundaries of the Boland health district, from where they are transported to work daily.

  5. Heat stress management program improving worker health and operational effectiveness: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Rosalyn G; Skelton, Scott B; Alvis, Kimberly L; Shane, Leigh A

    2013-03-01

    Heat stress monitoring is a vital component of an effective health and safety program when employees work in exceptionally warm environments. Workers at hazardous waste sites often wear personal protective equipment (PPE), which increases the body heat stress load. No specific Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations address heat stress; however, OSHA does provide several guidance documents to assist employers in addressing this serious workplace health hazard. This article describes a heat stress and surveillance plan implemented at a hazardous waste site as part of the overall health and safety program. The PPE requirement for work at this site, coupled with extreme environmental temperatures, made heat stress a significant concern. Occupational health nurses and industrial hygienists developed a monitoring program for heat stress designed to prevent the occurrence of significant heat-related illness in site workers. The program included worker education on the signs of heat-related illness and continuous physiologic monitoring to detect early signs of heat-related health problems. Biological monitoring data were collected before workers entered the exclusion zone and on exiting the zone following decontamination. Sixty-six site workers were monitored throughout site remediation. More than 1,700 biological monitoring data points were recorded. Outcomes included improved worker health and safety, and increased operational effectiveness. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CARGO INSURANCE CONTRACT IN CASE OF INTERNATIONAL LAND TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănilă Ștefan MATEI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cargo international transport is an engine for the development of the economic relations between states involving cross-border movement of goods through the crossing of at least one border of a state (international transport or by crossing at least two border crossing points, in which case we are in the presence of an international cargo transit. During the transit the goods transported may be subject to an insurance. The object of the cargo insurance is, thus, represented by the goods, the items expressly listed in the insurance policy, within the territorial limits specified in the insurance policy, both during the transport and during the storage, in the latter case, at the express request of the insured and with the acceptance of the insurer. This paper analyzes the characteristics of the cargo insurance aiming to present the theoretical and practical aspects of interest with regard to the cargo insurance concluded in case of an international land freight transport.

  7. Shifting the burden or expanding access to care? Assessing malaria trends following scale-up of community health worker malaria case management and reactive case detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A; Winters, Anna; Cheelo, Sanford; Hamainza, Busiku; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Miller, John M; Bridges, Daniel J

    2017-11-02

    Malaria is a significant burden to health systems and is responsible for a large proportion of outpatient cases at health facilities in endemic regions. The scale-up of community management of malaria and reactive case detection likely affect both malaria cases and outpatient attendance at health facilities. Using health management information data from 2012 to 2013 this article examines health trends before and after the training of volunteer community health workers to test and treat malaria cases in Southern Province, Zambia. An estimated 50% increase in monthly reported malaria infections was found when community health workers were involved with malaria testing and treating in the community (incidence rate ratio 1.52, p malaria testing and treating in the community. These results suggest a large public health benefit to both community case management of malaria and reactive case detection. First, the capacity of the malaria surveillance system to identify malaria infections was increased by nearly one-third. Second, the outpatient attendance at health facilities was modestly decreased. Expanding the capacity of the malaria surveillance programme through systems such as community case management and reactive case detection is an important step toward malaria elimination.

  8. DOE ZERH Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Green Acres #20, #26, #28, New Paltz, NY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of three DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the cold climate that got a HERS of 26, 28, and 26 without PV or -3, -1, and -3.5 with PV; with R-22 ICFs, 10” ocsf plus 2.7” c ccsf in attic; ICF basements with 4.3” ccsf under slab; tri;e-pane windows; ERVs, ground source heat pumps (COP 5.7).

  9. Occupational lead exposure among automotive garage workers – a case study for Jimma town, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Yalemsew

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ethiopia, although there are numerous small-scale and medium industries which use lead-based raw materials that may pose health risks to workers, there are no workplace regulations for lead exposure. Moreover, there are no studies carried out on the blood lead levels (BLLs of workers or on the contribution of common workplace practices to lead poisoning. Method A cross-sectional study on the BLLs of 45 automotive garage workers and 40 non-garage workers was carried out in the town of Jimma, Ethiopia. In addition to BLL analysis, data on some risk factors such as smoking, and chewing ‘khat’ (the leaves of Catha adulis were gathered through structured questionnaires and interviews and data analysis was performed using SPSS (version 16. The t-test was used to compare mean BLLs of study groups. The analysis of variance (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson chi-square and odds ratio tests were used to investigate the associations between specific job type, smoking and/or ‘khat’ chewing, service years and occurrence of non-specific symptoms with BLLs. Results The mean BLL of the automotive-garage workers was found to be significantly greater than that of the controls. The BLLs of all the lead-exposed individuals were found to be over 10 μg/dL, and 53% of them had BLLs ranging 12 – 20 μg/dL, with the remaining 47% having over 20 μg/dL. The BLL of the workers increased with the duration of working in an automotive garage. Individuals involved in manual car painting comprise a larger percentage (58% of those with the highest BLLs (≥ 20 μg/dL. Lead accumulation in individuals who chew ‘khat’ in the work place was found to be faster than in those who are not used to chewing ‘khat’. ‘Khat’ is an evergreen shrub native to tropical East Africa, with dark green opposite leaves which are chewed when fresh for their stimulating effects. Conclusion The findings of the study have clearly demonstrated that the

  10. A population-based case-control study of mesothelioma deaths among U.S. railroad workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, M B; Garshick, E; Muñoz, A; Woskie, S R; Speizer, F E

    1986-09-01

    We have completed a case-control analysis of mesothelioma deaths among current and retired U.S. railroad employees. Cause-specific death certificates were obtained for 87% of 15,059 deaths reported by the railroad retirement board, and 20 mesotheliomas were identified according to death certificate diagnosis. A 10:1 matched analysis with railroad workers dying of nonmalignant, nonaccidental causes yielded a very strong association with prior railroad work in jobs with potential asbestos exposure (odds ratio = 7.2, 95% lower confidence limit = 3.3). Consideration of railroad occupations with regular asbestos exposures (e.g., skilled trades, steam locomotive repair) yielded an odds ratio of 21.4 (95% lower confidence limit = 8.7), but the occupations with potential intermittent exposure (e.g., engineers, firemen, carmen) yielded a nonsignificant odds ratio of 2.3 (95% lower confidence limit = 0.5). Applying mesothelioma mortality rates from this study to the population of U.S. railroad workers at risk yields an estimate of 416 cases of mesothelioma occurring among U.S. railroad workers between 1981 and 2000.

  11. Hybrid renewable energy support policy in the power sector: The contracts for difference and capacity market case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onifade, Temitope Tunbi

    2016-01-01

    The article employs qualitative methods in contextualizing and conceptualizing the hybrid renewable energy support policy. It claims that hybrid policies may combine distinct mechanisms to drive desirable objectives better than traditional policies. A policy cycle helps to frame the United Kingdom's Contracts for Difference and Capacity Market (CFD & CM) scheme as a case study. The CFD & CM policy emerged to address environmental and energy challenges through the deployment of renewable energy (RE) in a low-carbon economy, employing liberalization: Environmental protection is foremost in this scheme. The policy combines and improves on the elements of feed-in tariff (FIT) and quota obligation (QO), and strives to solve the problems of these traditional policies. It addresses regulatory uncertainty under FIT by employing private law mechanics to guarantee above-loss reward for low carbon generation, and addresses market uncertainty under QO by incentivizing the capacity to supply future low carbon energy based on projected demand, hence creating a predictable and stable market. It also accommodates other important commitments. Overall, the CFD & CM scheme is a hybrid policy that engages the energy market mainly for advancing the end goal of environmental protection. To thrive however, it needs to meet private sector interests substantially. - Highlights: •The hybrid support policy combines traditional support systems. •Hybrid policies may drive objectives better than traditional policies. •The UK's contract for difference and capacity market system is a hybrid policy. •Environmental protection is foremost in the UK's hybrid policy. •To thrive, the UK's hybrid policy should address private sector interests.

  12. Industrialization Impact on Worker Mobility and Land Use in Peri Urban Area (Case study of Semarang District, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, H. B.; Kurniawati, H.; Hutama, S. T. E. W.

    2018-02-01

    In many cases, industrialization has stimulated the urbanization process massively. It tends to attract substantial number of labor migrants from nearby region to fulfill the demand of workers. The paper reports the research result of industrialization phenomena in Semarang district, Indonesia. It carried out the survey by taking 250 samples of migrant workers. The result shows that the presence of labor-intensive industries becomes the most influence factor for many migrants, rather than the driving factors from the place of origin. The attraction factor could cover regional and across the province force, as indicated that all migrant respondents come from both inside and outside of Central Java Province. Furthermore, based on the land-use distribution of the migrant settlement area, it indicates a growing land-use change, both of land cover and land functions.

  13. The Effects of a Contingency Contracting Program on the Nocturnal Enuresis of Three Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Anthony C.; Dunlap, Glen; Neff, Bryon

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a contingency contracting program to eliminate nocturnal enuresis of three children ages 5 to 12. Methods: The program was implemented by the children's primary caregivers, two of whom were foster parents and the third a case worker in the foster care system. The program was a package…

  14. Stigma and self-esteem: A case of HIV-positive sex-workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalemi, G; Gkioka, S; Tsapatsari, P; Tzeferakos, G; Kandri, T; Psarra, M L; Konstantopoulou, F; Douzenis, A

    2017-01-01

    Stigma associated with sex work and HIV can be easily recognized in public reactions towards the members of discriminated groups. Nevertheless, there are only a few studies examining the impact of discrimination to the self-esteem of individuals who suffer the coexistence of multiple stigmatizing conditions. In our case, the unprecedented stigmatization of sex workers through the media as a menace of public health as well as criminals due to their seropositivity should be examined with respect and scientificity. The sample consisted of the 27 women found to be HIV positive. The small number of subject and the uniqueness of the situation made necessary the use of qualitative research method. Data were collected of through a semi-structured interview during which personal and medical history was taken and Rosenberg self-esteem scale was completed. Information for each domain of interest was systematically collected from multiple interview guide items. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyze data derived from qualitative interview (IPA). Four main categories emerged from the horizontal analysis of the interviews referring to the mechanism used by those women in order to cope with stigma and protect their self-esteem, a description of their felt stigma and feelings about seropositivity, as well as the existence of self-destructive behaviors. The existence of a normal self-esteem on the majority of those women is well explained by the use of certain coping strategies in order to confront the enacted stigma, such as the avoidance of self-blame for their condition (HIV-positive), the disregard of public's discriminating comments and behaviors, the acknowledge of their competence in specific issues they have to deal with in their everyday life, in common with the existence of a strongly supportive network. Despite those women's felt stigma, structured by community's discriminating approach of their families and their feelings of helplessness and

  15. Antenatal depression case finding by community health workers in South Africa: feasibility of a mobile phone application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Alexander C; Tomlinson, Mark; Dewing, Sarah; le Roux, Ingrid M; Harwood, Jessica M; Chopra, Mickey; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2014-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials conducted in resource-limited settings have shown that once women with depressed mood are evaluated by specialists and referred for treatment, lay health workers can be trained to effectively administer psychological treatments. We sought to determine the extent to which community health workers could also be trained to conduct case finding using short and ultrashort screening instruments programmed into mobile phones. Pregnant, Xhosa-speaking women were recruited independently in two cross-sectional studies (N = 1,144 and N = 361) conducted in Khayelitsha, South Africa and assessed for antenatal depression. In the smaller study, community health workers with no training in human subject research were trained to administer the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) during the routine course of their community-based outreach. We compared the operating characteristics of four short and ultrashort versions of the EPDS with the criterion standard of probable depression, defined as an EPDS-10 ≥ 13. The prevalence of probable depression (475/1144 [42 %] and 165/361 [46 %]) was consistent across both samples. The 2-item subscale demonstrated poor internal consistency (Cronbach's α ranged from 0.55 to 0.58). All four subscales demonstrated excellent discrimination, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values ranging from 0.91 to 0.99. Maximal discrimination was observed for the 7-item depressive symptoms subscale: at the conventional screening threshold of ≥10, it had 0.97 sensitivity and 0.76 specificity for detecting probable antenatal depression. The comparability of the findings across the two studies suggests that it is feasible to use community health workers to conduct case finding for antenatal depression.

  16. Co-operation and conflict under hard and soft contracting regimes: case studies from England and Wales

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, David; Allen, Pauline; Doheny, Shane; Petsoulas, Christina; Vincent-Jones, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper examines NHS secondary care contracting in England and Wales in a period which saw increasing policy divergence between the two systems. At face value, England was making greater use of market levers and utilising harder-edged service contracts incorporating financial penalties and incentives, while Wales was retreating from the 1990 s internal market and emphasising cooperation and flexibility in the contracting process. But there were also cross-border spill-overs inv...

  17. Acculturation and adaptation among Lithuanian workers in Norway (a case study)

    OpenAIRE

    Kmite, Liuda Jr

    2011-01-01

    Migration and intercultural relations In a new culture, migrants experience acculturation. Through acculturation migrants may choose which acculturation strategy to use. In 2010, emigration from Lithuania increased four times. Lithuanians account for several per cent of all migrants in Norway. The study aims to assess the acculturation strategies which Lithuanian workers in Rogaland area (Norway) adopt.

  18. Post-Retirement Satisfaction among Ghanaian Workers –The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The general purpose of this study was to find out the factors that contributed to or accounted for post-retirement satisfaction among Ghanaian workers; and whether teacher retirees and non-teacher retirees differ in their post-retirement satisfaction with all those factors that account for post-retirement satisfaction.

  19. Knowledge Sharing and Dialogue among Information Technology Workers: A Case Study Using a Public Works Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study is the willingness or reluctance of information technology (IT) knowledge workers and managers to share knowledge. The purpose of the study was to examine the willingness or unwillingness of technical personnel in IT to share technical knowledge and the issues surrounding their reluctance, if any. The study…

  20. Implementation of 5S in Manufacturing Industry: A Case of Foreign Workers in Melaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Houa San

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lean manufacturing system has been infiltrated in manufacturing sectors across the world. In fact, Lean manufacturing system is a practice which regards the use of the resources, creation of value for the end customers, and as the ways to eliminate the waste. There are several tools that can be used to eliminate the waste within the industry. This research is a study of the implementation of 5S in manufacturing industry. Despite this, the research study focused on manufacturing industry, which has been implemented 5S system in Melaka State. Although there are number of tools and technique available to help in improving the manufacturing process, however, there is only few industries could implement the tools successfully. In this research, foreign workers play a main role in implement the 5S systems as the manufacturing industry in Malaysia adopt large amount of foreign workers to work as employees. Therefore, it is important to ensure the foreign workers truly understand the concept of 5S system and adopt the best ways to implement it in order to have better performance. This research study has been proposed by the research model of the barriers to implementation of 5S in manufacturing industry among foreign workers. A several research method has been adopted to do the research, such as descriptive research design with quantitative methods, survey questionnaire and cross-sectional studies.

  1. ACCOUNTING PARADIGM OF LIVED EXPERIENCES IN ACTION RESEARCH: THE CASE OF MALAYSIAN PLANTATION WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Susela DEVI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces action research as a possible new method to reduce the distance between idealism and accounting practice, thus contributing to the accounting literature. The source of this paper is an on-going large research project. The project has three objectives. Firstly, to provide evidence of the utilisation of accounting methods in the Malaya plantation industry from its earliest beginnings through to the introduction of accounting tools such as budgets, leading to the creation of a social and economic underclass in Malaysia. Secondly, to examine the extent to which accounting information provided in the Annual Reports of Malaysian plantation companies is used in determining the wages of plantation workers on the grounds that workers in the plantation industry have been and still are, among the most poorly paid in Malaysia, and perhaps the world. Interestingly, the wages of plantation workers are determined through a negotiation process between the National Union of Plantation Workers and the Malaysian Agricultural Producers Association. This paper draws from this research project and explicates the utilisation of the Action Research methodology in reporting the “lived experiences” of those affected by Management Accounting budgets and demonstrating how the parties to wage negotiation, the employers, union and employees, can better derive value from accounting information provided within the annual reports of Malaysian plantation companies.

  2. A case-referent study of cancer mortality among sulfate mill workers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E; Hagberg, S; Nilsson, T; Persson, B; Wingren, G; Torén, K

    2001-05-01

    To investigate whether workers in Swedish sulfate mills have an increased risk of death from certain malignancies that have previously been linked to the pulping process. Subjects of the study (n=2480) were men aged 40-75 at death during 1960-89 in the parishes surrounding four sulfate mills. Exposure assessment was based on information from the personnel files in the mills- 35% of the subjects were recognised there, and work categories were created. Among all sulfate mill workers, the odds ratio (OR) (90% confidence interval (90% CI)) for death from lung cancer was 1.6 (1.1 to 2.3), pleural mesotheliomas 9.5 (1.9 to 48), brain tumours 2.6 (1.2 to 5.3), and liver or biliary tract cancer 2.3 (1.0 to 5.2). There was an increased mortality from leukaemia among workers in the soda recovery plant (5.9 (2.6 to 13)) and bleaching plant and digester house (2.8 (1.0 to 7.5)). Sulfate mill workers were at increased risk of dying from lung cancer and pleural mesotheliomas, probably due to exposure to asbestos. Increased risks of brain tumours and cancers of the liver or biliary tract were also found but the aetiology is not obvious.

  3. The Role of Training in Reducing Poverty: The Case of Agricultural Workers Receiving Microcredit in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Kazi Tanvir; Parvez, Asif; Hilton, David; Kabir, G. M. Shamsul; Wahid, Ishraat Saira

    2014-01-01

    The policy of providing microcredit and skill training to poor agricultural workers in developing countries is well-established. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the effectiveness of the training part of that policy. BRAC (formerly the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), the largest non-governmental organization in…

  4. A socio-historical approach to policy analysis: the case of the Brazilian Workers' Food Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Souza, Jamacy; Vieira-da-Silva, Ligia Maria; Pinell, Patrice

    2018-02-05

    Policy analyses based on traditional or structuralist definitions of the state are important, but they have some limitations for explaining processes related to policymaking, implementation, and results. Bourdieusian sociology links the analysis to objective and subjective dimensions of social practices and can help elucidate these phenomena. This article provides such empirical evidence by analyzing the social genesis of a Brazilian policy that currently serves 18 million workers and was established by the state in 1976 through the Fiscal Incentives Program for Workers' Nutrition (PIFAT/PAT). The study linked the analysis of the trajectory of social agents involved in the policy's formulation to the historical conditions that allowed the policy to exist in the first place. Although the literature treats the policy as a workers' food program (PAT), the current study showed that it actually represented a new model for paying financial subsidies to companies that provided food to their employees, meanwhile upgrading the commercial market for collective meals. The study further showed that the program emerged as an administrative policy, but linked to economic agents. The program became a specific social space in which issues related to workers' nutrition became secondary, but useful for disguising what had been an explicit side of its genesis, namely its essentially fiscal nature.

  5. Contracting for Public Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Carsten

    strategic purchasing understanding markets communicating the contracting decision designing and drafting the contract the role of the consumer the regulation of service provision Illustrated throughout with practitioner case-studies from a range of OECD countries, this book presents an important new......Insightful and comprehensive and covering new subjects like globalization and IT, this text, international in its approach, provides a thorough introduction to the key phases of the contracting process and the skills required by managers in its implementation. These include: policy for contracting...

  6. Survey on evacuation facilities in case of nuclear emergency in Shimane prefecture (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Shogo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Oguri, Tomomi; Kimura, Masanori; Hirouchi, Jun; Munakata, Masahiro; Homma, Toshimitsu

    2017-02-01

    To contribute evaluations of dose reduction effect due to evacuation facilities in case of nuclear emergency, we surveyed on structural and material data on 22 facilities (290 rooms) which are listed in local disaster management plan in Matsue city. These facilities can be divided into three categories in terms of structure, scale and intended purpose of them: educational facilities (12 facilities, 235 rooms (include gymnastic hall)), communal facilities (7 facilities, 42 rooms) and gymnastic hall (3 facilities, 13 rooms). Height and floor-area of rooms, as well as window-area were collected as the structural data. We also collected information on constructional materials (i.e. roof, ceiling, inner wall, outer wall, window, floor), and density of those. In addition, mass-thicknesses of the constructional materials were evaluated based on our surveys, and compared to the previous studies which were made in Japan, U.S., and European countries. Consequently, it was found that there is no significant difference of mass-thickness of constructional materials between the results of our surveys and the previous studies. However, for gymnastic hall, since thin metal plates are used for roofs, we can point out that the mass-thickness of roofs are much lower than those for other concrete facilities and clay tile roofing wooden houses. (author)

  7. Effect of Wind Turbine Noise on Workers' Sleep Disorder: A Case Study of Manjil Wind Farm in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Milad; Monnazzam, Mohammad Reza; Zakerian, Sayedabbolfazl; Yousefzadeh, Arsalan

    2015-04-01

    Noise from wind turbines is one of the most important factors affecting the health, welfare, and human sleep. This research was carried out to study the effect of wind turbine noise on workers' sleep disorder. For this, Manjil Wind Farm, because of the greater number of staff and turbines than other wind farms in Iran, was chosen as case study. A total number of 53 participants took part in this survey. They were classified into three groups of mechanics, security, and official. In this study, daytime sleepiness data of workers were gathered using Epworth Sleepiness Scales (ESS) was used to determine the level of daytime sleepiness among the workers. The 8-h equivalent sound level (LAeq,8h) was measured to determine the individuals' exposure at each occupational group. Finally, the effect of sound, age, and workers' experience on individuals' sleep disorder was analyzed through multiple regression analysis in the R software. The results showed that there was a positive and significant relationship between age, workers' experience, equivalent sound level, and the level of sleep disorder. When age is constant, sleep disorder will increase by 26% as per each 1 dB increase in equivalent sound level. In situations where equivalent sound level is constant, an increase of 17% in sleep disorder is occurred as per each year of work experience. Because of the difference in sound exposure in different occupational groups. The effect of noise in repairing group was about 6.5 times of official group and also 3.4 times of the security group. Sleep disorder effect caused by wind turbine noise in the security group is almost two times more than the official group. Unlike most studies on wind turbine noise that address the sleep disorder among inhabitants nearby wind farms, this study, for the first time in the world, examines the impact of wind turbine noise on sleep disorder of workers who are more closer to wind turbines and exposed to higher levels of noise. So despite all the

  8. Organisational aspects and benchmarking of e-learning initiatives: a case study with South African community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisach, Ulrike; Weilemann, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    South Africa desperately needs a comprehensive approach to fight HIV/AIDS. Education is crucial to reach this goal and Internet and e-learning could offer huge opportunities to broaden and deepen the knowledge basis. But due to the huge societal and digital divide between rich and poor areas, e-learning is difficult to realize in the townships. Community health workers often act as mediators and coaches for people seeking medical and personal help. They could give good advice regarding hygiene, nutrition, protection of family members in case of HIV/AIDS and finding legal ways to earn one's living if they were trained to do so. Therefore they need to have a broader general knowledge. Since learning opportunities in the townships are scarce, a system for e-learning has to be created in order to overcome the lack of experience with computers or the Internet and to enable them to implement a network of expertise. The article describes how the best international resources on basic medical knowledge, HIV/AIDS as well as on basic economic and entrepreneurial skills were benchmarked to be integrated into an e-learning system. After tests with community health workers, researchers developed recommendations on building a self-sustaining system for learning, including a network of expertise and best practice sharing. The article explains the opportunities and challenges for community health workers, which could provide information for other parts of the world with similar preconditions of rural poverty. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Socio-environmental factors associated with the risk of contracting Buruli ulcer in Tiassalé, South Côte d'Ivoire : a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    N'krumah, Raymond T. A. S.; Koné, Brama; Tiembre, Issaka; Cissé, Guéladio; Pluschke, Gerd; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The exact mode of transmission remains elusive; yet, some studies identified environmental, socio-sanitary, and behavioral risk factors. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of such factors to contracting BU in Tiassal?, south C?te d?Ivoire. Methodology A case-control study was conducted in 2012. Cases were BU patients diagnosed according to clinical definition put forth by the ...

  10. The high cost of fine print. Antitrust case against a major Blue Cross plan may redefine terms of contract negotiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Melanie; Blesch, Gregg

    2010-10-25

    With its challenge to Michigan Blues contracts with some hospitals, the Justice Department is doing something it hasn't in more than 10 years. The move means insurers need to carefully vet contracts for similar issues. "This signals they're still in the enforcement business as it relates to healthcare insurance," says lawyer David Marx Jr.

  11. The Influences of Leadership Style and School Climate to Faculty Psychological Contracts: A Case of S University in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chin; Fu, Chi-Jung

    2006-01-01

    This study was to investigate the impacts of leadership style and school climate on faculty psychological contracts. Demographic variables were also tested. The findings indicated that overall perceptions of the faculties toward leadership style, school climate, and psychological contract were favorable. Moreover, leadership style and school…

  12. Unfair contract terms and the consumer: ECJ case-law, foreign literature and their impact on Dutch law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondius, E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In the late twentieth century, most European states have adopted legislation on unfair contract terms. The Directive 93/13/EEC on unfair terms in consumer contracts has effectively made the European Court of Justice (ECJ) the final arbiter in interpreting much of this legislation. The

  13. Conservative care of De Quervain's tenosynovitis/ tendinopathy in a warehouse worker and recreational cyclist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Emily R

    2012-06-01

    This case study was conducted to evaluate the conservative management of a patient presenting with right sided wrist and thumb pain diagnosed as De Quervain's tenosynovitis/tendinopathy. A 49-year-old female warehouse worker and recreational cyclist with right-sided De Quervain's tenosynovitis/tendinopathy that began after a long-distance cycling trip. Treatment included ultrasound, soft tissue and myofascial release therapy, tool assisted fascial stripping or "guasha", acupuncture, mobilizations and kinesiology taping. Home advice included icing, rest, wrist bracing, elevation and eccentric rehabilitation exercises. The positive outcome was a complete resolution of the patient's complaint. This case demonstrates how De Quervain's disease is a challenging condition to treat with conservative methods and can be aggravated with new exacerbating factors as treatment continues. In this case, the addition of the active care (including eccentric exercises and self-care) helped to reinforce the passive care given in the office and accelerate the recovery.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii infection in workers occupationally exposed to unwashed raw fruits and vegetables: a case control seroprevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarado-Esquivel Cosme

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Through a case control seroprevalence study, we sought to determine the association of Toxoplasma gondii infection with occupational exposure to unwashed raw fruits and vegetables. Methods Subjects, numbering 200, who worked growing or selling fruits and vegetables, and 400 control subjects matched by age, gender, and residence were examined by enzyme immunoassays for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Socio-demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics from the study subjects were obtained. Results Of the 200 fruit and vegetable workers, 15 (7.5% of whom, and 31 (7.8% of the 400 controls were positive for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies (P = 0.96. Anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibodies were found in 2 (1% of the fruit workers and in 11 (2.8% of the control subjects (P = 0.23. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma antibodies increased with age (P = 0.0004. In addition, seropositivity to Toxoplasma was associated with ill status (P = 0.04, chronic tonsillitis (P = 0.03, and reflex impairment (P = 0.03. Multivariate analysis showed that Toxoplasma infection was associated with consumption of raw meat (OR = 5.77; 95% CI: 1.15-28.79; P = 0.03, unwashed raw fruits (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.11-5.63; P = 0.02, and living in a house with soil floors (OR = 3.10; 95% CI: 1.22-7.88; P = 0.01, whereas Toxoplasma infection was negatively associated with traveling abroad (OR = 0.28; 95% CI: 0.12-0.67; P = 0.005. Conclusions This is the first report of seroprevalence and contributing factors for Toxoplasma infection in workers occupationally exposed to unwashed raw fruits and vegetables, and the results may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Toxoplasma infection especially in female workers at reproductive age.

  15. Safety Challenges and Improvement Strategies of Ethnic Minority Construction Workers: A Case Study in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunlin; Luo, Xiaowei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yue; Sapkota, Bibek

    2018-04-18

    Due to cultural differences, ethnic minority construction workers are more difficult to manage and more vulnerable to accidents. This study aims to identify the major barriers faced by ethnic minority workers from their own perspectives and determine potential strategies to enhance safety climate of construction projects, thus ultimately improve their safety performance. A survey with modified Nordic safety climate questionnaire was conducted in a certain sub-contractor in Hong Kong. In-depth interviews, status quo description, major challenge investigation and safety knowledge tests were carried as well. The top three most important safety challenges identified are improper stereotypes from the whole industry, lack of opportunities for job assignment, and language barriers. To improve the safety performance, employers should allocate sufficient personal protective equipment and governments should organize unannounced site visits more frequently. Besides, the higher-level management should avoid giving contradictory instructions to foremen against to the standards of supervisors.

  16. Towards greater realism in inclusive fitness models: the case of worker reproduction in insect societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenseleers, Tom; Helanterä, Heikki; Alves, Denise A.; Dueñez-Guzmán, Edgar; Pamilo, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    The conflicts over sex allocation and male production in insect societies have long served as an important test bed for Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness, but have for the most part been considered separately. Here, we develop new coevolutionary models to examine the interaction between these two conflicts and demonstrate that sex ratio and colony productivity costs of worker reproduction can lead to vastly different outcomes even in species that show no variation in their relatedness structure. Empirical data on worker-produced males in eight species of Melipona bees support the predictions from a model that takes into account the demographic details of colony growth and reproduction. Overall, these models contribute significantly to explaining behavioural variation that previous theories could not account for. PMID:24132088

  17. Health activism in Cape Town: a case study of the Health Workers Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, W; Claassen, J W B; Le Grange, C A; Hussey, G D

    2012-03-02

    The Health Workers Society (HWS), founded in 1980, was one of several progressive health organisations that fought for a democratic health system in South Africa. We document the sociopolitical context within which it operated and some of its achievements. HWS, many of whose members were staff and students of the University of Cape Town (UCT), provided a forum for debate on health-related issues, politics and society, and worked closely with other organisations to oppose the apartheid state's health policies and practices. They assisted with the formation of the first dedicated trade union for all healthcare workers and were one of the first to pioneer the primary healthcare approach in an informal settlement in Cape Town.

  18. Studies in biological excretion of inhaled plutonium in the case of a few occupational workers in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedge, A.G.; Chandramouli, S.; Iyer, R.S.; Bhat, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    A power reactor fuel reprocessing plant is in operation at Tarapur. The various processes involved in the plant are: fuel rod cutting, dissolution in nitric acid, separation of plutonium, and handling of separated plutonium. The chemical form of plutonium could be nitrate, TBP complex, or oxide depending upon the nature of the process involved. Possible internal exposure to plant personnel occurs mainly by inhalation and occasionally through a contaminated wound. Occupational workers are regularly monitored for internal contamination by urinary excretion analysis as well as by in-vivo lung counting. This paper presents a follow-up study of plutonium elimination in four inhalation exposure cases. (author) 8 refs.; 6 figs

  19. A global social contract to reduce maternal mortality: the human rights arguments and the case of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Gorik; Mulumba, Moses; Hammonds, Rachel; Latif Laila, Abdul; Waris, Attiya; Forman, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    Progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5a, reducing maternal deaths by 75% between 1990 and 2015, has been substantial; however, it has been too slow to hope for its achievement by 2015, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, including Uganda. This suggests that both the Government of Uganda and the international community are failing to comply with their right-to-health-related obligations towards the people of Uganda. This country case study explores some of the key issues raised when assessing national and international right-to-health-related obligations. We argue that to comply with their shared obligations, national and international actors will have to take steps to move forward together. The Government of Uganda should not expect additional international assistance if it does not live up to its own obligations; at the same time, the international community must provide assistance that is more reliable in the long run to create the 'fiscal space' that the Government of Uganda needs to increase recurrent expenditure for health - which is crucial to addressing maternal mortality. We propose that the 'Roadmap on Shared Responsibility and Global Solidarity for AIDS, TB and Malaria Response in Africa', adopted by the African Union in July 2012, should be seen as an invitation to the international community to conclude a global social contract for health. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Western European countryside from an Eastern European perspective: Case of migrant workers in Norwegian agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Rye, Johan Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the EU enlargements in 2004 and 2007, large numbers of migrant workers from Eastern Europe in-migrated to the Western European countryside. In this paper I discuss how these migration streams in important ways challenge the dominant perspectives in contemporary rural studies, in particular their focus on lifestyle-related rural in-migration, on the post-productivist character of the countryside, and on the social constructions of the rural as idyllic space. These perspectives a...

  1. Women workers in male dominated industrial manufacturing organisations: Contrasting workplace case studies from Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, John; Henderson, Lindy; Strachan, Glenda

    2005-01-01

    This study compared women's roles, expectations and experiences in two comparable, male dominated industrial manufacturing companies in Australia. Both organisations are subject to legislated equal opportunity program and reporting requirements. The research was conducted to examinee the differences between what is submitted in their EEO reports and the experience of women workers in the organisations. Good jobs and poor jobs existed in the same legislative and industrial framework and in the...

  2. Responses to Co-workers Receiving Recognition at Work: A Case Study in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane, Che Mezoh Akuro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to examine, the impact of co-workers receiving recognition on two types of responses namely, positive /negative and the resulting behavioral intentions (interpersonal counterproductive work behaviors and interpersonal citizenship behaviors). Employees might not only receive recognition themselves in their organizations and groups but often they witness others receiving it either directly by observation or indirectly through stories. This may lead to vari...

  3. Biomonitoring of complex occupational exposures to carcinogens: The case of sewage workers in Paris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Zabadi, Hamzeh; Ferrari, Luc; Laurent, Anne-Marie; Tiberguent, Aziz; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Sewage workers provide an essential service in the protection of public and environmental health. However, they are exposed to varied mixtures of chemicals; some are known or suspected to be genotoxics or carcinogens. Thus, trying to relate adverse outcomes to single toxicant is inappropriate. We aim to investigate if sewage workers are at increased carcinogenic risk as evaluated by biomarkers of exposure and early biological effects. This cross sectional study will compare exposed sewage workers to non-exposed office workers. Both are voluntaries from Paris municipality, males, aged (20–60) years, non-smokers since at least six months, with no history of chronic or recent illness, and have similar socioeconomic status. After at least 3 days of consecutive work, blood sample and a 24-hour urine will be collected. A caffeine test will be performed, by administering coffee and collecting urines three hours after. Subjects will fill in self-administered questionnaires; one covering the professional and lifestyle habits while the a second one is alimentary. The blood sample will be used to assess DNA adducts in peripheral lymphocytes. The 24-hour urine to assess urinary 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxy-Guanosine (8-oxo-dG), and the in vitro genotoxicity tests (comet and micronucleus) using HeLa S3 or HepG2 cells. In parallel, occupational air sampling will be conducted for some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Volatile Organic Compounds. A weekly sampling chronology at the offices of occupational medicine in Paris city during the regular medical visits will be followed. This protocol has been accepted by the French Est III Ethical Comitee with the number 2007-A00685-48. Biomarkers of exposure and of early biological effects may help overcome the limitations of environmental exposure assessment in very complex occupational or environmental settings

  4. Production practices affecting worker task demands in concrete operations: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Babak; Mitropoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Construction work involves significant physical, mental, and temporal task demands. Excessive task demands can have negative consequences for safety, errors and production. This exploratory study investigates the magnitude and sources of task demands on a concrete operation, and examines the effect of the production practices on the workers' task demands. The NASA Task Load Index was used to measure the perceived task demands of two work crews. The operation involved the construction of a cast-in-place concrete building under high schedule pressures. Interviews with each crew member were used to identify the main sources of the perceived demands. Extensive field observations and interviews with the supervisors and crews identified the production practices. The workers perceived different level of task demands depending on their role. The production practices influenced the task demands in two ways: (1) practices related to work organization, task design, resource management, and crew management mitigated the task demands; and (2) other practices related to work planning and crew management increased the crew's ability to cope with and adapt to high task demands. The findings identify production practices that regulate the workers' task demands. The effect of task demands on performance is mitigated by the ability to cope with high demands.

  5. Proposal for the renegotiation of a contract for the supply of eight coil casings for the barrel toroid magnet of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the renegotiation of a contract for the supply of eight coil casings for the Barrel Toroid Magnet of the ATLAS detector. The proposal for the award of a contract with ABB ENERTECH (CH) was presented to Finance Committee for information in September 1998 (CERN/FC/4089). In view of the developments outlined in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to agree to the renegotiation of a contract with ALSTOM SWITZERLAND (CH), for the supply of eight coil casings for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet for a total Ex-works price of 12 580 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July 2001, with an option for an extra coil casing for an additional Ex-works price of 1 525 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July 2001, bringing the total amount for the supply to 14 105 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July 2001. The total amount of the contract, including transport to the integration site, will not exceed 14 490 000 Swiss francs, subject to revision after 31 July...

  6. Permanent Temporariness? Changes in Social Contracts in Knowledge Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Rasmussen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Many sociologists have argued that work no longer plays the central role in contemporary life experience because we have entered an age of insecurity in relation to employment, and knowledge workers are often pictured as egoistical portfolio workers who are only interested in their careers and no longer loyal to their employers. Cappelli (1999 on the other hand argues that more insecure employment relations is a result of employers’ strategy to buy workers rather than offering them long-term relations. Using case studies from seven different knowledge work contexts in Norway, this article argues that more temporary employment relations is not the result of career-seeking portfolio workers, but of changes in employment practices of their employers. These are not primarily changes in the formal employment contracts from permanent to temporary employment, but in the social contracts as they are practiced by the employers and experienced by the knowledge workers in the different contexts of knowledge work. The reason for more temporary relations was not because work does not matter for knowledge workers. On the contrary, we found that they accepted insecure conditions because work mattered and because they were eager to take on new tasks, learn the trade in new fields, and show that they were able to do the job. When they left their employer, it was because they were not able to do a good job in their positions or because they were increasingly directly exposed to an insecure market that signaled that they were not profitable (enough for their employer. Although changes in employment practices by the employers toward more short-term relations are not caused by disloyal portfolio workers, these practices may produce the problem of disloyal workers who have to secure their employment in the labor market.

  7. Government Contract Law Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    leading to the modifications yields a negative answer. The dispute was initiated by a recognition that the specifications were defective and that the...est ay 1 ay b U.S v . d i c t i 0 the ate. ay th e bro . 331 Alexa they State in ou decor cal d di sti of 1 i by le repre neces...TT966) cons tr fo1 low to pow States Since ue and d that th ers alle s, the C visions Speech o US 306, 408 US ster, 40 v . Johns this Co

  8. Introducing New Peer Worker Roles into Mental Health Services in England: Comparative Case Study Research Across a Range of Organisational Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Steve; Holley, Jess; Gibson, Sarah; Larsen, John; Lucock, Mike; Oborn, Eivor; Rinaldi, Miles; Stamou, Elina

    2015-11-01

    A wide variety of peer worker roles is being introduced into mental health services internationally. Empirical insight into whether conditions supporting role introduction are common across organisational contexts is lacking. A qualitative, comparative case study compared the introduction of peer workers employed in the statutory sector, voluntary sector and in organisational partnerships. We found good practice across contexts in structural issues including recruitment and training, but differences in expectations of the peer worker role in different organisational cultures. Issues of professionalism and practice boundaries were important everywhere but could be understood very differently, sometimes eroding the distinctiveness of the role.

  9. The Determinants of Worker Remittance in Terms of Foreign Factors: The Case of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Rezwanul Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the determinants of worker remittance of Bangladesh. Instead of traditional approach of estimating the remittance determinants, here we propose to use foreign macroeconomic indicators as a proxy determinant to avoid endogeneity. We also used panel estimation technique in our study to incorporate country specific heterogeneity of remittance inflow of Bangladesh. According our study any changes in the number of labor force, consumer price index, export, import, government expenditure and devaluation or appreciation of host countries (origin of the remittance income currency can significantly influence the inward remittance income of Bangladesh.

  10. Special Problems in Securing a Reduction in Working Hours: The Case of Security Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Lundall

    2002-01-01

    The paper considers the complex process of introducing a regime of shorter working hours in the private security sector in South Africa. While the process of reducing the working hours of security workers in 1999 was bold, there is potential for real gains and losses to be derived from the process and this depends on the system and levels of compensation that are negotiated for the period of transition to the new schedules in working hours. A reduction in normal working hours can affect the s...

  11. 76 FR 8303 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Award-Fee Contracts (DFARS Case 2006-D021)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... event a contractor fails to meet contractual obligations. Assuming the contract is properly structured... meet contractual performance requirements will maximize the amount of award fee earned, there is no...

  12. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will {open_quotes}help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.{close_quotes} Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers.

  13. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will open-quotes help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.close quotes Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers

  14. The Managers’ Influence On The Workers’ Engagement – A Case Study Of Public Sector Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Hawrysz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The workers’ engagement means that they are loyal to their employers, trust both supervisors and co-workers, are not interested in changing their job, are proud of their work for a given company and that the boundary between private and professional life is often blurred. Proponents of the concept highlight the positive influence of engagement on the success of the company measured by workers’ loyalty, productivity, profitability and customers’ satisfaction. This is why, more and more researchers are interested in this concept. Apart from the engagement concept itself and the ways of its measurement, they pay attention to the possibility of affecting the workers’ engagement. However, researchers do not totally agree to the set of factors determining the workers’ engagement. There is though some agreement in their suggestions concerning the way of perceiving managers as one of the key factors determining the workers’ engagement. The aim of this article is to state whether the attitude of managers of the public sector organisations has a positive influence on the workers’ engagement. The article also tries to show differences in the management’s attitudes in Poland and abroad. For the needs of aims verification a survey was carried out among 1716 workers employed in 220 purposefully chosen public sector organisations located mainly in Europe.

  15. Polymorphic Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, João Filipe; Greenberg, Michael; Igarashi, Atsushi; Pierce, Benjamin C.

    Manifest contracts track precise properties by refining types with predicates - e.g., {x : Int |x > 0 } denotes the positive integers. Contracts and polymorphism make a natural combination: programmers can give strong contracts to abstract types, precisely stating pre- and post-conditions while hiding implementation details - for example, an abstract type of stacks might specify that the pop operation has input type {x :α Stack |not ( empty x )} . We formalize this combination by defining FH, a polymorphic calculus with manifest contracts, and establishing fundamental properties including type soundness and relational parametricity. Our development relies on a significant technical improvement over earlier presentations of contracts: instead of introducing a denotational model to break a problematic circularity between typing, subtyping, and evaluation, we develop the metatheory of contracts in a completely syntactic fashion, omitting subtyping from the core system and recovering it post facto as a derived property.

  16. Availability and the use of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code among workers employed on the basis of employment contracts in small and medium enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Andysz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Polish Labour Code provides employees with a range of solutions (benefits supporting them in achieving balance between work and private life. This paper was aimed at indicating availability and the use of legal benefits supporting work-life balance (WLB among Polish workers of small and medium enterprises. Material and Methods: The study sample included 219 respondents, aged 22–64, working in small and medium enterprises and employed on the basis of employment contracts for at least a year. The respondents completed a questionnaire on availability and the use of benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code, referring to their current workplaces. Results: Most frequently the studied employees took sick leave because of one’s own illness and leave on demand. In our sample, 45% of the women took maternity leave and 26% of the men took paternity leave. The respondents took educational and parental leave the least frequently. More than half of the respondents (58% did not return to the same position after leave devoted to childcare, even though they had such a possibility. Conclusions: In fact, most of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by law were available to the employees of small and medium enterprises, regardless of their gender. Availability and the use of the majority of benefits were similar among the women and men. Availability of benefits depended on the specificity of industry and a profession, thus, future research on work-life balance policy should control for variables related to the character of work.

  17. Risk factors for tuberculosis among health care workers in South India: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Anoop; David, Thambu; Thomas, Kurien; Kuruvilla, P J; Balaji, V; Jesudason, Mary V; Samuel, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) among health care workers (HCWs) in India remains under-researched. This study is a nested case-control design assessing the risk factors for acquiring TB among HCWs in India. It is a nested case-control study conducted at a tertiary teaching hospital in India. Cases (n = 101) were HCWs with active TB. Controls (n = 101) were HCWs who did not have TB, randomly selected from the 6,003 subjects employed at the facility. Cases and controls were compared with respect to clinical and demographic variables. The cases and controls were of similar age. Logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (BMI) <19 kg/m(2) (odds ratio [OR]: 2.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-5.87), having frequent contact with patients (OR: 2.83, 95% CI: 1.47-5.45) and being employed in medical wards (OR: 12.37, 95% CI: 1.38-110.17) or microbiology laboratories (OR: 5.65, 95% CI: 1.74-18.36) were independently associated with increased risk of acquiring TB. HCWs with frequent patient contact and those with BMI <19 kg/m(2) were at high risk of acquiring active TB. Nosocomial transmission of TB was pronounced in locations, such as medical wards and microbiology laboratories. Surveillance of high-risk HCWs and appropriate infrastructure modifications may be important to prevent interpersonal TB transmission in health care facilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Between Status and Contract?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Keiser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with unfree labour in Germany from the early modern age until the beginning of the 20th century. It presents the main conclusions of a book published in 2013 on this subject in German. Unfree labour is not identified in the first place with slavery or any other labour relationship based on status. Instead, this study aims at an analysis of freedom and coercion in contractual labour relationships. It will be argued that in Germany contractual labour relationships before 1800 were embedded in a legal system that strongly restricted contractual autonomy and aimed at the suppression of free labour markets. The scope of this legislation was to guarantee efficient labour performance, which was not only perceived as being in the personal interest of an employer, but as a fundamental element of the common good. After 1800 the system changed to more incentive-based legislation that established freedom of contract for labour relations. Nevertheless, coercion in order to perform the contractual duties of a work contract remained important for many groups of workers, especially farmhands and industrial workers. The last criminal sanctions for breaches of labour contracts were only abolished in the revolution of 1919. This development shows the difficulties German law had in extending the principles of private law to workers. When a system of free labour was fully established, the issue of unemployment and economic problems, especially in the Weimar Republic, required a new system of protective rules. The history of free market based labour contracts in Germany was therefore very short, with state intervention shi ing from control and coercion to social assistance.

  19. Administrative contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević-Petković Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Administrative contracts are a special type of contract where usually one of the contracting parties is a public law body and which is concluded for the performance of public service and the realization of a public interest. They go a long way since its inception to its eventual final acceptance of all the legal systems. One of the enduring characteristics of this type of contract is their disquised or unnoticed existence. This is why only monitoring their development may lead to a complete understanding of the importance and essence of this institution as well as the need for its complete legal regulation.

  20. Electrical contracting

    CERN Document Server

    Neidle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Electrical Contracting, Second Edition is a nine-chapter text guide for the greater efficiency in planning and completing installations for the design, installation and control of electrical contracts. This book starts with a general overview of the efficient cabling and techniques that must be employed for safe wiring design, as well as the cost estimation of the complete electrical contract. The subsequent chapters are devoted to other electrical contracting requirements, including electronic motor control, lighting, and electricity tariffs. A chapter focuses on the IEE Wiring Regulations an

  1. Administrative contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Vukićević-Petković Milica

    2015-01-01

    Administrative contracts are a special type of contract where usually one of the contracting parties is a public law body and which is concluded for the performance of public service and the realization of a public interest. They go a long way since its inception to its eventual final acceptance of all the legal systems. One of the enduring characteristics of this type of contract is their disquised or unnoticed existence. This is why only monitoring their development may lead to a complete u...

  2. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudzenko, N.; Hatch, M.; Bazyka, D.; Dyagil, I.; Reiss, R.F.; Brenner, A.; Chumak, V.; Babkina, N.; Zablotska, L.B.; Mabuchi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods: In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results: After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions: These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. - Highlights: • A unique population – a cohort of 110,645 Chernobyl clean-up workers from Ukraine. • Followed 1986–2006 for leukemia, interviewed about non-radiation risk factors. • Petroleum exposure increased risk for non-CLL leukemias, particularly CML. • No risk factor other than radiation was found for CLL.

  3. Stakeholders' perceptions of integrated community case management by community health workers: a post-intervention qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L Buchner

    Full Text Available Integrated community case management (iCCM involves delivery of simple medicines to children with pneumonia, diarrhea and/or malaria by community health workers (CHWs. Between 2010 and 2012, an iCCM intervention trial was implemented by Healthy Child Uganda. This study used qualitative tools to assess whether project stakeholders perceived that iCCM improved access to care for children under five years of age.The intervention involved training and equipping 196 CHWs in 98 study villages in one sub-county in Uganda in iCCM. During the eight-month intervention, CHWs assessed sick children, provided antimalarials (coartem for fever, antibiotics (amoxicillin for cough and fast breathing, oral rehydration salts/zinc for diarrhea, and referred very sick children to health facilities. In order to examine community perceptions and acceptability of iCCM, post-intervention focus groups and key respondent interviews involving caregivers, health workers, CHWs and local leaders were carried out by experienced facilitators using semi-structured interview guides. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques.Respondents reported increased access to health care for children as a result of iCCM. Access was reportedly closer to home, available more hours in a day, and the availability of CHWs was perceived as more reliable. CHW care was reported to be trustworthy and caring. Families reported saving money especially due to reduced transportation costs, and less time away from home. Respondents also perceived better health outcomes. Linkages between health facilities and communities were reportedly improved by the iCCM intervention due to the presence of trained CHWs in the community.iCCM delivered by CHWs may improve access to health care and is acceptable to families. Policymakers should continue to seek opportunities to implement and support iCCM, particularly in remote communities where there are health worker shortages.

  4. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, N., E-mail: gudznat@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Hatch, M., E-mail: hatchm@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bazyka, D., E-mail: Bazyka@yahoo.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Dyagil, I., E-mail: leuk@ukr.net [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Reiss, R.F., E-mail: rfr1@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Brenner, A., E-mail: brennera@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chumak, V., E-mail: Chumak.vadim@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Babkina, N., E-mail: natalie.babkina@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Zablotska, L.B., E-mail: lydia.zablotska@ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Mabuchi, K., E-mail: mabuchik@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Background: Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods: In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results: After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions: These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. - Highlights: • A unique population – a cohort of 110,645 Chernobyl clean-up workers from Ukraine. • Followed 1986–2006 for leukemia, interviewed about non-radiation risk factors. • Petroleum exposure increased risk for non-CLL leukemias, particularly CML. • No risk factor other than radiation was found for CLL.

  5. Empowering school personnel for positive youth development: the case of Hong Kong school social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Siu-ming

    2009-01-01

    While empowerment has become a popular concept in working with adolescents, few attempts have been made to explore the possibilities for empowering school personnel to create an environment in which young people can make maximum use of the opportunity to learn and grow. Based on the field experiences of 15 Hong Kong school social workers, this article examines how practitioners use various strategies to interact with school personnel to generate empowering practices in the school setting: namely, (1) exerting influence on school personnel in daily conversations and interactions; (2) creating an environment conducive to the teacher-student relationship; (3) achieving consensus with school personnel through lobbying and negotiation; and (4) collaborating with school personnel to organize life education and positive youth development programs. The findings provide valuable reference materials to guide other practitioners in applying the empowerment approach in actual practice. It also helps fill the gap in existing literature on empowerment and school social work.

  6. Abuse and Violence Against Foreign Domestic Workers. A Case from Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Akm Ahsan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores various abuses Foreign Domestic Helpers (FDHs or migrant domestic workers (MDW in Hong Kong suffer and the strategies they take up to cope with this abuse. Data were collected from 215 domestic helpers (135 from the Philippines, 30 from Thailand, 41 from Indonesia, and 9 from Sri Lanka all of whom had been in residence for at least six months. Selected by snow-balling technique, respondents were interviewed with structured and non-structured questionnaires. Research shows that sexual abuse is the most common form of abuse against MDWs followed by psychological and physical abuses. Female employers are the main perpetuators of psychological abuse while the male employers are culpable for sexual abuses. Coping strategies varied widely among the MDWs. Many of them endure the violence to keep the job; some quit the job and others struggle with the decision to stay or quit.

  7. Designing and assessing weather-based financial hedging contracts to mitigate water conflicts at the river basin scale. A case study in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Laura; Denaro, Simona; Kern, Jordan; Giuliani, Matteo; Castelletti, Andrea; Characklis, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Growing water demands and more frequent and severe droughts are increasingly challenging water management in many regions worldwide, exacerbating water disputes and reducing the space for negotiated agreements at the catchment scale. In the lack of a centralized controller, the design and deployment of coordination and/or regulatory mechanisms is a way to improve system-wide efficiency while preserving the distributed nature of the decision making setting, and facilitating cooperation among institutionally independent decision-makers. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in index-based insurance contracts as mechanisms for sharing hydro-meteorological risk in complex and heterogeneous decision making context (e.g. multiple stakeholders and institutionally independent decision makers). In this study, we explore the potential for index-based insurance contracts to mitigate the conflict in a water system characterized by (political) power asymmetry between hydropower companies upstream and farmers downstream. The Lake Como basin in the Italian Alps is considered as a case study. We generated alternative regulatory mechanisms in the form of minimum release constraints to the hydropower facilities, and designed an insurance contract for hedging against hydropower relative revenue losses. The fundamental step in designing this type of insurance contracts is the identification of a suitable index, which triggers the payouts as well as the payout function, defined by strike level and slope (e.g., euros/index unit). A portfolio of index-based contracts was designed for the case study and evaluated in terms of revenue floor, basis risk and revenue fluctuation around the mean, both with and without insurance. Over the long term, the insurance proved to be capable to keep the minimum revenue above a specified level while providing a greater certainty on the revenue trend. This result shows the possibility to augment farmer's supply with little loss for hydropower

  8. ENFORCEMENT OF MORTGAGE CONTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa A. BELU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A chattel mortgage contract is the expression of a real guarantee that gives the creditor precedence over other creditors, in addition to the general pledge upon the belongings of the debtor. It refers to the sale of mortgaged movable assets, exclusively or prioritized in favor of the mortgaging creditor, in case the debtor does not comply with his / her commitments, under the signed mortgage contract. Beginning from this purpose, shared by both sides (as the chattel mortgage contract is synallagmatic, in case the debtor is unable to fulfill his / her commitments, the sides reach a situation of enforcement of the signed chattel mortgage contract. Given the legal status of the chattel mortgage contract [Art. 2387-2477 Noul Cod Civil , Universul Juridic, Bucureşti, 2016, ISBN 978-606-673-792-0], the principle of binding force of the contract and the principle according to which signed legal conventions will entail legal effects, the Romanian law maker developed the proper legal framework for the enforcement of the chattel mortgage contract. [art. 622 si urm. Noul Cod de Procedură Civilă, ed. Hamangiu, Bucureşti, 2016, ISBN 978-606-27-0459-9].

  9. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzenko, N; Hatch, M; Bazyka, D; Dyagil, I; Reiss, R F; Brenner, A; Chumak, V; Babkina, N; Zablotska, L B; Mabuchi, K

    2015-10-01

    Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. These data - the first from a working population in Ukraine - add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A crisis worker's observations on the psychosocial support for victims and families following child sexual abuse; a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Daniel R; Jones, Alyson

    2014-10-01

    The Lancashire Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) centre in Preston saw 204 children aged 16 and under for examination following allegation of sexual assault in 2013. The psychological impact on the child is well known but not always addressed correctly or appropriately; the impact and resulting difficulties faced by the parent/carer of the child can also easily go un-noticed. Mrs A attended the centre with her 2 year old daughter in 2013, where I was the crisis worker in the case. She was contacted five months later and the support they received after attending the centre discussed. Her experiences, along with my own anecdotal experiences are discussed. Independent Sexual Assault Advisors (ISVAs) offer support following attendance at the centre, and various charitable organisations offer counselling, emotional and practical support. Health visitors, paediatricians, school nurses and social workers also play a role in looking after children and families following allegations of assault. However, the organisations and agencies involved in psychological aftercare for victims and parents are hindered by strict referral criteria and lack of funding or appropriate specialist expertise. The psychological, educational and behavioural support for parents and children, and specifically pre-trial counselling for children need significant improvement if we are to offer the best support for victims. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Bottlenecks and contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The report surveys the central points in the literature about contracts on geographical price differences and transmission rights in the power market. It is commonly believed that such contracts may reduce market power and contribute to better network investments. The theoretical debate is in part unfinished and largely based on very stylised assumptions. There is some indication that such contracts may not be very useful in practice. But they may be useful in some cases, perhaps in particular when power is transported outside limited surplus areas and for certain investment decisions where there is no systems operator with a natural responsibility

  12. EDF FARN (fast action force in case of nuclear accident) - Focus on radiation protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. As part of the operation of its nuclear power plants, EDF set up in the 80's an emergency response organisation together with the French public authorities aimed at managing the consequences, especially radiological of any events. This is based on the setting up of emergency plans involving both the operator and the public authorities, at local and national level, with both parties assessing the consequences of a radiological accident in the environment constantly enhanced as part of the continuous improvement process. As the Fukushima accident especially highlighted the relevance of having a response system available off site, this emergency response organisation has been strengthened both with equipment and human resources so as to be able to respond to major accidents further to external hazards. These resources have been designed to factor in a high level of radiological risk. The functions and responsibilities are clearly defined for any event occurring at a nuclear power plant. The operator shall be accountable for the actions to be taken on site concerning technical plant management, worker protection and rescue of casualties. The public authorities shall be accountable for all the measures to be taken off site, especially protection of the local population and environmental monitoring. The EDF emergency response organisation is based on enhanced equipment and human resources at site and corporate level supplemented with EDF corporate and non-EDF resources. The EDF emergency plan covers the situation where all the site units are affected. The decision to set up the nuclear rapid response taskforce was taken further to the Fukushima accident in 2011 and it has been operational since 2012. Integrated in the emergency response organisation, its main aim is to be capable of responding in less than 12 hours to reinstate water, electricity and air supply at the nuclear power plant where the accident has occurred. It is

  13. [Analysis of the knowledge and practices of health care workers in Emergency Departments regarding the protection and preservation of evidence in forensic cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilçe, Arzu; Yıldız, Dilek; Baysal, Gonca; Ozdoğan, Fatma; Taş, Fatma

    2010-11-01

    The frequency of violent incidents is increasing. This increase has made the role of Emergency Department (ED) staff more important in the collection, recording, protection, and storage of the evidence until the arrival of the responsible people concerned with the issue. Therefore, this study was designed to analyze the knowledge and practices of the nursing staff working in the EDs with respect to the protection and preservation of the evidence in forensic cases. This research, which was designed to be descriptive, was conducted with 44 health care workers in the hospitals with Emergency Departments in the center of Bolu province between October 2008 and January 2009. It was observed that 90.9% of the health care workers encountered forensic cases, 65.9% of them had not attended any training on forensic cases, and 22.7% of them did not use care when removing and storing the clothes of the patient. It was considered that 90.9% of the health care workers duly carry out their duties and responsibilities in forensic cases; however, 18.2% of them do not have sufficient knowledge or practical experience in the preservation and protection of evidence in forensic cases. It was observed that most health care workers do not have sufficient knowledge or practical experience in the preservation and protection of evidence in forensic cases.

  14. Automatic Conflict Detection on Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Stephen; Pace, Gordon J.; Schneider, Gerardo

    Many software applications are based on collaborating, yet competing, agents or virtual organisations exchanging services. Contracts, expressing obligations, permissions and prohibitions of the different actors, can be used to protect the interests of the organisations engaged in such service exchange. However, the potentially dynamic composition of services with different contracts, and the combination of service contracts with local contracts can give rise to unexpected conflicts, exposing the need for automatic techniques for contract analysis. In this paper we look at automatic analysis techniques for contracts written in the contract language mathcal{CL}. We present a trace semantics of mathcal{CL} suitable for conflict analysis, and a decision procedure for detecting conflicts (together with its proof of soundness, completeness and termination). We also discuss its implementation and look into the applications of the contract analysis approach we present. These techniques are applied to a small case study of an airline check-in desk.

  15. Contracting private sector providers for public sector health services in Jalisco, Mexico: perspectives of system actors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Luz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Contracting out health services is a strategy that many health systems in the developing world are following, despite the lack of decisive evidence that this is the best way to improve quality, increase efficiency and expand coverage. A large body of literature has appeared in recent years focusing on the results of several contracting strategies, but very few papers have addressed aspects of the managerial process and how this can affect results. Case description This paper describes and analyses the perceptions and opinions of managers and workers about the benefits and challenges of the contracting model that has been in place for almost 10 years in the State of Jalisco, Mexico. Both qualitative and quantitative information was collected. An open-ended questionnaire was used to obtain information from a group of managers, while information provided by a self-selected group of workers was collected via a closed-ended questionnaire. The analysis contrasted the information obtained from each source. Discussion and Evaluation Findings show that perceptions of managers and workers vary for most of the items studied. For managers the model has been a success, as it has allowed for expansion of coverage based on a cost-effective strategy, while for workers the model also possesses positive elements but fails to provide fair labour relationships, which negatively affects their performance. Conclusion Perspectives of the two main groups of actors in Jalisco's contracting model are important in the design and adjustment of an adequate contracting model that includes managerial elements to give incentives to worker performance, a key element necessary to achieve the model's ultimate objectives. Lessons learnt from this study could be relevant for the experience of contracting models in other developing countries.

  16. The Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS 2013): soluble plutonium retention in the lungs of an occupationally exposed USTUR case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmachev, S. Y.; Avtandilashvili, M.; Martinez, F.; Thomas, E. M.; Miller, F. L.; Nielsen, C. E.; Puncher, M.; Morgan, W. F.; Birchall, A.

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, plutonium retention in human upper airways was investigated based on the dosimetric structure of the human respiratory tract proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper describes analytical work methodology, case selection criteria, and summarizes findings on soluble (ICRP 68 Type M material) plutonium distribution in the lungs of a former nuclear worker occupationally exposed to plutonium nitrate [ 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 ]. Thirty-eight years post-intake, plutonium was found to be uniformly distributed between bronchial (BB), bronchiolar (bb) and alveolar-interstitial (AI) dosimetric compartments as well as between the left and right lungs. 239+240 Pu and 238 Pu total body activity was estimated to be 2333 ± 23 and 42.1 ± 0.7 Bq, respectively. The results of this work provide key information on the extent of plutonium binding in the upper airways of the human respiratory tract. (authors)

  17. Judges, commerce and contract law

    OpenAIRE

    Gava, John

    2010-01-01

    John Gava, Reader at Adelaide Law School, considers the question how should judges decide commercial cases, in particular, contract cases? He looks at the circumstances and impact of the use of contract law, with attention on common law contract and market needs. Published in Amicus Curiae – Journal of the Society for Advanced Legal Studies at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by SALS at the IALS (Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, Un...

  18. Forestry contracting in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khosa, M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available of their workers directly to a contractor system. For example, forest contractors are now hired to carry out planting, tending and silvicultural operations. Sappi Forests, Mondi Forests and Safcol are all contracting certain work out and are currently assisting...

  19. Nurses' and community support workers' experience of telehealth: a longitudinal case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Urvashi; Clarke, Malcolm

    2014-04-10

    Introduction of telehealth into the healthcare setting has been recognised as a service that might be experienced as disruptive. This paper explores how this disruption is experienced. In a longitudinal qualitative study, we conducted focus group discussions prior to and semi structured interviews post introduction of a telehealth service in Nottingham, U.K. with the community matrons, congestive heart failure nurses, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease nurses and community support workers that would be involved in order to elicit their preconceptions and reactions to the implementation. Users experienced disruption due to the implementation of telehealth as threatening. Three main factors add to the experience of threat and affect the decision to use the technology: change in clinical routines and increased workload; change in interactions with patients and fundamentals of face-to-face nursing work; and change in skills required with marginalisation of clinical expertise. Since the introduction of telehealth can be experienced as threatening, managers and service providers should aim at minimising the disruption caused by taking the above factors on board. This can be achieved by employing simple yet effective measures such as: providing timely, appropriate and context specific training; provision of adequate technical support; and procedures that allow a balance between the use of telehealth and personal visit by nurses delivering care to their patients.

  20. A gender analysis of a national community health workers program: A case study of Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizada, Said Ahmad Maisam; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn; Labonté, Ronald

    2018-05-07

    Gender equity can be a neglected issue in health system reforms. This paper explores the multiple layered gender dynamics of the Afghan Community Health Worker (CHW) Program within broader health system reforms in Afghanistan using a qualitative research design. We interviewed policy makers, health managers, CHWs and community members in 16 sites in 2013 and 2014. We found that gendered societal norms interact and influence the Afghan CHW program in a dynamic way. Gendered social norms around the division of labour tend to privilege women in terms of access to resources at the community level, but it is men who hold leadership positions that ultimately decide how the resources are to be distributed. The Afghan Ministry of Public Health expresses a commitment to gender equity, but policies on gender are restricted to reproductive health, thus constraining a gender-equity approach as focused on maternal and child health. Our explicit gender analysis not only reveals gender inequities in the Afghan CHW Program and the broader health system, it also uncovers how a highly gendered division of health labour provides some opportunities for women's empowerment that can disrupt patriarchal role constraints and broader gender inequities.

  1. Rethinking Compassion Fatigue Through the Lens of Professional Identity: The Case of Child-Protection Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrion, Steve; Morselli, Carlo; Guay, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Compassion fatigue is currently the dominant model in work-related stress studies that explain the consequences of caring for others on child-protection workers. Based on a deterministic approach, this model excludes the role of cognition a priori and a posteriori in the understanding of the impact of caregiving or providing social support. By integrating the notion of professional identity, this article adds a subjective perspective to the compassion fatigue model allowing for the consideration of positive outcomes and takes into account the influence of stress caused by accountability. Mainly, it is argued that meanings derived from identity and given to situations may protect or accelerate the development of compassion fatigue or compassion satisfaction. To arrive at this proposition, the notions of compassion fatigue and identity theory are first reviewed. These concepts are then articulated around four work-related stressors specific to child-protection work. In light of this exercise, it is argued that professional identity serves as a subjective interpretative framework that guides the understanding of work-related situations. Therefore, compassion fatigue is not only a simple reaction to external stimuli. It is influenced by meanings given to the situation. Furthermore, professional identity modulates the impact of compassion fatigue on psychological well-being. Practice, policy, and research implications in light of these findings are also discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Post-"Psychological Contract" Violation: The Durability and Transferability of Employee Perceptions. The Case of TimTec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Judy; Malone, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with 20 employees 5 years after a factory closure explored pre- and postlayoff experiences and perceptions of current employers. The experience of the violation of the psychological contract affected perceptions of loyalty, commitment, and trust that were transferred to the current employer. (SK)

  3. Do Iran’s buy-back service contracts lead to optimal production? The case of Soroosh and Nowrooz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, Abbas; Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    We model the dynamically optimal oil production on Iran’s offshore Soroosh and Nowrooz fields, which have been developed by Shell Exploration through a buy-back service contract. In particular, we examine the National Iranian Oil Company’s (NIOC) actual and contractual oil production behavior and compare it to the production profile that would have been optimal under the conditions of the contract. We find that the contract’s production profile is different from optimal production profile for most discount rates, and that the NIOC’s actual behavior is inefficient—its production rates have not maximized profits. Because the NIOC’s objective is purported to be maximizing cumulative production instead of the present discounted value of the entire stream of profits, we also compare the NIOC’s behavior to the production profile that would maximize cumulative production. We find that even though what the contract dictates comes close to maximizing cumulative production, the NIOC has not been achieving its own objective of maximizing cumulative production. - Highlights: ► The NIOC’s production rates have not maximized profits. ► The contract’s production profile is inefficient for most discount rates. ► What the contract dictates comes close to maximizing cumulative production. ► The NIOC has not been maximizing cumulative production.

  4. A questionnaire-based survey of dry eye disease among leather tannery workers in Kanpur, India: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ramesh Chandra; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Kushwaha, Raj Nath; Khan, Perwez; Mohan, Shalini

    2014-12-01

    Kanpur is a major leather processing center in India, where a large number of tanneries are situated. During tanning process, workers are constantly exposed to heat, leather dust produced in buffering operations and a wide range of chemicals. All these factors are known to cause dry eye. Being ophthalmologists of a tertiary health care center in Kanpur, we used to notice over a period of time that a considerable number of patients with dry eye symptoms, attending our out-patient department, were related to leather tanning industries. But, no published data is available on the prevalence of and risk factors for dry eye disorders among tannery worker. To estimate the prevalence of dry eye problem and its severity among the workers of leather tanneries in the industrial belt of Kanpur and to evaluate various risk factors related to it. In this cross-sectional case-control study, Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) Questionnaire was presented to randomly selected tannery workers and control group. OSDI score was calculated based on subjects' response, and was evaluated with OSDI chart to assess the magnitude of dry eye symptoms and to grade its severity. RESULTS were analyzed statistically to evaluate the significance level. A total of 800 workers were selected by simple random sampling, out of which 72 workers were excluded from the study. Thus the questionnaire was presented to a total of 728 workers, while control group included 260 individuals. All the workers as well as controls were male with age ranging from 20 to 59 years. The mean age for tannery workers was 34.05 ± 8.96 years and that for control group was 32.97 ± 10.59 years (p = 0.14). The tannery workers had mean duration of work at tanneries for 6.99 ± 4.86 years. The prevalence of dry eye symptoms among tannery workers was 33.79% (95% CI: 30.35-37.24), while that in control group was 15.77% (95% CI: 11.31-20.23) (p workers, 47.96% (95% CI: 41.68-54.26) workers had mild, 36.99% (95% CI: 30

  5. Healthcare Worker Preferences for Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Programs in South Africa: A Best-Worst Scaling Choice Experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan N O'Hara

    Full Text Available Healthcare workers (HCWs in South Africa are at a high risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB due to their occupational exposures. This study aimed to systematically quantify and compare the preferred attributes of an active TB case finding program for HCWs in South Africa.A Best-Worst Scaling choice experiment estimated HCW's preferences using a random-effects conditional logit model. Latent class analysis (LCA was used to explore heterogeneity in preferences."No cost", "the assurance of confidentiality", "no wait" and testing at the occupational health unit at one's hospital were the most preferred attributes. LCA identified a four class model with consistent differences in preference strength. Sex, occupation, and the time since a previous TB test were statistically significant predictors of class membership.The findings support the strengthening of occupational health units in South Africa to offer free and confidential active TB case finding programs for HCWs with minimal wait times. There is considerable variation in active TB case finding preferences amongst HCWs of different gender, occupation, and testing history. Attention to heterogeneity in preferences should optimize screening utilization of target HCW populations.

  6. Physical activity in adolescence and abdominal obesity in adulthood: a case-control study among women shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Anderson da Silva; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo; Canuto, Raquel; Olinto, Beatriz Anselmo; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity may have a protective effect against abdominal obesity, an important risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the association between the practice of physical activities in adolescence and abdominal obesity in adulthood among women shift workers in Southern Brazil in 2011. This case-control study included 215 cases (waist circumference greater than or equal to 88 cm) and 326 controls. For both the case and control groups, participation in leisure-time physical activities was most frequent in adolescence and was significantly less in adulthood. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, women who participated in five or more physical activities in adolescence were 50 percent less likely to have abdominal obesity than women who participated in one activity or no physical activities (Odds Ratio = 0.50; 95% confidential interval: 0.27-0.93, p value = .029). Participation in various types of leisure-time physical activities in adolescence may protect against abdominal obesity in adulthood, even if the number of physical activities decreases over time. This finding demonstrated the importance of physical activity as well as the period of life in which these should be encouraged for the prevention of health disorders, such as abdominal obesity.

  7. 48 CFR 22.1408 - Contract clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 22.1408 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Employment of Workers with Disabilities 22.1408 Contract clause. (a) Insert the clause at 52.222-36, Affirmative Action for Workers with...

  8. 48 CFR 622.1408 - Contract clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract clause. 622.1408 Section 622.1408 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Employment of Workers with Disabilities 622.1408 Contract...

  9. Assessment of Navy Contract Management Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    capability? • 85% of quality problems are related to processes, while only 15% of problems are controlled by individual workers ( Deming , 1986...eligible participants: 369 • Total surveys completed: 185 • Response rate: 50% CONTRACT MANAGEMENT MATURITY MODEL© MATURITY LEVEL 5...Measurement – Organizations systematically use performance metrics to measure the quality and evaluate the effectiveness of the contract management

  10. 29 CFR 4.142 - Contracts in an indefinite amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Determining Amount of Contract § 4.142 Contracts in an indefinite amount. (a) Every contract subject to this Act which is indefinite in amount is required to contain the....), a case arising under the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act. Such a contract, which may be in the...

  11. Leadership and governance of community health worker programmes at scale: a cross case analysis of provincial implementation in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Helen; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla

    2017-09-15

    National community health worker (CHW) programmes are returning to favour as an integral part of primary health care systems, often on the back of pre-existing community based initiatives. There are significant challenges to the integration and support of such programmes, and they require coordination and stewardship at all levels of the health system. This paper explores the leadership and governance tasks of large-scale CHW programmes at sub-national level, through the case of national reforms to South Africa's community based sector, referred to as the Ward Based Outreach Team (WBOT) strategy. A cross case analysis of leadership and governance roles, drawing on three case studies of adoption and implementation of the WBOTs strategy at provincial level (Western Cape, North West and Gauteng) was conducted. The primary case studies mapped system components and assessed implementation processes and contexts. They involved teams of researchers and over 200 interviews with stakeholders from senior to frontline, document reviews and analyses of routine data. The secondary, cross case analysis specifically focused on the issues and challenges facing, and strategies adopted by provincial and district policy makers and managers, as they engaged with the new national mandate. From this key sub-national leadership and governance roles were formulated. Four key roles are identified and discussed: 1. Negotiating a fit between national mandates and provincial and district histories and strategies of community based services 2. Defining new organisational and accountability relationships between CHWs, local health services, communities and NGOs 3. Revising and developing new aligned and integrated planning, human resource, financing and information systems 4. Leading change by building new collective visions, mobilising political, including budgetary, support and designing implementation strategies. This analysis, from real-life systems, adds to understanding of the processes

  12. Availability and the use of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code among workers employed on the basis of employment contracts in small and medium enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andysz, Aleksandra; Jacukowicz, Aleksandra; Stańczak, Aleksander; Drabek, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Polish Labour Code provides employees with a range of solutions (benefits) supporting them in achieving balance between work and private life. This paper was aimed at indicating availability and the use of legal benefits supporting work-life balance (WLB) among Polish workers of small and medium enterprises. The study sample included 219 respondents, aged 22-64, working in small and medium enterprises and employed on the basis of employment contracts for at least a year. The respondents completed a questionnaire on availability and the use of benefits guaranteed by the Polish Labour Code, referring to their current workplaces. Most frequently the studied employees took sick leave because of one's own illness and leave on demand. In our sample, 45% of the women took maternity leave and 26% of the men took paternity leave. The respondents took educational and parental leave the least frequently. More than half of the respondents (58%) did not return to the same position after leave devoted to childcare, even though they had such a possibility. In fact, most of work-life balance benefits guaranteed by law were available to the employees of small and medium enterprises, regardless of their gender. Availability and the use of the majority of benefits were similar among the women and men. Availability of benefits depended on the specificity of industry and a profession, thus, future research on work-life balance policy should control for variables related to the character of work. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Heterogeneous social preferences, screening, and employment contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinand A. von Siemens

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies a monopsonistic firm's optimal employment contracts if workers have private information on both their propensity for social comparisons and their ability. Employees of the firm are taken to form their own distinct reference group. It is shown that screening workers with equal ability according to their social preferences is then not possible within the firm. In consequence, the firm distorts production by its employees with low ability, or it excludes workers with low abili...

  14. "Even if you know everything you can forget": health worker perceptions of mobile phone text-messaging to improve malaria case-management in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline O H Jones

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a qualitative study to investigate the perceptions and experiences of health workers involved in a a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a novel intervention to improve health worker malaria case-management in 107 government health facilities in Kenya. The intervention involved sending text-messages about paediatric outpatient malaria case-management accompanied by "motivating" quotes to health workers' mobile phones. Ten malaria messages were developed reflecting recommendations from the Kenyan national guidelines. Two messages were delivered per day for 5 working days and the process was repeated for 26 weeks (May to October 2009. The accompanying quotes were unique to each message. The intervention was delivered to 119 health workers and there were significant improvements in correct artemether-lumefantrine (AL management both immediately after the intervention (November 2009 and 6 months later (May 2010. In-depth interviews with 24 health workers were undertaken to investigate the possible drivers of this change. The results suggest high acceptance of all components of the intervention, with the active delivery of information in an on the job setting, the ready availability of new and stored text messages and the perception of being kept 'up to date' as important factors influencing practice. Applying the construct of stages of change we infer that in this intervention the SMS messages were operating primarily at the action and maintenance stages of behaviour change achieving their effect by creating an enabling environment and providing a prompt to action for the implementation of case management practices that had already been accepted as the clinical norm by the health workers. Future trials testing the effectiveness of SMS reminders in creating an enabling environment for the establishment of new norms in clinical practice as well as in providing a prompt to action for the implementation of the new

  15. Women's Learning in Contract Work: Practicing Contradictions in Boundaryless Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara

    2008-01-01

    The general rise in contractors, particularly among knowledge workers negotiating "boundaryless" employment conditions, has generated interest in the nature and forms of contract work. This article explores the learning of contract workers as they negotiate these conditions, with a focus on women. Drawing from a qualitative study of…

  16. Contracting of services companies management and the outsourcing paradox: a study of success case under the prism of the HSE management systems; Gestao de empresas prestadoras de servico e o paradoxo da terceirizacao: um estudo de caso de sucesso sob o prisma do sistema de gestao de SMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robalinho da Silva, Agostinho da Mota [PETROBRAS, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Unidade de Negocio da Bacia de Campos. Gerencia de Seguranca, Meio Ambiente e Saude]. E-mail: amrs@petrobras.com.br; Lima, Gilson Brito Alves [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Curso de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia de Seguranca do Trabalho]. E-mail: Gilson@civil.uff.br

    2003-07-01

    Outsourcing, sometimes called 'terceirizacao', evoques polemic. In one hand by arguments that becomes precarious the work conditions, seeking only to reduce costs, increasing as consequence the number of accidents. In other hand for arguments that companies can not be excellent in all competence areas, needing to associate more and more to strategic partners. Ideological arguments defends the non-outsourcing of work force as form of socializing the rights and strengthening the workers' representation in defense of its interests. On the other hand there are mega enterprises mobilizing a varied and intense range of professional competencies that would hinder personnel's administration in a non-outsourcing context. The outsourcing, here denominated Contracting of Services that best express the practice in study, it is the reality of Exploration and Production of Petroleum Industry. This work wants to demonstrate through Study of Case of Campos' Basin, that is possible to reconcile the industrial growth with elevated number of contracted workers, without committing SMS indicators. We do not enter in the merit of the outsourcing or non-outsourcing for understanding that is theme for specific work. Also wants to stimulate HSE Management Systems and regulatory instruments for selection and control like requirements to ability and qualify companies in the sector. (author)

  17. Acute hepatitis B in a healthcare worker: A case report of genuine vaccination failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Van Der Waaij, L.A.; Schirm, J.; Kallenberg, Cees; van Steenbergen, J.; Wolters, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Individuals who reach the antibody threshold level of 10 IU/I against the surface protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) after completion of a series of hepatitis B vaccination are considered to be long-term protected against a clinically manifest HBV infection. Case report: Here we

  18. Acute hepatitis B in a healthcare worker : A case report of genuine vaccination failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Hein J.; van der Waaij, Laurens A.; Schirm, Jurien; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; van Steenbergen, Jim; Wolters, Bert

    Background: Individuals who reach the antibody threshold level of 10 IU/I against the surface protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) after completion of a series of hepatitis B vaccination are considered to be long-term protected against a clinically manifest HBV infection. Case report: Here we

  19. Professionalism: A Comparative Case Study of Teachers, Nurses, and Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Mary Antony

    2016-01-01

    While there are numerous calls to enhance the professionalism of teachers, there is little empirical research in the United States that examines educators' understanding of the concept. This comparative case study compared the conceptualisation of professionalism by faculty and students in a college of education vis-à-vis the conceptualisation of…

  20. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  1. Community Health Workers as Social Marketers of Injectable Contraceptives: A Case Study from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidert, Karen; Gessessew, Amanuel; Bell, Suzanne; Godefay, Hagos; Prata, Ndola

    2017-03-24

    Ethiopia has made notable progress in increasing awareness and knowledge of family planning and is considered a success story among funders and program planners. Yet unmet need among rural women (28.6%) is almost double that of urban women (15.5%), with a wide gap in total fertility rate depending on urban (2.6) or rural (5.5) residence. This study investigates the impact of a service delivery model that combines community-based distribution (CBD) of contraception with social marketing in Tigray, Ethiopia, to create a more sustainable approach to CBD. Between September 2011 and October 2013, 626 volunteer CHWs were recruited and trained to administer depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) injections and provide counseling and referrals to the health post for other methods; the project implementation period ended in June 2014. The CHWs received a supply of DMPA injections in the form of a microloan from a drug revolving fund; the CHWs charged women a minimal fee (5 birr, or US$0.29), determined based on willingness-to-pay data, for each DMPA injection; and the CHWs returned part of the fee (3 birr) to the drug revolving fund while keeping the remaining portion (2 birr). The CHWs also promoted demand for family planning through door-to-door outreach and community meetings. Existing health extension workers (HEWs) provided regular supervision of the CHWs, supplemented by in-depth supervision visits from study coordinators. Baseline and endline representative surveys of women of reproductive age, as well as of participating CHWs, were conducted. In addition, DMPA provision data from the CHWs were collected. Between October 2011 and June 2014, the CHWs served in total 8,604 women and administered an estimated 15,410 DMPA injections, equivalent to providing 3,853 couple-years of protection. There was a 25% significant increase in contraceptive use among surveyed women, from 30.1% at baseline to 37.7% at endline, with DMPA use largely responsible for this increase

  2. Socially Constructed Hierarchies of Impairments: The Case of Australian and Irish Workers' Access to Compensation for Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpur, Paul; Connolly, Ursula; Blanck, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Socially constructed hierarchies of impairment complicate the general disadvantage experienced by workers with disabilities. Workers with a range of abilities categorized as a "disability" are likely to experience less favourable treatment at work and have their rights to work discounted by laws and institutions, as compared to workers without disabilities. Value judgments in workplace culture and local law mean that the extent of disadvantage experienced by workers with disabilities additionally will depend upon the type of impairment they have. Rather than focusing upon the extent and severity of the impairment and how society turns an impairment into a recognized disability, this article aims to critically analyse the social hierarchy of physical versus mental impairment. Using legal doctrinal research methods, this paper analysis how Australian and Irish workers' compensation and negligence laws regard workers with mental injuries and impairments as less deserving of compensation and protection than like workers who have physical and sensory injuries or impairments. This research finds that workers who acquire and manifest mental injuries and impairments at work are less able to obtain compensation and protection than workers who have developed physical and sensory injuries of equal or lesser severity. Organizational cultures and governmental laws and policies that treat workers less favourably because they have mental injuries and impairments perpetuates unfair and artificial hierarchies of disability attributes. We conclude that these "sanist" attitudes undermine equal access to compensation for workplace injury as prohibited by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

  3. Employment contract and insecurity jobs: asymmetric information modelling of atypical situation, case of poor and less developed countries

    OpenAIRE

    El Bouhadi, Abdelhamid

    2006-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is dedicated to study the relations of recruiting among the employee and the employer in a frame characterized by the insecurity conditions of job and large scale of unemployment. The recruiting relationship that we will study is atypical as far as the offered salary is not a fixed minimum wage. The hiring contract between the employer and the employee in the developing labour markets is made with different conditions regarding to others, mainly in the developed countrie...

  4. Is there lattice contraction in multicomponent metal oxides? Case study for GdVO4:Eu3+ nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liusai; Li, Liping; Zhao, Minglei; Fu, Chaochao; Li, Guangshe

    2013-08-01

    Metal oxide nanomaterials have been found to have great potential for diverse applications due to their unique relationships between structure and properties. Lattice expansion as particle size reduces was previously considered to be general for metal oxide nanomaterials. It is now a great challenge to see if lattice contraction could be induced by the size effect for metal oxide nanomaterials. ABO4 metal oxides (e.g., CaWO4, GdVO4, and CdWO4) are some of the most important functional materials with many applications, while such oxides at the nanoscale are never reported to show a lattice contraction. This work presents a first report on the variation from lattice expansion to lattice contraction by tuning the microstructures of GdVO4:Eu3+ nanocrystals. A hydrothermal method was adopted to synthesize GdVO4:Eu3+ nanocrystals, and then these nanoparticles were calcined at 600 ° C in air. It is found that particle size reduction led to a lattice contraction for the calcined samples, which is in contrast to the lattice expansion observed for the hydrothermally synthesized counterparts or many other metal oxide nanomaterials. In addition, the lattice symmetry of the calcined samples remained almost a constant. The results indicate that the negative surface stress was eliminated by calcination treatment, leading to a homogeneous compression process in the lattice structure of the calcined GdVO4:Eu3+ nanocrystals. Furthermore, Eu3+ was taken as a structural probe and a luminescence center to study the local environments pertinent to these structural changes and to optimize the photoluminescence performance.

  5. Worker Entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucouliagos, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates the experience of worker entrepreneurship, highlighting successes and failures in Europe, and analyzes the relative importance of factors to worker entrepreneurship such as access to finance, education and training, organizational culture, and worker risk taking. (JOW)

  6. Contract Renewal Information - all Contracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Multifamily Portfolio datasets (section 8 contracts) - The information has been compiled from multiple data sources within FHA or its contractors. HUD oversees more...

  7. Contract theory and EU Contract Law

    OpenAIRE

    Hesselink, M.W.; Twigg-Flesner, C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between contract theory and European contract law. In particular, it confronts the leading contract law theories with the main characteristics of EU contract law. The conclusion is that the two do not match well. In particular, monist normative contract theories are largely irreconcilable with the contract law of the EU. The paper further addresses the main implications of this mismatch, both for contract theory and for EU contract law. It suggests that in...

  8. Improving pneumonia case-management in Benin: a randomized trial of a multi-faceted intervention to support health worker adherence to Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Marcel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of death among children under five years of age. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy can improve the quality of care for pneumonia and other common illnesses in developing countries, but adherence to these guidelines could be improved. We evaluated an intervention in Benin to support health worker adherence to the guidelines after training, focusing on pneumonia case management. Methods We conducted a randomized trial. After a health facility survey in 1999 to assess health care quality before Integrated Management of Childhood Illness training, health workers received training plus either study supports (job aids, non-financial incentives and supervision of workers and supervisors or "usual" supports. Follow-up surveys were conducted in 2001, 2002 and 2004. Outcomes were indicators of health care quality for Integrated Management-defined pneumonia. Further analyses included a graphical pathway analysis and multivariable logistic regression modelling to identify factors influencing case-management quality. Results We observed 301 consultations of children with non-severe pneumonia that were performed by 128 health workers in 88 public and private health facilities. Although outcomes improved in both intervention and control groups, we found no statistically significant difference between groups. However, training proceeded slowly, and low-quality care from untrained health workers diluted intervention effects. Per-protocol analyses suggested that health workers with training plus study supports performed better than those with training plus usual supports (20.4 and 19.2 percentage-point improvements for recommended treatment [p = 0.08] and "recommended or adequate" treatment [p = 0.01], respectively. Both groups tended to perform better than untrained health workers. Analyses of treatment errors revealed that incomplete assessment and difficulties processing clinical findings

  9. Declining job security level and workers' perfomance in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The study assessed bank workers' level of job security and also investigated the relationship between job security level and job performance among employees of the banks. ... These comprised both permanent and contract workers.

  10. Choice Model and Influencing Factor Analysis of Travel Mode for Migrant Workers: Case Study in Xi’an, China

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Chen; Zuo-xian Gan; Yu-ting He

    2015-01-01

    Based on the basic theory and methods of disaggregate choice model, the influencing factors in travel mode choice for migrant workers are analyzed, according to 1366 data samples of Xi’an migrant workers. Walking, bus, subway, and taxi are taken as the alternative parts of travel modes for migrant workers, and a multinomial logit (MNL) model of travel mode for migrant workers is set up. The validity of the model is verified by the hit rate, and the hit rates of four travel modes are all great...

  11. Dietary vitamin A and lung cancer: results of a case-control study among chemical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G G; Thompson, F E; Cook, R R

    1987-01-01

    A nested case-control study conducted among a cohort of chemical manufacturing employees provided an opportunity to test the hypothesis that lung cancer risk is inversely related to dietary intake of vitamin A. Eligible for study were 308 former male employees who had died of lung cancer between 1940 and 1980. Two control groups, one a decedent and the other a "living" series, were individually matched to the cases one-for-one. Interviews were completed with 734 subjects or their next-of-kin and included a food frequency list. A vitamin A index was developed for each subject based on the frequency of consumption of 29 food items. After adjustment for a number of potentially confounding variables (e.g., smoking, educational level, and use of vitamin supplements), there was evidence that vitamin A intake was inversely associated with lung cancer risk. The effect was most pronounced in the comparisons with the "living" controls and appeared strongest among cigarette smokers. Subjects in the lowest tertile of vitamin A intake had approximately twice the risk of lung cancer as those in the highest. Analyses of an index of carotenoids and of individual food items suggested that plant sources of vitamin A may play a more important role in producing the effect than do animal sources.

  12. Termination of Dynamic Contracts in an Equilibrium Labor Market Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Cheng

    2005-01-01

    I construct an equilibrium model of the labor market where workers and firms enter into dyamic contracts that can potentially last forever, but are subject to optimal terminations. Upon a termination, the firm hires a new worker, and the worker who is terminated receives a termination compensation from the firm and is then free to go back to the labor market to seek new employment opportunities and enter into new dynamic contracts. The model permits only two types of equilibrium terminations ...

  13. Workers in Alternative Employment Arrangements: A Second Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohany, Sharon R.

    1998-01-01

    Both the proportion and characteristics of workers in four alternative employment arrangements in February 1997 were little different from two years earlier. The groups--temporary-help-agency workers, contract company workers, workers who are on call, and independent contractors--continue to be highly diverse. (Author/JOW)

  14. Turnkey contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langetepe, G.

    1977-01-01

    To make energy available economically and in sufficient quantity is a main point for the future of an industrial and more for a developing country. The investment costs and the availability of a power plant and in particular for a nuclear power plant are the most significant factors in the economic operation of the plant. In the phase before signing the contract the essential decisions are made with high influence in the economic operation and the availability of the plant. A turn-key contract offers good possibilities to minimize the risks referring a) the plant quality and functionality, b) the plant investment cost, c) the plant completion date, d) the handling of the licensing procedures, e) the availability of the operation. The lecture mentions the points which are of high influence for a successful erection and operation period and which must be clarified before signing the contract between the buyer and supplier of the plant. (orig./HP) [de

  15. The "Total Worker Health" Concept: A Case Study in a Rural Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Cecilia; Macy, Gretchen; Golla, Vijay; Lartey, Grace; Basham, Jacqueline

    2018-05-01

    This case study was conducted to identify barriers of integration of health protection and health promotion in rural workplaces with tailored interventions that address the identified barriers. Data on a workplace's ability to integrate wellness programs and health protection programs were collected through a questionnaire along with a seven-question interview. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the quantitative data. Qualitative measures were assessed using thematic analysis. Based off the results of the assessments, the company received tailored training sessions. The largest hindrance to organizational support was time. However, improved knowledge about the need and importance of integration helped the participants to conceptualize and plan for more collaboration between departments. New ways to increase integration at workplaces, especially rural workplaces are needed. More comprehensive interventions that include management are also needed.

  16. Effectively engaging the private sector through vouchers and contracting - A case for analysing health governance and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtnebel, Matthias; O'Mahony, Ashleigh; Pillai, Nandini; Hort, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Health systems of low and middle income countries in the Asia Pacific have been described as mixed, where public and private sector operate in parallel. Gaps in the provision of primary health care (PHC) services have been picked up by the private sector and led to its growth; as can an enabling regulatory environment. The question whether governments should purchase services from the private sector to address gaps in service provision has been fiercely debated. This purposive review draws evidence from systematic reviews, and additional published and grey literature, for input into a policy brief on purchasing PHC-services from the private sector for underserved areas in the Asia Pacific region. Additional published and grey literature on vouchers and contracting as mechanisms to engage the private sector was used to supplement the conclusions from systematic reviews. We analysed the literature through a policy lens, or alternatively, a 'bottom-up' approach which incorporates components of a realist review. Evidence indicates that both vouchers and contracting can improve health service outcomes in underserved areas. These outcomes however are strongly influenced by (1) contextual factors, such as roles and functions attributable to a shared set of key actors (2) the type of delivered services and community demand (3) design of the intervention, notably provider autonomy and trust (4) governance capacity and provision of stewardship. Examining the experience of vouchers and contracting to expand health services through engagement with private sector providers in the Asia Pacific found positive effects with regards to access and utilisation of health services, but more importantly, highlighted the significance of contextual factors, appropriate selection of mechanism for services provided, and governance arrangements and stewardship capacity. In fact, for governments seeking to engage the private sector, analysis of context and capacities are potentially a more

  17. Methodological remarks on contraction theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    Because contraction analysis stems from a differential and incremental framework, the nature and methodology of contraction-based proofs are significantly different from those of their Lyapunov-based counterparts. This paper specifically studies this issue, and illustrates it by revisiting some c...... classical examples traditionally addressed using Lyapunov theory. Even in these cases, contraction tools can often yield significantly simplified analysis. The examples include adaptive control, robotics, and a proof of convergence of the deterministic Extended Kalman Filter....

  18. Judicial construction of termination clauses of employment contracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These principles are underpinned by theoretical assumptions that do not distinguish between pure commercial contracts and employment contracts, although the two kinds of ... This is so, given that contract- based principles do not recognise and protect workers' reasonable expectations of fair treatment and job security.

  19. A Comparative Research on the Satisfaction of the Main Contractor and Subcontractor Workers: The Case of Yalova Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Koçak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The subcontractor practices on both in public and private sectors have been increasing because of Neo-liberal policies that have been spreading together with globalization. Subcontractors have been obtaining competitive advantages and cost reductions by employing non-unionized workers. With these practices, some discriminations and differences are seen related to workers in the organization, also some social and physiological problems are observed between workers. Thus, the expectations of the workers are differentiated and the level of motivations and job satisfactions of the workers are changed. Because, the workers, who work under subcontractors and have no membership of a trade union, are subjected to some negatives such as the lack of income and job security. Especially, with the spreading of the subcontractor applications in municipalities, municipality workers are divided into some groups such as those who are members of trade unions and those who are not, and those who work for the main contractor and subcontractor. Also, the rights of workers are differentiated in terms of social and economics. In this context, the workers’ satisfaction level of Yalova Municipality in terms of the discriminations and differentiations is going to be studied.

  20. Qualitative case studies of professional-level workers with traumatic brain injuries: A contextual approach to job accommodation and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Richard T; Rumrill, Phillip D; Rumrill, Stuart P; Minton, Deborah L; Hendricks, Deborah J; Sampson, Elaine; Stauffer, Callista; Scherer, Marcia J; Nardone, Amanda; Leopold, Anne; Jacobs, Karen; Elias, Eileen

    2017-09-14

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multi-systemic disability that causes a wide range of difficulties with personal and social functioning. Four individuals with TBI participated in an evaluation of barriers to their continued employment following graduation from college. A trained interviewer completed the Work Experience Survey (WES) in teleconsultation sessions with each participant. Researchers applied a qualitative case study research design. Participants reported a wide range of difficulties in performing essential functions of their jobs (3 to 24) that have the potential to significantly affect their productivity. Career mastery problems reflected outcomes associated with TBI such as 'believing that others think I do a good job' and 'having the resources (e.g., knowledge, tools, supplies, and equipment) needed to do the job.' Indicative of their wish to continue their current employment, participants reported high levels of job satisfaction. The WES is a cost-effective needs assessment tool to aid health and rehabilitation professionals in providing on-the-job supports to workers with TBI.

  1. The modulation of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders for a knowledge worker with chiropractic care and applied ergonomics: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Charles W.; Casey, George; Dubro, Robert E.; Johnson, Dale F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This report describes the case management of musculoskeletal disorders for an employee in a college work environment using both chiropractic care and applied ergonomics. Clinical Findings A 54-year-old male office worker presented with decreased motor function in both wrists; intermittent moderate-to-severe headaches; and pain or discomfort in the neck, both shoulders, left hand and wrist, and lumbosacral region resulting from injuries sustained during recreational soccer and from excessive forces and awkward postures when interacting with his home and office computer workstations. Intervention and Results Ergonomic training, surveillance, retrofitted equipment with new furniture, and an emphasis on adopting healthy work-style behaviors were applied in combination with regular chiropractic care. Baseline ergonomic job task analysis identified risk factors and delineated appropriate control measures to improve the subject's interface with his office workstation. Serial reevaluations at 3-month, 1-year, and 2-year periods recorded changes to the participant's pain, discomfort, and work-style behaviors. At end of study and relative to baseline, pain scale improved from 4/10 to 2/10; general disability improved from 4 to 0; and hand grip strength (pounds) increased from 20 to 105 (left) and 45 to 100 (right). Healthy work habits and postures adopted in the 3-month to 1-year period regressed to baseline exposures for 3 of 6 risk priorities identified in the ergonomic job task analysis. Conclusion The patient responded positively to the intervention of chiropractic care and applied ergonomics. PMID:23997724

  2. Validating Timed Component Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Liu, Shaoying; Olsen, Petur

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for testing software components with contracts that specify functional behavior, synchronization, as well as timing behavior. The approach combines elements from unit testing with model-based testing techniques for timed automata. The technique is implemented...... in an online testing tool, and we demonstrate its use on a concrete use case....

  3. Performance Evaluation of Community Health Workers: Case Study in the Amazon of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, Christopher; Naraine, Renuka; Paucar Villacorta, Diego Mauricio

    2018-03-26

    A shortage in human resources for health is a growing crisis that has led to an inability to provide adequate health services to impoverished populations. By "task-shifting", health systems can delegate certain activities, such as health promotion and referral, to trained community members to help fill the human resource gap. An effective community health agent program can improve maternal and child health and overall effectiveness of rural health systems. Such a program is most effective when the community health agents receive supervision and evaluation of their performance. There is a shortage of literature that provides instruction and example on how to conduct a performance evaluation in the developing world to improve maternal and child health outcomes. The current study provides a case study of a performance evaluation in the Amazon region of Peru and how the findings can be used to make program adjustments. A set of instruments to measure the performance of CHWs was adapted from the literature and then implemented in the field. The instruments were used to measure the quality of home visits by the CHWs, their knowledge of the health topics, and structural activities. Three communities with an active CHW program in Loreto, Peru were chosen to receive the evaluation. All CHWs in the communities were evaluated. The scores from the evaluation were compared internally to identify strengths and weaknesses of the program and within the population of CHWs. The evaluation was completed on 52 home visits and 27 CHWs in three communities. The CHWs were found to be most effective at creating good relationships with caregivers and delivering health messages, and least effective at interacting with the child during the home visit and using material to deliver health messages. The evaluation instruments were well suited for the CHW program that utilizes home visits to teach about child health and development.

  4. A participatory supportive return to work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke Lammerts

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders are associated with high costs for productivity loss, sickness absence and unemployment. A participatory supportive return to work (RTW program was developed in order to improve RTW among workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder. The program contained a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of this new program, compared to usual care. In addition, its return on investment was evaluated. Methods An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a 12-month randomized controlled trial. A total of 186 participants was randomly allocated to the new program (n = 94 or to usual care (n = 92. Effect measures were the duration until sustainable RTW in competitive employment and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs gained. Costs included intervention costs, medical costs and absenteeism costs. Registered data of the Dutch Social Security Agency were used to assess the duration until sustainable RTW, intervention costs and absenteeism costs. QALYs and medical costs were assessed using three- or six-monthly questionnaires. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputations. Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis were conducted from the societal perspective. A return on investment analysis was conducted from the social insurer’s perspective. Various sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the results. Results The new program had no significant effect on the duration until sustainable RTW and QALYs gained. Intervention costs and medical costs were significantly higher in the intervention group. From the societal perspective, the maximum probability of cost-effectiveness for duration until sustainable RTW was 0.64 at a willingness to pay of about €10 000/day, and 0.27 for QALYs gained, regardless of the

  5. A participatory supportive return to work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; van Dongen, Johanna M; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2017-02-02

    Mental disorders are associated with high costs for productivity loss, sickness absence and unemployment. A participatory supportive return to work (RTW) program was developed in order to improve RTW among workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder. The program contained a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of this new program, compared to usual care. In addition, its return on investment was evaluated. An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a 12-month randomized controlled trial. A total of 186 participants was randomly allocated to the new program (n = 94) or to usual care (n = 92). Effect measures were the duration until sustainable RTW in competitive employment and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Costs included intervention costs, medical costs and absenteeism costs. Registered data of the Dutch Social Security Agency were used to assess the duration until sustainable RTW, intervention costs and absenteeism costs. QALYs and medical costs were assessed using three- or six-monthly questionnaires. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputations. Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis were conducted from the societal perspective. A return on investment analysis was conducted from the social insurer's perspective. Various sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the results. The new program had no significant effect on the duration until sustainable RTW and QALYs gained. Intervention costs and medical costs were significantly higher in the intervention group. From the societal perspective, the maximum probability of cost-effectiveness for duration until sustainable RTW was 0.64 at a willingness to pay of about €10 000/day, and 0.27 for QALYs gained, regardless of the willingness to pay. From the social insurer's perspective, the

  6. Addressing the social determinants of health: a case study from the Mitanin (community health worker) programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sulakshana; Schneider, Helen

    2014-09-01

    The Mitanin Programme, a government community health worker (CHW) programme, was started in Chhattisgarh State of India in 2002. The CHWs (Mitanins) have consistently adopted roles that go beyond health programme-specific interventions to embrace community mobilization and action on local priorities. The aim of this research was to document how and why the Mitanins have been able to act on the social determinants of health, describing the catalysts and processes involved and the enabling programmatic and organizational factors. A qualitative comparative case study of successful action by Mitanin was conducted in two 'blocks', purposefully selected as positive exemplars in two districts of Chhattisgarh. One case focused on malnutrition and the other on gender-based violence. Data collection involved 17 in-depth interviews and 10 group interviews with the full range of stakeholders in both blocks, including community members and programme team. Thematic analysis was done using a broad conceptual framework that was further refined. Action on social determinants involved raising awareness on rights, mobilizing women's collectives, revitalizing local political structures and social action targeting both the community and government service providers. Through these processes, the Mitanins developed identities as agents of change and advocates for the community, both with respect to local cultural and gender norms and in ensuring accountability of service providers. The factors underpinning successful action on social determinants were identified as the significance of the original intent and vision of the programme, and how this was carried through into all aspects of programme design, the role of the Mitanins and their identification with village women, ongoing training and support, and the relative autonomy of the programme. Although the results are not narrowly generalizable and do not necessarily represent the situation of the Mitanin Programme as a whole, the

  7. Contract & agency labour: beyond self-regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    A paper about the regulation of contract labour. Academic and legal aspects as well as case studies of global union federation work to organise and regulate contract labour in Thailand, Pakistan, Colombia, South Korea and at international level.

  8. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Information 4 Responsible Office 4 References 4 Program Description 5 Business Case 5 Program Status 6 Schedule 7 Performance...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS

  9. Is Contract Law Necessary?

    OpenAIRE

    SCHWARTZ, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This lecture was delivered on 17 March 2010. Alan Schwartz, Sterling Professor of Law; Professor of Management, Yale University This Lecture argues that much of the contract law in the cases (the US, the UK and Canada) and in the codes (Europe and Latin America) is unnecessary. To say that a law is unnecessary is to say that it does not perform a useful social function. The argument below thus sets out the functions that contract laws today are thought to serve, and then shows that many of...

  10. Contract theory and EU Contract Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, M.W.; Twigg-Flesner, C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between contract theory and European contract law. In particular, it confronts the leading contract law theories with the main characteristics of EU contract law. The conclusion is that the two do not match well. In particular, monist normative contract theories

  11. Muscle Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, H Lee; Hammers, David W

    2018-02-01

    SUMMARYMuscle cells are designed to generate force and movement. There are three types of mammalian muscles-skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and move them relative to each other. Cardiac muscle comprises the heart, which pumps blood through the vasculature. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are known as striated muscles, because the filaments of actin and myosin that power their contraction are organized into repeating arrays, called sarcomeres, that have a striated microscopic appearance. Smooth muscle does not contain sarcomeres but uses the contraction of filaments of actin and myosin to constrict blood vessels and move the contents of hollow organs in the body. Here, we review the principal molecular organization of the three types of muscle and their contractile regulation through signaling mechanisms and discuss their major structural and functional similarities that hint at the possible evolutionary relationships between the cell types. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. Contract design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, P.

    2006-01-01

    The current state of the electric power industry in Ontario was discussed with particular reference to the procurement of contracts and why the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) must be contracting to resolve many of Ontario's electricity issues. As Ontario increasingly relies on imports and natural gas-fired generation, the price of electricity continues to rise given that supply is at a low level. In addition to the generation gap, there are also several transmission constrained areas in Ontario, particularly in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The OPA announced 2 projects totalling 1900 MW to relieve congestion. According to the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), the total potential opportunity for new generation by 2015 is about 5,000 to 7,000 megawatts. OPA is expected to launch procurement processes for up to 1000 MW of cogeneration, 250 MW of province-wide conservation initiatives, 1900 MW of generation in the western part of the GTA, and 600 MW of generation in downtown Toronto. New nuclear capacity is also anticipated in addition to renewables and conservation/demand management (CDM) initiatives. The OPA's competitive procurement processes will include requests for expressions of interest, requests for qualifications and requests for proposals. The challenge of balancing the technical complexities and realities of procuring generation assets with the need for a fair procurement process was discussed. Contracts will be designed to react to market signals and will include 3 styles: tariff style, tolling style and standard offer contract. OPA will make every effort to balance generator and ratepayer interests. 6 figs

  13. Effects of Heat Stress on Construction Labor Productivity in Hong Kong: A Case Study of Rebar Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P. C.

    2017-01-01

    Global warming is bringing more frequent and severe heat waves, and the result will be serious for vulnerable populations such as construction workers. Excessive heat stress has profound effects on physiological responses, which cause occupational injuries, fatalities and low productivity. Construction workers are particularly affected by heat stress, because of the body heat production caused by physically demanding tasks, and hot and humid working conditions. Field studies were conducted be...

  14. Advancing Immigrant Worker Rights through Labor-Community Coalition: Comparative Case Studies of the CLEAN Carwash Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mindy Minyi

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, a coalition known as the CLEAN Carwash Campaign has been organizing car wash workers in Los Angeles. How did CLEAN manage the divergent interests of its coalition members and strategize? What is it about CLEAN that led the labor-community coalition to achieve gains for carwasheros when conventional wisdom dictates that low wage immigrant workers were too vulnerable to be unionized? Given the dearth of empirical research into how social movement coalitions strategize and how campai...

  15. The Impact of the Choice of Evaluation Criteria and the Type of Tender on the Awarding Public Contracts (in the Case of Construction Contracts at the Local Level in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Ochrana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Public procurement may be examined from different perspectives. Using the Czech Republic as an example, this study is devoted to examining the impact of decisions made by the contracting authority regarding a public tender on the tender process itself and on the outcomes of the tender. The contracting authority addresses a number of decision-making issues regarding public procurements. For example, it needs to decide between two types of criteria (choosing between a single-criterion evaluation or rather opting for several evaluation criteria. At the same time, the authority is free to choose among different types of award procedures while adhering to certain restrictions imposed by the Act on Public Contracts. Using a sample of 1,027 construction work contracts awarded in the Czech Republic, the study examines, in more detail, the impacts of individual choices made by the contracting authority (namely the type of evaluation criteria chosen and the type of procedure for awarding contracts on the estimated and final price of public contracts. Recommendations on how to streamline the process of public procurement can be drawn from conclusions from the empirical analysis.

  16. Accidental exposure to biological material in healthcare workers at a university hospital: Evaluation and follow-up of 404 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Eliana Battaggia; Lopes, Marta Heloísa; Yasuda, Maria Aparecida Shikanai

    2005-01-01

    The care and follow-up provided to healthcare workers (HCWs) from a large teaching hospital who were exposed to biological material between 1 August 1998 and 31 January 2002 is described here. After exposure, the HCW is evaluated by a nurse and doctor in an emergency consultation and receives follow-up counselling. The collection of 10 ml of blood sample from each HCW and its source patient, when known, is made for immunoenzymatic testing for HIV, HBV and HCV. Evaluation and follow-up of 404 cases revealed that the exposures were concentrated in only a few areas of the hospital; 83% of the HCWs exposed were seen by a doctor responsible for the prophylaxis up to 3 h after exposure. Blood was involved in 76.7% (309) of the exposures. The patient source of the biological material was known in 80.7% (326) of the exposed individuals studied; 80 (24.5%) sources had serological evidence of infection with 1 or more agents: 16.2% were anti-HCV positive, 3.8% were HAgBs positive and 10.9% were anti-HIV positive. 67% (273) of the study population completed the proposed follow-up. No confirmed seroconversion occurred. In conclusion, the observed adherence to the follow-up was quite low, and measures to improve it must be taken. Surprisingly, no difference in adherence to the follow-up was observed among those exposed HCW at risk, i.e. those with an infected or unknown source patient. Analysis of post-exposure management revealed excess prescription of antiretroviral drugs, vaccine and immunoglobulin. Infection by HCV is the most important risk of concern, in our hospital, in accidents with biological material.

  17. Retrospective benzene exposure assessment for a multi-center case-cohort study of benzene-exposed workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portengen, Lützen; Linet, Martha S; Li, Gui-Lan; Lan, Qing; Dores, Graça M; Ji, Bu-Tian; Hayes, Richard B; Yin, Song-Nian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Quality of exposure assessment has been shown to be related to the ability to detect risk of lymphohematopoietic disorders in epidemiological investigations of benzene, especially at low levels of exposure. We set out to build a statistical model for reconstructing exposure levels for 2898 subjects from 501 factories that were part of a nested case-cohort study within the NCI-CAPM cohort of more than 110,000 workers. We used a hierarchical model to allow for clustering of measurements by factory, workshop, job, and date. To calibrate the model we used historical routine monitoring data. Measurements below the limit of detection were accommodated by constructing a censored data likelihood. Potential non-linear and industry-specific time-trends and predictor effects were incorporated using regression splines and random effects. A partial validation of predicted exposures in 2004/2005 was performed through comparison with full-shift measurements from an exposure survey in facilities that were still open. Median cumulative exposure to benzene at age 50 for subjects that ever held an exposed job (n=1175) was 509 mg/m(3) years. Direct comparison of model estimates with measured full-shift personal exposure in the 2004/2005 survey showed moderate correlation and a potential downward bias at low (<1 mg/m(3)) exposure estimates. The modeling framework enabled us to deal with the data complexities generally found in studies using historical exposure data in a comprehensive way and we therefore expect to be able to investigate effects at relatively low exposure levels.

  18. Cluster of cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome among Toronto healthcare workers after implementation of infection control precautions: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Gravel, Denise; McDonald, L Clifford; Lem, Marcus; Sarwal, Shelley; McGeer, Allison; Green, Karen; Vearncombe, Mary; Roth, Virginia; Paton, Shirley; Loeb, Mark; Simor, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    To review the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection control practices, the types of exposure to patients with SARS, and the activities associated with treatment of such patients among healthcare workers (HCWs) who developed SARS in Toronto, Canada, after SARS-specific infection control precautions had been implemented. A retrospective review of work logs and patient assignments, detailed review of medical records of patients with SARS, and comprehensive telephone-based interviews of HCWs who met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. Seventeen HCWs from 6 hospitals developed disease that met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. These HCWs had a mean age (+/-SD) of 39+/-2.3 years. Two HCWs were not interviewed because of illness. Of the remaining 15, only 9 (60%) reported that they had received formal infection control training. Thirteen HCWs (87%) were unsure of proper order in which personal protective equipment should be donned and doffed. Six HCWs (40%) reused items (eg, stethoscopes, goggles, and cleaning equipment) elsewhere on the ward after initial use in a room in which a patient with SARS was staying. Use of masks, gowns, gloves, and eyewear was inconsistent among HCWs. Eight (54%) reported that they were aware of a breach in infection control precautions. HCWs reported fatigue due to an increased number and length of shifts; participants worked a median of 10 shifts during the 10 days before onset of symptoms. Seven HCWs were involved in the intubation of a patient with SARS. One HCW died, and the remaining 16 recovered. Multiple factors were likely responsible for SARS in these HCWs, including the performance of high-risk patient care procedures, inconsistent use of personal protective equipment, fatigue, and lack of adequate infection control training.

  19. Formal and relational contracts between organizations: proposal of a model for analysis of the transactional and governance structure characteristics of comparative cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cardoso Siqueira Ambrozini

    Full Text Available Abstract The literature indicates that the use of formal and relational governance structures have a fundamental role in the conduct and maintenance of inter-organizational relationships. Nevertheless, there are possibilities for discussions about the composition and function of these structures in the presence of different transactional characteristics. Thus, a model based on the literatures of formal contracts, inter-organizational relationships, Relational Contract Theory, and Transaction Cost Economics is proposed. Since this is a qualitative exploratory research, six structured interviews were carried out and interpreted by means of Content Analysis for case comparison and discussion of theoretical propositions. It was observed that some transactional characteristics, when present with greater intensity in the context of a transaction, tend to corroborate the theoretical propositions of formal contractual function, demonstrating that the intensity of these characteristics is a relevant factor for analyzing the adequacy of governance structures. Likewise, the use of different relational norms presents variations within each characteristic analyzed. Other aspects explored in the Content Analysis are suggested in the composition of the analysis model. The propositions explored regarding the composition of the transaction context and the complementarity of governance structure of inter-organizational relationships are also discussed.

  20. Evaluation and mechanism for outcomes exploration of providing public health care in contract service in rural China: a multiple-case study with complex adaptive systems design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huixuan; Zhang, Shengfa; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Fugang; Zhong, You; Gu, Linni; Qu, Zhiyong; Tian, Donghua

    2015-02-27

    The Chinese government has increased the funding for public health in 2009 and experimentally applied a contract service policy (could be seen as a counterpart to family medicine) in 15 counties to promote public health services in the rural areas in 2013. The contract service aimed to convert village doctors, who had privately practiced for decades, into general practitioners under the government management, and better control the rampant chronic diseases. This study made a rare attempt to assess the effectiveness of public health services delivered under the contract service policy, explore the influencing mechanism and draw the implications for the policy extension in the future. Three pilot counties and a non-pilot one with heterogeneity in economic and health development from east to west of China were selected by a purposive sampling method. The case study methods by document collection, non-participant observation and interviews (including key informant interview and focus group interview) with 84 health providers and 20 demanders in multiple level were applied in this study. A thematic approach was used to compare diverse outcomes and analyze mechanism in the complex adaptive systems framework. Without sufficient incentives, the public health services were not conducted effectively, regardless of the implementation of the contract policy. To appropriately increase the funding for public health by local finance and properly allocate subsidy to village doctors was one of the most effective approaches to stimulate health providers and demanders' positivity and promote the policy implementation. County health bureaus acted as the most crucial agents among the complex public health systems. Their mental models influenced by the compound and various environments around them led to the diverse outcomes. If they could provide extra incentives and make the contexts of the systems ripe enough for change, the health providers and demanders would be receptive to the

  1. Emergency department case management: the dyad team of nurse case manager and social worker improve discharge planning and patient and staff satisfaction while decreasing inappropriate admissions and costs: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Darlene P; Herrick, Charlotte A

    2002-01-01

    A model of emergency department (ED) case management consisting of a social worker and a nurse case manager can prevent inappropriate admissions, improve discharge planning, decrease cost, and enhance patient satisfaction. The individual and combined roles of the dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager are discussed. A literature review includes how a case management dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager in the ED can decrease utilization of the ED for nonemergent visits, promote the use of community resources, and improve discharge planning to avoid excessive costs. The importance of the dyad team working with the interdisciplinary team in the ED, the primary care physician (PCP), and other community health care providers in order to provide a holistic approach to care is addressed. A discussion about the improvement of both patient and staff satisfaction demonstrates the results of case management strategies that support and advocate for patients to receive quality, cost-effective care across the health care continuum, while decreasing the use of the ED for nonemergent care.

  2. Behavior of the Energy Secretary in working matter: the case of workers exposed to nuclear energy (ionizing radiations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez J, G.

    2006-01-01

    Safety and Safeguards, dis concentrated organ of the Secretary of Energy, referring brief antecedents of their creation and emphasizing their mission. The generic and specific attributions are analyzed, as well as the approval abilities and policy-inspection and surveillance, imposition of sanctions and application of safety measures that have been conferred it by law, of where it comes off it performance in the labor circles. In the third chapter there are relative purely technical questions to the nuclear energy and to the occupationally exposed by it use hard-workers. By this way topics such as energy and ionizing radiations are studied, their applications, practices and effects; as well as the importance of the radiological protection and their connection with the safety and hygiene in the work for exposure to physical agents. In the fourth chapter an analysis of the different existent normative instruments is made in the national and international juridical mark, beginning, according to the Kelsen pyramid, with the Political Constitution of the Mexican United States for later to revise the Agreement 115 of the Work International Organization and the Regulation Law of the Article 27 Constitutional in Nuclear Matter and to crumble the General Regulation of Radiological Safety and the applicable Mexican Official Standards whose surveillance runs in charge of the Dis concentrated Regulator Organ that has made an appointment. Finally, it is presented, the case analysis in where the intervention can be appreciated, through the imposition of sanctions, of the referred dependence in the labor relationships of certain work centers. (Author)

  3. Factors associated with work-related accidents and sickness among maquiladora workers: the case of Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, H; Denman, C; Lara, F

    1995-01-01

    The health problems of maquiladora workers were explored in a sample of 497 workers of Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. The workers were interviewed using a structured questionnaire containing four sections: a sociodemographic profile, occupational history, working conditions, and a health profile. Overall, 12.6 percent of the workers reported having an accident while working in the maquila, more than 40 percent of these requiring at least one day of disability, and 18.3 percent of workers reported having an episode of sickness/disease. More than 60 percent perceived health-related risks associated with working conditions. The presence of a doctor or nurse in the plant (odds ratio = 0.30), a perception of risk associated with working conditions (odds ratio = 1.85), and the plant offering information about work-related risks (odds ratio = 0.39) were among the significant predictors of work-related accidents and disease/sickness. The authors discuss the implications of these results for programs and policies to improve safety conditions in the maquiladora industry.

  4. Health Reform and its Impact on Healthcare Workers: A Case Study of the National Clinical Hospital of Cordova, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Álvarez

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid 1990’s, health in Argentina has no longer been considered a social function of the State but was transformed into a market commodity. Neoliberal decentralization favored the introduction of corporate methods and incentivized privatization. In practice, this led to self-management for hospitals, deregulation of social services and incorporation of private capital to the public health business. This exploratory study looks at the impact of these reforms in the public health services sector. It analyzes living and working conditions, changes produced in the organization of work and their effect on labor relations and on participation in union, political and social activities by workers at the National Clinical Hospital of Cordoba, Argentina. Data was primarily collected through an interview survey of a convenience sample of 68 workers from the non-teaching staff; this represents 10% of the total professional, administrative and maintenance staff of the hospital. The interviews demonstrate deterioration in income and living conditions. Hospital self-management for these workers led to increased competition, the fragmentation in the work spaces, tension and the distrust between co-workers, as well as increased intensity in the workload of some employees. The profile of these healthcare workers is structured and marked by silence, the resolution of the conflicts by means of individual action in the workplace, and minimal participation in social-political-union or community organizations.

  5. Psychological contract and organizational citizenship behavior : A new deal for new generations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lub, X.D.; Blomme, R.J.; Bal, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to shed light on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) of different generations of hospitality workers in relation to their psychological contract. The psychological contract, which describes employees' implicit expectations of their employer, is related to a range of

  6. The Davis-Bacon and Service Contract Acts: Laws Whose Time has Passed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pendolino, Timothy J

    1994-01-01

    In the Davis-Bacon and Service-Contract Acts, Congress attempted to protect the wages of workers in the construction and service industries by establishing a sort of minimum wage for Government contracts...

  7. A case control study of differences in non-work injury and accidents among sawmill workers in rural compared to urban British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a cohort of British Columbian male sawmill workers, we conducted a nested case-control study of the impact of rural compared to urban residence as well as rural/urban migration patterns in relation to hospitalization for non-work injury. We postulate that for many types of non-work injuries, rates will be higher in rural communities than in urban ones and that rates will also be higher for workers who migrate from urban to rural communities. Methods Using conditional logistic regression, univariate models were first run with each of five non-work injury outcomes. These outcomes were hospitalizations due to assault, accidental poisoning, medical mis-adventure, motor vehicle trauma, and other non-work injuries. In multivariate models marital status, ethnicity, duration of employment, and occupation were forced into the model and associations with urban, compared to rural, residence and various urban/migration patterns were tested. Results Urban or rural residence and migration status from urban to other communities, and across rural communities, were not associated with hospitalization for medical misadventure, assault, or accidental poisoning. The likelihood of a rural resident being hospitalized for motor vehicle trauma is higher than for an urban resident. The likelihood that a rural resident is hospitalized for "other" non-work injury is higher than for an urban resident. Conclusion In a relatively homogenous group of workers, and using a rigorous study design, we have demonstrated that the odds of other non-work injury are much higher for workers resident in and migrating to rural regions of Canada than they are for workers resident in or migrating to urban places.

  8. Contraction theorems in fuzzy metric space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnoosh, R.; Aghajani, A.; Azhdari, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the results on fuzzy contractive mapping proposed by Dorel Mihet will be proved for B-contraction and C-contraction in the case of George and Veeramani fuzzy metric space. The existence of fixed point with weaker conditions will be proved; that is, instead of the convergence of subsequence, p-convergence of subsequence is used.

  9. Managing Relationships and Competence to Stay Market-Oriented: The Case of a Finnish Contract Research Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppänen, Veikko; Skaates, Maria Anne

    2001-01-01

    Relationships influence organizations' competencies. A model of competence dynamics at the organization, dyad, and network levels is developed and applied in a contractual R&D case. It is argued that the model also depicts marketing concerns of knowledge-intensive professional services firms....... Finally developing processual models of relationship-related competence management is discussed....

  10. Reflections on the health workers' strike at Malawi's major tertiary hospital, QECH, Blantyre, 2001: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muula, A S; Phiri, A

    2003-03-01

    Health workers and support staff at Malawi's major referral hospital, the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, were on strike between 5th and 19th October 2001. The health workers' grievances included: lack of risk allowances; poor professional allowances; low salaries; and low housing allowances. The strike resulted in almost total closure of the 1500-bed hospital; only the burns and orthopaedic wards continued to serve patients. Volunteer staff, comprising the Red Cross, and nursing and medical students provided services. Verbal and written threats by the authorities had minimal effect on terminating the strike; rather, they encouraged the resolve to continue with the industrial action. We report aspects of the genesis, progress and resolution of the strike. Although not much seems to have been achieved, both the employer and the workers need to draw lessons from the experience.

  11. 48 CFR 432.007 - Contract financing payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract financing... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING 432.007 Contract financing payments. The HCA may prescribe, on a case-by-case basis, a shorter period for financing payments. [61 FR 53646, Oct. 15, 1996. Redesignated...

  12. 48 CFR 32.103 - Progress payments under construction contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Non-Commercial Item Purchase Financing 32.103... to be withheld shall be made by the contracting officer on a case-by-case basis. Such decisions will... other factors. Upon completion of all contract requirements, retained amounts shall be paid promptly...

  13. Root cause analysis of the radiation workers (radiography) in excess doses of NBD (case study: PT. XYZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arifin M Wibowo; Fajariadi; Aditia Anamta

    2013-01-01

    Negligence and non-compliance is the main factor of causing an incident in radiography. It shown as the result of TLD evaluation of PT. XYZ workers exceeding the dose limit (NBD). Root cause analysis stage begin in collecting data such as license, workers permit, dose, and incident sequence report. Causal chart is a tool to identification root cause to make easier of the analysis. Results of collecting data are to be clarified in BAPETEN investigation and then there are some a recommendation to facility. (author)

  14. Contract types - turnkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, G.

    1975-01-01

    Turnkey or the turnkey type of contract refers to a system of management according to which one organization accepts total responsibility for completing all parts and all phases of a project. In the case of a power project the turnkey contractor undertakes to design the plant, supply or procure and erect the equipment, build the station and put it into operation. (orig./FW) [de

  15. A Case Analysis of Energy Savings Performance Contract Projects and Photovoltaic Energy at Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY AND FORT BLISS CASE BACKGROUND A. PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY The use of photovoltaic power systems is nothing new in the Department...against the Outback MPPT charge controller . This test will be done over a one month timeframe. The Arizona Power ISG test plan is contained in...cost-benefit analysis of conventional power versus emerging photovoltaic energy for the Army’s Fort Bliss in El Paso, TX. The project will also analyze

  16. Contract farming and producer participation in the avocado industry in Michoacan: The case of Calavo de Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Jenny Patricia

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines the extent to which contractual arrangements with Calavo have influenced participation of small-scale farmers in the avocado export market, as well as the Michoacán avocado industry in general. The case study makes extensive use of both primary and secondary sources. Qualitative information and data were collected through semi-structured interviews and informal conversations with avocado growers, Calavo’s personnel and representatives of local organizations. I find...

  17. Government Contract Law (9th Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    This Ninth Edition, like its predecessors, will serve as the textbook for the Government Contract Law taught at the School of Systems and Logistics...drawn from Government Contract Law -Cases, 1987 edition, for a rounded approach to the subject. This edition of the text includes coverage of the...Government Contract Law complements the Federal Acquisition Regulation and provides a preventive law treatment for contracting personnel. While it may

  18. Use of Visuals for Food Safety Education of Spanish-Speaking Foodservice Workers: A Case Study in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Lakshman

    2012-01-01

    Providing food safety training to an audience whose native language is not English is always a challenge. In the study reported here, minimal-text visuals in Spanish were used to train Hispanic foodservice workers about proper handwashing technique and glove use based on the 2005 Food Code requirements. Overall, results indicated that visuals…

  19. Guide for the use of the regulations on medical surveillance to exposed workers in case of abnormal events (radiological accidents)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    According to medical surveillance, abnormal events are those extraordinary situations that may imply real or potential damage for a human being or a determined population. This guide refers to abnormal events that may imply, solely, to occupationally-exposed workers and small groups of population eventually related

  20. Parenchymal asbestosis due to primary asbestos exposure among ship-breaking workers: report of the first cases from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, Venkiteswaran; Ahasan, Md Faizul; Khan, Ahad Mahmud

    2017-11-03

    We report for the first time asbestosis among ship-breaking workers of Sitakunda in Bangladesh who were exposed to asbestos during ship-based and beach-based operations for at least 10 years. Asbestosis was present among 35% of workers. Years of work (>20) and forced vital capacity (<80% of predicted) were significantly associated with the disease. Currently, global ship-breaking operations are mainly concentrated in the Indian subcontinent, and Bangladesh has the majority share. Ninety per cent of domestic steel is produced in the ship-breaking operations in Bangladesh and is an important contributor to the economy. It also gives employment to more than 100 000 people. It is imperative to medically check up all the workers for benign and malignant diseases causally related to asbestos among these vulnerable population of workers. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Community campaigns, supply chains, and protecting the health and well-being of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michael; Sokas, Rosemary K

    2009-11-01

    The growth of contingent work (also known as precarious employment), the informal sector, and business practices that diffuse employer responsibility for worker health and safety (such as outsourcing and the development of extended national and international contracting networks [supply chains]) pose a serious threat to occupational health and safety that disproportionately affects low-wage, ethnic minority, and immigrant workers. Drawing on cases from the United States and Australia, we examine the role that community-based campaigns can play in meeting these challenges, including several successful campaigns that incorporate supply chain regulation.

  2. Types of contracts and contracting procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijl, N.A. van

    1977-01-01

    Contracting for a nuclear power plant can be carried out in many different ways, from a bilateral agreement between two countries to an international open bidding competition. Also the kind of contracts (turnkey, split-package or multi-contract type) are discussed with their pros and cons as well as the contracting procedures which can be followed to come to the conclusion of a contract. (orig.) [de

  3. Fluor Daniel Hanford contract standards/requirements identification document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, G.L.

    1997-04-24

    This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) for the Fluor Daniel Hanford Contract, represents the necessary and sufficient requirements to provide an adequate level of protection of the worker, public health and safety, and the environment.

  4. The "aid contract" and its compensation scheme: a case study of the performance of the Ugandan health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Cruz, Valeria; McPake, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Current literature on aid effectiveness describes increasing use of a more contractual approach to the relationship between donor and recipient government in which a system of rewards and penalties for good and bad performance operates. The purpose of this case study of the Ugandan health sector was to understand the extent to which this approach is influencing processes and effectiveness. This qualitative study used a conceptual framework based on agency theory and 'realistic evaluation'. Our results showed that the main official mechanism to assess and reward performance established through the Sector Wide Approach lacked objective criteria and was based on an unstructured system of discussions and agreements among donors. The achievement of a satisfactory performance rating was facilitated by the agreeing to undertakings that were under-demanding, vaguely formulated and lacking quantitative benchmarks against which progress could be measured. However, even when poor performance was readily observable, penalties failed to be applied by donors. This was always the case in relation to health sector performance and mostly so in relation to general governance and accountability. Funds continued to be disbursed despite the lack of progress made in achieving targets and undertakings and other evident performance problems (e.g. in the area of governance). A series of explanations of the failure to penalise were put forward by donor representatives in relation to this behaviour including the need to maintain long-term relationships based on trust and not to undermine health sector performance by withdrawing aid. Thus there are likely to be incentives to disburse funds and report success, irrespective of the realities of aid programmes in the context of large foreign aid volumes associated with increased political visibility of aid in donor countries.

  5. 45 CFR 1626.11 - H-2 agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Other employment rights as provided in the worker's specific contract under which the nonimmigrant... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false H-2 agricultural workers. 1626.11 Section 1626.11... ON LEGAL ASSISTANCE TO ALIENS § 1626.11 H-2 agricultural workers. (a) Nonimmigrant agricultural...

  6. Protecting health workers from nosocomial Hepatitis B infections: A review of strategies and challenges for implementation of Hepatitis B vaccination among health workers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malewezi, Bridget; Omer, Saad B; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Araru, Trish

    2016-12-01

    The Sub-Saharan region has the highest Hepatitis B virus (HBV) rates, and health workers are at an increased risk of contracting nosocomial HBV infection. Vaccination of health workers plays a critical role in protecting them from sequelae of HBV; however, health-worker vaccination remains a challenge for many countries. This study was conducted to review practices/measures and challenges in the Sub-Saharan region relating to vaccination of health workers against HBV. We performed a literature review of articles addressing any aspect of HBV vaccination of health workers in the Sub-Saharan region sourced from PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, including a case study of Malawi policies and strategies in training institutions and facilities. Our findings indicated that HBV awareness and vaccination were relatively high, but vaccination rates were lower, with 4.6-64.4% of those "ever vaccinated" completing the vaccination regimen. There was also great variation in the proportion of health workers exhibiting natural immunity from previous exposure (positive for anti-Hepatitis B core antibodies; 41-92%). Commonly cited reasons for non-uptake of vaccine included cost, lack of awareness of vaccine availability, and inadequate information concerning the vaccine. Countries in this region will require locally relevant data to develop cost-effective strategies that maximize the benefit to their health workers due to the great diversity of HBV epidemiology in the region. Copyright © 2016 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The web of silence: a qualitative case study of early intervention and support for healthcare workers with mental ill-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Sandra E

    2014-02-08

    There is a high rate of stress and mental illness among healthcare workers, yet many continue to work despite symptoms that affect their performance. Workers with mental health issues are typically ostracized and do not get the support that they need. If issues are not addressed, however, they could become worse and compromise the health and safety, not only of the worker, but his/her colleagues and patients. Early identification and support can improve work outcomes and facilitate recovery, but more information is needed about how to facilitate this process in the context of healthcare work. The purpose of this study was to explore the key individual and organizational forces that shape early intervention and support for healthcare workers who are struggling with mental health issues, and to identify barriers and opportunities for change. A qualitative, case study in a large, urban healthcare organization was conducted in order to explore the perceptions and experiences of employees across the organization. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight healthcare workers who had experienced mental health issues at work as well as eight workplace stakeholders who interacted with workers who were struggling (managers, coworkers, union leaders). An online survey was completed by an additional 67 employees. Analysis of the interviews and surveys was guided by a process of interpretive description to identify key barriers to early intervention and support. There were many reports of silence and inaction in response to employee mental health issues. Uncertainty in identifying mental health problems, stigma regarding mental ill health, a discourse of professional competence, social tensions, workload pressures, confidentiality expectations and lack of timely access to mental health supports were key forces in preventing employees from getting the help that they needed. Although there were a few exceptions, the overall study findings point to many barriers to supporting

  8. The web of silence: a qualitative case study of early intervention and support for healthcare workers with mental ill-health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a high rate of stress and mental illness among healthcare workers, yet many continue to work despite symptoms that affect their performance. Workers with mental health issues are typically ostracized and do not get the support that they need. If issues are not addressed, however, they could become worse and compromise the health and safety, not only of the worker, but his/her colleagues and patients. Early identification and support can improve work outcomes and facilitate recovery, but more information is needed about how to facilitate this process in the context of healthcare work. The purpose of this study was to explore the key individual and organizational forces that shape early intervention and support for healthcare workers who are struggling with mental health issues, and to identify barriers and opportunities for change. Methods A qualitative, case study in a large, urban healthcare organization was conducted in order to explore the perceptions and experiences of employees across the organization. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight healthcare workers who had experienced mental health issues at work as well as eight workplace stakeholders who interacted with workers who were struggling (managers, coworkers, union leaders). An online survey was completed by an additional 67 employees. Analysis of the interviews and surveys was guided by a process of interpretive description to identify key barriers to early intervention and support. Results There were many reports of silence and inaction in response to employee mental health issues. Uncertainty in identifying mental health problems, stigma regarding mental ill health, a discourse of professional competence, social tensions, workload pressures, confidentiality expectations and lack of timely access to mental health supports were key forces in preventing employees from getting the help that they needed. Although there were a few exceptions, the overall study findings point to

  9. Roles of Social Movement Organizations for Securing Workers' Safety in Korea: A Case Study of Abolition of the 30-Minute Delivery Guarantee Program in Pizza Delivery Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Many restaurants in Korea maintain quick-delivery service programs to satisfy customers. This service allows delivery workers limited time to deliver, which frequently put them in danger. Most of the workers are young, work part-time, and are rarely organized into trade unions. In this article, through a case study of the social movement to abolish the 30-minute delivery guarantee program of pizza companies in Korea, we argue that social movements involving social movement organizations (SMOs) and individual citizens could serve as a means to rectify this problem. We show how the SMOs developed and expanded the movement using a framing perspective and how the general public became involved through social media. Data was collected via online searching. Interview scripts from key players of SMOs and unofficial documents they provided were also reviewed. Three SMOs primarily led the movement, successfully forming a frame that emphasized social responsibility. SMOs also utilized social media to link their standing frame with unmobilized citizens and to expand the movement. We identified contributing factors and limitations of the movement and drew lessons that could be applied to other sectors where workers are in vulnerable positions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Public contracts by negotiated procedure in cases of urgency – a new interpretation of the legal basis in light of experiences with organization of the 2012 European Football Championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Horubski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The negotiated procedure without publication of a contract notice is a special procedure for awarding public procurement contracts which departs from the obligation imposed on contracting authorities of respecting the freedoms of the internal market and rules of competition. The procedure may be applied in exceptional situations of extreme urgency resulting from an event which could not be foreseen. The current judicature of the Court of Justice of the EU provides interpretations of the legal basis for application of the procedure in specific cases. However, it does not address the issue of whether it is possible to regard improper performance of contractual obligations as unpredictable. It does not provide broader considerations concerning the form of regulations on the procedure of awarding public interest contracts either. These issues were subject to analysis in one of the resolutions of the National Appeal Chamber (KIO – the Polish authority issuing decisions in matters related to public procurement contracts. In resolution KIO/KD 58/10 of 6 August 2010, KIO assessed the correctness of the application of the negotiated procedure for changing the contractor of the Municipal Stadium in Wrocław in the run-up to the 2012 European Football Championships. KIO found that the significant delay in construction of the facility was unpredictably exceptional, and significantly threatened the timeliness of commissioning the facility, which resulted in termination of the agreement by the contracting authority. The resolution also included an assessment allowing for the position that such a situation was exceptional due to the scale of the threat to the public interest, including the commercial interest of the contracting authority, stemming from a lack of immediate performance of the contract if it resulted in disproportionate consequences for a specific community. The issue of acceptance of such an interpretation by EU institutions remains unresolved.

  11. Non-turnkey contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Shunji

    1975-01-01

    A turnkey contract is recommended to such a country which is in the initial stage of nuclear power development with respect to a few plants being constructed earlier. The prime contractor may not necessarily be a reactor supplier. In some cases an architect engineering company may be a contractor. If this arrangement is not possible and the contract had to be a non-turnkey type, there might be some advantage to such a developing country capable of undertaking some major portions of the project works. Even if she might face with troubles and difficulties during construction of the first nuclear power station, she might have chance of aquiring technical kowledge and experience which would later enable her to make the plant of her own manufacture. In such a case it is advisable to limit the number of main contracts as small as possible and to utilize an organization to assist the owner in project management or to assume this function in his behalf. (orig./FW) [de

  12. Non-turnkey contract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, S

    1975-01-01

    A turnkey contract is recommended to such a country which is in the initial stage of nuclear power development with respect to a few plants being constructed earlier. The prime contractor may not necessarily be a reactor supplier. In some cases an architect engineering company may be a contractor. If this arrangement is not possible and the contract had to be a non-turnkey type, there might be some advantage to such a developing country capable of undertaking some major portions of the project works. Even if she might face troubles and difficulties during construction of the first nuclear power station, she might have a chance of aquiring technical kowledge and experience which would later enable her to make the plant of her own manufacture. In such a case it is advisable to limit the number of main contracts as small as possible and to utilize an organization to assist the owner in project management or to assume this function in his behalf.

  13. Evaluation of Work Fatigue in Loading Workers Using Muscle Fatigue Assessment Method (MFA: A Case Study in a Brick Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Omid Kalte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: Work fatigue is one of the main causes of workrelated musculoskeletal disorders and reduced productivity in industry. Therefore, it is vital to evaluate work fatigue, especially muscle fatigue, to determine the permissible workload. This study aimed to evaluate muscle fatigue of brick field workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on transportation sector workers in Pey Dezh Brick Production Company, Golestan, Iran in 2015. In this research, the qualitative of Muscle Fatigue Assessment (MFA method was used to assess the level of fatigue. Duration of each task and frequency of efforts were determined using the level of effort to obtain a numerical result for comparison with the standard level. Results: The evaluated task was to remove paired bricks from the conveyor and transfer them to trailer truck by workers. The final results revealed that lower back tolerated the most amount of pressure (score=323, followed by the shoulders and wrist of the right hand (scores=313, which were assigned to the fatigue level. Therefore, the highest total fatigue of workload was imposed on these body parts. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the upper limbs of workers incurred the highest burden in lifting bricks, and there was a in risk of WMSDS due to high workload. Therefore, it is recommended that working systems be improved through rotating work and reducing the number of transferred bricks to avoid risks caused by accumulation of fatigue.

  14. Evaluating a streamlined clinical tool and educational outreach intervention for health care workers in Malawi: the PALM PLUS case study

    OpenAIRE

    Sodhi, Sumeet; Banda, Hastings; Kathyola, Damson; Burciul, Barry; Thompson, Sandy; Joshua, Martias; Bateman, Eric; Fairall, Lara; Martiniuk, Alexandra; Cornick, Ruth; Faris, Gill; Draper, Beverley; Mondiwa, Martha; Katengeza, Egnat; Sanudi, Lifah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Nearly 3 million people in resource-poor countries receive antiretrovirals for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, yet millions more require treatment. Key barriers to treatment scale up are shortages of trained health care workers, and challenges integrating HIV/AIDS care with primary care. The research PALM PLUS (Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS in Malawi) is an intervention designed to simplify and integrate existing Malawian national guidelines into a single, simp...

  15. Crowdsourcing data collection of the retail tobacco environment: case study comparing data from crowdsourced workers to trained data collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Annice E; Lieberman, Alicea J; Dench, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    To assess whether crowdsourcing is a viable option for conducting surveillance of point of sale (POS) tobacco marketing practices. We posted jobs to an online crowdsourcing platform to audit 194 Florida licensed tobacco retailers over a 3-week period. During the same period, trained data collectors conducted audits at the same retail locations. Data were collected on cigarette advertising, cigarette promotions and product availability (electronic cigarettes, snus and dissolvables). We compared data collected by crowdsourced workers and trained staff and computed frequencies, percent agreement and inter-rater reliability. Photographs of e-cigarettes and exterior cigarette advertisements submitted by crowdsourced workers were used to validate responses. Inter-rater reliability between crowdsourced and trained data collectors was moderate to high for coding exterior cigarette advertisements, product availability and some tobacco promotions, but poor to fair when coding presence of sales and interior cigarette advertisements. Photos submitted by crowdsourced workers confirmed e-cigarette availability that was missed by trained data collectors in three stores. Crowdsourcing may be a promising form of data collection for some POS tobacco measures. Future studies should examine the cost-effectiveness of crowdsourcing compared with traditional trained data collectors and assess which POS measures are most amenable to crowdsourcing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. A Research on the Determination of the Perception Levels of Shipyard Workers Related To Occupational Health and Security: Yalova Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kavi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Shipbuilding sector, which has an important employment and export potential, is getting importance in Turkey. In this sector, the number of employees who work directly is 35.000 and the numbers of employees who work indirectly 100.000 are employed. The sector requires obligations and necessary activities in terms of vocational health and security since it includes working risks and has an increasing importance. Because of the lack of the vocational health and security measures, it has been seen many deaths and accidents in Tuzla Shipyards. Especially, the lack of trainings and measures to prevent to the industrial accident is an indication that there is a perception problem towards vocational health and security. Contrary to this, though it is taught on vocational health and security, the perceptions of the workers may not be enough. In this mean, it needs to be studied what to extend and how the workers perceive and apply the vocational health and security trainings or applications, which are taught at the shipyards, in workplace. In this paper, it is going to be studied the knowledge level of the workers related to the vocational health and security, determined training needs and if they satisfied with the trainings and measures by a survey in the Yalova shipyards.

  17. Effects of Heat Stress on Construction Labor Productivity in Hong Kong: A Case Study of Rebar Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P C

    2017-09-12

    Global warming is bringing more frequent and severe heat waves, and the result will be serious for vulnerable populations such as construction workers. Excessive heat stress has profound effects on physiological responses, which cause occupational injuries, fatalities and low productivity. Construction workers are particularly affected by heat stress, because of the body heat production caused by physically demanding tasks, and hot and humid working conditions. Field studies were conducted between August and September 2016 at two construction training grounds in Hong Kong. Onsite wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT), workers' heart rate (HR), and labor productivity were measured and monitored. Based on the 378 data sets of synchronized environmental, physiological, construction labor productivity (CLP), and personal variables, a CLP-heat stress model was established. It was found that WBGT, percentage of maximum HR, age, work duration, and alcohol drinking habits were determining factors for predicting the CLP (adjusted R ² = 0.68, p stress reduces CLP, with the percentage of direct work time decreasing by 0.33% when the WBGT increased by 1 °C. The findings in this study extend the existing practice notes by providing scientific data that may be of benefit to the industry in producing solid guidelines for working in hot weather.

  18. Gender, Labour and Precarity in the South East European Periphery: the Case of Textile Workers in Štip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bonfiglioli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the living and working conditions of textile workers in the city of Štip (Macedonia. The textile industry was highly developed during socialist times, but underwent a process of decline after the Yugoslav break-up. While it still represents a relevant economic sector for post-socialist Macedonia, the textile industry is highly dependent on outsourced orders from Western Europe. Local workers’ living and labour conditions, therefore, are affected by the global ‘race to the bottom’ for production costs that is typical of the garment industry. On the basis of a series of interviews conducted in Skopje and Štip with workers and factory owners, the article argues that contemporary working conditions in the Macedonian textile industry are characterised by poor labour rights, gender discrimination and widespread precarity. In contrast to the current circumstances, working and living conditions during socialist times are positively remembered by workers, who claim that their social status and living standards have deteriorated in the course of the last twenty years. This narrative of precarity is also partially shared by local entrepreneurs, who emphasise the global and local obstacles that hinder the development of the textile industry in Macedonia.

  19. ABOUT THE RECENT INTERPRETATION OF CJEU IN THE MATTER OF UNFAIR TERMS OF CONSUMER CREDIT CONTRACTS RELEVANT MEANINGS FOR THE NATIONAL CASE LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Orga-Dumitriu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The original formula established by the EU legislator for the repression of unfair terms (by the use of the criteria for the establishment of the abusive character – the lack of negotiation of the clause, the significant unbalance between the rights and obligations of the parties and the infringement, by the professional, of the good faith requirement was consolidated by the developments made at case law level through the exercise, by the Court in Luxembourg, of its interpretative function. The study starts with a diachronic view of the solutions that highlighted the manifest tendency of CJEU to provide the effective protection of consumers by the admission of the judicial control performed ex officio over the unfair terms in Océano Grupo, Mostaza Claro and Cofidis, such judgments being also reconfirmed on occasion of the ulterior interventions from Pannon GSM, Asturcom Telecomunicaciones and Pénzügyi Lízing or, with particular reference to the consumer credit contracts, in Banco Español de Crédito and, lately, in Aziz (I. Afterwards, following a general description of the casuistic background of the disputes between credit consumers and banks in Romania (II, the analysis of the juridical meanings of the interpretations related to the recent Kásler case law from the 30th of April 2014, respectively Sánchez Morcillo and Abril García case laws from the 17th of July 2014 may not be extended also by the realistic assessment of the effects thereof in our national law and of the (potential implications that are relevant for the Romanian courts of law (III.

  20. Globalization and workers' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Ichiro

    2008-10-01

    The global integration of economies worldwide has led to increased pressure for "labor flexibility". A notable aspect of this trend has been the rise in non-standard work arrangements, which include part-time work, temporary agency-based work, fixed-term contingent work, and independent contracting. Although non-standard work arrangements are convenient for employers, they are often associated with poor pay, absence of pension and health benefits, as well as lack of protection from unions and labor laws. Studies have begun to address the question of whether these "precarious" jobs pose a health hazard for workers. The challenge for causal inference is that precarious workers are likely to differ from non-precarious workers in a variety of characteristics that also influence health outcomes, i.e. there is confounding and selection bias. However, even after taking account of these biases--through propensity score-matched analysis--there is evidence to suggest that non-standard work may be damaging to workers' health. Policies modeled after the European Union's Directive on Part-Time Work may help to mitigate some of the health hazards associated with precarious work.

  1. Fraud in Rights and Contracts: A Review of Bankruptcy Case of Livent Inc. Based on Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Anindyo Widhoyoko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research discussed the accounting scandal in the perspective of governance, risk, and compliance using Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC framework. Unlike other fraud’s framework, GRC framework combinedthree different aspects of business sustainability of reporting. The purpose of the research was to highlight early business fraud that usually initiated by the company in boosting up the revenue during the Initial public offering(IPO processes. When other research discussed the business’ fraud schemes through the document alteration, this research focused on a case showing how a business could make the wrong statement to the investors through real and lawful future contracts with unqualified audit opinion. Structurally, this research was done through the action research method in pointing out all the directors’ failures in their function to hold the fiduciary duty to exercise their responsibility. Based on the analysis with the accordance with the framework used, it is highlighted that directors in the aspect of (1 governance decisive, they fail to set proportional target, provide ethical value, and react positively to maintain the company sustainability; (2 compliance submissive, they do not submit the accounting standards through undisclosed third-party agreement, misrepresentation of revenue recognition, and mistreatment of expense omission; (3 risk preventive, they fail to assess the risk occurs from legal aspect of conflict of interest, long-term contractual and engagement risks, and insufficient future cash flow.

  2. Sun Safety at Work Canada: a multiple case-study protocol to develop sun safety and heat protection programs and policies for outdoor workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Desre M; Tenkate, Thomas; Strahlendorf, Peter; Kushner, Rivka; Gardner, Audrey; Holness, D Linn

    2015-07-10

    CAREX Canada has identified solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) as the second most prominent carcinogenic exposure in Canada, and over 75 % of Canadian outdoor workers fall within the highest exposure category. Heat stress also presents an important public health issue, particularly for outdoor workers. The most serious form of heat stress is heat stroke, which can cause irreversible damage to the heart, lungs, kidneys, and liver. Although the need for sun and heat protection has been identified, there is no Canada-wide heat and sun safety program for outdoor workers. Further, no prevention programs have addressed both skin cancer prevention and heat stress in an integrated approach. The aim of this partnered study is to evaluate whether a multi-implementation, multi-evaluation approach can help develop sustainable workplace-specific programs, policies, and procedures to increase the use of UV safety and heat protection. This 2-year study is a theory-driven, multi-site, non-randomized study design with a cross-case analysis of 13 workplaces across four provinces in Canada. The first phase of the study includes the development of workplace-specific programs with the support of the intensive engagement of knowledge brokers. There will be a three-points-in-time evaluation with process and impact components involving the occupational health and safety (OHS) director, management, and workers with the goal of measuring changes in workplace policies, procedures, and practices. It will use mixed methods involving semi-structured key informant interviews, focus groups, surveys, site observations, and UV dosimetry assessment. Using the findings from phase I, in phase 2, a web-based, interactive, intervention planning tool for workplaces will be developed, as will the intensive engagement of intermediaries such as industry decision-makers to link to policymakers about the importance of heat and sun safety for outdoor workers. Solar UV and heat are both health and safety hazards

  3. An unusual case of organophosphate intoxication of a worker in a plastic bottle recycling plant: an important reminder.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C L; Chuang, H Y; Chang, C Y; Liu, S T; Wu, M T; Ho, C K

    2000-01-01

    A young man was sent to our emergency unit because he had suffered from vomiting and cold sweating for 2 days. At the time he was admitted, he had no acute abdominal pains or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physical examination revealed nothing but a faster heart rate and moist, flushing skin. The patient had worked for 6 years at a plastic bottle-recycling factory, but none of his co-workers had the same symptoms. Nevertheless, because the plant also recycled pesticide bottles, we suspected...

  4. Rapid urease test and endoscopic data in dynamic in case of peptic ulcers in former Chernobyl accident clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlikovs, G.; Seleznovs, J.; Farbtuha, T.; Straupeniece, I.; Kuzenko, A.; Pokrotnieks, J.

    2002-01-01

    111 peptic ulcer patients former Chernobyl accident clean-up workers were examined. The patients have been working in the damaged zone during 1986-87 years receiving small radiation dosages. Chronic peptic gastric and duodenal ulcers appeared in them later. The goal of the trial is to investigate the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication measures in triple-therapy course of medium duration (10 days) include ranitidine, amoxycillinum, and methronidazolum. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was accompanied by rapid urease test. The test was repeated after a 1-year period. Analysing the data results we ascertain that the prolonged success of triple-therapy is rather ineffective and have unclear correlation with endoscopic data. This is much evident in case of gastric ulcers. These results testify that clinical course of peptic ulcers in case of post-radiation syndrome differs from the same in population. (authors)

  5. Endogenous Market Structures and Contract Theory. Delegation, principal-agent contracts, screening, franchising and tying

    OpenAIRE

    Etro Federico

    2010-01-01

    I study the role of unilateral strategic contracts for firms active in markets with price competition and endogenous entry. Traditional results change substantially when the market structure is endogenous rather than exogenous. They concern 1) contracts of managerial delegation to non-profit maximizers, 2) incentive principal-agent contracts in the presence of moral hazard on cost reducing activities, 3) screening contracts in case of asymmetric information on the productivity of the managers...

  6. Construction contracts law and management

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Will; Murdoch, John

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of this bestselling textbook has been thoroughly revised to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive coverage of the legislation, administration and management of construction contracts. It now includes comparisons of working with JCT, NEC3, and FIDIC contracts throughout. Introducing this topic at the core of construction law and management, this book provides students with a one-stop reference on construction contracts. Significant new material covers: procurement tendering developments in dispute settlement commentary on all key legislation, case law and contract amendments In line with new thinking in construction management research, this authoritative guide is essential reading for every construction undergraduate and an extremely useful source of reference for practitioners.

  7. Relationship of duration of work exposure and feeling of subjective fatigue: A case study on jewelry manufacturing workers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmi Ravindra Salve

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Fatigue can be defined in various conditions. In literature it has been defined and explored by various researches through different aspects. This study was conducted to establish the relationship between the duration of work exposure and feeling of subjective fatigue. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one jewelry manufacturing workers as study group and 27 students as control group participated with their signed informed consent. The daily diary method and feeling of subjective fatigue evaluation questionnaire were used as a tool in this study. Three categories of feeling of subjective fatigue were considered in this study. The study was conducted mainly in the middle of the week. The data regarding feeling of subjective fatigue were collected before starting of work and after completion of the work day. Results: The results showed that The time spent on the job by the workers engaged in jewelry manufacturing was 670 min and were in four slots with the longest work period being 240 min. Sleeping time was found to be around 480 min. Conclusion: The study revealed that all three dimensions (general, mental, and physical were affected by the whole day work exposure. Among three types of fatigues, general fatigue was observed at the beginning and end of the work shift.

  8. INVESTIGATING THE LEVEL OF BURNOUT AND INFLUENCING FACTORS ON IT AMONG THE WORKERS: CASE STUDY THE PETROCHEMICAL INDUSTRIES NATIONAL COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan DARVISH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is done with the purpose of investigation the level of burnout andinfluencing factors on it. The method used is measuring or filed-finding,descriptive studies type and the statistic society is made of the entire officialand non-official workers in the petrochemical industries national company inthe year (2009 including 6901people in the main office and 12 subsidiarycompanies who are working. The estimation of the sample volume is madeusing the cochran formula by the volume of 1742 people and the accidentalclass and the domesticated form of the Maslach Burn Out Inventory has beenused for gathering the dependant variant data of the study. In this study therelevance or effect of 20 independent variables on the burnout and itsconstituents was investigated. In the two variable tests, the emotionalcommitment had a reverse relation with burnout. So that with the increase ofthe interest and bind of the workers to the organization, the level of burnoutdecreased. In analyzing the step by step regression of the burnout accordingto the expected variables, 41percent of the explained burnout (R 2 =41%,and ranking the amount of the standard coefficient, the main elements likethe nature of the job, emotional commitment, work environment, job security,coworkers, education, job type, salary and the premium and jobindependence in the remaining regression equation and on the burnoutvariable have been influencing.

  9. Correlates of health care utilization under targeted interventions: The case of female sex workers in Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Varun; Suryawanshi, Dipak; Saggurti, Niranjan; Bharat, Shalini

    2017-11-01

    Accessibility and frequency of use of health care services among female sex workers (FSWs) are constrained by various factors. In this analysis, we examined the correlates of frequency of using health care services under targeted interventions among FSWs. A sample of FSWs (N = 1,973) was obtained from a second round (2012) of Behavioral Tracking Survey, conducted in five districts of Andhra Pradesh, a high-HIV-prevalence state in southern India. We used negative binomial regression models to analyze frequency of utilization of health care services among FSWs. Based on our analysis, we suggest that various predisposing and enabling factors were found to be significantly associated with the visit to NGO clinics for treatment of any health problem, any sexually transmitted infection symptom, and the number of condoms received from the peer worker or condom depot. We suggest the need for further research with respect to various correlates of frequency of using health care among FSWs to develop effective intervention strategies in countries that have high HIV prevalence among FSWs and targeted interventions need more diligent implementation to reach the unreached.

  10. Case Study in Designing a Research Fundamentals Curriculum for Community Health Workers: A University - Community Clinic Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, Jill; Kalichman, Michael; Bell, Yvonne; Dagnino, Cynthia; Taras, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Community health workers are increasingly incorporated into research teams. Training them in research methodology and ethics, while relating these themes to a community’s characteristics, may help to better integrate these health promotion personnel into research teams. Approach and Strategies This pilot project involved the design and implementation of an interactive training course on research fundamentals for community health workers from clinics in a rural, predominately Latino setting. Curriculum development was guided by collaborative activities arising from a university - clinic partnership, a community member focus group, and the advice of community-based researchers. The resulting curriculum was interactive and stimulated dialogue between trainees and academic researchers. Discussion and Conclusions Collaboration between researchers and health agency professionals proved to be a practical method to develop curriculum for clinic staff. An interactive curriculum allowed trainees to incorporate community-specific themes into the discussion. This interaction educated course instructors from academia about the community as much as it educated course participants about research. The bidirectional engagement that occurs during the development and teaching of this course can potentially lead to research partnerships between community agencies and academia, better-informed members of the public, and research protocols that accommodate community characteristics. PMID:24121537

  11. Informal Workers in Thailand: Occupational Health and Social Security Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Nankongnab, Noppanun; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai; Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Woskie, Susan; Slatin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    Informal workers in Thailand lack employee status as defined under the Labor Protection Act (LPA). Typically, they do not work at an employer's premise; they work at home and may be self-employed or temporary workers. They account for 62.6 percent of the Thai workforce and have a workplace accident rate ten times higher than formal workers. Most Thai Labor laws apply only to formal workers, but some protect informal workers in the domestic, home work, and agricultural sectors. Laws that protect informal workers lack practical enforcement mechanisms and are generally ineffective because informal workers lack employment contracts and awareness of their legal rights. Thai social security laws fail to provide informal workers with treatment of work-related accidents, diseases, and injuries; unemployment and retirement insurance; and workers' compensation. The article summarizes the differences in protections available for formal and informal sector workers and measures needed to decrease these disparities in coverage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Housing and bed and board contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Janko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work not only legal nature of catering services is analyzed, but also legal position of parties in it. Catering contract (Housing and Bed and Board Contract is unnamed in our country and the main source of law for this contract are business practices and usage. A lot of attention is paid to this question. Lack of legal norms for this area is general characteristic for most of the tourism contracts. In this contract its title is also debatable because term 'catering services' is not usually used in practice. Although this contract is unnamed in Comparative Law ,in tourist more developed countries there are more codified business practices from this area and there is more Case Law. Having in mind development of tourist economy adequate legal conditions in tourism contract are expected.

  13. QUALITATIVE STUDY ON THE FOUNDATIONS OF THE EXISTANCE OF THE EMPLOYEES’ PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT. THE CASE OF THE ROMANIAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Muresanu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of psychological contract (PC, which describes the promises that play the role of obligations within the employment relation, has become during the last thirty years a major analysis tool in the organizational behaviour field. However, it has been mainly used, almost exclusively, in North-American or British organizational contexts. Only recently the researches on the psychological contracts have turned towards other parts of the world such as China, Southern America or India. Despite this opening towards new horizons, the Eastern European countries mainly remain unexplored from the psychological contract perspective. Certain well-known researchers (for example Rousseau and Coyle-Shapiro have even stated that the psychological contract simply doesn’t exist in this part of Europe. The present study which represents a part of the author’s doctoral thesis, demonstrates the opposite. Thus, our field research carried out in 2010 in two companies of the automotive industry in Romania on a sample of 31 participants, led us to conclude that the psychological contract is present in this country, too. By using a qualitative methodological approach inspired from the grounded theory, we have been able to notice that the foundations of the existence of the psychological contract are present in the analyzed sample. First of all, the employees benefit from contractual freedom, which allows them to negotiate the terms of their psychological contract and to begin or get out of an employment relation if it becomes unsatisfactory. Secondly, the employers benefit from a lot of flexibility when presenting the terms of the psychological contract to their employees. These two elements are derived from the market economy which is now being built in Eastern Europe and represent a significant change as compared to the employment relation characteristic to the centralized economy. Finally, our survey allowed us to seize, in the analyzed employment relation

  14. Case study in designing a research fundamentals curriculum for community health workers: a university-community clinic collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, Jill; Kalichman, Michael; Bell, Yvonne; Dagnino, Cynthia; Taras, Howard L

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly incorporated into research teams. Training them in research methodology and ethics, while relating these themes to a community's characteristics, may help to better integrate these health promotion personnel into research teams. An interactive training course on research fundamentals for CHWs was designed and implemented jointly by a community agency serving a primarily Latino, rural population and an academic health center. A focus group of community members and input from community leaders comprised a community-based participatory research model to create three 3-hour interactive training sessions. The resulting curriculum was interactive and successfully stimulated dialogue between trainees and academic researchers. By choosing course activities that elicited community-specific responses into each session's discussion, researchers learned about the community as much as the training course educated CHWs about research. The approach is readily adaptable, making it useful to other communities where CHWs are part of the health system.

  15. Health effects of low-dose radiation on atomic workers: a case study of employer-directed research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    The 15-year history of a study on the health effects of low-dose radiation on workers at the Hanford Atomic Plant in Washington State demonstrates different facets of political control by employers over investigations of employee working conditions. Evidence obtained through the Freedom of Information Act shows that the original study, under the guidance of Dr. Thomas Mancuso, an experienced and respected occupational health epidemiologist, was proof to employees that their exposure levels were safe. When it turned out that the study might show an increase in cancer rates among plant employees, its control was transferred to the employer. Lessons from these events are that it may be necessary for organized labor to negotiate the conduct of occupational health investigations as part of negotiated settlements

  16. An unusual case of organophosphate intoxication of a worker in a plastic bottle recycling plant: an important reminder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C L; Chuang, H Y; Chang, C Y; Liu, S T; Wu, M T; Ho, C K

    2000-11-01

    A young man was sent to our emergency unit because he had suffered from vomiting and cold sweating for 2 days. At the time he was admitted, he had no acute abdominal pains or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physical examination revealed nothing but a faster heart rate and moist, flushing skin. The patient had worked for 6 years at a plastic bottle-recycling factory, but none of his co-workers had the same symptoms. Nevertheless, because the plant also recycled pesticide bottles, we suspected organophosphate pesticide intoxication. The patient's plasma acetylcholinesterase level was checked, revealing 1498.6 microU/L (normal range: 2,000-5, 000) on the first day and 1,379 microU/L on the second day. Upon questioning, the patient recalled that one of his shoe soles had been damaged and that his foot had been wet from walking all day in rain collected on the factory floor on the day that his symptoms first occurred. We conducted a study in the change of preshift and postshift acetylcholinesterase levels among six of his co-workers on a rainy day. We used the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare the preshift and postshift plasma acetylcholinesterase levels; no significant difference was revealed (p = 0.600), leaving contamination via the damaged shoe sole suspect. We reviewed the literature on organophosphate intoxication; pesticide bottle-recycling factories were reported to be at a low risk of organophosphate toxicity in the working environment. However, because the potential risk of intoxication is still present, protective equipment such as clothing, gloves, and water-proof shoes should be worn, and employees should be educated on the potential risks.

  17. Assessment of non-financial incentives for volunteer community health workers - the case of Wukro district, Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Fisaha; Yemane, Dejen; Gebreslassie, Azeb

    2014-09-22

    Volunteer community health workers (VCHW) are health care providers who are trained but do not have any professional certification. They are intended to fill the gap for unmet curative, preventative, and health promotion health needs of communities. This study aims to investigate the non-financial incentives for VCHWs and factors affecting their motivation. A cross-sectional quantitative study was performed from February to March 2013. A total of 400 randomly selected female VCHWs were included using the district health office registers. Finally, multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors of VCHW motivation. Significant numbers (48%) of study participants have mentioned future training as a major non-financial incentive. Age between 20 and 36 years old (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.18, 2.13), married VCHWs (AOR = 3.84, 95% CI = 1.73, 5.02), presence of children under five years old (AOR = 0.2, 95% CI = 0.09, 0.71), allowing volunteer withdrawal (AOR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.06, 2.47), and establishment of a local endowment fund for community health workers after they left volunteerism (AOR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.91) are all factors associated with VCHW motivation. Future training was mentioned as the prime non-financial incentive. Age, marital status, presence of children under five, allowing volunteer withdrawal, and establishment of a local endowment fund were identified as the independent predictors of motivation. Therefore, considering a non-financial incentive package, including further training and allowing volunteer withdrawal, would be helpful to sustain volunteerism.

  18. Back and neck pain disability and upper limb symptoms of home healthcare workers: A case-control study from Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccò, Matteo; Pezzetti, Federica; Signorelli, Carlo

    2017-03-30

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are quite frequent in healthcare workers (HCWs), but data about MSD in home-based healthcare workers (HHWs) are lacking. In this study we describe the prevalence of MSD among Italian HHWs. A case-control study was carried out among 300 random-selected female HCWs, the sample comprising 100 HHWs, 100 HCWs with a low exposure to patient handling (MAPO - Movimentazione e Assistenza Pazienti Ospedalizzati - Movement and Assistance of Hospital Patients index 0-5) and 100 HCWs with high exposure to patient handling (MAPO index ≥ 5.01). As a negative control group, 200 visual display unit workers were also randomly selected. Musculoskeletal disorder cases were collected using a standardized case definition. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed comparing the MSD prevalence in the 4 groups. The overall prevalence of MSD was 17% in the reference group and 28.3% for HCWs. HHWs and HCWs with MAPO index ≥ 5.01 had similar prevalence of neck pain (9% and 11%, respectively), whereas lumbosacral pain prevalence was higher in the HHWs group (31%), with similar results in residential HCWs groups (21% in MAPO index 0-5 group and 25% in MAPO index ≥ 5.01 group). HCWs of group MAPO index ≥ 5.01 and HHWs showed the higher prevalence of upper limb complaints, with a prevalence of 20% and 10%, respectively. In multivariate regression analysis, prevalence of MSD complaints was quite similar in HHWs (adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) = 2.335, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.318-4.138) and in HCWs of the group MAPO ≥ 5.01 (ORadj = 2.729, 95% CI: 1.552-4.797). The prevalence of MSD in the examined HCWs was relatively high, with HHWs appearing as a particularly high-risk group for lumbosacral back pain. In higher exposed HCWs, upper-limb symptoms were particularly frequent, probably reflecting the different tasks required to manage residential and homebased patients. In conclusion, this study reaffirms the high prevalence of

  19. Promoting work participation of non-permanent workers with psychological problems: An evidence-based approach to occupational health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audhoe, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Unemployed and temporary agency workers and workers with expired fixed-term contracts are a particularly vulnerable group, at risk for sickness absence and prolonged work disability due to psychological problems. These workers who are without an employment contract, are also known as non-permanent

  20. Method Determining the Contents of the Contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Yudha Hernoko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The contents of the contract are primarily determined by what the real mutually agreed upon by the parties. By interpreting some certain statements, in this case to determine its meaning, to be clear based on what the parties committed themselves. Why is the interpretation required? In facts, on the many cases provided a valuable lesson, how many commercial disputes arise when the performance of the contract. The dispute begins when the parties have a different understanding of the statement that they use in the contract. Indeed, businesses are very familiar with the business processes that they do, but at the time of the business process are set forth in the contract language and designed by those who do not understand the legal aspects of the contract, the contract can be ascertained open possibility for disputes. The power of contract binding (the contents of the agreement toward to the characteristic and the wide spectrum of the rights and obligations contractually, basically a contract represents the power of performance among others in order implementing the rights and obligations of the parties. As an instrument to understand the contract, the method of determining the content of the contract (e.g., through interpretation, autonomous and heteronomous factors, further can be used to assess the reciprocation of rights and obligations in a meaningful and proportional contractual relationship.

  1. Employment contracts and health selection: Unhealthy employees out and healthy employees in?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, A.F.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Bossche, S.N.J. van den; Taris, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The healthy worker effect implies that healthy workers go "up" in employment status whereas less healthy workers go "down" into precarious temporary employment or unemployment. These hypotheses were tested during an economic recession, by predicting various upward and downward contract

  2. Employment Contracts and Health Selection Unhealthy Employees Out and Healthy Employees In?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, A.F.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Bossche, S.N.J. van den; Taris, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The healthy worker effect implies that healthy workers go "up" in employment status whereas less healthy workers go "down" into precarious temporary employment or unemployment. These hypotheses were tested during an economic recession, by predicting various upward and downward contract

  3. Evaluating a streamlined clinical tool and educational outreach intervention for health care workers in Malawi: the PALM PLUS case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martiniuk Alexandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly 3 million people in resource-poor countries receive antiretrovirals for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, yet millions more require treatment. Key barriers to treatment scale up are shortages of trained health care workers, and challenges integrating HIV/AIDS care with primary care. The research PALM PLUS (Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS in Malawi is an intervention designed to simplify and integrate existing Malawian national guidelines into a single, simple, user-friendly guideline for mid-level health care workers. Training utilizes a peer-to-peer educational outreach approach. Research is being undertaken to evaluate this intervention to generate evidence that will guide future decision-making for consideration of roll out in Malawi. The research consists of a cluster randomized trial in 30 public health centres in Zomba District that measures the effect of the intervention on staff satisfaction and retention, quality of patient care, and costs through quantitative, qualitative and health economics methods. Results and outcomes In the first phase of qualitative inquiry respondents from intervention sites demonstrated in-depth knowledge of PALM PLUS compared to those from control sites. Participants in intervention sites felt that the PALM PLUS tool empowered them to provide better health services to patients. Interim staff retention data shows that there were, on average, 3 to 4 staff departing from the control and intervention sites per month. Additional qualitative, quantitative and economic analyses are planned. The partnership Dignitas International and the Knowledge Translation Unit at the University of Cape Town Lung Institute have led the adaptation and development of the PALM PLUS intervention, using experience gained through the implementation of the South African precursor, PALSA PLUS. The Malawian partners, REACH Trust and the Research Unit at the Ministry of Health, have led the qualitative and

  4. Evaluating a streamlined clinical tool and educational outreach intervention for health care workers in Malawi: the PALM PLUS case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Sumeet; Banda, Hastings; Kathyola, Damson; Burciul, Barry; Thompson, Sandy; Joshua, Martias; Bateman, Eric; Fairall, Lara; Martiniuk, Alexandra; Cornick, Ruth; Faris, Gill; Draper, Beverley; Mondiwa, Martha; Katengeza, Egnat; Sanudi, Lifah; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Schull, Michael J

    2011-11-08

    Nearly 3 million people in resource-poor countries receive antiretrovirals for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, yet millions more require treatment. Key barriers to treatment scale up are shortages of trained health care workers, and challenges integrating HIV/AIDS care with primary care. PALM PLUS (Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS in Malawi) is an intervention designed to simplify and integrate existing Malawian national guidelines into a single, simple, user-friendly guideline for mid-level health care workers. Training utilizes a peer-to-peer educational outreach approach. Research is being undertaken to evaluate this intervention to generate evidence that will guide future decision-making for consideration of roll out in Malawi. The research consists of a cluster randomized trial in 30 public health centres in Zomba District that measures the effect of the intervention on staff satisfaction and retention, quality of patient care, and costs through quantitative, qualitative and health economics methods. In the first phase of qualitative inquiry respondents from intervention sites demonstrated in-depth knowledge of PALM PLUS compared to those from control sites. Participants in intervention sites felt that the PALM PLUS tool empowered them to provide better health services to patients. Interim staff retention data shows that there were, on average, 3 to 4 staff departing from the control and intervention sites per month. Additional qualitative, quantitative and economic analyses are planned. Dignitas International and the Knowledge Translation Unit at the University of Cape Town Lung Institute have led the adaptation and development of the PALM PLUS intervention, using experience gained through the implementation of the South African precursor, PALSA PLUS. The Malawian partners, REACH Trust and the Research Unit at the Ministry of Health, have led the qualitative and economic evaluations. Dignitas and Ministry of Health have facilitated interaction with

  5. Precarious Pedagogies? The Impact of Casual and Zero-Hour Contracts in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lopes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Precarious work is associated with and characterizes the effects of neoliberal policy—the transference of economic risk onto workers, the erosion of workers’ rights, the flexibilization and casualization of work contracts, self-responsibility, financial insecurity, and emotional stress. In the Higher Education (HE sector, the number of insecure academic jobs, especially zero-hour contracts for hourly paid teaching and short-term contract research, has grown exponentially in recent years in response to the structural and fiscal changes within universities, which reflect these global shifts. This paper presents findings from a pilot study conducted with academics on casual contracts in HE institutions in England and Wales. Qualitative interviews and focus groups were undertaken with teachers (lecturers and tutors on hourly paid and zero-hour contracts to examine the relationship between their contractual situations and pedagogical practices. The research broadly seeks to contribute to ongoing discussions concerned with the impact of neoliberalism on higher education and specifically highlights the case of contingent lecturers as casualties of the casualization of the academic labor force.

  6. AGILE DRAFTING OF OUTSOURCING CONTRACTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Storgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    and in several parallel tracks using different competencies. By the use of an illustrative case-study, this paper explores how scrum can be applied to enhance the process of drafting outsourcing contracts. The analysis indicates that the use of an agile method, such as Scrum, can be beneficial in this context...

  7. Quality and safety of integrated community case management of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests and pneumonia by community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Davidson H; Brooks, Erin Twohig; Semrau, Katherine; Pilingana, Portipher; MacLeod, William B; Siazeele, Kazungu; Sabin, Lora L; Thea, Donald M; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo

    2012-03-01

    To assess the quality and safety of having community health workers (CHWs) in rural Zambia use rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and provide integrated management of malaria and pneumonia. In the context of a cluster-randomized controlled trial of two models for community-based management of malaria and/or non-severe pneumonia in children under 5 years old, CHWs in the intervention arm were trained to use RDTs, follow a simple algorithm for classification and treat malaria with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and pneumonia with amoxicillin. CHW records were reviewed to assess the ability of the CHWs to appropriately classify and treat malaria and pneumonia, and account for supplies. Patients were also followed up to assess treatment safety. During the 12-month study, the CHWs evaluated 1017 children with fever and/or fast/difficult breathing and performed 975 RDTs. Malaria and/or pneumonia were appropriately classified 94-100% of the time. Treatment based on disease classification was correct in 94-100% of episodes. Supply management was excellent with over 98% of RDTs, amoxicillin, and AL properly accounted for. The use of RDTs, amoxicillin, and AL was associated with few minor adverse events. Most febrile children (90%) with negative RDT results recovered after being treated with an antipyretic alone. Volunteer CHWs in rural Zambia are capable of providing integrated management of malaria and pneumonia to children safely and at high quality.

  8. Invalidity of contract: legislative regulation and types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Василь Іванович Крат

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invalidity contracts always attracted attention researchers. Without regard to it, in modern conditions there is an enormous layer of the problems related to invalidity contract, that to require a doctrine and utilitarian comprehension. The article is sanctified to research invalidity contract. In the article analyses problems of the legislative regulation and types of invalidity contract through the prism of judicial practice. In the Civil code of Ukraine, a voidable contract sets as a common rule. A voidable of the contract is incarnated in the so-called «virtual» invalidity when only the most typical grounds are enumerated. However, even such approach does not allow to overcome all possible cases that arise up in practice. Such situation touches possibility of voidable contracts concluded with the purpose of to shut out the appeal of claim to the property of the debtor. Therefore it follows to set general rules in relation to voidable contracts of the debtor. A nullity of the contract takes place only in the case when there is the direct pointing of law on the qualification of that or another contract as the nullity. The nullity of contract in the Civil code of Ukraine is constructed by means of «textual» invalidity. There are no single attempts to use the construction of «virtual» invalidity in judicial practice when there is the direct pointing of law on the qualification of that or another contract as the nullity, that is impermissible. Methodologically incorrectly to carry out identifying of invalidity contract and obligation with the aim of providing of application of different after the rich in content filling norms.

  9. Informal Workers in Thailand: Occupational Health and Social Security Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Nankongnab, Noppanun; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai; Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Woskie, Susan; Slatin, Craig

    2018-01-01

    Informal workers in Thailand lack employee status as defined under the Labor Protection Act (LPA). Typically, they do not work at an employer’s premise; they work at home and may be self-employed or temporary workers. They account for 62.6 percent of the Thai workforce and have a workplace accident rate ten times higher than formal workers. Most Thai Labor laws apply only to formal workers, but some protect informal workers in the domestic, home work, and agricultural sectors. Laws that protect informal workers lack practical enforcement mechanisms and are generally ineffective because informal workers lack employment contracts and awareness of their legal rights. Thai social security laws fail to provide informal workers with treatment of work-related accidents, diseases, and injuries; unemployment and retirement insurance; and workers’ compensation. The article summarizes the differences in protections available for formal and informal sector workers and measures needed to decrease these disparities in coverage. PMID:25995374

  10. Validity and efficacy of the labor contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Toyama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The validity and efficacy of the labor contract as well as cases of nullity and defeasibility import an analysis of scopes of the supplementary application of Civil Code taking into account the peculiarities of Labor Law. Labor contract, while legal business has as regulatory framework to the regulations of Civil Code but it is necessary to determine, in each case, whether to apply fully this normative body, or modulate its supplemental application, or simply conclude that it doesn’t result compatible its regulation due to the special nature of labor relations. Specifically, this issue will be analyzed from cases of nullity and defeasibility of the labor contract.

  11. Reviving Ulysses contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellecy, Ryan

    2003-12-01

    Ulysses contracts have faced paternalism objections since they first were proposed. Since the contracts are designed to override a present request from a legally competent patient in favor of a past request made by that patient, enforcement of these contracts was argued to be unjustifiable strong paternalism. Recent legal developments and new theories of practical reasoning suggest that the discussion of Ulysses contracts should be revived. This paper argues that with a proper understanding of the future-directed planning embodied in Ulysses contracts, the charge of strong paternalism can be answered, and the enforcement of some Ulysses contracts may be justified under the rubric of weak paternalism.

  12. ADMINISTRATIVE CONTRACTS. DELIMITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Teodora PASCARIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Article examines whether all contracts of public persons are administrative contracts; in other words, if the administration may conclude contracts that, according to their legal nature, are not administrative. If we start from the definition of administrative contracts as it appears in Law no. 554/2004, these include contracts by public authorities which concern the enhancement of public property execution of works of public interest, public services, public procurement and other administrative contracts provided by special laws and subject to the jurisdiction of the administrative courts.

  13. Monitoring Processes in Visual Search Enhanced by Professional Experience: The Case of Orange Quality-Control Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visalli, Antonino; Vallesi, Antonino

    2018-01-01

    Visual search tasks have often been used to investigate how cognitive processes change with expertise. Several studies have shown visual experts' advantages in detecting objects related to their expertise. Here, we tried to extend these findings by investigating whether professional search experience could boost top-down monitoring processes involved in visual search, independently of advantages specific to objects of expertise. To this aim, we recruited a group of quality-control workers employed in citrus farms. Given the specific features of this type of job, we expected that the extensive employment of monitoring mechanisms during orange selection could enhance these mechanisms even in search situations in which orange-related expertise is not suitable. To test this hypothesis, we compared performance of our experimental group and of a well-matched control group on a computerized visual search task. In one block the target was an orange (expertise target) while in the other block the target was a Smurfette doll (neutral target). The a priori hypothesis was to find an advantage for quality-controllers in those situations in which monitoring was especially involved, that is, when deciding the presence/absence of the target required a more extensive inspection of the search array. Results were consistent with our hypothesis. Quality-controllers were faster in those conditions that extensively required monitoring processes, specifically, the Smurfette-present and both target-absent conditions. No differences emerged in the orange-present condition, which resulted to mainly rely on bottom-up processes. These results suggest that top-down processes in visual search can be enhanced through immersive real-life experience beyond visual expertise advantages.

  14. Monitoring Processes in Visual Search Enhanced by Professional Experience: The Case of Orange Quality-Control Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Visalli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual search tasks have often been used to investigate how cognitive processes change with expertise. Several studies have shown visual experts' advantages in detecting objects related to their expertise. Here, we tried to extend these findings by investigating whether professional search experience could boost top-down monitoring processes involved in visual search, independently of advantages specific to objects of expertise. To this aim, we recruited a group of quality-control workers employed in citrus farms. Given the specific features of this type of job, we expected that the extensive employment of monitoring mechanisms during orange selection could enhance these mechanisms even in search situations in which orange-related expertise is not suitable. To test this hypothesis, we compared performance of our experimental group and of a well-matched control group on a computerized visual search task. In one block the target was an orange (expertise target while in the other block the target was a Smurfette doll (neutral target. The a priori hypothesis was to find an advantage for quality-controllers in those situations in which monitoring was especially involved, that is, when deciding the presence/absence of the target required a more extensive inspection of the search array. Results were consistent with our hypothesis. Quality-controllers were faster in those conditions that extensively required monitoring processes, specifically, the Smurfette-present and both target-absent conditions. No differences emerged in the orange-present condition, which resulted to mainly rely on bottom-up processes. These results suggest that top-down processes in visual search can be enhanced through immersive real-life experience beyond visual expertise advantages.

  15. Temporary Workforce Planning with Firm Contracts: A Model and a Simulated Annealing Heuristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Al-Salamah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a model for temporary staffing when temporary employment is managed by firm contracts and to propose a simulated annealing-based method to solve the model. Temporary employment is a policy frequently used to adjust the working hour capacity to fluctuating demand. Temporary workforce planning models have been unnecessarily simplified to account for only periodic hiring and laying off; a company can review its workforce requirement every period and make hire-fire decisions accordingly, usually with a layoff cost. We present a more realistic temporary workforce planning model that assumes a firm contract between the worker and the company, which can extend to several periods. The model assumes the traditional constraints, such as inventory balance constraints, worker availability, and labor hour mix. The costs are the inventory holding cost, training cost of the temporary workers, and the backorder cost. The mixed integer model developed for this case has been found to be difficult to solve even for small problem sizes; therefore, a simulated annealing algorithm is proposed to solve the mixed integer model. The performance of the SA algorithm is compared with the CPLEX solution.

  16. Epidemiological aspects of the Thule case. Mortality, number of hospital admissions and fertility levels observed amongst the workers employed at the Thule base following the B-52 bomber crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juel, K.

    1996-01-01

    In 1968 an American B-52 bomber carrying nuclear bombs crashed near the Thule Air Base in Greenland. Since 1986 it has been suspected that morbidity was elevated among the workers employed during the following clean-up period. The aim was to elucidate certain following epidemiological aspects including possible hazardous effects on the workers' health measured by death rate, hospital admissions and fertility levels, to analyze the mortality pattern of these workers compared to that of the rest of the Danish population, to discuss alternatives for the analysis of possible hazardous effects on workers' health after the crash and the consequences of the political and media coverage. No significant difference was found in the frequency of live-born children among the workers employed during the clean-up period compared to those employed outside this period and to those in the first-named group involved in a specific clean-up operation. The number of hospital admissions was the same in both groups but there were more admissions of psychiatric cases among the workers employed during the clean-up period, amongst these 75% represented alcoholism. No differences were found between the employed groups and the general Danish population with regard to total mortality or mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases or other natural causes or accidents. Prevalent causes of death were lung cancer, heart disease, alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, suicide and accidents. It is concluded that Thule workers did not suffer excess mortality and there is no basis for the theory of mass sterilization. The crash of may have led to a few cases of illness. (AB) 148 refs

  17. Impact of Contract Bundling and Consolidation on Defense Acquisition System and Defense Industrial Base: The Case of the U.S. Department of the Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    or 39% of the value of such contracts. Next, a group of nine firms—EDO Communications and Countermeasures Systems, Lockheed Martin, Sociedad ...49,437,854.00 5.94% SOCIEDAD ESPAIOLA DE MONTAJES INDUSTRIALES SA $60,000,000.00 7.21% LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION $79,342,491.00 9.54% EDO

  18. Older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema,J.F.; Giesen, F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to an ageing population and global economic competition, there is a societal need for people to extend their working lives while maintaining high work productivity. This article presents an overview of the labour participation, job performance, and job characteristics of older workers in the

  19. Migrating Worker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    This is the preliminary report on the results obtained in the Migrating Worker-project. This project was initiated by the Danish Ministry of Finance with the aim of illustrating the effects of the 1408/71 agreement and the bilateral double taxation agreements Denmark has with the countries included...

  20. Temporary workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hesselink, J.; Verbiest, S.; Goudswaard, A.

    2014-01-01

    Temporary employment contracts are often used by employers to manage fluctuations in personnel needs. Many sectors of industry experience these fluctuations, which are often seasonal. This creates uncertainty about the continuousness of demand for work, which is transferred from employers to

  1. Elementos de flexibilidade em contratos de terceirização logística: o caso de uma empresa de telecomunicações Flexibility elements in contracts of logistic outsourcing: the case of a telecommunications company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Albergaria de Mello Bandeira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa, através da técnica de estudo de caso, a terceirização logística em uma empresa de telecomunicações. Inicialmente, são discutidos os cuidados e a importância do contrato de terceirização, segundo abordagem da economia dos custos de transação. Analisam-se as possíveis causas das falhas na contratação, e sugerem-se providências para evitar repetições em implementações semelhantes. A experiência adquirida indica que um erro primordial, na opinião dos autores, refere-se à falta de definição da estratégia a ser seguida pela organização em relação ao modelo de contratação. Essa definição é uma etapa fundamental, já que o contrato deve estar alinhado à estratégia.This article examines, through the technique of case study, the process of logistics outsourcing in a Brazilian telecommunications company. Initially, the importance of contracts for outsourcing is analyzed according to the perspective of the transaction costs economics theory. The possible causes of imperfections in the contracting process are analyzed, and the steps to avoid the repetition of these mistakes in similar implementations are suggested. According to the authors' point of view, the acquired experience indicates that a primary error in outsourcing contracts refers to the lack of a strategy to be followed by the organization in relation to a contracting model. This definition is a fundamental step, since the contract must be aligned to the strategy.

  2. Contractibility of curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Charatonik

    1991-11-01

    Full Text Available Results concerning contractibility of curves (equivalently: of dendroids are collected and discussed in the paper. Interrelations tetween various conditions which are either sufficient or necessary for a curve to be contractible are studied.

  3. Impact of windows and daylight exposure on overall health and sleep quality of office workers: a case-control pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubekri, Mohamed; Cheung, Ivy N; Reid, Kathryn J; Wang, Chia-Hui; Zee, Phyllis C

    2014-06-15

    This research examined the impact of daylight exposure on the health of office workers from the perspective of subjective well-being and sleep quality as well as actigraphy measures of light exposure, activity, and sleep-wake patterns. Participants (N = 49) included 27 workers working in windowless environments and 22 comparable workers in workplaces with significantly more daylight. Windowless environment is defined as one without any windows or one where workstations were far away from windows and without any exposure to daylight. Well-being of the office workers was measured by Short Form-36 (SF-36), while sleep quality was measured by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). In addition, a subset of participants (N = 21; 10 workers in windowless environments and 11 workers in workplaces with windows) had actigraphy recordings to measure light exposure, activity, and sleep-wake patterns. Workers in windowless environments reported poorer scores than their counterparts on two SF-36 dimensions--role limitation due to physical problems and vitality--as well as poorer overall sleep quality from the global PSQI score and the sleep disturbances component of the PSQI. Compared to the group without windows, workers with windows at the workplace had more light exposure during the workweek, a trend toward more physical activity, and longer sleep duration as measured by actigraphy. We suggest that architectural design of office environments should place more emphasis on sufficient daylight exposure of the workers in order to promote office workers' health and well-being.

  4. Evaluating the Impacts of Health, Social Network and Capital on Craft Efficiency and Productivity: A Case Study of Construction Workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingfeng; Yi, Wen; Miao, Mengyi; Zhang, Lei

    2018-02-15

    The construction industry has been recognized, for many years, as among those having a high likelihood of accidents, injuries and occupational illnesses. Such risks of construction workers can lead to low productivity and social problems. As a result, construction workers' well-being should be highly addressed to improve construction workers' efficiency and productivity. Meanwhile, the social support from a social network and capital (SNC) of construction workers has been considered as an effective approach to promote construction workers' physical and mental health (P&M health), as well as their work efficiency and productivity. Based on a comprehensive literature review, a conceptual model, which aims to improve construction workers' efficiency and productivity from the perspective of health and SNC, was proposed. A questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate the construction workers' health, SNC and work efficiency and productivity in Nanjing, China. A structural equation model (SEM) was employed to test the three hypothetical relationships among construction workers' P&M health, SNC and work efficiency and productivity. The results indicated that the direct impacts from construction workers' P&M health on work efficiency and productivity were more significant than that from the SNC. In addition, the construction workers' social capital and the network can indirectly influence the work efficiency and productivity by affecting the construction workers' P&M health. Therefore, strategies for enhancing construction workers' efficiency and productivity were proposed. Furthermore, many useable suggestions can be drawn from the research findings from the perspective of a government. The identified indicators and relationships would contribute to the construction work efficiency and productivity assessment and health management from the perspective of the construction workers.

  5. Cancer incidence and mortality among temporary maintenance workers in a refinery/petrochemical complex in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Chung, Eun-Kyo; Jang, Jae-Kil; Lee, Hye-Eun; Ryu, Hyang-Woo; Yoo, Kye-Mook; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Kyoo-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Petrochemical plant maintenance workers are exposed to various carcinogens such as benzene and metal fumes. In Korea, maintenance operations in petrochemical plants are typically performed by temporary employees hired as contract workers. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate cancer risk in temporary maintenance workers in a refinery/petrochemical complex in Korea. Methods: Subjects consisted of 14 698 male workers registered in a regional petrochemical plant maintenance workers union during 2002–2007. Cancer mortality and incidence were identified by linking with the nationwide death and cancer registries during 2002–2007 and 2002–2005, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for each cancer. Results: Increased SMR 3.61 (six cases, 95% CI: 1.32–7.87) and SIR 3.18 (five cases, 95% CI: 1.03–7.42) were observed in oral and pharyngeal cancers. Conclusion: Our findings may suggest a potential association between oral and pharyngeal cancers and temporary maintenance jobs in the petrochemical industry. Future studies should include a longer follow-up period and a quantitative exposure assessment. PMID:24999849

  6. Concept of contracting authority

    OpenAIRE

    Kasiliauskaitė, Vitalija

    2016-01-01

    Concept of Contracting Authority Law on Public Procurement the procurement concept implies the conclusion that public procurement be declared only such purchases are carried out by the contracting authority. The contracting authorities can be a subject of state and municipal management institutes, whose assignment authority is determined by a functional approach. Also, contracting authorities may be public and legal entities, but that the public interest and operates non-commercial activities...

  7. Inflation Forecast Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Gersbach, Hans; Hahn, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new type of incentive contract for central bankers: inflation forecast contracts, which make central bankers’ remunerations contingent on the precision of their inflation forecasts. We show that such contracts enable central bankers to influence inflation expectations more effectively, thus facilitating more successful stabilization of current inflation. Inflation forecast contracts improve the accuracy of inflation forecasts, but have adverse consequences for output. On balanc...

  8. [Psychological contract in the light of flexible employment: The review of studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żołnierczyk-Zreda, Dorota

    Changing employment relations between employees and employers due to the increasing employment flexibility have contributed to the development of a new paradigm to analyze these relations based on the concept of psychological contract. This paradigm might be particularly relevant in Poland where the employment flexibility understood as the number of workers with temporary contracts is the highest in Europe. In this paper the concept of psychological contract is presented along with the existing findings related to its range, balance and contract fulfilment vs. contract breach. The results of studies showing the differences in psychological contract of temporary and permanent workers are also presented. The majority of them indicate that psychological contracts of temporary workers are limited in their extent, less balanced and asymmetric (to workers' disadvantage), as well as more transactional in their nature than those of permanent workers. The temporary workers' well-being and attitudes towards work and their reaction to psychological contract breach largely depends on their preferences for this type of employment, on their qualifications and on a labor market situation. Med Pr 2016;67(4):529-536. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  9. Approach to derive doses for case-control studies of lung cancer and leukaemia among workers internally exposed to uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Berard, Philippe; Bingham, Derek; Blanchardon, Eric; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cecile; Birchall, Alan; Puncher, Matthew; Bull, Richard; Hurtgen, Christian; Riddell, Tony; Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Case-control studies are currently conducted in 3 European countries (Belgium, France and the United Kingdom) to estimate the risk of lung cancer and leukaemia in relation to internal exposure to uranium and plutonium amongst workers in the nuclear industry. The project requires calculating doses absorbed by the lung and the bone marrow for many hundreds of cases and controls internally exposed. In order to establish a common approach to dose reconstruction, a detailed dosimetry protocol and a database of individual exposure were set up and will be presented. The dose reconstruction relies heavily on bioassay data, which are usually urine analysis, extending back over 50 years in some cases. Inevitably, data obtained over such a time span are of variable quality. It is important to review the monitoring practices at the various laboratories and to assess the reliability of these data in order to estimate possible biases as well as random uncertainties. Another key step in the reconstruction process is to decide upon the likely intake regimes consistent with the data. Generally, chronic intakes will be assumed and acute intakes will be added only when their existence is supported by operational data. Biokinetic models are used both to calculate intakes from bioassay data and to convert intakes to doses. The ICRP publication 66 respiratory tract model will be used along with the latest systemic models described by ICRP. These will be supplemented by the Leggett 2005 model for plutonium. These various models will be implemented by the code IMBA-Expert. Since it is essential to obtain central estimates for the doses, a particular problem is encountered with datasets consisting only of values below the limit of detection. For these cases Bayesian statistics will be employed using a non-informative prior probability distribution. (author)

  10. A global perspective on foreign contract labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, J E; Casco, R R

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides a general overview on foreign contract labor. The growth in the use of foreign contract labor is described with reference to other types of international labor movements such as 1) illegal, undocumented, or irregular migration; 2) free migration; and 3) permanent settlement migration. Within this general context, the various national advantages and disadvantages of contract labor are outlined. Particular issues like the role of trade unions and the likely future international labor circulation are noted. The 1984 World Labour Report estimates a global stock of almost 22 million foreign workers. Despite lack of reliable data, the size of irregular labor flows is considerable. More than 4 million undocumented workers, primarily Mexicans, can be found in the US alone. Other major flows of illegal labor go from China to Hong Kong, Malaysia to Singapore, Columbia to Venezuela, and poor Arab countries to oil-exporting countries in the Middle East. Laws are often poorly enforced and contradictory. Employers often actively recruit illegal migrants. While permanent migration was formerly the primary source of foreign workers, the numbers migrating in this manner are decreasing significantly. In absolute terms, host countries gain considerably more through the use of contract labor than sending countries. The pervasive commitment of national governments to economic growth is a prime consideration in the decision to import foreign labor. In general, trade unions have created an environment wherein the use of foreign labor in the formal as opposed to the informal labor market is more difficult. The disadvantages of labor export include the costs of family separation, worker exploitation, and cultural alienation. Remittances constitute the most tangible return of labor export. In many countries they have made a very considerable impact on the balance of payments deficit.

  11. Contract law as fairness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijnsma, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the implications for contract law of Rawls' theory of justice as fairness. It argues that contract law as an institution is part of the basic structure of society and as such subject to the principles of justice. Discussing the basic structure in relation to contract law is

  12. Contracting for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, C.M.

    1981-10-01

    This paper deals with uranium sales contracts, i.e. with contractual arrangements in the first steps of the fuel cycle, which cover uranium production and conversion. The various types of contract are described and, where appropriate, their underlying business philosophy and their main terms and conditions. Finally, the specific common features of such contracts are reviewed. (NEA) [fr

  13. Other enrichment related contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to long-term enrichment contracts, DOE has other types of contracts: (1) short-term, fixed-commitment enrichment contract; (2) emergency sales agreement for enriched uranium; (3) feed material lease agreement; (4) enriched uranium storage agreement; and (5) feed material usage agreement

  14. Mobile Applications for Knowledge Workers and Field Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stieglitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the diffusion of mobile applications (mobile apps has risen significantly. Nowadays, mobile business apps are strongly emerging in business, enhancing productivity and employees’ satisfaction, whilst the usage of customized individual enterprise apps is still an exception. Standardized business apps enable basic functionalities, for example, mobile data storage and exchange (e.g., Dropbox, communication (e.g., Skype, and other routine processes, which support mobile workers. In addition, mobile apps can, for example, increase the flexibility of mobile workers by easing the access to firm’s information from outside the enterprise and by enabling ubiquitous collaboration. Hence, mobile apps can generate competitive advantages and can increase work efficiency on a broad scale. But mobile workers form no coherent group. Our research reveals, based on two case studies, that they can be clustered into two groups: knowledge workers and field workers. Knowledge workers and field workers fulfill different tasks and work in different environments. Hence, they have different requirements for mobile support. In this paper we conclude that standardized mobile business apps cannot meet the different requirements of various groups of mobile workers. Task- and firm-specific (individualized requirements determine the specification, implementation, and application of mobile apps.

  15. The web of silence: a qualitative case study of early intervention and support for healthcare workers with mental ill-health

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a high rate of stress and mental illness among healthcare workers, yet many continue to work despite symptoms that affect their performance. Workers with mental health issues are typically ostracized and do not get the support that they need. If issues are not addressed, however, they could become worse and compromise the health and safety, not only of the worker, but his/her colleagues and patients. Early identification and support can improve work outcomes and facilitate...

  16. Policies on smoking in the casino workplace and their impact on smoking behavior among employees: Case study of casino workers in Macao

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, S. H.; Pilkington, P.; Wan, Y. K. P.; Faculty of Business Administration, University of Macao; Institute for Sustainability, Health and Environment, UWE

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) is a major health concern, contributing to a range of adverse health effects. Workers in the hospitality industry are often exposed to increased levels of SHS in the workplace, and casino workers in particular have been shown to be exposed to high levels of SHS. During the past decade, authorities worldwide have introduced smoke-free legislation in enclosed public places, primarily to protect workers from the harmful effects of SHS. Importantly, implementat...

  17. Job insecurity and well-being in the temporary workforce : Testing volition and contract expectations as boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhard-Oettel, C.; Rigotti, T.; Clinton, M.; de Jong, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether temporary contract volition and workers' expectations for contract renewal are boundary conditions to explain differences in temporary workers' job insecurity feelings and well-being. It is hypothesized that (1) low volition through higher job insecurity indirectly

  18. Reestruturação produtiva e saúde do trabalhador: um estudo de caso Restructuring of production and workers' health: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Silvia Monteiro

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo de caso em uma empresa tendo como objetos da pesquisa a forma de administração praticada e os trabalhadores da área de produção, e como objetivo identificar os possíveis efeitos das estratégias participativas no trabalho sobre a saúde dos trabalhadores. Analisaram-se dados relativos à empresa: histórico, características da administração praticada, organização da produção e do processo de trabalho; e também dados relacionados aos trabalhadores da área de produção: idade, grau de escolaridade, percepção sobre o trabalho, vida familiar, vida social, lazer e morbidade referida. Concluiu-se que as características da administração praticada tiveram origem nas idéias vindas do Japão, incluindo a flexibilização da produção, a terceirização, a polivalência e a participação no trabalho. Para os trabalhadores, a participação no trabalho foi sempre referida de forma ambígua, alguns relatando efeitos positivos, como maior liberdade e respeito, com boas repercussões na vida dentro e fora do trabalho. Para uma parte da população estudada, as características da organização do trabalho praticada na empresa têm efeitos deletérios sobre sua saúde, gerando queixas de dificuldade para dormir, nervosismo, sonhos com o trabalho, dores de cabeça etc.We performed a case study on a company focusing on the form of management and the shop floor workers, in order to identify the possible effects of participant work strategies on workers' health. Data on the company included its history, type of management, and organization of both production and the work process. Data on shop floor workers included age, schooling, perceptions of work, family life, recreation, and self-reported disease history. We concluded that the characteristics of the management model adopted by the company originated from ideas imported from Japan, including flexibilization of production, outsourcing, performance of multiple tasks

  19. Duration in Production Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, James M.; Korb, Penelope J.

    2006-01-01

    We use 2003 and 2004 ARMS data to analyze variations in contract duration among growers of broilers who hold production contracts. Most contracts cover just a single flock, but many extend for 1-2 years, and a significant minority of broiler contracts specify lengths of 5, 10, and even 15 years. We find that grower debt and production volume are inversely related to the choice of a short term (a year or less) contract, while lengthy prior experience with the contractor promotes short term con...

  20. Procurement Integrity in Contingency Operations: A Case Study of Army Contracting Officer Corruption in Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom Utilizing Occupational Fraud Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Army CCOs (Majors Momon, Murray, and Pressley), while another (Major Davis) committed suicide after confessing to an Army investigator that she had...result was an Army contracting workforce that was “understaffed, overworked , under-trained, under-supported, and … most importantly, under-valued...Congress, noted that the fraud which occurred in OIF and OEF was in large part due to “the lack of oversight and being overworked , a small office with

  1. Negotiating Efficient PPP Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvarnø, Christina D.

    . An opportunity the member states should consider using when procuring a PPP. This paper looks at the negotiation and contracting of a PPP in an economic theoretical and EU public procurement perspective and discusses how to establish an efficient PPP contract under a strong public law doctrine. Governments......This paper concerns Public Private Partnership (PPP) contracts in concern to the coming new 2014/24IEU public procurement directive. The new EU public procurement directive gives the public authority the opportunity to negotiate PPPs much more when they are implemented in national law...... procurement law. Furthermore, the paper seeks to establish a connection between public law, private law and the efficient PPP contract by drawing upon economic theory and empirical contract data from UK, US and Danish partnering contracts from the construction industry and the aim of contracting joint utility...

  2. Patient-, health worker-, and health facility-level determinants of correct malaria case management at publicly funded health facilities in Malawi: results from a nationally representative health facility survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Laura C; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Wolkon, Adam; Luka, Madalitso; Luhanga, Misheck; Sande, John; Oyugi, Jessica; Ali, Doreen; Mathanga, Don; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-02-20

    Prompt and effective case management is needed to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. However, malaria diagnosis and treatment is a multistep process that remains problematic in many settings, resulting in missed opportunities for effective treatment as well as overtreatment of patients without malaria. Prior to the widespread roll-out of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in late 2011, a national, cross-sectional, complex-sample, health facility survey was conducted in Malawi to assess patient-, health worker-, and health facility-level factors associated with malaria case management quality using multivariate Poisson regression models. Among the 2,019 patients surveyed, 34% had confirmed malaria defined as presence of fever and parasitaemia on a reference blood smear. Sixty-seven per cent of patients with confirmed malaria were correctly prescribed the first-line anti-malarial, with most cases of incorrect treatment due to missed diagnosis; 31% of patients without confirmed malaria were overtreated with an anti-malarial. More than one-quarter of patients were not assessed for fever or history of fever by health workers. The most important determinants of correct malaria case management were patient-level clinical symptoms, such as spontaneous complaint of fever to health workers, which increased both correct treatment and overtreatment by 72 and 210%, respectively (pfacility-level factors were significantly associated with case management quality. Introduction of RDTs holds potential to improve malaria case management in Malawi, but health workers must systematically assess all patients for fever, and then test and treat accordingly, otherwise, malaria control programmes might miss an opportunity to dramatically improve malaria case management, despite better diagnostic tools.

  3. The 3rd annual Australian contract mining conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Papers discussed: the termination of contract debate - implications for the industry; contract industry`s outlook; viability of contract mining at ERA`s Ranger mine in the Northern Territory; obtaining superior operational performance, and reducing risk, using mining contractors; industry consolidation, contracts and market trends; mining equipment financing - the operating lease alternative; Portman Mining Ltd.; development of contract mining within the coal operations of Eastern Australia; case study - Thiess. contractors` experience in operating the Collinsville coal mine for the MIM/Itochu joint venture; integrating contractor management on mines with duty of care; the risk variables; and conflicting objectives - mine optimisation and the underground contract.

  4. Marketization of Care and Gendered Cross-Border Migration from Indonesia to Malaysia: The Case of Indonesian Female Migrant Domestic Workers in/to Malaysia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kimura (Kenji)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction For the last two decades, the rights of domestic workers have drawn attention from academia, policy makers, NGO workers and human rights activists. The International Labour Organization (ILO) (2011) estimates that there are currently 53 to 100 million domestic

  5. On the Distribution of Worker Productivity: The Case for Teacher Effectiveness and Student Achievement. CEDR Working Paper. WP #2016-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan; Startz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    It is common to assume that worker productivity is normally distributed, but this assumption is rarely if ever tested. We estimate the distribution of worker productivity where individual productivity is measured with error, using the productivity of elementary school teachers as an example. Proposals to improve teacher productivity often focus on…

  6. Influenza vaccine effectiveness among healthcare workers in comparison to hospitalized patients: A 2004-2009 case-test, negative-control, prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhems, P; Baghdadi, Y; Roche, S; Bénet, T; Regis, C; Lina, B; Robert, O; Voirin, N; Ecochard, R; Amour, S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate Vaccine Effectiveness (VE) in healthcare workers (HCW) and to compare VE between patients and HCW. A case-control investigation based on the prospective study was conducted between 2004 and 2009 in a teaching hospital. All HCW with influenza-like illness (ILI) from participating units (n = 24) were included, and vaccination status was characterized by interview. A total of 150 HCW presented ILI; 130 (87%) were female, 27 (18%) were positive for influenza, and 42 (28%) were vaccinated. Adjusted VE was 89% (95% CI 39 to 98). Among patients, adjusted VE was 42% (95% CI −39 to 76). The difference of VE (VEhcw - VEpat) was 46.15% (95% CI 2.41 to 144). The VE ratio (VEhcw / VEpat) was 2.09 (95% CI −1.60 to 134.17). Influenza VE differed between HCW and patients when the flu season was taken into account. This finding confirms the major impact of host determinants on influenza VE. PMID:26327520

  7. Community health workers providing government community case management for child survival in sub-Saharan Africa: who are they and what are they expected to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Asha; Young, Mark; Nefdt, Rory; Basu, Roshni; Sylla, Mariame; Clarysse, Guy; Bannicq, Marika Yip; de Sousa, Alexandra; Binkin, Nancy; Diaz, Theresa

    2012-11-01

    We describe community health workers (CHWs) in government community case management (CCM) programs for child survival across sub-Saharan Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, 91% of 44 United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) offices responded to a cross-sectional survey in 2010. Frequencies describe CHW profiles and activities in government CCM programs (N = 29). Although a few programs paid CHWs a salary or conversely, rewarded CHWs purely on a non-financial basis, most programs combined financial and non-financial incentives and had training for 1 week. Not all programs allowed CHWs to provide zinc, use timers, dispense antibiotics, or use rapid diagnostic tests. Many CHWs undertake health promotion, but fewer CHWs provide soap, water treatment products, indoor residual spraying, or ready-to-use therapeutic foods. For newborn care, very few promote kangaroo care, and they do not provide antibiotics or resuscitation. Even if CHWs are as varied as the health systems in which they work, more work must be done in terms of the design and implementation of the CHW programs for them to realize their potential.

  8. [Is it possible to sustain health promotion programs in private companies? The case of four Quebec private companies of blue collar workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Angèle; Filion, Gilbert; Labrie, Louise; Bouteiller, Dominique; Perreault, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Sustained health promotion programmes in the workplace (HPPW) continues to be a public health challenge. This article presents an evaluation of the implementation and sustainability of such programmes in private blue-collar companies in Quebec to shed light on issues specific to this type of setting. A multiple case (4 sites), longitudinal (7 years) and interpretive study method was used. The interpretation framework considered that the implementation and sustainability of HPPW in companies are the result of organizational learning in health promotion, determined by the strategies of individuals in a position of control who shape the decisional processes related to these programmes. After seven years of observation, two of the four sites had continued their HPPW, although these programmes were no longer applied within these companies. The health promotion organizational learning processes in both sites were defined according to targeted organizational purposes set by the decision-makers who supported HPPW. However, these gains were largely lost when HPPW were no longer retained as a component of their organizational development strategy. The organizational conditions that are conducive to HPPW are difficult to put together and sustain in companies like those in our study. Businesses implement these programmes mainly for the organizational benefits they expect to reap in the short term, whereas improvement in the health of workers in the longer term is not a priority.

  9. The expected and actual communication of health care workers during the management of intrapartum: An interpretive multiple case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen K.M. M'Rithaa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Daily activities within a health care organisation are mediated by information communication processes (ICP involving multiple health care professionals at different levels of care. Effective perinatal management requires critical information to be accurately communicated. If there is a breakdown in this communication patient safety is at risk for various reasons such as: inadequate critical information, misconception of information and uninformed decisions being made. The purpose of this study was to interpret the complexities around ICP in order to contribute to the effective management of the intrapartum period. Methods: Multi method, multiple case study approach was used to understand the ICP during the management of the intrapartum period. During the study, the expected ICP, the actual ICP, the challenges involved and the desired ICP were analysed. Twenty-four in-depth interviews with skilled birth attendants (SBAs employing observer-as-participant roles, field notes, and document review methods were utilised to gather the data. Thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data using Atlas TI software. Results: The study revealed three subthemes which emerged from the expected ICP, whilst three others that emerged formed the theme actual ICP. The subthemes from the expected ICP included: accessibility of obstetric services, expected referral, recommended tools, expected communication and expected documentation. The theme actual ICP held threee merging subthemes: the handover processes, collaborative information seeking, information communicated and referral processes. Conclusion: This study showed that what was expected was not what was actually happening. The requirements of the policies and protocols need to be effectively implemented to improve practice building these into current biomedical guidelines.

  10. New staff contract policy

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  11. Contract Design: Financial Options and Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Amelung, Volker E; Juhnke, Christin

    2018-01-12

    (panel) into account. The first two articles of this series on contract design have shown that complete contracts in healthcare are unrealistic. Healthcare reimbursement contracts are incomplete contracts with a high degree of uncertainty. In incomplete contracts specific contractual regulations are not made for any eventuality. For this reason it is important that the parties agree on the prevention of endogenous risks (asymmetric information after the conclusion of the contract) and on the procedure in the case of unforeseen circumstances (the risks of random, parameter risk and change risks to the healthcare program).

  12. Copyright Preemption of Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Bohannan, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This Article argues that both courts and scholars are wrong in their categorical approaches to preemption of contracts under the Copyright Act, and proposes an intermediate approach that recognizes the importance of both contract rights and federal policy in preemption analysis. First, it argues that both courts and scholars have misapplied preemption law to breach of contract claims. Although the two sides tend to favor opposite results, they take equally categorical approaches. Categori...

  13. What do community health workers have to say about their work, and how can this inform improved programme design? A case study with CHWs within Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Martin; Geniets, Anne; Winters, Niall; Rega, Isabella; Mbae, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are used increasingly in the world to address shortages of health workers and the lack of a pervasive national health system. However, while their role is often described at a policy level, it is not clear how these ideals are instantiated in practice, how best to support this work, or how the work is interpreted by local actors. CHWs are often spoken about or spoken for, but there is little evidence of CHWs' own characterisation of their practice, which raises questions for global health advocates regarding power and participation in CHW programmes. This paper addresses this issue. A case study approach was undertaken in a series of four steps. Firstly, groups of CHWs from two communities met and reported what their daily work consisted of. Secondly, individual CHWs were interviewed so that they could provide fuller, more detailed accounts of their work and experiences; in addition, community health extension workers and community health committee members were interviewed, to provide alternative perspectives. Thirdly, notes and observations were taken in community meetings and monthly meetings. The data were then analysed thematically, creating an account of how CHWs describe their own work, and the tensions and challenges that they face. The thematic analysis of the interview data explored the structure of CHW's work, in terms of the frequency and range of visits, activities undertaken during visits (monitoring, referral, etc.) and the wider context of their work (links to the community and health service, limited training, coordination and mutual support through action and discussion days, etc.), and provided an opportunity for CHWs to explain their motivations, concerns and how they understood their role. The importance of these findings as a contribution to the field is evidenced by the depth and detail of their descriptive power. One important aspect of this is that CHWs' accounts of both successes and challenges involved

  14. What do community health workers have to say about their work, and how can this inform improved programme design? A case study with CHWs within Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community health workers (CHWs are used increasingly in the world to address shortages of health workers and the lack of a pervasive national health system. However, while their role is often described at a policy level, it is not clear how these ideals are instantiated in practice, how best to support this work, or how the work is interpreted by local actors. CHWs are often spoken about or spoken for, but there is little evidence of CHWs’ own characterisation of their practice, which raises questions for global health advocates regarding power and participation in CHW programmes. This paper addresses this issue. Design: A case study approach was undertaken in a series of four steps. Firstly, groups of CHWs from two communities met and reported what their daily work consisted of. Secondly, individual CHWs were interviewed so that they could provide fuller, more detailed accounts of their work and experiences; in addition, community health extension workers and community health committee members were interviewed, to provide alternative perspectives. Thirdly, notes and observations were taken in community meetings and monthly meetings. The data were then analysed thematically, creating an account of how CHWs describe their own work, and the tensions and challenges that they face. Results: The thematic analysis of the interview data explored the structure of CHW's work, in terms of the frequency and range of visits, activities undertaken during visits (monitoring, referral, etc. and the wider context of their work (links to the community and health service, limited training, coordination and mutual support through action and discussion days, etc., and provided an opportunity for CHWs to explain their motivations, concerns and how they understood their role. The importance of these findings as a contribution to the field is evidenced by the depth and detail of their descriptive power. One important aspect of this is that CHWs

  15. Differences between health-promoting lifestyle among sex worker with substance use and non-substance use women (Case study in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Damirchi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The high risks behaviors in sex worker women have a strong relationship with substance use. In addition, lifestyle has a key role in prevalence of social problems. Therefore, the aim of current study is to investigate the differences between health-promoting lifestyle among women sex workers with substance and non-substance use.Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive correlation research. The 120 women including 60 sex worker with substance use and 60 non-substance use women who were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran in 2016. They completed the Health- Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP. Data was analyzed by utilizing multivariate analysis of variance. SPSS software version 20 was used.Results: The results indicated that there was a the higher mean scores in nutrition and interpersonal sub-scales in non-substance use women than sex worker women (P=0.001. In addition, in spiritual level (P=0.001, responsibility (P=0.008 and Stress Management (P=0.015 in non-substance women had lower scores than substance use women sex-worker.Conclusion: These findings indicated that even though the life style in two group of sex worker women was unhealthy and unsafe but, in life style components in two women sex worker with and without substance abuse were different.

  16. Smart contracts sobre Bitcoin

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu Alemany, Josep Miquel

    2016-01-01

    El present treball final de màster realitza una introducció als smart contracts. El treball introdueix el concepte de contracte intel·ligent, els seus usos i alguns exemples existents. Seguidament proporciona les nocions necessàries de les transaccions del protocol Bitcoin per poder implementar un contracte intel·ligent, usant la blockchain que ofereix el protocol. Per últim, s'explica la implementació d'un contracte intel·ligent usant bitcoin: un canal de micropagaments. El presente traba...

  17. MEDIATION CLAUSE IN COMMERCIAL CONTRACTS (THE ADVANTAGES OF MEDIATION CLAUSE IN COMMERCIAL CONTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Florinel Augustin Ignat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It often happens that the end of the contracts to be existing commercial relationships and a new contract has already intuitu personae character. But not always the case, that those who enter into legal commercial forcing consideration to the benefits and under commercial contracts, know the dealer or individual that established commercial relations. These traders resort to contractual conditions which states precisely the extent of the obligations assumed by each party, setting rules, deadlines, penalties and even ways of interpretation of contracts. Contracting Parties, namely traders aware that the law is the contract parties by special caluze invest ( to settle disputes concerning the interpretation or punishment for failure and even termination obligations tribunalule arbitration courts or the territorial and material .

  18. Cost-effectiveness of a participatory return-to-work intervention for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Sylvia J; Anema, Johannes R; Schellart, Antonius J M; van Mechelen, Willem; van der Beek, Allard J

    2010-03-28

    Within the working population there is a vulnerable group: workers without an employment contract and workers with a flexible labour market arrangement, e.g. temporary agency workers. In most cases, when sick-listed, these workers have no workplace/employer to return to. Also, for these workers access to occupational health care is limited or even absent in many countries. For this vulnerable working population there is a need for tailor-made occupational health care, including the presence of an actual return-to-work perspective. Therefore, a participatory return-to-work program has been developed based on a successful return-to-work intervention for workers, sick-listed due to low back pain.The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial to study the (cost-)effectiveness of this newly developed participatory return-to-work program adapted for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers, sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders, compared to usual care. The design of this study is a randomised controlled trial with one year of follow-up. The study population consists of temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed between 2 and 8 weeks due to musculoskeletal disorders. The new return-to-work program is a stepwise program aimed at making a consensus-based return-to-work implementation plan with the possibility of a (therapeutic) workplace to return-to-work. Outcomes are measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is duration of the sickness benefit period after the first day of reporting sick. Secondary outcome measures are: time until first return-to-work, total number of days of sickness benefit during follow-up; functional status; intensity of musculoskeletal pain; pain coping; and attitude, social influence and self-efficacy determinants. Cost-benefit is evaluated from an insurer's perspective. A process evaluation is part of this study. For sick-listed workers without an

  19. Cost-effectiveness of a participatory return-to-work intervention for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the working population there is a vulnerable group: workers without an employment contract and workers with a flexible labour market arrangement, e.g. temporary agency workers. In most cases, when sick-listed, these workers have no workplace/employer to return to. Also, for these workers access to occupational health care is limited or even absent in many countries. For this vulnerable working population there is a need for tailor-made occupational health care, including the presence of an actual return-to-work perspective. Therefore, a participatory return-to-work program has been developed based on a successful return-to-work intervention for workers, sick-listed due to low back pain. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial to study the (cost-effectiveness of this newly developed participatory return-to-work program adapted for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers, sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders, compared to usual care. Methods/Design The design of this study is a randomised controlled trial with one year of follow-up. The study population consists of temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed between 2 and 8 weeks due to musculoskeletal disorders. The new return-to-work program is a stepwise program aimed at making a consensus-based return-to-work implementation plan with the possibility of a (therapeutic workplace to return-to-work. Outcomes are measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is duration of the sickness benefit period after the first day of reporting sick. Secondary outcome measures are: time until first return-to-work, total number of days of sickness benefit during follow-up; functional status; intensity of musculoskeletal pain; pain coping; and attitude, social influence and self-efficacy determinants. Cost-benefit is evaluated from an insurer's perspective. A process evaluation is

  20. Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act 1970 and labour market flexibility: An exploratory assessment of contract labour use in India's formal manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Deb Kusum; Choudhury, Homagni; Singh, Jaivir

    2015-01-01

    One particularly significant piece of labour legislation in India is the Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act, 1970 (CLA,1970), which regulates labour hired by firms through the offices of a labour contractor - such labour being referred to as 'contract' labour in India. This paper seeks to examine this Act and its implication for manufacturing employment in India. While empirical evidence seems to indicate the presence of large number of 'contract' workers in the Indian manufacturi...

  1. Contract on using computer resources of another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Mihajlo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contractual relations involving the use of another's property are quite common. Yet, the use of computer resources of others over the Internet and legal transactions arising thereof certainly diverge from the traditional framework embodied in the special part of contract law dealing with this issue. Modern performance concepts (such as: infrastructure, software or platform as high-tech services are highly unlikely to be described by the terminology derived from Roman law. The overwhelming novelty of high-tech services obscures the disadvantageous position of contracting parties. In most cases, service providers are global multinational companies which tend to secure their own unjustified privileges and gain by providing lengthy and intricate contracts, often comprising a number of legal documents. General terms and conditions in these service provision contracts are further complicated by the '.service level agreement', rules of conduct and (nonconfidentiality guarantees. Without giving the issue a second thought, users easily accept the pre-fabricated offer without reservations, unaware that such a pseudo-gratuitous contract actually conceals a highly lucrative and mutually binding agreement. The author examines the extent to which the legal provisions governing sale of goods and services, lease, loan and commodatum may apply to 'cloud computing' contracts, and analyses the scope and advantages of contractual consumer protection, as a relatively new area in contract law. The termination of a service contract between the provider and the user features specific post-contractual obligations which are inherent to an online environment.

  2. Accommodation training in foreign workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masumi; Miyao, Masaru; Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    By relaxing the contracted focus-adjustment muscles around the eyeball, known as the ciliary and extraocular muscles, the degree of pseudomyopia can be reduced. This understanding has led to accommodation training in which a visual target is presented in stereoscopic video clips. However, it has been pointed out that motion sickness can be induced by viewing stereoscopic video clips. In Measurement 1 of the present study, we verified whether the new 3D technology reduced the severity of motion sickness in accordance with stabilometry. We then evaluated the short-term effects of accommodation training using new stereoscopic video clips on foreign workers (11 females) suffering from eye fatigue in Measurement 2. The foreign workers were trained for three days. As a result, visual acuity was statistically improved by continuous accommodation training, which will help promote ciliary muscle stretching.

  3. Consistency Checking of Web Service Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambronero, M. Emilia; Okika, Joseph C.; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural properties are analyzed for web service contracts formulated in Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) and Choreography Description Language (CDL). The key result reported is an automated technique to check consistency between protocol aspects of the contracts. The contracts...... are abstracted to (timed) automata and from there a simulation is set up, which is checked using automated tools for analyzing networks of finite state processes. Here we use the Concurrency Work Bench. The proposed techniques are illustrated with a case study that include otherwise difficult to analyze fault...

  4. Client Abuse to Public Welfare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig; Korczynski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We analyse a case study of workers’ experience of client abuse in a Danish public welfare organisation. We make an original contribution by putting forward two different theoretical expectations of the case. One expectation is that the case follows a pattern of customer abuse processes in a social...... patterns of customer abuse associated with a liberal market economy – in which the customer is treated as sovereign against the relatively powerless worker, and in which workers bear heavy emotional costs of abuse. Our findings show a greater match to the social processes of abuse within a social market...... market economy – in which workers are accorded power and resources, in which workers tend to frame the abuse as the outcome of a co-citizen caught in system failure and in which workers demonstrate some resilience to abuse. Another expectation is that New Public Management reforms push the case to follow...

  5. NGO field workers in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Haroon SIDDIQUE

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available NGOs came into the society in their present form after World War II and more precisely in 1960s. Before that also different forms of philanthropy existed. Like elsewhere in the world, in Pakistan also state and the market were the two sectors catering for different needs of the people. When foreign funding started coming into the poor countries, the channel of NGOs was considered more appropriate including the fact they had roots in the society and the benefit could reach the far flung areas. NGO field workers are the real actors in the NGOs’ activities but sadly the NGOs those raise the slogans of working for the destitute do not bother to facilitate the NGO field workers. Eventually the NGO field workers are facing problems of job insecurity, poor salary structure, unhealthy working environment and even harassment especially in case of women NGO field workers in Pakistan

  6. Decompression sickness in caisson workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghawabi, Samir H. El; Mansour, Mohamed B.; Youssef, Fatma L.; Ghawabi, Mohamed H. El; Latif, Mohamed M. Abd El

    1971-01-01

    El Ghawabi, S. H., Mansour, M. B., Youssef, F. L., El Ghawabi, M. H., and Abd El Latif, M. M. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 323-329. Decompression sickness in caisson workers. An investigation of 55 bridge construction workers is reported. The overall bends rate was 0·97%. (The term `bends' as used in this study is defined in the paper.) Chokes were encountered in 67·27% of workers. A clinical, haematological, and radiological study was performed. Definite bony changes were found in 43·6% of all workers; 91·6% of these had lesions around the elbow. The presence of dense areas in the neck of the scapula is reported in two cases for the first time. The relatively high haematocrit value is thought to play a part in the pathogenesis of bone infarction through its relation with blood viscosity. Images PMID:5124832

  7. Democratic contract law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the normative relationship between contract law and democracy. In particular, it argues that in order to be legitimate contract law needs to have a democratic basis. Private law is not different in this respect from public law. Thus, the first claim made in this article will

  8. Contract Teachers in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sangeeta; Pandey, Priyanka

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we use non-experimental data from government schools in Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh, two of the largest Indian states, to present average school outcomes by contract status of teachers. We find that contract teachers are associated with higher effort than civil service teachers with permanent tenures, before as well as after…

  9. Whither Performance Contracting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Norman S.

    This report describes briefly performance contracts; discusses their shortcomings, pitfalls, and advantages; and gives some insight into the future development of this new concept. Two shortcomings of performance contracting include (1) teaching to the test and (2) board abdication of its responsibility for making final decisions about educational…

  10. Comparing contracting performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian

    . Hypotheses are suggested for the role of culture, competition, contracts, capabilities and collaboration for contracting performance between and across the countries. Arguments are tested against data from on four comparable national surveys of private delivery of park and road maintenance services in local...

  11. BOT Outsourcing Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Petersen, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Build-operate-transfer (BOT) contracting has been widely usen in the engineering and construction industry, but has only recently been introduced in services industry domains. Notably, service provider firms from emerging markets have recently started offering BOT outsourcing contracts. In this p...

  12. IAEA research contracts. Third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports in the field of Radioactive waste management and environmental research included are: Research Contract No.20. Studies in the uptake of radioisotopes by edible marine products; Research Contract No. 33, Behaviour of fission products in soil; Research Contract No.100, Ionic interaction near clay surfaces. Reports dealing with Health physics and radiation protection presented are: Research Contract No.14, The effect of radiation on plant cells and its modification with protective substances; Research Contract No.32, Determination of the enrichment factors of calcium isotopes on ion exchange resins and the investigation of the various systems of electrolytic separation; Research Contract No. 53, Selection of sulphydryl compounds for radiation protection, using a new microbiological method; Research Contract No. 79, A study of the uptake of radioactive calcium in the skeleton. Reports related to Radiobiology are: Research Contract No.11, Genetical investigations on the effect of ionizing radiation on human cells

  13. IAEA research contracts. Third annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-04-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports in the field of Radioactive waste management and environmental research included are: Research Contract No.20. Studies in the uptake of radioisotopes by edible marine products; Research Contract No. 33, Behaviour of fission products in soil; Research Contract No.100, Ionic interaction near clay surfaces. Reports dealing with Health physics and radiation protection presented are: Research Contract No.14, The effect of radiation on plant cells and its modification with protective substances; Research Contract No.32, Determination of the enrichment factors of calcium isotopes on ion exchange resins and the investigation of the various systems of electrolytic separation; Research Contract No. 53, Selection of sulphydryl compounds for radiation protection, using a new microbiological method; Research Contract No. 79, A study of the uptake of radioactive calcium in the skeleton. Reports related to Radiobiology are: Research Contract No.11, Genetical investigations on the effect of ionizing radiation on human cells

  14. Hybrid classification: the case of the acquisition procedure documentation within and ouside the Public Contracts information systems in Alto Adige Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Delneri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With reference to the acquisition procedures, the related documentation is created and managed mostly on the platform of the subcontracting institution, partly on the Alto Adige Public Sector Contracts information system. With a partial integration between this system and the platform made available by the Agenzia per i procedimenti e la vigilanza in materia di contratti pubblici di lavori, servizi e forniture, classification and filing information can be assigned to the documents coming from both platform, while the reunification of documents related to the same process is transferred to the preservation system as unique archive of the administration.

  15. Importance of Close Follow-Up in the Fetus with Premature Atrial Contractions Accompanied by Atrial Septal Aneurysm: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Yozgat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhythms that derive from parts of atria other than the sinus node are called premature atrial contractions (PACs. Vast majority of fetal PACs are idiopathic. Fetal PACs usually have a good prognosis and disappear spontaneously during pregnancy or after delivery. Development of fetal tachycardia or fetal bradycardia is rarely reported during follow-up of fetuses diagnosed with PACs. To the best of our knowledge, coexistence of tachycardia and bradycardia leading to hemodynamic impairment has not yet been reported. We present a fetus diagnosed with PACs and atrial septal aneurysm (ASA on the 23rd week of gestation proceeding to fetal bradycardia and fetal tachycardia and consequently hemodynamic impairment. We suggest closer follow-up of fetuses with PACs accompanied by ASA.

  16. Drilling contracts and incentives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmundsen, Petter; Sorenes, Terje; Toft, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Shortages of rigs and personnel have encouraged discussion of designing incentive contracts in the drilling sector. However, for the drilling contracts, there are not a large variety of contract types in use. This article describes and analyses incentives for drilling contractors. These are directly represented by the compensation formats utilised in the present and in the consecutive drilling contracts. Indirectly, incentives are also provided by the evaluation criteria that oil companies use for awarding drilling assignments. Changes in contract format pose a number of relevant questions relating to resource management, and the article takes an in-depth look at some of these. Do evaluation criteria for awarding drilling assignments encourage the development of new technology and solutions? How will a stronger focus on drilling efficiency influence reservoir utilisation?

  17. Drilling contract issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, G.B.; Worden, D.R.; Borbridge, G.K.D.

    1997-01-01

    Some selected issues which are facing both operators and contractors in drilling for oil and gas, such as the allocation of risk by contract and by statute and the implementation of new technologies, were discussed. There are three varieties of written drilling contracts used in Canada: (1) day work and meterage contracts, (2) master drilling agreements, and (3) contracts that are used in construction projects that do not specifically relate to drilling. Issues relevant to the contractual allocation of risk, to implementing new drilling technologies, to reconciling contract and statute liability, and the formation of strategic alliances for mutual benefit, and the factors contributing to the success of such alliances were explored. 12 refs

  18. THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Giorgiana GRAMA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The psychological contract became known as a research paradigm within corporate research, providing a broad framework which explains the employee-company relations. Despite all this, there are still many debates on the concept and a series of criticism were expressed that led to the necessity of some more rigorous theoretical and empirical analysis. The psychological contract refers to the unwritten, implicit expectations that employees have from the company and vice versa; it is that which defines the things the employee expects from the employer. Consequently, each of the parties involved in the contract may have different perceptions on these commitments and obligations. Thus the psychological contract may be regarded as an exchange relation between the employer and the employee. Breaking the psychological contract affects the performance, the morale, and the motivation of the staff in a negative manner. The information presented in this paper is intended to contribute to the theoretical and methodological development of the concept.

  19. On the Specification of Full Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okika, Joseph; Ravn, Anders Peter; Fenech, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Contracts specify properties of an interface to a software component. We consider the problem of de ning a full contract that speci es not only the normal behaviour, but also special cases and tolerated exceptions. In this paper we focus on the behavioural properties of use cases taken from...... the Common Component Modelling Example (CoCoME), proposed as a benchmark to compare di erent component models. We rst give the full speci cation of the use cases in the deontic-based speci cation language CL, and then we concentrate on three particular properties in order to compare deontic and operational...

  20. Higher Education in Non-Standard Wage Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Luisa; Chelli, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to verify whether higher education increases the likelihood of young Italian workers moving from non-standard to standard wage contracts. Design/methodology/approach: The authors exploit a data set on labour market flows, produced by the Italian National Statistical Office, by interviewing about 85,000…

  1. Malaria case management by community health workers in the Central African Republic from 2009-2014: overcoming challenges of access and instability due to conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckstuhl, Laura; Lengeler, Christian; Moyen, Jean Méthode; Garro, Helle; Allan, Richard

    2017-09-29

    In the Central African Republic (CAR), decades of armed conflict have crippled the public health system. This has left the population without timely access to life-saving services and therefore vulnerable to the numerous consequences of infectious diseases, including malaria. As a response, in 2008 an international non-governmental organization started a network of community health workers (CHWs) in the highly malaria-endemic region of northwest CAR. The area has experienced years of violent clashes between rebel groups and seen hundreds of thousands of people displaced. Data from routine patient registers from 80 CHWs working in Paoua and Markounda sub-prefectures were entered and retrospectively reviewed. The time period covered December 2009-April 2014 and hence different stages of conflict and unrest. Several indicators were measured over time, including malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) positivity rates, CHW reporting rates, and malnutrition indicators. Among nearly 200,000 people who consulted a CHW during this period, 81% were found to be positive for malaria parasites by RDT. In total, 98.9% of these positive cases were appropriately treated with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Only 1.2% of RDT negative cases were incorrectly treated with an ACT. Monthly data from each CHW were regularly reported, with more than 96% of CHWs reporting each month in the first 3 years of the project. However, since the coup d'état in March 2013, the number of CHWs reporting each month decreased as the programme battled the additional constraints of civil war. Although the political crisis affected the CHWs, the programme showed that it could reach those most vulnerable and continue some level of care at all times. In addition, this programme revealed that surveillance could be maintained in conflict zones. This paper fills a significant gap in the knowledge of malaria control in CAR and this is especially important for agencies which must often decide in a

  2. Contract Award Decisions Resulting in Contract Termination for Default

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    .... Specifically, the audit focused on contracts terminated either for default or convenience and determined whether the contract terminations could have been averted based on information available before contract award...

  3. Control of telematic and informatics workers' activities: some legal-computing considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ziccardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the technological control of the workers is closely related to the improvement of technological tools. From an unsophisticated control mode, targeting the environment and operated through videocameras, the actual framework consists in embedded control tools strictly related to the technologies that are given to the workers for their daily activity.Thanks to software installed on network servers, mobile phones, tablets and computers, it is possibile now to operate a full control activity which do not distinguish, in most cases, between control over the data related to the employment contract and control over the personal data of the subject and over his private life. This article will address, from a legal informatics point of view, the most common tools to operate such controls.

  4. Wages of Non-regular Workers: Compensation for employment insecurity and lack of work flexibility (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    TSURU Kotaro; KUME Koichi; OHTAKE Fumio; OKUDAIRA Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    We examine survey-based evidence on the desired wage compensation of non-regular workers in response to employment insecurity and work flexibility. Comparing the compensation rate by work status, contract workers ask for the highest rate for employment insecurity while part time workers ask for the highest rate for work flexibility. We investigate the determinants of the compensation. Female, aged (over age 50), and risk averse workers are likely to ask for more compensation. Non-regular work...

  5. Temporary work and depressive symptoms in South Korean workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W; Kim, T-H; Lee, T-H; Ju, Y J; Chun, S Y; Park, E-C

    2017-08-01

    In many countries, including South Korea, labour market changes have led to an increase in unstable, temporary jobs. There is evidence that workers in such jobs may experience poorer mental health than those in more stable employment. To investigate the association between temporary employment and depressive symptoms in South Korean workers. We analysed data from the 2010-2014 Korean Welfare Panel Study (KOWEPS). Employment type was categorized into workers paid per day of labour (day labourers), those on short-term contracts (fixed-term workers) and permanent workers. The association between employment type and depressive symptoms, measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D 11), was examined using the generalized estimating equation model. A total of 3756 workers aged 20-59 were included in the 2010 baseline population. Day labourers had the highest mean CES-D 11 score, followed by fixed-term workers and permanent workers. With the day labourer group as reference, fixed-term workers (β: -1.5027, P < 0.001) and permanent workers (β: -2.1848, P < 0.001) showed statistically significant decreases in depression scores. Compared with day labourers, fixed-term workers and permanent workers had progressively lower depression scores. The findings of this study suggest that mental health inequalities based on employment type exist in South Korea. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. JURIDICAL WILL IN CONTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian CIONGARU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the business law, almost all judicial relationships of private law are obligational juridical relationships which are made up of legal acts and facts. The most important legal act is the contract since it is the basis of the social life in any community meaning that it represents the most important economic and juridical instrument for the participants to a contract. The persons are free and equal in society and, consequently, no power is valid and fundamental unless it relies on their consent, namely on a contract. So, the existence of a civil contract relies on the principles of consensualism, a perception based on moral rules to observe one’s promises, to have good faith and to observe the interests of your fellow creature. The exterior manifestation, the expression or declaration of the juridical will constitutes the consent of such person in making the structure of contract. The declared will must correspond to the person’s real will and the adoption and declaration of the juridical will must take place consciously. Any contract that does not derive from juridical will is null and the civilizing character is inexistent. The principles giving sense to consensualism is the one of agreement between parties so as to produce legal effects by itself and it is enough for the conclusion of a contract, regardless of the form in which it is exteriorized, a principle expressed by the Latin adagio pacta sunt servanda.

  7. Manual of contracts for the electricity sector. Contracts that work: Drafting and proper legal application. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoene, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This manual deals fundamentally with the drafting of contracts for the electricity sector. It covers all types of contracts on both the customer and the network side with their various special clauses and variants, specifically: basic supply, substitute supply, supply contracts for private, commercial and industrial special customers as well as redistributors, EFET contracts, network access contracts, supplier framework contracts, feed-in contracts, grid connection contracts and connection use contracts. The manual also addresses questions concerning electricity customer insolvency, an issue of growing importance. The following topics are furthermore dealt with in a practically oriented manner and with care being taken to explain the underlying legal issues in readily understandable language. What basic framework conditions are specified by the new energy economy laws and general civil law? What possibilities are available in drafting contracts and what are the ramifications in each case? What subject matters in a contract are of particular economic significance? How can concession contracts be designed in a market-conforming way when there is strong competition for qualified rights of way? What opportunities and risks are associated with innovative products? What options for action does a supplier have in the event of (threatening) customer insolvency? Model contracts from day-to-day management practice and tips, checklists and cautioning notes round off this manual.

  8. IAEA research contracts. Second annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No. 1, Factors controlling the distribution of fission products in the biosphere; Research Contract No. 4, The development of a method of non-destructive analysis to determine the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements that are in storage under water and that have been out of the reactor for periods of more than one month; Research Contract No. 5, Non-destructive method for evaluating the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements; Research Contract No. 19, Studies of contamination in local marine resources, and more specifically the determination of horizontal and vertical diffusion rates in Suruga Bay; Research Contract No. 22, A study of the uptake, accumulation and loss of radioactive material by marine bacteria; Research Contract No. 26, (a) Red cell life span in patients with congenital or acquired haemolytic anaemia using Cr-51 and pie-operative spleen scanning; (b) The aeriology of tropical iron deficiency anaemia using Fe-59 in

  9. IAEA research contracts. Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-07-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No. 1, Factors controlling the distribution of fission products in the biosphere; Research Contract No. 4, The development of a method of non-destructive analysis to determine the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements that are in storage under water and that have been out of the reactor for periods of more than one month; Research Contract No. 5, Non-destructive method for evaluating the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements; Research Contract No. 19, Studies of contamination in local marine resources, and more specifically the determination of horizontal and vertical diffusion rates in Suruga Bay; Research Contract No. 22, A study of the uptake, accumulation and loss of radioactive material by marine bacteria; Research Contract No. 26, (a) Red cell life span in patients with congenital or acquired haemolytic anaemia using Cr-51 and pie-operative spleen scanning; (b) The aeriology of tropical iron deficiency anaemia using Fe-59 in

  10. Construction Worker Fatigue Prediction Model Based on System Dynamic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Adi Tri Joko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction accident can be caused by internal and external factors such as worker fatigue and unsafe project environment. Tight schedule of construction project forcing construction worker to work overtime in long period. This situation leads to worker fatigue. This paper proposes a model to predict construction worker fatigue based on system dynamic (SD. System dynamic is used to represent correlation among internal and external factors and to simulate level of worker fatigue. To validate the model, 93 construction workers whom worked in a high rise building construction projects, were used as case study. The result shows that excessive workload, working elevation and age, are the main factors lead to construction worker fatigue. Simulation result also shows that these factors can increase worker fatigue level to 21.2% times compared to normal condition. Beside predicting worker fatigue level this model can also be used as early warning system to prevent construction worker accident

  11. Psychological contract in the light of flexible employment: The review of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Żołnierczyk-Zreda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Changing employment relations between employees and employers due to the increasing employment flexibility have contributed to the development of a new paradigm to analyze these relations based on the concept of psychological contract. This paradigm might be particularly relevant in Poland where the employment flexibility understood as the number of workers with temporary contracts is the highest in Europe. In this paper the concept of psychological contract is presented along with the existing findings related to its range, balance and contract fulfilment vs. contract breach. The results of studies showing the differences in psychological contract of temporary and permanent workers are also presented. The majority of them indicate that psychological contracts of temporary workers are limited in their extent, less balanced and asymmetric (to workers’ disadvantage, as well as more transactional in their nature than those of permanent workers. The temporary workers’ well-being and attitudes towards work and their reaction to psychological contract breach largely depends on their preferences for this type of employment, on their qualifications and on a labor market situation. Med Pr 2016;67(4:529–536

  12. Does on-the-job informal learning in OECD countries differ by contract duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira Sequeda, M.T.; de Grip, A.; van der Velden, R.K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that employees with temporary contracts have a lower training participation than those who have a contract of indefinite duration. There is however no empirical literature on the difference in informal learning on-the-job between permanent and temporary workers. In this

  13. Does on-the-job informal learning in OECD countries differ by contract duration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira Sequeda, M.T.; de Grip, A.; van der Velden, R.K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that employees with temporary contracts have a lower training participation than those who have a contract of indefinite duration. There is however no empirical literature on the difference in informal learning on-the-job between permanent and temporary workers. In this

  14. Contract management survey 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2002-10-01

    Spending on clinical contracts continues to outpace spending on business services, but may be leveling off. The 12th annual Contract Management Survey shows that the performance of clinical vendors is now comparable to business service vendors in meeting savings targets. Both business and clinical vendors are receiving higher marks from hospital leaders, but execs quickly respond to low marks by bringing the service back in-house of changing vendors. This report examines trends in outsourcing, satisfaction levels, the decision-making process, contract features and performance, and spending.

  15. 2001 contract management survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    For the second year running, hospitals are spending more on clinical outsourcing than on business services. The Eleventh Annual Contract Services Survey shows that, in clinical areas, executives use outsourcing to acquire specialized expertise with cost savings secondary. Reducing costs and FTEs are the primary reasons for outsourcing business operations. Business service contracts are more likely to meet expectations for cost savings. Overall, satisfaction levels are up, but in some areas there's still a lot of room for improvement. This report examines current trends in outsourcing, strategies for the future, satisfaction levels, the decisionmaking process, contract features, and costs.

  16. The contract - introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, G.

    1975-01-01

    The contract is the last and final step of project planning and the first step of project implementation. The contract has to specify in detail and to the point, as concisely as possible, the complete scope of supplies and work, define all technical particulars and requirements, put forward the conditions of legal, regulatory, administrative and financial procedure, prepare for operating and maintenance instructions to be issued after commissioning. In short, the contract is expected to be a reliable instrument during the manufacturing and construction period as well as a guide-book to assist the owner afterwards in the operation and maintenance of the plant. (orig./FW) [de

  17. Patient aggression perceived by community support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Christopher; Hannah, Annette; Swain, Nicola; Gray, Andrew; Coverdale, John; Oud, Nico

    2009-12-01

    Objective: Aggression by patients is a known risk factor for hospital workers. Within New Zealand, the bulk of ongoing care for physical and mental disabilities and health issues is not hospital based, but contracted to various non-governmental agencies. The rate of client aggression towards care workers from these organizations, to our knowledge, has not been assessed. Method: Two hundred and forty-two support workers in non-governmental agencies caring for people with disabilities responded to an anonymous mailed survey on client aggression, personal distress, and communication style. Results: Most support workers did experience verbal forms of aggression or destructive behaviour, fewer experienced physical aggression, and a minority were injured, sexually harassed, stalked or harassed by means of formal complaint. The median total violence score was five (interquartile range 12.25). A higher total violence score (using the POPAS-NZ) was associated with age and gender, the primary disability of clients, and the numbers of hours worked. The length of time worked was not associated with total violence risk. Communication style, after correcting for other factors, was a predictor of aggression. Almost 6% of care workers reported distress symptoms at a level associated with clinically significant stress reactions. Conclusions: Patient aggression is common among care workers, and can cause distress in the minority. We suggest that further research to clarify risk factors and develop interventions for care workers is needed.

  18. Technical note: Analysis of claims and disputes in contracts for oil and gas development projects in Iran with solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathollah Sajedi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Contracts for oil and gas development projects are naturally complex, they are explained with some of maps and technical specifications. To supply the goals of contracts, it is necessary to construct by a team having owner, consulting engineer and contractor. The unique aspects of each project and team working are resulting to disagreements. It should be noted that the majority of team workers have not previously worked together. It may not be expected to forecast all project aspects in design and preparation of tender documents process. However, in some cases it will occur inconsistencies in contract documents and possibly may be disagreements on commentary of the cases which there are in the provisions of the contract. Every root of disagreement resulted in to claim and finally dispute. Lack of foresight and/or existing ambiguous texts in some provisions of contract, not being aware of components of the project to conditions and obligations and rules of contract will complex and sometimes impossible the agreement on implementation problems. Therefore, the claims will be resulted in disputes and inflict financial losses to contractors and/or owners and then the projects will not be completed. In Iran many activities have not been carried out about claims and disputes in different orientations especially in areas futures and hence, it was studied in this research. Firstly, research history was considered and the causes of claims and disputes were identified in process of different levels of oil projects construction from primary to exploitation and then a questionnaire was prepared using the comments of experts. Finally, the questionnaire was analysed by SPSS and the approved factors in creation of claims and disputes and in their roots were ranked.

  19. Formalized description of assessment procedures of tender offers (of the construction organizer and contracting companies in case of engineering control scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sborshchikov Sergey Borisovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The procedure of evaluating and selecting tender offers is not only an important element of the control system of investment and construction activity but is also an effective tool to increase its efficiency due to optimization of construction works price, reduction of their duration, stimulating innovations in the production, increasing the quality and engineering safety of construction production. At the recent time when new organizational forms and control schemes of investment and construction activity are appearing the system of competitive bidding gains more importance and new functions, because the choice of construction organizer and contracting companies directly influences the results of the construction. The authors consider the task of selecting the bidders’ offers which is a multicriterion task. The offers are evaluated according to the set of parameters reflecting the effectiveness of investment and construction projects. The criteria selection is based on the fact that the proposals of the organizer of construction and the contractors are related to the cost of works and to the deadlines which directly affects the implementation parameters of investment and construction projects.

  20. Domestic Worker, Transnational Advocacy and the State of Exception: A Case Study on The Advocacy of Domestic Worker’s Rights in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Ramadhan Bastari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains why domestic workers (PRT remain not considered as formal workers in Indonesia. This problem becomes very urgent as PRT covers 76% of the national labor population and there has been considerable pressure from transnational community. This question is answered by applying  Agamben's theory of state of exception. This paper deploysdiscourse analysis method to examine a number of texts related to the Government of Indonesian's stance and the advocacy for PRT’s rights in Indonesia. This study finds that the Government of Indonesia has established a state of exception allowing to ignore PRT’s rights as workers under existing law. The study, then, concludes that the Government of Indonesian cannot be expected to meet PRT’s rights. Consequently, the strategy of advocacy should be directed to encourage other countries to push Indonesia so as to meet PRT’s rights.

  1. Establishing contract periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffman, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The lead time for executing the Adjustable Fixed-Commitment (AFC) contract and exceptions which may be considered are discussed. The initial delivery period is also discussed. Delays, deferrals, and schedule adjustment charges are finally considered

  2. Industrial Services Contracts

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This document gives an overview of Industrial Services contracts at CERN, including the probable expenditure in 2006 and the estimated expenditure for 2007. The Finance Committee is invited: - to take note of the revised amount in 2006 for Industrial Services contracts referred to in this document of 138.02 MCHF at 2006 prices compared to the previously anticipated amount of 122.67 MCHF at 2005 prices; - to take note that the estimated amount in 2007 for the contracts referred to in this document will be 112.54 MCHF at 2006 prices; - for the reasons set out in this document, the Finance Committee is also invited to approve the requests for the contracts presented and highlighted in the Annexes.

  3. Temporary labour contracts

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    At its September 2000 meeting, the Finance Committee approved a second one-year extension of the four existing temporary labour contracts (L020/PE, L021/PE, L022/PE, L023/PE) until 31 December 2001 for a total amount not exceeding 6 000 000 Swiss francs at 2000 prices. The Finance Committee is invited: - to take note that the estimated annual expenditure on temporary labour in 2001 will amount to approximately 4 500 000 Swiss francs against the previously estimated 6 000 000 Swiss francs; - to approve the extension of the four existing contracts by six months to 30 June 2002 for an overall amount not exceeding 1 500 000 Swiss francs; - to take note that new contracts for the Swiss part of the CERN site will be submitted for adjudication in December 2001 and that new contracts for the French part of the CERN site will be submitted for adjudication in the course of 2002.

  4. Temporary labour contracts

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    The five contracts for Temporary Labour assignments on the CERN site (L020/PE, L021/PE, L022/PE, L023/PE and L024/PE) approved by the Finance Committee in March 1996 (CERN/FC/3857) will reach the end of their initial three-year contractual period at the end of December 1999. Following the satisfactory execution of these contracts during this period, CERN requests approval to extend them from January 2000 for the first of the two years foreseen in the original adjudication. The Finance Committee is invited: - to take note that the three-year expenditure for Temporary Labour contracts from 1997 to 1999 will not exceed 19 100 000 Swiss francs, compared to the 18 900 000 Swiss francs estimated at the time of the adjudication in March 1996; - to approve an extension of the present Temporary Labour contracts for the year 2000 for a total amount not exceeding 6 000 000 Swiss francs.

  5. SOCIO-ECONOMIC STUDY OF SUPLIT STONE BREAKER WOMEN IN SUPPORTING FAMILY LIFE: A CASE STUDY OF INFORMAL SECTOR STONE BREAKER WORKER IN THE NORTH MORAMO, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambolong M.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A socio-economic study of Suplit Stone breaker women In Supporting Family life is a study of the Informal Sector Workers carried out in the form of a survey. This study aims to assess the socio-economic level of the workers, educational level, results achieved, income levels, health effects, and household's social condition. This research will specifically study and analyze income received, identify and examine the issues that arise in performing stone breaker as an occupation: deficiencies, expectations, and negative impacts. Ten urban villages/villages in Moramo North District was taken as research population. Area samples taken were five (5 urban/rural where workers are concentrated in Lalowaru Village, Puasana Village, Mata Mawatu Village, Sanggula Village, and Lamokula Village. Samples community were 5 percent of all household. Therefore total samples taken were 93 people scattered in villages. Research informants are Head of North Morano district, Stone Processing owner, and stone carrier driver. Data collection was conducted by observation, interview using a list of questions, as well as documentation of objective conditions. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis techniques, which describe the objective conditions of the field in accordance with the purpose of research. Research result shows workers are housewives who help their husbands and families to supplement the household income to support family life. In general, socio-economic conditions of women suplit stone breaker is relatively low, their education level is generally elementary or none. The results achieved are still limited by an average of IDR 30,000, per day/worker is calculated based on the total stone yield. These women perform their work using simple tools such as hammer and gloves. The negative impact on eye health and breathing difficulty caused by inhaling stone dust every day. The problems faced by the workers is the lack of working capital to be trying to own

  6. Can labour contract differences in health and work-related attitudes be explained by quality of working life and job insecurity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, A.F.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Bossche, S.N.J. van den; Smulders, P.G.W.; Taris, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesise that due to a lower quality of working life and higher job insecurity, the health and work-related attitudes of temporary workers may be less positive compared to permanent workers. Therefore, we aimed to (1) examine differences between contract groups (i.e. permanent contract,

  7. Corrupt Relational Contracting

    OpenAIRE

    Johann Graf Lambsdorff; Sitki Utku Teksoz

    2002-01-01

    Because corruption must be hidden from the public and is not enforced by courts it entails transaction costs, which are larger than those from legal exchange. This suggests that corrupt contracts are primarily relational contracts where legal exchange serves as a basis for sealing and enforcing corrupt agreements. Legal exchange not only provides for corrupt opportunities, but for the necessary enforcement mechanisms. Examples of such legal exchange are long-term business exchange, belonging ...

  8. Contracting as a Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    disconfirmation of expectations theory to examine customer satisfaction in the procuring contracting officer (PCO)–program manager (PM) relationship in...marketing terms, finding that disconfirmed expectations lead to consumer satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The former approach presents the idea that if an...individual exerts effort, the expectation is that successful performance will occur leading to a desired result. In contracting, the theory might be

  9. Expansionary fiscal contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Ulf Michael; Hutchison, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Expansionary Fiscal Contraction (EFC) hypothesis predicts that a major fiscal consolidation leads to an economic expansion under certain circumstances. We test this hypothesis, and the implied non-linear responses of the economy to large and small changes in fiscal policy, using data from...... that the exogenous fiscal contraction in Denmark was a credible regime shift and, together with other reforms undertaken at the time, increased both private consumption and aggregate output....

  10. Avoiding surety contracts in bankruptcy procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiber Dragor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serbia's courts jurisprudence has divergent attitudes with respect to the dilemma whether a surety contract represents a contract without consideration, which may be avoided once the guarantor is subject to bankruptcy procedure without any additional conditions, or an onerous contract. Whether a surety contract is an onerous one has anyhow been disputed in the legal theory. One school of thought considers this contract as non-onerous one, since vis-a-vis guarantor's obligation no benefit to be expected from the other contractual party (i. e. creditor exists. The other school of thought understands surety (almost always as an onerous contract bearing in mind that the guarantor who enters into this contract does not have intentio liberalis. There are numerous and nuanced views based on analyses of the relation between a guarantor and a debtor focused on the argument that surety is a contract without consideration if intentio liberalis existed vis-a-vis main debtor rather than vis-a-vis creditor. Our legal literature did not pay much attention to that issue until recently. In a rare text dedicated to it the author's basic standpoint is that surety represents a contract without consideration. An exception, depending on the circumstances of the case, could be surety given by a parent company for the obligation of a subsidiary, provided the former reasonably expected a benefit in terms of an increase in the value of shares. Commercial courts followed such reasoning. In this article an opposite stance has been argued. Namely, the onerousness of surety must be assessed based on the relation between the guarantor and the main debtor rather than between the guarantor and the creditor. As a rule, surety is an onerous contract because the guarantor expects to collect from the debtor through subrogation the amount he paid to the creditor; exceptionally, surety may be a non-onerous contract if intentio liberalis existed vis-a-vis main debtor. However, this

  11. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-03-16

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify

  12. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-01-01

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify

  13. Introduction of mobile phones for use by volunteer community health workers in support of integrated community case management in Bushenyi District, Uganda: development and implementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumusiime, David Katuruba; Agaba, Gad; Kyomuhangi, Teddy; Finch, Jan; Kabakyenga, Jerome; MacLeod, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    A substantial literature suggests that mobile phones have great potential to improve management and survival of acutely ill children in rural Africa. The national strategy of the Ugandan Ministry of Health calls for employment of volunteer community health workers (CHWs) in implementation of Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) of common illnesses (diarrhea, acute respiratory infection, pneumonia, fever/malaria) affecting children under five years of age. A mobile phone enabled system was developed within iCCM aiming to improve access by CHWs to medical advice and to strengthen reporting of data on danger signs and symptoms for acutely ill children under five years of age. Herein critical steps in development, implementation, and integration of mobile phone technology within iCCM are described. Mechanisms to improve diagnosis, treatment and referral of sick children under five were defined. Treatment algorithms were developed by the project technical team and mounted and piloted on the mobile phones, using an iterative process involving technical support personnel, health care providers, and academic support. Using a purposefully developed mobile phone training manual, CHWs were trained over an intensive five-day course to make timely diagnoses, recognize clinical danger signs, communicate about referrals and initiate treatment with appropriate essential drugs. Performance by CHWs and the accuracy and completeness of their submitted data was closely monitored post training test period and during the subsequent nine month community trial. In the full trial, the number of referrals and correctly treated children, based on the agreed treatment algorithms, was recorded. Births, deaths, and medication stocks were also tracked. Seven distinct phases were required to develop a robust mobile phone enabled system in support of the iCCM program. Over a nine month period, 96 CHWs were trained to use mobile phones and their competence to initiate a community trial was

  14. Demographic and behavioral characteristics of non-sex worker females attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in Japan: a nationwide case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Hideko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs reported in STI surveillance increased rapidly for women in Japan during the 1990s, the sexual behavior of women potentially at risk of STI infection remains unknown. Methods In order to determine the demographic and behavioral characteristics of non-sex worker (SW females attending STI clinics, female attendees (n = 145, excluding SW, from nine clinics across Japan and female controls from the general population (n = 956, both aged 18-50 years, were compared using two data sets of nationwide sexual behavior surveys conducted in 1999. Results Although the occupation-type and education level were unrelated to STI clinic attendance in multivariate analysis, non-SW females attending STI clinics were younger (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 0.94, 95%CI: 0.89, 0.99, and more likely to be unmarried (AOR = 4.11, 95% CI: 1.73, 9.77 than the controls from the general population. In the previous year, STI clinic attendees were more likely to have had multiple partnerships (AOR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.42, 6.71 and unprotected vaginal sex with regular partners (AOR = 3.59, 95% CI: 1.49, 8.64, and tended to have had their first sexual intercourse at a younger age (AOR = 1.77, 95%CI: 0.89, 3.54 and more unprotected vaginal and/or oral sex with casual partners (AOR = 2.08, 95%CI: 0.75, 5.71. Identical sexual behavior patterns were observed between the female attendees with a current diagnosis of STI (n = 72 and those before diagnosis (n = 73 and between those with a past history of STI (n = 66 and those without (n = 79. Conclusion These results indicate that not only multiple partnerships or unprotected sex with casual partners, but also unprotected vaginal sex within a regular partnership is prevalent among non-SW female STI clinic attendees. The identical sexual behavior patterns observed between female attendees with a current STI diagnosis and those without, and between those attendees

  15. Access, acceptability and utilization of community health workers using diagnostics for case management of fever in Ugandan children: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukanga David

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of diagnostics in integrated community case management (iCCM of fever is recognized as an important step in improving rational use of drugs and quality of care for febrile under-five children. This study assessed household access, acceptability and utilization of community health workers (CHWs trained and provided with malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs and respiratory rate timers (RRTs to practice iCCM. Methods A total of 423 households with under-five children were enrolled into the study in Iganga district, Uganda. Households were selected from seven villages in Namungalwe sub-county using probability proportionate to size sampling. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to caregivers in selected households. Data were entered into Epidata statistical software, and analysed using SPSS Statistics 17.0, and STATA version 10. Results Most (86%, 365/423 households resided within a kilometre of a CHW’s home, compared to 26% (111/423 residing within 1 km of a health facility (p  Fifty-seven percent (243/423 of caregivers took their febrile children to a CHW at least once in the three month period preceding the survey. Households located 1–3 km from a health facility were 72% (AOR 1.72; 95% CI 1.11–2.68 more likely to utilize CHW services compared to households within 1 km of a health facility. Households located 1–3 km from a CHW were 81% (AOR 0.19; 95% CI 0.10–0.36 less likely to utilize CHW services compared to those households residing within 1 km of a CHW. A majority (79%, 336/423 of respondents thought CHWs services were better with RDTs, and 89% (375/423 approved CHWs’ continued use of RDTs. Eighty-six percent (209/243 of respondents who visited a CHW thought RRTs were useful. Conclusion ICCM with diagnostics is acceptable, increases access, and is the first choice for caregivers of febrile children. More than half of caregivers of febrile children utilized CHW services over a three

  16. An unsatisfactory contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2012-01-01

    For the last 15 years contract policy has been one of the top priorities of CERN staff, as expressed in successive surveys initiated by the Staff Association. In one’s professional life, having some forward vision of one’s career prospects is the key to loyalty and motivation. On the contrary, instability about the future is always at the root of anxiety, conflicts, or even health problems. A good employer must therefore balance the needs of the Company and those of its employees. CERN’s current contract policy, as described in the Administrative Circular No 2, states that staff members should first obtain a limited duration (LD) contract of up to five years. Then, if they want to stay in the Organization, staff members must apply, usually once a year, and before the end of their LD contract, for an indefinite contract (IC) post. All candidates for an IC post are considered by the Review Board for the award of indefinite contracts (Review Board) which will choose the most suita...

  17. Role of the contract workforce in the oilpatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wake, G.

    1999-01-01

    The role of a staffing agency such as the Design Group Staffing Services Inc. was described. The Agency was founded in 1976. Today, it is the dominant agency in western Canada that provides technical, industrial, information technology and office services to its customers in the petroleum industry including Bantrel, Syncrude, Suncor, Delta, Nova, TransAlta, PanCanadian. A series of overhead viewgraphs accompanied this presentation which dealt with the all aspects of the contract workforce. A contractor was described as being a temporary worker and not a company employee. A 1996 survey has shown that the largest reported users of contract personnel were petroleum and petrochemical industries. This is partly due to the cyclical aspect of the petroleum industry in western Canada. The advantages and disadvantages of contract workforce were also described. The main reason for using contract workers is to provide organizations with the flexibility to meet fluctuations in demand. Other advantages include the ability to meet deadlines, minimize training time, eliminate legal liabilities, and reduce payroll and administration costs. Two of the disadvantages are the potential for high turnover and loyalty issues. The procedures and legalities of hiring contractors were also described. The importance of clearly distinguishing between a contract of employment (an employee) and a contract for service (an independent contractor) was also emphasized. 2 figs

  18. Custom, contract, and kidney exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Kieran; Krawiec, Kimberly D

    2012-01-01

    In this Essay, we examine a case in which the organizational and logistical demands of a novel form of organ exchange (the nonsimultaneous, extended, altruistic donor (NEAD) chain) do not map cleanly onto standard cultural schemas for either market or gift exchange, resulting in sociological ambiguity and legal uncertainty. In some ways, a NEAD chain resembles a form of generalized exchange, an ancient and widespread instance of the norm of reciprocity that can be thought of simply as the obligation to “pay it forward” rather than the obligation to reciprocate directly with the original giver. At the same time, a NEAD chain resembles a string of promises and commitments to deliver something in exchange for some valuable consideration--that is, a series of contracts. Neither of these salient "social imaginaries" of exchange--gift giving or formal contract--perfectly meets the practical demands of the NEAD system. As a result, neither contract nor generalized exchange drives the practice of NEAD chains. Rather, the majority of actual exchanges still resemble a simpler form of exchange: direct, simultaneous exchange between parties with no time delay or opportunity to back out. If NEAD chains are to reach their full promise for large-scale, nonsimultaneous organ transfer, legal uncertainties and sociological ambiguities must be finessed, both in the practices of the coordinating agencies and in the minds of NEAD-chain participants. This might happen either through the further elaboration of gift-like language and practices, or through a creative use of the cultural form and motivational vocabulary, but not necessarily the legal and institutional machinery, of contract.

  19. Productivity in Knowledge Worker Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Romero, Ana María; Mahou Fernández, Ángel; Varanki, H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Information and Communication Technologies in work pro- cesses has not brought the expected productivity improvement. Some studies even suggest that the always-on model decreases productivity. This article proposes work teams as a new unit for knowledge worker productivity analysis in organizations. Organizations? ability to adopt new analysis measures is analyzed in three case studies.

  20. Workers' Objectives in Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Michel

    1990-01-01

    A case study of quality circles in an appliance factory found that circle members and nonmembers obtained better working conditions by improving quality through the direct impact of their work on the company's market position. The study of the quality improvement process shows that workers seek more than psychological rewards for their…

  1. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  2. IAEA research contracts. First annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The present volume is the first issue of what will become a regular annual publication by the Agency. It contains summaries of the final reports on all those contracts which have expired before 31 December 1960 with a few exceptions. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No.2, The investigation of electrophysiological responses of biological systems, in particular of nerve cells, to irradiation with small doses of X-ray and other types of ionizing radiation, Research Contract No.3, Investigation on the mode of the protective action of certain sulfhydryl compounds against radiation effects on the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, using tritium-labelled thymidine, Research Contract No.6, Investigation and development of a new method of monitoring and dosimetry for low fluxes of fast neutrons, involving the use of a bubble chamber, Research Contract No.13, Effects of incorporated radioisotopes upon the stability of genetic materials, Research Contract No.16, Interrelationship of root absorption and leaf absorption of radioisotopes in herbaceous plants, Research Contract No. 23, The uptake of radioactive wastes by lowland rice from contaminated soils due to irrigation water and its decontamination, Research Contract No.28, Comparison between mutation rates induced by acute and chronic gamma irradiation

  3. IAEA research contracts. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-07-01

    The present volume is the first issue of what will become a regular annual publication by the Agency. It contains summaries of the final reports on all those contracts which have expired before 31 December 1960 with a few exceptions. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No.2, The investigation of electrophysiological responses of biological systems, in particular of nerve cells, to irradiation with small doses of X-ray and other types of ionizing radiation, Research Contract No.3, Investigation on the mode of the protective action of certain sulfhydryl compounds against radiation effects on the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, using tritium-labelled thymidine, Research Contract No.6, Investigation and development of a new method of monitoring and dosimetry for low fluxes of fast neutrons, involving the use of a bubble chamber, Research Contract No.13, Effects of incorporated radioisotopes upon the stability of genetic materials, Research Contract No.16, Interrelationship of root absorption and leaf absorption of radioisotopes in herbaceous plants, Research Contract No. 23, The uptake of radioactive wastes by lowland rice from contaminated soils due to irrigation water and its decontamination, Research Contract No.28, Comparison between mutation rates induced by acute and chronic gamma irradiation.

  4. Exceptions to the Principle of Free Movement of Workers in the European Community: the Case of Persons Infected with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemri Elezi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The movement of workers in the years after the foundation of the European Community (EC wasas a result of the labor market needs, essentially in most developed countries in which there was a lack ofspecific profiles of occupation and skilled workers. Due to the fact that, every member state of ECdiscretionary regulates the issues relating to free movement of workers, working conditions and organizationof working hours, it was inalienable the harmonization of rules at the EC level. Even today there are a largenumber of legal measures regarding the harmonization of legislation on free movement in the EC memberstates; however, they are sometimes interpreted differently by its member states, particularly those related tomovement restrictions. Specifically, in the framework of realization of the right to free movement will alsoanalyze the rules that exclude this right and states conduct against persons who violate the rules on freemovement. As states, under the protection of public health of their citizens, they have the right to restrict thefree movement of workers coming from other states, in this context this paper will analyze the behavior ofstates towards persons infected with the virus HIV. This paper will analyze the right to free circulation ofworkers in the EC, and the limitations that exist in several member states, whereas suggests eliminating theobstacles which are not based on the positive acts of the EC.

  5. The Role of Music in the Education of Young Male Workers in Nineteenth-Century Greece: The Case of Charity Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents music teaching in nineteenth-century Greece orphanages and schools of destitute children, which were the main schools for vocational training of the working class in that period. Five representative institutions were selected. Music education for young male workers in nineteenth-century Greece was both in accord with and…

  6. Dreams that do not come true: Re-addressing social security to expand old-age social protection : The case of informal workers in El Salvador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.E.A. Joya (Nancy)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper focuses on old-age income security, with the objective to explore obstacles and opportunities to expand social protection for informal workers in El Salvador. It first introduces the main concepts and debates on social security, social protection, coverage and informality, to

  7. Access to and utilisation of healthcare services by sex workers at truck-stop clinics in South Africa: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fobosi, S. C.; Lalla-Edward, S. T.; Ncube, S.; Buthelezi, F.; Matthew, P.; Kadyakapita, A.; Slabbert, M.; Hankins, C. A.; Venter, W. D. F.; Gomez, G. B.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sex worker-specific health services aim to respond to the challenges that this key population faces in accessing healthcare. These services aim to integrate primary healthcare (PHC) interventions, yet most services tend to focus on prevention of HIV and sexually transmitted infections

  8. Understanding significant processes during work environment interventions to alleviate time pressure and associated sick leave of home care workers--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Gunn Robstad; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2013-11-15

    Ergonomic and work stress interventions rarely show long-term positive effect. The municipality participating in this study received orders from the Norwegian Labour Inspectorate due to an identified unhealthy level of time pressure, and responded by effectuating several work environment interventions. The study aim is to identify critical factors in the interaction between work environment interventions and independent rationalization measures in order to understand a potential negative interfering effect from concurrent rationalizations on a comprehensive work environment intervention. The study, using a historic prospective mixed-method design, comprised 6 home care units in a municipality in Norway (138 respondents, response rate 76.2%; 17 informants). The study included quantitative estimations, register data of sick leave, a time line of significant events and changes, and qualitative descriptions of employee appraisals of their work situation gathered through semi-structured interviews and open survey responses. The work environment interventions were in general regarded as positive by the home care workers. However, all units were simultaneously subjected to substantial contextual instability, involving new work programs, new technology, restructurings, unit mergers, and management replacements, perceived by the home care workers to be major sources of stress. Findings suggest that concurrent changes induced through rationalization resulted in negative exposure effects that negated positive work environment intervention effects, causing an overall deteriorated work situation for the home care workers. Establishment and active utilization of communication channels from workers to managers are recommended in order to increase awareness of putative harmful and interruptive effects of rationalization measures.

  9. HARMONIZATION OF THE CONSUMER CONTRACT DISPOSITIONS WITH THE GENERAL CONTRACT RULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru MATEESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work contains and mainly tackles the contract of consumption, its differences and similitudes to a general contract, manners of applying it, and the way in which the former can be better coordinated and correlated to the general contracting terms, established by the civil law. Along the years, the consumption contract has undergone several addenda and it has come to represent an instrument of both refference and regulation for the socio-economical relations between two parties who have a commercial agreement. The general law frame has had a great influence in the development of the consumption contract, as well as on its applicability conditions and its manner of deployment. Through the development of the judicial law concerning the contract of concumption, this type of agreement has influenced, through its human and social nature, both the general contract, and the specific frame it relates to. The relationship between the two types of contract is one of interdependence, which is determined by the need of judicial regulation in the Romanian and European economy. The ceaselees development of interhuman relations pushes society towards maintaining a continuous study of the advancement of specific legislation and judicial regulation. The main purpose of this work is analyzing the general judicial frame and the way in which the differences between the general contract and the consumption one may represent a benefic and mutual influence on protecting the citizens’ rights, which in the case of the consumption contract encompasses the protection of consumers’ rights. Also, it will analyze the aspects that determine the manner of application and the the differences that can be surmounted in order to achieve a better cohesion between these types of contracts.

  10. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation by the worker. Indirect participation involves employee representation, while direct participation relates to individual involvement in management’s decision-making processes. In the Framework Dir...

  11. INDEFINITE CONTRACT REVIEW 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    The Director-General has decided to review staff members in professional categories 2 to 5 satisfying the criteria for consideration for the award of an indefinite contract, in accordance with Article R II 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. Staff members holding a fixed-term contract which it has been decided not to renew will not be considered. The following stages are foreseen:1.\tCandidates qualifying for review in accordance with Article R II 1.20 of the Staff Regulations and the Administrative Circular N° 9 will be contacted by Human Resources Division. 2.\tThe criteria as to when staff members qualify for review are described in Administrative Circular N° 9. These include the following:staff members who are in their fourth year of service on a fixed-term contract;in addition, for staff members having three years or more of previous relevant service in the Organization on a contract of limited duration (or term-contract) and upon proposal by the division leader concerned, consid...

  12. INDEFINITE CONTRACT REVIEW 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Director-General has decided to review staff members in professional categories 2 to 5 satisfying the criteria for consideration for the award of an indefinite contract, in accordance with Article R II 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. Staff members holding a fixed-term contract which it has been decided not to renew will not be considered. The following stages are foreseen: 1. Candidates qualifying for review in accordance with Article R II 1.20 of the Staff Regulations and the Administrative Circular N° 9 will be contacted by Human Resources Division. 2. The criteria as to when staff members qualify for review are described in Administrative Circular N° 9. These include the following: staff members who are in their fourth year of service on a fixed-term contract; in addition, for staff members having three years or more of previous relevant service in the Organization on a contract of limited duration (or term-contract) and upon proposal by the division leader concerned, consideration fo...

  13. Temporary labour contracts

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    The five contracts for Temporary Labour assignments on the CERN site (L020/PE, L 021/PE, L 022/PE, L 023/PE and L 024/PE) approved by the Finance Committee in March 1996 (CERN/FC/3857) reached the end of their initial three-year contractual period at the end of December 1999. At CERN?s request, in September 1999 the Finance Committee approved an extension of these contracts for the year 2000 for a total amount not exceeding 6 000 000 Swiss francs (CERN/FC/4196). In December 1999, one of the five contractors, FIRCROFT, withdrew from its contract for 2000. Following the satisfactory execution of the four remaining contracts during 2000, CERN requests approval to extend them from January 2001 for the second of the two optional years provided for in the original adjudication. The Finance Committee is invited to approve the extension of the existing contracts until 31 December 2001 for a total amount not exceeding 6 000 000 Swiss francs at 2000 prices.

  14. Networks and informal contract law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Tjin Tai, Eric; Brownsword, Roger; van Gestel, Rob A.J.; Micklitz, Hans-W.

    2017-01-01

    It is often argued that formal contract law cannot treat networks correctly. An analysis of networks in an informal contract law system shows that informal contract law is no panacea. Remaining problems require a different approach to legal regulation and contract practice.

  15. Legal aspects related to workers and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, N.M. de; Fischer, D.

    1985-01-01

    The legal aspects related to protection of the worker during its activity and in case of accident which involves dead or invalidity or occupation disease are presented. The aspects concerning to employment relation for workers in nuclear installations, and the professional liability for workers who handle ionizing radiation are discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Investigation of occupational health and safety issues among health care workers in public hospitals: a case study of St. Dominic's Hospital, Akwatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soglo, Lawrencia

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the occupational health and safety (OHS) issues of the Ghanaian health worker in the public hospital. The investigations were conducted using two instruments: a questionnaire for accessing OHS in the workers and a hazard identification checklist for physical analysis of the work environment. A number of 132 questionnaires were distributed among the occupational groups: Doctors, Nurses, Laboratory, Pharmacy, X-ray, and Mortuary staff of the St. Dominic’s hospital in Akwatia. It was deduced that there was a high level of knowledge of OHS among the workers. Results also showed that only 32.2% of the staff had access to all the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) they required. There was a proportion of workers who did not always make use of the few available PPE or consistently follow standard safety precautions. The reasons they attributed to this was mostly because of ‘High workload pressure’, followed by the ‘unavailability of PPE’. It also showed that 46% of workers who had ever had needlestick injuries had not reported the incidences for medical attention. The main hazards prevalent among the workers ranged from exposure to biological, chemical, and physical agents, ergonomic hazards, stress and violence. Though they all faced some violence at work, the rate was higher among females. Results from the hazard identification checklist exposed the presence of some common hazards to all departments while some were peculiar to specific departments. Manual handling, hazards of chemicals agents, exposure to biological agents, sharp object usage, ergonomics, hazards from waste management and violence were identified in all five departments. However hazards such as steam or chemical explosions and burn hazards were specific to the laboratory, exposure to radiation was identified in both the Xray and laboratory departments, and cold stress was peculiar to the Mortuary. With regards to hazards they deemed most threatening

  17. Multiple Challenges of Flexible Workforce Management: the contract managers experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Torres de Magalhães

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a survey that had the purpose to evaluate the human resources (HR practices adopted by a Brazilian industrial corporation from the viewpoint of contracting out managers to deal with four flexible workforce management challenges: qualification; quality; commitment; standardization of outsourcing services. These HR practices are still little discussed by scholars. So, this is the main contribution of this article. It is also virtually nonexistent in the literature studies that encompass analysis about HR practices to deal with major challenges of outsourcing throughout the viewpoint of contracting out managers. We performed 15 semi-structured interviews with contracting out managers. It was also performed a documental analysis about the rules of outsourcing practices of the corporation. We found management practices to deal with each of the four challenges presented. The management of contracts and the provision of training programs were the most prominent of the related practices. The results show that Brazillian labor laws contribute to the segregation of temporary workers, because the companies avoid a more direct relationship fearing legal constraints. Although several efforts were put to improve the work conditions of the flexible workforce, these workers are still stigmatized, seen and treated as less important than direct employers; this causes negative impacts on commitment. The decision to use flexible workforce by companies is still mainly due to cost savings. Therefore, there is still a long way to improve HR practices related to temporary workers in order to avoid losses for all the social actors envolved.

  18. Capitation, contracts, and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    The radiology business manager in today's environment must become proficient in contract evaluations and negotiations. Health care is focusing on preventive medicine. Third-party payers are offering plans and programs to provide ''well-patient'' care. For prepaid (HMO-IPA-PTO) plans to succeed, demands for reduced fees and other entrepreneurial contractual arrangements are developed. This presentation will focus on specific items contained in most contracts. The issues of withhold, billing procedures, prompt-payment rewards, medical liability, capitation determinations, and modified capitation plans will be discussed. It is the intent of this presentation to share with the audience methods of evaluating contracts, the importance of negotiating specific terms, and an approach to determination of capitation amounts

  19. PROCUREMENT AND CONTRACT MANAGEMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Training & Development Group; Linda Orr-Easo; Tel. 72460; Nathalie Dumeaux; Tel. 78144

    2001-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of a new training on: Procurement and Contract Management (This seminar will be run by CERN experts in French or in English) Level 1 The aim is to raise awareness of the key issues involved. Date : 8 June 2001 This level is open to everyone. Participants should register via our Web page as soon as possible. Level 2 To develop the skills needed to effectively manage contracts, from the Technical, Commercial and Legal aspects. Dates : Three days, Autumn 2001 This Level is open to those who are/will be more directly responsible for procurement and contract management. Participants should have followed Level 1. For a description of the seminar, please consult:   Level 1: http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/MANCO/P9798/9-cm_e.htm Level 2: http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/MANCO/P9798/9-cm2_e.htm

  20. Amending Contracts for Choreographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bocchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Distributed interactions can be suitably designed in terms of choreographies. Such abstractions can be thought of as global descriptions of the coordination of several distributed parties. Global assertions define contracts for choreographies by annotating multiparty session types with logical formulae to validate the content of the exchanged messages. The introduction of such constraints is a critical design issue as it may be hard to specify contracts that allow each party to be able to progress without violating the contract. In this paper, we propose three methods that automatically correct inconsistent global assertions. The methods are compared by discussing their applicability and the relationships between the amended global assertions and the original (inconsistent ones.