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Sample records for continuous-flow accelerator mass

  1. Continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.S.C.; Han, B.X.; Von Reden, K.F.; Schneider, R.J.; Roberts, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a widely used technique for radiocarbon dating of archaeological or environmental samples that are very small or very old (up to 50,000 years before present). Because of the method's extreme sensitivity, AMS can also serve as an environmental tracer and supplements conventional nuclear counting techniques for monitoring 14 C emissions from operating nuclear power plants and waste repositories. The utility of present AMS systems is limited by the complex sample preparation process required. Carbon from combusted artefacts must be incorporated into a solid metallic target from which a negative ion beam is produced and accelerated to MeV energies by an accelerator for subsequent analysis. This paper will describe a novel technique being developed by the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (NOSAMS) Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the production of negative carbon ion beams directly from a continuously flowing sample gas stream, eliminating the requirement for a solid target. A key component of the new technique is a microwave-driven, gaseous-feed ion source originally developed at Chalk River Laboratories for the very different requirements of a high current proton linear accelerator. A version of this ion source is now being adapted to serve as an injector for a dedicated AMS accelerator facility at NOSAMS. The paper begins with a review of the fundamentals of radiocarbon dating. Experiments carried out at NOSAMS with a prototype of the microwave ion source are described, including measurements of sample utilization efficiency and sample 'memory' effect. A new version of the microwave ion source, optimized for AMS, is also described. The report concludes with some predictions of new research opportunities that will become accessible to the technique of continuous-flow AMS. (author)

  2. Continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.S.C.; Han, B.X.; Von Reden, K.F.; Schneider, R.J.; Roberts, M.L.

    2006-05-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a widely used technique for radiocarbon dating of archaeological or environmental samples that are very small or very old (up to 50,000 years before present). Because of the method's extreme sensitivity, AMS can also serve as an environmental tracer and supplements conventional nuclear counting techniques for monitoring 14 C emissions from operating nuclear power plants and waste repositories. The utility of present AMS systems is limited by the complex sample preparation process required. Carbon from combusted artefacts must be incorporated into a solid metallic target from which a negative ion beam is produced and accelerated to MeV energies by an accelerator for subsequent analysis. This paper will describe a novel technique being developed by the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (NOSAMS) Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the production of negative carbon ion beams directly from a continuously flowing sample gas stream, eliminating the requirement for a solid target. A key component of the new technique is a microwave-driven, gaseous-feed ion source originally developed at Chalk River Laboratories for the very different requirements of a high current proton linear accelerator. A version of this ion source is now being adapted to serve as an injector for a dedicated AMS accelerator facility at NOSAMS. The paper begins with a review of the fundamentals of radiocarbon dating. Experiments carried out at NOSAMS with a prototype of the microwave ion source are described, including measurements of sample utilization efficiency and sample 'memory' effect. A new version of the microwave ion source, optimized for AMS, is also described. The report concludes with some predictions of new research opportunities that will become accessible to the technique of continuous-flow AMS. (author)

  3. Photochemical transformations accelerated in continuous-flow reactors: basic concepts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuanhai; Straathof, Natan J W; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2014-08-18

    Continuous-flow photochemistry is used increasingly by researchers in academia and industry to facilitate photochemical processes and their subsequent scale-up. However, without detailed knowledge concerning the engineering aspects of photochemistry, it can be quite challenging to develop a suitable photochemical microreactor for a given reaction. In this review, we provide an up-to-date overview of both technological and chemical aspects associated with photochemical processes in microreactors. Important design considerations, such as light sources, material selection, and solvent constraints are discussed. In addition, a detailed description of photon and mass-transfer phenomena in microreactors is made and fundamental principles are deduced for making a judicious choice for a suitable photomicroreactor. The advantages of microreactor technology for photochemistry are described for UV and visible-light driven photochemical processes and are compared with their batch counterparts. In addition, different scale-up strategies and limitations of continuous-flow microreactors are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Photochemical transformations accelerated in continuous-flow reactors : basic concepts and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Y.; Straathof, N.J.W.; Hessel, V.; Noel, T.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous-flow photochemistry is used increasingly by researchers in academia and industry to facilitate photochemical processes and their subsequent scale-up. However, without detailed knowledge concerning the engineering aspects of photochemistry, it can be quite challenging to develop a suitable

  5. Romanian wines characterization with CF-IRMS (Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costinel, Diana; Ionete, Roxana Elena; Vremera, Raluca; Stanciu, Vasile

    2007-01-01

    Wine growing has been known for centuries long in Romania. The country has been favored by its geographical position in south-eastern Europe, by its proximity to the Black Sea, as well as by the specificity of the local soil and climate. Alongside France, Italy, Spain, Germany, countries in this area like Romania could also be called 'a vine homeland' in Europe. High quality wines produced in this region were object of trade ever since ancient times. Under current EU research projects, it is necessary to develop new methods of evidencing wine adulteration and safety. The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the ratios of stable isotopes in bio-molecules now provides the means to prove the botanical and geographical origin of a wide variety of foodstuffs - and therefore, to authenticate and eliminate fraud. Isotope analysis has been officially adopted by the EU as a means of controlling adulteration of wine. Adulteration of wine can happen in many ways, e.g. addition of non-grape ethanol, addition of non-grape sugar, water or other unauthorized substances, undeclared mixing of wines from different wards, geographical areas or countries, mislabelling of variety and age. The present paper emphasize the isotopic analysis for D/H, 18 O/ 16 O, 13 C/ 12 C from wines, using a new generation Isotope Ratio MS, Finnigan Delta V Plus, coupling with a three flexible continuous flow preparation device (GasBench II, TC Elemental Analyser and GC-C/TC). Therefore authentication of wines is an important problem to which isotopic analysis has made a significant contribution. (authors)

  6. Performance of a liquid-junction interface for capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry using continuous-flow fast-atom bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhoud, N.J.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Gramberg, L.G.; Verheij, E.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1989-01-01

    The on-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry using a continuous-flow fast-atom bombardment system in combination with a liquid-junction interface is described. The influence of the liquid-junction coupling on the efficiency and the resolution is investigated. Qualitative

  7. Continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) and its applications in hydrocarbon research and exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpana, G.; Patil, D.J.; Kumar, B.

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers have been widely used to determine the isotopic ratios of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur. Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CFIRMS) provides reliable data on nanomole amount of sample gas without the need for cryogenic trapping using cold fingers as in dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer. High sample throughput is achieved as the system is configured with automated sample preparation devices and auto samplers. This paper presents a brief description of CFIRMS exploration

  8. Ambient infrared laser ablation mass spectrometry (AIRLAB-MS) with plume capture by continuous flow solvent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeremy T.; Williams, Evan R.; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.

    2017-10-31

    A new experimental setup for spatially resolved ambient infrared laser ablation mass spectrometry (AIRLAB-MS) that uses an infrared microscope with an infinity-corrected reflective objective and a continuous flow solvent probe coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer is described. The efficiency of material transfer from the sample to the electrospray ionization emitter was determined using glycerol/methanol droplets containing 1 mM nicotine and is .about.50%. This transfer efficiency is significantly higher than values reported for similar techniques.

  9. A continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for high precision determination of dissolved gas ratios and isotopic composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charoenpong, C. N.; Bristow, L. A.; Altabet, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). A continuous flow of He carrier gas completely degasses the sample, and passes through the preparation and purification system before entering the IRMS for analysis. The use of this continuous He carrier permits short analysis times (less than 8 min per sample......) as compared with current high-precision methods. In addition to reference gases, calibration is achieved using air-equilibrated water standards of known temperature and salinity. Assessment of reference gas injections, air equilibrated standards, as well as samples collected in the field shows the accuracy...

  10. High precision measurements of carbon isotopic ratio of atmospheric methane using a continuous flow mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Morimoto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A high-precision measurement system for the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric CH4 (δ^(13CH_4 was developed using a pre-concentration device for CH4 and a gas chromatograph-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS. The measurement system required 100 mlSTP of an atmospheric air sample, corresponding to approximately 0.18μlSTP of CH_4, to determine the δ^(13CH_4 value with a reproducibility of 0.07‰. Replicated analyses of a CH_4-in-air standard gas during the period from 2002 to 2008 indicated that the value of δ^(13CH_4 measured by this system was consistent within the measurement reproducibility. To evaluate the δ^(13CH_4 measurement system, thus developed, diurnal variations of the atmospheric CH_4 concentration and δ^(13CH_4 were observed in the northern part of the Tokyo metropolitan area. From the relationship between the CH_4 concentration and δ^(13CH_4, dominant sources of the observed CH4 fluctuations were identified.

  11. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements on atmospheric methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brass

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS technique for high-precision δD and δ13C measurements of atmospheric methane on 40 mL air samples. CH4 is separated from other air components by utilizing purely physical processes based on temperature, time and mechanical valve switching. Chemical agents are avoided. Trace amounts of interfering compounds can be separated by gas chromatography after pre-concentration of the CH4 sample. The purified sample is then either combusted to CO2 or pyrolyzed to H2 for stable isotope measurement. Apart from connecting samples and refilling liquid nitrogen as coolant the system is fully automated and allows an unobserved, continuous analysis of samples. The analytical system has been used for analysis of air samples with CH4 mixing ratios between ~100 and ~10 000 ppb, for higher mixing ratios samples usually have to be diluted.

  12. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Laboratory of acceleration mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybler, P.; Chrapan, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the principle of the method of acceleration mass spectrometry and the construction plans of this instrument at the Faculty of ecology and environmental sciences in Banska Stiavnica. Using of this instrument for radiocarbon dating is discussed. A review of laboratories with acceleration mass spectrometry is presented

  15. High-precision 13C and 18O measurements by continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) in Romanian wines characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costinel, Diana; Ionete, Roxana; Vremera, Raluca; Stanciu, Vasile

    2008-01-01

    Wines characterization is an important problem to which isotopic analysis by continuous flow- IRMS has made a significant contribution. The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the ratios of stable isotopes in bio-molecules now provides the means to prove the botanical and geographical origin of a wide variety of foodstuffs - and therefore, to authenticate and eliminate fraud. There is a strong need for reliable and validated methods to ensure compliance with such regulation and to protect the interests of the consumer. The right to producing wines with an appellation of origin is guaranteed by the Ministry of Agriculture, based on proposals made by the National Office of Vine and Wine (starting with the 1993 vintage year). The Ministry of Agriculture, the National Office for Vine and Wine, and the National Research Institute grants the authentication of the wines with appellation of origin. The present paper emphasize the isotopic analysis for 18 O/ 16 O and 13 C/ 12 C from wines, using a new generation Isotope Ratio MS, CF-IRMS Delta V Plus, coupled with three flexible continuous flow preparation devices (GasBench II and TC Elemental Analyser). (authors)

  16. Frequency-Modulated Continuous Flow Analysis Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (FM-CFA-ESI-MS) for Sample Multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filla, Robert T; Schrell, Adrian M; Coulton, John B; Edwards, James L; Roper, Michael G

    2018-02-20

    A method for multiplexed sample analysis by mass spectrometry without the need for chemical tagging is presented. In this new method, each sample is pulsed at unique frequencies, mixed, and delivered to the mass spectrometer while maintaining a constant total flow rate. Reconstructed ion currents are then a time-dependent signal consisting of the sum of the ion currents from the various samples. Spectral deconvolution of each reconstructed ion current reveals the identity of each sample, encoded by its unique frequency, and its concentration encoded by the peak height in the frequency domain. This technique is different from other approaches that have been described, which have used modulation techniques to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of a single sample. As proof of concept of this new method, two samples containing up to 9 analytes were multiplexed. The linear dynamic range of the calibration curve was increased with extended acquisition times of the experiment and longer oscillation periods of the samples. Because of the combination of the samples, salt had little effect on the ability of this method to achieve relative quantitation. Continued development of this method is expected to allow for increased numbers of samples that can be multiplexed.

  17. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  18. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  19. Mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator use is renewing the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry in extending the detection limits. These new devices allow the measurement of rare isotope ratio, as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl or 41 Ca, from the earth natural reservoirs [fr

  20. Accelerator-based ultrasensitive mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gove, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter describes a new mass spectrometry technique involving charged particle accelerators normally used for basic research in nuclear science. Topics considered include the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, the limitations of the direct measurement of radioactive decay, mass spectrometry using a tandem electrostatic accelerator, mass spectrometry using a cyclotron, how accelerator mass spectrometry circumvents the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, measurements of stable isotopes, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications, modifications to existing accelerators, descriptions of dedicated systems, and future applications

  1. Principle of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The principle of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is described mainly on technical aspects: hardware construction of AMS, measurement of isotope ratio, sensitivity of measurement (measuring limit), measuring accuracy, and application of data. The content may be summarized as follows: rare isotope (often long-lived radioactive isotope) can be detected by various use of the ion energy obtained by the acceleration of ions, a measurable isotope ratio is one of rare isotope to abundant isotopes, and a measured value of isotope ratio is uncertainty to true one. Such a fact must be kept in mind on the use of AMS data to application research. (M.H.)

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry in NIPNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.; Cata-Danil, D.; Petrascu, M.; Popescu, I.; Stan-Sion, C.; Radulescu, M.; Plostinaru, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in sample materials. The method has applications in environmental physics, medicine, measurements of cosmic-ray or nuclear power plant produced radionuclides in the earth's atmosphere. All over the world, more than 40 charged particles and heavy ion accelerators are performing such analyses concerning the research interest of a huge number of laboratories. The Romanian Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest has initiated a construction project for the AMS facility at the FN - Van de Graaff Tandem accelerator. This program benefits of technical and financial assistance provided by IAEA in the frame of the IAEA-TC Project ROM 8014-265C. A general lay-out of the AMS project is presented. The construction work has begun and first tests of the AMS injector will take place between July - September this year. (authors)

  3. Measurement of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O at nanomolar amounts using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, A; Downie, S.; Webster, E.; Hopkins, D.W.; Rennie, M.J. [Univ. of Dundee (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-01

    We are currently developing methods using Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) in conjunction with a thermal desorption purification unit to measure nanomolar levels of C0{sub 2} and N{sub 2}0. Samples of the pure gases diluted in He/air and transferred to septum capped Exetainers (Labco) provided a simple means to investigate the technique. We analyzed C0{sub 2} at natural abundance in the concentration range 50 to 5 nmoles and N{sub 2}0 at two concentrations between 25 and 5 nmoles. The technique was then used to measure C0{sub 2} (natural abundance and {sup 13}C-labeled) generated from the ninhydrin reaction. The results are summarized in a table; values are expressed in delta {sup 13}C notation relative to Pee Dee Belemnite. The data show that, provided care is taken to minimize or eliminate sources of contamination (air leaks, etc.), CF-IRMS coupled with a thermal desorption unit permits measurement of {sup 13}C enrichment in much smaller amounts of isolated amino acids than has been possible until now. The new methodology, including thermal desorption, should allow stable-isotope investigations on much smaller samples than are possible with other currently available techniques-while maintaining high precision.

  4. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  5. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the Rossendorf 5 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Buerger, W.; Curian, H.; Hartmann, B.; Hentschel, E.; Matthes, H.; Probst, W.; Seidel, M.; Turuc, S.; Hebert, D.; Rothe, T.; Stolz, W.

    1992-01-01

    The Rossendorf electrostatic accelerators (5 MV tandem accelerator and single ended 2 MV van de Graaff accelerator) are already used for ion beam analysis. The existing methods (RBS, PIXE, ERDA, NRA, nuclear microprobe and external beam) will be completed by introduction of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). A short description of the Rossendorf AMS system is given and first experimental results are presented. (R.P.) 4 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Atom counting with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    1995-01-01

    A brief review of the current status and some recent applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are presented. Some connections to resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIS) as the alternate atom counting method are discussed

  8. Continuous-flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe connected on-line with high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for spatially resolved analysis of small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2013-06-30

    A continuous-flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe extracts soluble material from surfaces for direct ionization and detection by mass spectrometry. Demonstrated here is the on-line coupling of such a probe with high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) enabling extraction, separation and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces in a spatially resolved (~0.5 mm diameter spots) manner. A continuous-flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe was connected to a six-port, two-position valve for extract collection and injection to an HPLC column. A QTRAP® 5500 hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap equipped with a Turbo V™ ion source operated in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode was used for all experiments. The system operation was tested with the extraction, separation and detection of propranolol and associated metabolites from drug dosed tissues, caffeine from a coffee bean, cocaine from paper currency, and proteins from dried sheep blood spots on paper. Confirmed in the tissue were the parent drug and two different hydroxypropranolol glucuronides. The mass spectrometric response for these compounds from different locations in the liver showed an increase with increasing extraction time (5, 20 and 40 s). For on-line separation and detection/identification of extracted proteins from dried sheep blood spots, two major protein peaks dominated the chromatogram and could be correlated with the expected masses for the hemoglobin α and β chains. Spatially resolved sampling, separation, and detection of small molecules and proteins from surfaces can be accomplished using a continuous-flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe coupled on-line with HPLC/MS detection. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. On the interference of Kr during carbon isotope analysis of methane using continuous-flow combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, J.; Seth, B.; Bock, M; van der Veen, C.; Möller, L.; Sapart, C.J.; Prokopiou, M.; Sowers, T.; Röckmann, T.; Fischer, H

    2013-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane ( 13C of CH4) on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography (GC) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled to a

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Gore, J.A.; Sparrow, H.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.

    2006-01-01

    Accelerator based mass spectrometry (ABMs) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half life and available in small amount. The 14 U D Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out ABMs studies with heavy isotopes like 36 Cl and 129 I. Cosmogenic radio isotope 36 Cl is widely being detected using ABMs as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36 Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc. As a part of the ongoing ABMs programme at 14UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36 Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has been developed. Further progress made in this programme is discussed in this paper. (author)

  11. Mass spectrometry by means of tandem accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based on an accelerator allows to measure rare cosmogenic isotopes found in natural samples with isotopic abundances up to 10E-15. The XTU Tandem of Legnaro National Laboratories can measure mean heavy isotopes (36Cl, 41Ca, 129I) in applications interesting cosmochronology and Medicine. The TTT-3 Tandem of the Naples University has been modified in view of precision studies of C14 in Archeology, Paleantology and Geology. In this paper a review is made of principles and methodologies and of some applicationy in the framework of the National Program for mass spectrametry research with the aid of accelerators

  12. On the interference of Kr during carbon isotope analysis of methane using continuous-flow combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmitt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotope analysis of methane (δ13C of CH4 on atmospheric samples is one key method to constrain the current and past atmospheric CH4 budget. A frequently applied measurement technique is gas chromatography (GC isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS coupled to a combustion-preconcentration unit. This report shows that the atmospheric trace gas krypton (Kr can severely interfere during the mass spectrometric measurement, leading to significant biases in δ13C of CH4, if krypton is not sufficiently separated during the analysis. According to our experiments, the krypton interference is likely composed of two individual effects, with the lateral tailing of the doubly charged 86Kr peak affecting the neighbouring m/z 44 and partially the m/z 45 Faraday cups. Additionally, a broad signal affecting m/z 45 and especially m/z 46 is assumed to result from scattered ions of singly charged krypton. The introduced bias in the measured isotope ratios is dependent on the chromatographic separation, the krypton-to-CH4 mixing ratio in the sample, the focusing of the mass spectrometer as well as the detector configuration and can amount to up to several per mil in δ13C. Apart from technical solutions to avoid this interference, we present correction routines to a posteriori remove the bias.

  13. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry: background and contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukens, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Since the advent of radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) many studies have been conducted to understand the background from mass spectrometric processes and the origins of contamination associated with the ion source and sample preparation. By studying the individual contributions a better understanding of these processes has been obtained and it has been demonstrated that it is possible to date samples reliably up to 60 000 BP. (orig.)

  14. A New Accelerator-Based Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Tandem electrostatic accelerators produce beams of positive ions which are used to penetrate atomic nuclei in a target, inducing nuclear reactions whose study elucidates varied properties of the nucleus. Uses of the system, which acts like a mass spectrometer, are discussed. These include radiocarbon dating measurements. (JN)

  15. Liquid phase oxidation chemistry in continuous-flow microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemoets, Hannes P L; Su, Yuanhai; Shang, Minjing; Hessel, Volker; Luque, Rafael; Noël, Timothy

    2016-01-07

    Continuous-flow liquid phase oxidation chemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention as the reactor provides enhanced heat and mass transfer characteristics, safe use of hazardous oxidants, high interfacial areas, and scale-up potential. In this review, an up-to-date overview of both technological and chemical aspects of liquid phase oxidation chemistry in continuous-flow microreactors is given. A description of mass and heat transfer phenomena is provided and fundamental principles are deduced which can be used to make a judicious choice for a suitable reactor. In addition, the safety aspects of continuous-flow technology are discussed. Next, oxidation chemistry in flow is discussed, including the use of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, ozone and other oxidants in flow. Finally, the scale-up potential for continuous-flow reactors is described.

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  17. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry - From DNA to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    2013-01-01

    A brief review of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presented. The present work touches on a few technical aspects and recent developments of AMS, and describes two specific applications of AMS, the dating of human DNA with the 14 C bomb peak and the search for superheavy elements in nature. Since two extended general reviews on technical developments in AMS [1] and applications of AMS [2] will appear in 2013, frequent reference to these reviews is made. (authors)

  19. Heavy-ion accelerator mass spectrometry with a 'small' accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steier, P.; Golser, R.; Priller, A.; Vockenhuber, C.; Irlweck, K.; Kutschera, W.; Lichtenstein, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: VERA, the Vienna environmental research accelerator, is based on a 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator and is designed to allow the transport of ions of all elements, from the lightest to the heaviest. The VERA heavy ion program tries to establish measurement methods which work for the long-lived radionuclides where suppression of isobars is not required. Among these are 129 I, 210 Pb, 236 U and all heavier ions where no stable isobars exist. To suppress neighboring masses, the resolution of VERA was increased, both by improving the ion optics of existing elements and by installing a new electrostatic separator after the analyzing magnet. Interfering ions which pass all beam filters are identified with a high-resolution time-of-flight system, using a 0.5 μg/cm 2 DLC (diamond-like carbon) foil in the start detector, which substantially reduces beam straggling. Compared to heavy ion AMS at large tandem accelerators (TV ≥ 8 MV) and for cases where stable isobar interference is absent, it is possible to offset the disadvantage of lower ion energy. Moreover, the more compact facilities like VERA achieve higher stability and reliability and provide advanced computer control. This promises even higher precision and sensitivity for a larger number of samples, which is a prerequisite for research on natural-occurring heavy radioisotopes at environmental levels. First results on the measurement of 210 Pb (half-life 22 a) and 236 U (23 Ma) encourages us to push towards even heavier radionuclides (e.g. 224 Pu, 81 Ma). (author)

  20. Subattomole sensitivity in biological accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge

    2008-05-15

    The Uppsala University 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has been used to study (14)C-labeled biological samples utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) technology. We have adapted a sample preparation method for small biological samples down to a few tens of micrograms of carbon, involving among others, miniaturizing of the graphitization reactor. Standard AMS requires about 1 mg of carbon with a limit of quantitation of about 10 amol. Results are presented for a range of small sample sizes with concentrations down to below 1 pM of a pharmaceutical substance in human blood. It is shown that (14)C-labeled molecular markers can be routinely measured from the femtomole range down to a few hundred zeptomole (10 (-21) mol), without the use of any additional separation methods.

  1. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems

  2. New applications of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its invention in the late 70's, and reduction to near-routine practice by the mid-80's, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful tool for archaeological and geochemical measurements in which cosmogenic isotopes such as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I are used as either tracers or chronometers. The utility of such measurements is demonstrated by the fact that most accelerators having AMS capabilities have significant backlogs of samples awaiting measurement. In designing and justifying a new accelerator facility in which AMS was to be a major feature, we sought to advance the field and increase the resources available for it by two steps: (1) development of new research applications in which intentionally added isotopic labels were used rather than just naturally present ones; and (2) enhancement of spectrometer throughout, making new classes of experiments possible by greatly increasing the number of samples that could be measured in individual experiments. Results of the effort to date suggest that development of a family of very small spectrometers optimized for just tritium and/or radiocarbon will be attractive in the near future

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronk, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used routinely for radiocarbon measurements for several years. This thesis describes theoretical work to understand the reasons for low accuracy and range and offers practical solutions. The production and transport of the ions used in the measurements are found to be the most crucial stages in the process. The theories behind ion production by sputtering are discussed and applied to the specific case of carbon sputtered by caesium. Experimental evidence is also examined in relation to the theories. The phenomena of space charge and lens aberrations are discussed along with the interaction between ion beams and gas molecules in the vacuum. Computer programs for calculating phase space transformations are then described; these are designed to help investigations of the effects of space charge and aberrations on AMS measurements. Calculations using these programs are discussed in relation both to measured ion beam profiles in phase space and to the current dependent transmission of ions through the Oxford radiocarbon accelerator. Improvements have been made to this accelerator and these are discussed in the context of the calculations. C - ions are produced directly from carbon dioxide at the Middleton High Intensity Sputter Source. Experiments to evaluate the performance of such a source are described and detailed design criteria established. An ion source designed and built specifically for radiocarbon measurements using carbon dioxide is described. Experiments to evaluate its performance and investigate the underlying physical processes are discussed. (author)

  4. 14C Accelerator mass spectrometry in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, Roberto M.; Linares, R.; Queiroz, E.A.; Oliveira, F.M.; Cardozo, L.; Carvalho, C.R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive technique that enables the direct measurement of carbon isotopes in samples as small as a few milligrams. The possibility of dating or tracing rare or even compound specific carbon samples has application in many fields of science such as Archaeology, Geosciences and Biomedicine. Several kinds of material such as wood, charcoal, carbonate and bone can be chemically treated and converted to graphite to be measured in the accelerator system. The Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil will soon be able to perform the complete 14 C-AMS measurement of samples. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are prepared and converted to carbon dioxide. A stainless steel vacuum system was constructed for carbon dioxide purification and graphitization is performed in sealed tubes in a muffle oven. Graphite samples will be analyzed in a 250 kV Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation which will be installed in the beginning of 2012. With the sample preparation laboratory at LACRON and the SSAMS system, the Physics Institute of UFF will be the first 14 C-AMS facility in Latin America. (author)

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry of small biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2008-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for isotopic ratio measurements. In the biomedical field, AMS can be used to measure femtomolar concentrations of labeled drugs in body fluids, with direct applications in early drug development such as Microdosing. Likewise, the regenerative properties of cells which are of fundamental significance in stem-cell research can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by AMS analysis of human DNA. However, AMS nominally requires about 1 mg of carbon per sample which is not always available when dealing with specific body substances such as localized, organ-specific DNA samples. Consequently, it is of analytical interest to develop methods for the routine analysis of small samples in the range of a few tens of microg. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator to study small biological samples using AMS. Different methods are presented and compared. A (12)C-carrier sample preparation method is described which is potentially more sensitive and less susceptible to contamination than the standard procedures.

  6. Calibration samples for accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, R.L.; Flynn, D.S.; Gabbard, F.

    1981-01-01

    Radioactive samples with precisely known numbers of atoms are useful as calibration sources for lifetime measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry. Such samples can be obtained in two ways: either by measuring the production rate as the sample is created or by measuring the decay rate after the sample has been obtained. The latter method requires that a large sample be produced and that the decay constant be accurately known. The former method is a useful and independent alternative, especially when the decay constant is not well known. The facilities at the University of Kentucky for precision measurements of total neutron production cross sections offer a source of such calibration samples. The possibilities, while quite extensive, would be limited to the proton rich side of the line of stability because of the use of (p,n) and (α,n) reactions for sample production

  7. Radiocarbon dating with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has two great advantages over conventional dating: 1) much smaller samples can be handled and 2) counting time is significantly shorter. Three examples are given for Holocene-age material from east-central Ellesmere Island. The results demonstrate the potential use of this technique as a powerful research tool in studies of Quaternary chronology. Individual fragments of marine shells as small as 0.1 g have been dated successfully at the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. In the case of an aquatic moss from a lake sediment core, an increment 0.5 cm thick could be used instead of a 5 cm-thick slice, thus allowing a much more precise estimate of the onset of organic sedimentation

  8. Accelerator mass analysis at tandem accelerator in Kyoto University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Tazawa, Yuji; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hirose, Masanori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Ogino, Koya; Kohno, Masuchika; Funaba, Hiroyuki

    1996-12-01

    Tandem accelerator in Science Faculty, Kyoto University was renewed from 5 MV in the highest terminal voltage of Van de Graaff to 8 MV of Peletron in 1992. And, AMS effective for cosmic ray, dating, environment measurement and so forth is determined to a column of collaborative studies by universities and institutes in Japan. On this renewal, because of using high energy beam transportation of the present tandem accelerator, super high sensitivity measurement of long half-life radioactive isotopes of heavy elements such as {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I and so forth is aimed, although having some limitations due to small magnet. The accelerator is active in characteristics of the middle size tandem accelerator, and developing {sup 14}C measurement for its standard technology, as aiming at {sup 36}Cl measurement, at first. As a result, in this tandem accelerator stable and high beam transmittance could be obtained by adding a slit at negative ion source to make emittance of incident beam smaller. {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of Modan`s sample obtained by graphitizing NBS oxalic acid and Ded`s sample consisting of mineral graphite produced in Sri Lanka are measured to confirm better reproductivity of this system. Future development of successive incident method is planned to test actual carbon samples. (G.K.)

  9. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    The objective of this thesis is to report the development of a new, alternative process for the flexible production of nitrile compounds in continuous flow. Nitriles are an important class of compounds that find applications as solvents, chemical intermediates and pharmaceutical compounds......, alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  10. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry to nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Zhang Chuan

    2002-01-01

    As an ultra high sensitive analyzing method, accelerator mass spectrometry is playing an important role in the studies of nuclear physics and astrophysics. The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) applications in searching for violation of Pauli exclusion principle and study on supernovae are discussed as examples

  11. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol A. Kulkarni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed.

  12. Surface mass balance contributions to acceleration of Antarctic ice mass loss during 2003-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.; Scambos, Ted; Kim, Baek-Min; Waliser, Duane E.; Tian, Baijun; Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent observations from satellite gravimetry (the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission) suggest an acceleration of ice mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). The contribution of surface mass balance changes (due to variable precipitation) is compared with GRACE?derived mass loss acceleration by assessing the estimated contribution of snow mass from meteorological reanalysis data. We find that over much of the continent, the acceleration can be explained by ...

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry and associated facilities at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Bohra, Archna; Ojha, S.; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Roonwal, G.S.; Chopra, S.; Pattanaik, J.K.; Balakrishnan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility at Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) is developed by upgrading its existing 15UD Pelletron accelerator. Since last two decades Pelletron is mainly used for nuclear physics, materials science, atomic physics, radiation biology and accelerator mass spectrometry is recent development. In addition, a chemistry laboratory in clean room for the chemical processing of samples for AMS studies has also been established. At present the AMS facility is used for 10 Be, 26 Al measurements and soon other long lived radio-isotopes will also be used

  14. A GPU Accelerated Spring Mass System for Surgical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for surgical simulators to dofast and precise calculations of tissue deformation to simulateincreasingly complex morphology in real-time. Unfortunately, evenfast spring-mass based systems have slow convergence rates for largemodels. This paper presents a method to accele...... to accelerate computation of aspring-mass system in order to simulate a complex organ such as theheart. This acceleration is achieved by taking advantage of moderngraphics processing units (GPU)....

  15. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry-current status in techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mineo; Nagai, Hisao; Kobayashi, Koichi.

    1991-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the mass spectrometry by incorporating an accelerator. After samples are ionized, they are accelerated to a certain energy, and mass, energy, nuclear charge (atomic number) are distinguished, and ion counting is made one by one with a heavy ion detector. For the measurement of long half-life radioisotopes, mass spectrometry has been used because of the high sensitivity, but in low energy mass spectrometry, there are the difficulties due to the mixing of the molecular ions having nearly same mass and the existence of isobars. One of the methods solving these difficulties is an accelerator which enables background-free measurement. The progress of AMS is briefly described, and at present, it is carried out in about 30 facilities in the world. In AMS, the analysis is carried out in the order of the ionization of samples, the acceleration of beam, the electron stripping with a thin film, the sorting of the momentum and energy of beam and the identification of particles. The efficiency, sensitivity and accuracy of detection and the application are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Leptoquarks: Neutrino masses and related accelerator signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Hirsch, M.; Kovalenko, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    Leptoquark-Higgs interactions induce mixing between leptoquark (LQ) states with different chiralities once the electroweak symmetry is broken. In such LQ models Majorana neutrino masses are generated at 1-loop order. Here we calculate the neutrino mass matrix and explore the constraints on the parameter space enforced by the assumption that LQ-loops explain current neutrino oscillation data. LQs will be produced at the CERN LHC, if their masses are at or below the TeV scale. Since the fermionic decays of LQs are governed by the same Yukawa couplings, which are responsible for the nontrivial neutrino mass matrix, several decay branching ratios of LQ states can be predicted from measured neutrino data. Especially interesting is that large lepton flavor violating rates in muon and tau final states are expected. In addition, the model predicts that, if kinematically possible, heavier LQs decay into lighter ones plus either a standard model Higgs boson or a Z 0 /W ± gauge boson. Thus, experiments at the LHC might be able to exclude the LQ mechanism as an explanation of neutrino data.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10 9 ) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10 13--15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14 C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3 H, 41 Ca and 26 Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications

  19. The assembly and use of continuous flow systems for chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Joshua; Jamison, Timothy F

    2017-11-01

    The adoption of and opportunities in continuous flow synthesis ('flow chemistry') have increased significantly over the past several years. Continuous flow systems provide improved reaction safety and accelerated reaction kinetics, and have synthesised several active pharmaceutical ingredients in automated reconfigurable systems. Although continuous flow platforms are commercially available, systems constructed 'in-lab' provide researchers with a flexible, versatile, and cost-effective alternative. Herein, we describe the assembly and use of a modular continuous flow apparatus from readily available and affordable parts in as little as 30 min. Once assembled, the synthesis of a sulfonamide by reacting 4-chlorobenzenesulfonyl chloride with dibenzylamine in a single reactor coil with an in-line quench is presented. This example reaction offers the opportunity to learn several important skills including reactor construction, charging of a back-pressure regulator, assembly of stainless-steel syringes, assembly of a continuous flow system with multiple junctions, and yield determination. From our extensive experience of single-step and multistep continuous flow synthesis, we also describe solutions to commonly encountered technical problems such as precipitation of solids ('clogging') and reactor failure. Following this protocol, a nonspecialist can assemble a continuous flow system from reactor coils, syringes, pumps, in-line liquid-liquid separators, drying columns, back-pressure regulators, static mixers, and packed-bed reactors.

  20. A statistical investigation of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Harry

    2017-02-01

    We use the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (the correlation between the ratio of total-to-visible mass and acceleration in galaxies; MDAR) to test the galaxy-halo connection. We analyse the MDAR using a set of 16 statistics that quantify its four most important features: shape, scatter, the presence of a `characteristic acceleration scale', and the correlation of its residuals with other galaxy properties. We construct an empirical framework for the galaxy-halo connection in LCDM to generate predictions for these statistics, starting with conventional correlations (halo abundance matching; AM) and introducing more where required. Comparing to the SPARC data, we find that: (1) the approximate shape of the MDAR is readily reproduced by AM, and there is no evidence that the acceleration at which dark matter becomes negligible has less spread in the data than in AM mocks; (2) even under conservative assumptions, AM significantly overpredicts the scatter in the relation and its normalization at low acceleration, and furthermore positions dark matter too close to galaxies' centres on average; (3) the MDAR affords 2σ evidence for an anticorrelation of galaxy size and Hubble type with halo mass or concentration at fixed stellar mass. Our analysis lays the groundwork for a bottom-up determination of the galaxy-halo connection from relations such as the MDAR, provides concrete statistical tests for specific galaxy formation models, and brings into sharper focus the relative evidence accorded by galaxy kinematics to LCDM and modified gravity alternatives.

  1. Diazo compounds in continuous-flow technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Simon T R; Wirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Diazo compounds are very versatile reagents in organic chemistry and meet the challenge of selective assembly of structurally complex molecules. Their leaving group is dinitrogen; therefore, they are very clean and atom-efficient reagents. However, diazo compounds are potentially explosive and extremely difficult to handle on an industrial scale. In this review, it is discussed how continuous flow technology can help to make these powerful reagents accessible on large scale. Microstructured devices can improve heat transfer greatly and help with the handling of dangerous reagents safely. The in situ formation and subsequent consumption of diazo compounds are discussed along with advances in handling diazomethane and ethyl diazoacetate. The potential large-scale applications of a given methodology is emphasized. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Issues and opportunities in accelerator mass spectrometry for stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has developed in the last 30 years many notable applications to the spectrometry of radioisotopes, particularly in radiocarbon dating. The instrumentation science of trace element AMS (TEAMS) that analyzes stable isotopes, also called Accelerator SIMS or MegaSIMS, while unique in many features, has also shared in many of these significant advances and has pushed TEAMS sensitivity to concentration levels surpassing many competing mass spectroscopic technologies. This review examines recent instrumentation developments, the capabilities of the new instrumentation and discernable trends for future development. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Design of a ram accelerator mass launch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Michael; Armerding, Calvin; Berschauer, Andrew; Christofferson, Erik; Clement, Paul; Gohd, Robin; Neely, Bret; Reed, David; Rodriguez, Carlos; Swanstrom, Fredrick

    1988-01-01

    The ram accelerator mass launch system has been proposed to greatly reduce the costs of placing acceleration-insensitive payloads into low earth orbit. The ram accelerator is a chemically propelled, impulsive mass launch system capable of efficiently accelerating relatively large masses from velocities of 0.7 km/sec to 10 km/sec. The principles of propulsion are based on those of a conventional supersonic air-breathing ramjet; however the device operates in a somewhat different manner. The payload carrying vehicle resembles the center-body of the ramjet and accelerates through a stationary tube which acts as the outer cowling. The tube is filled with premixed gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixtures that burn in the vicinity of the vehicle's base, producing a thrust which accelerates the vehicle through the tube. This study examines the requirement for placing a 2000 kg vehicle into a 500 km circular orbit with a minimum amount of on-board rocket propellant for orbital maneuvers. The goal is to achieve a 50 pct payload mass fraction. The proposed design requirements have several self-imposed constraints that define the vehicle and tube configurations. Structural considerations on the vehicle and tube wall dictate an upper acceleration limit of 1000 g's and a tube inside diameter of 1.0 m. In-tube propulsive requirements and vehicle structural constraints result in a vehicle diameter of 0.76 m, a total length of 7.5 m and a nose-cone half angle of 7 degrees. An ablating nose-cone constructed from carbon-carbon composite serves as the thermal protection mechanism for atmospheric transit.

  4. Tritium depth profiling in carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Pilz, W.; Sun, G.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Bekris, N.; Penzhorn, R.-D.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium depth profiling measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry have been performed at the facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. In order to achieve a uniform erosion at the target surface inside a commercial Cs ion sputtering source and to avoid edge effects, the samples were mechanically scanned and the signals were recorded only during sputtering at the centre of the sputtered area. The sputtered negative ions were mass analysed by the injection magnet of the Tandetron. Hydrogen and deuterium profiles were measured with the Faraday cup between the injection magnet and the accelerator, while the tritium was counted after the accelerator with semiconductor detectors. Depth profiles have been measured for carbon samples which had been exposed to the plasma at the first wall of the Garching fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade and from the European fusion experiment JET, Culham, UK

  5. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry: advances and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Emerging trends in the applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are identified and illustrated with specific examples. Areas of application covered include rapid landscape evolution, calibration of the radiocarbon time scale, compound-specific radiocarbon studies, tracing of nuclear discharges, and searches for extraterrestrial isotopes

  6. 14 C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    The different aspects concerning the 14 C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of 14 C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  7. Neutrino mass and mixing, and non-accelerator experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental knowledge about neutrinos derived from kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at reactors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indication that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing

  8. Injection system of the minicyclotron accelerator mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yonghao; Li Deming; Chen Maobai; Lu Xiangshun

    1999-01-01

    The existing injection system of the SMCAMS (super-sensitive mini-cyclotron accelerator mass spectrometer) is described together with the discussion of its disadvantages exposed after having been operating for five years, which provides a basis for consideration of improvements to the injection system. An optimized injection system with an analytical magnet added prior to the minicyclotron has been proposed and calculated

  9. Surface Mass Balance Contributions to Acceleration of Antarctic Ice Mass Loss during 2003- 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, K. W.; Wilson, C. R.; Scambos, T. A.; Kim, B. M.; Waliser, D. E.; Tian, B.; Kim, B.; Eom, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations from satellite gravimetry (the GRACE mission) suggest an acceleration of ice mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). The contribution of surface mass balance changes (due to variable precipitation) is compared with GRACE-derived mass loss acceleration by assessing the estimated contribution of snow mass from meteorological reanalysis data. We find that over much of the continent, the acceleration can be explained by precipitation anomalies. However, on the Antarctic Peninsula and other parts of West Antarctica mass changes are not explained by precipitation and are likely associated with ice discharge rate increases. The total apparent GRACE acceleration over all of the AIS between 2003 and 2013 is -13.6±7.2 GTon/yr2. Of this total, we find that the surface mass balance component is -8.2±2.0 GTon/yr2. However, the GRACE estimate appears to contain errors arising from the atmospheric pressure fields used to remove air mass effects. The estimated acceleration error from this effect is about 9.8±5.8 GTon/yr2. Correcting for this yields an ice discharge acceleration of -15.1±6.5 GTon/yr2.

  10. Hybrid Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Carson; Chopski, Steven; Murad, Nohra; Allaire, Paul; Mentzer, Robert; Rossano, Joseph; Arabia, Francisco; Throckmorton, Amy

    2018-05-01

    Clinical studies using total artificial hearts (TAHs) have demonstrated that pediatric and adult patients derive quality-of-life benefits from this form of therapy. Two clinically-approved TAHs and other pumps under development, however, have design challenges and limitations, including thromboembolic events, neurologic impairment, infection risk due to large size and percutaneous drivelines, and lack of ambulation, to name a few. To address these limitations, we are developing a hybrid-design, continuous-flow, implantable or extracorporeal, magnetically-levitated TAH for pediatric and adult patients with heart failure. This TAH has only two moving parts: an axial impeller for the pulmonary circulation and a centrifugal impeller for the systemic circulation. This device will utilize the latest generation of magnetic bearing technology. Initial geometries were established using pump design equations, and computational modeling provided insight into pump performance. The designs were the basis for prototype manufacturing and hydraulic testing. The study results demonstrate that the TAH is capable of delivering target blood flow rates of 1-6.5 L/min with pressure rises of 1-92 mm Hg for the pulmonary circulation and 24-150 mm Hg for the systemic circulation at 1500-10 000 rpm. This initial design of the TAH was successful and serves as the foundation to continue its development as a novel, more compact, nonthrombogenic, and effective therapeutic alternative for infants, children, adolescents, and adults with heart failure. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Computer automation of an accelerator mass spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressett, J.D.; Maxson, D.L.; Matteson, S.; McDaniel, F.D.; Duggan, J.L.; Mackey, H.J.; North Texas State Univ., Denton, TX; Anthony, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of trace impurities in electronic materials using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) requires efficient automation of the beam transport and mass discrimination hardware. The ability to choose between a variety of charge states, isotopes and injected molecules is necessary to provide survey capabilities similar to that available on conventional mass spectrometers. This paper will discuss automation hardware and software for flexible, high-sensitivity trace analysis of electronic materials, e.g. Si, GaAs and HgCdTe. Details regarding settling times will be presented, along with proof-of-principle experimental data. Potential and present applications will also be discussed. (orig.)

  12. Determination of {sup 135}Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, C.M.; Charles, C.R.J. [Andre. E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E. [Andre. E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Cornett, R.J. [Andre. E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Litherland, A.E. [IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The ratio of anthropogenic {sup 135}Cs and {sup 137}Cs isotopes is characteristic of a uranium fission source. This research evaluates the technique of isotope dilution (yield tracing) for the purpose of quantifying {sup 135}Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry with on-line isobar separation. Interferences from Ba, Zn{sub 2}, and isotopes of equal mass to charge ratios were successfully suppressed. However, some sample crosstalk from source contamination remains. The transmission and di-fluoride ionization efficiencies of Cs isotopes were found to be 8 × 10{sup −3} and 1.7 × 10{sup −7} respectively. This quantification of {sup 135}Cs using yield tracing by accelerator mass spectrometry shows promise for future environmental sample analysis once the issues of sample crosstalk and low efficiency can be resolved.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry for measurement of long-lived radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, D; Phillips, F M

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes (10)Be, (14)C,(26)A1, 36Cl, and (129)1 can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10(-12) to 10(- 5) and as few as 10(5) atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of halflives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 41Ca with a positive-ion source and the UNILAC accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhof, A.; Henning, W.; Mueller, M.; Roeckl, E.; Schuell, D.; Korschinek, G.; Nolte, E.; Paul, M.

    1987-06-01

    We have made first tests investigating the performance characteristics of the UNILAC accelerator system at GSI, in order to explore the sensitivity achievable in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 41 Ca with high-current positive-ion sources. Positively charged Ca 3+ ions of up to about 100 micro-amperes electrical current were injected from a penning-sputter source and, after further stripping to Ca 9+ , accelerated to 14.3 MeV/nucleon. The combination of velocity-focussing accelerator and magnetic ion-beam transport system completely eliminated background from the other calcium isotopes. Full-stripping and detection of 41 Ca 20+ ions with a magnetic spectrograph provides separation from isobaric 41 K and, at present, a level of sensitivity of 41 Ca/Ca ≅ 2x10 -15 . Future improvements and implications for dating of Pleistoscene samples will be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C determination in CO2 produced from laser decomposition of aragonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, Brad E; Thorrold, Simon R; Roberts, Mark L

    2008-11-01

    The determination of (14)C in aragonite (CaCO(3)) decomposed thermally to CO(2) using an yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped neodymium laser is reported. Laser decomposition accelerator mass spectrometry (LD-AMS) measurements reproduce AMS determinations of (14)C from the conventional reaction of aragonite with concentrated phosphoric acid. The lack of significant differences between these sets of measurements indicates that LD-AMS radiocarbon dating can overcome the significant fractionation that has been observed during stable isotope (C and O) laser decomposition analysis of different carbonate minerals. The laser regularly converted nearly 30% of material removed into CO(2) despite it being optimized for ablation, where laser energy breaks material apart rather than chemically altering it. These results illustrate promise for using laser decomposition on the front-end of AMS systems that directly measure CO(2) gas. The feasibility of such measurements depends on (1) the improvement of material removal and/or CO(2) generation efficiency of the laser decomposition system and (2) the ionization efficiency of AMS systems measuring continuously flowing CO(2).

  16. Sewage sludge irradiators: Batch and continuous flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavale, D.S.; George, J.R.; Shah, M.R.; Rawat, K.P.

    1998-01-01

    The potential threat to the environment imposed by high pathogenic organism content in municipal wastewater, especially the sludge and the world-wide growing aspirations for a cleaner, salubrious environment have made it mandatory for the sewage and sludge to undergo treatment, prior to their ultimate disposal to mother nature. Incapabilities associated with the conventional wastewater treatments to mitigate the problem of microorganisms have made it necessary to look for other alternatives, radiation treatment being the most reliable, rapid and environmentally sustainable of them. To promote the use of radiation for the sludge hygienization, Department of Atomic Energy has endeavoured to set up an indigenous, Sludge Hygienization Research Irradiator (SHRI) in the city of Baroda. Designed for 18.5 PBq of 60 Co to disinfect the digested sludge, the irradiator has additional provision for treatment of effluent and raw sewage. From engineering standpoint, all the subsystems have been functioning satisfactorily since its commissioning in 1990. Prolonged studies, spanning over a period of six years, primarily focused on inactivation of microorganism revealed that 3 kGy dose of gamma radiation is adequate to make the sludge pathogen and odour-free. A dose of 1.6 kGy in raw sewage and 0.5 kGy in effluent reduced coliform counts down to the regulatory discharge limits. These observations reflect a possible cost-effective solution to the burgeoning problem of surface water pollution across the globe. In the past, sub 37 PBq 60 Co batch irradiators have been designed and commissioned successfully for the treatment of sludge. Characterized with low dose delivery rates they are well-suited for treating low volumes of sludge in batches. Some concepts of continuous flow 60 Co irradiators having larger activities, yet simple and economic in design, are presented in the paper

  17. Design of a mesoscale continuous flow route towards lithiated methoxyallene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghers, Sofie; Heugebaert, Thomas S A; Moens, Matthias; Sonck, Jolien; Thybaut, Joris; Stevens, Chris Victor

    2018-05-11

    The unique nucleophilic properties of lithiated methoxyallene allow for C-C bond formation with a wide variety of electrophiles, thus introducing an allenic group for further functionalization. This approach has yielded a tremendously broad range of (hetero)cyclic scaffolds, including API precursors. To date, however, its valorization at scale is hampered by the batch synthesis protocol which suffers from serious safety issues. Hence, the attractive heat and mass transfer properties of flow technology were exploited to establish a mesoscale continuous flow route towards lithiated methoxyallene. An excellent conversion of 94% was obtained, corresponding to a methoxyallene throughput of 8.2 g/h. The process is characterized by short reaction times, mild reaction conditions and a stoichiometric use of reagents. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Report of the consultants' meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. Its use within the IAEA is recommended by the consultants in this meeting. The IAEA programs in which the technology would be useful and beneficial are: safeguards, physical and chemical sciences, human health, food and agriculture, radioactive waste management, radiation safety, industry and earth sciences.

  19. Report of the consultants' meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. Its use within the IAEA is recommended by the consultants in this meeting. The IAEA programs in which the technology would be useful and beneficial are: safeguards, physical and chemical sciences, human health, food and agriculture, radioactive waste management, radiation safety, industry and earth sciences

  20. 36Chlorine accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator. RSP-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Gore, J.A.; Sparrow, H.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.; Hemalatha, M.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half life and available in small amount. The 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out AMS studies with heavy isotopes like 36 Cl and 129 I. Cosmogenic radio isotope 36 Cl is widely being detected using AMS as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36 Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc. As a part of the ongoing AMS programme at 14UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, Mumbai, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36 Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has been developed. 36 Cl measurements carried out to detect and measure the ratio of 36 Cl to 35 Cl in an irradiated sample and dated sample are reported in this paper

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator. PD-1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, P.V.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra sensitive means of counting individual atoms having sufficiently long half-life and available in small amount. The 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator is an ideal machine to carry out AMS studies with heavy isotopes like 36 Cl and 129 I. Cosmogenic radioisotope 36 Cl is widely being detected using AMS as it has got applications in ground water research, radioactive waste management, atmospheric 36 Cl transport mechanism studies of Arctic Alpine ice core etc . The AMS programme at the 14 UD Mumbai Pelletron Accelerator has taken off with the installation of the state of the art Terminal Potential Stabilizer setup and operation of the accelerator in Generating Volt Meter (GVM) mode. Feasibility studies have been carried out for detection/identification of 14 C from a charcoal sample and 3 He in natural Helium. As the primary interest of AMS programme at Mumbai Pelletron Accelerator is related to the cosmogenic nuclei, 36 Cl and 129 I, a segmented gas detector developed for identification of 36 Cl was tested for performance. Recently a beam chopper required for this measurement has also been developed

  2. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutschera, W

    1988-05-20

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -15/ relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 8/ years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and manmade (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotopes are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, mineral exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS will be discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned field. Depending on the specific problem to be investigated, different aspects of an AMS system are of importance. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators.

  3. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1987-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10 -10 to 10 -15 relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10 2 to 10 8 years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and man-made (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotope are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, minerals exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS are discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned fields. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators

  4. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Ditada, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J.P.; Clacher, A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  5. Accelerator mass analyses of meteorites - carbon-14 terrestrial ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Y.; Rucklidge, J.; Beukens, R.; Fireman, E.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-14 terrestrial ages of ten Antarctic meteorites have been measured by the IsoTrace accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The 14 C terrestrial age of 1 gram sample was determined from 14 C concentrations collected at melt and re-melt temperatures, compared with the 14 C concentration of the known Bruderheim chondrite. Yamato-790448 (LL3) chondrite was found to be the oldest terrestrial age of 3x10 4 years in the nine Yamato chondrites, whereas Yamato-791630 (L4) chondrite is considered to be the youngest chondrites less than thousand years. Allan Hills chondrite of ALH-77231 (L6) shows older terrestrial age than the nine Yamato chondrites. New accelerator data of the terrestrial age show higher accuracy with smaller sample than the previous counting method. (author)

  6. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R; Ditada, M [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J P; Clacher, A [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N D [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry - Indian scenario. PD-1-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kailas, S.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator based ultra sensitive Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programmes are being vigorously pursued world over for the past three decades. There are more than 50 accelerator facilities devoted to this multidisciplinary activity. Realizing the importance of this programme, the work related to AMS has commenced at three major accelerator facilities in India: Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar; Interuniversity Accelerator Centre, Delhi; BARC - TIFR Pelletron accelerator facility, Mumbai. At Bhubaneswar, facilities have been set up to carry our high precision 14 C based AMS programmes using the 3 MV Pelletron. A magnetic bouncer, an electrostatic analyzer and a chemistry lab for making samples in graphite form are some of the important features of this AMS facility. A number of users have already got their samples analysed using this AMS facility. The AMS programme has used upto 20 % of beam time available from the 3 MV Pelletron at Bhubaneswar. At Delhi efforts are underway and initial success has been achieved for carrying out 10 Be based AMS programme. Novel method based on simultaneously injecting oxide of Be - ( 9 Be and 17 O) and ( 10 Be and 16 O) has been tried to obtain the ratio of 9 Be / 10 Be. A velocity filter is also available for this programme. Both at Bhubaneswar and Delhi, provision exists in the form of a multi cathode target wheel for carrying out measurements for a number of samples. At Mumbai the emphasis has been in precision measurement of 36 Cl in samples. Segmented anode detector has been developed for the separation of interfering 36 S and 36 Cl isobars

  8. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) sample preparation laboratory in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, Kita D.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Anjos, Roberto M. dos; Linares, Roberto; Queiroz, Eduardo; Oliveira, Fabiana M. de; Cardozo, Laio; Carvalho, Carla R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: For decades Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been widely used for radiocarbon measurements all over the world with application in several fields of science from archaeology to geosciences. This technique provides ultrasensitive analysis of reduced size samples or even specific compounds since sample atoms are accelerated to high energies and measured using nuclear particle detectors. Sample preparation is extremely important for accurate radiocarbon measurement and includes chemical pre-treatment to remove all possible contaminants. For beam extraction in the accelerator ion source, samples are usually converted to graphite. In this work we report a new radiocarbon sample preparation facility installed at the Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are chemically treated and converted to carbon dioxide by hydrolysis or combustion. A stainless steel based vacuum line was constructed for carbon dioxide separation and graphitization is performed in sealed quartz tubes in a muffle oven. Successful graphite production is important to provide stable beam currents and to minimize isotopic fractionation. Performance tests for graphite production are currently under way and isotopic analysis will soon be possible with the acquisition of a Single Stage AMS System by our group. The Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation is a 250 kV air insulated accelerator especially constructed to measure the amount of 14 C in small modern graphite samples to a precision of 0.3 % or better. With the installation of such equipment in the first half of 2012, UFF will be ready to perform the 14C -AMS technique. (author)

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry at Peking University: experiments and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiaer; Guo Zhiyu; Yan Shengqing; Li Renxing; Xiao Min; Li Kun; Liu Hongtao; Liu Kexin; Wang Jianjun; Li Bin; Lu Xiangyang; Yuan Sixun; Chen Tiemei; Gao Shijun; Zheng Shuhui; Chen Chengye; Liu Yan

    1997-01-01

    The Peking University Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (PKUAMS) has been put into routine operation. 14 C measurements of archaeological samples with fast cycling injection have shown good results. The new multi-target high-intensity sputtering ion source has been tested and 10 Be measurements were carried out with a new detector in which both the stopping of the intense flux of 10 B ions and the identification of 10 Be ions are performed. 26 Al samples were also measured. While various applications show good prospects for PKUAMS, further upgrade is desirable

  10. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in aluminum metabolism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirav, O.; Vetterli, D.; Johnson, R.R.; Sutton, R.A.L.; Walker, V.R.; Halabe, A.; Fink, D.; Middleton, R.; Klein, J.

    1990-06-01

    The recent recognition that aluminum causes toxicity in uremic patients and may be associated with Alzheimer's disease has stimulated many studies of its biochemical effects. However, such studies were hampered by the lack of a suitable tracer. In a novel experiment, we have applied the new technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to investigate aluminum kinetics in rats, using as a marker the long-lived isotope 26 Al. We present the first aluminum kinetic model for a biological system. The results clearly demonstrate the advantage this technique holds for isotope tracer studies in animals as well as humans. (Author) (24 refs., 3 figs.)

  11. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in aluminum metabolism studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirav, O; Vetterli, D; Johnson, R R [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Sutton, R A.L.; Walker, V R; Halabe, A [British Columbia U.iv., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Medicine; Fink, D; Middleton, R; Klein, J [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1990-06-01

    The recent recognition that aluminum causes toxicity in uremic patients and may be associated with Alzheimer`s disease has stimulated many studies of its biochemical effects. However, such studies were hampered by the lack of a suitable tracer. In a novel experiment, we have applied the new technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to investigate aluminum kinetics in rats, using as a marker the long-lived isotope {sup 26}Al. We present the first aluminum kinetic model for a biological system. The results clearly demonstrate the advantage this technique holds for isotope tracer studies in animals as well as humans. (Author) (24 refs., 3 figs.).

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry with a coupled tandem-linac system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    A coupled system provides higher energies, which allows one to extend AMS to hitherto untouched mass regions. Another important argument is that the complexity, although bothersome for the operation, increases the selectivity of detecting a particular isotope. The higher-energy argument holds for any heavy-ion accelerator which is capable of delivering higher energy than a tandem. The present use of tandem-linac combinations for AMS, rather than cyclotrons, linacs or combinations of these machines, has mainly to do with the fact that this technique was almost exclusively developed around tandem accelerators. Therefore the tandem-linac combination is a natural extension to higher energies. The use of negative ions has some particular advantages in suppressing background from unwanted elements that do not form stable negative ions (e.g., N, Mg, Ar). On the other hand, this limits the detection of isotopes to elements which do form negative ions. For particular problems it may therefore be advantageous to use a positive-ion machine. What really matters most for choosing one or the other machine is to what extent the entire accelerator system can be operated in a truly quantiative way from the ion source to the detection system. 20 references, 4 figures

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry with the Grenoble and Orsay cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.

    1981-01-01

    Three and one half years ago, at the Rochester meeting, we presented our first accelerator mass spectrometry measurements of 10 Be using the external ion source of the Grenoble cyclotron. Since that time the technique has been used to measure 10 Be in more than 100 geophysical samples. We have also used the ALICE accelerator facility (linear accelerator plus cyclotron) at Orsay to detect 26 Al (half-life 730,000 years) and 41 Ca (100,000 years). While the latter measurements have so far been carried out only with enriched samples, they did demonstrate the feasibility of eliminating interference from lower atomic number isobars by analyzing fully stripped ions of the species being sought. We describe here the present experimental status of these two techniques, following closely two papers presented recently at another conference. We would like to stress that these techniques have not been developed arbitrarily, or as goals in themselves, but rather with certain applications in mind. It is therefore perhaps useful to first briefly outline these applications, which can be divided into three areas

  14. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry at IFIN-HH in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Catana, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Radulescu, M.; Enachescu, M.

    1999-01-01

    An AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) facility was constructed at the FN - 8 MV Tandem Accelerator of the National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest. It represents the first experimental setup of this type in the large geographical area of Eastern Europe. The main components of the facility are: the ion injector deck, the AMS beam line and the detector systems. The injector deck is polarised at 50 kV and contains the high current sputtering ion source (spherical ionizer) followed, for beam transport, by electrostatic devices (single lenses, steerers, quadrupole lenses), a double focussing, 90 angle analysing magnet (Danfysik), a pre-acceleration tube (NEC) and several diagnose and defining elements. The AMS samples are placed in an eight stack magazine attached to the ion source. On the exit side of the Tandem Accelerator tank, a velocity filter and the particle detection system are mounted. The beam line, on the high energy side, is optically achromatic and contains two 90 angle analysing magnets of 150 MEP. For particle detection a Bragg-curve Spectroscopy Detector (ionisation chamber) is used and a multi-anode gas detector with TOF discrimination is under construction. The research programme at this new facility is focused on using 26 Al for medical applications. In future it will be use for 129 I - AMS measurements as a nuclear safeguard. This long lived isotope will be used to monitor and investigate the transport of 129 I in vicinity of three nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe: Kozloduy (Bulgaria), Cernavoda (Romania) and Chernobyl (Ukraine). Measurements will concern soil, precipitation and air samples. Water samples will be collected along the flow of rivers Danube and Dnieper, from the Danube Delta and from coastal areas of the Black Sea. (authors)

  16. Method and apparatus for accelerating a solid mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidman, D.A.; Goldstein, Y.A.

    1984-01-01

    An axi-symmetrical projectile, having a mass ranging from fractions of a gram to kilograms, is accelerated to velocities in the range of 10 5 to 10 7 centimeters per second by a propelling force produced by a plasma resulting from electric discharge. The discharge is imploded against the projectile surface so lines of the magnetic fields are approximately azimuthal around the projectile axis. The projectile is tapered so it experiences a net, stable axial accelerating force along the accelerator axis by the combined action of the magnetic field producing radially directed momentum and pressure on the plasma, the interaction of the magnetic field and ions induced by the plasma on the surface, as well as material the plasma ablates from the surface. The plasma discharge is initiated either in low density background gas between anode and cathode of a discharge module, or along an insulator surface between the electrodes in low density background gas. Alternatively, in either of these situations the discharge can be initiated in a gas which is produced by ablation of the projectile surface. In an alternative situation, the projectile acts as a switch for triggering discharges. Eddy current heating of the projectile is minimized by shaping the discharge current pulse so the plasma has a relatively weak magnetic field when it arrives at the surface, or by making the projectile electrically non-conducting. To provide a long acceleration path, a series of modules is aligned. In one embodiment, the projectile position, as it advances between modules, is sensed and discharges are switched on sequentially in the modules

  17. Catalyst retention in continuous flow with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten, S.C.; Noel, T.; Wang, Q.; Hessel, V.

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the retention of organometallic catalysts in continuous flow processes utilizing supercritical carbon dioxide. Due to its innovative properties, supercritical carbon dioxide offers interesting possibilities for process intensification. As a result of safety and cost

  18. Enhancing chemical synthesis using catalytic reactions under continuous flow conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Asadi, Mousa

    2017-01-01

    Many advantages have been demonstrated for continuous flow chemistry in comparison with batch chemistry; such as easy automation, high level of reproducibility, improved safety, and process reliability. Indeed, with continuous flow processes constant reaction parameters such as temperature, time, amount of reagents, catalyst, solvents, efficient mixing etc. can easily be assured. The research detailed in this PhD thesis takes advantages of flow chemistry applying it to the Fukuyama ...

  19. 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry with a bespoke instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcken, K.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Schnabel, C.; Binnie, S.A.; Xu, S.; Phillips, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmogenic 36 Cl analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a valuable environmental and geological sciences research tool. Overcoming the stable nuclide 36 S isobar interfering with measurement is challenging, however. Traditionally this has required large accelerators, but following recent technical advances it is now possible with ∼30 MeV ion energies. Consequently 5 MV or even smaller modern bespoke spectrometers are now 36 Cl-capable, increasing accessibility and promoting wider and more varied 36 Cl use. However, the technical ability to identify 36 Cl ions is quite distinct from demonstrated high-performance AMS. Such is the theme of this paper. We present a systematic analysis of the accurate measurement of sample radioisotope relative to the stable chlorine, the normalisation of the measured ratio and correction for remaining 36 S interference, all combined with the use of stable-isotope dilution to determine sample Cl concentration to begin with. We conclude by showing that repeated analyses support our claims for routine 3% 36 Cl-AMS data. Accordingly, the modest SUERC spectrometer well competes with the performance of larger longer-established instruments, and the results may be quite generic for modern bespoke instruments.

  20. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaobo; Hu Jinjun; Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a promising method to provide extreme sensitivity measurements of the production yields of long-lived radioisotopes, which cannot be detected by other methods. AMS technique plays an important role in the research of nuclear physics, as well as the application field of AMS covered nuclear science and technology, life science, earth science, environmental science, archaeology etc. The newest AMS field is that of actinide, particularly U and Pu, isotopic assay with expanding applications in nuclear safeguards and monitoring, and as a modern bomb-fallout tracer for atmospheric transport and surface sediment movement. This paper reviews the applications of AMS in the research of nuclear energy and nuclear security including the research of half life of radionuclides, cross section of nuclear reaction. (authors)

  1. Dating of some fossil Romanian bones by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Skog, Goeran; Emilian Alexandrescu; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Krstina; Faarinen, Mikko; Persson, Per

    2002-01-01

    Some fossil bones from Romanian territories have been dated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using the pelletron system from Lund University. The preparation of samples has been the classical procedure to produce pure graphite from bones specimens, The Paleolithic site from Malu Rosu, near Giurgiu was thoroughly analyzed. Two human fossil skulls from Cioclovina and Baia de Fier of special archaeological importance have been estimated to be of around 30 000 years old, a conclusion with great implications for the history of ancient Romania. By this physical analysis, a long scientific dispute was settled. The two fossil human skulls are the only ones of this age from Romania. One could advance the hypothesis that the skulls belong to a certain type of a branch of Central European Cro-Magon, the classical western type, considering both the chronological and the anthropological features. They constitute eastern limit of the Cro-Magnon man type. (authors)

  2. The AMS [Accelerator Mass Spectrometer] program at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, I.D.

    1988-09-01

    Livermore will have an operational Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) by mid-1989 as part of its new Multi-user Tandem Laboratory. The spectrometer was designed primarily for applications in archaeology and the geosciences and was co-funded by the University of California Regents. Radiological control for personnel protection, ion sources and injection systems, the tandem and all beam handling hardware are operated with a distributed processor computer control system. The Tandem is the former University of Washington injector FN which has been upgraded with Dowlish tubes, pelletron charging and SF 6 gas. Design goals for the AMS system, computer aided operation, automated measurement capability, initial results and some of our intended applications will be presented. 5 refs., 2 figs

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry of the heaviest long-lived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator is the heart of the Vienna environmental research accelerator (VERA). ... Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, Institute for Isotopic Research and Nuclear Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; Russian Research Center, “Kurchatov Institute”, Institute of Nuclear ...

  4. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomand, A; Bucholz, B A; Clifford, A J; Duecker, S R; Johnson, H; Schneider, P D; Zulim, R A.

    1999-01-01

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkins disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry: ultrasensitive analysis of global science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.; Bird, J.B.; Fink, D.; Herzog, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), an innovative analytical technique, measures rare atoms at unprecedented levels of sensitivity, revolutionizing the science of radiocarbon dating and accessing new environmental tracers and chronometers. AMS can study extraterrestrial materials, the earth sciences, the future of the global environment, and the history of mankind. The Shroud of Turin, meteorites from Mars, the crown of Charlemagne, and ancient air trapped in Antarctic ice indicate some of the samples on which AMS has been applied. This book has compiled the diverse set of scientific literature into a single volume, suitable as a text or resource on the major AMS-related outcomes, issues, and methods. It explains how scientists and researchers succeeded in counting Carbon-14 atoms at an extraordinary level, examines the impact of AMS on the branches of scientific technology and historical research, provides an understanding of the chronology and significance of past and present environmental changes, details the advances in AMS equipment, technology, and methods as well as the expansion of AMS research

  6. Improving tritium exposure reconstructions using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, A.H.; Hunt, J.R.; Vogel, J.S.; Knezovich, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples and permits greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Because existing methodologies for quantifying tritium have some significant limitations, the development of tritium AMS has allowed improvements in reconstructing tritium exposure concentrations from environmental measurements and provides an important additional tool in assessing the temporal and spatial distribution of chronic exposure. Tritium exposure reconstructions using AMS were previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases. Although the current quantification limit of tritium AMS is not adequate to determine natural environmental variations in tritium concentrations, it is expected to be sufficient for studies assessing possible health effects from chronic environmental tritium exposure. (orig.)

  7. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmacological and toxicological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen; Tompkins, Elaine M; White, Ian N H

    2006-01-01

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), known for radiocarbon dating of archeological specimens, has revolutionized high-sensitivity isotope detection in pharmacology and toxicology by allowing the direct determination of the amount of isotope in a sample rather than measuring its decay. It can quantify many isotopes, including 26Al, 14C, 41Ca, and 3H with detection down to attomole (10(-18)) amounts. Pharmacokinetic data in humans have been achieved with ultra-low levels of radiolabel. One of the most exciting biomedical applications of AMS with 14C-labeled potential carcinogens is the detection of modified proteins or DNA in tissues. The relationship between low-level exposure and covalent binding of genotoxic chemicals has been compared in rodents and humans. Such compounds include heterocyclic amines, benzene, and tamoxifen. Other applications range from measuring the absorption of 26Al to monitoring 41Ca turnover in bone. In epoxy-embedded tissue sections, high-resolution imaging of 14C label in cells is possible. The uses of AMS are becoming more widespread with the availability of instrumentation dedicated to the analysis of biomedical samples. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Ion source memory in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaitre, Georges; Bourles, Didier; Martschini, Martin [ASTER, Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Steier, Peter [VERA, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Since the DREAMS (Dresden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) facility went operational in 2011, constant effort was put into enabling routine measurements of long-lived radionuclides as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 41}Ca. For precise AMS-measurements of the volatile element Cl the key issue is the minimization of the long term memory effect. For this purpose one of the two original HVE sources was mechanically modified, allowing the usage of bigger cathodes with individual target apertures. Additionally a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, a small inter-laboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect in the Cs sputter ion sources of the AMS facilities VERA, ASTER and DREAMS had been investigated by running samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples containing highly enriched {sup 35}Cl({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl > 500). Primary goals of the research are the time constants of the recovery from the contaminated sample ratio to the initial ratio of the sample and the level of the long-term memory effect in the sources.

  9. Installation of a tandem-type accelerator mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushima, Toshihiko; Togawa, Orihiko; Mizutani, Yoshihiko; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi

    2000-02-01

    Tandem-type accelerator mass spectrometer (hereinafter referred to as Tandetron) was installed at the Ominato Facility of Mutsu Establishment, JAERI in April, 1997. The objective of its installation is to investigate the mechanism of the mixing and circulation of seawater in the ocean, by collecting seawater samples around Japan and analyzing the horizontal and vertical distributions of 14 C contained in the samples. The Tandetron consists of two lines to measure isotopic ratios of carbon and those of heavier iodine. The adjustment for the carbon line was finished and the measurements of seawater samples were started. The iodine line, on the other hand, is on the final step of its adjustment and performance tests are being carried out with a TOF (Time of Flight) detector. The iodine line will be used to analyze 129 I released from a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant and other nuclear facilities. In this report, we summarize the status of installation of the carbon and iodine lines for the Tandetron. The report describes the situations of their adjustments until now, the outline of the Tandetron, tests of measurement performance, evaluation and inspection of shielding performance, problems and their solutions, and so on. (author)

  10. Detection of {sup 59}Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Larsson, Ragnar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Chemical Engineering II; Skog, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Quaternary Geology

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of {sup 59}Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. {sup 59}Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of {sup 59}Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of {sup 59}Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of {sup 59}Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of {sup 59}Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for {sup 59}Ni has been determined to 100{+-}30 Bq per gram nickel (100{+-}30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Improving tritium exposure reconstructions using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. R.; Vogel, J. S.; Knezovich, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples and permits greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Because existing methodologies for quantifying tritium have some significant limitations, the development of tritium AMS has allowed improvements in reconstructing tritium exposure concentrations from environmental measurements and provides an important additional tool in assessing the temporal and spatial distribution of chronic exposure. Tritium exposure reconstructions using AMS were previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases. Although the current quantification limit of tritium AMS is not adequate to determine natural environmental variations in tritium concentrations, it is expected to be sufficient for studies assessing possible health effects from chronic environmental tritium exposure. PMID:14735274

  12. Detection of 59Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K.; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, G.

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of 59 Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. 59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of 59 Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of 59 Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of 59 Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of 59 Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for 59 Ni has been determined to 100±30 Bq per gram nickel (100±30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system

  13. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, 14 C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ 14 C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of 14 C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS 14 C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages

  14. Preparation of nanoparticles by continuous-flow microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, Andreas; Reiner, Joseph E.; Vreeland, Wyatt N.; DeVoe, Don L.; Locascio, Laurie E.; Gaitan, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We review a variety of micro- and nanoparticle formulations produced with microfluidic methods. A diverse variety of approaches to generate microscale and nanoscale particles has been reported. Here we emphasize the use of microfluidics, specifically microfluidic systems that operate in a continuous flow mode, thereby allowing continuous generation of desired particle formulations. The generation of semiconductor quantum dots, metal colloids, emulsions, and liposomes is considered. To emphasize the potential benefits of the continuous-flow microfluidic methodology for nanoparticle generation, preliminary data on the size distribution of liposomes formed using the microfluidic approach is compared to the traditional bulk alcohol injection method.

  15. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watrous, Matthew George; Adamic, Mary Louise; Olson, John Eric; Baeck, D. L.; Fox, R. V.; Hahn, P. A.; Jenson, D. D.; Lister, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world's best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  16. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Matthew George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adamic, Mary Louise [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, John Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baeck, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, R. V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hahn, P. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jenson, D. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lister, T. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  17. Continuous-Flow Biochips: Technology, Physical Design Methods and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Araci, Ismail Emre; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    This article is a tutorial on continuous-flow biochips where the basic building blocks are microchannels, and microvalves, and by combining them, more complex units such as mixers, switches, and multiplexers can be built. It also presents the state of the art in flow-based biochip technology...

  18. Pin-count reduction for continuous flow microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Alexander; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers integrating the necessary functions on-chip. We are interested in flow-based biochips, where a continuous flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves, controlled from external pressure sources via off...

  19. Multistep Continuous-Flow Synthesis in Medicinal Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Trine P; Mirsharghi, Sahar; Rummel, Pia Cwarzko

    2013-01-01

    A three-step continuous-flow synthesis system and its application to the assembly of a new series of chemokine receptor ligands directly from commercial building blocks is reported. No scavenger columns or solvent switches are necessary to recover the desired test compounds, which were obtained i...... studies in medicinal chemistry....

  20. Pushing the accelerator - speeding up drug research with accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, R.C. E-mail: colin.garner@cbams.co.uk; Leong, D

    2000-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive analytical method yet developed for elemental isotope analysis and has a broad range of applications. The measurement of {sup 14}C is of most interest to biomedical researchers but few studies have been reported using AMS in drug discovery and development. For biomedical use, {sup 14}C is incorporated into organic molecules by either radiosynthesis or biosynthetically and the isotope is used as a surrogate for the distribution of the radiolabelled molecule either in animal or human studies. The majority of users of {sup 14}C quantitate the radioactivity using decay counting usually with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Our Centre over the past 12 months has been evaluating and validating the use of AMS as an alternative detection method. In vitro spiking studies of human plasma with {sup 14}C-Fluconazole, a prescription antifungal drug has demonstrated an excellent correlation between AMS and LSC (correlation coefficient 0.999). Human Phase I clinical studies have been conducted with radioactive doses ranging from 120 Bq (7000 dpm) to 11 kBq (300 nCi) to provide mass balance, plasma concentration and radioactive metabolite profiling data. Limits of detection of 0.00022 Bq {sup 14}C-labelled drug/ml plasma have been accurately quantitated in a plasma background of 0.0078 Bq/ml (0.013 dpm/ml in a plasma background of 0.47 dpm/ml or 2.72 pMC in a background of 90.19 pMC)

  1. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  2. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buchholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Enright, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCartt, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Malfatti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ognibene, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loots, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stewart, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-08

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  3. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerteltaub, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bench, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buchholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Enright, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loots, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCartt, A. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Malfatti, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ognibene, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stewart, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-21

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  4. Radio-tracing 'without' radioactivity: accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a form of isotope-ratio mass spectrometry that quantifies concentrations of certain long-lived radioisotopes independently of their radioactive decay. AMS is primarily used in the geosciences for determining the age of a material that contains naturally occurring radioisotopes. AMS uses the same high specificity for enriched levels of these radioisotopes in tracing low chemical doses for long periods in biological systems, including humans. AMS provides the safety of low radiative exposure to experimental subjects and investigators, while obtaining attomole sensitivities that are not possible with stable isotope tracers because of their natural isotopic abundances. AMS isotope tracing was first applied to quantifying the genotoxicity of low level environmental chemicals in animals and later in humans. Physiologic concentrations of 14 C-labeled trace nutrients (folate, carotene, and tocopherol) are now measured directly in humans without concern about radiation. The radiative exposure is less than the commonly accepted risks of natural background radiation or the radiation fields found in high altitude air flights. AMS measures very small biological samples (such as 20 microliters of blood) that are easily obtained from human volunteers or model animals at frequent intervals for detailed analysis of kinetic profiles. This high data density enables the construction of compartmental models that elucidate nutrient behavior in tissues that cannot be directly sampled. The pharmaceutical industry is enthusiastic about AMS as a detector for 'micro-dosing' in which the human kinetics of an assuredly non-toxic dose of a candidate drug is tested early in a development project. Molecular tracing uses 3 H or 14 C as common isotopic labels, but AMS contributes to elemental tracing with certain radioisotopes having very long lives, such as 26 AL or 41 Ca. Calcium-41 is a particularly useful isotope in biomedical research because it is used

  5. The future of the accelerator mass spectrometry of rare long-lived radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerators, originally designed for nuclear physics, can be added to mass spectrometric apparatus to increase the sensitivity so that isotope ratios in the range 10 -12 to 10 -15 can be measured routinely. This significant improvement of high-sensitivity mass spectrometry has been called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. The present article addresses the basic principles of accelerator mass spectrometry and some recent applications which show its versatility. In particular, it is noted that accelerator mass spectrometry could play an increasing role in the measurement of the levels of long lived radioactivities in the environment, including the actinides, which result from human activities such as the use of nuclear power. To fulfill this promise, continued research and development is necessary to provide ion sources, various types of heavy ion accelerators and peripheral magnetic and electric analysers. (N.K.)

  6. Acceleration of the GrIS mass loss as observed by GRACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2012-01-01

    The mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has previously been analysed in a variety of ways, including altimetry, gravimetry and mass budget calculations, establishing a continuing decrease in the ice mass, with a number of studies finding acceleration in the mass loss. Here, we examine...

  7. Feasibility studies of RFQ based 14C accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Liu Kexin; Yan Xueqing; Xie Yi; Fang Jiaxun; Chen Jiaer

    2007-01-01

    Electrostatic accelerators with terminal voltage less than 1 MeV have been successfully used for 14 C AMS. This contribution shows that a small RFQ accelerator may also be suitable for AMS 14 C measurements. A well-designed RFQ accelerator can realize a low energy spread and high isotopic selection with a length of less than 1 m and reasonable power consumption. Compared with small tandem accelerators, a RFQ does not need isolation gas and can accept much higher beam currents. Its stripper would be at ground potential and there would be no further acceleration after stripping, so the background from charge exchange processes should be lower. The RFQ design and system are described

  8. Observations of the Coronal Mass Ejection with a Complex Acceleration Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Kirichenko, A. S.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    We study the coronal mass ejection (CME) with a complex acceleration profile. The event occurred on 2009 April 23. It had an impulsive acceleration phase, an impulsive deceleration phase, and a second impulsive acceleration phase. During its evolution, the CME showed signatures of different acceleration mechanisms: kink instability, prominence drainage, flare reconnection, and a CME–CME collision. The special feature of the observations is the usage of the TESIS EUV telescope. The instrument could image the solar corona in the Fe 171 Å line up to a distance of 2 {R}ȯ from the center of the Sun. This allows us to trace the CME up to the LASCO/C2 field of view without losing the CME from sight. The onset of the CME was caused by kink instability. The mass drainage occurred after the kink instability. The mass drainage played only an auxiliary role: it decreased the CME mass, which helped to accelerate the CME. The first impulsive acceleration phase was caused by the flare reconnection. We observed the two-ribbon flare and an increase of the soft X-ray flux during the first impulsive acceleration phase. The impulsive deceleration and the second impulsive acceleration phases were caused by the CME–CME collision. The studied event shows that CMEs are complex phenomena that cannot be explained with only one acceleration mechanism. We should seek a combination of different mechanisms that accelerate CMEs at different stages of their evolution.

  9. The Generation of Diazo Compounds in Continuous-Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Katharina J; Koenigs, Rene M

    2018-03-25

    Toxic, cancerogenic and explosive - these attributes are typically associated with diazo compounds. Nonetheless, diazo compounds are nowadays a highly demanded class of reagents for organic synthesis, yet the concerns with regards to safe and scalable transformations of these compounds are still exceptionally high. Lately, the research area of the continuous-flow synthesis of diazo compounds attracted significant interest and a whole variety of protocols for their "on-demand" preparation have been realized to date. This concept article focuses on the recent developments using continuous-flow technologies to access diazo compounds; thus minimizing risks and hazards when working with this particular class of compounds. In this article we discuss these concepts and highlight different pre-requisites to access and to perform downstream functionalization reaction. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Product differentiation during continuous-flow thermal gradient PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Niel; Wittwer, Carl; Palais, Robert; Gale, Bruce

    2008-06-01

    A continuous-flow PCR microfluidic device was developed in which the target DNA product can be detected and identified during its amplification. This in situ characterization potentially eliminates the requirement for further post-PCR analysis. Multiple small targets have been amplified from human genomic DNA, having sizes of 108, 122, and 134 bp. With a DNA dye in the PCR mixture, the amplification and unique melting behavior of each sample is observed from a single fluorescent image. The melting behavior of the amplifying DNA, which depends on its molecular composition, occurs spatially in the thermal gradient PCR device, and can be observed with an optical resolution of 0.1 degrees C pixel(-1). Since many PCR cycles are within the field of view of the CCD camera, melting analysis can be performed at any cycle that contains a significant quantity of amplicon, thereby eliminating the cycle-selection challenges typically associated with continuous-flow PCR microfluidics.

  11. Physical modeling of shoreline bioremediation: Continuous flow mesoscale basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveum, P.; Ramstad, S.; Faksness, L.G.; Bech, C.; Johansen, B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design and use of continuous flow basin beach models in the study of bioremediation processes, and gives some results from an experiment designed to study the effects of different strategies for adding fertilizers. The continuous flow experimental basin system simulates an open system with natural tidal variation, wave action, and continuous supply and exchange of seawater. Biodegradation and bioremediation processes can thus be tested close to natural conditions. Results obtained using the models show a significant enhancement of biodegradation of oil in a sediment treated with an organic nutrient source, increased nutrient level in the interstitial water, and sediment microbial activity. These physical models gives biologically significant results, and can be used to simulate biodegradation and bioremediation in natural systems

  12. Controlled synthesis of poly(3-hexylthiophene in continuous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Seyler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for organic semiconducting materials with the emergence of organic electronic devices. In particular, large-area devices such as organic thin-film photovoltaics will require significant quantities of materials for device optimization, lifetime testing and commercialization. Sourcing large quantities of materials required for the optimization of large area devices is costly and often impossible to achieve. Continuous-flow synthesis enables straight-forward scale-up of materials compared to conventional batch reactions. In this study, poly(3-hexylthiophene, P3HT, was synthesized in a bench-top continuous-flow reactor. Precise control of the molecular weight was demonstrated for the first time in flow for conjugated polymers by accurate addition of catalyst to the monomer solution. The P3HT samples synthesized in flow showed comparable performance to commercial P3HT samples in bulk heterojunction solar cell devices.

  13. Advanced Continuous Flow Platform for On-Demand Pharmaceutical Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Weeranoppanant, Nopphon; Thomas, Dale A; Tahara, Kohei; Stelzer, Torsten; Russell, Mary Grace; O'Mahony, Marcus; Myerson, Allan S; Lin, Hongkun; Kelly, Liam P; Jensen, Klavs F; Jamison, Timothy F; Dai, Chunhui; Cui, Yuqing; Briggs, Naomi; Beingessner, Rachel L; Adamo, Andrea

    2018-02-21

    As a demonstration of an alternative to the challenges faced with batch pharmaceutical manufacturing including the large production footprint and lengthy time-scale, we previously reported a refrigerator-sized continuous flow system for the on-demand production of essential medicines. Building on this technology, herein we report a second-generation, reconfigurable and 25 % smaller (by volume) continuous flow pharmaceutical manufacturing platform featuring advances in reaction and purification equipment. Consisting of two compact [0.7 (L)×0.5 (D)×1.3 m (H)] stand-alone units for synthesis and purification/formulation processes, the capabilities of this automated system are demonstrated with the synthesis of nicardipine hydrochloride and the production of concentrated liquid doses of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, neostigmine methylsulfate and rufinamide that meet US Pharmacopeia standards. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electrohydrodynamics and other hydrodynamic phenomena in continuous-flow electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saville, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The process known as continuous flow electrophoresis employs an electric field to separate the constituents of particulate samples suspended in a liquid. Complications arise because the electric field generates temperature gradients due to Joule heating and derives an electrohydrodynamic crossflow. Several aspects of the flow are discussed including entrance effects, hydrodynamic stability and a flow restructuring due to the combined effects of buoyancy and the crossflow. 10 references

  15. The advantages of orthogonal acceleration in ICP time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaal, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The OptiMass 8000 incorporates an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A general schematic of the instrument is given. The continuous ion beam is chopped by an orthogonal accelerator. A push out pulse supply is coupled to the accelerator for providing repetitive push-out voltages at a frequency of 30 kHz. The ion packets that are sliced out of the beam then travel within the field free space towards the SMARTGATE ion blanker. Orthogonal accelerator parameters are set to enable temporal-spatial focusing at the SMARTGATE ion blanker, so that iso-mass ion packets are resolved in time. Any ion packets of unwanted specie are ejected from the direction of travel by supplying pulsed voltages onto the deflection plates of the SMARTGATE. The ions to be measured are let through SMARTGATE and travel further down the field free space, to enter the ion reflectron. The ion reflectron increases the resolution of the mass spectrometer by means of temporal-energy focussing. After reflection, the ions travel within the field free space towards the discrete-dynode detector. In comparison to other acceleration geometries used in elemental time-of-flight mass spectrometry the OptiMass 8000 orthogonal acceleration geometry ultimately leads to superior resolution. As the energy spread is about 3 orders of magnitude lower in the time-of-flight direction for an oaTOFMS in comparison to an on-axis system, aberration acquired in the initial stages of acceleration are much lower. As a result the orthogonal acceleration scheme provides superior resolution at the first spatial focus point and the detector. The orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight analyzer of the OptiMass 8000 is able to provide resolution of at least 1800 at mass 238. (author)

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry researches at NIES-TERRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Yasuyuki; Yoneda, Minoru; Tanaka, Atsushi; Uehiro, Takashi; Morita, Masatoshi; Uchida, Masao; Yoshinaga, Jun

    2003-01-01

    In the AMS facility at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES-TERRA; Tandem accelerator for Environmental Research and Radiocarbon Analysis), several research programs have been proceeded, including a program, called GC-AMS, for the compound-specific 14 C analysis in environmental samples

  17. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry with 15 UD pelletron at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The 15 UD Pelletron machine is widely used to carry on investigations in a variety of disciplines like nuclear physics, materials science, radiobiology etc. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry studies with 15 UD pelletron machine at Nuclear Science Centre are elaborated

  18. Radioecological studies at the National Accelerator Centre based on the determination of 129I by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gutierrez, J. M.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Chamizo, E.; Santos, F. J.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2006 a compact system of mass spectrometry with Accelerator (AMS) is installed at the National Center of Accelerators, Seville. After an initial set-up and study have been opening many lines of research in fields such as archeology, geology, paleontology, oceanography, oceanography, internal dosimetry and characterization of radioactive waste, among others. In particular, based on the measurement of 1 29I have made contributions to the field of radioecology and radiation protection. In this work they are summarized and presented some of these investigations. (Author)

  19. Phase-synchronisation in continuous flow models of production networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz-Reiter, Bernd; Tervo, Jan Topi; Freitag, Michael

    2006-04-01

    To improve their position at the market, many companies concentrate on their core competences and hence cooperate with suppliers and distributors. Thus, between many independent companies strong linkages develop and production and logistics networks emerge. These networks are characterised by permanently increasing complexity, and are nowadays forced to adapt to dynamically changing markets. This factor complicates an enterprise-spreading production planning and control enormously. Therefore, a continuous flow model for production networks will be derived regarding these special logistic problems. Furthermore, phase-synchronisation effects will be presented and their dependencies to the set of network parameters will be investigated.

  20. Graphene-based battery electrodes having continuous flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Xu, Wu; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Deyu

    2014-05-24

    Some batteries can exhibit greatly improved performance by utilizing electrodes having randomly arranged graphene nanosheets forming a network of channels defining continuous flow paths through the electrode. The network of channels can provide a diffusion pathway for the liquid electrolyte and/or for reactant gases. Metal-air batteries can benefit from such electrodes. In particular Li-air batteries show extremely high capacities, wherein the network of channels allow oxygen to diffuse through the electrode and mesopores in the electrode can store discharge products.

  1. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, Pavel P., E-mail: povinec@fmph.uniba.sk; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-15

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  2. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for 14C and 129I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  3. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guri; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-03

    Wet macroalgal slurries have been converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) in a bench-scale continuous-flow reactor system. Carbon conversion to a gravity-separable oil product of 58.8% was accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 °C) in a pressurized (subcritical liquid water) environment (20 MPa) when using feedstock slurries with a 21.7% concentration of dry solids. As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent, and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water-soluble organics. Conversion of 99.2% of the carbon left in the aqueous phase was demonstrated. Finally, as a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of residual organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  4. Accelerated mass loss from Greenland ice sheet : Links to atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Waliser, Duane E.; Lee, Choon-Ki; Tian, Baijun; Scambos, Ted; Kim, Baek-Min; van Angelen, Jan H.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive the mass imbalance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is critical to the accurate projection of its contribution to future sea level rise. Greenland's ice mass loss has been accelerating recently. Using satellite Earth-gravity and regional climate model data,

  5. Electromagnetic field modeling and ion optics calculations for a continuous-flow AMS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.X.; Reden, K.F. von; Roberts, M.L.; Schneider, R.J.; Hayes, J.M.; Jenkins, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    A continuous-flow 14 C AMS (CFAMS) system is under construction at the NOSAMS facility. This system is based on a NEC Model 1.5SDH-1 0.5 MV Pelletron accelerator and will utilize a combination of a microwave ion source (MIS) and a charge exchange canal (CXC) to produce negative carbon ions from a continuously flowing stream of CO 2 gas. For high-efficiency transmission of the large emittance, large energy-spread beam from the ion source unit, a large-acceptance and energy-achromatic injector consisting of a 45 o electrostatic spherical analyzer (ESA) and a 90 o double-focusing magnet has been designed. The 45 o ESA is rotatable to accommodate a 134-sample MC-SNICS as a second ion source. The high-energy achromat (90 o double focusing magnet and 90 o ESA) has also been customized for large acceptance. Electromagnetic field modeling and ion optics calculations of the beamline were done with Infolytica MagNet, ElecNet, and Trajectory Evaluator. PBGUNS and SIMION were used for the modeling of ion source unit

  6. A compact permanent magnet cyclotrino for accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, A.T.; Clark, D.J.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Li, C.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors describe the development of a new instrument for the detection of trace amounts of rare isotopes, a Cyclotron Mass Spectrometer (CMS). A compact low energy cyclotron optimized for high mass resolution has been designed and has been fabricated. The instrument has high sensitivity and is designed to measure carbon-14 at abundances of < 10{sup {minus}12}. A novel feature of the instrument is the use of permanent magnets to energize the iron poles of the cyclotron. The instrument uses axial injection, employing a spiral inflector. The instrument has been assembled and preliminary measurements of the magnetic field show that it has a uniformity on the order of 2 parts in 10{sup 4}.

  7. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Bazan, F.

    1980-01-01

    Both crushed (150 to 300 μm) and cored 1.8 mm diameter) samples of SYNROC have been leached with the single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of Cs-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 0 C and 75 0 C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO 3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC C were ranked Cs > Sr greater than or equal to Ca > Ba > Zr. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and PNL 76-68 glass beads. Problems encountered when comparing the leaching rates of different waste forms are discussed

  8. Application of magnetohydrodynamic actuation to continuous flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jonathan; Karamata, Boris; Lillis, Brian; Gleeson, James P; Alderman, John; Collins, John K; Lane, William; Mathewson, Alan; Berney, Helen

    2002-11-01

    Continuous flow microreactors with an annular microchannel for cyclical chemical reactions were fabricated by either bulk micromachining in silicon or by rapid prototyping using EPON SU-8. Fluid propulsion in these unusual microchannels was achieved using AC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) actuation. This integrated micropumping mechanism obviates the use of moving parts by acting locally on the electrolyte, exploiting its inherent conductive nature. Both silicon and SU-8 microreactors were capable of MHD actuation, attaining fluid velocities of the order of 300 microm s(-1) when using a 500 mM KCl electrolyte. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a thermocycling process, was chosen as an illustrative example of a cyclical chemistry. Accordingly, temperature zones were provided to enable a thermal cycle during each revolution. With this approach, fluid velocity determines cycle duration. Here, we report device fabrication and performance, a model to accurately describe fluid circulation by MHD actuation, and compatibility issues relating to this approach to chemistry.

  9. An efficient continuous flow helium cooling unit for Moessbauer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, I.R.; Campbell, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    A Moessbauer continuous flow cooling unit for use with liquid helium over the temperature range 4.2 to 300K is described. The cooling unit can be used for either absorber or source studies in the horizontal plane and it is positioned directly on top of a helium storage vessel. The helium transfer line forms an integral part of the cooling unit and feeds directly into the storage vessel so that helium losses are kept to the minimum. The helium consumption is 0.12 l h -1 at 4.2 K decreasing to 0.055 l h -1 at 40 K. The unit is top loading and the exchange gas cooled samples can be changed easily and quickly. (author)

  10. Review - On-chip diamagnetic repulsion in continuous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Tarn, Noriyuki Hirota, Alexander Iles and Nicole Pamme

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the potential of a microfluidic continuous flow particle separation system based on the repulsion of diamagnetic materials from a high magnetic field. Diamagnetic polystyrene particles in paramagnetic manganese (II chloride solution were pumped into a microfluidic chamber and their deflection behaviour in a high magnetic field applied by a superconducting magnet was investigated. Two particle sizes (5 and 10 μm were examined in two concentrations of MnCl2 (6 and 10%. The larger particles were repelled to a greater extent than the smaller ones, and the effect was greatly enhanced when the particles were suspended in a higher concentration of MnCl2. These findings indicate that the system could be viable for the separation of materials of differing size and/or diamagnetic susceptibility, and as such could be suitable for the separation and sorting of small biological species for subsequent studies.

  11. Continuous-flow chemiluminometric determination of some tetracyclines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syropoulos, A.B.; Calokerinos, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Chemiluminescence is found to be generated by action of lucigenin or hexacyanoferrate(III) on tetracyclines. The reaction with lucigenin exhibits chemiluminescence after alkaline degradation of tetracyclines to the corresponding iso derivatives. The reaction with hexacyanoferrate (III) occurs after acidic degradation of tetracyclines to corresponding anhydro derivatives. The chemiluminescence reaction takes place in alkaline medium, and allows the development of a continuous-flow method for the determination of 1.00-10.0 μgml -1 oxytetracycline and doxycycline. When applied to commercial formulations, the procedure was relatively free from interferences from common excipients. The results obtained for the assay of dosage forms compared well with those obtained by the official methods and demonstrated good accuracy and precision. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 6 tabs

  12. Continuous-flow chemiluminometric determination of some tetracyclines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syropoulos, A B; Calokerinos, A C [University of Athens (greece). Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry

    1991-12-24

    Chemiluminescence is found to be generated by action of lucigenin or hexacyanoferrate(III) on tetracyclines. The reaction with lucigenin exhibits chemiluminescence after alkaline degradation of tetracyclines to the corresponding iso derivatives. The reaction with hexacyanoferrate (III) occurs after acidic degradation of tetracyclines to corresponding anhydro derivatives. The chemiluminescence reaction takes place in alkaline medium, and allows the development of a continuous-flow method for the determination of 1.00-10.0 {mu}gml{sup -1} oxytetracycline and doxycycline. When applied to commercial formulations, the procedure was relatively free from interferences from common excipients. The results obtained for the assay of dosage forms compared well with those obtained by the official methods and demonstrated good accuracy and precision. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 6 tabs.

  13. Development of a continuous-flow fluidic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.M.

    1985-08-01

    A study was made of a fluidic pump which utilizes gas pistons, a venturi-like reverse-flow-diverter, and a planar Y-type flow junction to produce a continuous flow of liquid from a system containing no moving parts. The study included an evaluation of the system performance and of methods for controlling the stability of the fluidic system. A mathematical model of the system was developed for steady-state operation using accepted theories of fluid mechanics. Although more elaborate models are needed for detailed design and optimization of specific systems, the model determined some of the main factors controlling the system performance and will be used in the development of more accurate models. 49 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  14. Microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, Mariana; Dragomir, Maria; Voicu, Anca

    2008-01-01

    Microbiologically induced corrosion is the label generally applied to corrosion involving the action of bacteria on metal surfaces. While different combinations of bacterial species, materials and chemical constituents are interrelated factors, stagnant water is the factor most often mentioned in reported cases. This paper presents the results obtained regarding the testing of microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions in the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. The tests were performed on coupons of SA106gr.B exposed both in stagnant conditions and in flow conditions. The surfaces of these coupons were studied by metallographic technique, while the developed biofilms were analysed using microbiological technique. The correlation of all the results which were obtained emphasized that the minimizing the occurrence of stagnant or low-flow conditions can prove effective in reducing the risk of microbiologically induced corrosion in plant cooling-water systems. (authors)

  15. The origin of mass and experiments on high-energy particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, B.L.

    2006-01-01

    The visible world is one consisting of nucleons and electrons. The mass of nucleon arises from chiral symmetry breaking in quantum chromodynamics, so high energy accelerator experiments cannot give a clue to the nature of mass of matter in the visible world. The origin of the mass of the matter will be clarified when the mechanism of chiral symmetry breaking in quantum chromodynamics is established [ru

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.; Grootes, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Our program is directed toward measurement of 10 Be and 14 C using the FN Tandem accelerator of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory. We began work in June 1977. Our progress and results up to August, 1979, were reported at the Tenth International Radiocarbon Conference. The present report covers chiefly our work since then. For 14 C, we are in the final stages of testing a new sample changer and alternator and are comparing three systems of normalizing the rare and abundant ion beams to give isotope ratios. We have successfully prepared graphitized carbon source samples from contemporary and other material; while the graphitized sources have given the largest carbon beams, we are exploring other possibilities, among which the use of C/Ag combinations appears very promising. For 10 Be, we have begun testing and measuring samples prepared from Antarctic and Peruvian snow and ice. In both the carbon and the beryllium programs various technical developments are in progress in addition to those reported here

  17. Continuous Flow Science in an Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory: Photocatalytic Thiol-Ene Reaction Using Visible Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santandrea, Jeffrey; Kairouz, Vanessa; Collins, Shawn K.

    2018-01-01

    An undergraduate teaching laboratory experiment involving a continuous flow, photocatalytic thiol-ene reaction using visible-light irradiation is described that allows students to explore concepts of green chemistry, photochemistry, photocatalysis, and continuous flow chemistry.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 59Ni and Fe isotopes at the Argonne superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.; Kutschera, W.; Myslek-Laurikainen, B.; Pardo, R.C.; Smither, R.K.; Yntema, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have obtained initial results in an attempt to use the Argonne tandem-linac system for accelerator mass spectrometry of medium-heavy nuclei. Nuclei of the radioisotope 59 Ni (T/sub 1/2 = 7.5 x 10 5 y) and of the stable isotope 58 Fe at low concentrations have been accelerated and clearly identified. The latter experiment is in preparation of a measurement of the half-life of 60 Fe

  19. Earth and environmental sciences by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with the large tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, K.; Takahashi, T.; Sueki, K.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-nuclide AMS system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) has been able to measure environmental levels of long lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I by employing a molecular pilot beam method. In addition, we have been developing 32 Si and 41 Ca AMS systems for future research programs. Recently, the performance of 36 Cl AMS was improved in AMS technique. The standard deviation is within ±2%, and the background is better than 5 x 10 -15 for the 36 Cl/Cl ratio. At present, our Tsukuba AMS research group has focused its activities especially on the measurement of 36 Cl. We have measured more than 500 samples in year including earth and environmental sciences with the Tsukuba AMS system. A detailed description of the Tsukuba AMS system is given and earth and environmental applications are also described briefly. (author)

  20. Accelerating Twisted Mass LQCD with QPhiX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröck, Mario [INFN, Rome3; Simula, Silvano [INFN, Rome3; Strelchenko, Alexei [Fermilab

    2016-07-08

    We present the implementation of twisted mass fermion operators for the QPhiX library. We analyze the performance on the Intel Xeon Phi (Knights Corner) coprocessor as well as on Intel Xeon Haswell CPUs. In particular, we demonstrate that on the Xeon Phi 7120P the Dslash kernel is able to reach 80\\% of the theoretical peak bandwidth, while on a Xeon Haswell E5-2630 CPU our generated code for the Dslash operator with AVX2 instructions outperforms the corresponding implementation in the tmLQCD library by a factor of $\\sim 5\\times$ in single precision. We strong scale the code up to 6.8 (14.1) Tflops in single (half) precision on 64 Xeon Haswell CPUs.

  1. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Nuclear Science Laboratory: Applications to Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, P.; Bauder, W.; Bowers, M.; Lu, W.; Ostdiek, K.; Robertson, D.

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) program at the Nuclear Science Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame is focused on measurements related to galactic radioactivity and to nucleosynthesis of main stellar burning as well as the production of so called Short-Lived Radionuclides (SLRs) in the Early Solar System (ESS). The research program is based around the 11MV FN tandem accelerator and the use of the gas-filled magnet technique for isobar separation. Using a technique that evolved from radiocarbon dating, this paper presents a number of research programs that rely on the use of an 11MV tandem accelerator at the center of the AMS program.

  2. Interface for the rapid analysis of liquid samples by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Thomas, Avi; Daley, Paul F; Salazar Quintero, Gary A; Bench, Graham

    2014-02-04

    An interface for the analysis of liquid sample having carbon content by an accelerator mass spectrometer including a wire, defects on the wire, a system for moving the wire, a droplet maker for producing droplets of the liquid sample and placing the droplets of the liquid sample on the wire in the defects, a system that converts the carbon content of the droplets of the liquid sample to carbon dioxide gas in a helium stream, and a gas-accepting ion source connected to the accelerator mass spectrometer that receives the carbon dioxide gas of the sample in a helium stream and introduces the carbon dioxide gas of the sample into the accelerator mass spectrometer.

  3. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry using TANDEM accelerator in National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizota, Takeshi; Nakao, Setsuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Saito, Kazuo [Particle Beam Sceince Laboratory, Multi-Function Material Science Department, National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) analysis was studied using TANDEM accelerator. The heavy ions of MeV range emit the secondary ions of atoms, molecules, polymers and clusters from the irradiated samples without destruction. The analysis system of PDMS designed and set-up using a mass spectrometer of Time of Flight and the TANDEM accelerator. The system performance was tested for C-60 fullerene on the surface of the samples using 11.2 MeV {sup 28}Si beams produced by the TANDEM accelerator of 1.7MV. The result shows that the hydrogen and hydrocarbons can be analyzed in the range of 1amu unit. The resolution (M/{delta}M) of the Mass Spectrometry system is confirmed to be about 1000 from the separation of the 720 and 721amu peaks, which is attributed to the C-60 fullerene including {sup 13}C atoms. (H. Katsuta)

  4. Bacterial communities in batch and continuous-flow wetlands treating the herbicide S-metolachlor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed, O.F.; Maillard, E.; Vuilleumier, S.; Imfeld, G.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of wetland bacterial communities in the context of pesticide contamination and hydrological regime is scarce. We investigated the bacterial composition in constructed wetlands receiving Mercantor Gold ® contaminated water (960 g L −1 of the herbicide S-metolachlor, > 80% of the S-enantiomer) operated under continuous-flow or batch modes to evaluate the impact of the hydraulic regime. In the continuous-flow wetland, S-metolachlor mass removal was > 40%, whereas in the batch wetland, almost complete removal of S-metolachlor (93–97%) was observed. Detection of ethanesulfonic and oxanilic acid degradation products further indicated S-metolachlor biodegradation in the two wetlands. The dominant bacterial populations were characterised by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 pyrosequencing. The bacterial profiles evolved during the first 35 days of the experiment, starting from a composition similar to that of inlet water, with the use of nitrate and to a lesser extent sulphate and manganese as terminal electron acceptors for microbial metabolism. Proteobacteria were the most abundant phylum, with Beta-, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria representing 26%, 19% and 17% respectively of total bacterial abundance. Bacterial composition in wetland water changed gradually over time in continuous-flow wetland and more abruptly in the batch wetland. Differences in overall bacterial water structure in the two systems were modest but significant (p = 0.008), and S-metolachlor, nitrate, and total inorganic carbon concentrations correlated with changes in the bacterial profiles. Together, the results highlight that bacterial composition profiles and their dynamics may be used as bioindicators of herbicide exposure and hydraulic disturbances in wetland systems. - Highlights: • We evaluated the bacterial composition in wetlands treating S-metolachlor • Hydraulic regime impacted biogeochemical processes and S-metolachlor removal

  5. Mass, charge, and energy separation by selective acceleration with a traveling potential hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, L. Schwager; Barr, W. L.; Lowder, R. S.; Post, R. F.

    1996-10-01

    A traveling electric potential hill has been used to generate an ion beam with an energy distribution that is mass dependent from a monoenergetic ion beam of mixed masses. This effect can be utilized as a novel method for mass separation applied to identification or enrichment of ions (e.g., of elements, isotopes, or molecules). This theory for mass-selective acceleration is presented here and is shown to be confirmed by experiment and by a time-dependent particle-in-cell computer simulation. Results show that monoenergetic ions with the particular mass of choice are accelerated by controlling the hill potential and the hill velocity. The hill velocity is typically 20%-30% faster than the ions to be accelerated. The ability of the hill to pickup a particular mass uses the fact that small kinetic energy differences in the lab frame appear much larger in the moving hill frame. Ions will gain energy from the approaching hill if their relative energy in the moving hill frame is less than the peak potential of the hill. The final energy of these accelerated ions can be several times the source energy, which facilitates energy filtering for mass purification or identification. If the hill potential is chosen to accelerate multiple masses, the heaviest mass will have the greatest final energy. Hence, choosing the appropriate hill potential and collector retarding voltage will isolate ions with the lightest, heaviest, or intermediate mass. In the experimental device, called a Solitron, purified 20Ne and 22Ne are extracted from a ribbon beam of neon that is originally composed of 20Ne:22Ne in the natural ratio of 91:9. The isotopic content of the processed beam is determined by measuring the energy distribution of the detected current. These results agree with the theory. In addition to mass selectivity, our theory can also be applied to the filtration of an ion beam according to charge state or energy. Because of this variety of properties, the Solitron is envisioned to

  6. New method for laser driven ion acceleration with isolated, mass-limited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasch-Colberg, T.; Sokollik, T.; Gorling, K.; Eichmann, U.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P.V.; Andreev, A.; Sandner, W.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to investigate laser driven ion acceleration with fully isolated, mass-limited glass spheres with a diameter down to 8μm is presented. A Paul trap was used to prepare a levitating glass sphere for the interaction with a laser pulse of relativistic intensity. Narrow-bandwidth energy spectra of protons and oxygen ions have been observed and were attributed to specific acceleration field dynamics in case of the spherical target geometry. A general limiting mechanism has been found that explains the experimentally observed ion energies for the mass-limited target.

  7. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Bazan, F.

    1982-01-01

    Both crushed (150- to 300- μm) and cored (1,8- mm-diam) samples of SYNROC have been leached with single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of cesium-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 0 and 75 0 C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO 3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC-C were ranked cesium > strontium greater than or equal to calcium > barium > zirconium. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory 76-68 glass beads. This comparison depends on how the surface areas are determined for each sample. Based on geometric surface areas for SYNROC cores and glass beads, cesium leach rates from SYNROC compare well with both sodium and neptunium leached from the glass. The other elements leached from SYNROC are lower than sodium and neptunium leached from glass. They also vary for each element, while glass shows nearly the same leach rate for both sodium and neptunium

  8. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Bazan, F.

    1981-01-01

    Both crushed (150 to 300 μm) and cored (1.8 mm diameter) samples of SYNROC have been leached with the single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of Cs-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 and 75 0 C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO 3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC C were ranked Cs > Sr greater than or equal to Ca > Ba > Zr. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and PNL 76-68 glass beads. This comparison depends on how the surface areas are determined for each sample. Based on geometric surface areas for SYNROC cores and glass beads Cs leach rates from SYNROC compare well with both Na and Np leached from the glass. The other elements leached from SYNROC are lower than Na and Np leached from glass. They also vary for each element while glass shows nearly the same leach rate for both Na and Np

  9. Simulation of dilated heart failure with continuous flow circulatory support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Wang

    Full Text Available Lumped parameter models have been employed for decades to simulate important hemodynamic couplings between a left ventricular assist device (LVAD and the native circulation. However, these studies seldom consider the pathological descending limb of the Frank-Starling response of the overloaded ventricle. This study introduces a dilated heart failure model featuring a unimodal end systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR to address this critical shortcoming. The resulting hemodynamic response to mechanical circulatory support are illustrated through numerical simulations of a rotodynamic, continuous flow ventricular assist device (cfVAD coupled to systemic and pulmonary circulations with baroreflex control. The model further incorporated septal interaction to capture the influence of left ventricular (LV unloading on right ventricular function. Four heart failure conditions were simulated (LV and bi-ventricular failure with/without pulmonary hypertension in addition to normal baseline. Several metrics of LV function, including cardiac output and stroke work, exhibited a unimodal response whereby initial unloading improved function, and further unloading depleted preload reserve thereby reducing ventricular output. The concept of extremal loading was introduced to reflect the loading condition in which the intrinsic LV stroke work is maximized. Simulation of bi-ventricular failure with pulmonary hypertension revealed inadequacy of LV support alone. These simulations motivate the implementation of an extremum tracking feedback controller to potentially optimize ventricular recovery.

  10. Continuous-flow sheathless diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yilong; Song, Le; Yu, Liandong; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2016-01-01

    Separating particles from a complex mixture is often necessary in many chemical and biomedical applications. This work presents a continuous-flow sheathless diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids through U-shaped microchannels. Due to the action of a size-dependent magnetic force, diamagnetic particles are focused into a single stream in the inlet branch of the U-turn and then continuously separated into two streams in its outlet branch. A 3D numerical model is developed to predict and understand the diamagnetic particle transport during this separation process. The numerical predictions are found to agree well with the experimental observations in a systematic study of the effects of multiple parameters including ferrofluid flow rate, concentration and magnet-channel distance. Additional numerical studies of the geometric effects of the U-turn reveal that increasing the outlet-branch width of the U-turn can significantly enhance the diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids. - Highlights: • Particles are focused and separated in the two branches of a U-shaped microchannel. • Negative magnetophoretic motion in ferrofluids causes the particle deflection. • A 3D numerical model is developed to simulate the particle separation. • Multiple parametric effects are studied both experimentally and numerically. • Increasing the outlet-branch width significantly enhances the particle separation.

  11. Continuous-flow sheathless diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yilong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921 (United States); Song, Le [School of Instrument Science and Opto-electronic Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Yu, Liandong, E-mail: liandongyu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Instrument Science and Opto-electronic Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Xuan, Xiangchun, E-mail: xcxuan@clemson.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Separating particles from a complex mixture is often necessary in many chemical and biomedical applications. This work presents a continuous-flow sheathless diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids through U-shaped microchannels. Due to the action of a size-dependent magnetic force, diamagnetic particles are focused into a single stream in the inlet branch of the U-turn and then continuously separated into two streams in its outlet branch. A 3D numerical model is developed to predict and understand the diamagnetic particle transport during this separation process. The numerical predictions are found to agree well with the experimental observations in a systematic study of the effects of multiple parameters including ferrofluid flow rate, concentration and magnet-channel distance. Additional numerical studies of the geometric effects of the U-turn reveal that increasing the outlet-branch width of the U-turn can significantly enhance the diamagnetic particle separation in ferrofluids. - Highlights: • Particles are focused and separated in the two branches of a U-shaped microchannel. • Negative magnetophoretic motion in ferrofluids causes the particle deflection. • A 3D numerical model is developed to simulate the particle separation. • Multiple parametric effects are studied both experimentally and numerically. • Increasing the outlet-branch width significantly enhances the particle separation.

  12. Continuous-flow technology—a tool for the safe manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Cantillo, David; Kappe, C Oliver

    2015-06-01

    In the past few years, continuous-flow reactors with channel dimensions in the micro- or millimeter region have found widespread application in organic synthesis. The characteristic properties of these reactors are their exceptionally fast heat and mass transfer. In microstructured devices of this type, virtually instantaneous mixing can be achieved for all but the fastest reactions. Similarly, the accumulation of heat, formation of hot spots, and dangers of thermal runaways can be prevented. As a result of the small reactor volumes, the overall safety of the process is significantly improved, even when harsh reaction conditions are used. Thus, microreactor technology offers a unique way to perform ultrafast, exothermic reactions, and allows the execution of reactions which proceed via highly unstable or even explosive intermediates. This Review discusses recent literature examples of continuous-flow organic synthesis where hazardous reactions or extreme process windows have been employed, with a focus on applications of relevance to the preparation of pharmaceuticals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Nanofiltration-Enabled In Situ Solvent and Reagent Recycle for Sustainable Continuous-Flow Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodi, Tamas; Didaskalou, Christos; Kupai, Jozsef; Balogh, Gyorgy T; Huszthy, Peter; Szekely, Gyorgy

    2017-09-11

    Solvent usage in the pharmaceutical sector accounts for as much as 90 % of the overall mass during manufacturing processes. Consequently, solvent consumption poses significant costs and environmental burdens. Continuous processing, in particular continuous-flow reactors, have great potential for the sustainable production of pharmaceuticals but subsequent downstream processing remains challenging. Separation processes for concentrating and purifying chemicals can account for as much as 80 % of the total manufacturing costs. In this work, a nanofiltration unit was coupled to a continuous-flow rector for in situ solvent and reagent recycling. The nanofiltration unit is straightforward to implement and simple to control during continuous operation. The hybrid process operated continuously over six weeks, recycling about 90 % of the solvent and reagent. Consequently, the E-factor and the carbon footprint were reduced by 91 % and 19 %, respectively. Moreover, the nanofiltration unit led to a solution of the product eleven times more concentrated than the reaction mixture and increased the purity from 52.4 % to 91.5 %. The boundaries for process conditions were investigated to facilitate implementation of the methodology by the pharmaceutical sector. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry of heavy elements: /sup 36/Cl to /sup 205/Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, W

    1987-08-25

    Measurements are discussed in which the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry was applied to problems involving heavy radioisotopes. These measurements, which depend on the ion energies that can be reached with the new heavy-ion accelerator facilities, were performed at the Argonne tandem linac accelerator system (ATLAS) and at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI. The topics include a discussion of measurements of long nuclear lifetimes, of radioisotope detection of interest to solar neutrino experiments, and of a determination of the /sup 41/Ca concentration in natural samples of terrestrial origin by making use of isotopic pre-enrichment in an isotope separator. A long-known method of isobar separation, employing a gas-filled magnetic field region, has been revived for some of these measurements and its characteristics and advantages are briefly reviewed.

  15. Development of accelerator mass spectrometry in China Institute of Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ming; Jiang Shan; Dong Kejun; Qiu Jiuzi; Peng Bo; Guan Yongjing; Yin Xinyi; Wu Shaoyong; Li Shihong; Zhou Duo

    2005-01-01

    The measurement method for some radio isotope such as 99 Tc, 182 Hf, 151 Sm is developing in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system, and applications in the fields of nuclear physics, geosciences, life science and materials science is carried out. The brief introduction of these methods and applications are described in this paper. (authors)

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages of amino acid extracts from Californian palaeoindian skeletons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bada, J.L.; Gillespie, R.; Gowlett, J.A.J.; Hedges, R.E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have used accelerator mass spectrometry to determine the radiocarbon ages of the amino acid extracts used in the original racemization studies of skeletal remains found in California. The studies indicate that some of the controversial Californian skeletons, which had been assigned to the Upper Pleistocene, are in fact Holocene. (author)

  17. Continuous-flow solar UVB disinfection reactor for drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonimpa, Eric Gentil; Vadheim, Bryan; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2012-05-01

    Access to safe, reliable sources of drinking water is a long-standing problem among people in developing countries. Sustainable solutions to these problems often involve point-of-use or community-scale water treatment systems that rely on locally-available resources and expertise. This philosophy was used in the development of a continuous-flow, solar UVB disinfection system. Numerical modeling of solar UVB spectral irradiance was used to define temporal variations in spectral irradiance at several geographically-distinct locations. The results of these simulations indicated that a solar UVB system would benefit from incorporation of a device to amplify ambient UVB fluence rate. A compound parabolic collector (CPC) was selected for this purpose. Design of the CPC was based on numerical simulations that accounted for the shape of the collector and reflectance. Based on these simulations, a prototype CPC was constructed using materials that would be available and inexpensive in many developing countries. A UVB-transparent pipe was positioned in the focal area of the CPC; water was pumped through the pipe to allow exposure of waterborne microbes to germicidal solar UVB radiation. The system was demonstrated to be effective for inactivation of Escherichia coli, and DNA-weighted UV dose was shown to govern reactor performance. The design of the reactor is expected to scale linearly, and improvements in process performance (relative to results from the prototype) can be expected by use of larger CPC geometry, inclusion of better reflective materials, and application in areas with greater ambient solar UV spectral irradiance than the location of the prototype tests. The system is expected to have application for water treatment among communities in (developing) countries in near-equatorial and tropical locations. It may also have application for disaster relief or military field operations, as well as in water treatment in areas of developed countries that receive

  18. Comparison of plateletpheresis on three continuous flow cell separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendulkar Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Platelet concentrate (PC remains one of the most important support measures in thrombocytopenic patients. An efficient cell separator is a prerequisite for an optimally functioning apheresis setup. Donor blood count may undergo a temporary reduction after the procedure. Aim: The aim was to find the extent of reduction in donor blood count (hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell, and platelet after plateletpheresis and to evaluate the cell separator for collection efficiency, processing time, and leukoreduction. Study Design and Methods: Two hundred and thirty seven procedures performed on the Amicus (N = 121, Fenwal CS-3000 Plus (N = 50 and Cobe spectra (N = 66 in a one year period were evaluated. The procedures performed on the continuous flow centrifugation (CFC cell separators and donor blood counts (pre and post donation done were included in the study. Results: The percent reduction in hemoglobin (HB, hematocrit (HCT, white blood cell (WBC and platelet count ((PLT ct was 2.9, 3.1, 9, 30.7 (Mean, N = 237 respectively after the procedure. The post donation PLT ct reduced to < 100x109/L (range 80-100 in five donors (N = 5/237, Amicus. The pre donation PLT ct in them was 150-200x109/L. Collection efficiency (percent of Amicus (79.3 was better as compared to the other two machines (CS: 62.5, Cobe: 57.5. PC collected on Cobe spectra had < 1x106 WBC. The donor pre donation PLT levels had a positive correlation to the product PLT yield (r = 0.30, P = 0.000. Conclusion: Monitoring donor blood counts helps to avoid pheresis induced adverse events. A cautious approach is necessary in donors whose pre donation PLT ct is 150-200x109/L. The main variable in PLT yield is donor PLT ct (pre donation. High collection efficiency is a direct measure of an optimally functioning cell separator.

  19. Phantom dark energy with varying-mass dark matter particles: Acceleration and cosmic coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate several varying-mass dark matter particle models in the framework of phantom cosmology. We examine whether there exist late-time cosmological solutions, corresponding to an accelerating universe and possessing dark energy and dark matter densities of the same order. Imposing exponential or power-law potentials and exponential or power-law mass dependence, we conclude that the coincidence problem cannot be solved or even alleviated. Thus, if dark energy is attributed to the phantom paradigm, varying-mass dark matter models cannot fulfill the basic requirement that led to their construction.

  20. Determination of "1"3"5Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, C.M.; Charles, C.R.J.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E.; Cornett, R.J.; Litherland, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of anthropogenic "1"3"5Cs and "1"3"7Cs isotopes is characteristic of a uranium fission source. This research evaluates the technique of isotope dilution (yield tracing) for the purpose of quantifying "1"3"5Cs by accelerator mass spectrometry with on-line isobar separation. Interferences from Ba, Zn_2, and isotopes of equal mass to charge ratios were successfully suppressed. However, some sample crosstalk from source contamination remains. The transmission and di-fluoride ionization efficiencies of Cs isotopes were found to be 8 × 10"−"3 and 1.7 × 10"−"7 respectively. This quantification of "1"3"5Cs using yield tracing by accelerator mass spectrometry shows promise for future environmental sample analysis once the issues of sample crosstalk and low efficiency can be resolved.

  1. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shun-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional centerof- mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month later. They were divided into an elite group (EG; n = 5 and a sub-elite group (SG; n = 5. The triaxial center-of-mass acceleration recorded during a level-surface progressive intensity running protocol (3, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 km/h; 5 min each was used for correlation analyses with running distance during the ultramarathon. The EG showed negative correlations between mediolateral (ML acceleration (r = −0.83 to −0.93, p < 0.05, and between anterior-posterior (AP acceleration and running distance (r = −0.8953 to −0.9653, p < 0.05, but not for vertical control of the center of mass. This study suggests that runners reduce stride length to minimize mediolateral sway and the effects of braking on the trunk; moreover, cadence must be increased to reduce braking effects and enhance impetus. Consequently, the competition level of ultramarathons can be elevated.

  2. Radionuclides in man and his environment measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Erlandsson, Bengt; Kiisk, Madis; Persson, Per; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina; Mattsson, Soeren; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Olofsson, Mikael

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive analytical method for measuring very low concentrations of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. For radioanalytical purposes, the main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than one hour). In this report some current applications of the AMS technique at the Lund Pelletron accelerator are presented, in particular studies of 14 C-labeled pharmaceuticals used in clinical nuclear medicine and biomedical research

  3. Performance of the rebuilt SUERC single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Richard P.; Ascough, Philippa L.; Dougans, Andrew; Gallacher, Paul; Gulliver, Pauline; Rood, Dylan H.; Xu, Sheng; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.

    2015-10-01

    The SUERC bipolar single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) has been dismantled and rebuilt to accommodate an additional rotatable pre-accelerator electrostatic spherical analyser (ESA) and a second ion source injector. This is for the attachment of an experimental positive-ion electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source in addition to a Cs-sputter source. The ESA significantly suppresses oxygen interference to radiocarbon detection, and remaining measurement interference is now thought to be from 13C injected as 13CH molecule scattering off the plates of a second original pre-detector ESA.

  4. Acceleration Signal Characteristics for Intuitional Mass Analysis of Metallic Loose Parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Chang-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) have operated LPMS (Loose Parts Monitoring System) for early detection of the possible presence of metallic parts in the reactor coolant system (RCS); however, analysis of the metallic impact wave characteristics in the LPMS is an important issue because information, such as the mass of the metallic part and the impact location, is not provided. Most studies have concentrated on fieldwork using the frequency characteristics for the analysis of the metallic part mass. Thus, the field engineers cannot analyze signals without special software and access to the system. This paper is intended to introduce a process of intuitional mass analysis using the attenuation rate of the acceleration signal and the intervals between peak signals. Most studies related to mass analysis of a metallic part impact signal in LPMS have used the frequency spectrum. This paper presents a method of using the acceleration signal characteristics for intuitional mass analysis of loose metallic parts. With the method proposed in this paper, because the mass of a metallic part can be understood intuitionally without any special analysis program, intuitional analysis used in parallel with frequency spectrum analysis will be in effect

  5. Importance of the virtual mass force in accelerating steam/water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Y.F.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Virtual mass force is one of the forces that must be considered against accelerating a dispersed fluid flowing in the bulk of a continuous fluid. This force depends on the geometry of the interface and the flow pattern of the two fluids. For dilute two-phase flow mixtures where the bubbles are singly dispersed, the value of the virtual mass force coefficient is dependent on the geometry of the bubble. However, for high void fraction cases, such as depressurization initiated by a pipe break in light water reactors, more intense interaction is expected between the two phase and, therefore, the value of the virtual mass force must be well defined. The effects of implementing the virtual mass force term in the momentum equations of a two-fluid model may be significant for improving the stability of the solution of the conservation equations, the accuracy of the numerical results, and the computation time. In the current work, a new stability criterion is derived after implementing Hancox's model for the virtual mass force in the momentum equations of the six-equation two-phase flow model of TERMIT. A one-dimensional blow-down in a horizontal pipe is considered to investigate the importance of incorporating the virtual mass force in accelerating mixtures flows

  6. Acceleration Signal Characteristics for Intuitional Mass Analysis of Metallic Loose Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Chang-Gyu [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) have operated LPMS (Loose Parts Monitoring System) for early detection of the possible presence of metallic parts in the reactor coolant system (RCS); however, analysis of the metallic impact wave characteristics in the LPMS is an important issue because information, such as the mass of the metallic part and the impact location, is not provided. Most studies have concentrated on fieldwork using the frequency characteristics for the analysis of the metallic part mass. Thus, the field engineers cannot analyze signals without special software and access to the system. This paper is intended to introduce a process of intuitional mass analysis using the attenuation rate of the acceleration signal and the intervals between peak signals. Most studies related to mass analysis of a metallic part impact signal in LPMS have used the frequency spectrum. This paper presents a method of using the acceleration signal characteristics for intuitional mass analysis of loose metallic parts. With the method proposed in this paper, because the mass of a metallic part can be understood intuitionally without any special analysis program, intuitional analysis used in parallel with frequency spectrum analysis will be in effect.

  7. Mass-Discrepancy Acceleration Relation: A Natural Outcome of Galaxy Formation in Cold Dark Matter Halos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Aaron D; Benítez-Llambay, Alejandro; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; Frenk, Carlos S; Bower, Richard; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A; Navarro, Julio F; Fattahi, Azadeh; Oman, Kyle A

    2017-04-21

    We analyze the total and baryonic acceleration profiles of a set of well-resolved galaxies identified in the eagle suite of hydrodynamic simulations. Our runs start from the same initial conditions but adopt different prescriptions for unresolved stellar and active galactic nuclei feedback, resulting in diverse populations of galaxies by the present day. Some of them reproduce observed galaxy scaling relations, while others do not. However, regardless of the feedback implementation, all of our galaxies follow closely a simple relationship between the total and baryonic acceleration profiles, consistent with recent observations of rotationally supported galaxies. The relation has small scatter: Different feedback implementations-which produce different galaxy populations-mainly shift galaxies along the relation rather than perpendicular to it. Furthermore, galaxies exhibit a characteristic acceleration g_{†}, above which baryons dominate the mass budget, as observed. These observations, consistent with simple modified Newtonian dynamics, can be accommodated within the standard cold dark matter paradigm.

  8. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcken, K.M., E-mail: klaus.wilcken@ansto.gov.au [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such {sup 14}C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, {sup 14}C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the {sup 14}N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  9. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors—the test-mass-to-test-mass interferometric link—behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as nongravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterized by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system's free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalize over nuisance parameters. The F statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalized to marginalize over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  10. Bacterial communities in batch and continuous-flow wetlands treating the herbicide S-metolachlor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, O.F. [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France); Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM), UMR 7156 University of Strasbourg/CNRS (France); Maillard, E. [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France); Vuilleumier, S. [Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM), UMR 7156 University of Strasbourg/CNRS (France); Imfeld, G., E-mail: imfeld@unistra.fr [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France)

    2014-11-15

    Knowledge of wetland bacterial communities in the context of pesticide contamination and hydrological regime is scarce. We investigated the bacterial composition in constructed wetlands receiving Mercantor Gold{sup ®} contaminated water (960 g L{sup −1} of the herbicide S-metolachlor, > 80% of the S-enantiomer) operated under continuous-flow or batch modes to evaluate the impact of the hydraulic regime. In the continuous-flow wetland, S-metolachlor mass removal was > 40%, whereas in the batch wetland, almost complete removal of S-metolachlor (93–97%) was observed. Detection of ethanesulfonic and oxanilic acid degradation products further indicated S-metolachlor biodegradation in the two wetlands. The dominant bacterial populations were characterised by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 pyrosequencing. The bacterial profiles evolved during the first 35 days of the experiment, starting from a composition similar to that of inlet water, with the use of nitrate and to a lesser extent sulphate and manganese as terminal electron acceptors for microbial metabolism. Proteobacteria were the most abundant phylum, with Beta-, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria representing 26%, 19% and 17% respectively of total bacterial abundance. Bacterial composition in wetland water changed gradually over time in continuous-flow wetland and more abruptly in the batch wetland. Differences in overall bacterial water structure in the two systems were modest but significant (p = 0.008), and S-metolachlor, nitrate, and total inorganic carbon concentrations correlated with changes in the bacterial profiles. Together, the results highlight that bacterial composition profiles and their dynamics may be used as bioindicators of herbicide exposure and hydraulic disturbances in wetland systems. - Highlights: • We evaluated the bacterial composition in wetlands treating S-metolachlor • Hydraulic regime impacted biogeochemical processes and S-metolachlor removal

  11. Comparing contact and immersion freezing from continuous flow diffusion chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nagare

    2016-07-01

    process that is enhanced compared to immersion freezing due to the position of the INP on the droplet, and we discriminate it from collisional contact freezing, which assumes an enhancement due to the collision of the particle with the droplet. For best comparison with contact freezing results, immersion freezing experiments of the same INPs were performed with the continuous flow diffusion chamber Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber–Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (IMCA–ZINC for a 3 s residence time. In IMCA–ZINC, each INP is activated into a droplet in IMCA and provides its surface for ice nucleation in the ZINC chamber. The comparison of contact and immersion freezing results did not confirm a general enhancement of freezing efficiency for contact compared with immersion freezing experiments. For AgI particles the onset of heterogeneous freezing in CLINCH was even shifted to lower temperatures compared with IMCA–ZINC. For ATD, freezing efficiencies for contact and immersion freezing experiments were similar. For kaolinite particles, contact freezing became detectable at higher temperatures than immersion freezing. Using contact angle information between water and the INP, it is discussed how the position of the INP in or on the droplets may influence its ice nucleation activity.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry-enabled studies: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjomand, Ali

    2010-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is a detection platform with exceptional sensitivity compared with other bioanalytical platforms. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is widely used in archeology for radiocarbon dating applications. Early exploration of the biological and pharmaceutical applications of AMS began in the early 1990s. AMS has since demonstrated unique problem-solving ability in nutrition science, toxicology and pharmacology. AMS has also enabled the development of new applications, such as Phase 0 microdosing. Recent development of AMS-enabled applications has transformed this novelty research instrument to a valuable tool within the pharmaceutical industry. Although there is now greater awareness of AMS technology, recognition and appreciation of the range of AMS-enabled applications is still lacking, including study-design strategies. This review aims to provide further insight into the wide range of AMS-enabled applications. Examples of studies conducted over the past two decades will be presented, as well as prospects for the future of AMS.

  13. Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The talk summarizes the principles of particle acceleration and addresses problems related to storage rings like LEP and LHC. Special emphasis will be given to orbit stability, long term stability of the particle motion, collective effects and synchrotron radiation.

  14. Prospects for experiments on neutrino masses and mixing via neutrino oscillations at future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanou, R.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A study is made of the requirements necessary for improvement in our knowledge of limits in mass and mixing parameters for neutrinos via oscillation phenomena at accelerators. It is concluded that increased neutrino event rate (flux x energy) at modest energy machines (e.g., AGS and LAMPF) is the single most important requirement. This will permit smaller E/L ratios and refinement of systematics

  15. Sample preparation for accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    The adaptation of the University of Washington FN tandem Van de Graaff to accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), as well as some of the results obtained, are described in another paper in this volume (Farwell et al., 1981). Here we discuss our experiences in preparing carbon and beryllium samples that give large and stable ion beams when used in our Extrion cesium sputter source with an inverted cesium beam geometry

  16. The distributed control system of Shanghai mini-cyclotron accelerator mass spectrometer (SMCAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Yuhe

    2001-01-01

    It is mainly introduced the composition, structure, hardware and software designing, function, and the method of communication between the host computer and the ADAM modules of the distributed control system on Shanghai Mini-cyclotron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (SMCAMS). Some detail problems such as controlling the devices staying on high voltage by ADAM-4541 (RS-485 to Fiber Optic Convertor) and optical fiber are also introduced

  17. An electrostatic beam line for accelerator mass spectroscopy of exotic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.; Hemmick, T.; Teng, R.; Kagan, H.; Haas, P.; Boyd, R.N.; Turner, R.; Nitz, D.; Ciampa, D.; Olsen, S.L.; Gentile, T.; Haelen, T.

    1985-01-01

    An all-electrostatic charged particle spectrometer has been constructed to perform high sensitivity searches for exotic states of matter. This spectrometer consists of an electrosatic beam line capable of mass independent charged particle transport and selection together with time-of-flight, energy loss and total energy detectors. This system has been used in conjunction with the tandem electrostatic accelerator at the Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory of the University of Rochester to search for fractionally charged or anomalously heavy particles. (orig.)

  18. An improved method for statistical analysis of raw accelerator mass spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutjahr, A.; Phillips, F.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.

    1987-01-01

    Hierarchical statistical analysis is an appropriate method for statistical treatment of raw accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) data. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that this method yields more accurate estimates of isotope ratios and analytical uncertainty than the generally used propagation of errors approach. The hierarchical analysis is also useful in design of experiments because it can be used to identify sources of variability. 8 refs., 2 figs

  19. ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF CHANGING THE SHOCK ABSORBER RESISTANCE FACTOR ON ACCELERATING THE VEHICLE SPRUNG MASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rozhkov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The change of acceleration of the vehicle sprung mass while changing the coefficient of resistance of the adaptive pendant shock absorber has been analyzed. Presentation of disturbing influence is taken as a harmonic function containing the initial phase. Solution of the system of differential equations is carried out taking into account the initial conditions. The mathematical modeling of the impact of the vehicle sprung mass vibrations at various moments of time of forming the actuating signal on the change of the coefficient of resistance allowed to formulate requirements to the system of adaptive suspension control.

  20. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Mass transfer effects in feeder flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2008-01-01

    Flow conditions play a dominant role in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. Recent plant data of feeders and laboratory tests confirms that there is a close relationship between local flow conditions, expressed by mass transfer coefficient, and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends. The knowledge of local effects can be useful for minimizing the number of inspected components, predicting the location of the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, and determining what components or feeders should be replaced. A similar evaluation applies also to FAC in heat transfer equipment such as heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local mass transfer parameters. For FAC where the flow is dominant, the FAC rate is proportional to mass flux of ferrous ions. The mass flux is the product of the mass transfer coefficient and the concentration difference, or degree of saturation. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products (ferrous ions) from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate in the mass-transfer controlled FAC. The degree of saturation reduces the mass flux, thus reducing the FAC rate. This effect can be significant in long piping, e.g., in outlet feeders. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence for the relationship between local mass transfer conditions and the FAC rate. It shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC and most important flow parameters that affect mass transfer coefficient. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry of Strontium-90 for homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumey, S J; Brown, T A; Hamilton, T F; Hillegonds, D J

    2008-03-03

    Strontium-90 is one of the most hazardous materials managed by agencies charged with protecting the public from radiation. Traditional radiometric methods have been limited by low sample throughput and slow turnaround times. Mass spectrometry offers the advantage of shorter analysis times and the ability to measure samples immediately after processing, however conventional mass spectrometric techniques are susceptible to molecular isobaric interferences that limit their overall sensitivity. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry is insensitive to molecular interferences and we have therefore begun developing a method for determination of {sup 90}Sr by accelerator mass spectrometry. Despite a pervasive interference from {sup 90}Zr, our initial development has yielded an instrumental background of {approx} 10{sup 8} atoms (75 mBq) per sample. Further refinement of our system (e.g., redesign of our detector, use of alternative target materials) is expected to push the background below 10{sup 6} atoms, close to the theoretical limit for AMS. Once we have refined our system and developed suitable sample preparation protocols, we will utilize our capability in applications to homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health.

  3. Cinematic Characterization of Convected Coherent Structures Within an Continuous Flow Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Thomas; Rodriguez, Jesse; Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In this study, two separate diagnostics are applied to a plasma jet produced from a coaxial accelerator with characteristic velocities exceeding 105 m/s and timescales of 10 μs. In the first of these, an ultra-high frame rate CMOS camera coupled to a Z-type laser Schlieren apparatus is used to obtain flow-field refractometry data for the continuous flow Z-pinch formed within the plasma deflagration jet. The 10 MHz frame rate for 256 consecutive frames provides high temporal resolution, enabling turbulent fluctuations and plasma instabilities to be visualized over the course of a single pulse. The unique advantage of this diagnostic is its ability to simultaneously resolve both structural and temporal evolution of instabilities and density gradients within the flow. To allow for a more meaningful statistical analysis of the resulting wave motion, a multiple B-dot probe array was constructed and calibrated to operate over a broadband frequency range up to 100 MHz. The resulting probe measurements are incorporated into a wavelet analysis to uncover the dispersion relation of recorded wave motion and furthermore uncover instability growth rates. Finally these results are compared with theoretical growth rate estimates to identify underlying physics. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program in addition to the National Defense Science Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  4. A Microwave Driven Ion Source for Continuous-Flow AMS (Abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.; Schneider, R.J.; Reden, K.F. von; Hayes, J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Benthien, A.

    2005-01-01

    A microwave-driven, gas-fed ion source originally developed as a high-current positive ion injector for a Tandem accelerator at Chalk River has been the subject of a three-year development program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution NOSAMS facility. Off-line tests have demonstrated positive carbon currents of 1 mA and negative carbon currents of 80 μA from CO2 gas feed. This source and a magnesium charge-exchange canal were coupled to the recombinator of the NOSAMS Tandetron for on-line tests, with the source fed with reference gasses and a combustion device.The promising results obtained have prompted the redesign of the microwave source for use as an on-line, continuous-flow injector for a new AMS facility under construction at NOSAMS. The new design is optimized for best transmission of the extracted positive-ion beam through the charge-exchange canal and for reliable operation at 40 kV extraction voltage. Other goals of the re-design include improved lifetime of the microwave window and the elimination of dead volumes in the plasma generator that increase sample hold-up time.This talk will include a summary of results obtained to date at NOSAMS with the Chalk River source and a detailed description of the new design

  5. Sirolimus formulation with improved pharmacokinetic properties produced by a continuous flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solymosi, Tamás; Angi, Réka; Basa-Dénes, Orsolya; Ránky, Soma; Ötvös, Zsolt; Glavinas, Hristos; Filipcsei, Genovéva; Heltovics, Gábor

    2015-08-01

    The oral bioavailability of Sirolimus is limited by poor dissolution of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a low bioavailability and large inter-individual differences in blood levels. Several different formulation approaches were applied to overcome these disadvantageous pharmacokinetic properties including the marketed oral solution and a tablet form containing wet milled nanocrystals. These approaches deliver improved pharmacokinetics, yet, they share the characteristics of complex production method and composition. We have developed a nanostructured Sirolimus formulation prepared by the controlled continuous flow precipitation of the compound from its solution in the presence of stabilizers. We have shown that contrary to the batch production the process could be easily intensified and scaled up; apparently the uniformity of the precipitation is heavily dependent on the production parameters, most likely the mixing of the solvent and antisolvent. We compared the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the nanostructured formula with the marketed nanoformula. We found that our method produces particles in the size range of less than 100nm. The solid form redispersed instantaneously in water and in biorelevant media. Both the solid form and the redispersed colloid solution showed excellent stability even in accelerated test conditions. The oral administration of the nanostructured formula resulted in faster absorption, higher exposure and higher trough concentrations when compared to the marked form. These advantageous properties could allow the development of solid oral Sirolimus formulae with lower strength and gel based topical delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Designing double-gap linear accelerators for a wide mass range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysenko, W.P.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Rusnak, B.; Krawczyk, F.; Saadatmand, K.; Wan, Z.

    1998-01-01

    For applications like ion implantation, rf linacs using double-gap structures with external resonators can be used because they are practical at low frequencies. However, since the two gaps associated with a given resonator cannot be individually phased, it is not obvious how to build a linac that can efficiently accelerate particles having different mass/charge ratios. This paper describes the beam dynamics of double-gap rf linacs and shows how to maximize the range of mass/charge ratios. The theory also tells one how to rescale a linac tune (i.e., reset the voltages and phases) so that a new particle, having a different mass or charge, will behave similarly to the original particle

  7. Precise isotope analysis. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to human sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Isotope 14 C is a radioisotope with a half-life of 5,730 years, and the measurement of its concentration makes it possible to calculate 'carbon 14 age.' This paper introduces up-to-date accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), which is used in 14 C concentration measurement, and outlines its applied researches in pharmaceutical and medical fields. AMS technique has been applied in Europe and the United States to microdose clinical tests. In Japan, implementation foundation has been ready through the guidelines of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, five years behind Europe and the United States. Although conventional AMS measurement of 14 C required an acceleration voltage of 3 million volts or more, technological development has enabled a high accuracy of 14 C concentration measurement with the low acceleration voltage of about 400,000 volts. A sample for AMS method is graphitized, transformed to carbon ions ( 12 C-, 13 C-, and 14 C-) through negative ionization with cesium irradiation, accelerated under 450 kV, bombarded with argon gas, charge-converted to 12 C+, 13 C+, and 14 C+, and measured. Biological samples for microdose study are plasma, urine, feces, and biological tissue. Model tests showed a very good linearity between the concentrations of 14 C-containing compounds and 14 C concentrations. Applied research on microdose clinical tests is expected to increase its usability in the future, as an effective means of drug development. (A.O.)

  8. Analysis of trace elements by means of accelerator secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ender, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of material composition and trace element concentration is of increasing interest primarily in semiconductor technology but also in metallurgy, geology, biology and medicine. At present, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is in many respects the best technique to provide 3-dimensional information on the distribution of trace elements with concentrations below 1 ppm. However, due to the presence of molecular ions the detectability of many trace elements it restricted because of molecular mass interferences. In addition, detectors used in SIMS have a background counting rate of 0.1-1 Hz, which further limits trace element analysis. In Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) long-lived radionuclides are detected free of molecular interferences and detector background at isotopic ratios as low as 10 -15 . Moreover, isobaric interferences can be reduced as well. In order to benefit from these advantages a combination of SIMS and AMS (Accelerator SIMS) has been proposed almost 20 years ago, but no facility has ever been fully developed. It has been the aim of this work to add a new sputtering chamber for AMS measurements of ultrapure semiconductor material to the existing PSI/ETH AMS facility. To fulfill the requirements of material analysis, an UHV chamber with special precautions against contamination has been built and adapted to the existing AMS setup. For sputtering, a commercial Cs gun with an ExB filter and a 1 o beam bend for neutral particle suppression is used to obtain a pure Cs ion beam. The gun is equipped with different apertures for varying the diameter of the beam spot. With the integrated scanning unit the 10 keV Cs beam can be rastered over approximately 1 mm 2 . This allows different applications such as bulk analysis, depth profiling and imaging. The secondary ion extraction is matched to the ion optical and geometrical requirements of the existing accelerator mass spectrometer. (author) figs., tabs., 67 refs

  9. CologneAMS, a dedicated center for accelerator mass spectrometry in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, A., E-mail: dewald@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Zilges, A. [CologneAMS, Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Dunai, T.; Rethemeyer, J.; Melles, M.; Staubwasser, M. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne (Germany); Kuczewski, B. [Division of Nuclear Chemistry, University of Cologne (Germany); Richter, J. [Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, University of Cologne (Germany); Radtke, U. [Institute of Geography, University of Cologne, Germany, Rectorate, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Blanckenburg, F. von [GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Klein, M. [HVEE, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    CologneAMS is a new centre for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at University of Cologne. It has been funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to improve the experimental conditions especially for those German scientists that apply the AMS technique for their geologic, environmental, nuclear chemical, and nuclear astrophysical research. The new AMS-device has been built by High Voltage Engineering Europe (HVEE) and has been installed in the existing accelerator area of the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The AMS-facility is designed for the spectrometry of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I in and heavy ions up to {sup 236}U and {sup 244}Pu. The central part of the AMS-facility is a 6 MV Tandetron Trade-Mark-Sign accelerator. Downstream of the high energy mass spectrometer an additional switching magnet is used as a further filter element which supplies also additional ports for future extensions of the detector systems. The current status of CologneAMS and the results of the first test measurements will be presented.

  10. Improved detection limit for {sup 59}Ni using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, Ragnar; Kiisk, Madis; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    2002-11-01

    59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. To be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage it is important to measure the 59 Ni level. Accelerator mass spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive method for counting atoms, suitable for 59 Ni measurements. Improvements in the reduction of the background and in the chemical reduction of cobalt, the interfering isobar, have been made. This chemical purification is essential when using small tandem accelerators, <3 MV, combined with the detection of characteristic projectile X-rays. These improvements have lowered the detection limit for 59 Ni by a factor of twenty compared with the first value reported for the Lund AMS facility. Material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analysed and examples of the results are presented.

  11. Design Study of a Mini Cyclotron for the Application of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Yun, Chong-Chul; Youn, Min-Yong; Wang, Sonjong

    2009-01-01

    A small cyclotron has been considered for the use of biomedical accelerator mass spectrometer (BAMS). Over a decade ago a few cyclotrons had been constructed and tested for AMS, but technical problems of instability and poor transmission efficiency caused to discontinue further developments. The major reason of the demise of cyclotron AMS was the dominance of commercial Tandem-based AMS facilities. Now BAMS may ask for more compact system, and perhaps using positive ions to accelerate isotope tracers is a favorable feature. The design of a cyclotron to meet the requirements of BAMS has been performed by adopting a compact magnet with high stability and a flat-topping rf system to increase transmission efficiency.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Håkansson, Karl; Possnert, Göran

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for 14 C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5–10 μg C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.salehpour@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, PO Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hakansson, Karl; Possnert, Goeran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, PO Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for {sup 14}C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5-10 {mu}g C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  14. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  15. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry: accelerated kinetics of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2017-01-01

    Kinetics of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation was recorded in microdroplets by fusing a stream of microdroplets containing 40 µM chlorophyll a or b dissolved in methanol with a stream of aqueous microdroplets containing 35 mM hydrochloric acid (pH = 1·46). The kinetics of the demetallation of chlorophyll in the fused microdroplets (14 ± 6 µm diameter; 84 ± 18 m s-1 velocity) was recorded by controlling the traveling distance of the fused microdroplets between the fusion region and the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The rate of acid-induced chlorophyll demetallation was about 960 ± 120 times faster in the charged microdroplets compared with that reported in bulk solution. If no voltage was applied to the sprayed microdroplets, then the acceleration factor was about 580 ± 90, suggesting that the applied voltage is not a major factor determining the acceleration. Chlorophyll a was more rapidly demetallated than chlorophyll b by a factor of ~26 in bulk solution and ~5 in charged microdroplets. The demetallation kinetics was second order in the H+ concentration, but the acceleration factor of microdroplets compared with bulk solution appeared to be unchanged in going from pH = 1·3 to 7·0. The water:methanol ratio of the fused microdroplets was varied from 7:3 to 3:7 causing an increase in the reaction rate of chlorophyll a demetallation by 20%. This observation demonstrates that the solvent composition, which has different evaporation rates, does not significantly affect the acceleration. We believe that a major portion of the acceleration can be attributed to confinement effects involving surface reactions rather than either to evaporation of solvents or to the introduction of charges to the microdroplets.

  16. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Catana, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Radulescu, M.; Enachescu, M.; Ivascu, M.; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the experimental physical method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in a sample material. Ratios of radionuclides in the range 10 -13 - 10 -15 are normally measured with this technique, corresponding to a sensitivity which makes possible the detection of only 1 Atom in a surrounding material of about 1 Million of Billions of other Atoms. Thus, the AMS has advanced the art of Classical Mass Spectrometry (sensitivity 10 -11 ) to a sensitivity which allows for the first time the performance of special applications in environmental physics, medicine, pharmacology, geology, archaeology, measurements of radio nuclides in the Earth's atmosphere produced by cosmic-rays or by nuclear power plants, applications in astrophysics and in nuclear physics.An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility was constructed at the FN - 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering . The construction was possible in the frame of a co-operation with the Technical University Munich and with financial support from IAEA-Vienna. It represents the first experimental set-up of this type in the large geographical area of Eastern Europe. The main components of the facility are: the ion injector deck, the AMS beam line and the detector systems. The injector deck is polarized at 50 kV and contains the high current sputtering ion source (spherical ionizer) followed, for beam transport, by electrostatic devices (single lenses, steerers, quadrupole lenses) a double focussing, 90 angle analyzing magnet (Danfysik), a pre-acceleration tube (NEC) and several diagnose and defining elements. The AMS samples are placed in an eight-stack magazine attached to the ion source. On the exit side of the tandem accelerator tank, a velocity filter and the particle detection system are mounted. The beam line, on the high-energy side, is optically achromatic and contains two 90 angle analyzing magnets of

  17. Design of the hydraulic shock absorbers characteristics using the acceleration of the sprung mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polach P.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The force-velocity characteristics of the air-pressure-controlled shock absorbers produced in BRANO a.s. were designed on the basis of the relative deflections of the air springs. These characteristics are verified by means of another approach – the acceleration of the sprung mass criterion. The reference vehicle is the same as in the previous case – the SOR C 12 intercity bus. The bus multibody models created in the alaska simulation tool are used for the designed characteristics verification. The results of both approaches are compared.

  18. IAEA meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry, Zagreb, Croatia, April 19-21, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. It is of paramount importance to promote the use of AMS within the IAEA. This would be particularly beneficial for the following IAEA programs: Safeguards, Physical and chemical sciences, Human health, Food and agriculture, Radioactive waste management, Radiation safety, Industry and earth sciences. The IAEA is working in the area of development of reference materials, interlaboratory comparisons and quality assurance. This meeting recommends that this program further developed and extended to include all the AMS isotopes.

  19. IAEA meeting on accelerator mass spectrometry, Zagreb, Croatia, April 19-21, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has developed into a major analytical tool for the measurement of ultra-low-level long-lived radionuclides. It is of paramount importance to promote the use of AMS within the IAEA. This would be particularly beneficial for the following IAEA programs: Safeguards, Physical and chemical sciences, Human health, Food and agriculture, Radioactive waste management, Radiation safety, Industry and earth sciences. The IAEA is working in the area of development of reference materials, interlaboratory comparisons and quality assurance. This meeting recommends that this program further developed and extended to include all the AMS isotopes

  20. Dating of two human fossil bones from Romania by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Skog, Goeran; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Kristina; Faarinen, Mikko; Persson, Per; Alexandrescu, Emilian

    2005-01-01

    In this study we have dated two fossil remains found in Romania, by the method of radiocarbon using the technique of the accelerator mass spectrometry. The human fossil remains from Woman's cave, Baia de Fier, have been dated to the age 30150 ± 800 years BP, and the skull, from the Cioclovina cave has been dated to the age 29000 ± 700 years BP. These are among the most ancient dated human fossil remains from Romania, possibly belonging to the upper Paleolithic, the Aurignacian period. (authors)

  1. Discretization of space and time: mass-energy relation, accelerating expansion of the Universe, Hubble constant

    OpenAIRE

    Roatta , Luca

    2017-01-01

    Assuming that space and time can only have discrete values, we obtain the expression of the gravitational potential energy that at large distance coincides with the Newtonian. In very precise circumstances it coincides with the relativistic mass-energy relation: this shows that the Universe is a black hole in which all bodies are subjected to an acceleration toward the border of the Universe itself. Since the Universe is a black hole with a fixed radius, we can obtain the density of the Unive...

  2. Toward Understanding the Early Stags of an Impulsively Accelerated Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    B. E., & Howard, R. A . 2009, ApJ, 702, 901 Wood, B. E., Karovska , M., Chen, J., Brueckner, G. E., Cook, J. W., & Howard, R. A . 1999, ApJ, 512, 484...ar X iv :1 00 8. 11 71 v1 [ as tr o- ph .S R ] 6 A ug 2 01 0 Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. bubble c© ESO 2010 August 9, 2010 Toward...understanding the early stages of an impulsively accelerated coronal mass ejection SECCHI observations S. Patsourakos1, A . Vourlidas2, and B. Kliem3,4

  3. Applications of Continuous-Flow Photochemistry in Organic Synthesis, Material Science, and Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambié, Dario; Bottecchia, Cecilia; Straathof, Natan J W; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-09-14

    Continuous-flow photochemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention from researchers in academia and industry as this technology provides reduced reaction times, higher selectivities, straightforward scalability, and the possibility to safely use hazardous intermediates and gaseous reactants. In this review, an up-to-date overview is given of photochemical transformations in continuous-flow reactors, including applications in organic synthesis, material science, and water treatment. In addition, the advantages of continuous-flow photochemistry are pointed out and a thorough comparison with batch processing is presented.

  4. Accelerated ice-sheet mass loss in Antarctica from 18-year satellite laser ranging measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimate of the ice-sheet mass balance in Antarctic is very difficult due to complex ice sheet condition and sparse in situ measurements. In this paper, the low-degree gravity field coefficients of up to degree and order 5 derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR measurements are used to determine the ice mass variations in Antarctica for the period 1993–2011. Results show that the ice mass is losing with -36±13 Gt/y in Antarctica, -42±11 Gt/y in the West Antarctica and 6±10 Gt/y in the East Antarctica from 1993 to 2011. The ice mass variations from the SLR 5×5 have a good agreement with the GRACE 5×5, GRACE 5×5 (1&2 and GRACE (60×60 for the entire continent since 2003, but degree 5 from SLR is not sufficient to quantify ice losses in West and East Antarctica, respectively. The rate of ice loss in Antarctica is -28±17 Gt/y for 1993-2002 and -55±17 Gt/y for 2003-2011, indicating significant accelerated ice mass losses since 2003. Furthermore, the results from SLR are comparable with GRACE measurements.

  5. Techniques of tandem accelerator mass spectrometry and their applications to 14C measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Nakai, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Michiaki

    1990-01-01

    A tandem accelerator mass spectrometer, named Tandetron was installed at Nagoya University in 1982 for 14 C measurement. The Tandetron spectrometer consists of a Cs sputter ion source to produce negative carbon ions, a Schenkel-type 2.2 MV tandem accelerator, an ion-beam analyzing apparatus with a charge-energy selector and mass spectrometer, and a heavy ion detector to identify and count 14 C 3+ ions from various background ions. The 14 C concentrations in pine needles, sampled at the Higashiyama Campus of Nagoya University, have been measured since 1984. The present article describes some of the measurements of 14 C in pine needles, focusing on the annual changes in the Δ 14 C value of atmospheric CO 2 , and on the effect upon 14 C concentrations for pine needles of a local 14 CO 2 emission from incineration of radioactive organic solvent wastes containing 14 C, at the Radioisotope Center in the Higashiyama Campus. The pine needles at some locations seemed to be influenced by local artificial CO 2 emission. The Δ 14 C values increased noticeably from 1956 to 1964 as a result of artificial 14 C produced in nuclear weapon tests. (N.K.)

  6. Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments and peats by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The small sample size requirement of accelerator mass spectrometry has allowed the measurement of the 14C/12C ratio for components of various lake sediment and peat samples, with a view to gaining greater understanding of sedimentary processes and to overcome some of the problems associated with conventional radiocarbon dating of sediments, where the 14C/12C ratio of the whole sample, less carbonate, is measured. Some of the fractions of sedimentary organic matter are amenable to analysis. Different molecules are specific to higher plants, algae and bacteria, so estimates of the major sources of input to the sediment can be made. The lipid fraction, though a small component (1%) of the total organic matter, yields most source information. Analyses of n-fatty acids and n-alkanes by capillary gas chromatography are used to interpret the radiocarbon result for the total crude lipid samples in the light of the environmental information so gained. Comparison of the various radiocarbon results for different components of the sediment has provided evidence for the importance of the amount of organic carbon in the samples, microbial attack during storage, the presence of mineral carbon, mixing, hard-water effects and the influence of terrestrial material on lake sediments. A regime has been proposed for the routine preparation of samples at an accelerator mass spectrometry facility in order to provide maximum useful information on a sediment sample. (author)

  7. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, M., E-mail: mehran.salehpour@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics Division, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics Division, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A. [Ion Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV {sup 14,13,12}C{sup 3+} ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  8. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  9. Palladium-Catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling in Continuous Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Len

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon–carbon cross-coupling reactions are among the most important processes in organic chemistry and Suzuki–Miyaura reactions are the most widely used protocols. For a decade, green chemistry and particularly catalysis and continuous flow, have shown immense potential in achieving the goals of “greener synthesis”. To date, it seems difficult to conceive the chemistry of the 21st century without the industrialization of continuous flow process in the area of pharmaceuticals, drugs, agrochemicals, polymers, etc. A large variety of palladium Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reactions have been developed using a continuous flow sequence for preparing the desired biaryl derivatives. Our objective is to focus this review on the continuous flow Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling using homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts.

  10. Continuous flow photocyclization of stilbenes – scalable synthesis of functionalized phenanthrenes and helicenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Lefebvre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A continuous flow oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives has been developed which allows the scalable synthesis of backbone functionalized phenanthrenes and helicenes of various sizes in good yields.

  11. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Yates, Matthew D.; Zaybak, Zehra; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial

  12. A Novel Pressure Indicator for Continuous Flow PCR Chip Using Micro Molded PDMS Pillar Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Xin

    2005-01-01

    .... Continuous flow PCR chip releases biologists from their laborious exercises. The use of such chip is, however, hindered by costly expense of the syringe pump, which is used to maintain a constant flow rate...

  13. Domestic wastewater treatment using multi-electrode continuous flow MFCs with a separator electrode assembly design

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of domestic wastewater using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require reactors with multiple electrodes, but this presents unique challenges under continuous flow conditions due to large changes in the chemical oxygen demand (COD

  14. Applications of continuous-flow photochemistry in organic synthesis, material science, and water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambié, D.; Bottecchia, C.; Straathof, N.J.W.; Hessel, V.; Noël, T.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-flow photochemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention from researchers in academia and industry as this technology provides reduced reaction times, higher selectivities, straightforward scalability, and the possibility to safely use hazardous intermediates and gaseous

  15. Correlation analysis of measurement result between accelerator mass spectrometry and gamma counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Cheng, C.; Oka, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Shimoda, Marika

    2010-01-01

    The guidelines for microdosing in clinical trials were published in Japan in 2008 following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency and the Food and Drug Administration. They recommend utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and positron emission tomography as candidates for monitoring drug metabolites in preclinical studies. We correlate the two methods by measuring appropriately labeled tissue samples from various mouse organs using both AMS and gamma counter. First, we measured the 14 C background levels in mouse organs using the AMS system. We then clarified the relationship between AMS and gamma counter by simultaneously administering 14 C-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 14 C-FDG) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Tissue distribution was examined after 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h using the AMS system for 14 C-FDG and gamma counter for 18 F-FDG. Background 14 C levels were subtracted from the data obtained with radiotracer administration. The background 14 C concentration differed with tissue type measured. Background 14 C concentration in mouse liver was higher than in other organs, and was approximately 1.5-fold that in blood. The correlation coefficient (r) of the measurements between AMS ( 14 C-FDG) and gamma counter ( 18 F-FDG) was high in both normal (0.99 in blood, 0.91 in brain, 0.61 in liver and 0.78 in kidney) and tumor-bearing mice (0.95 in blood and 0.99 in tumor). The clearance profile of 18 F-FDG was nearly identical to that of 14 C-FDG measured with AMS. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis has an excellent correlation with biodistribution measurements using gamma counter. Our results suggest that the combination of AMS and positron emission tomography (PET) can act as a complementary approach to accelerate drug development. (author)

  16. Biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry-isotope measurements at the level of the atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J; Garner, R C

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a nuclear physics technique developed about twenty years ago, that uses the high energy (several MeV) of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to measure very small quantities of rare and long-lived isotopes. Elements that are of interest in biomedicine and environmental sciences can be measured, often to parts per quadrillion sensitivity, i.e. zeptomole to attomole levels (10(-21)-10(-18) mole) from milligram samples. This is several orders of magnitude lower than that achievable by conventional decay counting techniques, such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC). AMS was first applied to geochemical, climatological and archaeological areas, such as for radiocarbon dating (Shroud of Turin), but more recently this technology has been used for bioanalytical applications. In this sphere, most work has been conducted using aluminium, calcium and carbon isotopes. The latter is of special interest in drug metabolism studies, where a Phase 1 adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study can be conducted using only 10 nanoCurie (37 Bq or ca. 0.9 microSv) amounts or less of 14C-labelled drugs. In the UK, these amounts of radioactivity are below those necessary to request specific regulatory approval from the Department of Health's Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC), thus saving on valuable development time and resources. In addition, the disposal of these amounts is much less an environmental issue than that associated with microCurie quantities, which are currently used. Also, AMS should bring an opportunity to conduct "first into man" studies without the need for widespread use of animals. Centre for Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CBAMS) Ltd. is the first fully commercial company in the world to offer analytical services using AMS. With its high throughput and relatively low costs per sample analysis, AMS should be of great benefit to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology

  17. Continuous Flow Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution with Dimethylamine Generated in Situ by Decomposition of DMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Trine P; Larsen, Anders Foller; Ritzén, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A safe, practical, and scalable continuous flow protocol for the in situ generation of dimethylamine from DMF followed by nucleophilic aromatic substitution of a broad range of aromatic and heteroaromatic halides is reported.......A safe, practical, and scalable continuous flow protocol for the in situ generation of dimethylamine from DMF followed by nucleophilic aromatic substitution of a broad range of aromatic and heteroaromatic halides is reported....

  18. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  19. Flow and mass transfer downstream of an orifice under flow accelerated corrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Wael H.; Bello, Mufatiu M.; El Nakla, Meamer; Al Sarkhi, Abdelsalam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer downstream of orifices was numerically and experimentally investigated. ► The surface wear pattern is measured and used to validate the present numerical results. ► The maximum mass transfer coefficient found to occur at approximately 2–3 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice. ► The FAC wear rates were correlated with the turbulence kinetic energy and wall mass transfer in terms of Sherwood number. ► The current study offered very useful information for FAC engineers for better preparation of nuclear plant inspection scope. - Abstract: Local flow parameters play an important role in characterizing flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) downstream of sudden area change in power plant piping systems. Accurate prediction of the highest FAC wear rate locations enables the mitigation of sudden and catastrophic failures, and the improvement of the plant capacity factor. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the local flow and mass transfer parameters on flow accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. In the present study, orifice to pipe diameter ratios of 0.25, 0.5 and 0.74 were investigated numerically by solving the continuity and momentum equations at Reynolds number of Re = 20,000. Laboratory experiments, using test sections made of hydrocal (CaSO 4 ·½H 2 O) were carried out in order to determine the surface wear pattern and validate the present numerical results. The numerical results were compared to the plants data as well as to the present experiments. The maximum mass transfer coefficient found to occur at approximately 2–3 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice. This location was also found to correspond to the location of elevated turbulent kinetic energy generated within the flow separation vortices downstream of the orifice. The FAC wear rates were correlated with the turbulence kinetic energy and wall mass transfer in terms of Sherwood number. The current study found to offer very

  20. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, B.D.; Ognibene, T.; Vogel, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of 14 C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 14 C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the 14 C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with 14 C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS

  1. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry and the prehistoric occupation of the coast of rio de janeiro - brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio Macario, K.; Anjos, R.M.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Facure, A.D.; Elmore, M.; Coimbra, M.; Padron, I.; Najjar, R.; Kneip, L.; Lima, T.A.; Buarque, A.; Barbosa, M.; Seda, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique is a very attractive method for mass spectrometry, since it allows determination of concentrations with sensitivity down to 1 atom of isotope in 1015 atoms, using few milligrams samples. A Tandem accelerator is used as a magnetic and electrostatic analyzer. The determination of these extremely low concentrations of rare isotopes, accelerated to the MeV range, is measured by the direct counting of the atoms by nuclear detection techniques. The AMS technique has been implemented recently in Brazil, at the Pelletron 8UD Tandem accelerator (Sao Paulo), following many improvements on the ion source, VGM control, machine parameters control and detection system. In this contribution we report an important application on AMS on archaeological studies, performed at the Prime Lab (USA), on the dating of ceramics, bones, charcoals, nuts and shells samples of the of the coast of Rio de Janeiro. The main objective of this work is to improve the present knowledge on the occupation of Brazil by the Indians in the prehistoric period, studying archaeological sites located in Rio de Janeiro. Studies show that the Brazilian coast was first occupied in the beginning of the Holocene, with the settlements of the collectors of mollusk, builders of shell mounds, called S ambaquis . The word is of Tupi etymology, tamba meaning shellfish and ki to pile up. The Tupi were a horticultural/potter group who used to live on the Brazilian coast at the time of the European arrivals; they coined the term that describes the main characteristic of the sites - the accumulation of great quantities of mollusk shells. One of objectives of this research is to understand those societies functioning structure, spatial ordering, interaction in the environment and their transformation processes, from the study of their remains. It is intended to analyze the region occupation process dynamics and search for possible links between the pre-pottery population socio

  3. Thermal performance of shallow solar pond under open cycle continuous flow heating mode for heat extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sebaii, A.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt)]. E-mail: aasebaii@yahoo.com; Aboul-Enein, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt); Ramadan, M.R.I. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt); Khallaf, A.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt)

    2006-05-15

    The thermal performance of a shallow solar pond (SSP) under an open cycle continuous flow heating mode for heat extraction has been investigated. A serpentine heat exchanger (HE), either welded to the absorber plate or immersed in the pond water, has been used for extracting the heat. Suitable computer programs have been developed based on analytical solutions of the energy balance equations for the various elements of the SSP in the presence of the HE. Numerical calculations have been performed to study the effect of different operational and configurational parameters on the pond performance. In order to improve the pond performance, optimization of the various dimensions of the pond with the HE has been performed. The effects of the design parameters of the HE's tube, i.e. length L{sub he}, diameter D and mass flow rate m-bar {sub f} of the fluid flowing through the HE, on the pond performance have been investigated. The outlet temperature of the HE's fluid T{sub fo} is found to increase with increase of the HE length L{sub he}, and it decreases with increase of the mass flow rate of the HE's fluid m-bar {sub f} up to typical values for these parameters. Typical values for L{sub he} and m-bar {sub f} are found to be 4m and 0.004kg/s beyond which the change in T{sub fo} becomes insignificant. Experiments have been performed for the pond under different operational conditions with a HE welded to the absorber plate. To validate the proposed mathematical models, comparisons between experimental and theoretical results have been performed. Good agreement has been achieved.

  4. Fluoride sample matrices and reaction cells — new capabilities for isotope measurements in accelerator mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliades J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new techniques, which extend the range of elements that can be analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS, and which increase its isobar selection capabilities, have been recently introduced. The first consists of embedding the sample material in a fluoride matrix (e.g. PbF2, which facilitates the production, in the ion source, of fluoride molecular anions that include the isotope of interest. In addition to forming anions with large electron binding energies and thereby increasing the range of analysable elements, in many cases by selection of a molecular form with a particular number of fluorine atoms, some isobar discrimination can be obtained. The second technique, for the significant reduction of atomic isobar interferences, is used following mass selection of the rare isotope. It consists of the deceleration, cooling and reaction of the rare mass beam with a gas, selected so that unwanted isobars are greatly attenuated in comparison with the isotope of interest. Proof of principle measurements for the analysis of 36C1 and 41Ca have provided encouraging results and work is proceeding on the integration of these techniques in a new AMS system planned for installation in late 2012 at the University of Ottawa.

  5. Dating of two paleolithic human fossils from Romania by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Alexandrescu, Emilian; Skog, Goeran; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Kristina; Faarinen, Mikko; Persson, Per

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we have dated two human fossil remains from Romania by the method of radiocarbon using the technique of the accelerator mass spectrometry at the Pelletron system of Lund University, Sweden. Two fossil remains appear to be the most ancient human remains ever dated in our country: 1. A skull, a scapula and a tibia found in Baia de Fier in the Women's Cave, in Gorj county in the province Oltenia, by Constantin Nicolaescu-Plopsor in 1952; 2. A skull found in Cioclovina cave, near commune Bosorod, Hunedoara county in Transilvania by a worker at the exploitation of phosphate deposits in the year 1941. The skull was examined by Francisc Rainer, anthropologist, and Ioan Simionescu, geologist, who published a study. The lack of stratigraphic observations made very difficult the cultural and chronological assignments of this skull. These authors advanced the hypothesis that the skull belongs to the man of the type Homo sapiens fossilis. At the same time, a number of archaeologists believed that the skull might belong to a modern man, but there have been doubts about this matter. Under this circumstance, dating of the two skulls by physical analysis methods appears to be decisive. Samples of bone were taken from the scapula and tibia from Woman's cave, Baia de Fier and from the skull from Cioclovina cave. The content of Carbon 14 have been determined in the two samples by using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), performed at the AMS system of Lund University, in Sweden. Usually, the collagen amount sufficient for AMS measurements can be extracted from bone fragments with masses of 1 g or more (what provides 5 to 10% of the original collagen content). But, in the situation of the present studied fossil remains, because of the small quantity of bone samples and because the bones were very old, the determination of radiocarbon in the skulls was not so simple. For the preparation of the bone samples, we have essentially applied the Longin method

  6. Effective Acceleration Model for the Arrival Time of Interplanetary Shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2017-12-01

    In a previous work (Paouris and Mavromichalaki in Solar Phys. 292, 30, 2017), we presented a total of 266 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) with as much information as possible. We developed a new empirical model for estimating the acceleration of these events in the interplanetary medium from this analysis. In this work, we present a new approach on the effective acceleration model (EAM) for predicting the arrival time of the shock that preceds a CME, using data of a total of 214 ICMEs. For the first time, the projection effects of the linear speed of CMEs are taken into account in this empirical model, which significantly improves the prediction of the arrival time of the shock. In particular, the mean value of the time difference between the observed time of the shock and the predicted time was equal to +3.03 hours with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 18.58 hours and a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 22.47 hours. After the improvement of this model, the mean value of the time difference is decreased to -0.28 hours with an MAE of 17.65 hours and an RMSE of 21.55 hours. This improved version was applied to a set of three recent Earth-directed CMEs reported in May, June, and July of 2017, and we compare our results with the values predicted by other related models.

  7. Plans for laser ablation of actinides into an ECRIS for accelerator mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.C.; Kondev, F.G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Palchan, T.; Rehm, E.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; McGrath, C.; Imel, G.

    2012-01-01

    A project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment is underway. This project will require the measurement of many samples with high precision and accuracy. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly-charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) followed by linear acceleration. We have chosen to use laser ablation as the best means of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we believe this technique will have more efficiency and lower chamber contamination thus reducing 'cross talk' between samples. In addition construction of a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between multiple samples is part of the project. The status of the project, design, and goals for initial offline ablation tests will be discussed as well as the overall project schedule. The paper is followed by the associated poster. (authors)

  8. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R.Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14 C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided. (orig.)

  9. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided.

  10. Application of tandem accelerator mass spectrometor to the chronological study of archaeological samples on Ryukyu Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Hatsuo; Higa, Kenichi; Nakai, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Toshio.

    1987-01-01

    Along with the urbanization of rural areas on Ryukyu Islands, many shell mounds and pre-historic sites have been found in resent years. Chrological studies of shell samples from these mounds will lead to the better understanding of cultural background for the pre-historic human activities on the Ryukyu Islands. C-14 dating by beta counting is the common method to obtain the ages of the archaeological samples. It is, however, very limitted in obtaining the absolute ages by the above mehtod due to the large sample sizes required and time consuming. There are many newly obtained archaeological samples left unstudied in detail. The alternate is a method called Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) installed at Nagoya University, which is composed of the tandem type accelerator to measure very low concentration of C-14 in archaeological samples. The system has been designed particularly to measure the radio-carbon and has advantages of being small sample size and very little time consuming for C-14 measurement as compared with the beta counting. It is the aim of this work to apply the above AMS for obtaining the absolute ages of the archaeological samples. The results agreed well with those estimated by the Erthenware method (relative method of dating), which ranged from 500 to 6000 y.b.p. The results may be helpful for the chronological arrangement of the samples and for the understanding of pre-historical human activities on the Ryukyu Islands. (author)

  11. A dedicated AMS setup for medium mass isotopes at the Cologne FN tandem accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, M.; Altenkirch, R.; Feuerstein, C.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Hackenberg, G.; Herb, S.; Bhandari, P.; Heinze, S.; Stolz, A.; Dewald, A.

    2017-09-01

    AMS measurements of medium mass isotopes, e.g. of 53Mn and 60Fe, are gaining interest in various fields of operation, especially geoscience. Therefore a dedicated AMS setup has been built at the Cologne 10 MV FN tandem accelerator. This setup is designed to obtain a sufficient suppression of the stable isobars at energies around 100 MeV. In this contribution we report on the actual status of the new setup and the first in-beam tests of its individual components. The isobar suppression is done with (dE/dx) techniques using combinations of energy degrader foils with an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) and a time of flight (ToF) system, as well as a (dE/dx),E gas ionization detector. Furthermore, the upgraded ion source and its negative ion yield measurement for MnO- are presented.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona: geochronology of the climate record and connections with the ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Burr, G.S.; Beck, J.W.; Donahue, D.J.; Biddulph, D.; Hatheway, A.L.; Lange, T.E.; McHargue, L.R.

    2003-01-01

    There are many diverse uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Carbon-14 studies at our laboratory include much research related to paleoclimate, both with 14 C as a tracer of past changes in environmental conditions as observed in corals, marine sediments and many terrestrial records. Terrestrial records such as forest fires can also show the influence of oceanic oscillations, whether they are short-term such as ENSO, or on the millennial time scale. In tracer applications, we have developed the use of 129 I as well as 14 C as tracers for nuclear pollution studies around radioactive waste dump sites, in collaboration with IAEA. We discuss some applications carried out in Tucson for several of these fields and hope to give some idea of the breadth of these studies

  13. "1"4C ages and calendar years of Japanese swords measured with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Kazuhiro; Matsubara, Akihiro; Kokubu, Yoko; Nakamura, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Steel of Japanese swords has been produced with Tatara process from iron sand and charcoal. Carbon dissolved in steel was absorbed from wooden charcoal fuel during the production of the steel. From the decay of "1"4C activity in the steel, the "1"4C age of Japanese sword can be determined. The "1"4C ages of 4 Japanese swords were measured with accelerator mass spectrometry and calibrated to calendar years. Each "1"4C age provided plural calendar year periods with definite probabilities, and one of the periods agreed with the production year of each sword that was determined from the sword master's name cut in the grip of his sword after taking the age range of charcoal used for steel production and usage for several generations of the same names of sword masters into account. (author)

  14. Radiocarbon dating study of ancient iron artifacts with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igaki, Kenzo; Nakamura, Toshio; Hirasawa, Masahiro; Kato, Masako; Sano, Masamichi.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the correlation between the highly resistive property against corrosion and the production method of the ancient iron artifacts, it is essentially necessary to determine the accurate ages of them. 14 C dating with accelerator mass spectrometry was applied to the two ancient artifacts, a Japanese sword of wrought iron with a production age ranged from the Kamakura to the Muromachi period, estimation based on the fabrication technique, and a planning adze of cast iron with no definite origin. The former was dated as 880±150 y.B.P., corresponding to the calendar age ranged from AD 1021 to AD 1263, and the latter as 1720±160 y.B.P. with the calendar age ranged from AD 119 to AD 457 and from AD 483 to AD 508. These calibrated 14 C ages for both iron artifacts are consistent with the relevant ages conjectured by historical considerations. (author)

  15. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona: Geochronology of the Climatic Record and Connections with the Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Jull

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many diverse uses of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. 14C studies at our laboratory include much research related to paleoclimate, with 14C as a tracer of past changes in environmental conditions as observed in corals, marine sediments, and many terrestrial records. Terrestrial records can also show the influence of oceanic oscillations, whether they are short term, such as ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation, or on the millennial time scale. In tracer applications, we have developed the use of 129I as well as 14C as tracers for nuclear pollution studies around radioactive waste dump sites, in collaboration with IAEA. We discuss some applications carried out in Tucson, AZ, for several of these fields and hope to give some idea of the breadth of these studies.

  16. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  17. Penetration of bomb radiocarbon in the tropical Indian Ocean measured by means of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, E.; Arnold, M.; Maurice, P.; Monfray, P.; Duplessy, J.C.; Oestlund, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Radiocarbon measurements performed on seawater samples by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enable to reduce by a factor of 2000 the water sample size needed for the 14 C measurements. Therefore no chemical treatment on board the oceanographic vessel is required. Seventy-four AMS 14 C determinations on samples collected in the tropical-equatorial Indian Ocean during the second leg of the INDIGO program (1986) are presented and compared with the β-counting results obtained during the same campaign and the GEOSECS program (1978). A pronounced reduction of the equatorial 14 C deficit suggests that substantial amounts of bomb- 14 C are associated with the westward flowing Pacific water which enters the Indian Ocean via passages through the Indonesia Archipelago and/or to meridional mixing with 14 C-rich water of the southern subtropical gyre. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  19. Plan for mass accelerator spectrometry at Gif-sur-Yvette and Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, B.; Bianchi, L.; Delibrias, G.; Koechlin, Y.

    1981-05-01

    From early 50', a carbon 14 dating laboratory was created at the Centre des Faibles Radioactivites de Gif-sur-Yvette (C.F.R.). From this time, more than 5,000 archaeological and geological samples were measured with the Libby method by this laboratory. C.F.R. is in the way to actualize its dating activities with the new accelerator method. A 3 MV General Ionex Tandetron is planed to be located at Gif-sur-Yvette next year and shared with Orsay University for 14 C. 10 Be and 36 Cl mass spectroscopy measurement. During the same time attempts have been made to adapt the Super FN Tandem of the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay for 14 C dating

  20. Label-assisted mass spectrometry for the acceleration of reaction discovery and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pardo, Jaime R.; Chai, David I.; Liu, Song; Mrksich, Milan; Kozmin, Sergey A.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of new reactions expands our knowledge of chemical reactivity and enables new synthetic applications. Accelerating the pace of this discovery process remains challenging. We describe a highly effective and simple platform for screening a large number of potential chemical reactions in order to discover and optimize previously unknown catalytic transformations, thereby revealing new chemical reactivity. Our strategy is based on labelling one of the reactants with a polyaromatic chemical tag, which selectively undergoes a photoionization/desorption process upon laser irradiation, without the assistance of an external matrix, and enables rapid mass spectrometric detection of any products originating from such labelled reactants in complex reaction mixtures without any chromatographic separation. This method was successfully used for high-throughput discovery and subsequent optimization of two previously unknown benzannulation reactions.

  1. Decay kinetics of nicotine/NNK-DNA adducts in vivo studied by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, H.F.; He, L.; Liu, Y.F.; Liu, K.X.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Ma, H.J.; Li, K.

    2000-01-01

    The decay kinetics of nicotine-DNA adducts and NNK-DNA adducts in mice liver after single dosing was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The decay is characterized by a two-stage process. The half-lives of nicotine-DNA adducts are 1.3 d (4-24 h) and 7.0 d (1-21 d), while for NNK-DNA adducts are 0.7 d (4-24 h) and 18.0 d (1-21 d). The relatively faster decay of nicotine-DNA adducts suggests that the genotoxicity of nicotine is weaker than that of NNK. The in vitro study shows that the metabolization of nicotine is necessary for the final formation of nicotine-DNA adducts, and nicotine Δ1'(5') iminium ion is a probable metabolite species that binds to DNA molecule covalently

  2. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ( 14 C) and radiocalcium ( 41 Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS 14 C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO 2 to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high 13 C - ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, 14 C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP

  3. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schindler@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-15

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO{sub 2} and reduced to graphite to determine {sup 14}C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  4. Validation of a continuous flow method for the determination of soluble iron in atmospheric dust and volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, Lucio E; Gaiero, Diego M; Palomeque, Miriam E

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth and is supplied to the remote areas of the ocean mainly through atmospheric dust/ash. The amount of soluble Fe in dust/ash is a major source of uncertainty in modeling-Fe dissolution and deposition to the surface ocean. Currently in the literature, there exist almost as many different methods to estimate fractional solubility as researchers in the field, making it difficult to compare results between research groups. Also, an important constraint to evaluate Fe solubility in atmospheric dust is the limited mass of sample which is usually only available in micrograms to milligrams amounts. A continuous flow (CF) method that can be run with low mass of sediments (solubility studies on dust/ash. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan, E-mail: s.pavetich@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Akhmadaliev, Shavkat [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Golser, Robin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Keddadouche, Karim [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Martschini, Martin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Steier, Peter [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Long-term memory effect in negative ion sources investigated for chlorine isotopes. • Interlaboratory comparison of four up-to date negative ion sources. • Ion source improvement at DREAMS for minimization of long-term memory effect. • Long-term memory effect is the limitation for precise AMS data of volatile elements. • Findings to be considered for samples with highly variable ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl and {sup 129}I/I. - Abstract: Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in {sup 35}Cl ({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion

  6. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Long-term memory effect in negative ion sources investigated for chlorine isotopes. • Interlaboratory comparison of four up-to date negative ion sources. • Ion source improvement at DREAMS for minimization of long-term memory effect. • Long-term memory effect is the limitation for precise AMS data of volatile elements. • Findings to be considered for samples with highly variable ratios of 36 Cl/Cl and 129 I/I. - Abstract: Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35 Cl/ 37 Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35 Cl ( 35 Cl/ 37 Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between

  7. Fast parallel tandem mass spectral library searching using GPU hardware acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Lydia Ashleigh; Shanmugam, Avinash Kumar; Lam, Henry; Eng, Jimmy K; Martin, Daniel B

    2011-06-03

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a maturing discipline of biologic research that is experiencing substantial growth. Instrumentation has steadily improved over time with the advent of faster and more sensitive instruments collecting ever larger data files. Consequently, the computational process of matching a peptide fragmentation pattern to its sequence, traditionally accomplished by sequence database searching and more recently also by spectral library searching, has become a bottleneck in many mass spectrometry experiments. In both of these methods, the main rate-limiting step is the comparison of an acquired spectrum with all potential matches from a spectral library or sequence database. This is a highly parallelizable process because the core computational element can be represented as a simple but arithmetically intense multiplication of two vectors. In this paper, we present a proof of concept project taking advantage of the massively parallel computing available on graphics processing units (GPUs) to distribute and accelerate the process of spectral assignment using spectral library searching. This program, which we have named FastPaSS (for Fast Parallelized Spectral Searching), is implemented in CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) from NVIDIA, which allows direct access to the processors in an NVIDIA GPU. Our efforts demonstrate the feasibility of GPU computing for spectral assignment, through implementation of the validated spectral searching algorithm SpectraST in the CUDA environment.

  8. Dissipation of hydrological tracers and the herbicide S-metolachlor in batch and continuous-flow wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elodie; Lange, Jens; Schreiber, Steffi; Dollinger, Jeanne; Herbstritt, Barbara; Millet, Maurice; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide dissipation in wetland systems with regard to hydrological conditions and operational modes is poorly known. Here, we investigated in artificial wetlands the impact of batch versus continuous-flow modes on the dissipation of the chiral herbicide S-metolachlor (S-MET) and hydrological tracers (bromide, uranine and sulforhodamine B). The wetlands received water contaminated with the commercial formulation Mercantor Gold(®) (960 g L(-1) of S-MET, 87% of the S-enantiomer). The tracer mass budget revealed that plant uptake, sorption, photo- and presumably biodegradation were prominent under batch mode (i.e. characterized by alternating oxic-anoxic conditions), in agreement with large dissipation of S-MET (90%) under batch mode. Degradation was the main dissipation pathway of S-MET in the wetlands. The degradate metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOXA) mainly formed under batch mode, whereas metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (MESA) prevailed under continuous-flow mode, suggesting distinct degradation pathways in each wetland. R-enantiomer was preferentially degraded under batch mode, which indicated enantioselective biodegradation. The release of MESA and MOXA by the wetlands as well as the potential persistence of S-MET compared to R-MET under both oxic and anoxic conditions may be relevant for groundwater and ecotoxicological risk assessment. This study shows the effect of batch versus continuous modes on pollutant dissipation in wetlands, and that alternate biogeochemical conditions under batch mode enhance S-MET biodegradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An All-vanadium Continuous-flow Photoelectrochemical Cell for Extending State-of-charge in Solar Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zi; Shen, Yi; Liu, Dong; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-04

    Greater levels of solar energy storage provide an effective solution to the inherent nature of intermittency, and can substantially improve reliability, availability, and quality of the renewable energy source. Here we demonstrated an all-vanadium (all-V) continuous-flow photoelectrochemical storage cell (PESC) to achieve efficient and high-capacity storage of solar energy, through improving both photocurrent and photocharging depth. It was discovered that forced convective flow of electrolytes greatly enhanced the photocurrent by 5 times comparing to that with stagnant electrolytes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study revealed a great reduction of charge transfer resistance with forced convective flow of electrolytes as a result of better mass transport at U-turns of the tortuous serpentine flow channel of the cell. Taking advantage of the improved photocurrent and diminished charge transfer resistance, the all-V continuous-flow PESC was capable of producing ~20% gain in state of charge (SOC) under AM1.5 illumination for ca. 1.7 hours without any external bias. This gain of SOC was surprisingly three times more than that with stagnant electrolytes during a 25-hour period of photocharge.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry analyses of environmental radionuclides: sensitivity, precision and standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkis; Fink; Tuniz; Vogt

    2000-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. AMS allows an isotopic sensitivity as low as one part in 10(15) for 14C (5.73 ka), 10Be (1.6 Ma), 26Al (720 ka), 36Cl (301 ka), 41Ca (104 ka), 129I (16 Ma) and other long-lived radionuclides occurring in nature at ultra-trace levels. These radionuclides can be used as tracers and chronometers in many disciplines: geology, archaeology, astrophysics, biomedicine and materials science. Low-level decay counting techniques have been developed in the last 40-50 years to detect the concentration of cosmogenic, radiogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides in a variety of specimens. Radioactivity measurements for long-lived radionuclides are made difficult by low counting rates and in some cases the need for complicated radiochemistry procedures and efficient detectors of soft beta-particles and low energy x-rays. The sensitivity of AMS is unaffected by the half-life of the isotope being measured, since the atoms not the radiations that result from their decay, are counted directly. Hence, the efficiency of AMS in the detection of long-lived radionuclides is 10(6)-10(9) times higher than decay counting and the size of the sample required for analysis is reduced accordingly. For example, 14C is being analysed in samples containing as little as 20 microg carbon. There is also a world-wide effort to use AMS for the analysis of rare nuclides of heavy mass, such as actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. Finally, AMS microprobes are being developed for the in-situ analysis of stable isotopes in geological samples, semiconductors and other materials. Unfortunately, the use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required, but there are several attempts to develop compact AMS spectrometers at low (advances in AMS

  11. Continuous-Flow Processes in Heterogeneously Catalyzed Transformations of Biomass Derivatives into Fuels and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A. Romero

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous flow chemical processes offer several advantages as compared to batch chemistries. These are particularly relevant in the case of heterogeneously catalyzed transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into valuable chemicals and fuels. This work is aimed to provide an overview of key continuous flow processes developed to date dealing with a series of transformations of platform chemicals including alcohols, furanics, organic acids and polyols using a wide range of heterogeneous catalysts based on supported metals, solid acids and bifunctional (metal + acidic materials.

  12. Diels–Alder reactions of myrcene using intensified continuous-flow reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H. Hornung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the Diels–Alder reaction of the naturally occurring substituted butadiene, myrcene, with a range of different naturally occurring and synthetic dienophiles. The synthesis of the Diels–Alder adduct from myrcene and acrylic acid, containing surfactant properties, was scaled-up in a plate-type continuous-flow reactor with a volume of 105 mL to a throughput of 2.79 kg of the final product per day. This continuous-flow approach provides a facile alternative scale-up route to conventional batch processing, and it helps to intensify the synthesis protocol by applying higher reaction temperatures and shorter reaction times.

  13. Determination of 36Cl/Cl ratio in ground water using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suman; Deodhar, A.S.; Saravana Kumar, U.; Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Hemalatha, M.; Sparrow, H.; Mahata, K.; Thomas, R.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme using the 14 MV Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has been initiated with major emphasis on the determination of 36 Cl in water samples, of interest to hydrology and environment. In order to carry out the AMS measurement, a beam chopper to cut down beam intensity by a factor of 20 has been developed and commissioned. A multi-anode gas -si detector has been built to separate 36 Cl from the interfering 36 S. A new TPS system has been procured to operate the machine in the GVM mode. Standard and blank samples from Prime lab, Purdue have been employed in these measurements to standardise the technique for 36 Cl/Cl ratio determination. The detector was calibrated using the stable 35,37 Cl ions. The background 36 Cl in the system has been measured using the blank sample from Purdue and it was estimated that the ratio of 36 Cl/Cl was of the order of 10 -13 in the present setup. Ground water samples collected from South India were converted to AgCl and put in the SNICS ion source for the AMS measurements. These ground water samples, with 14 C content estimated to be in the range of 1 to 4 pMC indicate that the samples may be more than 35,000 years old. Using the AMS technique we have determined the 36 Cl/Cl ratio values for these ground water samples. They are found to range between 2 to 5 x 10 -12 . Additional measurements are planned to determine the age of the water samples and to understand the reasons for the observed high values of 36 Cl in these samples. (author)

  14. Improved 36Cl performance at the ASTER HVE 5 MV accelerator mass spectrometer national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, R.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Benedetti, L.; Bourlès, D.; Keddadouche, K.; Merchel, S.

    2013-01-01

    The HVE 5 MV ASTER AMS national facility at CEREGE was accepted in 2007. Since then we have continued to optimize performance for 36 Cl. Cl-36 analyses use AgCl, a Cs negative ion sputter source, Ar stripping to +5 in the terminal of the Tandetron™ accelerator at 5 MV and a silicon nitride post-acceleration stripper foil to enhance suppression of 36 S relative to 36 Cl. The major challenges to obtaining the desired performance for Earth science applications are ion source memory, mass fractionation effects, 36 S isobar suppression and sensitivity. Redesign of the SO110 ion source by HVE to change the size of the aperture and the shape of cathode significantly reduced ion source memory to less than ∼0.1%, a level that can be compensated for by matching standards to samples. We observe small systematic drifts in 35 Cl/ 37 Cl ratios over time, the source of which is not yet determined. Measurement of standards indicates that this effect limits the precision of 35 Cl/ 37 Cl ratio determination to about 2%. 36 S is suppressed in several ways. First, the sample chemistry has been designed to reduce S to low levels. Second, cathodes are constructed of low-S nickel, enabling direct target loading without the use of AgBr pre-packing. Third, a post-acceleration Si 3 N 4 stripper foil differentially absorbs energy from 36 Cl and 36 S. A subsequent electrostatic deflector is then able to suppress 36 S by a factor of ∼240 relative to 36 Cl. Differential energy loss in the detector further suppresses 36 S by about 10 −4 , for an overall suppression factor of 4 × 10 −7 . 36 S count rates are typically equivalent to a background 36 Cl/Cl of ∼10 −15 . At typical 35 Cl currents of ∼20 μA Cl 5+ samples with 36 Cl/ 35 Cl of 6 × 10 −14 can be measured to ±5% statistical uncertainty with 1 h of analysis time. Typical machine blanks have 36 Cl/Cl ∼2 × 10 −15 .

  15. Joint Bratislava–Prague studies of radiocarbon and uranium in the environment using accelerator mass spectrometry and radiometric methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Povinec, P. P.; Světlík, Ivo; Ješkovský, M.; Sivo, A.; John, J.; Špendlíková, I.; Němec, M.; Kučera, Jan; Richtáriková, M.; Breier, R.; Fejgl, Michal; Černý, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 304, č. 1 (2015), s. 67-73 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Accelerator mass spectrometry * Atmosphere * Environmental radioactivity * Radiocarbon * Tree rings * Uranium Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2015

  16. Observational infant exploratory [14C]-paracetamol pharmacokinetic microdose/therapeutic dose study with accelerator mass spectrometry bioanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garner, C.R.; Park, K.B.; French, N.S.; Earnshaw, C.; Schipani, A.; Selby, A.M.; Byrne, L.; Siner, S.; Crawley, F.P.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Duijn, E. van; ligt, R. de; Varendi, H.; Lass, J.; Grynkiewicz, G.; Maruszak, W.; Turner, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study were to compare [14C]-paracetamol ([14C]-PARA) paediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) after administration mixed in a therapeutic dose or an isolated microdose and to develop further and validate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) bioanalysis in the 0-2 year old age group.

  17. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry on Environmental studies concerning ages of holocene fires in Central amazon forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Anjos, R. M.; Lubian, J.; Cordeiro, R.C.; Turcq, B.; Sifeddine, A.; Di Tada, M.; Cresswell, R. G.; Fifield, L. K.

    1999-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique was used to determine the radiocarbon age of Holocene fires in forests of the Amazon Region. Most of the ages were found to be within the 1000-1500 years range. These disturbances were probably caused by climatic anomalies, and they have modified the structure and dynamics of the region vegetation

  18. A multistep continuous-flow system for rapid on-demand synthesis of receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Trine P; Ritzén, Andreas; Ulven, Trond

    2009-01-01

    A multistep continuous-flow system for synthesis of receptor ligands by assembly of three variable building blocks in a single unbroken flow is described. The sequence consists of three reactions and two scavenger steps, where a Cbz-protected diamine is reacted with an isocyanate, deprotected, an......, and reacted further with an alkylating agent....

  19. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes...

  20. Continuous Flow 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthoek-de Vries, Anna Jo; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, Johannes W.G.; van Bentum, Jan (P.J.M.); Gardeniers, Han J.G.E.; Kentgens, Arno P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline's favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of

  1. Solar oxidation and removal of arsenic--Key parameters for continuous flow applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, L W; O'Farrell, C

    2015-12-01

    Solar oxidation to remove arsenic from water has previously been investigated as a batch process. This research has investigated the kinetic parameters for the design of a continuous flow solar reactor to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater supplies. Continuous flow recirculated batch experiments were carried out under artificial UV light to investigate the effect of different parameters on arsenic removal efficiency. Inlet water arsenic concentrations of up to 1000 μg/L were reduced to below 10 μg/L requiring 12 mg/L iron after receiving 12 kJUV/L radiation. Citrate however was somewhat surprisingly found to promote a detrimental effect on the removal process in the continuous flow reactor studies which is contrary to results found in batch scale tests. The impact of other typical water groundwater quality parameters (phosphate and silica) on the process due to their competition with arsenic for photooxidation products revealed a much higher sensitivity to phosphate ions compared to silicate. Other results showed no benefit from the addition of TiO2 photocatalyst but enhanced arsenic removal at higher temperatures up to 40 °C. Overall, these results have indicated the kinetic envelope from which a continuous flow SORAS single pass system could be more confidently designed for a full-scale community groundwater application at a village level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Beyond organometallic flow chemistry : the principles behind the use of continuous-flow reactors for synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noel, T.; Su, Y.; Hessel, V.; Noël, T.

    2015-01-01

    Flow chemistry is typically used to enable challenging reactions which are difficult to carry out in conventional batch equipment. Consequently, the use of continuous-flow reactors for applications in organometallic and organic chemistry has witnessed a spectacular increase in interest from the

  3. Continuous flow photolysis of aryl azides: Preparation of 3H-azepinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan R. Bou-Hamdan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photolysis of aryl azides to give nitrenes, and their subsequent rearrangement in the presence of water to give 3H-azepinones, is performed in continuous flow in a photoreactor constructed of fluorinated ethylene polymer (FEP tubing. Fine tuning of the reaction conditions using the flow reactor allowed minimization of secondary photochemical reactions.

  4. Continuous flow hydrogenation of nitroarenes, azides and alkenes using maghemite-Pd nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghemite-supported ultra-fine Pd (1-2 nm) nanoparticles, prepared by a simple co-precipitation method, find application in the catalytic continuous flow hydrogenation of nitroarenes, azides, and alkenes wherein they play an important role in reduction of various functional group...

  5. COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF CONTINUOUS-FLOW LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neyt, Mattias; Van den Bruel, Ann; Smit, Yolba; De Jonge, Nicolaas; Erasmus, Michiel; Van Dijk, Diederik; Vlayen, Joan

    Objectives: Mechanical circulatory support through left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) improves survival and quality of life for patients with end-stage heart failure who are ineligible for cardiac transplantation. Our aim was to calculate the cost-effectiveness of continuous-flow LVADs.

  6. 76 FR 9984 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-(), 174080-(), 174085-(), 174095... manufacturer and part number of the oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and corrective...

  7. 76 FR 41669 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006... manufacturer and part number of the oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and corrective...

  8. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martina, Jerson R.; Westerhof, Berend E.; de Jonge, Nicolaas; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Westers, Paul; Chamuleau, Steven; van Dijk, Diederik; Rodermans, Ben F. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Lahpor, Jaap R.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and echocardiography may provide useful physiological information regarding cardiac support in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). We investigated the accuracy and characteristics of noninvasive blood pressure during cf-LVAD support.

  9. Applying lean principles to achieve continuous flow in 3PLs’ outbound processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overboom, M.A.; Small, J.S.; Naus, A.J.A.M.; de Haan, J.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The article offers information on the application of lean principles to achieve continuous flow in third party logistics providers (3PLs). It mentions that lean management principles and practices have been traditionally applied to manufacturing systems and try to make products flow through the

  10. A continuous-flow system for measuring in vitro oxygen and nitrogen metabolism in separated stream communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahl, C.; Jeppesen, E.; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    1991-01-01

    on the stream bank, consists of several macrophyte and sediment chambers equipped with a double-flow system that ensures an internal water velocity close to that in the stream and which, by continuously renewing the water, mimics diel fluctuation in stream temperature and water chemistry. Water temperature...... production and dark respiration occurred at similar rates (6-7g O2 m-2 day-1), net balance being about zero. Inorganic nitrogen was consumed both by the sediment and to a greater extent by the macrophytes, the diel average consumption being 1g N m-2 day-1. 3. The sum of the activity in the macrophyte...... and sediment chambers corresponded to the overall activity of the stream section as determined by upstream/downstream mass balance. This indicates that the results obtained with the continuous-flow chambers realistically describe the oxygen and the nitrogen metabolism of the stream....

  11. Analysis of a Fossil Bone from Malu Rosu - Giurgiu by Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Popescu, I.V.; Hellborg, Ragnar; Stenstroem, Kristina; Skog, Goeran; Alexandrescu, E.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work we studied a fossil bone found in the archaeological site at Malu Rosu, near Giurgiu. Other specimens of fossil bones from Malu Rosu had been earlier dated by a chemical method, considering the content of the fluorine by neutron activation analysis. In this paper we have determined the age of a bone from Malu Rosu by the method of radiocarbon using the AMS (accelerator mass spectroscopy) technique. The measurement has been performed at 3 MeV Pelletron accelerator of the Lund University. The preparation of the bone sample was done in 2 steps: extraction of collagen from the structure of the bone by a chemical pretreatment, and then the transformation of collagen to pure carbon. The conversion to the elemental carbon is done also in two steps: formation of CO 2 by collagen combustion, and then the reduction of CO 2 to pure carbon. The sample of bone, as pure carbon is put in a copper holder and is arranged in a wheel in the following sequence: 5 carbon samples and 3 standards (1 standard of anthracite and 2 standards of oxalic acid). The anthracite being a very old coal is considered to have no 14 C traces and by its measurement one gets the background for 14 C both of the accelerator and of preparation installation of samples. Oxalic acid is a standard SRM prepared by USA National Bureau of Standards, with a well known activity of 14 C, measured in the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory, Lund University, used to normalize the value of the 14 C counting rate, for the sample measured in the same conditions of beam current and time as the standard. The wheel with samples and standards are put in the ion source of the accelerator. The central part of the Lund AMS system is a Pelletron tandem accelerator (model 3UDH, produced by NEC, Wisconsin USA). The accelerator is run at 2.4 MV during AMS experiments, which is optimal for the C 3+ charge state. On the experimental beam line a magnetic quadrupole triplet, a velocity selector and a second analyzing

  12. Use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Human Health and Molecular Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Heather A; Malfatti, Michael A; Zimmermann, Maike; Ognibene, Ted; Henderson, Paul; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-12-19

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been adopted as a powerful bioanalytical method for human studies in the areas of pharmacology and toxicology. The exquisite sensitivity (10 -18 mol) of AMS has facilitated studies of toxins and drugs at environmentally and physiologically relevant concentrations in humans. Such studies include risk assessment of environmental toxicants, drug candidate selection, absolute bioavailability determination, and more recently, assessment of drug-target binding as a biomarker of response to chemotherapy. Combining AMS with complementary capabilities such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) can maximize data within a single experiment and provide additional insight when assessing drugs and toxins, such as metabolic profiling. Recent advances in the AMS technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have allowed for direct coupling of AMS with complementary capabilities such as HPLC via a liquid sample moving wire interface, offering greater sensitivity compared to that of graphite-based analysis, therefore enabling the use of lower 14 C and chemical doses, which are imperative for clinical testing. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent efforts in human studies using AMS, including technological advancements and discussion of the continued promise of AMS for innovative clinical based research.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating from the modern age to the past million age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tosaki, Y.; Sueki, K.; Bessyo, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-nuclide Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) is able to measure the long-lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I. The Tsukuba AMS system is able to perform AMS measurements with the terminal voltage of more than 10 MV. It is difficult to estimate the modern age dating (timescale of the past ten years) by the AMS dating method because the low attenuation of long-lived radioisotopes. The atomic bomb-produced radioisotopes are proposed as the environmental traces for the modern age dating. There is the advantage that the long half life of radioisotopes makes the attenuation negligilbe compared with the short half life of radioisotopes. We applied the 36 Cl bomb pulse as a dating tool for modern groundwater (∼50 years) instead of the 3 H bomb pulse. In addition, we have developed 32 Si-AMS system. The half life of 32 Si is about 140 years, therefore 32 Si-AMS is a useful tool for the modern age dating. On the other hand, we have started a new project to measure the cosmogenic nuclide of 36 Cl in an ice core retrieved from Dome Fuji station at Antarctic in order to investigate the past solar activity and the past earth environment as the timescale of the past million age. (author)

  14. Sample distillation/graphitization system for carbon pool analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Knies, D.L.; Grabowski, K.S.; DeTurck, T.M.; Treacy, D.J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    A facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, has been developed to extract, trap, cryogenically distill and graphitize carbon from a suite of organic and inorganic carbon pools for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The system was developed to investigate carbon pools associated with the formation and stability of methane hydrates. However, since the carbon compounds found in hydrate fields are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, this apparatus is applicable to a number of oceanographic and environmental sample types. Targeted pools are dissolved methane, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), solid organic matrices (e.g., seston, tissue and sediments), biomarkers and short chained (C 1 -C 5 ) hydrocarbons from methane hydrates. In most instances, the extraction, distillation and graphitization events are continuous within the system, thus, minimizing the possibility of fractionation or contamination during sample processing. A variety of methods are employed to extract carbon compounds and convert them to CO 2 for graphitization. Dissolved methane and DIC from the same sample are sparged and cryogenically separated before the methane is oxidized in a high temperature oxygen stream. DOC is oxidized to CO 2 by 1200 W ultraviolet photo-oxidation lamp, and solids oxidized in sealed, evacuated tubes. Hydrocarbons liberated from the disassociation of gas hydrates are cryogenically separated with a cryogenic temperature control unit, and biomarkers separated and concentrated by preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). With this system, up to 20 samples, standards or blanks can be processed per day

  15. Associations between accelerated glacier mass wastage and increased summer temperature in coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyurgerov, M.; McCabe, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Low-elevation glaciers in coastal regions of Alaska, the Canadian Arctic, individual ice caps around the Greenland ice sheet, and the Patagonia Ice Fields have an aggregate glacier area of about 332 ?? 103 km 2 and account for approximately 42% of all the glacier area outside the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. They have shown volume loss, especially since the end of the 1980s, increasing from about 45% in the 1960s to nearly 67% in 2003 of the total wastage from all glaciers on Earth outside those two largest ice sheets. Thus, a disproportionally large contribution of coastal glacier ablation to sea level rise is evident. We examine cumulative standardized departures (1961-2000 reference period) of glacier mass balances and air temperature data in these four coastal regions. Analyses indicate a strong association between increases in glacier volume losses and summer air temperature at regional and global scales. Increases in glacier volume losses in the coastal regions also coincide with an accelerated rate of ice discharge from outlet glaciers draining the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets. These processes imply further increases in sea level rise. ?? 2006 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  16. Adduction of DNA with MTBE and TBA in mice studied by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Wang, H F; Sun, H F; Du, H F; Xu, L H; Liu, Y F; Ding, X F; Fu, D P; Liu, K X

    2007-12-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a currently worldwide used octane enhancer substituting for lead alkyls and gasoline oxygenate. Our previous study using doubly (14)C-labeled MTBE [(CH(3))(3) (14)CO(14)CH(3)] has shown that MTBE binds DNA to form DNA adducts at low dose levels in mice. To elucidate the mechanism of the binding reaction, in this study, the DNA adducts with singly (14)C-labeled MTBE, which was synthesized from (14)C-methanol and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), or (14)C-labeled TBA in mice have been measured by ultra sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry. The results show that the methyl group of MTBE and tert-butyl alcohol definitely form adducts with DNA in mouse liver, lung, and kidney. The methyl group of MTBE is the predominant binding part in liver, while the methyl group and the tert-butyl group give comparable contributions to the adduct formation in lung and kidney.

  17. Kinetics of Beta-14[14C] Carotene in a Human Subject Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueker, S.R.; Lin, Y.; Follett, J.R.; Clifford, A.J.; Buchholz, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    β-Carotene is a tetraterpenoid distributed widely throughout the plant kingdom. It is a member of a group of pigments referred to as carotenoids that have the distinction of serving as metabolic precursors to vitamin A in humans and many animals [1,2]. We used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [3] to determine the metabolic behavior of a physiologic oral dose of β-[ 14 C]carotene (200 nanoCuries; 0.57 (micro)mol) in a healthy human subject. Serial blood specimens were collected for 210-d and complete urine and feces were collected for 17 and 10-d, respectively. Balance data indicated that the dose was 42% bioavailable. The absorbed β-carotene was lost slowly via urine in accord with the slow body turnover of β-carotene and vitamin A [4]. HPLC fractionation of plasma taken at early time points (0-24-h) showed the label was distributed between β-carotene and retinyl esters (vitamin A) derived from intestinal metabolism

  18. Quantitation of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in human serum samples by using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Shiraishi, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of human pharmacokinetics is important for development of new drugs. Microdosing studies have been proposed as means of obtaining human pharmacokinetics information at early stages of drug development. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has high detection sensitivity and is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we used the AMS microdosing facility at Yamagata University to measure the concentration of 14 C in 14 C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum samples. The calibration curve of 14 C concentration in serum was linear, and the correlation coefficient was 0.9994. The precision, accuracy, and stability values obtained (freeze and thaw cycles, and short- and long-term stability) satisfied the criteria. The mean background 14 C concentrations in samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers were 1.635dpm/mL in blood and 0.56dpm/mL in plasma. These results suggest the suitability of AMS-based quantitation for analyzing samples from microdosing studies. (author)

  19. Radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry: some recent results and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, R.E.M.

    1987-01-01

    14 C differs from other nuclides measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in that an extensive database of dates already exists. AMS dates should therefore have comparable accuracy, and the measurement of isotopic ratios to better than 1%, which was an important technical goal, has been reached. The main advantage of being able to date samples 1000 times smaller than previously lies in the extra selectivity that can be employed. This is reflected in the results and applications. Selection can apply at several levels; from objects that formerly contained too little carbon, to the choice of archaeological material, to the extraction of specific chemical compounds from a complex environmental sample. This is particularly useful in removing uncertainty regarding the validity of a date, since a given sample may comprise carbon atoms from different sources each with their own 14 C 'age'. Examples from archaeological and environmental research illustrating these points are given. 14 C dating by AMS differs from conventional radiocarbon dating by having the potential to measure much lower levels of 14 C, and therefore should double the time span of the method. This potential has not yet been realized because of sample contamination effects, and work in progress to reduce these is described. (author)

  20. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  1. Genotoxicity study on nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamine by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.S.; Wang, H.F.; Shi, J.Y.; Wang, X.Y.; Liu, Y.F.; Li, K.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Liu, K.X.; Guo, Z.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have studied DNA adduction with 14 C-labelled nicotine and nicotine-derived nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in mouse liver at doses equivalent to low-level exposure of humans. The dose ranges of nicotine and NNK administered were from 0.4 μg to 4.0 x 10 2 μg·kg -1 , and from 0.1 μg to 2.0 x 10 4 μg·kg -1 , respectively. In the exposure of mice to either nicotine or NNK, the number of DNA adducts increased linearly with increasing dose. The detection limit of DNA adducts was 1 adduct per 10 11 nucleotide molecules. This limit is 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than that of other techniques used for quantification of DNA adducts. The results of the animal experiments enabled us to speculate that nicotine is a potential carcinogen. According to the procedure for 14 C-labelled-NNK synthesis, the authors discuss the ultimate chemical speciation of NNK bound to DNA. From the animal tests the authors derived a directly perceivable relation between tobacco consumption and DNA adduction as the carcinogenic risk assessment

  2. Evaluation of 14C abundance in soil respiration using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Iida, Takao; Moriizumi, Jun; Asano, Tomohiro

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the behavior of 14 C in terrestrial ecosystems, 14 C abundance in soil respiration was evaluated in an urban forest with a new method involving a closed chamber technique and 14 C measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Soil respiration had a higher Δ 14 C than the contemporary atmosphere. This indicates that a significant portion of soil respiration is derived from the decomposition of soil organic matter enriched in 14 C by atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, with a notable time lag between atmospheric 14 C addition and re-emission from soil. On the other hand, δ 14 C in soil respiration demonstrated that 14 C abundance ratio itself in soil-respired CO 2 is not always high compared with that in atmospheric CO 2 because of the isotope fractionation during plant photosynthesis and microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. The Δ 14 C in soil respiration was slightly lower in August than in March, suggesting a relatively high contribution of plant root respiration and decomposition of newly accumulated and/or 14 C-depleted soil organic matter to the total soil respiration in August

  3. Detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in environmental samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, Karin; Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Gomez Guzman, Jose Manuel; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Shinonaga, Taeko [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Plutonium isotopes {sup 239}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=2.4.10{sup 4}a), {sup 240}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=6.5.10{sup 3}a) and {sup 242}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=3.7.10{sup 5}a) are anthropogenic radionuclides emitted into the environment by nuclear activities. Pu is accumulated in the human body and hence, poses a considerable hazard to human health. Due to the long half-lives, these isotopes are present in the biosphere on large time scales and a build-up can be expected. Therefore it is important to study the contamination pathway of Pu into the drinking water. At the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich a method to detect long-lived Pu isotopes by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is being developed. AMS requires only few milligrams of sample material, which is a substantial advantage over decay counting techniques. Consequently, more samples from different locations can be taken which is essential when searching for locally increased Pu concentrations as in the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident in March 2011. Samples from different locations in the Pacific Ocean and from the snow-hydrosphere are planned to be investigated by AMS. The principle detection method using AMS and an overview of the status of the project is presented.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry for analysis of 10Be. Applications in marine geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segl, M.

    1985-01-01

    Using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry the behaviour of long-lived (half time 1.5 Million years) cosmogenic isotopes 10 Be in a marine environment was examined. The geochemical behaviour of 10 Be in oceans was examined in a water profile of the eastern Atlantic and on sediment cores from the eastern Atlantic and the Antarctica. The retention period in oceans was calculated from the water profile to be 700-1000 years. The examination of sedimentary cores showed, that the 10 Be flow into the sediment in areas of high bioproductivity surpasses the production rate. Comparison of 10 Be flow with 230 Th flow into the examined sedimentary cores showed a period of retention of 10 Be in the ocean of only about 400 years. Changes in the sedimentation rate and changes in the mineralogical composition correlate with paleooceanographic events, the start of the Antarctica icing 14 million years ago, changes in the deep water circulation 6.5 million years ago and the icing over of the northern hemisphere 3 million years ago. The same paleooceanographic events find correlation with the inside structure of a total of 16 manganese nodes and crusts from diverse parts of the ocean which were also dated with 10 Be. (orig./DG) [de

  5. Initial in vitro testing of a paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Sunagawa, Gengo; Byram, Nicole A; Kuban, Barry D; Moazami, Nader

    2018-06-01

    Mechanical circulatory support has become standard therapy for adult patients with end-stage heart failure; however, in paediatric patients with congenital heart disease, the options for chronic mechanical circulatory support are limited to paracorporeal devices or off-label use of devices intended for implantation in adults. Congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathy often involve both the left and right ventricles; in such cases, heart transplantation, a biventricular assist device or a total artificial heart is needed to adequately sustain both pulmonary and systemic circulations. We aimed to evaluate the in vitro performance of the initial prototype of our paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart. The paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart pump was downsized from the adult continuous-flow total artificial heart configuration by a scale factor of 0.70 (1/3 of total volume) to enable implantation in infants. System performance of this prototype was evaluated using the continuous-flow total artificial heart mock loop set to mimic paediatric circulation. We generated maps of pump performance and atrial pressure differences over a wide range of systemic vascular resistance/pulmonary vascular resistance and pump speeds. Performance data indicated left pump flow range of 0.4-4.7 l/min at 100 mmHg delta pressure. The left/right atrial pressure difference was maintained within ±5 mmHg with systemic vascular resistance/pulmonary vascular resistance ratios between 1.4 and 35, with/without pump speed modulation, verifying expected passive self-regulation of atrial pressure balance. The paediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart prototype met design requirements for self-regulation and performance; in vivo pump performance studies are ongoing.

  6. Cultivation of methanogenic community from 2-km deep subseafloor coalbeds using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imachi, H.; Tasumi, E.; Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subseafloor environments associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs have been least explored by previous scientific drilling and hence the nature of deep subseafloor life and its ecological roles in the carbon cycle remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed cultivation of subseafloor methanogenic communities using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. The sample used for the reactor cultivation was obtained from 2 km-deep coalbeds off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the northwestern Pacific, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 using a riser drilling technology of the drilling vessel Chikyu. The coalbed samples were incubated anaerobically in the DHS reactor at the in-situ temperature of 40°C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with a tiny amount of yeast extract, acetate, propionate and butyrate was provided into the DHS reactor. After 34 days of the bioreactor operation, a small production of methane was observed. The methane concentration was gradually increased and the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane was consistency 13C-depleted during the bioreactor operation, indicating the occurrence of microbial methanogenesis. Microscopic observation showed that the enrichment culture contained a variety of microorganisms, including methanogen-like rod-shaped cells with F420 auto-fluorescence. Interestingly, many spore-like particles were observed in the bioreactor enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed the growth of phylogenetically diverse bacteria and archaea in the DHS reactor. Predominant archaeal components were closely related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the genus Methanobacterium. Some predominant bacteria were related to the spore-formers within the class Clostridia, which are overall in good agreement with microscopic observations. By analyzing ion images using a nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano

  7. Study of mechanism of cancer caused by carcinogenic substances with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shan; He Ming; Wu Shaoyong; You Qubo; Xu Guoji; Wang Qien; Liu Shijie

    2001-01-01

    Full text: It is reported that most of the cancerous patients were caused by cancerogenic substances. The research in recent years shows that carcinogenesis is related with Ca in the cells. In normal cells, the level of free Ca 2+ is very stable, the Ca 2+ as messenger plays an important role to keep normal function of cells. However, the level of free Ca 2+ in cells increases when the cells are exposed to cancerogenic substances such as cigarette smoking solution and chrysotile. But where do the increased Ca 2+ come from? There are three possibilities: 1) from outside of cell membrane; 2) from inside of nucleus; or 3) from both outside and inside of cells. By using external cultivation of cells 41 Ca as tracer and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) as measurement method, we investigate the origin of the increased Ca 2+ when the cells are exposed to cigarette smoking solution or chrysoltile is being undertaken. Several results as below have been gotten. 1. 41 Ca synthesis. A high purification of isotope of 40 Ca (99.95%) in form of CaO was irradiated by thermal neutron with a heavy water reactor at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The irradiation time and neutron flux were 988h and 4.9x10 13 , respectively. A 41 Ca/ 40 Ca ratio of 7x10 -5 was obtained. The conversion efficiency of Ca metal to CaH 2 was 80% to 90%. 2. CaH 2 sample preparation. There are two steps for CaH 2 sample preparation in AMS measurement. In the first step, CaO is reduced to metallic calcium via vacuum distillation and in the second, the CaO is converted into a hybrid. 3. 41 Ca AMS measurement. The first 41 Ca AMS measurement was performed with Hl-13 tandem AMS system in the CIAE. By using a 41 Ca blank sample, 30 nA of CaH 3 - ions from ion source can be obtained. Ions were accelerated with a terminal voltage of 7.8 and Ca 8+ (E=69.7 MeV) ions were selected. From the measurement, a 41 Ca/ 40 Ca ratio of about 10 -14 was deduced. (author)

  8. Study of the 27Al(n,2,)26Al reaction via accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.

    2000-06-01

    The excitation function for the 27 Al(n,2n) 26 Al reaction is expected to show a strongly non-linear behavior in the neutron-energy region around 14 MeV, the neutron energy in D-T plasmas; thus the production rate of 26 Al (t 1/2 =7.2*10 5 a) in D-T fusion environments can in principle be used to measure the temperature of such plasmas. Existing measurements, however, are strongly discordant. Therefore, a new accurate measurement of the 27 Al(n,2n) 26 Al cross sections in the near threshold region (E n =13.5-14.8 MeV) was performed with the goal to achieve relative cross sections with the highest accuracy possible. In addition, the measurements were also designed to provide good absolute cross-section values, as absolute cross sections are important for radioactive waste predictions. Samples of Al metal were irradiated with neutrons in the energy range near threshold (E th =13.55 MeV) at the Radiuminstitutes of both Vienna and St. Petersburg, and in Tokai-mura, Japan. In Tuebingen irradiations with neutrons of higher energies (17 and 19 MeV) were performed. The amount of 26 Al produced during the irradiations was measured via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). This work represents the first 26 Al measurements for this new facility. With this system, a background as low as 3*10 -15 for 26 Al/ 27 Al isotope ratios was obtained, corresponding to a (n,2n) cross section of 0.04 mb. Utilizing AMS, cross sections with much higher precision and considerably closer to the threshold than in previous investigations could be measured. The prerequisite for its application as a temperature monitor, namely a very well known shape of the excitation function was met. A quantitative prediction of the sensitivity of this method for monitoring the temperature in a D-T fusion plasma was therefore possible. For thermal plasmas temperature changes in the order of 5 to 15 % should be detectable. An even higher sensitivity was found

  9. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry to environmental research, Trial of GC-AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2003-01-01

    The accelerator analysis facility of the National Institute for Environmental Studies, which aims to develop a new device capable of measuring "1"4C age for each compound, is promoting the study to establish the GC-AMS that combines two-dimensional gas chromatograph (GC) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The on-line GC-AMS system for the metabolic measurement of "1"4C-labeled compounds for medicinal biochemical research is a system, in which a GC-separated sample is continuously converted into CO_2 in a combustion tube and introduced directly to a gas ion source to continuously measure "1"4C. In the "1"4C detection experiment, the concentration of CO_2 gas was changed using a helium introduction line and a sample injection valve, and CO_2 gas plus helium gas were introduced into the gas ion source. As a result, it was found that the online GC-AMS has feasibility and high potential capability. For off-line GC-AMS for environmental samples, after purification with preparative gas chromatography, the sample is converted to graphite in a vacuum line and applied to common AMS measurement. The authors collected Northwest Pacific Ocean bottom sediment cores, and performed the extraction and purification of fatty acids of specific stratigraphy and the "1"4C measurement of each compound. The age of the compound derived from the surface layer planktons was the result capable of indicating the sedimentary age of the stratigraphy. In addition, as an application study to explore the source of pollutants in the environment using "1"4C as a tracer representing the characteristics of each source, the authors started to conduct the research choosing atmospheric dust samples. As a starting point, the authors attempted to measure the "1"4C concentration of vehicle exhaust particles and incinerator fly ash particles respectively. There was hardly any "1"4C in vehicle exhaust particles. (A.O.)

  10. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-05

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method.

  11. Modeling the impact and costs of semiannual mass drug administration for accelerated elimination of lymphatic filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma A Stolk

    Full Text Available The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020.

  12. Emergence of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation from dark matter-baryon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, Benoit; Khoury, Justin; Penco, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    The observed tightness of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (MDAR) poses a fine-tuning challenge to current models of galaxy formation. We propose that this relation could arise from collisional interactions between baryons and dark matter (DM) particles, without the need for modification of gravity or ad hoc feedback processes. We assume that these interactions satisfy the following three conditions: (i) the relaxation time of DM particles is comparable to the dynamical time in disk galaxies; (ii) DM exchanges energy with baryons due to elastic collisions; (iii) the product between the baryon-DM cross section and the typical energy exchanged in a collision is inversely proportional to the DM number density. As a proof of principle, we present an example of a particle physics model that gives a DM-baryon cross section with the desired density and velocity dependence. For consistency with direct detection constraints, our DM particles must be either very light (m ll mb) or very heavy (mgg mb), corresponding respectively to heating and cooling of DM by baryons. In both cases, our mechanism applies and an equilibrium configuration can in principle be reached. In this exploratory paper, we focus on the heavy DM/cooling case because it is technically simpler, since the average energy exchanged turns out to be approximately constant throughout galaxies. Under these assumptions, we find that rotationally-supported disk galaxies could naturally settle to equilibrium configurations satisfying a MDAR at all radii without invoking finely tuned feedback processes. We also discuss issues related to the small scale clumpiness of baryons, as well as predictions for pressure-supported systems. We argue in particular that galaxy clusters do not follow the MDAR despite being DM-dominated because they have not reached their equilibrium configuration. Finally, we revisit existing phenomenological, astrophysical and cosmological constraints on baryon-DM interactions in light

  13. Detection of sputtered molecular doubly charged anions: a comparison of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2004-01-01

    The detection of small molecular dianions by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is compared. In SIMS, the existence of these dianions can be identified safely if the total mass number of the molecule is odd and the dianion is hence detected at a half-integral mass number. The occurrence of fragmentation processes which may interfere with this scheme, is illustrated by means of the energy spectra of singly and doubly charged negative cluster ions. As compared to SIMS, AMS can rely, in addition, on the break-up of molecular species in the stripping process: this allows to monitor the simultaneous arrival of several atomic constituents with a clear energetic pattern in coincidence at the detector. This feature is exemplified for the C 10 2- dianion

  14. Minimizing E-factor in the continuous-flow synthesis of diazepam and atropine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Anne-Catherine; Longstreet, Ashley R; Britton, Joshua; Wang, Yuran; Moriguchi, Hideki; Hicklin, Robert W; Green, William H; Jamison, Timothy F

    2017-12-01

    Minimizing the waste stream associated with the synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and commodity chemicals is of high interest within the chemical industry from an economic and environmental perspective. In exploring solutions to this area, we herein report a highly optimized and environmentally conscious continuous-flow synthesis of two APIs identified as essential medicines by the World Health Organization, namely diazepam and atropine. Notably, these approaches significantly reduced the E-factor of previously published routes through the combination of continuous-flow chemistry techniques, computational calculations and solvent minimization. The E-factor associated with the synthesis of atropine was reduced by 94-fold (about two orders of magnitude), from 2245 to 24, while the E-factor for the synthesis of diazepam was reduced by 4-fold, from 36 to 9. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid continuous flow synthesis of high-quality silver nanocubes and nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Mehenni, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    We report a biphasic-liquid segmented continuous flow method for the synthesis of high-quality plasmonic single crystal silver nanocubes and nanospheres. The nanocubes were synthesized with controllable edge lengths from 20 to 48 nm. Single crystal nanospheres with a mean size of 29 nm were obtained by in-line continuous-flow etching of as-produced 39 nm nanocubes with an aqueous solution of FeNO3. In comparison to batch synthesis, the demonstrated processes represent highly scalable reactions, in terms of both production rate and endurance. The reactions were conducted in a commercially available flow-reactor system that is easily adaptable to industrial-scale production, facilitating widespread utilization of the procedure and the resulting nanoparticles. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  16. Synthesis of Cyclic α-Diazo-β-keto Sulfoxides in Batch and Continuous Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaw, Patrick G; Buckley, Naomi M; Eccles, Kevin S; Lawrence, Simon E; Maguire, Anita R; Collins, Stuart G

    2017-04-07

    Diazo transfer to β-keto sulfoxides to form stable isolable α-diazo-β-keto sulfoxides has been achieved for the first time. Both monocyclic and benzofused ketone derived β-keto sulfoxides were successfully explored as substrates for diazo transfer. Use of continuous flow leads to isolation of the desired compounds in enhanced yields relative to standard batch conditions, with short reaction times, increased safety profile, and potential to scale up.

  17. Continuous-flow processes for the catalytic partial hydrogenation reaction of alkynes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Moreno-Marrodan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic partial hydrogenation of substituted alkynes to alkenes is a process of high importance in the manufacture of several market chemicals. The present paper shortly reviews the heterogeneous catalytic systems engineered for this reaction under continuous flow and in the liquid phase. The main contributions appeared in the literature from 1997 up to August 2016 are discussed in terms of reactor design. A comparison with batch and industrial processes is provided whenever possible.

  18. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; AlYami, Noktan; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Burlakov, Victor M.; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman

    2017-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  19. Continuous-flow enantioselective α-aminoxylation of aldehydes catalyzed by a polystyrene-immobilized hydroxyproline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xacobe C. Cambeiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of polystyrene-immobilized proline-based catalysts in packed-bed reactors for the continuous-flow, direct, enantioselective α-aminoxylation of aldehydes is described. The system allows the easy preparation of a series of β-aminoxy alcohols (after a reductive workup with excellent optical purity and with an effective catalyst loading of ca. 2.5% (four-fold reduction compared to the batch process working at residence times of ca. 5 min.

  20. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrow, Alec P; Besong, Tabot M D; AlYami, Noktan M; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Costa, Pedro M F J; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman M

    2017-02-21

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  1. Amination of Aryl Halides and Esters Using Intensified Continuous Flow Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Kohl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Significant process intensification of the amination reactions of aryl halides and esters has been demonstrated using continuous flow processing. Using this technology traditionally difficult amination reactions have been performed safely at elevated temperatures. These reactions were successfully conducted on laboratory scale coil reactor modules with 1 mm internal diameter (ID and on a preparatory scale tubular reactor with 6 mm ID containing static mixers.

  2. Barbier Continuous Flow Preparation and Reactions of Carbamoyllithiums for Nucleophilic Amidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiek, Maximilian A; Becker, Matthias R; Berionni, Guillaume; Zipse, Hendrik; Knochel, Paul

    2017-08-01

    An ambient temperature continuous flow method for nucleophilic amidation and thioamidation is described. Deprotonation of formamides by lithium diisopropylamine (LDA) affords carbamoyllithium intermediates that are quenched in situ with various electrophiles such as ketones, allyl bromides, Weinreb and morpholino amides. The nature of the reactive lithium intermediates and the thermodynamics of the metalation were further investigated by ab initio calculations and kinetic experiments. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V

    2014-06-14

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  4. Domestic wastewater treatment using multi-electrode continuous flow MFCs with a separator electrode assembly design

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2012-10-11

    Treatment of domestic wastewater using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require reactors with multiple electrodes, but this presents unique challenges under continuous flow conditions due to large changes in the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration within the reactor. Domestic wastewater treatment was examined using a single-chamber MFC (130 mL) with multiple graphite fiber brush anodes wired together and a single air cathode (cathode specific area of 27 m2/m3). In fed-batch operation, where the COD concentration was spatially uniform in the reactor but changed over time, the maximum current density was 148 ± 8 mA/m2 (1,000 Ω), the maximum power density was 120 mW/m2, and the overall COD removal was >90 %. However, in continuous flow operation (8 h hydraulic retention time, HRT), there was a 57 % change in the COD concentration across the reactor (influent versus effluent) and the current density was only 20 ± 13 mA/m2. Two approaches were used to increase performance under continuous flow conditions. First, the anodes were separately wired to the cathode, which increased the current density to 55 ± 15 mA/m2. Second, two MFCs were hydraulically connected in series (each with half the original HRT) to avoid large changes in COD among the anodes in the same reactor. The second approach improved current density to 73 ± 13 mA/m2. These results show that current generation from wastewaters in MFCs with multiple anodes, under continuous flow conditions, can be improved using multiple reactors in series, as this minimizes changes in COD in each reactor. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Continuous flow hydrogenation using polysilane-supported palladium/alumina hybrid catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shū Kobayashi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous flow systems for hydrogenation using polysilane-supported palladium/alumina (Pd/(PSi–Al2O3 hybrid catalysts were developed. Our original Pd/(PSi–Al2O3 catalysts were used successfully in these systems and the hydrogenation of unsaturated C–C bonds and a nitro group, deprotection of a carbobenzyloxy (Cbz group, and a dehalogenation reaction proceeded smoothly. The catalyst retained high activity for at least 8 h under neat conditions.

  6. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B.; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  7. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.

    2017-02-06

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  8. FEATURES OF LONG-TERM MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT WITH CONTINUOUS-FLOW PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Itkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a review of the comparative analysis of methods and tools for long-term mechanical circulatory support with continuous flow and pulsatile flow implantable pumps. Particular attention is paid to the choice of the optimal modes of the operation of pumps based on the physical principles of the interaction between a the steady flow of blood to the pulsatile mechanics of the heart chambers. 

  9. A steady-state continuous flow chamber for the study of daytime and nighttime chemistry under atmospherically relevant NO levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Ortega, John; Huang, Yuanlong; Shertz, Stephen; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Orlando, John J.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments performed in laboratory chambers have contributed significantly to the understanding of the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere. Two chemical regimes, classified as high-NO vs. zero-NO conditions, have been extensively studied in previous chamber experiments. Results derived from these two chemical scenarios are widely parameterized in chemical transport models to represent key atmospheric processes in urban and pristine environments. As the anthropogenic NOx emissions in the United States have decreased remarkably in the past few decades, the classic high-NO and zero-NO conditions are no longer applicable to many regions that are constantly impacted by both polluted and background air masses. We present here the development and characterization of the NCAR Atmospheric Simulation Chamber, which is operated in steady-state continuous flow mode for the study of atmospheric chemistry under intermediate NO conditions. This particular chemical regime is characterized by constant sub-ppb levels of NO and can be created in the chamber by precise control of the inflow NO concentration and the ratio of chamber mixing to residence timescales. Over the range of conditions achievable in the chamber, the lifetime of peroxy radicals (RO2), a key intermediate from the atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), can be extended to several minutes, and a diverse array of reaction pathways, including unimolecular pathways and bimolecular reactions with NO and HO2, can thus be explored. Characterization experiments under photolytic and dark conditions were performed and, in conjunction with model predictions, provide a basis for interpretation of prevailing atmospheric processes in environments with intertwined biogenic and anthropogenic activities. We demonstrate the proof of concept of the steady-state continuous flow chamber operation through measurements of major first-generation products

  10. A steady-state continuous flow chamber for the study of daytime and nighttime chemistry under atmospherically relevant NO levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Experiments performed in laboratory chambers have contributed significantly to the understanding of the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere. Two chemical regimes, classified as high-NO vs. zero-NO conditions, have been extensively studied in previous chamber experiments. Results derived from these two chemical scenarios are widely parameterized in chemical transport models to represent key atmospheric processes in urban and pristine environments. As the anthropogenic NOx emissions in the United States have decreased remarkably in the past few decades, the classic high-NO and zero-NO conditions are no longer applicable to many regions that are constantly impacted by both polluted and background air masses. We present here the development and characterization of the NCAR Atmospheric Simulation Chamber, which is operated in steady-state continuous flow mode for the study of atmospheric chemistry under intermediate NO conditions. This particular chemical regime is characterized by constant sub-ppb levels of NO and can be created in the chamber by precise control of the inflow NO concentration and the ratio of chamber mixing to residence timescales. Over the range of conditions achievable in the chamber, the lifetime of peroxy radicals (RO2, a key intermediate from the atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, can be extended to several minutes, and a diverse array of reaction pathways, including unimolecular pathways and bimolecular reactions with NO and HO2, can thus be explored. Characterization experiments under photolytic and dark conditions were performed and, in conjunction with model predictions, provide a basis for interpretation of prevailing atmospheric processes in environments with intertwined biogenic and anthropogenic activities. We demonstrate the proof of concept of the steady-state continuous flow chamber operation through measurements of major first

  11. Pulse Oximeter Derived Blood Pressure Measurement in Patients With a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lane, Kathleen A; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Munson, Sarah D; Pickrell, Jeanette; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2017-05-01

    Currently, blood pressure (BP) measurement is obtained noninvasively in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by placing a Doppler probe over the brachial or radial artery with inflation and deflation of a manual BP cuff. We hypothesized that replacing the Doppler probe with a finger-based pulse oximeter can yield BP measurements similar to the Doppler derived mean arterial pressure (MAP). We conducted a prospective study consisting of patients with contemporary continuous flow LVADs. In a small pilot phase I inpatient study, we compared direct arterial line measurements with an automated blood pressure (ABP) cuff, Doppler and pulse oximeter derived MAP. Our main phase II study included LVAD outpatients with a comparison between Doppler, ABP, and pulse oximeter derived MAP. A total of five phase I and 36 phase II patients were recruited during February-June 2014. In phase I, the average MAP measured by pulse oximeter was closer to arterial line MAP rather than Doppler (P = 0.06) or ABP (P < 0.01). In phase II, pulse oximeter MAP (96.6 mm Hg) was significantly closer to Doppler MAP (96.5 mm Hg) when compared to ABP (82.1 mm Hg) (P = 0.0001). Pulse oximeter derived blood pressure measurement may be as reliable as Doppler in patients with continuous flow LVADs. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Verification of the sputter-generated 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, R. G.; Surendran, P.; Kumar, Sanjay; Nair, J. P.; Yadav, M. L.; Hemalatha, M.; Thomas, R. G.; Mahata, K.; Kailas, S.; Gupta, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have performed systematic Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements at our ion source test set up and have demonstrated that gas phase 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions for all size 'n' can be readily generated from a variety of surfaces undergoing Cs+ ion sputtering in the presence of high purity SF6 gas by employing the gas spray-cesium sputter technique. In our SIMS measurements, the isotopic yield ratio 34SFn-/32SFn- (n = 1-6) was found to be close to its natural abundance but not for all size 'n'. In order to gain further insight into the constituents of these molecular anions, ultra sensitive Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements were conducted with the most abundant 32SFn- (n = 1-6) anions, at BARC-TIFR 14 UD Pelletron accelerator. The results from these measurements are discussed in this paper.

  13. Comparison of accelerator mass spectrometric measurement with liquid scintillation counting measurement for the determination of 14C in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuike, Kaeko; Yamada, Yoshimune; Amano, Hikaru

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of organically-bound 14 C in tree-ring cellulose of a Japanese Black Pine grown in Shika-machi (37.0 deg. N, 136.8 deg. E) and those of a Japanese Cedar grown in Kanazawa (36.5 deg. N, 136.7 deg. E), Japan, were analyzed for the ring-years from 1989 to 1998 by the accelerator mass spectrometric measurement. The results were compared with those of the same samples analyzed by the liquid scintillation counting measurement to determine the reliability of liquid scintillation counting measurement. An important result of this study is that the sensitivity and reproducibility of accelerator mass spectrometric measurement was almost equal to that of liquid scintillation counting measurement.

  14. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Triolo, Ronald J

    2012-05-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM) acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI). In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its superior robustness and small number of inputs required.

  15. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataraj Raviraj

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI. Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS, and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its

  16. Sequential injection approach for simultaneous determination of ultratrace plutonium and neptunium in urine with accelerator mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of ultratrace level plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np) using iron hydroxide coprecipitation in combination with automated sequential injection extraction chromatography separation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement...... show that preboiling and aging are important for obtaining high chemical yields for both Pu and Np, which is possibly related to the aggregation and adsorption behavior of organic substances contained in urine. Although the optimal condition for Np and Pu simultaneous determination requires 5-day aging...

  17. New accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages for the Mazama tephra layer from Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallett, D.J.; Hills, L.V.; Clague, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Charcoal fragments recovered from the Mazama air-fall tephra layer in cores from Dog and Cobb lakes, Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, yielded accelerator mass spectrometry ages of 6720 ± 70 and 6760 ± 70 14 C years BP, respectively. These two new ages, together with other previously published radiocarbon ages on charcoal and twig fragments from Mazama air-fall deposits, indicate that the climatic eruption of Mount Mazama occurred 6730 ± 40 14 C years BP. (author)

  18. 14C accelerator mass spectrometry - applications in archaeology, biomedicine and in the atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.

    1990-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is superior to all other analytical techniques in its detection sensitivity of radiocarbon ( 14 C). It has therefore influenced or even laid down the foundations for applications in many fields of science. In the current work, various applications of 14 C AMS are presented through published articles for which the measurements were performed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). These articles are embedded into an in-depth discussion about characteristic features of the respective fields, emphasizing the broad range of issues which need to be considered in interdisciplinary research. In archaeology new 14 C dates on equipment of the Iceman ('Oetzi'), the world's oldest intact mummy, show reasonable agreement with dates previously obtained on the Iceman himself (3360-3100 BC). However, several botanical remains from the finding place clearly belong to other time periods, indicating that the discovery site of Oetzi has been used as a mountain pass 1500 yr earlier and also 2000 yr later. Dating on spruce logs from the world's oldest salt mines at Hallstatt, Austria provide evidence that salt mining started 1-2 centuries earlier than previously supposed, i.e. in the 14th to the 13th century BC. Recently, Bayesian mathematics is a frequently used tool in calibrating radiocarbon data. So-called vague or non-informative priors employed in this method may cause severe problems as shown by extensive computer simulations. In biomedicine problems in toxicology and in forensic medicine were investigated. Heterocyclic amines (HAs) are probably the epidemiologically most relevant class of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances since they are produced naturally in cooking protein-rich food. A study of 14 C labeled HAs (MeIQx and PhIP) in rodents and humans, one of the first studies using 14 C-labeled mutagens also in healthy human volunteers, severely calls in question the validity of animal models for assessing heterocyclic

  19. Accurate determination of 41Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-01-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long‐Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 41 Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). 41 Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF 2 precipitations. Measured 41 Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The 41 Ca/ 60 Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 41 Ca in spent resins using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. • A chemical treatment procedure was developed to quantitatively recover calcium in solution and selectively extract it. • Developed firstly on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • Accelerator mass spectrometry allowed measuring concentrations of 41 Ca in spent resins as low as 0.02 ng/g of dry resin. • Final results are in agreement with current data used for spent resins management

  20. Integrated Vibration and Acceleration Testing to Reduce Payload Mass, Cost and Mission Risk, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a capability to provide integrated acceleration, vibration, and shock testing using a state-of-the-art centrifuge, allowing for the test of...

  1. Mass Producing Innovation: A Case Investigation on Why Accelerators Might Not Be a Paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Barnes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a growing number of accelerator programmes designed to start and support innovative startup businesses. Many accelerators are increasing the size of their intakes, with some programmes now launching over 200 new companies per year. On first inspection the large numbers and consistent approach taken to accelerating the participating companies appears to be in conflict with producing innovative and disruptive companies. This paper uses Y Combinator as a single case study to investigate whether increasing the number of companies within a batch has resulted in longer or shorter timeframes for companies to achieve an exit (through acquisition or initial public offering. The paper finds that the timeframe for achieving an exit for Y Combinator companies is reducing, even while batch size has sharply increased. There is no statistically significant correlation between the cohort size and the initial money raised during the programme.    Keyword : Accelerators, Startups, Innovation

  2. Performance optimisation of a new-generation orthogonal-acceleration quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Tony; Constantine, Jill; Harrison, Mark; Cavoit, Fabien

    2008-04-01

    Orthogonal-acceleration quadrupole time-of-flight (oa-QTOF) mass spectrometers, employed for accurate mass measurement, have been commercially available for well over a decade. A limitation of the early instruments of this type was the narrow ion abundance range over which accurate mass measurements could be made with a high degree of certainty. Recently, a new generation of oa-QTOF mass spectrometers has been developed and these allow accurate mass measurements to be recorded over a much greater range of ion abundances. This development has resulted from new ion detection technology and improved electronic stability or by accurate control of the number of ions reaching the detector. In this report we describe the results from experiments performed to evaluate the mass measurement performance of the Bruker micrOTOF-Q, a member of the new-generation oa-QTOFs. The relationship between mass accuracy and ion abundance has been extensively evaluated and mass measurement accuracy remained stable (+/-1.5 m m/z units) over approximately 3-4 orders of magnitude of ion abundance. The second feature of the Bruker micrOTOF-Q that was evaluated was the SigmaFit function of the software. This isotope pattern-matching algorithm provides an exact numerical comparison of the theoretical and measured isotope patterns as an additional identification tool to accurate mass measurement. The smaller the value, the closer the match between theoretical and measured isotope patterns. This information is then employed to reduce the number of potential elemental formulae produced from the mass measurements. A relationship between the SigmaFit value and ion abundance has been established. The results from the study for both mass accuracy and SigmaFit were employed to define the performance criteria for the micrOTOF-Q. This provided increased confidence in the selection of elemental formulae resulting from accurate mass measurements.

  3. The mass-damped Riemann problem and the aerodynamic surface force calculation for an accelerating body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Zhiqiang; Wilson, D.; Varghese, P.L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider an extension of the ordinary Riemann problem and present an efficient approximate solution that can be used to improve the calculations of aerodynamic forces on an accelerating body. The method is demonstrated with one-dimensional examples where the Euler equations and the body motion are solved in the non-inertial co-ordinate frame fixed to the accelerating body. 8 refs., 6 figs

  4. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Components in Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Garbak, J.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope-ratio measurement technique developed in the late 1970s for tracing long-lived radioisotopes (e.g., 14 C half life = 5760 y). The technique counts individual nuclei rather than waiting for their radioactive decay, allowing measurement of more than 100 low-level 14 C samples per day (Vogel et al, 1995). The LLNL AMS system is shown in Fig.1. The contemporary quantity of 14 C in living things ( 14 C/C = 1.2 x 10 -12 or 110 fmol 14 C/ g C) is highly elevated compared to the quantity of 14 C in petroleum-derived products. This isotopic elevation is sufficient to trace the fate of bio-derived fuel components in the emissions of an engine without the use of radioactive materials. If synthesis of a fuel component from biologically-derived source material is not feasible, another approach is to purchase 14 C-labeled material (e.g., dibutyl maleate (DBM)) and dilute it with petroleum-derived material to yield a contemporary level of 14 C. In each case, the virtual absence of 14 C in petroleum based fuels gives a very low 14 C background that makes this approach to tracing fuel components practical. Regulatory pressure to significantly reduce the particulate emissions from diesel engines is driving research into understanding mechanisms of soot formation. If mechanisms are understood, then combustion modeling can be used to evaluate possible changes in fuel formulation and suggest possible fuel components that can improve combustion and reduce PM emissions. The combustion paradigm assumes that large molecules break down into small components and then build up again during soot formation. AMS allows us to label specific fuel components, including oxygenates, trace the carbon atoms, and test this combustion modeling paradigm. Volatile and non-volatile organic fractions (VOF, NVOF) in the PM can be further separated. The VOF of the PM can be oxidized with catalysts in the exhaust stream to further decrease PM. The effectiveness

  5. Negative masses, even if isolated, imply self-acceleration, hence a catastrophic world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalleri, G.; Tonni, E.

    1997-01-01

    The conjecture of the existence of negative masses together with ordinary positive masses leads to runaway motions even if no self-reaction is considered. Pollard and Dunning-Davies have shown other constraints as a modification of the principle of least action and that negative masses can only exist at negative temperature, and must be adiabatically separate from positive masses. They show here that the self-reaction on a single isolated negative mass implies a runaway motion. Consequently, the consideration of self-fields and relevant self-reaction excludes negative masses even if isolated

  6. Development of aluminium-26 accelerator mass spectrometry for biological and toxicological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James

    Aluminium is now recognised as a toxic element. Its accumulation in the body leads to serious conditions in renal failure patients on haemodialysis, and there is suspected involvement in the aetiology of Alzheimer's Disease. Although uptake from food and water are important exposure pathways, there is so far little quantitative knowledge about gastrointestinal absorption of aluminium, its general speciation in the blood or its metabolism. This is partly because seven of aluminium's eight radioisotopes have half-lives too short to conduct accurate biochemical studies. The use of [67]Ga as a tracer for aluminium begs the question of its biochemical similarity. Radiotracer studies on aluminium are possible with [26]Al (T[2] = 716,000 years), but a comparatively large amount of this scarce and expensive radioisotope (price ca. 50 pence per Bq) would be needed to measure by normal counting techniques. Use of conventional mass spectrometry is impracticable due to [26]Mg interference (comprises 11 % of total stable Mg and inherent in all biological or environmental samples), but high energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (A.M.S.), resulting in some fully-stripped ions (Al[13+], Mg[12+]) , potentially overcomes this problem. [26]Al is particularly attractive in human toxicology because of its negligible natural abundance and low radiological hazard. We have used the 20 MV tandem Van De Graaff accelerator (S.E.R.C. Daresbury) to conduct 1A1 A.M.S. measurements in biological media. Stable currents of ALQ[-](100 nA for > 5 hours) were obtained from a modified Middleton ion source, using alumina/silver ion source preparations of 50 mug Al. [26]Al is unambiguously identified from and [26]Mg [27]AlO[-] is repeatedly measured on a Faray Cup placed in the beamline after adjusting the ion source magnet. Linear calibration (C.V. range tested ([26]Al/[27]Al ratios from 10[-6] to 10[-11]) and a detection limit (2?) of ca. 7 x 10[-18]g (5 nBq) [26]Al ratio [26]Al/[27]Al limit of 1.4 x

  7. What can we learn from the self-attraction and loading fingerprints about pre-GRACE mass-loss acceleration from Greenland and Antarctica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. L.; Vinogradova, N. T.

    2017-12-01

    Tide-gauge records from the North Atlantic reveal significant acceleration in sea level starting in the late 20th century. We have analyzed the tide-gauge data using a model in which the accelerations are assumed to be zero prior to 1990. The estimated accelerations range from -1 to +3 m cy-2 and exhibit a systematic spatial variability. Davis and Vinogradova [2017] demonstrated that to model this variability in sea-level acceleration requires contributions from several distinct physical processes: accelerated mass loss from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets and acceleration associated with ocean circulation and heat uptake. Atmospheric pressure also contributes to the observed changes in sea level, at a much smaller amplitude. Because we are focusing on sea-level accelerations (i.e., sea-level rate changes), the contribution from Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is negligible. Modeling of observed sea-level acceleration is achieved using external constraints for the important physical processes. Using GRACE results, we can calculate the sea-level "fingerprints" for Greenland and Antarctica associated with mass loading and gravitational perturbations. For the North Atlantic, Greenland induces a significant spatial variation in sea-level change—dominated by the solid-Earth response to the mass loss—whereas Antarctica contributes a spatially constant acceleration. The observations prefer a scaling of the solid-Earth/gravitational response, and we present the implications of this result for ice-mass changes prior to the onset of GRACE observations (2002-3).

  8. Silica-Supported Catalyst for Enantioselective Arylation of Aldehydes under Batch and Continuous-Flow Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Nakaya, Naoyuki; Akai, Junichiro; Kanaori, Kenji; Harada, Toshiro

    2018-05-04

    A silica-supported 3-aryl H 8 -BINOL-derived titanium catalyst exhibited high performance in the enantioselective arylation of aromatic aldehydes using Grignard and organolithium reagents not only under batch conditions but also under continuous-flow conditions. Even with a simple pipet reactor packed with the heterogeneous catalyst, the enantioselective production of chiral diarylmethanols could be achieved through a continuous introduction of aldehydes and mixed titanium reagents generated from the organometallic precursors. The pipet reactor could be used repeatedly in different reactions without appreciable deterioration of the activity.

  9. Synergistic Manganese(I) C-H Activation Catalysis in Continuous Flow: Chemoselective Hydroarylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Pesciaioli, Fabio; Oliveira, João C A; Warratz, Svenja; Ackermann, Lutz

    2017-11-20

    Chemoselective hydroarylations were accomplished by a novel synergistic Brønsted acid/manganese(I)-catalyzed C-H activation manifold. Thus, alkynes bearing O-leaving groups could, for the first time, be employed for C-H alkenylations without concurrent β-O elimination, thereby setting the stage for versatile late-stage diversifications. Also described is the first manganese-catalyzed C-H activation in continuous flow, thus enabling efficient hydroarylations within only 20 minutes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Versatile, High Quality and Scalable Continuous Flow Production of Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Martinez, Marta; Batten, Michael P.; Polyzos, Anastasios; Carey, Keri-Constanti; Mardel, James I.; Lim, Kok-Seng; Hill, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Further deployment of Metal-Organic Frameworks in applied settings requires their ready preparation at scale. Expansion of typical batch processes can lead to unsuccessful or low quality synthesis for some systems. Here we report how continuous flow chemistry can be adapted as a versatile route to a range of MOFs, by emulating conditions of lab-scale batch synthesis. This delivers ready synthesis of three different MOFs, with surface areas that closely match theoretical maxima, with production rates of 60 g/h at extremely high space-time yields. PMID:24962145

  11. One-step synthesis of pyridines and dihydropyridines in a continuous flow microwave reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. Bagley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bohlmann–Rahtz pyridine synthesis and the Hantzsch dihydropyridine synthesis can be carried out in a microwave flow reactor or using a conductive heating flow platform for the continuous processing of material. In the Bohlmann–Rahtz reaction, the use of a Brønsted acid catalyst allows Michael addition and cyclodehydration to be carried out in a single step without isolation of intermediates to give the corresponding trisubstituted pyridine as a single regioisomer in good yield. Furthermore, 3-substituted propargyl aldehydes undergo Hantzsch dihydropyridine synthesis in preference to Bohlmann–Rahtz reaction in a very high yielding process that is readily transferred to continuous flow processing.

  12. Rapid identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis by chip-based continuous flow PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzsch, Michael; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2012-06-01

    To combat the threat of biological agents like Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis in bioterroristic scenarios requires fast, easy-to-use and safe identification systems. In this study we describe a system for rapid amplification of specific genetic markers for the identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis. Using chip based PCR and continuous flow technology we were able to amplify the targets simultaneously with a 2-step reaction profile within 20 minutes. The subsequent analysis of amplified fragments by standard gel electrophoresis requires another 45 minutes. We were able to detect both pathogens within 75 minutes being much faster than most other nucleic acid amplification technologies.

  13. Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis for Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic...... meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high- resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features...

  14. State of the art of aerobic granulation in continuous flow bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Timothy R; Bott, Charles B; Wang, Zhi-Wu

    In the wake of the success of aerobic granulation in sequential batch reactors (SBRs) for treating wastewater, attention is beginning to turn to continuous flow applications. This is a necessary step given the advantages of continuous flow treatment processes and the fact that the majority of full-scale wastewater treatment plants across the world are operated with aeration tanks and clarifiers in a continuous flow mode. As in SBRs, applying a selection pressure, based on differences in either settling velocity or the size of the biomass, is essential for successful granulation in continuous flow reactors (CFRs). CFRs employed for aerobic granulation come in multiple configurations, each with their own means of achieving such a selection pressure. Other factors, such as bioaugmentation and hydraulic shear force, also contribute to aerobic granulation to some extent. Besides the formation of aerobic granules, long-term stability of aerobic granules is also a critical issue to be addressed. Inorganic precipitation, special inocula, and various operational optimization strategies have been used to improve granule long-term structural integrity. Accumulated studies reviewed in this work demonstrate that aerobic granulation in CFRs is capable of removing a wide spectrum of contaminants and achieving properties generally comparable to those in SBRs. Despite the notable research progress made toward successful aerobic granulation in lab-scale CFRs, to the best of our knowledge, there are only three full-scale tests of the technique, two being seeded with anammox-supported aerobic granules and the other with conventional aerobic granules; two other process alternatives are currently in development. Application of settling- or size-based selection pressures and feast/famine conditions are especially difficult to implement to these and similar mainstream systems. Future research efforts needs to be focused on the optimization of the granule-to-floc ratio, enhancement of

  15. Mechanistic insights into the oxidative dehydrogenation of amines to nitriles in continuous flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corker, Emily C.; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Riisager, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of various aliphatic amines to their corresponding nitrile compounds using RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts in air was successfully applied to a continuous flow reaction. Conversions of amines (up to >99%) and yields of nitriles (up to 77%) varied depending on reaction conditions...... and the amine utilised. The presence of water was found to be important for the activity and stability of the RuO2/Al2O3 catalyst. The Hammett relationship and in situ infrared spectroscopy were applied to divulge details about the catalytic mechanism of the oxidative dehydrogenation of amines over RuO2/Al2O3...

  16. Deconvolution-based resolution enhancement of chemical ice core records obtained by continuous flow analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Andersen, Katrine K.; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2005-01-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) has become a popular measuring technique for obtaining high-resolution chemical ice core records due to an attractive combination of measuring speed and resolution. However, when analyzing the deeper sections of ice cores or cores from low-accumulation areas...... of the data for high-resolution studies such as annual layer counting. The presented method uses deconvolution techniques and is robust to the presence of noise in the measurements. If integrated into the data processing, it requires no additional data collection. The method is applied to selected ice core...

  17. Acceleration of Gas Flow Simulations in Dual-Continuum Porous Media Based on the Mass-Conservation POD Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi

    2017-09-12

    Reduced-order modeling approaches for gas flow in dual-porosity dual-permeability porous media are studied based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method combined with Galerkin projection. The typical modeling approach for non-porous-medium liquid flow problems is not appropriate for this compressible gas flow in a dual-continuum porous media. The reason is that non-zero mass transfer for the dual-continuum system can be generated artificially via the typical POD projection, violating the mass-conservation nature and causing the failure of the POD modeling. A new POD modeling approach is proposed considering the mass conservation of the whole matrix fracture system. Computation can be accelerated as much as 720 times with high precision (reconstruction errors as slow as 7.69 × 10−4%~3.87% for the matrix and 8.27 × 10−4%~2.84% for the fracture).

  18. Acceleration of Gas Flow Simulations in Dual-Continuum Porous Media Based on the Mass-Conservation POD Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi; Sun, Shuyu; Yu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Reduced-order modeling approaches for gas flow in dual-porosity dual-permeability porous media are studied based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method combined with Galerkin projection. The typical modeling approach for non-porous-medium liquid flow problems is not appropriate for this compressible gas flow in a dual-continuum porous media. The reason is that non-zero mass transfer for the dual-continuum system can be generated artificially via the typical POD projection, violating the mass-conservation nature and causing the failure of the POD modeling. A new POD modeling approach is proposed considering the mass conservation of the whole matrix fracture system. Computation can be accelerated as much as 720 times with high precision (reconstruction errors as slow as 7.69 × 10−4%~3.87% for the matrix and 8.27 × 10−4%~2.84% for the fracture).

  19. Center of Mass Acceleration Feedback Control of Standing Balance by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation against External Postural Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the use of center of mass (COM) acceleration feedback for improving performance of a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) control system to restore standing function to a subject with complete, thoracic-level spinal cord injury (SCI). The approach for linearly relating changes in muscle stimulation to changes in COM acceleration was verified experimentally and subsequently produced data to create an input-output map driven by sensor feedback. The feedback gains were systematically tuned to reduce upper extremity (UE) loads applied to an instrumented support device while resisting external postural disturbances. Total body COM acceleration was accurately estimated (> 89% variance explained) using three-dimensional (3-D) outputs of two accelerometers mounted on the pelvis and torso. Compared to constant muscle stimulation employed clinically, feedback control of stimulation reduced UE loading by 33%. COM acceleration feedback is advantageous in constructing a standing neuroprosthesis since it provides the basis for a comprehensive control synergy about a global, dynamic variable and requires minimal instrumentation. Future work should include tuning and testing the feedback control system during functional reaching activity that is more indicative of activities of daily living. PMID:22987499

  20. Accelerated modern human?induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R.; Barnosky, Anthony D.; Garc?a, Andr?s; Pringle, Robert M.; Palmer, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    The oft-repeated claim that Earth?s biota is entering a sixth ?mass extinction? depends on clearly demonstrating that current extinction rates are far above the ?background? rates prevailing between the five previous mass extinctions. Earlier estimates of extinction rates have been criticized for using assumptions that might overestimate the severity of the extinction crisis. We assess, using extremely conservative assumptions, whether human activities are causing a mass extinction. First, we...

  1. Bioremoval of trivalent chromium using Bacillus biofilms through continuous flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, K.; Sadiq, I. Mohammed; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effective bioremoval of Cr(III) using bacterial biofilms. ► Simplified bioreactor was fabricated for the biofilm development and Cr(III) removal. ► Economically feasible substrate like coarse sand and pebbles were used. - Abstract: Present study deals with the applicability of bacterial biofilms for the bioremoval of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A continuous flow reactor was designed for the development of biofilms on different substrates like glass beads, pebbles and coarse sand. The parameters for the continuous flow reactor were 20 ml/min flow rate at 30 °C, pH4. Biofilm biomass on the substrates was in the following sequence: coarse sand > pebbles > glass beads (4.8 × 10 7 , 4.5 × 10 7 and 3.5 × 10 5 CFU/cm 2 ), which was confirmed by CLSM. Biofilms developed using consortium of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus on coarse sand had more surface area and was able to remove 98% of Cr(III), SEM-EDX proved 92.60% Cr(III) adsorption on biofilms supported by coarse sand. Utilization of Bacillus biofilms for effective bioremoval of Cr(III) from chrome tanning effluent could be a better option for tannery industry, especially during post chrome tanning operation.

  2. Stable aerobic granules in continuous-flow bioreactor with self-forming dynamic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Li, Yajie; Yang, Changzhu; Pu, Wenhong; He, Liu; Bo, Fu

    2012-10-01

    A novel continuous-flow bioreactor with aerobic granular sludge and self-forming dynamic membrane (CGSFDMBR) was developed for efficient wastewater treatment. Under continuous-flow operation, aerobic granular sludge was successfully cultivated and characterized with small particle size of about 0.1-1.0mm, low settling velocity of about 15-25 m/h, loose structure and high water content of about 96-98%. To maintain the stability of aerobic granular sludge, strategies based on the differences of settling velocity and particle-size between granular and flocculent sludge were implemented. Moreover, in CGSFDMBR, membrane fouling was greatly relieved. Dynamic membrane was just cleaned once in more than 45 days' operation. CGSFDMBR presented good performance in treating septic tank wastewater, obtaining average COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP removal rates of 83.3%, 73.3%, 67.3% and 60%, respectively, which was more efficient than conventional bioreactors since that carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were simultaneously removed in a single aerobic reactor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous-Flow Photocatalytic Degradation of Organics Using Modified TiO2 Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs were fabricated on a Ti sheet following the anodic oxidation method and were decorated with reduced graphene oxide (RGO, graphene oxide (GO, and bismuth (Bi via electrodeposition. The surface morphologies, crystal structures, and compositions of the catalyst were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminance spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The TNTs loaded with RGO, GO, and Bi were used in a continuous-flow system as photocatalysts for the degradation of methylene blue (MB dye. It was found that the TNTs are efficient photocatalysts for the removal of color from water; upon UV irradiation on TNTs, the MB removal ratio was ~89%. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of the decorated TNTs were higher than that of pristine TNTs in visible light. In comparison with TNTs, the rate of MB removal in visible light was increased by a factor of 3.4, 3.2, and 2.9 using RGO-TNTs, Bi-TNTs, and GO-TNTs, respectively. The reusability of the catalysts were investigated, and their quantum efficiencies were also calculated. The cylindrical anodized TNTs were excellent photocatalysts for the degradation of organic pollutants. Thus, it was concluded that the continuous-flow photocatalytic reactor comprising TNTs and modified TNTs is suitable for treating wastewater in textile industries.

  4. Factors influencing arsenic and nitrate removal from drinking water in a continuous flow electrocoagulation (EC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N. Sanjeev; Goel, Sudha

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted under continuous flow conditions to evaluate some of the factors influencing contaminant removal by electrocoagulation (EC). A bench-scale simulation of drinking water treatment was done by adding a filtration column after a rectangular EC reactor. Contaminant removal efficiency was determined for voltages ranging from 10 to 25 V and a comparative study was done with distilled water and tap water for two contaminants: nitrate and arsenic(V). Maximum removal efficiency was 84% for nitrate at 25 V and 75% for arsenic(V) at 20 V. No significant difference in contaminant removal was observed in tap water versus distilled water. Increase in initial As(V) concentration from 1 ppm to 2 ppm resulted in a 10% increase in removal efficiency. Turbidity in the EC reactor effluent was 52 NTU and had to be filtered to achieve acceptable levels of final turbidity (5 NTU) at steady-state. The flow regime in the continuous flow reactor was also evaluated in a tracer study to determine whether it is a plug flow reactor (PFR) or constantly stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and the results show that this reactor was close to an ideal CSTR, i.e., it was fairly well-mixed.

  5. Factors influencing arsenic and nitrate removal from drinking water in a continuous flow electrocoagulation (EC) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N. Sanjeev [Civil Engineering Department, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Goel, Sudha, E-mail: sudhagoel@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Civil Engineering Department, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-01-15

    An experimental study was conducted under continuous flow conditions to evaluate some of the factors influencing contaminant removal by electrocoagulation (EC). A bench-scale simulation of drinking water treatment was done by adding a filtration column after a rectangular EC reactor. Contaminant removal efficiency was determined for voltages ranging from 10 to 25 V and a comparative study was done with distilled water and tap water for two contaminants: nitrate and arsenic(V). Maximum removal efficiency was 84% for nitrate at 25 V and 75% for arsenic(V) at 20 V. No significant difference in contaminant removal was observed in tap water versus distilled water. Increase in initial As(V) concentration from 1 ppm to 2 ppm resulted in a 10% increase in removal efficiency. Turbidity in the EC reactor effluent was 52 NTU and had to be filtered to achieve acceptable levels of final turbidity (5 NTU) at steady-state. The flow regime in the continuous flow reactor was also evaluated in a tracer study to determine whether it is a plug flow reactor (PFR) or constantly stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and the results show that this reactor was close to an ideal CSTR, i.e., it was fairly well-mixed.

  6. Removal of natural organic matter and arsenic from water by electrocoagulation/flotation continuous flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohora, Emilijan; Rončević, Srdjan; Dalmacija, Božo; Agbaba, Jasmina; Watson, Malcolm; Karlović, Elvira; Dalmacija, Milena

    2012-10-15

    The performance of the laboratory scale electrocoagulation/flotation (ECF) reactor in removing high concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM) and arsenic from groundwater was analyzed in this study. An ECF reactor with bipolar plate aluminum electrodes was operated in the horizontal continuous flow mode. Electrochemical and flow variables were optimized to examine ECF reactor contaminants removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as groundwater initial pH 5, flow rate=4.3 l/h, inter electrode distance=2.8 cm, current density=5.78 mA/cm(2), A/V ratio=0.248 cm(-1). The NOM removal according to UV(254) absorbance and dissolved organic matter (DOC) reached highest values of 77% and 71% respectively, relative to the raw groundwater. Arsenic removal was 85% (6.2 μg As/l) relative to raw groundwater, satisfying the drinking water standards. The specific reactor electrical energy consumption was 17.5 kWh/kg Al. The specific aluminum electrode consumption was 66 g Al/m(3). According to the obtained results, ECF in horizontal continuous flow mode is an energy efficient process to remove NOM and arsenic from groundwater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mobile magnetic particles as solid-supports for rapid surface-based bioanalysis in continuous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Sally A; Iles, Alexander; Pamme, Nicole

    2009-11-07

    An extremely versatile microfluidic device is demonstrated in which multi-step (bio)chemical procedures can be performed in continuous flow. The system operates by generating several co-laminar flow streams, which contain reagents for specific (bio)reactions across a rectangular reaction chamber. Functionalized magnetic microparticles are employed as mobile solid-supports and are pulled from one side of the reaction chamber to the other by use of an external magnetic field. As the particles traverse the co-laminar reagent streams, binding and washing steps are performed on their surface in one operation in continuous flow. The applicability of the platform was first demonstrated by performing a proof-of-principle binding assay between streptavidin coated magnetic particles and biotin in free solution with a limit of detection of 20 ng mL(-1) of free biotin. The system was then applied to a mouse IgG sandwich immunoassay as a first example of a process involving two binding steps and two washing steps, all performed within 60 s, a fraction of the time required for conventional testing.

  8. Partial nitrification using aerobic granules in continuous-flow reactor: rapid startup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunli; Sun, Supu; Lee, Duu-Jong; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Li; Yang, Xue; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-08-01

    This study applied a novel strategy to rapid startup of partial nitrification in continuous-flow reactor using aerobic granules. Mature aerobic granules were first cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor at high chemical oxygen demand in 16 days. The strains including the Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana strain were enriched in cultivated granules to enhance their structural stability. Then the cultivated granules were incubated in a continuous-flow reactor with influent chemical oxygen deamnad being stepped decreased from 1,500 ± 100 (0-19 days) to 750 ± 50 (20-30 days), and then to 350 ± 50 mg l(-1) (31-50 days); while in the final stage 350 mg l(-1) bicarbonate was also supplied. Using this strategy the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea, was enriched in the incubated granules to achieve partial nitrification efficiency of 85-90% since 36 days and onwards. The partial nitrification granules were successfully harvested after 52 days, a period much shorter than those reported in literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioremoval of trivalent chromium using Bacillus biofilms through continuous flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundar, K.; Sadiq, I. Mohammed; Mukherjee, Amitava [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, Nano Bio-Medicine Laboratory School of Bio Sciences and Technology VIT University, Vellore - 632014 (India); Chandrasekaran, N., E-mail: nchandrasekaran@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, Nano Bio-Medicine Laboratory School of Bio Sciences and Technology VIT University, Vellore - 632014 (India)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effective bioremoval of Cr(III) using bacterial biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simplified bioreactor was fabricated for the biofilm development and Cr(III) removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Economically feasible substrate like coarse sand and pebbles were used. - Abstract: Present study deals with the applicability of bacterial biofilms for the bioremoval of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A continuous flow reactor was designed for the development of biofilms on different substrates like glass beads, pebbles and coarse sand. The parameters for the continuous flow reactor were 20 ml/min flow rate at 30 Degree-Sign C, pH4. Biofilm biomass on the substrates was in the following sequence: coarse sand > pebbles > glass beads (4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7}, 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} and 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} CFU/cm{sup 2}), which was confirmed by CLSM. Biofilms developed using consortium of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus on coarse sand had more surface area and was able to remove 98% of Cr(III), SEM-EDX proved 92.60% Cr(III) adsorption on biofilms supported by coarse sand. Utilization of Bacillus biofilms for effective bioremoval of Cr(III) from chrome tanning effluent could be a better option for tannery industry, especially during post chrome tanning operation.

  10. Renewable Wood Pulp Paper Reactor with Hierarchical Micro/Nanopores for Continuous-Flow Nanocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hirotaka; Namba, Naoko; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Nogi, Masaya; Nishina, Yuta

    2017-06-22

    Continuous-flow nanocatalysis based on metal nanoparticle catalyst-anchored flow reactors has recently provided an excellent platform for effective chemical manufacturing. However, there has been limited progress in porous structure design and recycling systems for metal nanoparticle-anchored flow reactors to create more efficient and sustainable catalytic processes. In this study, traditional paper is used for a highly efficient, recyclable, and even renewable flow reactor by tailoring the ultrastructures of wood pulp. The "paper reactor" offers hierarchically interconnected micro- and nanoscale pores, which can act as convective-flow and rapid-diffusion channels, respectively, for efficient access of reactants to metal nanoparticle catalysts. In continuous-flow, aqueous, room-temperature catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-anchored paper reactor with hierarchical micro/nanopores provided higher reaction efficiency than state-of-the-art AuNP-anchored flow reactors. Inspired by traditional paper materials, successful recycling and renewal of AuNP-anchored paper reactors were also demonstrated while high reaction efficiency was maintained. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. A dietary supplementation with leucine and antioxidants is capable to accelerate muscle mass recovery after immobilization in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Savary-Auzeloux

    Full Text Available Prolonged inactivity induces muscle loss due to an activation of proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis; the latter is also involved in the recovery of muscle mass. The aim of the present work was to explore the evolution of muscle mass and protein metabolism during immobilization and recovery and assess the effect of a nutritional strategy for counteracting muscle loss and facilitating recovery. Adult rats (6-8 months were subjected to unilateral hindlimb casting for 8 days (I0-I8 and then permitted to recover for 10 to 40 days (R10-R40. They were fed a Control or Experimental diet supplemented with antioxidants/polyphenols (AOX (I0 to I8, AOX and leucine (AOX + LEU (I8 to R15 and LEU alone (R15 to R40. Muscle mass, absolute protein synthesis rate and proteasome activities were measured in gastrocnemius muscle in casted and non-casted legs in post prandial (PP and post absorptive (PA states at each time point. Immobilized gastrocnemius protein content was similarly reduced (-37% in both diets compared to the non-casted leg. Muscle mass recovery was accelerated by the AOX and LEU supplementation (+6% AOX+LEU vs. Control, P<0.05 at R40 due to a higher protein synthesis both in PA and PP states (+23% and 31% respectively, Experimental vs. Control diets, P<0.05, R40 without difference in trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities between diets. Thus, this nutritional supplementation accelerated the recovery of muscle mass via a stimulation of protein synthesis throughout the entire day (in the PP and PA states and could be a promising strategy to be tested during recovery from bed rest in humans.

  12. On the identification of carbonaceous aerosols via 14C accelerator mass spectrometry, and laser microprobe mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.; Fletcher, R.A.; Klouda, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon isotopic measurements ( 12 C, 14 C), derived from chemical measurements of total carbon plus AMS measurements of 14 C/ 12 C have become an accepted means for estimating fossil and contemporary carbon source contributions to atmospheric carbon. Because of the limited sensitivity of these techniques, however, such measurements are restricted to 'bulk' samples comprising at least 10-100 μg of carbon. Laser microprobe mass spectrometry (LMMS) offers an important complementary opportunity to investigate the chemical nature of individual particles as small as 0.1 μm in diameter. Although there is little hope to measure 14 C/ 12 C in such small samples, the compositional and structural information available with the laser microprobe is of interest for possible source discrimination. Also, the analysis of individual particles, which may reflect individual sources, yields significant potential increases in spatial, temporal and source resolution, in comparison to bulk sample analysis. Results of our exploratory investigation of known sources of carbonaceous particles, using LMMS, are presented. By applying multivariate techniques to laser mass spectra of soot from the combustion of heptane and wood, we found striking differences in the alkali metals (notably potassium) in the positive ion mass spectra. For ambient particles, 14 C has proved to be a crucial adjunct for the development and validation of the LMMS approach to single particle source assignment via carbon cluster pattern recognition. The combined techniques offer great promise for objective modeling (number and types of carbon sources) and for extension of the dichotomous carbon apportionment (fossil, contemporary) to subclasses such as soot from wood and agricultural burning, and that from coal and petroleum combustion. (orig.)

  13. First-year progress on research and development of a mass accelerator (MAID) as a driver for impact fusion, May 6, 1981-May 5, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this program is to construct a small scale mass accelerator consisting of 10 plasma discharge modules, and perform experiments and analysis with the system so that reliable scaling laws can be obtained for the device. The effort is directed to determining whether a large scale version of such a plasma driven mass accelerator could be used as a driver for inertial fusion, or other energy-related applications

  14. Measurements of natural levels of 14C in human's and rat's tissues by accelerator mass spectrometry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.Y.; Khu, H.J.; Kang, J.H.; Yoon, M.Y.; Kim, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive, safe and precise analytical method for quantifying long-lived isotope in biomedical research with animals as well as human beings. In Korea, AMS Laboratory has been operating successfully for years measuring especially archaeological samples for 14 C dating. In this year, a biological sample pretreatment facility was setup to work on biomedical applications. As a preliminary study, we have measured the natural background levels of 14 C in tissues and blood of humans and rats have been measured. The results were agreed with the other reported levels and gave stable and reproducible results within 1-2%. (author)

  15. Highly Selective Continuous Flow Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde to Cinnamyl Alcohol in a Pt/SiO2 Coated Tube Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel continuous flow process for selective hydrogenation of α, β-unsaturated aldehyde (cinnamaldehyde, CAL to the unsaturated alcohol (cinnamyl alcohol, COL has been reported in a tube reactor coated with a Pt/SiO2 catalyst. A 90% selectivity towards the unsaturated alcohol was obtained at the aldehyde conversion of 98.8%. This is a six-fold improvement in the selectivity compared to a batch process where acetals were the main reaction products. The increased selectivity in the tube reactor was caused by the suppression of acid sites responsible for the acetal formation after a short period on stream in the continuous process. In a fixed bed reactor, it had a similar acetal suppression phenomenon but showed lower product selectivity of about 47–72% due to mass transfer limitations. A minor change in selectivity and conversion caused by product inhibition was observed during the 110 h on stream with a turnover number (TON reaching 3000 and an alcohol production throughput of 0.36 kg gPt−1 day−1 in the single tube reactor. The catalysts performance after eight reaction cycles was fully restored by calcination in air at 400 °C. The tube reactors provide an opportunity for process intensification by increasing the reaction rates by a factor of 2.5 at the reaction temperature of 150 °C compared to 90 °C with no detrimental effects on catalyst stability or product selectivity.

  16. Risk Stratification of Patients With Current Generation Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices Being Bridged to Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Ashrith; Nguyen, Duc; Cruz-Solbes, Ana S; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Schutt, Robert C; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Park, Myung H; Graviss, Edward A; Gaber, Osama; Suarez, Erik; Montane, Eva; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Estep, Jerry D

    Patients bridged to transplant (BTT) with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have increased in the past decade. Decision support tools for these patients are limited. We developed a risk score to estimate prognosis and guide decision-making. We included heart transplant recipients bridged with CF-LVADs from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database and divided them into development (2,522 patients) and validation cohorts (1,681 patients). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were performed. Variables that independently predicted outcomes (age, African American race, recipient body mass index [BMI], intravenous [IV] antibiotic use, pretransplant dialysis, and total bilirubin) were assigned weight using linear transformation, and risk scores were derived. Patients were grouped by predicted posttransplant mortality: low risk (≤ 38 points), medium risk (38-41 points), and high risk (≥ 42 points). We performed Cox proportional hazards analysis on wait-listed CF-LVAD patients who were not transplanted. Score significantly discriminated survival among the groups in the development cohort (6.7, 12.9, 20.7; p = 0.001), validation cohort (6.4, 10.1, 13.6; p assist device (LVAD) BTT risk score that effectively identifies CF-LVAD patients who are at higher risk for worse outcomes after heart transplant. This score may help physicians weigh the risks of transplantation in patients with CF-LVAD.

  17. Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao; Ahn, Yongtae; Hou, Huijie; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    together (combined), in fed-batch or continuous flow conditions. Power production under these different conditions could not be made based on a single resistance, but instead required polarization tests to assess individual performance relative

  18. Nanoengineering of Ruthenium and Platinum-based Nanocatalysts by Continuous-Flow Chemistry for Renewable Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents an integrated study of nanocatalysts for heterogenous catalytic and electrochemical processes using pure ruthenium (Ru) with mixed-phase and platinum-based nanomaterials synthesized by continuous-flow chemistry. There are three

  19. Sequential continuous flow processes for the oxidation of amines and azides by using HOF·MeCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPake, Christopher B; Murray, Christopher B; Sandford, Graham

    2012-02-13

    The generation and use of the highly potent oxidising agent HOF·MeCN in a controlled single continuous flow process is described. Oxidations of amines and azides to corresponding nitrated systems by using fluorine gas, water and acetonitrile by sequential gas-liquid/liquid-liquid continuous flow procedures are reported. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of rotation on MHD flow past an accelerated isothermal vertical plate with heat and mass diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An exact analysis of rotation effects on unsteady flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting fluid past a uniformly accelerated infinite isothermal vertical plate, under the action of transversely applied magnetic field has been presented. The plate temperature is raised to Tw and the concentration level near the plate is also raised to C′w . The dimensionless governing equations are solved using Laplace-transform technique. The velocity profiles, temperature and concentration are studied for different physical parameters like thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, Schmidt number, Prandtl number and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with increasing values of thermal Grashof number or mass Grashof number. It is also observed that the velocity increases with decreasing magnetic field parameter.

  1. Modelling of hot air chamber designs of a continuous flow grain dryer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Lotte Strange; Poulsen, Mathias; Sørensen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    The pressure loss, flow distribution and temperature distribution of a number of designs of the hot air chamber in a continuous flow grain dryer, were investigated using CFD. The flow in the dryer was considered as steady state, compressible and turbulent. It is essential that the grain...... is uniformly dried as uneven drying can result in damage to the end-product during storage. The original commercial design was modified with new guide vanes at the inlets to reduce the pressure loss and to ensure a uniform flow to the line burner in the hot air chamber. The new guide vane design resulted...... in a 10% reduction in pressure loss and a γ-value of 0.804. Various design changes of the hot air chamber were analysed in terms of pressure loss and temperature distribution with the aim of a temperature variation of 5 K at the outlet ducts. An obstruction design was analysed, which improved mixing...

  2. Nitrite accumulation in continuous-flow partial autotrophic denitrification reactor using sulfide as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Li, Wenfei; Li, Xuechen; Zhao, Dongfeng; Ma, Bin; Wang, Yongqiang; Liu, Fang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2017-11-01

    The nitrite accumulation in handling nitrate and sulfide-laden wastewater in a continuous-flow upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. At sulfide/nitrate-nitrogen ratio of 1:0.76 and loading rates of 1.2kg-Sm -3 d -1 and 0.4kg-Nm -3 d -1 , the elemental sulfur and nitrite accumulation rates peaked at 90% and 70%, respectively, with Acrobacter, Azoarcus and Thauera presenting the functional strains in the studied reactor. The accumulated nitrite was proposed a promising feedstock for anaerobic ammonia oxidation process. An integrated partial autotrophic denitrification-anaerobic ammonia oxidation-aeration process for handling the ammonia and sulfide-laden wastewaters is proposed for further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs using continuous flow chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Baumann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of continuous flow processing as a key enabling technology has transformed the way we conduct chemistry and has expanded our synthetic capabilities. As a result many new preparative routes have been designed towards commercially relevant drug compounds achieving more efficient and reproducible manufacture. This review article aims to illustrate the holistic systems approach and diverse applications of flow chemistry to the preparation of pharmaceutically active molecules, demonstrating the value of this strategy towards every aspect ranging from synthesis, in-line analysis and purification to final formulation and tableting. Although this review will primarily concentrate on large scale continuous processing, additional selected syntheses using micro or meso-scaled flow reactors will be exemplified for key transformations and process control. It is hoped that the reader will gain an appreciation of the innovative technology and transformational nature that flow chemistry can leverage to an overall process.

  4. The synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using continuous flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Marcus; Baxendale, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of continuous flow processing as a key enabling technology has transformed the way we conduct chemistry and has expanded our synthetic capabilities. As a result many new preparative routes have been designed towards commercially relevant drug compounds achieving more efficient and reproducible manufacture. This review article aims to illustrate the holistic systems approach and diverse applications of flow chemistry to the preparation of pharmaceutically active molecules, demonstrating the value of this strategy towards every aspect ranging from synthesis, in-line analysis and purification to final formulation and tableting. Although this review will primarily concentrate on large scale continuous processing, additional selected syntheses using micro or meso-scaled flow reactors will be exemplified for key transformations and process control. It is hoped that the reader will gain an appreciation of the innovative technology and transformational nature that flow chemistry can leverage to an overall process.

  5. The route from problem to solution in multistep continuous flow synthesis of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bana, Péter; Örkényi, Róbert; Lövei, Klára; Lakó, Ágnes; Túrós, György István; Éles, János; Faigl, Ferenc; Greiner, István

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in the field of continuous flow chemistry allow the multistep preparation of complex molecules such as APIs (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients) in a telescoped manner. Numerous examples of laboratory-scale applications are described, which are pointing towards novel manufacturing processes of pharmaceutical compounds, in accordance with recent regulatory, economical and quality guidances. The chemical and technical knowledge gained during these studies is considerable; nevertheless, connecting several individual chemical transformations and the attached analytics and purification holds hidden traps. In this review, we summarize innovative solutions for these challenges, in order to benefit chemists aiming to exploit flow chemistry systems for the synthesis of biologically active molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required

  7. Nonequilibrium chemical instabilities in continuous flow stirred tank reactors: The effect of stirring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsthemke, W.; Hannon, L.

    1984-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for stirred chemical reactors. In the limiting case of practical interest, i.e., fast stirring, we solve for the characteristic function in steady state and derive expressions for the stationary moments through a perturbation expansion. Moments are explicitly calculated for a generic model of bistable behavior. We find that stirring decreases the area of the bistable region essentially by changing the point of transition from the high reaction rate state to the low reaction rate state. This is in remarkable agreement with the experimental findings of Roux, et al. Our results indicate that stirring should not be considered simply as an ''enhanced diffusion'' process and that nucleation plays only a minor role in transitions between multiple steady states in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

  8. A High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kjær, Helle Astrid

    2016-01-01

    of Polar Research (NIPR) in Tokyo. The system allows the continuous analysis of stable water isotopes and electrical conductivity, as well as the collection of discrete samples from both inner and outer parts of the core. This CFA system was designed to have sufficiently high temporal resolution to detect...... signals of abrupt climate change in deep polar ice cores. To test its performance, we used the system to analyze different climate intervals in ice drilled at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) site, Greenland. The quality of our continuous measurement of stable water isotopes has been......In recent decades, the development of continuous flow analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analysis has enabled greater sample throughput and greater depth resolution compared with the classic discrete sampling technique. We developed the first Japanese CFA system at the National Institute...

  9. Acclimatization Study for Biohydrogen Production from Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) in Continuous-flow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, N.; Lutpi, N. A.; Wong, Y. S.; Tengku Izhar, T. N.

    2018-03-01

    This research aims to study the acclimatization phase for biohydrogen production from palm oil mill effluent (POME) by adapting the microorganism to the new environment in continuous-flow system of thermophilic bioreactor. The thermophilic fermentation was continuously loaded with 0.4 L/day of raw POME for 35 days to acclimatize the microorganism until a steady state of biohydrogen production was obtained. The significance effect of acclimatization phase on parameter such as pH, microbial growth, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and alkalinity were also studied besides the production of biogas. This study had found that the thermophilic bioreactor reach its steady state with 1960 mL/d of biogas produced, which consist of 894 ppm of hydrogen composition.

  10. Continuous-flow oxidative cyanation of primary and secondary amines using singlet oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Dmitry B; Gilmore, Kerry; Kopetzki, Daniel; McQuade, D Tyler; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-01-07

    Primary and secondary amines can be rapidly and quantitatively oxidized to the corresponding imines by singlet oxygen. This reactive form of oxygen was produced using a variable-temperature continuous-flow LED-photoreactor with a catalytic amount of tetraphenylporphyrin as the sensitizer. α-Aminonitriles were obtained in good to excellent yields when trimethylsilyl cyanide served as an in situ imine trap. At 25°C, primary amines were found to undergo oxidative coupling prior to cyanide addition and yielded secondary α-aminonitriles. Primary α-aminonitriles were synthesized from the corresponding primary amines for the first time, by an oxidative Strecker reaction at -50 °C. This atom-economic and protecting-group-free pathway provides a route to racemic amino acids, which was exemplified by the synthesis of tert-leucine hydrochloride from neopentylamine. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Continuous flow electrophoretic separation of proteins and cells from mammalian tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Barlow, Grant H.; Blaisdell, Steven J.; Cleveland, Carolyn; Farrington, Mary Ann; Feldmeier, Mary; Hatfield, J. Michael; Lanham, J. Wayne; Grindeland, Richard; Snyder, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes an apparatus for continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE), designed to separate macromolecules and cells at conditions of microgravity. In this CFE, buffer flows upward in a 120-cm long flow chamber, which is 16-cm wide x 3.0-mm thick in the microgravity version (and 6-cm wide x 1.5-mm thick in the unit-gravity laboratory version). Ovalbumin and rat serum albumin were separated in space (flight STS-4) with the same resolution of the two proteins achieved at 25 percent total w/v concentration that was obtained in the laboratory at 0.2 percent w/v concentration. Rat anterior pituitary cells, cultured human embryonic kidney cells, and canine Langerhans cells were separated into subpopulations (flight STS-8) more effectively than in unit gravity, with comparable resolution having been achieved at 100 times the concentration possible on earth.

  12. Air-segmented continuous-flow analysis for molybdenum in various geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harita, Y.; Sugiyama, M.; Hori, T.

    2003-01-01

    An air-segmented continuous-flow method has been developed for the determination of molybdenum at ultra trace levels using the catalytic effect of molybdate during the oxidation of L-ascorbic acid by hydrogen peroxide. Incorporation of an on-line ion exchange column improved the tolerance limit for various ions. The detection limits with and without the column were 64 pmol L m1 and 17 pmol L m1 , and the reproducibilities at 10 nmol L m1 were 2.1 % and 0.2 %, respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of molybdenum in seawater and lake water as well as in rock and sediment samples. This method has the highest sensitivity among the available literature to our knowledge, and is also convenient for routine analysis of molybdenum in various natural samples. (author)

  13. On-chip determination of C-reactive protein using magnetic particles in continuous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phurimsak, Chayakom; Tarn, Mark D; Peyman, Sally A; Greenman, John; Pamme, Nicole

    2014-11-04

    We demonstrate the application of a multilaminar flow platform, in which functionalized magnetic particles are deflected through alternating laminar flow streams of reagents and washing solutions via an external magnet, for the rapid detection of the inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP). The two-step sandwich immunoassay was accomplished in less than 60 s, a vast improvement on the 80-300 min time frame required for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the 50 min necessary for off-chip magnetic particle-based assays. The combination of continuous flow and a stationary magnet enables a degree of autonomy in the system, while a detection limit of 0.87 μg mL(-1) makes it suitable for the determination of CRP concentrations in clinical diagnostics. Its applicability was further proven by assaying real human serum samples and comparing those results to values obtained using standard ELISA tests.

  14. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  15. Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices: shared care goals of monitoring and treating patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Jerry D; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Loza, Laurie P; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have been clinically adopted as a long-term standard of care therapy option for patients with end-stage heart failure. For many patients, shared care between the care providers at the implanting center and care providers in the community in which the patient resides is a clinical necessity. The aims of this review are to (1) provide a rationale for the outpatient follow-up exam and surveillance testing used at our center to monitor patients supported by the HeartMate II(®) CF-LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) and (2) provide the protocol/algorithms we use for blood pressure, driveline exit site, LVAD alarm history, surveillance blood work, and echocardiography monitoring in this patient population. In addition, we define our partnership outpatient follow-up protocol and the "shared care" specific responsibilities we use with referring health care providers to best manage many of our patients.

  16. Accurate determination of 129I concentrations and 129I/137Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-01-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 129 I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO 3 /HClO 4 , (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured 129 I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of 129 I/ 137 Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 129 I in spent resins using accelerator mass spectrometry. • The treatment procedure included microwave acid digestion of samples, iodine extraction by CL resins and AgI precipitation. • Developed first on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • 129 I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g of dry resin. • Results are in agreement with previous measurements and support reference values currently used for nuclear resin management

  17. Removing Copper from Contaminated Water Using Activated Carbon Sorbent by Continuous Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Salmani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A major concern of human being is accumulation and toxicity of heavy metals in their body. Copper is a heavy metal ion that in concentration of 2 mg/l can cause numerous complications. Different treatment methods have been proposed for removing metals from contaminated water by researchers. Among these methods, sorption seems a better method with high removal efficiency. In this study, conditions for removal of copper ions by activated carbon sorbent were studied with continuous flow. Materials & Methods: This was a laboratory – experimental study. A 20mg/l solution of copper ions was prepared and passed through a 5 × 10 cm column with average output rate of 1.85 ml/min. Output of column was sampled every 30 minutes and the remaining amount of copper ion in each sample was measured by flame atomic absorption. Results: The empty bed volume (EBV was equal to 138 ml. The highest removal efficiency was 99.7 percent at 127 minutes. From equilibrium time, the removal efficiency was constant with time. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon was 0.25mg.g-1. The isotherm study indicated that the sorption data can be obeyed by both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms (R2>0.95 but Langmuir model had higher agreement with this experimental data (R2= 0.988. Conclusion: The binding of ions to the sorbent in the adsorption process is extremely important. For this column 62.5 minutes after filling was appropriate, so the highest removal efficiency was obtained. Equilibrium time was dependent on the speed of influent through the column in the continuous flow. For selected column, the rate of 1.85 ml/min is a good performance.

  18. Removal of natural organic matter and arsenic from water by electrocoagulation/flotation continuous flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohora, Emilijan; Rončević, Srdjan; Dalmacija, Božo; Agbaba, Jasmina; Watson, Malcolm; Karlović, Elvira; Dalmacija, Milena

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A continuous electrocoagulation/flotation reactor was designed built and operated. ► Highest NOM removal according to UV 254 was 77% relative to raw groundwater. ► Highest NOM removal accordance to DOC was 71%, relative to raw groundwater. ► Highest As removal archived was 85% (6.2 μg/l), relative to raw groundwater. ► Specific reactor energy and electrode consumption was 1.7 kWh/m 3 and 66 g Al/m 3 . - Abstract: The performance of the laboratory scale electrocoagulation/flotation (ECF) reactor in removing high concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM) and arsenic from groundwater was analyzed in this study. An ECF reactor with bipolar plate aluminum electrodes was operated in the horizontal continuous flow mode. Electrochemical and flow variables were optimized to examine ECF reactor contaminants removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as groundwater initial pH 5, flow rate = 4.3 l/h, inter electrode distance = 2.8 cm, current density = 5.78 mA/cm 2 , A/V ratio = 0.248 cm −1 . The NOM removal according to UV 254 absorbance and dissolved organic matter (DOC) reached highest values of 77% and 71% respectively, relative to the raw groundwater. Arsenic removal was 85% (6.2 μg As/l) relative to raw groundwater, satisfying the drinking water standards. The specific reactor electrical energy consumption was 17.5 kWh/kg Al. The specific aluminum electrode consumption was 66 g Al/m 3 . According to the obtained results, ECF in horizontal continuous flow mode is an energy efficient process to remove NOM and arsenic from groundwater.

  19. Removal of natural organic matter and arsenic from water by electrocoagulation/flotation continuous flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohora, Emilijan, E-mail: emohora@ifc.org [University of Novi Sad Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Roncevic, Srdjan; Dalmacija, Bozo; Agbaba, Jasmina; Watson, Malcolm; Karlovic, Elvira; Dalmacija, Milena [University of Novi Sad Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A continuous electrocoagulation/flotation reactor was designed built and operated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highest NOM removal according to UV{sub 254} was 77% relative to raw groundwater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highest NOM removal accordance to DOC was 71%, relative to raw groundwater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highest As removal archived was 85% (6.2 {mu}g/l), relative to raw groundwater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific reactor energy and electrode consumption was 1.7 kWh/m{sup 3} and 66 g Al/m{sup 3}. - Abstract: The performance of the laboratory scale electrocoagulation/flotation (ECF) reactor in removing high concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM) and arsenic from groundwater was analyzed in this study. An ECF reactor with bipolar plate aluminum electrodes was operated in the horizontal continuous flow mode. Electrochemical and flow variables were optimized to examine ECF reactor contaminants removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as groundwater initial pH 5, flow rate = 4.3 l/h, inter electrode distance = 2.8 cm, current density = 5.78 mA/cm{sup 2}, A/V ratio = 0.248 cm{sup -1}. The NOM removal according to UV{sub 254} absorbance and dissolved organic matter (DOC) reached highest values of 77% and 71% respectively, relative to the raw groundwater. Arsenic removal was 85% (6.2 {mu}g As/l) relative to raw groundwater, satisfying the drinking water standards. The specific reactor electrical energy consumption was 17.5 kWh/kg Al. The specific aluminum electrode consumption was 66 g Al/m{sup 3}. According to the obtained results, ECF in horizontal continuous flow mode is an energy efficient process to remove NOM and arsenic from groundwater.

  20. Bubble-free on-chip continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction: concept and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenming; Kang, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2011-06-07

    Bubble formation inside a microscale channel is a significant problem in general microfluidic experiments. The problem becomes especially crucial when performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a chip which is subject to repetitive temperature changes. In this paper, we propose a bubble-free sample injection scheme applicable for continuous-flow PCR inside a glass/PDMS hybrid microfluidic chip, and attempt to provide a theoretical basis concerning bubble formation and elimination. Highly viscous paraffin oil plugs are employed in both the anterior and posterior ends of a sample plug, completely encapsulating the sample and eliminating possible nucleation sites for bubbles. In this way, internal channel pressure is increased, and vaporization of the sample is prevented, suppressing bubble formation. Use of an oil plug in the posterior end of the sample plug aids in maintaining a stable flow of a sample at a constant rate inside a heated microchannel throughout the entire reaction, as compared to using an air plug. By adopting the proposed sample injection scheme, we demonstrate various practical applications. On-chip continuous-flow PCR is performed employing genomic DNA extracted from a clinical single hair root sample, and its D1S80 locus is successfully amplified. Also, chip reusability is assessed using a plasmid vector. A single chip is used up to 10 times repeatedly without being destroyed, maintaining almost equal intensities of the resulting amplicons after each run, ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of the proposed sample injection scheme. In addition, the use of a commercially-available and highly cost-effective hot plate as a potential candidate for the heating source is investigated.

  1. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Geoffrey K.; Logan, Bruce E. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m{sup 2}, cathode surface area; 74 A/m{sup 3}) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of {eta}{sub E} = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H{sub 2} gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. (author)

  2. Durability of central aortic valve closure in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Deo, Salil; Daly, Richard C; Durham, Lucian A; Joyce, Lyle D; Stulak, John M; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    A competent aortic valve is essential to providing effective left ventricular assist device support. We have adopted a practice of central aortic valve closure by placing a simple coaptation stitch at left ventricular assist device implantation in patients with significant aortic insufficiency. We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the efficacy and durability of this procedure. The study included patients who had undergone continuous flow left ventricular assist device implantation. The patients were divided into 2 groups, those who did not require any aortic procedure because the valve was competent and those who underwent central aortic valve closure for mild or greater aortic regurgitation. The clinical endpoints were mortality, progression or recurrence of aortic insufficiency, and reoperation for aortic valve pathologic features. Aortic insufficiency was measured qualitatively from mild to severe on a scale of 0 to 5. A total of 123 patients received continuous flow left ventricular assist devices from February 2007 to August 2011. Of those, 18 (15%) underwent central aortic valve closure at left ventricular assist device implantation because of significant aortic insufficiency (1.8 ± 1.4) and 105 who did not (competent aortic valve, 0.15 ± 0.43; P assist device-supported patients, with follow-up extending into 2 years. Although aortic insufficiency progressed over time in those with minimal native valve regurgitation initially, no such progression was noted in those with central aortic valve closure. Additional investigation is needed to evaluate whether prophylactic central aortic valve closure should be performed at left ventricular assist device implantation to avoid problematic aortic regurgitation developing over time, in particular in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation for life-long (destination therapy) support. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  3. Titer plate formatted continuous flow thermal reactors for high throughput applications: fabrication and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Chen, Pin-Chuan; You, Byoung Hee; Kim, Namwon; Park, Taehyun; Lee, Tae Yoon; Soper, Steven A; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; Murphy, Michael C; Datta, Proyag; Desta, Yohannes

    2010-01-01

    A high throughput, multi-well (96) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform, based on a continuous flow (CF) mode of operation, was developed. Each CFPCR device was confined to a footprint of 8 × 8 mm 2 , matching the footprint of a well on a standard micro-titer plate. While several CFPCR devices have been demonstrated, this is the first example of a high-throughput multi-well continuous flow thermal reactor configuration. Verification of the feasibility of the multi-well CFPCR device was carried out at each stage of development from manufacturing to demonstrating sample amplification. The multi-well CFPCR devices were fabricated by micro-replication in polymers, polycarbonate to accommodate the peak temperatures during thermal cycling in this case, using double-sided hot embossing. One side of the substrate contained the thermal reactors and the opposite side was patterned with structures to enhance thermal isolation of the closely packed constant temperature zones. A 99 bp target from a λ-DNA template was successfully amplified in a prototype multi-well CFPCR device with a total reaction time as low as ∼5 min at a flow velocity of 3 mm s −1 (15.3 s cycle −1 ) and a relatively low amplification efficiency compared to a bench-top thermal cycler for a 20-cycle device; reducing the flow velocity to 1 mm s −1 (46.2 s cycle −1 ) gave a seven-fold improvement in amplification efficiency. Amplification efficiencies increased at all flow velocities for 25-cycle devices with the same configuration.

  4. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Rader, Geoffrey K.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m2/m3). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m2, cathode surface area; 74 A/m 3) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of ηE = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H2 gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Rader, Geoffrey K.

    2010-09-01

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m2/m3). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m2, cathode surface area; 74 A/m 3) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of ηE = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H2 gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A study for the fabulously of introducing an acceleration mass spectrometer facility (ABMs) for carbon-14 applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.I.M.; Comsan, N.; Sadek, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a study was conducted to show the importance and feasibility of introducing an accelerating mass spectrometer facility for carbon-14 analysis in the environmental levels. The different applications of Carbon-14 (e.g. dating and identification of food additives of synthetic origin) are discussed. There are two methods for C- 14 measurements, beta decay counting and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The beta decay method requires gram quantities of the sample carbon, compared to few milligram quantities in case of AMS method. The Central Lab. for Environmental Isotope Hydrology of the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control has a Carbon-14 analysis facility based on beta decay counting using a liquid scintillation counter after sample preparation in the form of benzene through rather complicated chemical conversion steps. This strongly limits the capacity of the laboratory to about 100-150 samples per year. Also, the amount of sample required limits our expansion for some very important applications like dating of archaeological small samples and especially old bone samples which normally have a low concentration of organic compounds. These applications are only possible by using the AMS method. For some applications only AMS could be used e.g measuring C-14 in atmospheric gases such as methane and carbon dioxide is virtually impossible using decay counting but quite feasible with AMS. The importance of purchasing an AMS facility or upgrading the existing accelerator is discussed in view of the shortage of such a facility in Africa and the Middle East. Acquiring an AMS in Egypt will make it possible to accurately date the Egyptian antiquities and to act as a regional laboratory and to enter into new applications where the amount of sample is limiting

  7. Instruments for radiation measurement in life sciences (4). 7. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry for drug development. Human mass balance studies at discovery stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, Teiji

    2005-01-01

    Following the recent trend of Position Paper issued from European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products on the non-clinical safety studies to support clinical trials with a single micro dose, human mass balance studies at discovery stages were made with special interest in using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) with a small amount of hot (radioisotope-labeled) drug. This method was found to be effective for the purpose of screening in the clinical study for pharmaceutical development. To show an example of the test, 5, 50, 500μg/body of C14-ARA (α1A adrenoreceptor antagonist, 50 nCi or 1.85 kBq/body/dose) were given (cross over) to several persons to be inspected and C14-quantity in the blood plasma or urine was determined with AMS until after 168 hours or so. The results of the present experiment demonstrate that human mass balance study at discovery stages is possible with ultra high sensitive measuring systems such as AMS and PET (positron emission tomography). (S. Ohno)

  8. Turnaround radius in an accelerated universe with quasi-local mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne; Prain, Angus, E-mail: vfaraoni@ubishops.ca, E-mail: mlapierre12@ubishops.ca, E-mail: angusprain@gmail.com [Physics Department, Bishop' s University, 2600 College Street, Sherbrooke, Québec, J1M 1Z7 Canada (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    We apply the Hawking-Hayward quasi-local energy construct to obtain in a rigorous way the turnaround radius of cosmic structures in General Relativity. A splitting of this quasi-local mass into local and cosmological parts describes the interplay between local attraction and cosmological expansion.

  9. Turnaround radius in an accelerated universe with quasi-local mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne; Prain, Angus

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Hawking-Hayward quasi-local energy construct to obtain in a rigorous way the turnaround radius of cosmic structures in General Relativity. A splitting of this quasi-local mass into local and cosmological parts describes the interplay between local attraction and cosmological expansion

  10. Speciation analysis of 129I in seawater using coprecipitation and accelerator mass spectrometry and its applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Shan; Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala

    2017-01-01

    Speciation analysis of long-lived 129I in seawater can provide useful information on the source of water masses. This paper presents an improved method for speciation analysis of 129I based on coprecipitation of iodide as AgI with Ag2SO3 and AgCl. By adding a small amount of 127I carrier...

  11. Accelerated modern human–induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R.; Barnosky, Anthony D.; García, Andrés; Pringle, Robert M.; Palmer, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    The oft-repeated claim that Earth’s biota is entering a sixth “mass extinction” depends on clearly demonstrating that current extinction rates are far above the “background” rates prevailing between the five previous mass extinctions. Earlier estimates of extinction rates have been criticized for using assumptions that might overestimate the severity of the extinction crisis. We assess, using extremely conservative assumptions, whether human activities are causing a mass extinction. First, we use a recent estimate of a background rate of 2 mammal extinctions per 10,000 species per 100 years (that is, 2 E/MSY), which is twice as high as widely used previous estimates. We then compare this rate with the current rate of mammal and vertebrate extinctions. The latter is conservatively low because listing a species as extinct requires meeting stringent criteria. Even under our assumptions, which would tend to minimize evidence of an incipient mass extinction, the average rate of vertebrate species loss over the last century is up to 100 times higher than the background rate. Under the 2 E/MSY background rate, the number of species that have gone extinct in the last century would have taken, depending on the vertebrate taxon, between 800 and 10,000 years to disappear. These estimates reveal an exceptionally rapid loss of biodiversity over the last few centuries, indicating that a sixth mass extinction is already under way. Averting a dramatic decay of biodiversity and the subsequent loss of ecosystem services is still possible through intensified conservation efforts, but that window of opportunity is rapidly closing. PMID:26601195

  12. Accelerated modern human-induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R; Barnosky, Anthony D; García, Andrés; Pringle, Robert M; Palmer, Todd M

    2015-06-01

    The oft-repeated claim that Earth's biota is entering a sixth "mass extinction" depends on clearly demonstrating that current extinction rates are far above the "background" rates prevailing between the five previous mass extinctions. Earlier estimates of extinction rates have been criticized for using assumptions that might overestimate the severity of the extinction crisis. We assess, using extremely conservative assumptions, whether human activities are causing a mass extinction. First, we use a recent estimate of a background rate of 2 mammal extinctions per 10,000 species per 100 years (that is, 2 E/MSY), which is twice as high as widely used previous estimates. We then compare this rate with the current rate of mammal and vertebrate extinctions. The latter is conservatively low because listing a species as extinct requires meeting stringent criteria. Even under our assumptions, which would tend to minimize evidence of an incipient mass extinction, the average rate of vertebrate species loss over the last century is up to 100 times higher than the background rate. Under the 2 E/MSY background rate, the number of species that have gone extinct in the last century would have taken, depending on the vertebrate taxon, between 800 and 10,000 years to disappear. These estimates reveal an exceptionally rapid loss of biodiversity over the last few centuries, indicating that a sixth mass extinction is already under way. Averting a dramatic decay of biodiversity and the subsequent loss of ecosystem services is still possible through intensified conservation efforts, but that window of opportunity is rapidly closing.

  13. Mass transfer coefficient in disturbed flow due to orifice for flow accelerated corrosion in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Parida, Smrutiranjan

    2015-01-01

    The flow of fluid in pipes cause corrosion wherein the inner surface of pipe becomes progressively thinner and susceptible to failure. This form of corrosion dependent on flow dynamics is called Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and has been observed in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Mass transfer coefficient (MTC) is related to extent of wall thinning and it changes from its value in a straight pipe (with same fluid parameters) for flow in orifices, bends, junctions etc. due to gross disturbance of the velocity profile. This paper presents two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for an orifice configuration in a straight pipe. Turbulent model K- ω with shear stress transport and transition flow was the model used for simulation studies. The mass transfer boundary layer (MTBL) thickness δ mtbl is related to the Schmidt number (Sc) and hydrodynamic boundary layer thickness δ h , as δ mtbl ~ δh/(Sc 1/3 ). MTBL is significantly smaller than δ h and hence boundary layer meshing was carried out deep into δ mtbl . Uniform velocity profile was applied at the inlet. Post orifice fluid shows large recirculating flows on the upper and lower wall. At various locations after orifice, mass transfer coefficient is calculated and compared with the value in straight pipe with fully developed turbulent flow. The MTC due to the orifice increases and it is correlated with enhanced FAC in region after orifice. (author)

  14. Characterization of binding and mobility of metals and xenobiotics in continuous flow and soil biosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunovska, A.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the dissertation thesis was to contribute to development of analytical tools and approaches application in characterization of binding and mobility of heavy metals and organic compounds (xenobiotics) in continuous flow and soil biosystems. Within the solution of this aim, a wide range of analytical methods (gamma-spectrometry, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, AAS, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, ion chromatography, and stripping volt-amperometry) and approaches (mathematical modelling - methods of nonlinear regression and in silico prediction modelling; chemometrics and statistical analysis of the data; single-step extraction methods, and lysimetry) were applied. In the first step of thesis solution, alternative sorbents of biological origin (biomass of microalgae, freshwater mosses, and waste biomass of hop) were obtained and physico-chemically characterized mainly in order to prediction of sorption capacities of Cd and synthetic dyes thioflavine T (TT), malachite green (MG) or methylene blue (MB) removal from single component or binary aqueous solutions and under conditions of batch or continuous flow systems. For these purposes, mathematical models of adsorption isotherms and models originated from chromatographic separation methods by application of methods of nonlinear regression analysis were used. In the second part of the work, methods of multivariate analysis in the evaluation of processes of synthetic dyes TT and MB binding in terms of the finding of relationships between sorption-desorption variables describing the stability of the bond and parameters defining the physic-chemical properties of river sediments and the environment of real or model waters were applied. In the last part of the work, a special laboratory lysimeter system was designed and applied within the soil biosystem defined by: soil additive (SA) derived from sewage sludge representing the source of microelements Zn and Cu <-> agriculturally used soil <-> soil solution <-> root

  15. Characterization of binding and mobility of metals and xenobiotics in continuous flow and soil biosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunovska, A.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the dissertation thesis was to contribute to development of analytical tools and approaches application in characterization of binding and mobility of heavy metals and organic compounds (xenobiotics) in continuous flow and soil biosystems. Within the solution of this aim, a wide range of analytical methods (gamma-spectrometry, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, AAS, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, ion chromatography, and stripping volt-amperometry) and approaches (mathematical modelling - methods of nonlinear regression and in silico prediction modelling; chemometrics and statistical analysis of the data; single-step extraction methods, and lysimetry) were applied. In the first step of thesis solution, alternative sorbents of biological origin (biomass of microalgae, freshwater mosses, and waste biomass of hop) were obtained and physico-chemically characterized mainly in order to prediction of sorption capacities of Cd and synthetic dyes thioflavine T (TT), malachite green (MG) or methylene blue (MB) removal from single component or binary aqueous solutions and under conditions of batch or continuous flow systems. For these purposes, mathematical models of adsorption isotherms and models originated from chromatographic separation methods by application of methods of nonlinear regression analysis were used. In the second part of the work, methods of multivariate analysis in the evaluation of processes of synthetic dyes TT and MB binding in terms of the finding of relationships between sorption-desorption variables describing the stability of the bond and parameters defining the physic-chemical properties of river sediments and the environment of real or model waters were applied. In the last part of the work, a special laboratory lysimeter system was designed and applied within the soil biosystem defined by: soil additive (SA) derived from sewage sludge representing the source of microelements Zn and Cu agriculturally used soil soil solution root system of

  16. Cardiac transplantation after bridged therapy with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Salil V; Sung, Kiick; Daly, Richard C; Shah, Ishan K; Altarabsheh, Salah E; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle D; Boilson, Barry A; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac transplantation is an effective surgical therapy for end-stage heart failure. Patients (pts) may need to be bridged with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) while on the transplant list as logistic factors like organ availability are unknown. Cardiac transplantation post-LVAD can be a surgically challenging procedure and outcome in these pts is perceived to be poorer based on experience with earlier generation pulsatile flow pumps. Data from a single institution comparing these pts with those undergoing direct transplantation in the present era of continuous flow device therapy are limited. Evaluate results of cardiac transplantation in pts bridged with a CF-LVAD (BTx) and compare outcomes with pts undergoing direct transplantation (Tx) in a single institution. From June 2007 till January 2012, 106 pts underwent cardiac transplantation. Among these, 37 (35%) pts (51±11 years; 85% male) were bridged with a CF-LVAD (BTx), while 70 (65%) comprised the Tx group (53±12 years; 72% males). The median duration of LVAD support was 227 (153,327) days. During the period of LVAD support, 10/37 (27%) pts were upgraded to status 1A and all were successfully transplanted. Median hospital stay in the BTx (14 days) was slightly longer than the Tx group (12 days) but not statistically significant (p=0.21). In-hospital mortality in the BTx (5%) and Tx (1%) were comparable (p=0.25). Estimated late survival in the BTx cohort was 94±7, 90±10 and 83±16% at the end of one, two and three years, respectively which was comparable to 97±4%, 93±6% and 89±9% for the Tx group (p=0.50). Cardiac transplantation after LVAD implant can be performed with excellent results. Patients can be supported on the left ventricular assist device even for periods close to a year with good outcome after cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand

  17. Measurements of δ11B in water by use of a mass spectrometer with accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fusco, Egidio; Rubino, Mauro; Marzaioli, Fabio; Di Rienzo, Brunella; Stellato, Luisa; Ricci, Andreina; Porzio, Giuseppe; D'onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    This study describes the tests carried out to measure the isotopic composition of Boron (B) in water samples by use of the magnetic spectrometer and accelerator of the Center for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of Italy. B was extracted from water samples to obtain Boric acid (B(OH)3), which was then analyzed. We quantified the precision of our experimental system and the variability introduced by the chemical extraction measuring chemically untreated and treated pure B(OH)3 samples. We found an instrumental precision around 10‰ (1σ), but, by increasing the number of replicates (>30), we obtained a standard deviation of the mean (σerr) around 3‰ or lower. We also tested whether the chemical extraction caused isotopic fractionation and found a small fractionation (ε = 5 ± 4‰) of treated samples normalized against untreated ones, compatible with zero at 2σ. In order to avoid δ11B biases, we decided to normalize unknown treated samples with treated standards. Finally, we measured δ11B of seawater and groundwater samples to test the analytical method, and obtained values of 30 ± 6‰ and -4 ± 4‰ respectively. We conclude that our experimental system is only suitable when remarkable (>10‰) δ11B differences exist among water samples, but cannot be used to measure natural differences (<10‰) unless the total uncertainty is significantly decreased.

  18. Does reproduction accelerate the growth of eye lens mass in female voles?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jánová, Eva; Havelková, Dana; Tkadlec, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 1 (2007), s. 85-88 ISSN 0777-6276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/04/2003; GA ČR(CZ) GD524/05/H536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : age estimation * eye lens mass * reproduction Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.433, year: 2007 http://www.naturalsciences.be/institute/associations/rbzs_website/bjz/back/pdf/BJZ%20137(1)/Volume%20137(1),%20pp.%2085-88.pdf

  19. XCAMS: The compact 14C accelerator mass spectrometer extended for 10Be and 26Al at GNS Science, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondervan, A.; Hauser, T. M.; Kaiser, J.; Kitchen, R. L.; Turnbull, J. C.; West, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed description is given of the 0.5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, installed in early 2010 at GNS Science, New Zealand. Its design follows that of previously commissioned Compact 14C-only AMS (CAMS) systems based on the Pelletron tandem accelerator. The only basic departure from that design is an extension of the rare-isotope achromat with a 45° magnet and a two-anode gas-ionisation detector, to provide additional filtering for 10Be. Realised performance of the three AMS modes is discussed in terms of acceptance-test scores, 14C Poisson and non-Poisson errors, and 10Be detection limit and sensitivity. Operational details and hardware improvements, such as 10Be beam transport and particle detector setup, are highlighted. Statistics of repeat measurements of all graphitised 14C calibration cathodes since start-up show that 91% of their total uncertainty values are less than 0.3%, indicating that the rare-isotope beamline extension has not affected precision of 14C measurement. For 10Be, the limit of detection in terms of the isotopic abundance ratio 10Be/9Be is 6 × 10-15 at at-1 and the total efficiency of counting atoms in the sample cathode is 1/8500 (0.012%).

  20. Development of an extraction method for the determination of dissolved organic radiocarbon in seawater by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Togawa, Orihiko; Amano, Hikaru

    2009-01-01

    We developed an extraction method for accurately and reproducibly determining dissolved organic radiocarbon in seawater by ultraviolet oxidation of dissolved organic carbon and subsequent accelerator mass spectrometry. We determined the irradiation time required for oxidation of the dissolved organic carbon. By modifying the experimental apparatus, we decreased contamination by dead carbon, which came mainly from petrochemical products in the apparatus and from the incursion of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The modifications decreased the analytical blank level to less than 1% of sample size, a percentage that had not previously been achieved. The recovery efficiency was high, 95±1%. To confirm both the accuracy and reproducibility of the method, we tested it by analyzing an oxalic acid radiocarbon reference material and by determining the dissolved organic carbon in surface seawater samples. (author)

  1. First accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dates documenting contemporaneity of nonanalog species in late Pleistocene mammal communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Semken, H.A. Jr.; Graham, R.W.; Klippel, W.F.; Markova, A.; Smirnov, N.G.; Southon, J.

    1999-10-01

    Worldwide late Pleistocene terrestrial mammal faunas are characterized by stratigraphic associations of species that now have exclusive geographic ranges. These have been interpreted as either taphonomically mixed or representative of communities that no longer exist. Accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dates (n = 60) on single bones of stratigraphically associated fossil micromammals from two American and two Russian sites document for the first time that currently allopatric mammals occurred together between 12,000 and 22,000 yr B.P. on two continents. The existence of mammal communities without modern analogs demonstrates that Northern Hemisphere biological communities are ephemeral and that many modern biomes are younger than 12 ka. Future climate change may result in new nonanalog communities.

  2. Ultra-trace determination of neptunium-237 and plutonium isotopes in urine samples by compact accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, X.; Christl, M.; Kramer-Tremblay, S., E-mail: sheila.kramer-tremblay@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Synal, H-A. [ETH Zurich, Lab. of Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Ultra-trace analysis of actinides, such as Pu isotopes and {sup 237}Np, in bioassay samples is often needed for radiation protection programs at nuclear facilities. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), particularly the compact ETH Zurich system “Tandy”, has evolved over the years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analysis. Employment of the AMS technique can reduce the demands on sample preparation chemistry and increase sample analysis throughput, due to very low instrumental detection limit, high rejection of interferences, and low susceptibility to adverse sample matrices. Initial research and development tests were performed to explore and demonstrate the analytical capability of AMS for Pu and Np urine bioassay. In this study, urine samples spiked with femtogram levels of Np and Pu isotopes were prepared and measured using compact ETH AMS system and the results showed excellent analytical capability for measuring Np and Pu isotopes at femtogram/litre levels in urine. (author)

  3. Possibility of content change in bioethanol gasoline during pre-treatment process for using accelerator mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masaaki; Yunoki, Shunji; Suzuki, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    We attempted to determine the bioethanol content of E3 gasoline by applying ASTM D6866 method B. In the pre-treatment process using accelerator mass spectroscopy(AMS), the graphite samples were prepared from E3 gasoline. Three portions of the same graphite sample were measured, and the contents agreed within the measurement error of AMS. The graphite samples prepared from eight portions of the same E3 gasoline sample were measured, but the accuracy was insufficient. There are many kinds of hydrocarbon compounds in the gasoline and their boiling points are different. The content of bioethanol was found to decrease with vaporization when E3 gasoline was placed in open air. A very small amount of E3 gasoline is pre-treated for AMS and the volatile loss cannot be ignored. It seems that the content change of bioethanol was caused by vaporization of E3 gasoline during the pre-treatment process. (author)

  4. Electrochemical removal of fluoride from water by PAOA-modified carbon felt electrodes in a continuous flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; Qian, Yan; An, Hao; Sun, Chencheng; Zhai, Jianping; Li, Qin

    2012-08-01

    A novel poly(aniline-co-o-aminophenol) (PAOA) modified carbon felt electrode reactor was designed and investigated for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. This reactor design is innovative because it operates under a wider pH range because of coating with a copolymer PAOA ion exchange film. In addition, contaminant mass transfer from bulk solution to the electrode surface is enhanced by the porous carbon felt as an electron-conducting carrier material compared to other reactors. The electrically controlled anion exchange mechanism was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The applicability of the reactor in the field was tested through a series of continuous flow experiments. When the flow rate and initial fluoride concentration were increased, the breakthrough curve became sharper, which lead to a decrease in the breakthrough time and the defluoridation capacity of the reactor. The terminal potential values largely influenced fluoride removal by the reactor and the optimal defluoridation efficiency was observed at around 1.2V. The breakthrough capacities were all >10mg/g over a wide pH range (pH 5-9) with an initial fluoride concentration of 10mg/L. Consecutive treatment-regeneration studies over a week (once each day) revealed that the PAOA-modified carbon felt electrode could be effectively regenerated for reuse. The PAOA-modified carbon felt electrode reactor is a promising system that could be made commercially available for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions in field applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of long-lived radionuclide (10Be, 41Ca, 129I) concentrations in nuclear waste by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bertaux, Maite; Bourles, Didier; Arnold, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste is essential for storage sites management. However, most of Long-Lived Radionuclides (LLRN), important for long-term management, are difficult to measure since concentration levels are very low and waste matrices generally complex. In an industrial approach, LLRN concentrations are not directly measured in waste samples but assessed from scaling factors with respect to easily measured gamma emitters. Ideally, the key nuclide chosen ( 60 Co, 137 Cs) should be produced by a similar mechanism (fission or activation) as the LLRN of interest and should have similar physicochemical properties. However, the uncertainty on the scaling factors, determined from experimental and/or calculation data, can be quite important. Consequently, studies are performed to develop analytical procedures which would lead to determine precisely the concentration of LLRN in nuclear waste. In this context, the aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of three LLRN: 129 I (T 1/2 = 15.7*10 6 a), 41 Ca (T 1/2 = 9.94*10 4 a) and 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.387*10 6 a) in spent resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurized Water Reactors using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) for measurement. The AMS technique combined mass spectrometry and nuclear physics to achieve highly efficient molecular and elemental isobars separation. Energies of several Million Electron-Volt transferred to the ions in the first accelerating part of specifically developed tandem accelerators lead to molecular isobars destruction through interaction with the argon gas used to strip the injected negative ions to positive ones. At the exit of the tandem accelerator, the energy acquired in both accelerating parts allows an elemental isobars separation based on their significantly different energy loss (dE) while passing through a thickness of matter dx that is proportional to their atomic number (Z) and inversely proportional to ions velocity (v) according to the

  6. Metabolic profiling of yeast culture using gas chromatography coupled with orthogonal acceleration accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry: application to biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Elsuida; Marriott, Philip J; Parker, Rhiannon M; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Morrison, Paul; Adams, Mike

    2014-01-07

    Yeast and yeast cultures are frequently used as additives in diets of dairy cows. Beneficial effects from the inclusion of yeast culture in diets for dairy mammals have been reported, and the aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the accurate mass identification of the 'global' metabolites in order to differentiate a variety of yeasts at varying growth stages (Diamond V XP, Yea-Sacc and Levucell). Microwave-assisted derivatization for metabolic profiling is demonstrated through the analysis of differing yeast samples developed for cattle feed, which include a wide range of metabolites of interest covering a large range of compound classes. Accurate identification of the components was undertaken using GC-oa-ToFMS (gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration-time-of-flight mass spectrometry), followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) for data reduction and biomarker discovery. Semi-quantification (fold changes in relative peak areas) was reported for metabolites identified as possible discriminative biomarkers (p-value 2), including D-ribose (four fold decrease), myo-inositol (five fold increase), L-phenylalanine (three fold increase), glucopyranoside (two fold increase), fructose (three fold increase) and threitol (three fold increase) respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A simple continuous flow cryostat for low temperature experiments in pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Hideharu; Tamura, Takaaki; Tabata, Yoneho

    1978-01-01

    A conventional liquid bath type cryostat connected with a helium refrigerator has been used for the irradiation at very low temperatures in a fast neutron source reactor, YAYOI. In order to start the experiments with the cryostat, it takes 4 to 6 hours to cool down and get ready for irradiation. Furthermore, it was not possible to transfer irradiated samples from the cryostat for irradiation to the other for measurements of electron spin resonance and resistivity, keeping the temperature of liquid helium. Accordingly a simple and convenient cryostat which is capable of providing a wide range of temperatures from liquid helium to 300K, as well as transferring samples with less complexity had been required. In this paper, the design and fabrication of a simple continuous flow cryostat to meet our requirements mentioned above is reported. Cooling time and the consumption rate of liquid helium during the operation at 4.2K under an output of the nuclear reactor of 500W are designed to be less than 30 minutes and less than 7 litres/hour, respectively. (author)

  8. A simple continuous flow cryostat for low temperature experiments in pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Hideharu; Tamura, Takaaki; Tabata, Yoneho

    1978-01-01

    A conventional liquid bath type cryostat connected with a helium refrigerator has been used for the irradiation at very low temperatures in a fast neutron source reactor, YAYOI. In order to start the experiments with the cryostat, it takes 4 to 6 hours to cool down and get ready for irradiation. Furthermore, it was not possible to transfer irradiated samples from the cryostat for irradiation to the other for measurements of electron spin resonance and resistivity keeping the temperature of liquid helium. Accordingly a simple and convenient cryostat which is capable of providing a wide range of temperatures from liquid helium to 300K, as well as transfering samples with less complexity had been required. In this paper, the design and fabrication of a simple continuous flow cryostat to meet our requirements mentioned above is reported. Cooling time and the consumption rate of liquid helium during the operation at 4.2K under a output of the nuclear reactor of 500W are designed to be less than 30 minutes and less than 7 litres/hour, respectively. (author)

  9. Uncertainty in counting ice nucleating particles with continuous flow diffusion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sarvesh; Rothenberg, Daniel A.; Wolf, Martin J.; David, Robert O.; Kanji, Zamin A.; Wang, Chien; Rösch, Michael; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the measurement of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations and sizing of crystals using continuous flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs). CFDCs have been deployed for decades to measure the formation of INPs under controlled humidity and temperature conditions in laboratory studies and by ambient aerosol populations. These measurements have, in turn, been used to construct parameterizations for use in models by relating the formation of ice crystals to state variables such as temperature and humidity as well as aerosol particle properties such as composition and number. We show here that assumptions of ideal instrument behavior are not supported by measurements made with a commercially available CFDC, the SPectrometer for Ice Nucleation (SPIN), and the instrument on which it is based, the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (ZINC). Non-ideal instrument behavior, which is likely inherent to varying degrees in all CFDCs, is caused by exposure of particles to different humidities and/or temperatures than predicated from instrument theory of operation. This can result in a systematic, and variable, underestimation of reported INP concentrations. We find here variable correction factors from 1.5 to 9.5, consistent with previous literature values. We use a machine learning approach to show that non-ideality is most likely due to small-scale flow features where the aerosols are combined with sheath flows. Machine learning is also used to minimize the uncertainty in measured INP concentrations. We suggest that detailed measurement, on an instrument-by-instrument basis, be performed to characterize this uncertainty.

  10. Continuous-Flow Production of Injectable Liposomes via a Microfluidic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzari, Alessandra; Bianco, Monica; Perrone, Elisabetta; Amato, Francesco; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Rendina, Filippo; Arima, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Injectable liposomes are characterized by a suitable size and unique lipid mixtures, which require time-consuming and nonstraightforward production processes. The complexity of the manufacturing methods may affect liposome solubility, the phase transition temperatures of the membranes, the average particle size, and the associated particle size distribution, with a possible impact on the drug encapsulation and release. By leveraging the precise steady-state control over the mixing of miscible liquids and a highly efficient heat transfer, microfluidic technology has proved to be an effective and direct methodology to produce liposomes. This approach results particularly efficient in reducing the number of the sizing steps, when compared to standard industrial methods. Here, Microfluidic Hydrodynamic Focusing chips were produced and used to form liposomes upon tuning experimental parameters such as lipids concentration and Flow-Rate-Ratios (FRRs). Although modelling evidenced the dependence of the laminar flow on the geometric constraints and the FRR conditions, for the specific formulation investigated in this study, the lipids concentration was identified as the primary factor influencing the size of the liposomes and their polydispersity index. This was attributed to a predominance of the bending elasticity modulus over the vesiculation index in the lipid mixture used. Eventually, liposomes of injectable size were produced using microfluidic one-pot synthesis in continuous flow. PMID:29232873

  11. Continuous-Flow Production of Injectable Liposomes via a Microfluidic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zizzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Injectable liposomes are characterized by a suitable size and unique lipid mixtures, which require time-consuming and nonstraightforward production processes. The complexity of the manufacturing methods may affect liposome solubility, the phase transition temperatures of the membranes, the average particle size, and the associated particle size distribution, with a possible impact on the drug encapsulation and release. By leveraging the precise steady-state control over the mixing of miscible liquids and a highly efficient heat transfer, microfluidic technology has proved to be an effective and direct methodology to produce liposomes. This approach results particularly efficient in reducing the number of the sizing steps, when compared to standard industrial methods. Here, Microfluidic Hydrodynamic Focusing chips were produced and used to form liposomes upon tuning experimental parameters such as lipids concentration and Flow-Rate-Ratios (FRRs. Although modelling evidenced the dependence of the laminar flow on the geometric constraints and the FRR conditions, for the specific formulation investigated in this study, the lipids concentration was identified as the primary factor influencing the size of the liposomes and their polydispersity index. This was attributed to a predominance of the bending elasticity modulus over the vesiculation index in the lipid mixture used. Eventually, liposomes of injectable size were produced using microfluidic one-pot synthesis in continuous flow.

  12. Continuous flow synthesis and characterization of tailor-made bare gold nanoparticles for use in SERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López -Lorente, Ángela I.; Valcárcel, Miguel; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in a stainless steel continuous flow tubular reactor using tetrachloroauric acid as a precursor but without using a classical reducing agent. Gold(III) ion is reduced by stainless steel to form gold nanoparticles which are collected at the end of the coil. A single-phase system is introduced that generates dispersed nanoparticles in the absence of reducing agents on their surface. By controlling flow rates and temperature, the size of the nanoparticles can be tuned in the range from 24 nm to 36 nm. The reproducibility of the preparation was investigated, relative standard deviation of both the wavelength of the peak and the intensity of the plasmonic absorption band were determined and found to vary by 0.15 % and 6.5 %, respectively. Flow synthesis is found to be an excellent alternative to chemical methods to produce stable gold nanoparticles of varying size in an efficiently way. The particles obtained also perform very well when used as a substrate in surface enhanced Raman scattering as shown by the characterization of carboxylated single walled carbon nanotubes. (author)

  13. Continuous Flow Chemistry: Reaction of Diphenyldiazomethane with p-Nitrobenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Alex; Fritz, Marshall; Napoline, Jonathan W; Pollet, Pamela; Liotta, Charles L

    2017-11-15

    Continuous flow technology has been identified as instrumental for its environmental and economic advantages leveraging superior mixing, heat transfer and cost savings through the "scaling out" strategy as opposed to the traditional "scaling up". Herein, we report the reaction of diphenyldiazomethane with p-nitrobenzoic acid in both batch and flow modes. To effectively transfer the reaction from batch to flow mode, it is essential to first conduct the reaction in batch. As a consequence, the reaction of diphenyldiazomethane was first studied in batch as a function of temperature, reaction time, and concentration to obtain kinetic information and process parameters. The glass flow reactor set-up is described and combines two types of reaction modules with "mixing" and "linear" microstructures. Finally, the reaction of diphenyldiazomethane with p-nitrobenzoic acid was successfully conducted in the flow reactor, with up to 95% conversion of the diphenyldiazomethane in 11 min. This proof of concept reaction aims to provide insight for scientists to consider flow technology's competitiveness, sustainability, and versatility in their research.

  14. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Rydfjord

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe, thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  15. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05m3/m3-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02m3/m3-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38mV, 1.0V; -0.426±4mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium.

  16. Effects of irradiation and storage on granulocytes harvested by continuous-flow centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrone, F.; Dallegri, F.; Brema, F.; Sacchetti, C.

    1979-01-01

    Five normal subjects were subjected to leukapheresis by continuous-flow-centrifugation (CFC) in the Aminco Celltrifuge. Granulocyte functional capacities were evaluated on the venous blood samples drawn before apheresis and on the cellrich plasma collected by CFC, immediately after collection and after short-term storage at 4degC with or without previous irradiation (1500 rad, 50 rad/min). The CFC technique has been shown to provide cells without functional damage. Irradiation did not appear to influence granulocyte function, as evaluated by in vitro studies. The data demonstrate that granulocytes maintain, even after irradiation, functional activities similar to those found immediately after collection for up to 24 hours of storage at 4degC and exhibit only a moderate loss of function after 48 h. Chemotaxis appears to be the most sensitive detector of cellular damage of stored granulocytes, either irradiated or non-irradiated; this technique may be the most useful for assessment of granulocyte function before transfusion. (author)

  17. A catalytic reactor for the organocatalyzed enantioselective continuous flow alkylation of aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Riccardo; Benaglia, Maurizio; Puglisi, Alessandra; Mandoli, Alessandro; Gualandi, Andrea; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio

    2014-12-01

    The use of immobilized metal-free catalysts offers the unique possibility to develop sustainable processes in flow mode. The challenging intermolecular organocatalyzed enantioselective alkylation of aldehydes was performed for the first time under continuous flow conditions. By using a packed-bed reactor filled with readily available supported enantiopure imidazolidinone, different aldehydes were treated with three distinct cationic electrophiles. In the organocatalyzed α-alkylation of aldehydes with 1,3-benzodithiolylium tetrafluoroborate, excellent enantioselectivities, in some cases even better than those obtained in the flask process (up to 95% ee at 25 °C), and high productivity (more than 3800 h(-1) ) were obtained, which thus shows that a catalytic reactor may continuously produce enantiomerically enriched compounds. Treatment of the alkylated products with Raney-nickel furnished enantiomerically enriched α-methyl derivatives, key intermediates for active pharmaceutical ingredients and natural products. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Preliminary observations of a continuous flow solar disinfection system for a rural community in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, L.W.; Price, C.

    2010-01-01

    This project involves the design and installation of a continuous flow reactor which uses solar radiation, an abundant resource in most sub-Saharan countries, to disinfect water supplies. The system was installed at a rural village in Kenya to disinfect surface water collected at a recently constructed micro-dam. The solar reactor uses CPC reflectors which reflect both direct and diffuse solar radiation onto clear pipes through which the requisite water supply flows. The reaction kinetics for the full-scale design had been determined on a variety of pathogenic micro-organisms under both artificial and real sunlight in controlled conditions. The community fully participated in the planning, installation and subsequent operation of the system. The preliminary water quality results indicate that the system is providing a safe source of water for the community. The installation, commissioning and initial use of the system highlights the critical need for community involvement and approval if such interventions are going to be successful in rural areas, alongside the requirements for strategic and technical support.

  19. Selective particle and cell capture in a continuous flow using micro-vortex acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Khoo, Bee Luan; Ma, Zhichao; Winkler, Andreas; Weser, Robert; Schmidt, Hagen; Han, Jongyoon; Ai, Ye

    2017-05-16

    Acoustic streaming has emerged as a promising technique for refined microscale manipulation, where strong rotational flow can give rise to particle and cell capture. In contrast to hydrodynamically generated vortices, acoustic streaming is rapidly tunable, highly scalable and requires no external pressure source. Though streaming is typically ignored or minimized in most acoustofluidic systems that utilize other acoustofluidic effects, we maximize the effect of acoustic streaming in a continuous flow using a high-frequency (381 MHz), narrow-beam focused surface acoustic wave. This results in rapid fluid streaming, with velocities orders of magnitude greater than that of the lateral flow, to generate fluid vortices that extend the entire width of a 400 μm wide microfluidic channel. We characterize the forces relevant for vortex formation in a combined streaming/lateral flow system, and use these acoustic streaming vortices to selectively capture 2 μm from a mixed suspension with 1 μm particles and human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-231) from red blood cells.

  20. Continuous Flow-Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of an Intermediate Redox State of Cytochrome-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forster, M.; Hester, R. E.; Cartling, B.

    1982-01-01

    An intermediate redox state of cytochrome c at alkaline pH, generated upon rapid reduction by sodium dithionite, has been observed by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy in combination with the continuous flow technique. The RR spectrum of the intermediate state is reported for excitation both...... in the (alpha, beta) and the Soret optical absorption band. The spectra of the intermediate state are more like those of the stable reduced form than those of the stable oxidized form. For excitation of 514.5 nm, the most prominent indication of an intermediate state is the wave-number shift of one RR band from...... 1,562 cm-1 in the stable oxidized state through 1,535 cm-1 in the intermediate state to 1,544 cm-1 in the stable reduced state. For excitation at 413.1 nm, a band, present at 1,542 cm-1 in the stable reduced state but not present in the stable oxidized state, is absent in the intermediate state. We...

  1. Submillisecond mixing in a continuous-flow, microfluidic mixer utilizing mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Drew P; Magana, Donny; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2014-02-07

    We report a continuous-flow, microfluidic mixer utilizing mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging detection, with an experimentally determined, submillisecond mixing time. The simple and robust mixer design has the microfluidic channels cut through a polymer spacer that is sandwiched between two IR transparent windows. The mixer hydrodynamically focuses the sample stream with two side flow channels, squeezing it into a thin jet and initiating mixing through diffusion and advection. The detection system generates a mid-infrared hyperspectral absorbance image of the microfluidic sample stream. Calibration of the hyperspectral image yields the mid-IR absorbance spectrum of the sample versus time. A mixing time of 269 μs was measured for a pD jump from 3.2 to above 4.5 in a D2O sample solution of adenosine monophosphate (AMP), which acts as an infrared pD indicator. The mixer was further characterized by comparing experimental results with a simulation of the mixing of an H2O sample stream with a D2O sheath flow, showing good agreement between the two. The IR microfluidic mixer eliminates the need for fluorescence labeling of proteins with bulky, interfering dyes, because it uses the intrinsic IR absorbance of the molecules of interest, and the structural specificity of IR spectroscopy to follow specific chemical changes such as the protonation state of AMP.

  2. Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell fed winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Bryan, Bill; Parker, Denny S; Merrill, Matthew D; Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D; Liu, Guangli; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    A pilot-scale (1,000 L) continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell was constructed and tested for current generation and COD removal with winery wastewater. The reactor contained 144 electrode pairs in 24 modules. Enrichment of an exoelectrogenic biofilm required ~60 days, which is longer than typically needed for laboratory reactors. Current generation was enhanced by ensuring adequate organic volatile fatty acid content (VFA/SCOD ≥ 0.5) and by raising the wastewater temperature (31 ± 1°C). Once enriched, SCOD removal (62 ± 20%) was consistent at a hydraulic retention time of 1 day (applied voltage of 0.9 V). Current generation reached a maximum of 7.4 A/m(3) by the planned end of the test (after 100 days). Gas production reached a maximum of 0.19 ± 0.04 L/L/day, although most of the product gas was converted to methane (86 ± 6%). In order to increase hydrogen recovery in future tests, better methods will be needed to isolate hydrogen gas produced at the cathode. These results show that inoculation and enrichment procedures are critical to the initial success of larger-scale systems. Acetate amendments, warmer temperatures, and pH control during startup were found to be critical for proper enrichment of exoelectrogenic biofilms and improved reactor performance.

  3. Separation of magnetic beads in a hybrid continuous flow microfluidic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Abhishek [Haldia Institute of Technology, Production Engineering Department, Haldia (India); Ganguly, Ranjan; Datta, Amitava [Jadavpur University, Power Engineering Department (India); Modak, Nipu, E-mail: nmechju@gmail.com [Jadavpur University, Mechanical Engineering Department (India)

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic separation of biological entities in microfluidic environment is a key task for a large number of bio-analytical protocols. In magnetophoretic separation, biochemically functionalized magnetic beads are allowed to bind selectively to target analytes, which are then separated from the background stream using a suitably imposed magnetic field. Here we present a numerical study, characterizing the performance of a magnetophoretic hybrid microfluidic device having two inlets and three outlets for immunomagnetic isolation of three different species from a continuous flow. The hybrid device works on the principle of split-flow thin (SPLITT) fractionation and field flow fractionation (FFF) mechanisms. Transport of the magnetic particles in the microchannel has been predicted following an Eulerian-Lagrangian model and using an in-house numerical code. Influence of the salient geometrical parameters on the performance of the separator is studied by characterizing the particle trajectories and their capture and separation indices. Finally, optimum channel geometry is identified that yields the maximum capture efficiency and separation index. - Highlights: • Immunomagnetic separation in a hybrid microchannel design is investigated numerically. • Influence of salient geometric parameters on the device performance is analysed. • Optimum device dimension for best separation parameters are identified. • Optimized design of hybrid separator performs better than FFF or SPLITT devices.

  4. Integration of Bromine and Cyanogen Bromide Generators for the Continuous-Flow Synthesis of Cyclic Guanidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotz, Gabriel; Lebl, René; Dallinger, Doris; Kappe, C Oliver

    2017-10-23

    A continuous-flow process for the in situ on-demand generation of cyanogen bromide (BrCN) from bromine and potassium cyanide that makes use of membrane-separation technology is described. In order to circumvent the handling, storage, and transportation of elemental bromine, a continuous bromine generator using bromate-bromide synproportionation can optionally be attached upstream. Monitoring and quantification of BrCN generation was enabled through the implementation of in-line FTIR technology. With the Br 2 and BrCN generators connected in series, 0.2 mmol BrCN per minute was produced, which corresponds to a 0.8 m solution of BrCN in dichloromethane. The modular Br 2 /BrCN generator was employed for the synthesis of a diverse set of biologically relevant five- and six-membered cyclic amidines and guanidines. The set-up can either be operated in a fully integrated continuous format or, where reactive crystallization is beneficial, in semi-batch mode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Human Fitting Studies of Cleveland Clinic Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H.; Steffen, Robert J.; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Cruz, Vincent; Golding, Leonard A.R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Moazami, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of mechanical circulatory support devices is challenging, especially in patients with a small chest cavity. We evaluated how well the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) fit the anatomy of patients about to receive a heart transplant. A mock pump model of the CFTAH was rapid-prototyped using biocompatible materials. The model was brought to the operative table, and the direction, length, and angulation of the inflow/outflow ports and outflow conduits were evaluated after the recipient's ventricles had been resected. Thoracic cavity measurements were based on preoperative computed tomographic data. The CFTAH fit well in all five patients (height, 170 ± 9 cm; weight, 75 ± 24 kg). Body surface area was 1.9 ± 0.3 m2 (range, 1.6-2.1 m2). The required inflow and outflow port orientation of both the left and right housings appeared consistent with the current version of the CFTAH implanted in calves. The left outflow conduit remained straight, but the right outflow direction necessitated a 73 ± 22 degree angulation to prevent potential kinking when crossing over the connected left outflow. These data support the fact that our design achieves the proper anatomical relationship of the CFTAH to a patient's native vessels. PMID:25806613

  6. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  7. Salt removal using multiple microbial desalination cells under continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Youpeng

    2013-05-01

    Four microbial desalination cells (MDCs) were hydraulically connected and operated under continuous flow conditions. The anode solution from the first MDC flowed into the cathode, and then on to the anode of the next reactor, which avoided pH imbalances that inhibit bacterial metabolism. The salt solution also moved through each desalination chamber in series. Increasing the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of the salt solution from 1 to 2. days increased total NaCl removal from 76 ± 1% to 97 ± 1%, but coulombic efficiencies decreased from 49 ± 4% to 35 ± 1%. Total COD removals were similar at both HRTs (60 ± 2%, 2. days; 59 ± 2%, 1. day). Community analysis of the anode biofilms showed that bacteria most similar to the xylose fermenting bacterium Klebsiella ornithinolytica predominated in the anode communities, and sequences most similar to Geobacter metallireducens were identified in all MDCs except the first one. These results demonstrated successful operation of a series of hydraulically connected MDCs and good desalination rates. © 2013 Elsevier B.V..

  8. Carotid Artery Stenting in a Patient With a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michele; Squizzato, Francesco; Grego, Franco; Bottio, Tommaso; Gerosa, Gino; Antonello, Michele

    2016-08-01

    To demonstrate the safety and feasibility of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in a patient with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD). A 54-year-old woman with a LVAD was referred for a 90% stenosis of the right internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient was offered CAS, and oral anticoagulant was not discontinued in the periprocedural period. Because of absent arterial pulses, percutaneous transfemoral access was obtained under ultrasound guidance. Particular attention was paid to cannulation of the innominate artery; a 7-F guiding catheter was advanced from the descending aorta into the innominate artery under road-mapping, avoiding maneuvers in the ascending aorta where the outflow Dacron graft of the LVAD was anastomosed. To avoid cerebral flow modifications, the Angioguard RX was used as the cerebral protection device rather than other devices such as the flow reversal or flow-clamping systems. At this point, CAS was performed in a standard fashion using the 7×30-mm Precise ProRX stent. The computed tomography angiogram at 6 months showed patency of the stented right ICA. With adequate planning, CAS appears feasible in patients with a LVAD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Continuous flow bioassay method to evaluate the effects of outboard motor exhausts and selected aromatic toxicants on fish. [Carassius auratus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenniman, G. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago); Hartung, R.; Weber, W.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A continuous flow bioassay system was designed to measure the effects of outboard motor exhaust (OME) emissions and selected volatile and evaporative aromatic toxicants on goldfish (Carassius auratus). Continuous flow bioassays were run for 24, 48, 72, 96, and 720 h to determine lethal concentrations for 50 percent of individuals (LC 50's) for leaded OME, non-leaded OME, toluene, xylene, and 1,3,5 trimethylbenzene, the three individual compounds having been identified as significant aromatic components of OME. The 96 h LC-50's for these substances were found to be 171, 168, 23, 17, and 13 ppm, respectively. The values of 171 and 168 ppm for the two OME's are given in terms of gallons of fuel burned per million gallons of water. The continuous flow bioassay method was demonstrated to be a more reliable indicator of the effects of OME pollutants on aquatic organisms than is the static bioassay method.

  10. Mass-spectrometer for on-line operation with an accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, B.N.; Gall', L.N.; Domkin, V.D.

    1974-01-01

    The paper describes the most essential elements and parameters of a mass-spectrometer designed for the on-line operation with the Leningrad Institute for Nuclear Physics synchrocyclotron with an extracted 1 GeV proton beam. The mass-spectrometer consists of two sections: analytical and measuring. A thermal ionization ion source is used for measuring isotope composition of nuclear reaction alkaline products produced in a target under the effect of 19 ev protons. While the selection and development of an ion-optical system for the source a provision had to be made for a high efficiency of the device as well as a stobility of parameters of the ion-optical system. To meet these requirements a massive electrode principle formed the basis of the system. Electrodes were a slit-type system consisted of three cylindrical lenses. Anion-optical system scheme is given in the paper. The employment of the ion-optical system with a small angle divergence in the horizontal plane provided for a high resolution of the spectrometer, approximately 400 at the relative aperture of 14-16%. The target consisted of a stack of MPG-6 graphite plates (20-30 pcs), 0.1 mm thick, 9x18 mm; the plates were fixed (1x10 0.1 mm apart by means of narrow in terlayers (1x10 mm) of the same material. For ensuring optimal diffusion and ionization depending upon the chemical element under study the target was heated up to 1.500-1.900 deg C. Results were obtained on the production cross-sections of lithium (6, 7, 8, 9 Li) isotope in the carbon target. While measuring sup(7, 8, 9)Li isotope yields the target irradiation period was 15 min and for 6 Li 3 min. The background was measured for each line of a mass-spectrum with proton beam off. The results obtained for the lithium isotope production cross section are of interests for discussions on problems of the light element production in cosmic rays

  11. Mass acceleration in a multi-module plasma jet for impact fusion. Final report, 21 May 1984-21 May 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, R.L.; Goldstein, S.A.; Tidman, D.A.; Massey, D.W.; Winsor, N.K.; Witherspoon, F.D.

    1985-07-01

    GT-Devices began work on multi-module mass accelerators for impact fusion in 1981. The technique employs sequentially switched high pressure plasma jets to accelerate a lightweight projectile in a circular barrel. The purpose of the work of the past 12 months was to improve the understanding of the plasma jet acceleration process, and to translate that understanding into verifiable results. Both goals have been accomplished. During the past year we conceived, designed, built and fired 325 shots on the Module Test Facility (MTF). This facility provided sufficient diagnostics to investigate a wide variety of geometries, plasmas and current pulses, so that rapid progress was made

  12. Reagent-free determination of amikacin content in amikacin sulfate injections by FTIR derivative spectroscopy in a continuous flow system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Ovalles

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative estimation of amikacin (AMK in AMK sulfate injection samples is reported using FTIR-derivative spectrometric method in a continuous flow system. Fourier transform of mid-IR spectra were recorded without any sample pretreatment. A good linear calibration (r>0.999, %RSD<2.0 in the range of 7.7–77.0 mg/mL was found. The results showed a good correlation with the manufacturer's and overall they all fell within acceptable limits of most pharmacopoeial monographs on AMK sulfate. Keywords: Amikacin, FTIR derivative spectrometry, Continuous flow system, Pharmaceutical preparation, Injection, Sulfate

  13. Using Dark Matter Haloes to Learn about Cosmic Acceleration: A New Proposal for a Universal Mass Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation provides a strong test of any cosmic acceleration model because a successful dark energy model must not inhibit or overpredict the development of observed large-scale structures. Traditional approaches to studies of structure formation in the presence of dark energy or a modified gravity implement a modified Press-Schechter formalism, which relates the linear overdensities to the abundance of dark matter haloes at the same time. We critically examine the universality of the Press-Schechter formalism for different cosmologies, and show that the halo abundance is best correlated with spherical linear overdensity at 94% of collapse (or observation) time. We then extend this argument to ellipsoidal collapse (which decreases the fractional time of best correlation for small haloes), and show that our results agree with deviations from modified Press-Schechter formalism seen in simulated mass functions. This provides a novel universal prescription to measure linear density evolution, based on current and future observations of cluster (or dark matter) halo mass function. In particular, even observations of cluster abundance in a single epoch will constrain the entire history of linear growth of cosmological of perturbations.

  14. Uncertainty in counting ice nucleating particles with continuous flow diffusion chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Garimella

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the measurement of ice nucleating particle (INP concentrations and sizing of crystals using continuous flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs. CFDCs have been deployed for decades to measure the formation of INPs under controlled humidity and temperature conditions in laboratory studies and by ambient aerosol populations. These measurements have, in turn, been used to construct parameterizations for use in models by relating the formation of ice crystals to state variables such as temperature and humidity as well as aerosol particle properties such as composition and number. We show here that assumptions of ideal instrument behavior are not supported by measurements made with a commercially available CFDC, the SPectrometer for Ice Nucleation (SPIN, and the instrument on which it is based, the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (ZINC. Non-ideal instrument behavior, which is likely inherent to varying degrees in all CFDCs, is caused by exposure of particles to different humidities and/or temperatures than predicated from instrument theory of operation. This can result in a systematic, and variable, underestimation of reported INP concentrations. We find here variable correction factors from 1.5 to 9.5, consistent with previous literature values. We use a machine learning approach to show that non-ideality is most likely due to small-scale flow features where the aerosols are combined with sheath flows. Machine learning is also used to minimize the uncertainty in measured INP concentrations. We suggest that detailed measurement, on an instrument-by-instrument basis, be performed to characterize this uncertainty.

  15. Continuous-flow cardiac assistance: effects on aortic valve function in a mock loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Egemen; Rutten, Marcel; Dat, Marco; van de Vosse, Frans; Kadipasaoglu, Cihan; de Mol, Bas

    2011-12-01

    As the use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat end-stage heart failure has become more widespread, leaflet fusion--with resul-tant aortic regurgitation--has been observed more frequently. To quantitatively assess the effects of nonpulsatile flow on aortic valve function, we tested a continuous-flow LVAD in a mock circulatory system (MCS) with an interposed valve. To mimic the hemodynamic characteristics of LVAD patients, we utilized an MCS in which a Jarvik 2000 LVAD was positioned at the base of a servomotor-operated piston pump (left ventricular chamber). We operated the LVAD at 8000 to 12,000 rpm, changing the speed in 1000-rpm increments. At each speed, we first varied the outflow resistance at a constant stroke volume, then varied the stroke volume at a constant outflow resistance. We measured the left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, pump flow, and total flow, and used these values to compute the change, if any, in the aortic duty cycle (aortic valve open time) and transvalvular aortic pressure loads. Validation of the MCS was demonstrated by the simulation of physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. At increasing LVAD speeds, the mean aortic pressure load steadily increased, while the aortic duty cycle steadily decreased. Changes were consistent for each MCS experimental setting, despite variations in stroke volume and outflow resistance. Increased LVAD flow results in an impaired aortic valve-open time due to a pressure overload above the aortic valve. Such an overload may initiate structural changes, causing aortic leaflet fusion and/or regurgitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of the Behavior of the Mercury on Diverse Microelectrodes with Cell of Continuous Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Valldeperas, F

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of six types of microelectrodes in two different support electrolytes was developed using a new analytic technique for analysis of mercury in liquid samples in the ambit of parts by million. For it, a new system of cell of continuous flow and platinum microelectrodes and of platinum with gold film was implemented using volt-amperemetry of anodized spoil with square wave. In a preliminary study, some parameters that characterize the analysis with this new cell were optimized, for example the sample's speed flow and the time of electrodeposition. The calibration curves were made for the different types of microelectrode that were used in an ambit of concentrations of 1-10 ppm. According to the obtained results, the microelectrode that better works is the platinum disk for possessing bigger superficial area exposed to the dissolution, which increases the analite's currents of pick. And as a support electrolyte, potassium tiocianato is recommended because of its effectiveness to solve the analytic sign of the mercury. Studies of answer of the current of mercury regarding the quantity of the placed sample and studies of interferences of the analysis with this type of microelectrode were also carried out. With regard to the study of the quantity of sample, it was obtained that the electrochemical answer of the cell is directly proportional to the concentration of the analite placed in it. In the study of interference, it was found that the copper, lead, and zinc ions affect the analysis of mercury in concentrations of 0.1 ppm and on in the case of the microelectrode of platinum disk. And in case that the same microelectrode is used recovered with gold, it only affects the copper in concentrations over 5 ppm, for what is necessary to take into account a previous treatment of the sample in the event of containing some of the interfering ions [es

  17. Large-Scale, Continuous-Flow Production of Stressed Biomass (Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Jil T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Fortney, Julian L.; Lam, Bonita R.; Hazen, Terry C.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2010-05-01

    The Protein Complex Analysis Project (PCAP, http://pcap.lbl.gov/), focuses on high-throughput analysis of microbial protein complexes in the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism, DesulfovibriovulgarisHildenborough(DvH).Interest in DvHas a model organism for bioremediation of contaminated groundwater sites arises from its ability to reduce heavy metals. D. vulgarishas been isolated from contaminated groundwater of sites in the DOE complex. To understand the effect of environmental changes on the organism, midlog-phase cultures are exposed to nitrate and salt stresses (at the minimum inhibitory concentration, which reduces growth rates by 50percent), and compared to controls of cultures at midlogand stationary phases. Large volumes of culture of consistent quality (up to 100 liters) are needed because of the relatively low cell density of DvHcultures (one order of magnitude lower than E. coli, for example) and PCAP's challenge to characterize low-abundance membrane proteins. Cultures are grown in continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTRs) to produce consistent cell densities. Stressor is added to the outflow from the CFSTR, and the mixture is pumped through a plug flow reactor (PFR), to provide a stress exposure time of 2 hours. Effluent is chilled and held in large carboys until it is centrifuged. A variety of analyses -- including metabolites, total proteins, cell density and phospholipidfatty-acids -- track culture consistency within a production run, and differences due to stress exposure and growth phase for the different conditions used. With our system we are able to produce the requisite 100 L of culture for a given condition within a week.

  18. Microfluidic magnetic fluidized bed for DNA analysis in continuous flow mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Neuta, Iván; Pereiro, Iago; Ahlford, Annika; Ferraro, Davide; Zhang, Qiongdi; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Descroix, Stéphanie; Nilsson, Mats

    2018-04-15

    Magnetic solid phase substrates for biomolecule manipulation have become a valuable tool for simplification and automation of molecular biology protocols. However, the handling of magnetic particles inside microfluidic chips for miniaturized assays is often challenging due to inefficient mixing, aggregation, and the advanced instrumentation required for effective actuation. Here, we describe the use of a microfluidic magnetic fluidized bed approach that enables dynamic, highly efficient and simplified magnetic bead actuation for DNA analysis in a continuous flow platform with minimal technical requirements. We evaluate the performance of this approach by testing the efficiency of individual steps of a DNA assay based on padlock probes and rolling circle amplification. This assay comprises common nucleic acid analysis principles, such as hybridization, ligation, amplification and restriction digestion. We obtained efficiencies of up to 90% for these reactions with high throughput processing up to 120μL of DNA dilution at flow rates ranging from 1 to 5μL/min without compromising performance. The fluidized bed was 20-50% more efficient than a commercially available solution for microfluidic manipulation of magnetic beads. Moreover, to demonstrate the potential of this approach for integration into micro-total analysis systems, we optimized the production of a low-cost polymer based microarray and tested its analytical performance for integrated single-molecule digital read-out. Finally, we provide the proof-of-concept for a single-chamber microfluidic chip that combines the fluidized bed with the polymer microarray for a highly simplified and integrated magnetic bead-based DNA analyzer, with potential applications in diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Jerson R; Westerhof, Berend E; de Jonge, Nicolaas; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Westers, Paul; Chamuleau, Steven; van Dijk, Diederik; Rodermans, Ben F M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Lahpor, Jaap R

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and echocardiography may provide useful physiological information regarding cardiac support in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). We investigated the accuracy and characteristics of noninvasive blood pressure during cf-LVAD support. Noninvasive arterial pressure waveforms were recorded with Nexfin (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). First, these measurements were validated simultaneously with invasive arterial pressures in 29 intensive care unit patients. Next, the association between blood pressure responses and measures derived by echocardiography, including left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions (LVEDDs), left ventricular end-systolic dimensions (LVESDs), and left ventricular shortening fraction (LVSF) were determined during pump speed change procedures in 30 outpatients. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms by the Nexfin monitor slightly underestimated invasive measures during cf-LVAD support. Differences between noninvasive and invasive measures (mean ± SD) of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressures were -7.6 ± 5.8, -7.0 ± 5.2, -6.9 ± 5.1, and -0.6 ± 4.5 mm Hg, respectively (all blood pressure responses did not correlate with LVEDD, LVESD, or LVSF, while LVSF correlated weakly with both pulse pressure (r = 0.24; p = 0.005) and (dP(art)/dt)max (r = 0.25; p = 0.004). The dicrotic notch in the pressure waveform was a better predictor of aortic valve opening (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.87) than pulse pressure (AUC = 0.64) and (dP(art)/dt)max (AUC = 0.61). Patients with partial support rather than full support at 9,000 rpm had a significant change in systolic pressure, pulse pressure, and (dP(art)/dt)max during ramp studies, while echocardiographic measures did not change. Blood pressure measurements by Nexfin were reliable and may thereby act as a compliment to the assessment of the cf-LVAD patient.

  20. Early in vivo experience with the pediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Kuban, Barry D; Gao, Shengqiang; Dessoffy, Raymond; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2018-03-30

    Heart transplantation in infants and children is an accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure, but donor organ availability is low and always uncertain. Mechanical circulatory support is another standard option, but there is a lack of intracorporeal devices due to size and functional range. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of our initial prototype of a pediatric continuous-flow total artificial heart (P-CFTAH), comprising a dual pump with one motor and one rotating assembly, supported by a hydrodynamic bearing. In acute studies, the P-CFTAH was implanted in 4 lambs (average weight: 28.7 ± 2.3 kg) via a median sternotomy under cardiopulmonary bypass. Pulmonary and systemic pump performance parameters were recorded. The experiments showed good anatomical fit and easy implantation, with an average aortic cross-clamp time of 98 ± 18 minutes. Baseline hemodynamics were stable in all 4 animals (pump speed: 3.4 ± 0.2 krpm; pump flow: 2.1 ± 0.9 liters/min; power: 3.0 ± 0.8 W; arterial pressure: 68 ± 10 mm Hg; left and right atrial pressures: 6 ± 1 mm Hg, for both). Any differences between left and right atrial pressures were maintained within the intended limit of ±5 mm Hg over a wide range of ratios of systemic-to-pulmonary vascular resistance (0.7 to 12), with and without pump-speed modulation. Pump-speed modulation was successfully performed to create arterial pulsation. This initial P-CFTAH prototype met the proposed requirements for self-regulation, performance, and pulse modulation. Copyright © 2018 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential of gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-oaTOFMS) in flavor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Laurent B; Newton, Anthony; Simian, Hervé; Robert, Fabien; Douce, David; Hancock, Peter; Green, Martin; Blank, Imre

    2003-04-23

    Gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-oaTOFMS) is an emerging technique offering a straightforward access to a resolving power up to 7000. This paper deals with the use of GC-oaTOFMS to identify the flavor components of a complex seafood flavor extract and to quantify furanones formed in model Maillard reactions. A seafood extract was selected as a representative example for complex food flavors and was previously analyzed using GC-quadrupole MS, leaving several molecules unidentified. GC-oaTOFMS analysis was focused on these unknowns to evaluate its potential in flavor research, particularly for determining exact masses. N-Methyldithiodimethylamine, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and tetrahydro-2,4-dimethyl-4H-pyrrolo[2,1-d]-1,3,5-dithiazine were successfully identified on the basis of the precise mass determination of their molecular ions and their major fragments. A second set of experiments was performed to test the capabilities of the GC-oaTOFMS for quantification. Calibration curves were found to be linear over a dynamic range of 10(3) for the quantification of furanones. The quantitative data obtained using GC-oaTOFMS confirmed earlier results that the formation of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone was favored in the xylose/glycine model reaction and 2(or 5)-ethyl-4-hydroxy-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone in the xylose/alanine model reaction. It was concluded that GC-oaTOFMS may become a powerful analytical tool for the flavor chemist for both identification and quantification purposes, the latter in particular when combined with stable isotope dilution assay.

  2. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3-AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600 °C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. The potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  3. Enhancement of arterial pressure pulsatility by controlling continuous-flow left ventricular assist device flow rate in mock circulatory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozkurt, S.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Rutten, M.C.M.

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) generally operate at a constant speed, which reduces pulsatility in the arteries and may lead to complications such as functional changes in the vascular system, gastrointestinal bleeding, or both. The purpose of this study is to increase

  4. Palladium on Carbon-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling Reaction Using an Efficient and Continuous Flow System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Hattori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous flow Suzuki-Miyaura reaction between various haloarenes and arylboronic acids was successfully achieved within only ca. 20 s during the single-pass through a cartridge filled with palladium on carbon (Pd/C. No palladium leaching was observed in the collected reaction solution by atomic absorption spectrometry (detection limit: 1 ppm.

  5. Secular trends of body mass index in North Indian children with Type 1 diabetes do not support the Accelerator Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Devi; Samprathi, Madhusudan; Jayaraman, Dhaarani; Kohat, Dilesh; Bhalla, Anil Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The accelerator hypothesis, which proposes a link between Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) through weight-related insulin resistance, remains untested in developing countries with increasing rates of childhood obesity and T1D, and different ethnicities. We aimed to test the accelerator hypothesis in the context of a significant increase in T1D at our centre. Medical records of children diagnosed with T1D between January 2005 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The body mass index (BMI) standard deviation scores (SDSs) were calculated using height and weight measurements recorded 1-2 months after diagnosis of T1D and compared with age-matched anthropometric data. The rate of change in BMI SDSs over time was calculated. Analysis of BMI data was undertaken for the three age categories: 10 and >10 years. The mean age at diagnosis of 467 children with T1D was 7·27 ± 0·32 years and showed no change over the study period. There was a yearly increase of 14·11% in patient numbers; this increase was similar in the three age categories (22·7%, 17·0%, 16·3%, respectively, P = 1·0). Comparison of patient numbers between the two time periods of 5 years each showed a marked increase during 2010-2014 (148 vs 319, % increase 115·5%). The mean BMI SDSs at diagnosis in the three age categories were similar (P = 1·0) and showed a yearly change of -0·36; the mean change in the three age categories was also similar (-0·35, -0·27, -0·46, respectively, P = 1·0). No correlation was found between age at diagnosis and BMI SDSs (correlation coefficient 0·010, P = 0·82). The mean BMI SDS in patients was significantly lower compared to controls (-0·54 vs -0·02, P = 0·001). There was no association between BMI SDS and age at diagnosis in children with new onset T1D. Further studies are needed to test whether the accelerator hypothesis is relevant in developing countries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Development of a simple extraction cell with bi-directional continuous flow coupled on-line to ICP-MS for assessment of elemental associations in solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buanuam, Janya; Tiptanasup, Kasipa; Shiowatana, Juwadee

    2006-01-01

    A continuous-flow system comprising a novel, custom-built extraction module and hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) detection is proposed for assessing metal mobilities and geochemical associations in soil compartments as based on using the three step BCR (now...... the Measurements and Testing Programme of the European Commission) sequential extraction scheme. Employing a peristaltic pump as liquid driver, alternate directional flows of the extractants are used to overcome compression of the solid particles within the extraction unit to ensure a steady partitioning flow rate...... and thus to maintain constant operationally defined extraction conditions. The proposed flow set-up is proven to allow for trouble-free handling of soil samples up to 1 g and flow rates ≤ 10 mL min–1. The miniaturized extraction system was coupled to ICP-MS through a flow injection interface in order...

  7. The transmission theory of electrostatic analyzer in six dimensional phase space and the concept design of a supersensitive mass spectrometer beam line for HI-13 tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Xialing; Cao Qingxi; Zhang Jie; Ye Jingping

    1986-01-01

    It follows from the motion equations of charged particle in curvilinear coordinates system that the transfer matrix of electrostatic analyzer was derived in six dimensional phase space. In accordance with these matrixes, the concept design of the supersensitive mass spectrometer beam line for HI-13 tandem accelerator was calculated

  8. {sup 14} C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator; Datacao por {sup 14} C utilizando espectrometria de massa com acelerador de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: paulogom@if.uff.br; Yokoyama, Y. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Science; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1999-03-01

    The different aspects concerning the {sup 14} C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of {sup 14} C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  9. Biological attenuation of arsenic and iron in a continuous flow bioreactor treating acid mine drainage (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rojo, L; Héry, M; Le Pape, P; Braungardt, C; Desoeuvre, A; Torres, E; Tardy, V; Resongles, E; Laroche, E; Delpoux, S; Joulian, C; Battaglia-Brunet, F; Boisson, J; Grapin, G; Morin, G; Casiot, C

    2017-10-15

    Passive water treatments based on biological attenuation can be effective for arsenic-rich acid mine drainage (AMD). However, the key factors driving the biological processes involved in this attenuation are not well-known. Here, the efficiency of arsenic (As) removal was investigated in a bench-scale continuous flow channel bioreactor treating As-rich AMD (∼30-40 mg L -1 ). In this bioreactor, As removal proceeds via the formation of biogenic precipitates consisting of iron- and arsenic-rich mineral phases encrusting a microbial biofilm. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) oxidation and iron (Fe) and arsenic removal rates were monitored at two different water heights (4 and 25 mm) and with/without forced aeration. A maximum of 80% As removal was achieved within 500 min at the lowest water height. This operating condition promoted intense Fe(II) microbial oxidation and subsequent precipitation of As-bearing schwertmannite and amorphous ferric arsenate. Higher water height slowed down Fe(II) oxidation, Fe precipitation and As removal, in relation with limited oxygen transfer through the water column. The lower oxygen transfer at higher water height could be partly counteracted by aeration. The presence of an iridescent floating film that developed at the water surface was found to limit oxygen transfer to the water column and delayed Fe(II) oxidation, but did not affect As removal. The bacterial community structure in the biogenic precipitates in the bottom of the bioreactor differed from that of the inlet water and was influenced to some extent by water height and aeration. Although potential for microbial mediated As oxidation was revealed by the detection of aioA genes, removal of Fe and As was mainly attributable to microbial Fe oxidation activity. Increasing the proportion of dissolved As(V) in the inlet water improved As removal and favoured the formation of amorphous ferric arsenate over As-sorbed schwertmannite. This study proved the ability of this bioreactor

  10. Continuous-Flow Synthesis and Materials Interface Engineering of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots for Photovoltaic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    El-Ballouli, Ala’a O.

    2016-05-25

    Harnessing the Sun’s energy via the conversion of solar photons to electricity has emerged as a sustainable energy source to fulfill our future demands. In this regard, solution-processable, size-tunable PbS quantum dots (QDs) have been identified as a promising active materials for photovoltaics (PVs). Yet, there are still serious challenges that hinder the full exploitation of QD materials in PVs. This dissertation addresses two main challenges to aid these QDs in fulfilling their tremendous potential in PV applications. First, it is essential to establish a large-scale synthetic technique which maintains control over the reaction parameters to yield QDs with well-defined shape, size, and composition. Rigorous protocols for cost-effective production on a scale are still missing from literature. Particularly, previous reports of record-performance QD-PVs have been based on small-scale, manual, batch syntheses. One way to achieve a controlled large-scale synthesis is by reducing the reaction volume to ensure uniformity. Accordingly, we design a droplet-based continuous-flow synthesis of PbS QDs. Only upon separating the nucleation and growth phases, via a dual-temperature-stage reactor, it was possible to achieve high-quality QDs with high photoluminescence quantum yield (50%) in large-scale. The performance of these QDs in a PV device was comparable to batch-synthesized QDs, thus providing a promise in utilizing automated synthesis of QDs for PV applications. Second, it is crucial to study and control the charge transfer (CT) dynamics at QD interfaces in order to optimize their PV performance. Yet, the CT investigations based on PbS QDs are limited in literature. Here, we investigate the CT and charge separation (CS) at size-tunable PbS QDs and organic acceptor interfaces using a combination of femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopic techniques and steady-state measurements. The results reveal that the energy band alignment, tuned by the quantum

  11. Continuous flow hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination and speciation of arsenic in wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadjova, Irina B. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Lampugnani, Leonardo [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: lampugnani@ipcf.cnr.it; Onor, Massimo [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D' Ulivo, Alessandro [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Tsalev, Dimiter L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2005-07-15

    Methods for the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of total arsenic and arsenic species in wines based on continuous flow hydride generation (HG) with atomization in miniature diffusion flame (MDF) are described. For hydride-forming arsenic, L-cysteine is used as reagent for pre-reduction and complexation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate. Concentrations of hydrochloric acid and tetrahydroborate are optimized in order to minimize interference by ethanol. Procedure permits determination of the sum of these four species in 5-10-fold diluted samples with limit of detection (LOD) 0.3 and 0.6 {mu}g l{sup -1} As in white and red wines, respectively, with precision between 2% and 8% RSD at As levels within 0.5-10 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Selective arsine generation from different reaction media is used for non-chromatographic determination of arsenic species in wines: citrate buffer at pH 5.1 for As(III); 0.2 mol l{sup -1} acetic acid for arsenite + dimethylarsinate (DMA); 8 mol l{sup -1} HCl for total inorganic arsenic [As(III) + As(V)]; and monomethylarsonate (MMA) calculated by difference. Calibration with aqueous and ethanol-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for 10- and 5-fold diluted samples, respectively. The LODs are 0.4 {mu}g l{sup -1} for As(III) and 0.3 {mu}g l{sup -1} for the other three As species and precision is within 4-8% RSDs. Arsenic species in wine were also determined by coupling of ion chromatographic separation on an anion exchange column and HG-flame AFS detection. Methods were validated by means of recovery studies and comparative analyses by HG-AFS and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The LODs were 0.12, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.13 {mu}g l{sup -1} (as As) and RSDs were 2-6%, 5-9%, 3-7% and 2-5% for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA arsenic species, respectively. Bottled red and white wines from Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia and Italy were analyzed by non

  12. Design and testing of a unique randomized gravity, continuous flow bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Carroll B.

    1993-01-01

    high concentrations of oxygen into the culture medium. The system described allows for continuous, on line sampling for production of product without disturbing fluid and particle dynamics in the reaction chamber. It provides for the introduction of substrate, or control substances after cell adaptation to simulated microgravity has been accomplished. The reactor system provides for the nondisruptive, continuous flow replacement of nutrient and removal of product. On line monitoring and control of growth conditions such as pH and nutrient status are provided. A rotating distribution valve allows cessation of growth chamber rotation, thereby preserving the simulated microgravity conditions over longer periods of time.

  13. Continuous flow hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination and speciation of arsenic in wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2005-01-01

    Methods for the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of total arsenic and arsenic species in wines based on continuous flow hydride generation (HG) with atomization in miniature diffusion flame (MDF) are described. For hydride-forming arsenic, L-cysteine is used as reagent for pre-reduction and complexation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate. Concentrations of hydrochloric acid and tetrahydroborate are optimized in order to minimize interference by ethanol. Procedure permits determination of the sum of these four species in 5-10-fold diluted samples with limit of detection (LOD) 0.3 and 0.6 μg l -1 As in white and red wines, respectively, with precision between 2% and 8% RSD at As levels within 0.5-10 μg l -1 . Selective arsine generation from different reaction media is used for non-chromatographic determination of arsenic species in wines: citrate buffer at pH 5.1 for As(III); 0.2 mol l -1 acetic acid for arsenite + dimethylarsinate (DMA); 8 mol l -1 HCl for total inorganic arsenic [As(III) + As(V)]; and monomethylarsonate (MMA) calculated by difference. Calibration with aqueous and ethanol-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for 10- and 5-fold diluted samples, respectively. The LODs are 0.4 μg l -1 for As(III) and 0.3 μg l -1 for the other three As species and precision is within 4-8% RSDs. Arsenic species in wine were also determined by coupling of ion chromatographic separation on an anion exchange column and HG-flame AFS detection. Methods were validated by means of recovery studies and comparative analyses by HG-AFS and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The LODs were 0.12, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.13 μg l -1 (as As) and RSDs were 2-6%, 5-9%, 3-7% and 2-5% for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA arsenic species, respectively. Bottled red and white wines from Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia and Italy were analyzed by non-chromatographic and chromatographic procedures and the As

  14. Growth parameters of microalgae tolerant to high levels of carbon dioxide in batch and continuous-flow photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerhoff, P.; Hu, Q.; Esparza-Soto, M.; Vermaas, W. [Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Microalgae can be cultured in photobioreactors to sequester carbon dioxide and produce potentially valuable biomaterials. The goal of the present study was to identify and utilize microalgal strains that are capable of tolerating up to 20% CO{sub 2} (gas phase) concentrations under variable light or flue-gas blend conditions and reactor configurations to produce biomass. Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp., both cultured from a Sonoran desert mineral spring, grew well and tolerated exposure to a gas mixture containing up to 20% CO{sub 2} applied continuously in batch reactors to the culture. Experiments were conducted with simulated coal-powered acidic flue gases containing SOx/NOx at concentrations of 200 to 350 ppmV. Microalgae did not grow well without pH control, and high levels (> 250 mM) of nitrite or sulphite in the liquid media inhibited algal growth. Pseudo steady-state experiments were also conducted using helical tubular and flat-plate photobioreactors with continuous flow (water and gas) and with artificial or natural sunlight. With a 2 d hydraulic residence time (HRT), the helical tubular photobioreactor produced 0.50 {+-} 0.11 g C d{sup -1} (0.056 {+-} 0.012 g C L{sup -1} d{sup -1}) dry-weight cell mass during continuous fluorescent-lamp irradiance and 0.048 {+-} 0.018 g C L{sup -1} d{sup -1} during 12 h light/darkness cycling. The flat-plate photobioreactor (2 d HRT) produced 0.42 {+-} 0.28 g C L{sup -1} d{sup -1} with artificial lighting and with natural sunlight; a 4 d HRT produced 0.14 {+-} 0.02 g C L{sup -1} d{sup -1}. Reactor modelling indicated that a threshold of reactor size (i.e. HRT) and reactor depth (path-length of light) exists based upon the optical density of the cells in the water column and their growth rates.

  15. Quality of Graphite Target for Biological/Biomedical/Environmental Applications of 14C-Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic graphitization for 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry (14C-AMS) produced various forms of elemental carbon. Our high-throughput Zn reduction method (C/Fe = 1:5, 500 °C, 3 h) produced the AMS target of graphite-coated iron powder (GCIP), a mix of nongraphitic carbon and Fe3C. Crystallinity of the AMS targets of GCIP (nongraphitic carbon) was increased to turbostratic carbon by raising the C/Fe ratio from 1:5 to 1:1 and the graphitization temperature from 500 to 585 °C. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon had a large isotopic fractionation and a low AMS ion current. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon also yielded less accurate/precise 14C-AMS measurements because of the lower graphitization yield and lower thermal conductivity that were caused by the higher C/Fe ratio of 1:1. On the other hand, the AMS target of GCIP containing nongraphitic carbon had higher graphitization yield and better thermal conductivity over the AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon due to optimal surface area provided by the iron powder. Finally, graphitization yield and thermal conductivity were stronger determinants (over graphite crystallinity) for accurate/precise/high-throughput biological, biomedical, and environmental14C-AMS applications such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination (ADME), and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) of nutrients, drugs, phytochemicals, and environmental chemicals. PMID:20163100

  16. Geomagnetic reversals, polar ice and cosmic spherules: some recent measurements with a small dedicated accelerator mass-spectrometry facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.

    1987-01-01

    We have developed techniques for measuring the cosmogenic isotopes 10 Be (half-life 1.5 Ma) and 26 Al (716 ka) by using a small (ca. 2.2 MV) dedicated accelerator mass spectrometer facility. Three recent applications of such measurements are as follows. 1. 10 Be has been measured in marine-sediment cores at levels corresponding to three recent geomagnetic reversals. We observe an increase in 10 Be production at each of these times. The results give information on the form and length of the geomagnetic intensity changes during a reversal, and the level at which magnetic remanence is acquired in the sediments. 2. 10 Be has been measured over a 2083 m ice core, corresponding to the last climatic cycle, recovered from Vostok, Antarctica. The results suggest that the precipitation rate during the last Ice Age was about half of its present rate. There are also some indications of fairly rapid 10 Be production changes. 3. 10 Be and 26 Al have been measured in 'cosmic spherules' (small round objects, ca. 500 μm diameter) recovered in deep-sea sediments and in melt lakes on Greenland ice. The results confirm an extraterrestrial origin for such objects, as well as indicating that the parent bodies of most of them were irradiated in space as small (less than 1 cm) objects. These spherules thus very probably represent cometary debris. (author)

  17. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in Kara Sea and Novaya Zemlya sediments using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.; Skipperud, L.; Salbu, B.; Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.C.; Day, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used to determine Pu activity concentrations and 240 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratios in sediments from the Kara Sea and radioactive waste dumping sites at Novaya Zemlya. Measured 239,240 Pu activities ranged from 0.06 - 9.8 Bq/kg dry weight, 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.13 to 0.28, and 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu activity ratios from 0.02 to 0.6. Perturbations from global fallout isotope ratios were evident at three sites: the Yenisey Estuary and Abrosimov Fjords where 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios were lower (0.13-0.14); and Stepovogo Fjord sediments where ratios were higher (up to 0.28) than fallout ratios. Based on procedural blanks, detection limits for AMS were below 1 fg Pu and the method showed good precision for isotope ratio measurements, minimal matrix, interference and memory effects. For high level samples, comparison between alpha spectrometry and AMS gave good agreement for measurement of 239,240 Pu activity concentrations. (author)

  18. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-01

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B 12 . Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B 12 is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of 14 C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ( 14 C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B 12 in the range of normal dietary intake. The B 12 used was quantitatively labeled with 14 C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B 12 or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with 14 C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced 14 C-B 12 of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified 14 C-B 12 was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B 12 assimilation

  19. Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Industrial partner projects focus on big, complex challenges and opportunities like smart grid, weather forecasting for renewable energy sources, alternative energy...

  20. Mass acceleration in a multi-module plasma jet for impact fusion. Final report, 31 July 1985-30 July 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, R.L.; Goldstein, S.A.; Tidman, D.A.; Wang, S.Y.; Winsor, N.K.; Witherspoon, F.D.

    1986-08-01

    Successful development of a mass accelerator for impact fusion requires successful development of its components. The Advanced Impluse Module (AIM) is now operational, and is presently being used to povide a structured armature for electromagnetic gun experiments. Metals materials have been identified for the accelerator bore, and their limits identified and tested. A side-mounted, removable projectile detector and its circuitry has been developed. The next step is to use these components to achieve significantly higher velocities than have been achieved by our previous technology

  1. Enantioselective Organocatalysis in Microreactors: Continuous Flow Synthesis of a (S-Pregabalin Precursor and (S-Warfarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Porta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous flow processes have recently emerged as a powerful technology for performing chemical transformations since they ensure some advantages over traditional batch procedures. In this work, the use of commercially available and affordable PEEK (Polyetheretherketone and PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography tubing as microreactors was exploited to perform organic reactions under continuous flow conditions, as an alternative to the commercial traditional glass microreactors. The wide availability of tubing with different sizes allowed quickly running small-scale preliminary screenings, in order to optimize the reaction parameters, and then to realize under the best experimental conditions a reaction scale up for preparative purposes. The gram production of some Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs such as (S-Pregabalin and (S-Warfarin was accomplished in short reaction time with high enantioselectivity, in an experimentally very simple procedure.

  2. Startup and long term operation of enhanced biological phosphorus removal in continuous-flow reactor with granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Lv, Yufeng; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The startup and long term operation of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in a continuous-flow reactor (CFR) with granules were investigated in this study. Through reducing the settling time from 9min to 3min gradually, the startup of EBPR in a CFR with granules was successfully realized in 16days. Under continuous-flow operation, the granules with good phosphorus and COD removal performance were stably operated for more than 6months. And the granules were characterized with particle size of around 960μm, loose structure and good settling ability. During the startup phase, polysaccharides (PS) was secreted excessively by microorganisms to resist the influence from the variation of operational mode. Results of relative quantitative PCR indicated that granules dominated by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) were easier accumulated in the CFR because more excellent settling ability was needed in the system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation on hemolytic effect of poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles synthesized using continuous flow and batch processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libi, Sumit; Calenic, Bogdan; Astete, Carlos E.; Kumar, Challa; Sabliov, Cristina M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract

    With the increasing interest in polymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications, there is a need for continuous flow methodologies that allow for the precise control of nanoparticle synthesis. Poly(lactide-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles with diameters of 220–250 nm were synthesized using a lab-on-a-chip, exploiting the precise flow control offered by a millifluidic platform. The association and the effect of PLGA nanoparticles on red blood cells (RBCs) were compared for fluorescent PLGA nanoparticles made by this novel continuous flow process using a millifluidic chip and smaller PLGA nanoparticles made by a batch method. Results indicated that all PLGA nanoparticles studied, independent of the synthesis method and size, adhered to the surface of RBCs but had no significant hemolytic effect at concentrations lower than 10 mg/ml.

  4. Accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Because the use of accelerated heavy ions would provide many opportunities for new and important studies in nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry, as well as other disciplines, both the Chemistry and Physics Divisions are supporting the development of a heavy-ion accelerator. The design of greatest current interest includes a tandem accelerator with a terminal voltage of approximately 25 MV injecting into a linear accelerator with rf superconducting resonators. This combined accelerator facility would be capable of accelerating ions of masses ranging over the entire periodic table to an energy corresponding to approximately 10 MeV/nucleon. This approach, as compared to other concepts, has the advantages of lower construction costs, lower operating power, 100 percent duty factor, and high beam quality (good energy resolution, good timing resolution, small beam size, and small beam divergence). The included sections describe the concept of the proposed heavy-ion accelerator, and the development program aiming at: (1) investigation of the individual questions concerning the superconducting accelerating resonators; (2) construction and testing of prototype accelerator systems; and (3) search for economical solutions to engineering problems. (U.S.)

  5. Protected diazonium salts: a continuous-flow preparation of triazenes including the anticancer compounds dacarbazine and mitozolomide

    OpenAIRE

    Schotten, Christiane; Aldmairi, Abdul Hadi; Sagatov, Yerbol; Shepherd, Martyn; Browne, Duncan L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a continuous-flow process for the preparation of triazenes, whereby diazonium salts are generated and converted into their masked or protected triazene derivatives. Key to realizing the process, which is applicable to a wide range of substrates, is the identification of solvent and reagent parameters that avoid fouling and clogging in the tubing used in these studies. The process has also been applied to prepare the antineoplastic agents mitozolomide and dacarbazine. We also...

  6. Continuous-flow retro-Diels-Alder reaction: an efficient method for the preparation of pyrimidinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekkaa, Imane; Palkó, Márta; Mándity, István M; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2018-01-01

    The syntheses of various pyrimidinones as potentially bioactive products by means of the highly controlled continuous-flow retro-Diels-Alder reaction of condensed pyrimidinone derivatives are presented. Noteworthy, the use of this approach allowed us to rapidly screen a selection of conditions and quickly confirm the viability of preparing the desired pyrimidinones in short reaction times. Yields typically higher than those published earlier using conventional batch or microwave processes were achieved.

  7. Biotic manganese oxidation coupled with methane oxidation using a continuous-flow bioreactor system under marine conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Kashiwabara, Teruhiko; Saito, Yumi; Tasumi, Eiji; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Takai, Ken; Cao, Linh Thi Thuy; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (BioMnOx) can be applied for the effective removal and recovery of trace metals from wastewater because of their high adsorption capacity. Although a freshwater continuous-flow system for a nitrifier-based Mn-oxidizing microbial community for producing BioMnOx has been developed so far, a seawater continuous-flow bioreactor system for BioMnOx production has not been established. Here, we report BioMnOx production by a methanotroph-based microbial community by using a continuous-flow bioreactor system. The bioreactor system was operated using a deep-sea sediment sample as the inoculum with methane as the energy source for over 2 years. The BioMnOx production became evident after 370 days of reactor operation. The maximum Mn oxidation rate was 11.4 mg L -1 day -1 . An X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the accumulated BioMnOx was birnessite. 16S rRNA gene-based clone analyses indicated that methanotrophic bacterial members were relatively abundant in the system; however, none of the known Mn-oxidizing bacteria were detected. A continuous-flow bioreactor system coupled with nitrification was also run in parallel for 636 days, but no BioMnOx production was observed in this bioreactor system. The comparative experiments indicated that the methanotroph-based microbial community, rather than the nitrifier-based community, was effective for BioMnOx production under the marine environmental conditions.

  8. Separation of platelets from other blood cells in continuous-flow by dielectrophoresis field-flow-fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Piacentini, Niccolò; Mernier, Guillaume; Tornay, Raphaël; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We present a microfluidic device capable of separating platelets from other blood cells in continuous flow using dielectrophoresis field-flow-fractionation. The use of hydrodynamic focusing in combination with the application of a dielectrophoretic force allows the separation of platelets from red blood cells due to their size difference. The theoretical cell trajectory has been calculated by numerical simulations of the electrical field and flow speed, and is in agreement with the experiment...

  9. In situ synthesis of Cu-BTC (HKUST-1) in macro-/mesoporous silica monoliths for continuous flow catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Alexander; Ameloot, Rob; Coq, Bernard; Fajula, François; Coasne, Benoît; De Vos, Dirk; Galarneau, Anne

    2012-05-16

    The metal-organic framework Cu-BTC has been successfully synthesized as nanoparticles inside the mesopores of silica monoliths featuring a homogeneous macropore network enabling the use of Cu-BTC for continuous flow applications in liquid phase with low pressure drop. High productivity was reached with this catalyst for the Friedländer reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  10. Efficient Synthesis of Ir-Polyoxometalate Cluster Using a Continuous Flow Apparatus and STM Investigation of Its Coassembly Behavior on HOPG Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junyong; Chang, Shaoqing; Suryanto, Bryan H R; Gong, Chunhua; Zeng, Xianghua; Zhao, Chuan; Zeng, Qingdao; Xie, Jingli

    2016-06-06

    Taking advantage of a continuous-flow apparatus, the iridium(III)-containing polytungstate cluster K12Na2H2[Ir2Cl8P2W20O72]·37H2O (1) was obtained in a reasonable yield (13% based on IrCl3·H2O). Compound 1 was characterized by Fourier transform IR, UV-visible, (31)P NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and thermogravimetric analysis measurements. (31)P NMR, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis all indicated 1 was a new polytungstate cluster compared with the reported K14[(IrCl4)KP2W20O72] compound. Intriguingly, the successful isolation of 1 relied on the custom-built flow apparatus, demonstrating the uniqueness of continuous-flow chemistry to achieve crystalline materials. The catalytic properties of 1 were assessed by investigating the activity on catalyzing the electro-oxidation of ruthenium tris-2,2'-bipyridine [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+). The voltammetric behavior suggested a coupled catalytic behavior between [Ru(bpy)3](3+/2+) and 1. Furthermore, on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy) benzene (TCDB) was used as the two-dimensional host network to coassemble cluster 1; the surface morphology was observed by scanning tunneling microscope technique. "S"-shape of 1 was observed, indicating that the cluster could be accommodated in the cavity formed by two TCDB host molecules, leading to a TCDB/cluster binary structure.

  11. Three-dimensional printed magnetophoretic system for the continuous flow separation of avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhe; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Ronghui; Wang, Maohua; Lin, Jianhan

    2017-04-01

    As a result of the low concentration of avian influenza viruses in samples for routine screening, the separation and concentration of these viruses are vital for their sensitive detection. We present a novel three-dimensional printed magnetophoretic system for the continuous flow separation of the viruses using aptamer-modified magnetic nanoparticles, a magnetophoretic chip, a magnetic field, and a fluidic controller. The magnetic field was designed based on finite element magnetic simulation and developed using neodymium magnets with a maximum intensity of 0.65 T and a gradient of 32 T/m for dragging the nanoparticle-virus complexes. The magnetophoretic chip was designed by SOLIDWORKS and fabricated by a three-dimensional printer with a magnetophoretic channel for the continuous flow separation of the viruses using phosphate-buffered saline as carrier flow. The fluidic controller was developed using a microcontroller and peristaltic pumps to inject the carrier flow and the viruses. The trajectory of the virus-nanoparticle complexes was simulated using COMSOL for optimization of the carrier flow and the magnetic field, respectively. The results showed that the H5N1 viruses could be captured, separated, and concentrated using the proposed magnetophoretic system with the separation efficiency up to 88% in a continuous flow separation time of 2 min for a sample volume of 200 μL. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Characterization and optimization of the visualization performance of continuous flow overhauser DNP hyperpolarized water MRI: Inversion recovery approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhov, Maxim; Krummenacker, Jan; Denysenkov, Vasyl; Gerz, Kathrin; Prisner, Thomas; Schreiber, Laura Maria

    2016-03-01

    Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) allows the production of liquid hyperpolarized substrate inside the MRI magnet bore as well as its administration in continuous flow mode to acquire MR images with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. We implemented inversion recovery preparation in order to improve contrast-to-noise ratio and to quantify the overall imaging performance of Overhauser DNP-enhanced MRI. The negative enhancement created by DNP in combination with inversion recovery (IR) preparation allows canceling selectively the signal originated from Boltzmann magnetization and visualizing only hyperpolarized fluid. The theoretical model describing gain of MR image intensity produced by steady-state continuous flow DNP hyperpolarized magnetization was established and proved experimentally. A precise quantification of signal originated purely from DNP hyperpolarization was achieved. A temperature effect on longitudinal relaxation had to be taken into account to fit experimental results with numerical prediction. Using properly adjusted IR preparation, the complete zeroing of thermal background magnetization was achieved, providing an essential increase of contrast-to-noise ratio of DNP-hyperpolarized water images. To quantify and optimize the steady-state conditions for MRI with continuous flow DNP, an approach similar to that incorporating transient-state thermal magnetization equilibrium in spoiled fast field echo imaging sequences can be used. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tracing discharges of plutonium and technetium from nuclear processing plants by ultra-sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.; Hausladen, P.A.; Cresswell, R.G.; Di Tada, M.L.; Day, J.P.; Carling, R.S.; Oughton, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Historical discharges of plutonium from the Russian nuclear processing plant at Mayak in the Urals have been traced in sediments, soils and river water using ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium isotopes by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Significant advantages of AMS over other techniques are its very high sensitivity. which is presently ∼10 6 atoms (1 μBq), and its ability to determine the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio. The latter is a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium, being very low (1-2%) for weapons grade plutonium, and higher (∼ 20%) for plutonium from civil reactors or fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Since this ratio has changed significantly over the years of discharges from Mayak, a measurement can provide important information about the source of plutonium at a particular location. Similar measurements have been performed on samples from the Kara Sea which contains a graveyard of nuclear submarines from the former Soviet Union. AMS techniques have also been developed for detection of 99 Tc down to levels of a few femtograms. This isotope is one of the most prolific fission products and has a very long half-life of 220 ka. Hundreds of kg have been discharged from the nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield in the UK. While there may be public health issues associated with these discharges which can be addressed with AMS, these discharges may also constitute a valuable oceanographic tracer experiment in this climatically-important region of the world's oceans. Applications to date have included a human uptake study to assess long-term retention of 99 Tc in the body, and a survey of seaweeds from northern Europe to establish a baseline for a future oceanographic study

  14. Long-lived radionuclides as chronometers and tracers of environmental processes at the Xi'an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.; Hou, X.; Du, Y.; Kong, X.; Cheng, P.; Zhang, L.; Fan, Y.; Zhang, L.; Niu, Z.; Dong, G.; Chen, N.; Li, M.; Zhu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides with half-lives ranging from 103 to 108 years have wide applications in geochronology and environmental tracer studies. A wide range of climatic, geologic, and environmental records preserved in diverse natural archives can be characterized by measuring their concentrations, using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Relying on the operation of the Xi'an 3 MV multi-element AMS since 2006, multi-radionuclides such as 14C, 10Be, 26Al, and 129I have been widely used for the above studies. Here some representative works on the four radionuclides can be briefly summarized as (1) we have successfully obtained temporal and spatial distribution of fossil fuel CO2 in certain cities in China by analyzing Δ14C from atmospheric CO2 and one year growth plants respectively, providing direct scientific data for government's emission cutting policy; (2) we have mathematically disentangled geomagnetic field and precipitation signals in Chinese loess 10Be, and firstly confirmed that the timing of Brunhes-Matuyama (B/M) reversal in loess was synchronous with that of marine sediments; (3) we have explored the paired in situ 10Be and 26Al double dating methodology for exposure dating, which has been successfully applied in fluvial terraces investigations in Tibet and glacial evolution tracing in East Antarctica; and (4) we have evaluated the radiation risk after Fukushima nuclear accident based on the 129I observation. All the above mentioned progress has opened up the new directions in AMS applications and we hope to show more new results in the near future.

  15. Kinetics of carboplatin-DNA binding in genomic DNA and bladder cancer cells as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, S S; Stivers, K M; Vere White, R; Henderson, P T

    2005-01-01

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum-based drugs that are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The cytotoxicity of these drugs is mediated by platinum-DNA monoadducts and intra- and interstrand diadducts, which are formed following uptake of the drug into the nucleus of cells. The pharmacodynamics of carboplatin display fewer side effects than for cisplatin, albeit with less potency, which may be due to differences in rates of DNA adduct formation. We report the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a sensitive detection method often used for radiocarbon quantitation, to measure both the kinetics of [ 14 C]carboplatin-DNA adduct formation with genomic DNA and drug uptake and DNA binding in T24 human bladder cancer cells. Only carboplatin-DNA monoadducts contain radiocarbon in the platinated DNA, which allowed for calculation of kinetic rates and concentrations within the system. The percent of radiocarbon bound to salmon sperm DNA in the form of monoadducts was measured by AMS over 24 h. Knowledge of both the starting concentration of the parent carboplatin and the concentration of radiocarbon in the DNA at a variety of time points allowed calculation of the rates of Pt-DNA monoadduct formation and conversion to toxic cross-links. Importantly, the rate of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation was approximately 100-fold slower than that reported for the more potent cisplatin analogue, which may explain the lower toxicity of carboplatin. T24 human bladder cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological dose of [ 14 C]carboplatin, and the rate of accumulation of radiocarbon in the cells and nuclear DNA was measured by AMS. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1 amol/10 (micro)g of DNA. This sensitivity may allow the method to be used for clinical applications

  16. Kinetics of carboplatin-DNA binding in genomic DNA and bladder cancer cells as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hah, S S; Stivers, K M; Vere White, R; Henderson, P T

    2005-12-29

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum-based drugs that are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The cytotoxicity of these drugs is mediated by platinum-DNA monoadducts and intra- and interstrand diadducts, which are formed following uptake of the drug into the nucleus of cells. The pharmacodynamics of carboplatin display fewer side effects than for cisplatin, albeit with less potency, which may be due to differences in rates of DNA adduct formation. We report the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a sensitive detection method often used for radiocarbon quantitation, to measure both the kinetics of [{sup 14}C]carboplatin-DNA adduct formation with genomic DNA and drug uptake and DNA binding in T24 human bladder cancer cells. Only carboplatin-DNA monoadducts contain radiocarbon in the platinated DNA, which allowed for calculation of kinetic rates and concentrations within the system. The percent of radiocarbon bound to salmon sperm DNA in the form of monoadducts was measured by AMS over 24 h. Knowledge of both the starting concentration of the parent carboplatin and the concentration of radiocarbon in the DNA at a variety of time points allowed calculation of the rates of Pt-DNA monoadduct formation and conversion to toxic cross-links. Importantly, the rate of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation was approximately 100-fold slower than that reported for the more potent cisplatin analogue, which may explain the lower toxicity of carboplatin. T24 human bladder cancer cells were incubated with a subpharmacological dose of [{sup 14}C]carboplatin, and the rate of accumulation of radiocarbon in the cells and nuclear DNA was measured by AMS. The lowest concentration of radiocarbon measured was approximately 1 amol/10 {micro}g of DNA. This sensitivity may allow the method to be used for clinical applications.

  17. Pediatric microdose study of [(14)C]paracetamol to study drug metabolism using accelerated mass spectrometry: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Miriam G; van Duijn, Esther; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Windhorst, Albert D; Hendrikse, N Harry; Vaes, Wouter H J; Spaans, Edwin; Fabriek, Babs O; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Hanff, Lidwien M; Janssen, Paul J J M; Koch, Birgit C P; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by practical, ethical, and scientific challenges. Microdosing is a promising new method to obtain pharmacokinetic data in children with minimal burden and minimal risk. The use of a labeled oral microdose offers the added benefit to study intestinal and hepatic drug disposition in children already receiving an intravenous therapeutic drug dose for clinical reasons. The objective of this study was to present pilot data of an oral [(14)C]paracetamol [acetaminophen (AAP)] microdosing study as proof of concept to study developmental pharmacokinetics in children. In an open-label microdose pharmacokinetic pilot study, infants (0-6 years of age) received a single oral [(14)C]AAP microdose (3.3 ng/kg, 60 Bq/kg) in addition to intravenous therapeutic doses of AAP (15 mg/kg intravenous every 6 h). Blood samples were taken from an indwelling catheter. AAP blood concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and [(14)C]AAP and metabolites ([(14)C]AAP-Glu and [(14)C]AAP-4Sul) were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Ten infants (aged 0.1-83.1 months) were included; one was excluded as he vomited shortly after administration. In nine patients, [(14)C]AAP and metabolites in blood samples were detectable at expected concentrations: median (range) maximum concentration (C max) [(14)C]AAP 1.68 (0.75-4.76) ng/L, [(14)C]AAP-Glu 0.88 (0.34-1.55) ng/L, and [(14)C]AAP-4Sul 0.81 (0.29-2.10) ng/L. Dose-normalized oral [(14)C]AAP C max approached median intravenous average concentrations (C av): 8.41 mg/L (3.75-23.78 mg/L) and 8.87 mg/L (3.45-12.9 mg/L), respectively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a [(14)C]labeled microdose to study AAP pharmacokinetics, including metabolite disposition, in young children.

  18. A Simplified Calculation of a Continuous Flow Packed Contactor with Help of Characteristic Times

    OpenAIRE

    Sovová, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The proposed approach is illustrated on several examples of supercritical fluid extraction kinetics. Simple expressions for the calculation of characteristic times of both extraction and individual extraction steps are derived from mass balance equations and applied on experimental data from typical extractions from plants with supercritical CO2, as the extraction of oils from seeds or the extraction of essential oils from aromatic plants.

  19. Solid-state Marx based two-switch voltage modulator for the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, L M; Silva, J Fernando; Canacsinh, H; Ferrão, N; Mendes, C; Soares, R; Schipper, J; Fowler, A

    2010-07-01

    A new circuit topology is proposed to replace the actual pulse transformer and thyratron based resonant modulator that supplies the 60 kV target potential for the ion acceleration of the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator, the stability of which is critical for the mass resolution downstream separator, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The improved modulator uses two solid-state switches working together, each one based on the Marx generator concept, operating as series and parallel switches, reducing the stress on the series stacked semiconductors, and also as auxiliary pulse generator in order to fulfill the target requirements. Preliminary results of a 10 kV prototype, using 1200 V insulated gate bipolar transistors and capacitors in the solid-state Marx circuits, ten stages each, with an electrical equivalent circuit of the target, are presented, demonstrating both the improved voltage stability and pulse flexibility potential wanted for this new modulator.

  20. Enabling continuous-flow chemistry in microstructured devices for pharmaceutical and fine-chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockmann, Norbert; Gottsponer, Michael; Zimmermann, Bertin; Roberge, Dominique M

    2008-01-01

    Microstructured devices offer unique transport capabilities for rapid mixing, enhanced heat and mass transfer and can handle small amounts of dangerous or unstable materials. The integration of reaction kinetics into fluid dynamics and transport phenomena is essential for successful application from process design in laboratory to chemical production. Strategies to implement production campaigns up to tons of pharmaceutical chemicals are discussed, based on Lonza projects.