WorldWideScience

Sample records for continuous neutron source

  1. Reactors and neutron-scattering instruments in Western Europe -an update on continuous neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, G. S.; Thamm, G.

    1991-10-01

    Research reactors as sources of continuous neutron beams have been operational in Western Europe since the late fifties and have triggered a series of successful developments in reactor technology and in particular in neutron-scattering instrumentation. The culmination point so far was the construction and operation of the high-flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Although only one new reactor has been built since then, there were-and still are-efforts going on especially in Germany to provide a modern substitute for the older multi-purpose reactors still in operation or shut down already. Substantial effort also went into the modernization of the scattering instruments and experiment infrastructure (cold neutron sources, neutron guides, etc.) at several locations, showing that the scientific merits of neutron scattering are well recognized also on the political level. The ongoing construction of a cw-spallation neutron source in Switzerland might constitute an important step on the way to a new generation of high-flux sources.

  2. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  3. Neutron sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  4. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  5. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  6. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  7. Status of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Existing and planned facilities using proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source are reviewed. These include new project of neutron science proposed from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present status of facility requirement and accelerator technology leads us to new era of neutron science such as neutron scattering research and nuclear transmutation study using very intense neutron source. (author)

  8. Bunching of continuous neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golub, R. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gaehler, R. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: gahler@ill.fr; Habicht, K. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Klimko, S. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2006-01-09

    We present a system which can shape the intensity of a continuous, polychromatic polarized neutron beam into a high frequency sinusoidal signal of high contrast. It is based on a pure quantum-mechanical effect (longitudinal Stern-Gerlach). The system relies on a sequence of three RF flippers, and it works virtually loss-free. The signal occurs far downstream of the last flipper within a well defined region. As an application we discuss its use in high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

  9. Optimization of neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1993-11-09

    I consider here the optimization of the two component neutron source, allowing beam species and energy to vary. A simple model is developed, based on the earlier publications, that permits the optimum to be obtained simply. The two component plasma, with one species of hot ion (D{sup +} or T{sup +}) and the complementary species of cold ion, is easy to analyze in the case of a spatially uniform cold plasma, as to good approximation the total number of hot ions is important but not their spatial distribution. Consequently, the optimization can ignore spatial effects. The problem of a plasma with both types of hot ions and cold ions is rather more difficult, as the neutron production by hot-hot interactions is sensitive to their spatial distributions. Consequently, consideration of this problem will be delayed to a future memorandum. The basic model is that used in the published articles on the two-component, beam-plasma mirror source. I integrate the Fokker-Planck equation analytically, obtaining good agreement with previous numerical results. This simplifies the optimization, by providing a functional form for the neutron production. The primary result is expressed in terms of the power efficiency: watts of neutrons/watts of primary power. The latter includes the positive ion neutralization efficiency. At 150 keV, the present model obtains an efficiency of 0.66%, compared with 0.53% of the earlier calculation.

  10. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L. [comps.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  11. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y. [Tohoku Univ, Sendai (Japan); Itoh, S. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  12. Outline of spallation neutron source engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Noboru [Center for Neutron Science, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    Slow neutrons such as cold and thermal neutrons are unique probes which can determine structures and dynamics of condensed matter in atomic scale. The neutron scattering technique is indispensable not only for basic sciences such as condensed matter research and life science, but also for basic industrial technology in 21 century. It is believed that to survive in the science-technology competition in 21 century would be almost impossible without neutron scattering. However, the intensity of neutrons presently available is much lower than synchrotron radiation sources, etc. Thus, R and D of intense neutron sources become most important. The High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project is now being promoted jointly by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, but there has so far been no good text which covers all the aspects of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The present review was prepare aiming at giving a better understanding on pulsed spallation neutron sources not only to neutron source researchers but also more widely to neutron scattering researchers and accelerator scientists in this field. The contents involve, starting from what is neutron scattering and what neutrons are necessary for neutron scattering, what is the spallation reaction, how to produce neutrons required for neutron scattering more efficiently, target-moderator-reflector neutronics and its engineering, shielding, target station, material issues, etc. The author have engaged in R and D of pulsed apallation neutron sources and neutron scattering research using them over 30 years. The present review is prepared based on the author's experiences with useful information obtained through ICANS collaboration and recent data from the JSNS (Japanese Spallation Neutron Source) design team. (author)

  13. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  14. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israelashvili, I., E-mail: israelashvili@gmail.com [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Pedersen, B. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Beck, A. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J.M. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel)

    2015-06-11

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  15. Characterization of source neutrons produced by Frascati neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Martone, M.; Rado, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy)

    1994-11-01

    The characterization of the 14 MeV neutron source of the Frascati neutron generator (FNG) has been carried out using an absolutely calibrated U{sup Nat} micro-fission chamber with plane electrodes and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb activation reaction. The reaction rates have been measured at different angles with respect to the beam direction. The experimental results are compared with the corresponding quantities calculated by using a Monte Carlo code with an ad hoc source model. The calculated neutron emission reproduces satisfactory well the measured one. Improving of the used source model is discussed.

  16. High flux diffractometers on reactor neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewat, Alan W.

    2006-11-01

    Continuous neutron sources such as reactors can deliver a very high time-averaged flux to the sample using a relatively wide band of wavelengths, while still retaining good resolution. For example, the D20 diffractometer at ILL Grenoble, the world's highest flux neutron powder machine, can collect complete patterns at 100 ms intervals, and this has been important for the real time study of explosive SHS reactions. New very large 2D detectors, such as those recently installed on D2B and D19 at ILL, are up to an order of magnitude larger than previous designs, and will provide unmatched speed of data collection from very small samples, opening up new scientific perspectives for powder and single crystal diffraction. We will discuss future reactor based diffractometers designed for rapid data collection from small samples in special environments.

  17. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, Radoslav [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McLean, Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 ± 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  18. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  19. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  20. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  1. Overview of Spallation Neutron Source Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, G. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Muhrer, G.; Mezei, F.; Ferguson, P. D.

    In December 1971 , the world's most advanced steady-state research reactor, the High Flux Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, reached full power operation. The reactor has recently undergone an extensive renovation, is equipped with hot and cold sources, and has a complement of word class instruments. As such, the ILL reactor is the worldwide center for neutron research at a reactor installation. With present technology, the constraints of heat removal and fuel cost place a limit on the available flux of a steadystate research reactor at levels not much higher than that of the ILL reactor. There has been extensive progress worldwide to realize new high-flux neutron facilities using the technology of spallation. When coupled with the spallation process in appropriate target materials, highpower accelerators can be used to produce large numbers of neutrons, thus providing an alternate method to the use of nuclear reactors for this purpose. Spallation technology has recently become increasingly focussed on pulsed spallation neutron sources. Pulsed spallation neutron sources avoid the limitations of high time-average heat removal by producing neutrons for only a small fraction of the time. Also, the amount of energy deposited per useful neutron produced from spallation is less than that from fission. During the pulse, the available neutron flux from a pulsed spallation source can be much more intense than that obtainable in a steady-state reactor. Furthermore, pulsed neutron sources have certain unique features, which open up qualitatively new areas of science, which are not accessible to steady-state reactors. We discuss here the spallation process and spallation neutron sources. We compare the qualitative differences between fission and spallation and provide absolute neutron intensities for cold neutron production from a liquid H2, moderator at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) short-pulse pulsed spallation

  2. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  3. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  4. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusev, G., E-mail: rusev@lanl.gov; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  5. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  6. Development of compact accelerator neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letourneau Alain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a worldwide growing interest for small-scale and reduced-cost neutron sources not based on nuclear fission. High-intensity proton or deuteron beams impinging on light materials could be used to produce such neutron sources with intensities or brightness comparable to nuclear reactor for dedicated experiments. To develop such technologies several key technological issues have to be addressed. Among them the neutron production and the maximization of the neutron extraction and transport to the instrument is a key parameter for the design of high-brightness sources adapted for the required application. This issue have to be addressed with validated and predictive Monte-Carlo simulations. In this paper we present preliminary results on the use of Geant4 in the context of Compact Accelerator based Neutron Source (CANS developments.

  7. Development of compact accelerator neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Alain; Marchix, Anthony; Tran, Ngoc-Hoang; Chauvin, Nicolas; Menelle, Alain; Ott, Frédéric; Schwindling, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    There is a worldwide growing interest for small-scale and reduced-cost neutron sources not based on nuclear fission. High-intensity proton or deuteron beams impinging on light materials could be used to produce such neutron sources with intensities or brightness comparable to nuclear reactor for dedicated experiments. To develop such technologies several key technological issues have to be addressed. Among them the neutron production and the maximization of the neutron extraction and transport to the instrument is a key parameter for the design of high-brightness sources adapted for the required application. This issue have to be addressed with validated and predictive Monte-Carlo simulations. In this paper we present preliminary results on the use of Geant4 in the context of Compact Accelerator based Neutron Source (CANS) developments.

  8. Unconventional neutron sources for oil well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, C.M., E-mail: cfrankle@lanl.gov; Dale, G.E.

    2013-09-21

    Americium–Beryllium (AmBe) radiological neutron sources have been widely used in the petroleum industry for well logging purposes. There is strong desire on the part of various governmental and regulatory bodies to find alternate sources due to the high activity and small size of AmBe sources. Other neutron sources are available, both radiological ({sup 252}Cf) and electronic accelerator driven (D–D and D–T). All of these, however, have substantially different neutron energy spectra from AmBe and thus cause significantly different responses in well logging tools. We report on simulations performed using unconventional sources and techniques to attempt to better replicate the porosity and carbon/oxygen ratio responses a well logging tool would see from AmBe neutrons. The AmBe response of these two types of tools is compared to the response from {sup 252}Cf, D–D, D–T, filtered D–T, and T–T sources. -- Highlights: • AmBe sources are widely used for well logging purposes. • Governmental bodies would prefer to minimize AmBe use. • Other neutron sources are available, both radiological and electronic. • Tritium–tritium spectrum neutrons have similar logging tool response to AmBe. • A tritium–tritium neutron generator may be a viable AmBe replacement.

  9. Pulsed neutron source and instruments at neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Aizawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Morii, Yukio; Watanabe, Noboru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    We report the results of design studies on the optimal target shape, target - moderator coupling, optimal layout of moderators, and neutron instruments for a next generation pulsed spallation source in JAERI. The source utilizes a projected high-intensity proton accelerator (linac: 1.5 GeV, {approx}8 MW in total beam power, compressor ring: {approx}5 MW). We discuss the target neutronics, moderators and their layout. The sources is designed to have at least 30 beam lines equipped with more than 40 instruments, which are selected tentatively to the present knowledge. (author)

  10. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. (eds.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

  11. Modeling a neutron rich nuclei source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirea, M.; Bajeat, O.; Clapier, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Mueller, A.C.; Pauwels, N.; Proust, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3/CNRS, 91 - Orsay (France); Mirea, M. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Tandem Lab., Bucharest (Romania)

    2000-07-01

    The deuteron break-up process in a suitable converter gives rise to intense neutron beams. A source of neutron rich nuclei based on the neutron induced fission can be realised using these beams. A theoretical optimization of such a facility as a function of the incident deuteron energy is reported. The model used to determine the fission products takes into account the excitation energy of the target nucleus and the evaporation of prompt neutrons. Results are presented in connection with a converter-target specific geometry. (author000.

  12. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  13. Spallation neutron source target station issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.N.; Charlton, L.A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    In many areas of physics, materials and nuclear engineering, it is extremely valuable to have a very intense source of neutrons so that the structure and function of materials can be studied. One facility proposed for this purpose is the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS). This facility will consist of two parts: (1) a high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) and high powered ({approximately} 1 MW) proton accelerator, and (2) a target station which converts the protons to low-energy ({le} 2 eV) neutrons and delivers them to the neutron scattering instruments. This paper deals with the second part, i.e., the design and development of the NSNS target station and the scientifically challenging issues. Many scientific and technical disciplines are required to produce a successful target station. These include engineering, remote handling, neutronics, materials, thermal hydraulics, and instrumentation. Some of these areas will be discussed.

  14. Future opportunities with pulsed neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.D. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1996-05-01

    ISIS is the world`s most powerful pulsed spallation source and in the past ten years has demonstrated the scientific potential of accelerator-driven pulsed neutron sources in fields as diverse as physics, earth sciences, chemistry, materials science, engineering and biology. The Japan Hadron Project gives the opportunity to build on this development and to further realize the potential of neutrons as a microscopic probe of the condensed state. (author)

  15. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  16. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  17. Concrete enclosure to shield a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagrana M, L. E.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Soto B, T. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: emmanuelvillagrana@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the aim to design a shielding for a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source several Monte Carlo calculations were carried out using MCNP5 code. First, a point-like source was modeled in vacuum and the neutron spectrum and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated at several distances ranging from 5 up to 150 cm, these calculations were repeated including air, and a 1 x 1 x 1 m{sup 3} enclosure that was shielded with 5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50 and 80 cm-thick Portland type concrete walls. At all the points located inside the enclosure neutron spectra from 10{sup -8} up 0.5 MeV were the same regardless the distance from the source showing the room-return effect, for energies larger than 0.5 MeV neutron spectra are diminished as the distance increases. Outside the enclosure it was noticed that neutron spectra becomes -softer- as the concrete thickness increases due to reduction of mean neutron energy. With the ambient dose values the attenuation curve in terms of concrete thickness was calculated. (Author)

  18. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in a...

  19. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Austria)

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  20. Performance verification of an epithermal neutron flux monitor using accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X.; Murata, I.; Wang, T.

    2017-09-01

    The performance of an epithermal neutron flux monitor developed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is verified by Monte Carlo simulations using accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs). The results indicate that the developed epithermal neutron flux monitor works well and it can be efficiently used in practical applications to measure the epithermal neutron fluxes of ABNSs in a high accuracy.

  1. Development of cold neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Oong; Cho, M. S.; Park, K. N. and others

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the CNS facility in Hanaro to extend the scope of the neutron utilization and to carry out the works impossible by thermal neutrons. According to the project schedule, the establishment of the CNS concept and the basic design are performed in the phase 1, and the elementary technologies for basic design will be developed in the phase 2. Finally in the phase 3, the design of CNS will be completed, and the fabrication, the installation will be ended and then the development plan of spectrometers will be decided to establish the foothold to carry out the basic researches. This study is aimed to produce the design data and utilize them in the future basic and detail design, which include the estimation and the measurement of the heat load, the code development for the design of the in pile assembly and the heat removal system, the measurement of the shape of the CN hole, the performance test of thermosiphon and the concept of the general layout of the whole system etc.. (author)

  2. Neutron moderators for the European Spallation Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Zanini, L.; Batkov, K.

    to have access to cold and thermal neutrons with highest possible source brightness. Different design and configuration options were evaluated. The final configuration accepted for construction foresees two moderators with identical para-hydrogen (so-called "butterfly") shape, but different heights......The design of the neutron moderators for the European Spallation Source, intended to be installed at the start of operations of the facility in 2019 has now been finalized and the moderators are being fabricated. Among the driving principles in the design have been flexibility for instruments...

  3. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. STOVALL; S. NATH; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac is comprised of both normal and superconducting rf (SRF) accelerating structures. The SRF linac accelerates the beam from 186 to 1250 MeV through 117 elliptical, multi-cell niobium cavities. This paper describes the SRF linac architecture, physics design considerations, cavity commissioning, and the expected beam dynamics performance.

  5. Sweden to host a new neutron source

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The first European neutron source, currently under development, should commence operations by the end of this decade. Its aim: to produce beams of neutrons that can penetrate into the heart of matter without damaging it and reveal its secrets.   An artist's impression of what the ESS should look like in 2019. At the southern end of Sweden, a town called Lund is preparing for the arrival of the world's most powerful neutron source: the European Spallation Source (ESS). Construction is scheduled to start at the beginning of next year, and the facility is expected to become operational by 2019, when it will produce its first neutron beams. “The ESS is the result of an idea that began 20 years ago!” underlines Mats Lindroos, in charge of the ESS Accelerator Division. “Today, 17 European countries support the project, including Sweden, Denmark and Norway, who together account for 50% of the construction funding.” The ESS, whose design is al...

  6. Positron source based on neutron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2003-10-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high-energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the High Flux Reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as γ-e +e --converter and positron moderator. After acceleration to 3 keV by electrical lenses the positrons were magnetically guided through the beamline. Measurements were performed for various source geometries. The beam diameter and moderation characteristics such as positron work function, moderation efficiency and degradation were determined as well. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II.

  7. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Morse, J; Meyer, G; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P; Park, H G; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Wang, L

    2008-08-08

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of {approx}100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  8. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  9. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  10. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  11. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  12. New sources and instrumentation for neutrons in biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teixeira, S. C. M.; Zaccai, G.; Ankner, J.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron radiation offers significant advantages for the study of biological molecular structure and dynamics. A broad and significant effort towards instrumental and methodological development to facilitate biology experiments at neutron sources worldwide is reviewed.......Neutron radiation offers significant advantages for the study of biological molecular structure and dynamics. A broad and significant effort towards instrumental and methodological development to facilitate biology experiments at neutron sources worldwide is reviewed....

  13. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhong, Zhaopeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  14. Characterization of the source neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Angelone, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Martone, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Rado, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy)

    1995-03-01

    Integral experiments with a neutron source based on the T(d,n){alpha} reaction require a good knowledge of the source neutron distribution. The source neutrons are energy-angle distributed with an energy spread of a few mega-electron-volts and anisotropy emission of a few percent.The characterization of the 14-MeV neutron source of the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) has been carried out using an absolutely calibrated U{sup Nat} microfission chamber with plane electrodes and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb activation reaction. The reaction rates have been measured at different angles with respect to the beam direction. The experimental results are compared with the corresponding quantities calculated by using a Monte Carlo code (MCNP) with an ``ad hoc`` source model. The calculated neutron emission reproduces the measured one satisfactorily well. Improvement of the source model used is discussed. (orig.).

  15. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In a recent numerical optimization study we have found that liquid para-hydrogen coupled cold neutron moderators deliver 3–5 times higher cold neutron brightness at a spallation neutron source if they take the form of a flat, quasi 2-dimensional disc, in contrast to the conventional more voluminous...... for cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared...... to the much more voluminous liquid D2 or H2 moderators currently used. Neutronic simulation calculations confirm both of these theoretical conclusions....

  16. Application of the backward extrapolation method to pulsed neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2018-01-01

    Particle detectors operated in pulse mode are subjected to the dead-time effect. When the average of the detector counts is constant over time, correcting for the dead-time effect is simple and can be accomplished by analytical formulas. However, when the average of the detector counts changes over time it is more difficult to take into account the dead-time effect. When a subcritical nuclear assembly is driven by a pulsed neutron source, simple analytical formulas cannot be applied to the measured detector counts to correct for the dead-time effect because of the sharp change of the detector counts over time. This work addresses this issue by using the backward extrapolation method. The latter can be applied not only to a continuous (e.g. californium) external neutron source but also to a pulsed external neutron source (e.g. by a particle accelerator) driving a subcritical nuclear assembly. The backward extrapolation method allows to obtain from the measured detector counts both the dead-time value and the real detector counts.

  17. Fission, spallation or fusion-based neutron sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... In this paper the most promising technology for high power neutron sources is briefly discussed. The conclusion is that the route to high power neutron sources in the foreseeable future is spallation – short or long pulse or even CW – all of these sources will have areas in which they excel.

  18. Stabilized voltage sources for a slow neutron diffraction analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plyusnin, N.I.; Lobachev, S.A.; Galkin, N.G.

    An unified voltage source (UVS) and filament voltage source (FVS) are described' The sources are used for a slow neutron diffraction analyzer. FVS supplies the filament of a gun cathode and provides beam currents upto 2 mA at electric currents upto 5A and voltages upto 8V. FVS is built by a compensation scheme with continuous control. It possesses a control element with high output power and trigger protection. The range of the EVS protection circuit operation threshold control is 1-5 A, instability of output voltage doesn't exceed 1 mV, the load power consumption doesn't exceed 40 W. UVS is also built according to compensation principle with continuous control and non-regulated power supply of a negative feedback amplifier. The output voltage is controlled within the limits of 5-250 V, maximum load current is 5 mA, instability of output voltage doesn't exceed 50 mV, maximum power consumption is 1.5 W. Simplicity of the UVS circuit is reached by application of the minimum number of active and passive elements, and reliability - by the circuit protection from overloads. Operation of the slow neutron diffraction analyzer, a control unit of which is built on the base of the above voltage sources, proves their reliability and convenience. Diffraction patterns of good quality are obtained.

  19. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lychagin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections from methane; also the source size could be significantly larger than the incident beam diameter. We provide preliminary calculations of cooling of neutrons. These calculations show that such a source being installed at an intense source of thermal or cold neutrons like the ILL or PIK reactor or the ESS spallation source could provide the UCN density 105 cm−3, the production rate 107 UCN/s−1. Main advantages of such an UCN source include its low radiative and thermal load, relatively low cost, and convenient accessibility for any maintenance. We have carried out an experiment on cooling of thermal neutrons in a methane cavity. The data confirm the results of our calculations of the spectrum and flux of neutrons in the methane cavity.

  20. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, S., E-mail: stuarth@fnal.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Abraham, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aleksandrov, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Allen, C. [Techsource, Inc., 1475 Central Avenue, Suite 250, Los Alamos, NM 87544-3291 (United States); Alonso, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Anderson, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Arthur, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Assadi, S. [Techsource, Inc., 1475 Central Avenue, Suite 250, Los Alamos, NM 87544-3291 (United States); Ayers, J.; Bach, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Badea, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Battle, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Beebe-Wang, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ∼100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ∼400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ∼400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ∼100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  1. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  2. Neutron activation analysis: Modelling studies to improve the neutron flux of Americium-Beryllium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didi, Abdessamad; Dadouch, Ahmed; Tajmouati, Jaouad; Bekkouri, Hassane [Advanced Technology and Integration System, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Science Dhar Mehraz, University Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Fez (Morocco); Jai, Otman [Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tetouan (Morocco)

    2017-06-15

    Americium–beryllium (Am-Be; n, γ) is a neutron emitting source used in various research fields such as chemistry, physics, geology, archaeology, medicine, and environmental monitoring, as well as in the forensic sciences. It is a mobile source of neutron activity (20 Ci), yielding a small thermal neutron flux that is water moderated. The aim of this study is to develop a model to increase the neutron thermal flux of a source such as Am-Be. This study achieved multiple advantageous results: primarily, it will help us perform neutron activation analysis. Next, it will give us the opportunity to produce radio-elements with short half-lives. Am-Be single and multisource (5 sources) experiments were performed within an irradiation facility with a paraffin moderator. The resulting models mainly increase the thermal neutron flux compared to the traditional method with water moderator.

  3. PREFACE: Neutrino physics at spallation neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avignone, F. T.; Chatterjee, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Strayer, M.

    2003-11-01

    Unique because of their super-light masses and tiny interaction cross sections, neutrinos combine fundamental physics on the scale of the miniscule with macroscopic physics on the scale of the cosmos. Starting from the ignition of the primal p-p chain of stellar and solar fusion reactions that signal star-birth, these elementary leptons (neutrinos) are also critical players in the life-cycles and explosive deaths of massive stars and the production and disbursement of heavy elements. Stepping beyond their importance in solar, stellar and supernova astrophysics, neutrino interactions and properties influence the evolution, dynamics and symmetries of the cosmos as a whole. Further, they serve as valuable probes of its material content at various levels of structure from atoms and nuclei to valence and sea quarks. In the light of the multitude of physics phenomena that neutrinos influence, it is imperative to enhance our understanding of neutrino interactions and properties to the maximum. This is accentuated by the recent evidence of finite neutrino mass and flavour mixing between generations that reverberates on the plethora of physics that neutrinos influence. Laboratory experiments using intense neutrino fluxes would allow precision measurements and determination of important neutrino reaction rates. These can then complement atmospheric, solar and reactor experiments that have enriched so valuably our understanding of the neutrino and its repertoire of physics applications. In particular, intermediate energy neutrino experiments can provide critical information on stellar and solar astrophysical processes, along with advancing our knowledge of nuclear structure, sub-nuclear physics and fundamental symmetries. So where should we look for such intense neutrino sources? Spallation neutron facilities by their design are sources of intense neutrino pulses that are produced as a by-product of neutron spallation. These neutrino sources could serve as unique laboratories

  4. Studies and modeling of cold neutron sources; Etude et modelisation des sources froides de neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campioni, G

    2004-11-15

    With the purpose of updating knowledge in the fields of cold neutron sources, the work of this thesis has been run according to the 3 following axes. First, the gathering of specific information forming the materials of this work. This set of knowledge covers the following fields: cold neutron, cross-sections for the different cold moderators, flux slowing down, different measurements of the cold flux and finally, issues in the thermal analysis of the problem. Secondly, the study and development of suitable computation tools. After an analysis of the problem, several tools have been planed, implemented and tested in the 3-dimensional radiation transport code Tripoli-4. In particular, a module of uncoupling, integrated in the official version of Tripoli-4, can perform Monte-Carlo parametric studies with a spare factor of Cpu time fetching 50 times. A module of coupling, simulating neutron guides, has also been developed and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code McStas. Thirdly, achieving a complete study for the validation of the installed calculation chain. These studies focus on 3 cold sources currently functioning: SP1 from Orphee reactor and 2 other sources (SFH and SFV) from the HFR at the Laue Langevin Institute. These studies give examples of problems and methods for the design of future cold sources.

  5. Nondiffractive applications of neutrons at the spallation source SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The paper delivers an overview about experiments with neutrons from the spallation source SINQ which are not especially devoted to neutron scattering. A total of six experimental facilities are under construction using thermal as well as cold neutrons. Starting with some general considerations about the interaction of neutrons with matter, the principles, boundary conditions and the experimental set up of these experiments are described briefly. Some more details are given for the neutron radiography facility NEUTRA as the author`s special interest and research field. (author) 7 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs.

  6. The national spallation neutron source target station: A general overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.N.; Charlton, L.A. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.

  7. Transmission Bragg edge spectroscopy measurements at ORNL Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Molaison, J. J.; Tulk, C. A.; Crow, L.; Cooper, R. G.; Penumadu, D.

    2010-11-01

    Results of neutron transmission Bragg edge spectroscopic experiments performed at the SNAP beamline of the Spallation Neutron Source are presented. A high resolution neutron counting detector with a neutron sensitive microchannel plate and Timepix ASIC readout is capable of energy resolved two dimensional mapping of neutron transmission with spatial accuracy of ~55 μm, limited by the readout pixel size, and energy resolution limited by the duration of the initial neutron pulse. A two dimensional map of the Fe 110 Bragg edge position was obtained for a bent steel screw sample. Although the neutron pulse duration corresponded to ~30 mÅ energy resolution for 15.3 m flight path, the accuracy of the Bragg edge position in our measurements was improved by analytical fitting to a few mÅ level. A two dimensional strain map was calculated from measured Bragg edge values with an accuracy of ~few hundreds μistrain for 300s of data acquisition time.

  8. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial

  9. Neutron spectra and dosimetric features of isotopic neutron sources: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Martinez O, S. A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Av. Central del Norte 39-115, 150003 Tunja, Boyaca (Colombia)

    2015-10-15

    A convenient way to produce neutrons is the isotopic neutron source, where the production is through (α, n), (γ, n), and spontaneous fission reactions. Isotopic neutron sources are small, easy to handle, and have a relative low cost. On the other hand the neutron yield is small and mostly of them produces neutrons with a wide energy distribution. In this work, a review is carried out about the the main features of {sup 24}NaBe, {sup 24}NaD{sub 2}O, {sup 116}InBe, {sup 140}LaBe, {sup 238}PuLi, {sup 239}PuBe, {sup 241}AmB, {sup 241}AmBe, {sup 241}AmF, {sup 241}AmLi, {sup 242}CmBe, {sup 210}PoBe, {sup 226}RaBe, {sup 252}Cf and {sup 252}Cf/D{sub 2}O isotopic neutron source. Also, using Monte Carlo methods, the neutron spectra in 31 energy groups, the neutron mean energy; the Ambient dose equivalent, the Personal dose equivalent and the Effective dose were calculated for these isotopic neutron sources. (Author)

  10. General-purpose readout electronics for white neutron source at China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Cao, P.; Qi, X.; Yu, T.; Ji, X.; Xie, L.; An, Q.

    2018-01-01

    The under-construction White Neutron Source (WNS) at China Spallation Neutron Source is a facility for accurate measurements of neutron-induced cross section. Seven spectrometers are planned at WNS. As the physical objectives of each spectrometer are different, the requirements for readout electronics are not the same. In order to simplify the development of the readout electronics, this paper presents a general method for detector signal readout. This method has advantages of expansibility and flexibility, which makes it adaptable to most detectors at WNS. In the WNS general-purpose readout electronics, signals from any kinds of detectors are conditioned by a dedicated signal conditioning module corresponding to this detector, and then digitized by a common waveform digitizer with high speed and high precision (1 GSPS at 12-bit) to obtain the full waveform data. The waveform digitizer uses a field programmable gate array chip to process the data stream and trigger information in real time. PXI Express platform is used to support the functionalities of data readout, clock distribution, and trigger information exchange between digitizers and trigger modules. Test results show that the performance of the WNS general-purpose readout electronics can meet the requirements of the WNS spectrometers.

  11. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kralik, M.; Solc, J. [Czech Metrology Institute, CZ-102 00 Prague 10 (Czech Republic); Chvatil, D.; Krist, P.; Turek, K. [Nuclear Physics Institute, p.r.i., AS CR, CZ-250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Granja, C. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Horska 3a/22, CZ-128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a {sup 10}B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space.

  12. Energy-selective neutron transmission imaging at a pulsed source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelmann, W.; Frei, G.; Lehmann, E. H.; Vontobel, P.; Santisteban, J. R.

    2007-08-01

    Energy-selective neutron radiography experiments were carried out at the ISIS pulsed spallation source. This neutron transmission imaging technique combines the hardware used for conventional neutron radiography with the Bragg edge transmission features of time-of-flight methods. The main component of the energy-selective radiography set-up was a gated image-intensified CCD camera that viewed a neutron sensitive scintillation screen via a mirror. Energy resolution was obtained via synchronization of the light-intensifier with the pulse structure of the neutron source. It is demonstrated that contrast enhancement of materials can be straightforwardly achieved, and that microstructural features in metal samples can be directly visualized with high spatial resolution by taking advantage of the Bragg edges in the energy dependent neutron cross sections.

  13. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, P., E-mail: marini@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Mathieu, L. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Acosta, L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, México D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  14. Comparison of ultracold neutron sources for fundamental physics measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bison, G.; Daum, M.; Kirch, K; Lauss, B; Ries, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G; Brenner, T.; Geltenbort, P.; Jenke, T.; Zimmer, O.; Beck, M.; Heil, W.; Kahlenberg, J.; Karch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) are key for precision studies of fundamental parameters of the neutron and in searches for new CP violating processes or exotic interactions beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The most prominent example is the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM). We have performed an experimental comparison of the leading UCN sources currently operating. We have used a 'standard' UCN storage bottle with a volume of 32 liters, comparable in ...

  15. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H. (ed.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Thompson, P.B. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (United States). Engineering Division)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  16. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (United States). Engineering Division

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I & C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  17. Ion source antenna development for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Kang, Y.; Janney, M.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Schenkel, T.; Shukla, S.

    2002-02-01

    The operational lifetime of a radio-frequency (rf) ion source is generally governed by the length of time the insulating structure protecting the antenna survives during exposure to the plasma. Coating the antenna with a thin layer of insulating material is a common means of extending the life of such antennas. When low-power/low-duty factor rf excitation is employed, antenna lifetimes of several hundred hours are typical. When high-power, >30 kW, and high-duty cycles, ˜6%, are employed, as is the case of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source, antenna lifetime becomes unacceptably short. This work addresses this problem by first showing the results of microanalysis of failed antennas from the SNS ion source, developing a model of the damage mechanism based on plasma-insulator interaction, using the model to determine the dimensional and material properties of an ideal coating, and describing several approaches currently under way to develop a long-lived antenna for the SNS accelerator. These approaches include thermal spray coatings, optimized porcelain enamel coatings, refractory enamel coatings, and novel antenna geometries designed to operate with low rf electric fields.

  18. Accelerating fissile material detection with a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2018-01-30

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly to count neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a Poisson neutron generator for in-beam interrogation of a possible fissile neutron source and a DC power supply that exhibits electrical ripple on the order of less than one part per million. Certain voltage multiplier circuits, such as Cockroft-Walton voltage multipliers, are used to enhance the effective of series resistor-inductor circuits components to reduce the ripple associated with traditional AC rectified, high voltage DC power supplies.

  19. On the limit of neutron fluxes in the fission-based pulsed neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Ananiev, V. D.; Komyshev, G. G.; Rogov, A. D.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2017-09-01

    The upper limit of the density of the thermal neutron flux from pulsed sources based on the fission reaction is established. Three types of sources for research on ejected beams are considered: a multiplying target of the proton accelerator (a booster), a booster with the reactivity modulation (a superbooster), and a pulsing reactor. Comparison with other high-flux sources is carried out. The investigation has been performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of JINR.

  20. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa; Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Oba, Yojiro; Otake, Yoshie; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  1. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa, E-mail: yoshimasa.ikeda@riken.jp [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kumagai, Masayoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8857 (Japan); Oba, Yojiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Otake, Yoshie [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [Materials Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  2. Neutron shielding for a {sup 252} Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Eduardo Gallego, Alfredo Lorente [Depto. de Ingenieria Nuclear, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    To determine the neutron shielding features of water-extended polyester a Monte Carlo study was carried out. Materials with low atomic number are predominantly used for neutron shielding because these materials effectively attenuate neutrons, mainly through inelastic collisions and absorption reactions. During the selection of materials to design a neutron shield, prompt gamma production as well as radionuclide production induced by neutron activation must be considered. In this investigation the Monte Carlo method was used to evaluate the performance of a water-extended polyester shield designed for the transportation, storage, and use of a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source. During calculations a detailed model for the {sup 252}Cf and the shield was utilized. To compare the shielding features of water extended polyester, the calculations were also made for the bare {sup 252}Cf in vacuum, air and the shield filled with water. For all cases the calculated neutron spectra was utilized to determine the ambient equivalent neutron dose at four sites around the shielding. In the case of water extended polyester and water shielding the calculations were extended to include the prompt gamma rays produced during neutron interactions, with this information the Kerma in air was calculated at the same locations where the ambient equivalent neutron dose was determined. (Author)

  3. Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

    2009-12-01

    A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

  4. Lithium neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayanov, B.; Belov, V.; Kindyuk, V.; Oparin, E.; Taskaev, S. E-mail: taskaev@inp.nsk.su

    2004-11-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target, that produces neutrons via threshold {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies 1.915 or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, the results of experiments on neutron producing target prototype are presented, the results of calculations of hydraulic resistance for heat carrier flow and lithium layer temperature are shown. Calculation showed that the lithium target could run up to 10 mA proton beam before melting. Choice of target variant is substantiated. Program of immediate necessary experiments is described. Target design for neutron source constructed at BINP is presented. Manufacturing the neutron producing target up to the end of 2004 and obtaining a neutron beam on BINP accelerator-based neutron source are planned during 2005.

  5. Lithium neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayanov, B; Belov, V; Kindyuk, V; Oparin, E; Taskaev, S

    2004-11-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target, that produces neutrons via threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies 1.915 or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, the results of experiments on neutron producing target prototype are presented, the results of calculations of hydraulic resistance for heat carrier flow and lithium layer temperature are shown. Calculation showed that the lithium target could run up to 10 mA proton beam before melting. Choice of target variant is substantiated. Program of immediate necessary experiments is described. Target design for neutron source constructed at BINP is presented. Manufacturing the neutron producing target up to the end of 2004 and obtaining a neutron beam on BINP accelerator-based neutron source are planned during 2005.

  6. Investigation of Isfahan miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR for boron neutron capture therapy by MCNP simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z Kalantari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important neutron sources for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT is a nuclear reactor. It needs a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The optimum conditions of the neutron spectra for BNCT are provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. In this paper, Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR as a neutron source for BNCT was investigated. For this purpose, we designed a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA for the reactor and the neutron transport from the core of the reactor to the output windows of BSA was simulated by MCNPX code. To optimize the BSA performance, two sets of parameters should be evaluated, in-air and in-phantom parameters. For evaluating in-phantom parameters, a Snyder head phantom was used and biological dose rate and dose-depth curve were calculated in brain normal and tumor tissues. Our calculations showed that the neutron flux of the MNSR reactor can be used for BNCT, and the designed BSA in optimum conditions had a good therapeutic characteristic for BNCT.

  7. Thermal neutron equivalent doses assessment around KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M.N.; Al-Jarrallah, M.I.; Nassar, R

    2002-07-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) layer for thermal neutron detection via {sup 10}B(N,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks.cm{sup -2}.{mu}Sv{sup -1} using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSv.h{sup -1} up to 11 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv.h{sup -1}, which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems. (author)

  8. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  9. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  10. Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Vujic, J L; Greenspan, E; Guess, S; Karni, Y; Kastenber, W E; Kim, L; Leung, K N; Regev, D; Verbeke, J M; Waldron, W L; Zhu, Y

    2003-01-01

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  11. Overview of target systems for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, Tony A.; Barnes, John M.; Charlton, Lowell A. [and others; DiStefano, James; Farrell, Ken; Haines, John; Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Mansur, Louis K.; Pawel, Steve J.; Siman-Tov, Moshe; Taleyarkhan, Rusi; Wendel, Mark W.; McManamy, Thomas J.; Rennich, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose and requirements of target systems as well as the technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis, and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.

  12. The Ultracold Neutron Source at Los Alamos National Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makela, M.; Hogan, G.; . Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.; Ito, T. M.; Rios, R.; Mammei, R.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Back, H. O.; Broussard, L.; Holley, A.; Pattie, R.; Young, A. R.

    2007-04-01

    The Ultracold Neutron (UCN) source at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) has completed a second run cycle of operation. In the LANL UCN source spallation neutrons are cooled in a moderator then down scattered in solid deuterium (via a super thermal process) to UCN temperatures (1-4 mK). The UCN reach experiments after passing through 8 meters of guide. During the 2006 run cycle several changes were made to the source and guide system. This talk will give an overview of the LANL UCN source, its current status and results from source test runs during the 2006 run cycle.

  13. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalyga, V., E-mail: skalyga.vadim@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Sidorov, A. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Maslennikova, A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, 10/1 Minina Sq., 603005 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Volovecky, A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2014-12-21

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D–D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm{sup 2} is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  15. Secondary neutron source modelling using MCNPX and ALEPH codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakas, Christos; Kerkar, Nordine

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the subcritical state and divergence of reactors requires the presence of neutron sources. But mainly secondary neutrons from these sources feed the ex-core detectors (SRD, Source Range Detector) whose counting rate is correlated with the level of the subcriticality of reactor. In cycle 1, primary neutrons are provided by sources activated outside of the reactor (e.g. Cf252); part of this source can be used for the divergence of cycle 2 (not systematic). A second family of neutron sources is used for the second cycle: the spontaneous neutrons of actinides produced after irradiation of fuel in the first cycle. Both families of sources are not sufficient to efficiently monitor the divergence of the second cycles and following ones, in most reactors. Secondary sources cluster (SSC) fulfil this role. In the present case, the SSC [Sb, Be], after activation in the first cycle (production of Sb124, unstable), produces in subsequent cycles a photo-neutron source by gamma (from Sb124)-neutron (on Be9) reaction. This paper presents the model of the process between irradiation in cycle 1 and cycle 2 results for SRD counting rate at the beginning of cycle 2, using the MCNPX code and the depletion chain ALEPH-V1 (coupling of MCNPX and ORIGEN codes). The results of this simulation are compared with two experimental results of the PWR 1450 MWe-N4 reactors. A good agreement is observed between these results and the simulations. The subcriticality of the reactors is about at -15,000 pcm. Discrepancies on the SRD counting rate between calculations and measurements are in the order of 10%, lower than the combined uncertainty of measurements and code simulation. This comparison validates the AREVA methodology, which allows having an SRD counting rate best-estimate for cycles 2 and next ones and optimizing the position of the SSC, depending on the geographic location of sources, main parameter for optimal monitoring of subcritical states.

  16. First experimental implementation of pulse shaping for neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russina, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kali, Gy.; Santa, Zs. [HAS Research Institute for Solid State Physics, Konkoly Thege ut. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Mezei, F., E-mail: f.mezei@esshungary.eu [HAS Research Institute for Solid State Physics, Konkoly Thege ut. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-10-21

    One of the central issues in the design and the use of pulsed neutron sources is the control of pulse length in elastic scattering experiments, most significantly diffraction on crystalline matter. On the existing short pulse spallation sources the strongly wavelength dependent source pulse length that determines the resolution is permanently fixed on each beam line by the type of the moderator it faces. We have experimentally implemented for the first time the wavelength frame multiplication (WFM) multiplexing chopper method, an earlier proposed variant of the by now fully tested repetition rate multiplication technique for inelastic scattering spectroscopy on pulsed neutron sources. We have operated the time-of-flight diffractometer at the continuous reactor source at BNC in an unconventional multiplexing mode that emulates a pulsed source. As a full proof of principle of the WFM method we have experimentally demonstrated the extraction from each source pulse a series of polychromatic, chopper shaped neutron pulses, which can continuously cover any wavelength band. The achieved 25 {mu}s FWHM pulse length is shorter than that can be obtained at all at short pulse spallation sources for cold neutrons. The method allows us to build efficient, high and variable resolution diffractometers at long pulse spallation sources.

  17. Deuterium-lithium plasma as a source of fusion neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, A. Yu; Vesnin, V. R.

    2017-11-01

    The concepts of deuterium-tritium (D–T) fusion neutron source are currently developed for hybrid fusion–fission systems and the waste transmutation ones. The need to use tritium technologies is a deterrent factor in this promising direction of energy production. Potential possibilities of using systems that do not require tritium developments are of a significant interest. A deuterium-deuterium (D–D) reaction is considered for the use in demonstration fusion neutron sources. The product of this reaction is tritium, which will burn in the plasma with the emission of fast neutrons. D–D reaction is significantly slower then D–T reaction. Present study shows an increase in neutron yield using a powerful injection of the beam of deuterium atoms. The reactions of the deuterium with lithium isotopes are considered. In some of these reactions, fast neutrons can be obtained. The results of the calculation of the neutron yield from the deuterium lithium plasma are discussed. The estimates of the parameters needed for the realization of a source of fusion neutrons are presented.

  18. Neutron beam line design of a white neutron source at CSNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hantao; Zhang, Liying; Tang, Jingyu; Ruan, Xichao; Ning, Changjun; Yu, Yongji; Wang, Pengcheng; Li, Qiang; Ren, Jie; Tang, Hongqing; Wang, Xiangqi

    2017-09-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), which is under construction, is a large scientific facility dedicated mainly for multi-disciplinary research on material characterization using neutron scattering techniques. The CSNS Phase-I accelerator will deliver a proton beam with an energy of 1.6 GeV and a pulse repetition rate of 25 Hz to a tungsten target, and the beam power is 100 kW. A white neutron source using the back-streaming neutrons through the incoming proton beam channel was proposed and is under construction. The back-streaming neutrons which are very intense and have good time structure are very suitable for nuclear data measurements. The white neutron source includes an 80-m neutron beam line, two experimental halls, and also six different types of spectrometers. The physics design of the beam line is presented in this paper, which includes beam optics and beam characterization simulations, with the emphasis on obtaining extremely low background. The first-batch experiments on nuclear data measurements are expected to be conducted in late 2017.

  19. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H. [eds.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Engineering Services

    1995-01-01

    The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

  20. Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Walker, C. [ITER Joint Central Team, Garching (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

  1. Tagging fast neutrons from a 252Cf fission-fragment source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzinger, J; Al Jebali, R; Annand, J R M; Bala, A; Fissum, K G; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamilton, D; Mauritzson, N; Messi, F; Perrey, H; Rofors, E

    2017-10-01

    Coincidence and time-of-flight measurement techniques are employed to tag fission neutrons emitted from a 252Cf source sealed on one side with a very thin layer of Au. The source is positioned within a gaseous 4He scintillator detector. Together with α particles, both light and heavy fission fragments pass through the thin layer of Au and are detected. The fragments enable the corresponding fission neutrons, which are detected in a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector, to be tagged. The resulting continuous polychromatic beam of tagged neutrons has an energy dependence that agrees qualitatively with expectations. We anticipate that this technique will provide a cost-effective means for the characterization of neutron-detector efficiency in the energy range 1-6MeV. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments.

  3. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  4. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, I.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Andreani, C., E-mail: carla.andreani@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF Sezione di Messina, Messina (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Festa, G., E-mail: giulia.festa@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Gorini, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano—Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Loong, C.-K. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Centro NAST, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Senesi, R. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF Sezione di Messina, Messina (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-13

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target–moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  5. Research for the concept of Hanaro cold neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Oong; Cho, M. S.; Lee, M. W.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, K. N.; Park, S. H.; Yang, S. Y.; Kang, S. H.; Yang, S. H.; Chang, J. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Chang, C. I.; Cho, Y. S.

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of two parts, one is the conceptual design performed on the collaboration work with PNPI Russia and another is review of Hanaro CNS conceptual design report by Technicatome France, both of which are contained at vol. I and vol. II. representatively. In the vol. I, the analysis for the status of technology development, the technical characteristics of CNS is included, and the conceptual design of Hanaro cold neutron source is contained to establish the concept suitable to Hanaro. The cold neutron experimental facilities, first of all, have been selected to propose the future direction of physics concerning properties of the matter at Korea. And neutron guide tubes, the experimental hall and cold neutron source appropriate to these devices have been selected and design has been reviewed in view of securing safety and installing at Hanaro. (author). 38 refs., 49 tabs., 17 figs.

  6. Comparison of ultracold neutron sources for fundamental physics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bison, G.; Daum, M.; Kirch, K.; Lauss, B.; Ries, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G.; Brenner, T.; Geltenbort, P.; Jenke, T.; Zimmer, O.; Beck, M.; Heil, W.; Kahlenberg, J.; Karch, J.; Ross, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Geppert, C.; Karpuk, S.; Reich, T.; Siemensen, C.; Sobolev, Y.; Trautmann, N.

    2017-04-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) are key for precision studies of fundamental parameters of the neutron and in searches for new charge-parity-violating processes or exotic interactions beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The most prominent example is the search for a permanent electric-dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM). We have performed an experimental comparison of the leading UCN sources currently operating. We have used a "standard" UCN storage bottle with a volume of 32 liters, comparable in size to nEDM experiments, which allows us to compare the UCN density available at a given beam port.

  7. Pulsed neutron source based on accelerator-subcritical-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Makoto; Noda, Akira; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Okamoto, Hiromi; Shirai, Toshiyuki [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Research

    1997-03-01

    A new pulsed neutron source which consists of a 300MeV proton linac and a nuclear fuel subcritical assembly is proposed. The proton linac produces pulsed spallation neutrons, which are multipied by the subcritical assembly. A prototype proton linac that accelerates protons up to 7MeV has been developed and a high energy section of a DAW structure is studied with a power model. Halo formations in high intensity beam are also being studied. (author)

  8. Irradiation facilities at the spallation neutron source SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.; Ledermann, J.; Aebersold, H.; Kuehne, G.; Kohlik, K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Four independent experiments for sample irradiation are under construction and in preparation for operational tests at the spallation source SINQ. Three of them are located inside a thermal beam port with end positions inside or near the moderator tank. The other experiment will be established at the end position of a super mirror lined neutron guide for applications with cold neutrons. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  9. Time-correlated neutron analysis of a multiplying HEU source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E.C., E-mail: Eric.Miller@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Kalter, J.M.; Lavelle, C.M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Watson, S.M.; Kinlaw, M.T.; Chichester, D.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Noonan, W.A. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The ability to quickly identify and characterize special nuclear material remains a national security challenge. In counter-proliferation applications, identifying the neutron multiplication of a sample can be a good indication of the level of threat. Currently neutron multiplicity measurements are performed with moderated {sup 3}He proportional counters. These systems rely on the detection of thermalized neutrons, a process which obscures both energy and time information from the source. Fast neutron detectors, such as liquid scintillators, have the ability to detect events on nanosecond time scales, providing more information on the temporal structure of the arriving signal, and provide an alternative method for extracting information from the source. To explore this possibility, a series of measurements were performed on the Idaho National Laboratory's MARVEL assembly, a configurable HEU source. The source assembly was measured in a variety of different HEU configurations and with different reflectors, covering a range of neutron multiplications from 2 to 8. The data was collected with liquid scintillator detectors and digitized for offline analysis. A gap based approach for identifying the bursts of detected neutrons associated with the same fission chain was used. Using this approach, we are able to study various statistical properties of individual fission chains. One of these properties is the distribution of neutron arrival times within a given burst. We have observed two interesting empirical trends. First, this distribution exhibits a weak, but definite, dependence on source multiplication. Second, there are distinctive differences in the distribution depending on the presence and type of reflector. Both of these phenomena might prove to be useful when assessing an unknown source. The physical origins of these phenomena can be illuminated with help of MCNPX-PoliMi simulations.

  10. Development of An Epi-thermal Neutron Field for Fundamental Researches for BNCT with A DT Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Yuta; Imoto, Shoichi; Kusaka, Sachie; Sato, Fuminobu; Tanoshita, Masahiro; Murata, Isao

    2017-09-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is known to be a new promising cancer therapy suppressing influence against normal cells. In Japan, Accelerator Based Neutron Sources (ABNS) are being developed for BNCT. For the spread of ABNS based BNCT, we should characterize the neutron field beforehand. For this purpose, we have been developing a low-energy neutron spectrometer based on 3He position sensitive proportional counter. In this study, a new intense epi-thermal neutron field was developed with a DT neutron source for verification of validity of the spectrometer. After the development, the neutron field characteristics were experimentally evaluated by using activation foils. As a result, we confirmed that an epi-thermal neutron field was successfully developed suppressing fast neutrons substantially. Thereafter, the neutron spectrometer was verified experimentally. In the verification, although a measured detection depth distribution agreed well with the calculated distribution by MCNP, the unfolded spectrum was significantly different from the calculated neutron spectrum due to contribution of the side neutron incidence. Therefore, we designed a new neutron collimator consisting of a polyethylene pre-collimator and boron carbide neutron absorber and confirmed numerically that it could suppress the side incident neutrons and shape the neutron flux to be like a pencil beam.

  11. Development of An Epi-thermal Neutron Field for Fundamental Researches for BNCT with A DT Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osawa Yuta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT is known to be a new promising cancer therapy suppressing influence against normal cells. In Japan, Accelerator Based Neutron Sources (ABNS are being developed for BNCT. For the spread of ABNS based BNCT, we should characterize the neutron field beforehand. For this purpose, we have been developing a low-energy neutron spectrometer based on 3He position sensitive proportional counter. In this study, a new intense epi-thermal neutron field was developed with a DT neutron source for verification of validity of the spectrometer. After the development, the neutron field characteristics were experimentally evaluated by using activation foils. As a result, we confirmed that an epi-thermal neutron field was successfully developed suppressing fast neutrons substantially. Thereafter, the neutron spectrometer was verified experimentally. In the verification, although a measured detection depth distribution agreed well with the calculated distribution by MCNP, the unfolded spectrum was significantly different from the calculated neutron spectrum due to contribution of the side neutron incidence. Therefore, we designed a new neutron collimator consisting of a polyethylene pre-collimator and boron carbide neutron absorber and confirmed numerically that it could suppress the side incident neutrons and shape the neutron flux to be like a pencil beam.

  12. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of be a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors. (author)

  13. Method to determine the strength of a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Chacon R, A.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Depto. Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The use of a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3 {phi} x 3 NaI(Tl) detector, with a moderator sphere has been studied in the aim to measure the neutron fluence rate and to determine the source strength. Moderators with a large amount of hydrogen are able to slowdown and thermalize neutrons; once thermalized there is a probability that thermal neutron to be captured by hydrogen producing 2.22 MeV prompt gamma-ray. The pulse-height spectrum collected in a multicharmel analyzer shows a photopeak around 2.22 MeV whose net area is proportional to total neutron fluence rate and to the neutron source strength. The characteristics of this system were determined by a Monte Carlo study using the MCNP 4C code, where a detailed model of the Nal(Tl) was utilized. As moderators 3, 5, and 10 inches-diameter spheres where utilized and the response was calculated for monoenergetic and isotopic neutrons sources. (Author)

  14. Engineering design point for a 1MW fusion neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, Paul; Melnik, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; O'Bryan, John; Miller, Ronald

    2016-10-01

    Compact fusion neutron sources are currently serving important roles in medical isotope production, and could be used for waste transmutation if sufficient fluence can be attained. The engineering design point for a compact neutron source with target rateof e17n/sbased on the adiabatic compression of a spheromak is presented. The compression coils and passive structure are designed to maintain stability during compression. The power supplies consist of 4 separate banks of MJ each; Pspice simulations and power requirement calculations will be shown. We outline the diagnostic set that will be required for an experimental campaign to address issues relating to both formation efficiency and energy confinement scaling during compression. Work supported in part by DARPA Grant N66001-14-1-4044 and IAEA CRP on compac fusion neutron sources.

  15. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Stuart [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Aleksandrov, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Christopher K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Assadi, Saeed [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bartoski, Dirk [University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). Anderson Cancer Center; Blokland, Willem [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Casagrande, F. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Campisi, I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chu, C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Cousineau, Sarah M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crofford, Mark T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Danilov, Viatcheslav [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deibele, Craig E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dodson, George W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feshenko, A. [Inst. for Nuclear Research (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Galambos, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Han, Baoxi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hardek, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holmes, Jeffrey A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holtkamp, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Howell, Matthew P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jeon, D. [Inst. for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea); Kang, Yoon W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kasemir, Kay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Sang-Ho [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kravchuk, L. [Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Long, Cary D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McManamy, T. [McManamy Consulting, Inc., Middlesex, MA (United States); Pelaia, II, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Piller, Chip [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Plum, Michael A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pogge, James R. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Purcell, John David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shea, T. [European Spallation Source, Lund (Sweden); Shishlo, Andrei P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sibley, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stockli, Martin P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stout, D. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Tanke, E. [European Spallation Source, Lund (Sweden); Welton, Robert F [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Y. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Zhukov, Alexander P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of thermal neutron irradiation field using a cyclotron-based neutron source for alpha autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Mitsumoto, T; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Nakagawa, Y; Watanabe, T; Fujimoto, N; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2014-06-01

    It is important to measure the microdistribution of (10)B in a cell to predict the cell-killing effect of new boron compounds in the field of boron neutron capture therapy. Alpha autoradiography has generally been used to detect the microdistribution of (10)B in a cell. Although it has been performed using a reactor-based neutron source, the realization of an accelerator-based thermal neutron irradiation field is anticipated because of its easy installation at any location and stable operation. Therefore, we propose a method using a cyclotron-based epithermal neutron source in combination with a water phantom to produce a thermal neutron irradiation field for alpha autoradiography. This system can supply a uniform thermal neutron field with an intensity of 1.7×10(9) (cm(-2)s(-1)) and an area of 40mm in diameter. In this paper, we give an overview of our proposed system and describe a demonstration test using a mouse liver sample injected with 500mg/kg of boronophenyl-alanine. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Progress in Mirror-Based Fusion Neutron Source Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, A. V.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Beklemishev, A. D.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kolesnikov, E. Yu.; Korzhavina, M. S.; Korobeinikova, O. A.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Murakhtin, S. V.; Pinzhenin, E. I.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.; Yakovlev, D. V.; Yurov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in worldwide collaboration has developed a project of a 14 MeV neutron source for fusion material studies and other applications. The projected neutron source of the plasma type is based on the gas dynamic trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Essential progress in plasma parameters has been achieved in recent experiments at the GDT facility in the Budker Institute, which is a hydrogen (deuterium) prototype of the source. Stable confinement of hot-ion plasmas with the relative pressure exceeding 0.5 was demonstrated. The electron temperature was increased up to 0.9 keV in the regime with additional electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of a moderate power. These parameters are the record for axisymmetric open mirror traps. These achievements elevate the projects of a GDT-based neutron source on a higher level of competitive ability and make it possible to construct a source with parameters suitable for materials testing today. The paper presents the progress in experimental studies and numerical simulations of the mirror-based fusion neutron source and its possible applications including a fusion material test facility and a fusion-fission hybrid system. PMID:28793722

  18. Real-time neutron source localization and identification with a hand-held, volumetrically-sensitive, moderating-type neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshor, C. B.; Myers, E. R.; Oakes, T. M.; Young, S. M.; Currie, J. E.; Scott, P. R.; Miller, W. H.; Bellinger, S. L.; McGregor, D. S.; Caruso, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring source-dependent properties of free neutrons over a large neutron energy range, with hand-portable instrumentation, continues to push the frontier of neutron detection instrumentation design and analysis techniques. Building on prior work - C.B. Hoshor, et al., A portable and wide energy range semiconductor-based neutron spectrometer, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 803 (2015) 68-81 - which focused on demonstrating one-dimensional-based energy-dependent neutron measurement and analysis with a new class of solid-state moderating-type spectrometer, this work introduces two ;core; algorithmic methodologies that expand the analysis of neutron thermalization measurements to three spatial dimensions to determine the location and identity of neutron radiation sources in real time. Two extensions of these core methodologies are then proposed to further improve both the accuracy and reliability of source location and identity determinations with this new class of hand-held instrumentation. In 432 preliminary simulation tests, these method extensions are shown to decrease the average source location error by 64% and provide correct identity determinations in all test cases.

  19. Electron Accelerator Shielding Design of KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaopeng Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of the Ukraine have been collaborating on the design, development and construction of a neutron source facility at Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. The electron beam power is 100 kW using 100-MeV electrons. The facility was designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building was designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 5.0e-03 mSv/h during operation. The main source of the biological dose for the accelerator building is the photons and neutrons generated from different interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and the accelerator sections with the surrounding components and materials. The Monte Carlo N-particle extended code (MCNPX was used for the shielding calculations because of its capability to perform electron-, photon-, and neutron-coupled transport simulations. The photon dose was tallied using the MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is very small, ∼0.01 neutron for 100-MeV electron and even smaller for lower-energy electrons. This causes difficulties for the Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation resources for tallying the neutron dose outside the shield boundary with an acceptable accuracy. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were utilized for this study. The generated neutrons were banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron dose. The weight windows variance reduction technique was also utilized for both

  20. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  1. A liquid hydrocarbon deuteron source for neutron generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwoebel, P. R.

    2017-06-01

    Experimental studies of a deuteron spark source for neutron generators using hydrogen isotope fusion reactions are reported. The ion source uses a spark discharge between electrodes coated with a deuterated hydrocarbon liquid, here Santovac 5, to inhibit permanent electrode erosion and extend the lifetime of high-output neutron generator spark ion sources. Thompson parabola mass spectra show that principally hydrogen and deuterium ions are extracted from the ion source. Hydrogen is the chief residual gas phase species produced due to source operation in a stainless-steel vacuum chamber. The prominent features of the optical emission spectra of the discharge are C+ lines, the hydrogen Balmer Hα-line, and the C2 Swan bands. Operation of the ion source was studied in a conventional laboratory neutron generator. The source delivered an average deuteron current of ˜0.5 A nominal to the target in a 5 μs duration pulse at 1 Hz with target voltages of -80 to -100 kV. The thickness of the hydrocarbon liquid in the spark gap and the consistency thereof from spark to spark influences the deuteron yield and plays a role in determining the beam-focusing characteristics through the applied voltage necessary to break down the spark gap. Higher breakdown voltages result in larger ion beam spots on the target and vice-versa. Because the liquid self-heals and thereby inhibits permanent electrode erosion, the liquid-based source provides long life, with 104 pulses to date, and without clear evidence that, in principle, the lifetime could not be much longer. Initial experiments suggest that an alternative cylindrical target-type generator design can extract approximately 10 times the deuteron current from the source. Preliminary data using the deuterated source liquid as a neutron-producing target are also presented.

  2. A neutron source for IGISOL-JYFLTRAP: Design and characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattera, A.; Pomp, S.; Lantz, M.; Rakopoulos, V.; Solders, A.; Al-Adili, A.; Passoth, E.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Andersson, P.; Hjalmarsson, A. [Uppsala University, BOX 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Bedogni, R.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A. [INFN-LNF, Frascati (Italy); Bortot, D. [INFN-LNF, Frascati (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Gomez-Ros, J.M. [INFN-LNF, Frascati (Italy); CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Introini, M.V.; Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Gorelov, D.; Penttilae, H.; Moore, I.D.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Eronen, T. [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2017-08-15

    A white neutron source based on the Be(p, nx) reaction for fission studies at the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility has been designed and tested. 30MeV protons impinge on a 5mm thick water-cooled beryllium disc. The source was designed to produce at least 10{sup 12} fast neutrons/s on a secondary fission target, in order to reach competitive production rates of fission products far from the valley of stability. The Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA were used in the design phase to simulate the neutron energy spectra. Two experiments to characterise the neutron field were performed: the first was carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (SE), using an Extended-Range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer and a liquid scintillator which used the time-of-flight (TOF) method to determine the energy of the neutrons; the second employed Thin-Film Breakdown Counters for the measurement of the TOF, and activation foils, at the IGISOL facility in Jyvaeskylae (FI). Design considerations and the results of the two characterisation measurements are presented, providing benchmarks for the simulations. (orig.)

  3. Development of nuclear design criteria for neutron spallation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sordo, F.; Abanades, A. [E.T.S. Industriales, Madrid Polytechnic University, UPM, J.Gutierrez Abascal, 2 -28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Spallation neutron sources allow obtaining high neutronic flux for many scientific and industrial applications. In recent years, several proposals have been made about its use, notably the European Spallation Source (ESS), the Japanese Spallation Source (JSNS) and the projects of Accelerator-Driven Subcritical reactors (ADS), particularly in the framework of EURATOM programs. Given their interest, it seems necessary to establish adequate design basis for guiding the engineering analysis and construction projects of this kind of installations. In this sense, all works done so far seek to obtain particular solutions to a particular design, but there has not been any general development to set up an engineering methodology in this field. In the integral design of a spallation source, all relevant physical processes that may influence its behaviour must be taken into account. Neutronic aspects (emitted neutrons and their spectrum, generation performance..), thermomechanical (energy deposition, cooling conditions, stress distribution..), radiological (spallation waste activity, activation reactions and residual heat) and material properties alteration due to irradiation (atomic displacements and gas generation) must all be considered. After analysing in a systematic manner the different options available in scientific literature, the main objective of this thesis was established as making a significant contribution to determine the limiting factors of the main aspects of spallation sources, its application range and the criteria for choosing optimal materials. To achieve this goal, a series of general simulations have been completed, covering all the relevant physical processes in the neutronic and thermal-mechanical field. Finally, the obtained criteria have been applied to the particular case of the design of the spallation source of subcritical reactors PDX-ADS and XT-ADS. These two designs, developed under the European R and D Framework Program, represent nowadays

  4. Fission, spallation or fusion-based neutron sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The development of the brightness of X-ray facilities (compilation from Friso van der Veen Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH). neutron flux of a spallation source will increase markedly at each step, when going from short pulse to long pulse as in the extreme case to CW operation). Of the tremendous progress in science ...

  5. Upgrades to the ultracold neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattie, Robert; LANL-nEDM Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The spallation-driven solid deutrium-based ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided a facility for precision measurements of fundamental symmetries via the decay observables from neutron beta decay for nearly a decade. In preparation for a new room temperature neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment and to increase the statistical sensitivity of all experiments using the source an effort to increase the UCN output is underway. The ultimate goal is to provide a density of 100 UCN/cc or greater in the nEDM storage cell. This upgrade includes redesign of the cold neutron moderator and UCN converter geometries, improved coupling and coating of the UCN transport system through the biological shielding, optimization of beam timing structure, and increase of the proton beam current. We will present the results of the MCNP and UCN transport simulations that led to the new design, which will be installed spring 2016, and UCN guide tests performed at LANSCE and the Institut Laue-Langevin to study the UCN transport properties of a new nickel-based guide coating.

  6. Mini-D{sub 2} a source for ultracold neutrons at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altarev, I.; Hartmann, F.J.; Paul, S.; Schott, W.; Trinks, U.; Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Scheuer, A. [TUEV Rheinland, Koeln (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The new Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II offers the possibility to install a unique source for ultracold neutrons (UCN), the Mini-D{sub 2} UCN source, with a small volume of solid deuterium at a temperature of 5 K as converter, exposed to the cold neutron flux. This new source, being dedicated for storage experiments, is designed to be much superior to any existing UCN facility. In the pulsed operation mode the Mini-D{sub 2} source is expected to provide UCN densities up to 10{sup 4} n/cm{sup 3}. This density is orders of magnitude larger than that from the best existing source at Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble ({approx}50 n/cm{sup 3} at the exit of the neutron turbine). The large gain factor will enable new precision measurements of elementary properties of the free neutron, especially the electric dipole moment, the lifetime, and the angular correlation coefficients of the decay. These quantities are of fundamental interest in particle physics. Operated in the continuous mode, the UCN source will provide an UCN flux density of up to 5{center_dot}10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s at the exit, to be compared with {approx}3{center_dot}10{sup 4} n/cm{sup 2}s at ILL. This improved UCN-flux offers new possibilities for traditional studies with UCN. (author)

  7. Neutron activation analysis: Modelling studies to improve the neutron flux of Americium–Beryllium source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Didi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Americium–beryllium (Am-Be; n, γ is a neutron emitting source used in various research fields such as chemistry, physics, geology, archaeology, medicine, and environmental monitoring, as well as in the forensic sciences. It is a mobile source of neutron activity (20 Ci, yielding a small thermal neutron flux that is water moderated. The aim of this study is to develop a model to increase the neutron thermal flux of a source such as Am-Be. This study achieved multiple advantageous results: primarily, it will help us perform neutron activation analysis. Next, it will give us the opportunity to produce radio-elements with short half-lives. Am-Be single and multisource (5 sources experiments were performed within an irradiation facility with a paraffin moderator. The resulting models mainly increase the thermal neutron flux compared to the traditional method with water moderator.

  8. A (13)C(d,n)-based epithermal neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoulat, M E; Kreiner, A J

    2017-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) requires neutron sources suitable for in-hospital siting. Low-energy particle accelerators working in conjunction with a neutron producing reaction are the most appropriate choice for this purpose. One of the possible nuclear reactions is (13)C(d,n)(14)N. The aim of this work is to evaluate the therapeutic capabilities of the neutron beam produced by this reaction, through a 30mA beam of deuterons of 1.45MeV. A Beam Shaping Assembly design was computationally optimized. Depth dose profiles in a Snyder head phantom were simulated with the MCNP code for a number of BSA configurations. In order to optimize the treatment capabilities, the BSA configuration was determined as the one that allows maximizing both the tumor dose and the penetration depth while keeping doses to healthy tissues under the tolerance limits. Significant doses to tumor tissues were achieved up to ∼6cm in depth. Peak doses up to 57Gy-Eq can be delivered in a fractionated scheme of 2 irradiations of approximately 1h each. In a single 1h irradiation, lower but still acceptable doses to tumor are also feasible. Treatment capabilities obtained here are comparable to those achieved with other accelerator-based neutron sources, making of the (13)C(d,n)(14)N reaction a realistic option for producing therapeutic neutron beams through a low-energy particle accelerator. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements of the thermal neutron flux for an accelerator-based photoneutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Ali; Pazirandeh, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To have access to an appropriate neutron source is one of the most demanding requirements for neutron studies. This is important specially in laboratory and clinical applications, which need more compact and accessible sources. The most known neutron sources are fission reactors and natural isotopes, but there is an increasing interest for using accelerator based neutron sources because of their advantages. In this paper, we shall present a photo-neutron source prototype which is designed and fabricated to be used for different neutron researches including in-laboratory neutron activation analysis and neutron imaging, and also preliminary studies in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Series of experimental tests were conducted to examine the intensity and quality of the neutron field produced by this source. Monte-Carlo simulations were also utilized to provide more detailed evaluation of the neutron spectrum, and determine the accuracy of the experiments. The experiments demonstrated a thermal neutron flux in the order of 10(7) (n/cm(2).s), while simulations affirmed this flux and showed a neutron spectrum with a sharp peak at thermal energy region. According to the results, about 60 % of produced neutrons are in the range of thermal to epithermal neutrons.

  10. The neutronic design and performance of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Christopher M.

    Neutron scattering research is performed primarily at large-scale facilities. However, history has shown that smaller scale neutron scattering facilities can play a useful role in education and innovation while performing valuable materials research. This dissertation details the design and experimental validation of the LENS TMR as an example for a small scale accelerator driven neutron source. LENS achieves competitive long wavelength neutron intensities by employing a novel long pulse mode of operation, where the neutron production target is irradiated on a time scale comparable to the emission time of neutrons from the system. Monte Carlo methods have been employed to develop a design for optimal production of long wavelength neutrons from the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies ranging from 7 to 13 MeV proton energy. The neutron spectrum was experimentally measured using time of flight, where it is found that the impact of the long pulse mode on energy resolution can be eliminated at sub-eV neutron energies if the emission time distribution of neutron from the system is known. The emission time distribution from the TMR system is measured using a time focussed crystal analyzer. Emission time of the fundamental cold neutron mode is found to be consistent with Monte Carlo results. The measured thermal neutron spectrum from the water reflector is found to be in agreement with Monte Carlo predictions if the scattering kernels employed are well established. It was found that the scattering kernels currently employed for cryogenic methane are inadequate for accurate prediction of the cold neutron intensity from the system. The TMR and neutronic modeling have been well characterized and the source design is flexible, such that it is possible for LENS to serve as an effective test bed for future work in neutronic development. Suggestions for improvements to the design that would allow increased neutron flux into the instruments are provided.

  11. Anisotropy of neutron sources of Neutron Metrology Laboratory, IRD, Brazil; Anisotropia de fontes de neutrons do Laboratorio de Metrologia de Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.C.F.; Silva, F.S.; Leite, S.P.; Creazolla, P.G; Patrão, K.C.S.; Fonseca, E.S. da; Fernandes, S.S.; Pereira, W.W., E-mail: Alexander.camargo@oi.com.br, E-mail: s.felippesouza@gmail.com, E-mail: karla@ird.gov.br, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.br, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.br, E-mail: simonesilvafernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: prycyllacreazolla@gmail.com, E-mail: leitesprk@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia; Fundação Técnico Educacional Souza Marques (FTESM), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The anisotropy measurements have as main objective to define the emission of the radiation by different angles of an encapsulated neutron source. The measurements were performed using a Long Accuracy Counter (PLC) Detector in the Low Dispersion Room of the LNMRI / IRD with different neutron sources. Each measurement was made using a support for the source, emulated through an arduino system to rotate it. The carrier is marked with a variation of 5 °, ranging from 0 ° to 360 °, for the work in question only half, 0 ° to 180 ° is used for a total of nineteen steps. In this paper three sources of {sup 241}AmBe (α, n) 5.92 GBq (16 Ci) were used, neutron sources having the following dimensions: 105 mm in height and 31 mm in diameter. The PLC was positioned at a distance of 2 meters from the neutron source and has a radius of 15 cm for the detection area. The anisotropy factor of the {sup 241}AmBe source was 17%. The results in this work will focus mainly on the area of radioprotection and studies that will improve the process of routine measurements in laboratories and instrument calibrations. (author)

  12. 76 FR 76327 - Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources AGENCY: Nuclear... radiation alarms in rooms housing neutron sources. DATES: Submit comments by February 21, 2012. Comments..., Radiation Safety for Research. Mr. Hamawy is concerned about the security of neutron sources. III. Petition...

  13. The concept of a European spallation neutron source (ESS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    The next generation neutron source in Europe, which was studied by a collaboration between twelve laboratories, has been conceived as a 5 MW short pulse spallation source because of the superior overall scientific potential attributed to such a facility relative to all other options considered. While the accelerator side can use essentially established technology with some extensions in performance, a novel target concept based on the use of Mercury as a flowing liquid metal target was developed, which is not only expected to lead the way further into the future, but which was also found to give the best neutronic performance of all known choices. Close permanent interaction with a large user community yielded important input for the concept in general and for the upcoming R and D and design phases in particular. (author)

  14. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  15. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    , probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

  16. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  17. Methods for lipid nanostructure investigation at neutron and synchrotron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    A lipid membrane is a main component of biological membranes. Contemporary bionanotechnologies use phospholipids and ceramides as basic components of drugs and cosmetic preparations. Phospholipids-based nanoparticles are used as drug carriers. Effective development of bionanotechnologies in Russia calls for creation of physical methods to diagnose the particle nanostructure which would be promising for application in pharmacology. Radiation with wavelengths of 1-10 Å is an adequate instrument for detecting the nanostructure of lipid bi- and monolayers. The review deals with methods that apply neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation for studying nanostructures of lipid membranes, phospholipid nanoparticles, and phospholipid monolayers on a water surface by techniques of diffraction, small-angle scattering, and reflectometry. The importance of the mutually complementary application of neutron and synchrotron radiation for solving urgent problems of membrane biophysics, microbiology, dermapharmacology, and bionanotechnologies is demonstrated by particular examples of studies of phospholipid membranes and ceramide-based membranes. The efficiency of development and application of new methods for solving urgent problems of biophysics is shown. The review is written on the basis of results obtained over the period of 1999-2010 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Laboratory of Neutron Physics in collaboration with the Pharmaceutical Departments of universities of France (Paris-Sud, Chatenay Malabry) and Germany (Martin Luther University, Halle). The experiments were performed at various European and Russian neutron and synchrotron sources.

  18. Neutron sources and its dosimetric characteristics; Fuentes de neutrones y sus caracteristicas dosimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Mercado S, G.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego D, E.; Lorente F, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    By means of Monte Carlo methods the spectra of the produced neutrons {sup 252} Cf, {sup 252} Cf/D{sub 2}O, {sup 241} Am Be, {sup 239} Pu Be, {sup 140} La Be, {sup 239} Pu{sup 18}O{sub 2} and {sup 226} Ra Be have been calculated. With the information of the spectrum it was calculated the average energy of the neutrons of each source. By means of the fluence coefficients to dose it was determined, for each one of the studied sources, the fluence factors to dose. The calculated doses were H, H{sup *}(10), H{sub p,sIab} (10, 0{sup 0}), E{sub AP} and E{sub ISO}. During the phase of the calculations the sources were modeled as punctual and their characteristics were determined to 100 cm in the hole. Also, for the case of the sources of {sup 239} Pu Be and {sup 241} Am Be, were carried out calculations modeling the sources with their respective characteristics and the dosimetric properties were determined in a space full with air. The results of this last phase of the calculations were compared with the experimental results obtained for both sources. (Author)

  19. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, Thomas Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grelle, Austin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  20. The performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at a long-pulse spallation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R.

    1997-06-01

    In this document the author considers the performance of a long pulse spallation source for those neutron scattering experiments that are usually performed with a monochromatic beam at a continuous wave (CW) source such as a nuclear reactor. The first conclusion drawn is that comparison of the performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at CW and pulsed sources is simpler for long-pulsed sources than it is for the short-pulse variety. Even though detailed instrument design and assessment will require Monte Carlo simulations (which have already been performed at Los Alamos for SANS and reflectometry), simple arguments are sufficient to assess the approximate performance of spectrometers at an LPSS and to support the contention that a 1 MW long-pulse source can provide attractive performance, especially for instrumentation designed for soft-condensed-matter science. Because coupled moderators can be exploited at such a source, its time average cold flux is equivalent to that of a research reactor with a power of about 15 MW, so only a factor of 4 gain from source pulsing is necessary to obtain performance that is comparable with the ILL. In favorable cases, the gain from pulsing can be even more than this, approaching the limit set by the peak flux, giving about 4 times the performance of the ILL. Because of its low duty factor, an LPSS provides the greatest performance gains for relatively low resolution experiments with cold neutrons. It should thus be considered complementary to short pulse sources which are most effective for high resolution experiments using thermal or epithermal neutrons.

  1. Saturn Neutron Exosphere as Source for Inner and Innermost Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward; Sturner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Energetic proton and electron measurements by the ongoing Cassini orbiter mission are expanding our knowledge of the highest energy components of the Saturn magnetosphere in the inner radiation belt region after the initial discoveries of these belts by the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 missions. Saturn has a neutron exosphere that extends throughout the magnetosphere from the cosmic ray albedo neutron source at the planetary main rings and atmosphere. The neutrons emitted from these sources at energies respectively above 4 and 8 eV escape the Saturn system, while those at lower energies are gravitationally bound. The neutrons undergo beta decay in average times of about 1000 seconds to provide distributed sources of protons and electrons throughout Saturn's magnetosphere with highest injection rates close to the Saturn and ring sources. The competing radiation belt source for energetic electrons is rapid inward diffusion and acceleration of electrons from the middle magnetosphere and beyond. Minimal losses during diffusive transport across the moon orbits, e.g. of Mimas and Enceladus, and local time asymmetries in electron intensity, suggest that drift resonance effects preferentially boost the diffusion rates of electrons from both sources. Energy dependences of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift speeds relative to the icy moons are likely responsible for hemispheric differences (e.g., Mimas, Tethys) in composition and thermal properties as at least partly produced by radiolytic processes. A continuing mystery is the similar radial profiles of lower energy (belt region. Either the source of these lower energy protons is also neutron decay, but perhaps alternatively from atmospheric albedo, or else all protons from diverse distributed sources are similarly affected by losses at the moon' orbits, e.g. because the proton diffusion rates are extremely low. Enceladus cryovolcanism, and radiolytic processing elsewhere on the icy moon and ring surfaces, are additional

  2. Tomsk Polytechnic University cyclotron as a source for neutron based cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, V A; Bogdanov, A V; Golovkov, V M; Musabaeva, L I; Sukhikh, L G; Verigin, D A

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we present our cyclotron based neutron source with average energy 6.3 MeV generated during the 13.6 MeV deuterons interactions with beryllium target, neutron field dosimetry, and dosimetry of attendant gamma fields. We also present application of our neutron source for cancer treatment.

  3. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aymond, F. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bridgewater, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deppert, O. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Falk, Katerina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautier, Donald Cort [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Manuel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodsell, Alison Victoria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, Nevzat [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hamilton, Christopher Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Iliev, Metodi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Randall Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jung, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kleinschmidt, Annika [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pomerantz, Ishay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roth, Markus [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wurden, Glen Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaniyappan, Sasikumar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCary, E. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  4. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Scheuer, A.

    2002-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universität München, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D 2O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4500 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 l of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two-phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10° from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very improbable during the lifetime of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H 2) to the deuterium (D 2) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. A long-term change of the hydrogen content in the deuterium is avoided by storing the mixture not in a gas buffer volume but as a metal hydride at low pressure. The metal hydride storage system contains two getter beds, one with 250 kg of LaCo 3Ni 2, the other one with 150 kg of ZrCo 0.8Ni 0.2. Each bed can take the total gas inventory, both beds together can absorb the total gas inventory in <6 min at a pressure <3 bar. The new reactor will have 13 beam tubes, 4 of which are looking at the CNS, including two for very cold (VCN) and ultra-cold neutron (UCN) production. The latter will take place in the

  5. Neutron total cross section measurements of gold and tantalum at the nELBE photoneutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaske, Roland; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd; Bemmerer, Daniel; Birgersson, Evert; Ferrari, Anna; Grosse, Eckart; Kempe, Mathias; Kögler, Toni; Marta, Michele; Massarczyk, Ralph; Matic, Andrija; Schramm, Georg; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 197 Au and nat Ta have been measured at the nELBE photoneutron source in the energy range from 0.1 - 10 MeV with a statistical uncertainty of up to 2 % and a total systematic uncertainty of 1 %. This facility is optimized for the fast neutron energy range and combines an excellent t ime structure of the neutron pulses (electron bunch width 5 ps) with a short flight path of 7 m. Because of the low instantaneous neutron flux transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections are possible, that exhibit very different beam and back ground conditions than found at other neutron sources.

  6. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  7. Materials Selection for the HFIR Cold Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K.

    2001-08-24

    In year 2002 the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) will be fitted with a source of cold neutrons to upgrade and expand its existing neutron scattering facilities. The in-reactor components of the new source consist of a moderator vessel containing supercritical hydrogen gas moderator at a temperature of 20K and pressure of 15 bar, and a surrounding vacuum vessel. They will be installed in an enlarged beam tube located at the site of the present horizontal beam tube, HB-4; which terminates within the reactor's beryllium reflector. These components must withstand exceptional service conditions. This report describes the reasons and factors underlying the choice of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy for construction of the in-reactor components. The overwhelming considerations are the need to minimize generation of nuclear heat and to remove that heat through the flowing moderator, and to achieve a minimum service life of about 8 years coincident with the replacement schedule for the beryllium reflector. 6061-T6 aluminum alloy offers the best combination of low nuclear heating, high thermal conductivity, good fabricability, compatibility with hydrogen, superior cryogenic properties, and a well-established history of satisfactory performance in nuclear environments. These features are documented herein. An assessment is given of the expected performance of each component of the cold source.

  8. EURAC: A liquid target neutron spallation source using cyclotron technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlado, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Sanz, J.; Piera, M.

    1995-09-01

    Euratom/JRC Ispra led some years ago the design of an accelerator based neutron spallation source EURAC, with special emphasis as a fusion material testing device. DENIM was involved in the development of the last version of this source. EURAC proposes to use a beam of 600 MeV or 1.5 GeV protons, produced by an effective and low cost ring cyclotron with a current of 6 mA impinging in a liquid lead, or lead-bismuth, target. It will use an advanced cyclotron technology which can be implemented in the next future, in the line of the actual technology of the upgraded SIN-type cyclotron. The adjacent rows to the target correspond to the lead, or Li17Pb83, cooled channels where the samples will be located. The available volumes there were shown enough for material testing purposes. Here, proposal of using those experimental areas to introduce small masses of radioactive wastes for testing of transmutation in spallation source is made. In addition, extrapolation of present conceptual design to make available larger volumes under flexible conditions seems to be possible. Neutrons leaking from the test zone drive a subcritical booster (hidrogen moderator in the center.

  9. Neutron sources for in-situ planetary science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.uk; Ambrosi, R.M.; O' Brien, R.C. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-21

    There are a number of future European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA planetary science missions that are in the planning or initial study phases, where the scientific objectives include determining the surface composition, measuring planetary surface heat flow and constraining planetary chronology. University of Leicester is developing instrumentation for geophysical applications that include {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, {gamma}-ray densitometry and radiometric dating. This paper describes the modelling of a geophysical package, with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, in order to determine the impact that a neutron source would have on in-situ composition measurements, radiometric dating and, in particular, trace element detection. The suitability of o 2.54x2.54 cm LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) detectors in the geophysical package for in-situ missions was examined. {sup 252}Cf, Am-Be and Pu-Be neutron sources were compared in a trade-off study to determine mission suitability, potential for thermal and electric power production, mass and shielding requirements. This study is linked to a parallel examination of the suitability of radioisotope thermal generators for in-situ planetary science applications. The aim of the modelling was to optimise the source type and detector geometry in order to measure the elemental peaks of interest with a precision of 10% or better based on the Poisson statistics of the detected counts above background.

  10. Absolute experimental and numerical calibration of the 14 MeV neutron source at the Frascati neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Batistoni, P.; Martini, M.; Martone, M.; Rado, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65---00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1996-06-01

    The absolute neutron yield of the 14 MeV Frascati neutron generator (FNG) is routinely measured by means of the associated alpha-particle method with a silicon surface barrier detector (SSD). This paper describes the work carried out to characterize the neutron source in terms of absolute intensity and angle-energy distribution of the emitted neutrons. The development of the measuring setup and the assessment of the measurement results are also reported. A complementary calibration procedure for validating the SSD results, based on the use of fission chambers and the activation technique, is also reported. An accurate analysis of the system has been performed via the Monte Carlo neutron and photon MCNP transport code. A detailed model of the neutron source that includes ion slowing down has been inserted into the MCNP code to permit a numerical calibration of the neutron source for comparison with the experimental results. The resulting agreement among the various methods is very good considering the uncertainties, and an accuracy of {plus_minus}2{percent} is achieved for the measurement of the 14 MeV neutron yield of the FNG. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Absolute experimental and numerical calibration of the 14 MeV neutron source at the Frascati neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Batistoni, P.; Martini, M.; Martone, M.; Rado, V.

    1996-06-01

    The absolute neutron yield of the 14 MeV Frascati neutron generator (FNG) is routinely measured by means of the associated alpha-particle method with a silicon surface barrier detector (SSD). This paper describes the work carried out to characterize the neutron source in terms of absolute intensity and angle-energy distribution of the emitted neutrons. The development of the measuring setup and the assessment of the measurement results are also reported. A complementary calibration procedure for validating the SSD results, based on the use of fission chambers and the activation technique, is also reported. An accurate analysis of the system has been performed via the Monte Carlo neutron and photon MCNP transport code. A detailed model of the neutron source that includes ion slowing down has been inserted into the MCNP code to permit a numerical calibration of the neutron source for comparison with the experimental results. The resulting agreement among the various methods is very good considering the uncertainties, and an accuracy of ±2% is achieved for the measurement of the 14 MeV neutron yield of the FNG.

  12. Creep analysis of fuel plates for the Advanced Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.

    1994-11-01

    The reactor for the planned Advanced Neutron Source will use closely spaced arrays of fuel plates. The plates are thin and will have a core containing enriched uranium silicide fuel clad in aluminum. The heat load caused by the nuclear reactions within the fuel plates will be removed by flowing high-velocity heavy water through narrow channels between the plates. However, the plates will still be at elevated temperatures while in service, and the potential for excessive plate deformation because of creep must be considered. An analysis to include creep for deformation and stresses because of temperature over a given time span has been performed and is reported herein.

  13. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources

  14. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, Arun [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waldmann, Ole [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kapadia, Rehan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Takei, Kuniharu [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Javey, Ali [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Schenkel, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    We study field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron source. Arrays of carbon nano-fibers promise the high field-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of field emitters with a density up to 106 tips/cm2 and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. Lastly, the critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  15. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H. [ed.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering Div.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

  16. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  17. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  18. Recovery of spent high intensity neutron sources in Atalante Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bros, P.; Boyer Deslys, V.; Millet, A.; Solinhac, I.; Donnet, L.; Maillard, C.; Paillard, S.; Ranchoux, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Atalante facility is required by law to recover both neutron and gamma sources with activity levels exceeding 300 mCi. Most of the neutron sources consist of mixtures of alpha-emitters (238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am or 244Cm) and beryllium. Several processes now under consideration are based on routine chemical separation techniques (selective precipitation, extraction chromatography, ion exchange). The treatment produces an actinide oxide (which is used later for R and D studies) and solid beryllium nitrate, which is considered as a waste and transferred to a surface interim storage site if the overall activity of the package after 300 years is less than 50 MBq (ANDRA specifications). The Material Analysis and Metrology Laboratory of Atalante validate the residual alpha activity in the waste. The techniques used include alpha spectrometry and L-line X-ray fluorescence for alpha emitters, and plasma torch measurements (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) for beryllium analysis. Specific equipment for transport (B type cask), storage and treatment (hot shielded cells) are used for this activity. (Author)

  19. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  20. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tairan, Liang [School of Physics and Electronic Information Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043 (China); Zhiduo, Li [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Wen, Yin, E-mail: wenyin@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Fei, Shen [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Quanzhi, Yu [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Tianjiao, Liang [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-07-11

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm{sup 2}/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  1. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairan, Liang; Zhiduo, Li; Wen, Yin; Fei, Shen; Quanzhi, Yu; Tianjiao, Liang

    2017-07-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm2/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  2. Spallation Neutron Source Accident Terms for Environmental Impact Statement Input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devore, J.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1998-08-01

    This report is about accidents with the potential to release radioactive materials into the environment surrounding the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). As shown in Chap. 2, the inventories of radioactivity at the SNS are dominated by the target facility. Source terms for a wide range of target facility accidents, from anticipated events to worst-case beyond-design-basis events, are provided in Chaps. 3 and 4. The most important criterion applied to these accident source terms is that they should not underestimate potential release. Therefore, conservative methodology was employed for the release estimates. Although the source terms are very conservative, excessive conservatism has been avoided by basing the releases on physical principles. Since it is envisioned that the SNS facility may eventually (after about 10 years) be expanded and modified to support a 4-MW proton beam operational capability, the source terms estimated in this report are applicable to a 4-MW operating proton beam power unless otherwise specified. This is bounding with regard to the 1-MW facility that will be built and operated initially. See further discussion below in Sect. 1.2.

  3. Studies of a lead reflector for a pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.D.; Russell, G.J.; Meier, M.M.; Robinson, H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the consequences of adopting a non-moderating reflector and compares its performance to that of beryllium. Reflector studies on a time modulated source have shown lead to be an excellent reflector, maintaining the structure of the long time pulse (500 ..mu..s) marginally better than beryllium and with a slightly superior yield. Engineering, fabrication and cost factors as well as improved gamma and fast neutron shielding properties further favour lead as a reflector for these sources. Even for truly pulsed sources which rely primarily on time of flight for energy selection, Monte Carlo studies have shown that a lead reflector maintains an excellent time structure in hydrogenous moderators in the slowing down region. This paper describes the experimental comparison of lead and beryllium reflectors for the case of a pulsed spallation source. The target-moderator-reflector configuration used was a mock-up of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory's SNS geometry. The experiments were performed in the low current target area of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's spallation source, the WNR. This work was complemented by Monte Carlo calculations using the TIMOC code.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of thermal neutron flux of americium-beryllium source used in neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didi, Abdessamad; Dadouch, Ahmed; Bencheikh, Mohamed; Jai, Otman

    2017-09-01

    The neutron activation analysis is a method of exclusively elemental analysis. Its implementation of irradiates the sample which can be analyzed by a high neutron flux, this method is widely used in developed countries with nuclear reactors or accelerators of particle. The purpose of this study is to develop a prototype to increase the neutron flux such as americium-beryllium and have the opportunity to produce radioisotopes. Americium-beryllium is a mobile source of neutron activity of 20 curie, and gives a thermal neutron flux of (1.8 ± 0.0007) × 106 n/cm2 s when using water as moderator, when using the paraffin, the thermal neutron flux increases to (2.2 ± 0.0008) × 106 n/cm2 s, in the case of adding two solid beryllium barriers, the distance between them is 24 cm, parallel and symmetrical about the source, the thermal flux is increased to (2.5 ± 0.0008) × 106 n/cm2 s and in the case of multi-source (6 sources), with-out barriers, increases to (1.17 ± 0.0008) × 107 n/cm2 s with a rate of increase equal to 4.3 and with the both barriers flux increased to (1.37 ± 0.0008) × 107 n/cm2 s.

  5. Commissioning of cryogenic system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bin; He, Chongchao; Li, Na; Ding, Meiying; Wang, Yaqiong; Yu, Zhang; He, Kun

    2017-12-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source(CSNS) cryogenic system provides supercritical cryogenic hydrogen to neutron moderators, including a helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop and hydrogen safety equipment. The helium refrigerator is provided by Linde with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K. Hydrogen loop system mainly includes cryogenic hydrogen pipes, hydrogen circulator cold-box and accumulator cold-box. Cryogenic hydrogen pump, ortho-para convertor, helium-hydrogen heat-exchanger, hydrogen heater and accumulator are integrated in hydrogen circulation cold-box, and accumulator cold-box. Hydrogen safety equipment includes safety valves, rupture disk, hydrogen sensor, flame detector and other equipment to ensure that cryogenic system in dangerous situations will go down, vents, or takes other measures. The cryogenic system commissioning work includes four steps. First, in order to test the refrigerating capacity of refrigerator, when acceptance testing, refrigerator internal heater was used as thermal load. Second, using simulation load as heat load of moderator, hydrogen loop use helium instead of hydrogen, and cooled down to 20 K, then re-warming and test the leak detection of hydrogen loop system. Third, base on the step 2, using hydrogen as working medium, and optimized the control logic. Forth, cryogenic system with the moderators joint commissioning. Now, cryogenic system is connected with the moderators, and the forth step will be carried out in the near future.

  6. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  7. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  8. Intensity enhancement of cold neutrons from a coupled liquid-hydrogen moderator for pulsed cold neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Y; Kosugi, N; Iwasa, H; Furusaka, M; Watanabe, N

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain higher cold neutron intensity from a coupled liquid-hydrogen moderator with a premoderator for pulsed cold neutron sources, we examined a partial enhancement method, namely, narrow beam extraction for both a flat liquid-hydrogen moderator and a single-groove one. Combined with the narrow beam extraction, which is especially suitable for small-angle scattering and neutron reflectometry experiments, a single-groove moderator provides higher intensity, by about 30%, than a flat-surface moderator at the region of interest on a viewed surface. The effect of double-side beam extraction from such moderators on the intensity gain factor is also discussed. (author)

  9. Impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H.

    2004-10-01

    Transverse coupling impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam extraction system were performed and the results are here reported. The SNS beam extraction system is composed from 14 subsystems, each of which consists of a vertical kicker magnet plus a pulse forming network (PFN). Impedance bench measurements were performed on one large and one small aperture magnet, stand-alone as well as assembled with the first-article production PFN. The impedance measuring methods to cover the interesting frequency range from below 1 to 100MHz are described in considerable detail. The upper frequency range is properly covered by the conventional twin-wire method but it had to be supplemented at the low-frequency end by a direct input impedance measurement at the magnet busbar. Required modifications of the PFN to maintain the impedance budget are discussed. The total impedance estimate was finally obtained by quadratic scaling with vertical aperture from the two tested kicker subsystems.

  10. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  11. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /LANL, Ctr. for Nonlinear Studies /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H{sup -} injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  12. Proceedings of the fifteenth meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources (ICANS-XV). Advanced neutron sources towards the next century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Jun-ichi [Center for Neutron Science, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Itoh, Shinichi [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (JP)] (eds.)

    2001-03-01

    The fifteenth meeting of the International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources (ICANS-XV) was held at Epocal Tsukuba, International Congress Center on 6-9 November 2000. It was hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). This meeting focused on 'Neutron Sources toward the 21st Century' and research activities related to targets and moderators, neutron scattering instruments and accelerators were presented. The 151 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  14. Study of neutron generation in the compact tokamak TUMAN-3M in support of a tokamak-based fusion neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V. A.; Askinazi, L. G.; Belokurov, A. A.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Lebedev, S. V.; Melnik, A. D.; Shabelsky, A. A.; Tukachinsky, A. S.; Zhubr, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents DD neutron flux measurements in neutron beam injection (NBI) experiments aimed at the optimization of target plasma and heating beam parameters to achieve maximum neutron flux in the TUMAN-3M compact tokamak. Two ion sources of different design were used, which allowed the separation of the beam’s energy and power influence on the neutron rate. Using the database of experiments performed with the two ion sources, an empirical scaling was derived describing the neutron rate dependence on the target plasma and heating beam parameters. Numerical modeling of the neutron rate in the NBI experiments performed using the ASTRA transport code showed good agreement with the scaling.

  15. Overview of the national spallation neutron source with emphasis on the target station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.N.; Charlton, L.A. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.

  16. The front-end systems for the Spallation Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, R

    2001-01-01

    The front-end systems (FES) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project are being built by Berkeley Lab and will deliver a 52-mA H /sup -/ ion beam at 2.5 MeV energy to the subsequent drift-tube linac, to be built by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The FES comprise a volume-production, cesium-enhanced ion source, an electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT), an RFQ accelerator, and a medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) that includes rebuncher cavities, magnetic quadrupoles, and beam diagnostics. The macro-pulse duty factor is 6%, and the macro pulses have to be chopped into a minipulse structure with a time scale of hundreds of ns, to reduce beam losses and component activation during extraction from the SNS Accumulator Ring. Delivery of the entire FES to the main SNS facility in Oak Ridge is planned for April 2002. This paper discusses the design features and status of the major FES subsystems with special emphasis on ion source and LEBT for which first experimental results have been obtained. After ...

  17. Experimental demonstration of a compact epithermal neutron source based on a high power laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Raspino, D.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, L. A.; Armstrong, C.; Butler, N. M. H.; Clarke, R. J.; Higginson, A.; Kelleher, J.; Murphy, C. D.; Notley, M.; Rusby, D. R.; Schooneveld, E.; Borghesi, M.; McKenna, P.; Rhodes, N. J.; Neely, D.; Brenner, C. M.; Kar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Epithermal neutrons from pulsed-spallation sources have revolutionised neutron science allowing scientists to acquire new insight into the structure and properties of matter. Here, we demonstrate that laser driven fast (˜MeV) neutrons can be efficiently moderated to epithermal energies with intrinsically short burst durations. In a proof-of-principle experiment using a 100 TW laser, a significant epithermal neutron flux of the order of 105 n/sr/pulse in the energy range of 0.5-300 eV was measured, produced by a compact moderator deployed downstream of the laser-driven fast neutron source. The moderator used in the campaign was specifically designed, by the help of MCNPX simulations, for an efficient and directional moderation of the fast neutron spectrum produced by a laser driven source.

  18. The thermal triple-axis-spectrometer EIGER at the continuous spallation source SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhr, U., E-mail: uwe.stuhr@psi.ch [Laboratory of Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Roessli, B.; Gvasaliya, S. [Laboratory of Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Rønnow, H.M. [Laboratory for Quantum Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Féderale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Filges, U.; Graf, D.; Bollhalder, A.; Hohl, D.; Bürge, R.; Schild, M.; Holitzner, L.; Kaegi, C.; Keller, P.; Mühlebach, T. [Laboratory for Scientific Development and Novel Materials, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2017-05-01

    EIGER is the new thermal triple-axis-spectrometer at the continuous spallation SINQ at PSI. The shielding of the monochromator consists only of non- or low magnetizable materials, which allows the use of strong magnetic fields with the instrument. This shielding reduces the high energy neutron contamination to a comparable level of thermal spectrometers at reactor sources. The instrument design, the performance and first results of the spectrometer are presented.

  19. A Project for High Fluence 14 MeV Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Pillon, Mario; Pizzuto, Aldo; Pietropaolo, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The international community agrees on the importance to build a large facility devoted to test and validate materials to be used in harsh neutron environments. Such a facility, proposed by ENEA , reconsiders a previous study known as “Sorgentina” but takes into account new technological development so far attained. The “New Sorgentina” Fusion Source (NSFS) project is based upon an intense D - T 14 MeV neutron source achievable with T and D ion beams impinging on 2 m radius rotating target s . NSFS produces about 1 x10 13 n cm - 2 s - 1 over about 50 cm 3 . The NSFS facility will use the ion source and accelerating system technology developed for the Positive Ion Injectors (PII) used to heat the plasma in the fusion experiments,. NSFS, to be intended as an European facility, may be realized in a few years, once provided a preliminary technological program devote to study the operation of the ion source in continuous mode, target h eat loading/ removal, target and tritium handling, inventory as well as ...

  20. The spallation neutron source SINQ. A new large facility for research at PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.S.; Crawford, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    This document is intended to familiarize the non-specialist with the principles of neutron scattering and some of its applications. It presents an overview of the foundations of neutron scattering, the basic types of instruments used, and their principles of operation. The design concept and some technical details of the spallation neutron source are described for the benefit of the scientifically or technically interested reader. In future this source will form the heart of the instruments available to PSI`s wide community of neutron scattering researchers. (author) 32 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Design of a setup for {sup 252}Cf neutron source for storage and analysis purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hei, Daqian [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211106 (China); Zhuang, Haocheng [Xi’an Middle School of Shanxi Province, Xi’an 710000 (China); Jia, Wenbao, E-mail: jiawenbao@163.com [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211106 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Suzhou 215000 (China); Cheng, Can; Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Hongtao [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211106 (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211106 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Suzhou 215000 (China)

    2016-11-01

    {sup 252}Cf is a reliable isotopic neutron source and widely used in the prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. A cylindrical barrel made by polymethyl methacrylate contained with the boric acid solution was designed for storage and application of a 5 μg {sup 252}Cf neutron source. The size of the setup was optimized with Monte Carlo code. The experiments were performed and the results showed the doses were reduced with the setup and less than the allowable limit. The intensity and collimating radius of the neutron beam could also be adjusted through different collimator.

  2. Passive Safety Features Evaluation of KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have cooperated on the development, design, and construction of a neutron source facility. The facility was constructed at Kharkov, Ukraine and its commissioning process is underway. It will be used to conduct basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The facility has an electron accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. The electron beam power is 100 kW using 100 MeV electrons. Tungsten or natural uranium is the target material for generating neutrons driving the subcritical assembly. The subcritical assembly is composed of WWR-M2 - Russian fuel assemblies with U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt%, surrounded by beryllium reflector assembles and graphite blocks. The subcritical assembly is seated in a water tank, which is a part of the primary cooling loop. During normal operation, the water coolant operates at room temperature and the total facility power is ~300 KW. The passive safety features of the facility are discussed in in this study. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX was utilized in the analyses with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries. Negative reactivity temperature feedback was consistently observed, which is important for the facility safety performance. Due to the design of WWR-M2 fuel assemblies, slight water temperature increase and the corresponding water density decrease produce large reactivity drop, which offset the reactivity gain by mistakenly loading an additional fuel assembly. The increase of fuel temperature also causes sufficiently large reactivity decrease. This enhances the facility safety performance because fuel temperature increase provides prompt negative reactivity feedback. The reactivity variation due to an empty fuel position filled by water during the fuel loading process is examined. Also, the loading mistakes of removing beryllium reflector assemblies and

  3. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

    1995-06-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs.

  4. Improvement in the practical implementation of neutron source strength calibration using prompt gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Rahim; Rene Vega-Carrillo, Hector

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the neutron emission rate from neutron sources using prompt gamma rays in hydrogen was determined, and several improvements were applied. Using Monte Carlo calculations, the best positions for the source, moderator and detector relative to each other were selected. For (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf sources, the sizes for polyethylene spheres with the highest efficiency were 12- and 10-inch, respectively. In addition, a new shielding cone was designed to account for scattered neutrons and gamma rays. The newly designed shielding cone, which is 45 cm in length, provided suitable attenuation for the source radiation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The p + 9Be(thin target) reaction as a source of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, J.; Bém, P.; Majerle, M.; Mrázek, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.; Yasin, Z.

    2017-09-01

    The cyclotron driven fast quasi-monoenergetic neutron source based on the p+ 9Be (thin target) reaction was studied at the proton energy around 30 MeV Due to higher melting point of Be, the p+ 9Be(thin), reaction could be considered as an alternative to the most used p+Li(thin) neutron source, providing a similar quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectrum at significantly higher neutron output owing to advance in higher incident proton beam current. The neutron spectrum measured by the time-of-flight method agrees with other experimental data and indicates dominant contribution of ground and first excited states leading to only two peaks, separated by some 2-3 MeV, in the p+thin 9Be neutron spectrum.

  6. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Moses, D.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Slater, C.O.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1990-09-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, DORT, TORT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 99-group and 39-group neutron, 39-neutron-group 44-gamma-ray-group secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), 44-group gamma-ray interaction (GRI), and coupled, 39-neutron group 44-gamma-ray group (CNG) cross-section libraries. The neutron and SGRP libraries were generated primarily from ENDF/B-V data; the GRI library was generated from DLC-99/HUGO data, which is recognized as the ENDF/B-V photon interaction data. Modules from the AMPX and NJOY systems were used to process the multigroup data. Validity of selected data from the fine- and broad-group neutron libraries was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations.

  7. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: Effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) analysis is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV and D-T with...

  8. Polynomial approach method to solve the neutron point kinetics equations with use of the analytic continuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumelero, Fernanda; Petersen, Claudio Zen; Goncalves, Glenio Aguiar [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica; Schramm, Marcelo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we report a solution to solve the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations applying the Polynomial Approach Method. The main idea is to expand the neutron density and delayed neutron precursors as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. A genuine error control is developed based on an analogy with the Rest Theorem. For illustration, we also report simulations for different approaches types (linear, quadratic and cubic). The results obtained by numerical simulations for linear approximation are compared with results in the literature.

  9. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; D'Errico, F; Nath, R; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in sup 1 sup 0 B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast ...

  10. Fabrication development for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, B.W. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Copeland, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the fuel fabrication development for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. The fuel element is similar to that successfully fabricated and used in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for many years, but there are two significant differences that require some development. The fuel compound is U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} rather than U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and the fuel is graded in the axial as well as the radial direction. Both of these changes can be accomplished with a straightforward extension of the HFIR technology. The ANS also requires some improvements in inspection technology and somewhat more stringent acceptance criteria. Early indications were that the fuel fabrication and inspection technology would produce a reactor core meeting the requirements of the ANS for the low volume fraction loadings needed for the highly enriched uranium design (up to 1.7 Mg U/m{sup 3}). Near the end of the development work, higher volume fractions were fabricated that would be required for a lower- enrichment uranium core. Again, results look encouraging for loadings up to {approx}3.5 Mg U/m{sup 3}; however, much less evaluation was done for the higher loadings.

  11. Impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Transverse coupling impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS beam extraction system were performed and the results are here reported. The SNS beam extraction system is composed from 14 subsystems, each of which consists of a vertical kicker magnet plus a pulse forming network (PFN. Impedance bench measurements were performed on one large and one small aperture magnet, stand-alone as well as assembled with the first-article production PFN. The impedance measuring methods to cover the interesting frequency range from below 1 to 100 MHz are described in considerable detail. The upper frequency range is properly covered by the conventional twin-wire method but it had to be supplemented at the low-frequency end by a direct input impedance measurement at the magnet busbar. Required modifications of the PFN to maintain the impedance budget are discussed. The total impedance estimate was finally obtained by quadratic scaling with vertical aperture from the two tested kicker subsystems.

  12. Advanced neutron source reactor probabilistic flow blockage assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Phase I Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor identified core flow blockage as the most likely internal event leading to fuel damage. The flow blockage event frequency used in the original ANS PRA was based primarily on the flow blockage work done for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) PRA. This report examines potential flow blockage scenarios and calculates an estimate of the likelihood of debris-induced fuel damage. The bulk of the report is based specifically on the conceptual design of ANS with a 93%-enriched, two-element core; insights to the impact of the proposed three-element core are examined in Sect. 5. In addition to providing a probability (uncertainty) distribution for the likelihood of core flow blockage, this ongoing effort will serve to indicate potential areas of concern to be focused on in the preliminary design for elimination or mitigation. It will also serve as a loose-parts management tool.

  13. Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Michael P; Bradley, Joseph T; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Hardek, Thomas; Kang, Yoon W; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Young, Karen A

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Sys...

  14. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, N. A., E-mail: namauro@noctrl.edu [Department of Physics, North Central College, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Vogt, A. J. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Derendorf, K. S. [Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kreyssig, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lokshin, K. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wang, Xun-Li [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (Hong Kong); Egami, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  15. Neutronic design study of accelerator driven system (ADS) for Jordan subcritical reactor as a neutron source for nuclear research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xoubi, Ned

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a preliminary neutronic design study of an accelerator driven subcritical system for Jordan Subcritical Assembly (JSA) is presented. The conceptual design of coupling the JSA core with proton accelerator and spallation target is investigated, and its feasibility as a neutron source for nuclear research, and possibly for target irradiation and isotope production evaluated. 3D MCNPX model of the JSA reactor, the accelerator beam, and the Pb target was developed, based on actual reactor parameters. MCNPX calculations were carried out to estimate the absolute radial and axial neutron flux in the reactor, and to calculate the multiplication factor K eff and heat generated in the reactor. Numerical results showed an enormous increase in the neutron flux, by seven orders of magnitude, compared to the current JSA core design using Pu-Be source. In this research the results obtained are discussed and compared with those of the JSA, and do confirm the feasibility of utilizing the JSA as a viable nuclear research facility with adequate neutron flux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Hannah E. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 107 neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF3 composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  17. A Drabkin energy filter for experiments at a spallation neutron source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizzi, A. A.; Felcher, G. P.; Klose, F.

    2000-11-21

    We present a new approach for dynamic monochromatization of neutrons suitable for time-of-flight experiments at spallation neutron sources. The method requires polarized neutrons and is based on the Drabkin energy filter. In its initial application, this magnetic resonator device, consisting of a polarizer/analyzer system and a wavelength-dependent spin flipper, was proposed for extracting a narrow bandwidth from a broad bandwidth polarized neutron beam. At a spallation neutron source, wavelength is determined by time-of-flight (TOF) from the source to the detector. However, at each instant a spread of wavelengths is recorded due to the non-zero emission time of the source/moderator system. Particularly, high-intensity moderators for cold neutrons produce long ''tails'' in the intensity/time distribution for all wavelengths, degrading the resolution of the experiments. The Drabkin energy filter can be used to cut the neutron tails for all wavelengths, by drifting the resonance condition in synchronization with the TOF. Calculations show that the method is viable, and that substantial resolution gains are obtained by application to a TOF neutron reflectometer.

  18. Standard Practice for Conducting Irradiations at Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for irradiations at accelerator-based neutron sources. The discussion focuses on two types of sources, namely nearly monoenergetic 14-MeV neutrons from the deuterium-tritium T(d,n) interaction, and broad spectrum neutrons from stopping deuterium beams in thick beryllium or lithium targets. However, most of the recommendations also apply to other types of accelerator-based sources, including spallation neutron sources (1). Interest in spallation sources has increased recently due to their proposed use for transmutation of fission reactor waste (2). 1.2 Many of the experiments conducted using such neutron sources are intended to simulate irradiation in another neutron spectrum, for example, that from a DT fusion reaction. The word simulation is used here in a broad sense to imply an approximation of the relevant neutron irradiation environment. The degree of conformity can range from poor to nearly exact. In general, the intent of these simulations is to establish the fundam...

  19. Detailed Design of Cooling Water System for Cold Neutron Source in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I.; Lee, Y. S

    2007-04-15

    To make cold neutron, a cryogenic refrigerator is necessary to transform moderator into cryogenic state so, thermal neutron is changed into cold neutron through heat transfer with moderator. A cryogenic refrigerator mainly consists of two apparatus, a helium compressor and a cold box which needs supply of cooling water. Therefore, cooling water system is essential to operate of cryogenic refrigerator normally. This report is mainly focused on the detailed design of the cooling water system for the HANARO cold neutron source, and describes design requirement, calculation, specification of equipment and water treatment method.

  20. Shielding of a neutron irradiator with {sup 241}Am-Be source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, K.A.M. de; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: koliveira@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Fonseca, E.S., E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent dose rates at 1.0 cm from the outer surface of the shielding of a neutron irradiation system that uses {sup 241}Am-Be source with activity of 185 GBq (5 Ci) were determined. A theoretical-experimental approach including case studies, through computer simulations with MCNP code was employed to calculate the best shielding thickness. Following the construction of the neutron irradiator, dose measurements were conducted in order to validate data obtained from simulation. The neutron irradiator shielding was designed in such a way to allow transport of the neutron radiography system for in loco inspections ensuring workers' radiologic safety. (author)

  1. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project: Annual report, April 1987--March 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J.; McBee, M.R. (comp.)

    1989-02-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project (formerly called the Center for Neutron Research) will provide the world's best facilities for the study of neutron scattering. The ANS high-power density reactor will be fueled with uranium silicide and cooled, moderated, and reflected by deuterium oxide. Peak neutron fluxes in the reflector are expected to be 5 to 10 x 10/sup 19/ neutrons/center dot/m/sup -2//center dot/s/sup -1/ with a power level between 270 and 300 MW. This report describes the status of technical work funded through the ANS Project during the period April 1987 through March 1988. Earlier work is described in Center for Neutron Research Project Status Report and other Oak Ridge National Laboratory reports. 22 refs., 57 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. A compact self-flowing lithium system for use in an industrial neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor Kumar; Szott, Matthew; Jurczyk, Brian; Ahn, Chisung; Ruzic, David

    2016-10-01

    A compact trench module to flow liquid lithium in closed loops for handling high heat and particle flux have been fabricated and tested at UIUC. The module was designed to demonstrate the proof of concept in utilizing liquid metals for two principal objectives: i) as self-healing low Z plasma facing components, which is expected to solve the issues facing the current high Z components and ii) using flowing lithium as an MeV-level neutron source. A continuously flowing lithium loop ensures a fresh lithium interface and also accommodate a higher concentration of D, enabling advanced D-Li reactions without using any radioactive tritium. Such a system is expected to have a base yield of 10e7 n/s. For both the applications, the key success factor of the module is attaining the necessary high flow velocity of the lithium especially over the impact area, which will be the disruptive plasma events in fusion reactors and the incident ion beam for the neutron beam source. This was achieved by the efficient shaping of the trenches to exploit the nozzle effect in liquid flow. The compactness of the module, which can also be scaled as desired, was fulfilled by the use of high Tc permanent magnets and air cooled channels attained the necessary temperature gradient for driving the lithium. The design considerations and parameters, experimental arrangements involving lithium filling and attaining flow, data and results obtained will be elaborated. DOE SBIR project DE-SC0013861.

  3. Low-Power RF Tuning of the Spallation Neutron Source Warm LINAC Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Deibele, C

    2004-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A conventional 402.5 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) accelerates the beam from 2.5 to 86 MeV, and the 805 MHz coupled-cavity linac (CCL) continues acceleration to 186 MeV. Tuning the six DTL tanks involves adjusting post-coupler lengths and slug tuners to achieve the design resonant frequency and stabilized field distribution. A 2.5 MW klystron feeds RF power into each DTL tank through a ridge-loaded waveguide that does not perturb either the frequency or field distribution in the tank. The CCL consists of 4 RF modules operating in the βλ/2 mode. Each module contains 96 accelerating cavities in 12 segments of 8 cavities each, 11 active bridge coupler cavities, and 106 nominally unexcited coupling cavities. For each RF module, power from a single 5 MW klystron splits once and drives bridge couplers 3 and 9. We will discuss the special tools and measurement techniques developed f...

  4. Design of a compact high-power neutron source-The EURISOL converter target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samec, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)], E-mail: karel.samec@psi.ch; Milenkovic, R.Z.; Dementjevs, S.; Ashrafi-Nik, M.; Kalt, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2009-07-21

    The EURISOL project, a multi-lateral initiative supported by the EU, aims to develop a facility to achieve high yields of isotopes in radioactive beams and extend the variety of these isotopes towards more exotic types. The neutron source at the heart of the projected facility is designed to generate isotopes by fissioning uranium carbide (UC) targets arranged around a 4 MW neutron source. For reasons of efficiency, it is essential that the neutron source be as compact as possible, to avoid losing neutrons by absorption whilst maximising the escaping neutron flux, thus increasing the number of fissions in the UC targets. The resulting configuration presents a challenge in terms of absorbing heat deposition rates of up to 8 kW/cm{sup 3} in the neutron source; it has led to the selection of liquid metal for the target material. The current paper presents the design of a compact high-power liquid-metal neutron source comprising a specially optimised beam window concept. The design is based on two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations for thermal hydraulics and hydraulic aspects, as well as finite-element method (FEM) for assessing thermo-mechanical stability. The resulting optimised design was validated by a dedicated hydraulic test under realistic flow conditions. A full-scale mock-up was built at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and was tested at the Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL)

  5. Design of 6 Mev linear accelerator based pulsed thermal neutron source: FLUKA simulation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2012-01-15

    The 6 MeV LINAC based pulsed thermal neutron source has been designed for bulk materials analysis. The design was optimized by varying different parameters of the target and materials for each region using FLUKA code. The optimized design of thermal neutron source gives flux of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with more than 80% of thermal neutrons and neutron to gamma ratio was 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}ncm{sup -2}mR{sup -1}. The results of prototype experiment and simulation are found to be in good agreement with each other. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimized 6 eV linear accelerator based thermal neutron source using FLUKA simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beryllium as a photonuclear target and reflector, polyethylene as a filter and shield, graphite as a moderator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized pulsed thermal neutron source gives neutron flux of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of the prototype experiment were compared with simulations and are found to be in good agreement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This source can effectively be used for the study of bulk material analysis and activation products.

  6. MTS-6 detectors calibration by using 239Pu-Be neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Wrzesień

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thermoluminescent detectors, type MTS-6, containing isotope 6Li (lithium are sensitive in the range of thermal neutron energy; the 239Pu-Be (plutonium-and-beryllium source emits neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 11 MeV. These seemingly contradictory elements may be combined by using the paraffin moderator, a determined density of thermal neutrons in the paraffin block and a conversion coefficient neutron flux to kerma, not forgetting the simultaneous registration of the photon radiation inseparable from the companion neutron radiation. The main aim of this work is to present the idea of calibration of thermoluminescent detectors that consist of a 6Li isotope, by using 239Pu-Be neutron radiation source. Material and Methods: In this work, MTS-6 and MTS-7 thermoluminescent detectors and a plutonium-and-beryllium (239Pu-Be neutron source were used. Paraffin wax fills the block, acting as a moderator. The calibration idea was based on the determination of dose equivalent rate based on the average kerma rate calculated taking into account the empirically determined function describing the density of thermal neutron flux in the paraffin block and a conversion coefficient neutron flux to kerma. Results: The calculated value of the thermal neutron flux density was 1817.5 neutrons/cm2/s and the average value of kerma rate determined on this basis amounted to 244 μGy/h, and the dose equivalent rate 610 μSv/h. The calculated value allowed for the assessment of the length of time of exposure of the detectors directly in the paraffin block. Conclusions: The calibration coefficient for the used batch of detectors is (6.80±0.42×10–7 Sv/impulse. Med Pr 2017;68(6:705–710

  7. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. E-mail: stefano.agosteo@polimi.it; Curzio, G.; D' Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in {sup 10}B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  8. MTS-6 detectors calibration by using 239Pu-Be neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesień, Małgorzata; Albiniak, Łukasz; Al-Hameed, Hiba

    2017-10-17

    Thermoluminescent detectors, type MTS-6, containing isotope 6Li (lithium) are sensitive in the range of thermal neutron energy; the 239Pu-Be (plutonium-and-beryllium) source emits neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 11 MeV. These seemingly contradictory elements may be combined by using the paraffin moderator, a determined density of thermal neutrons in the paraffin block and a conversion coefficient neutron flux to kerma, not forgetting the simultaneous registration of the photon radiation inseparable from the companion neutron radiation. The main aim of this work is to present the idea of calibration of thermoluminescent detectors that consist of a 6Li isotope, by using 239Pu-Be neutron radiation source. In this work, MTS-6 and MTS-7 thermoluminescent detectors and a plutonium-and-beryllium (239Pu-Be) neutron source were used. Paraffin wax fills the block, acting as a moderator. The calibration idea was based on the determination of dose equivalent rate based on the average kerma rate calculated taking into account the empirically determined function describing the density of thermal neutron flux in the paraffin block and a conversion coefficient neutron flux to kerma. The calculated value of the thermal neutron flux density was 1817.5 neutrons/cm2/s and the average value of kerma rate determined on this basis amounted to 244 μGy/h, and the dose equivalent rate 610 μSv/h. The calculated value allowed for the assessment of the length of time of exposure of the detectors directly in the paraffin block. The calibration coefficient for the used batch of detectors is (6.80±0.42)×10-7 Sv/impulse. Med Pr 2017;68(6):705-710.

  9. Feasibility analysis of a Plasma Focus neutron source for BNCT treatment of transplanted human liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzi, V.; Mezzetti, F.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.

    2004-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy preliminary treatments on transplanted human liver have been recently conducted at Pavia University. The need of high fluences of thermal neutrons imposed the use of the available thermal channel of a TRIGA reactor properly modified for this application. We analyse the possibility of using the Plasma Focus (PF) machine as a pulsed neutron source for this medical application instead of a nuclear reactor. Thermalization of the fast (2.45 MeV for D-D reactions) neutrons produced by the PF is gained with a paraffin or polyethylene moderator which contains both the neutron source and the irradiation chamber. The design parameters of a PF optimized for such an application are discussed, as well as other considerations on the advantages that this machine can bring to this kind of cancer therapy.

  10. Fundamental Problems of Neutron Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source at the ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Gudkov

    2008-07-16

    We propose to provide theoretical support for the experimental program in fundamental neutron physics at the SNS. This includes the study of neutron properties, neutron beta-decay, parity violation effects and time reversal violation effects. The main purpose of the proposed research is to work on theoretical problems related to experiments which have a high priority at the SNS. Therefore, we will make a complete analysis of beta-decay process including calculations of radiative corrections and recoil corrections for angular correlations for polarized neutron decay, with an accuracy better that is supposed to be achieved in the planning experiments. Based on the results of the calculations, we will provide analysis of sensitivity of angular correlations to be able to search for the possible extensions of the Standard model. Also we will help to plan other experiments to address significant problems of modern physics and will work on their theoretical support.

  11. Characterization of a neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix detector for quantitative image analysis at a pulsed neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Minniti, Triestino; Kockelmann, Winfried; Dalgliesh, Robert; Burca, Genoveva; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2017-07-01

    The uncertainties and the stability of a neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix detector when operating in the event timing mode for quantitative image analysis at a pulsed neutron source were investigated. The dominant component to the uncertainty arises from the counting statistics. The contribution of the overlap correction to the uncertainty was concluded to be negligible from considerations based on the error propagation even if a pixel occupation probability is more than 50%. We, additionally, have taken into account the multiple counting effect in consideration of the counting statistics. Furthermore, the detection efficiency of this detector system changes under relatively high neutron fluxes due to the ageing effects of current Microchannel Plates. Since this efficiency change is position-dependent, it induces a memory image. The memory effect can be significantly reduced with correction procedures using the rate equations describing the permanent gain degradation and the scrubbing effect on the inner surfaces of the MCP pores.

  12. Status of the Ultracold Neutron Source at Los Alamos National Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, R.

    2007-10-01

    The ultracold neutron (UCN) source at Los Alamos (LANL) is currently in its third year of operation. High energy neutrons are produced via spallation from the LANSCE 800 MeV proton beam directed onto a tungsten target. These neutrons are then reflected and partially moderated in a Be ``flux trap'' (surrounded also by a layer of graphite), within which is located a cold polyethylene moderator. A small percentage of the cold neutrons are downscatttered within solid deuterium to colder temperatures (1-4 mK) and are then guided to the experimental area through 4-in diameter stainless steel guides. Modifications were made to the source for the 2006 and 2007 run cycles to increase UCN production. This talk will give an overview of the LANL UCN source, it's current status, and results from the 2006 and 2007 source test runs.

  13. Electron cloud instabilities in the Proton Storage Ring and Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaskiewicz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron cloud instabilities in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring and those foreseen for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source are examined theoretically, numerically, and experimentally.

  14. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriesheim, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne's ZING-P and ZING-P' prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and in press'' articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  15. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne`s ZING-P and ZING-P` prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and ``in press`` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  16. 150 keV accelerator as pulsed neutron source; Acelerador de 150 keV como fuente de neutrones pulsada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, F.

    1970-07-01

    The project of a 150 keV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator built at J.E.N. is described. Beam currents of more than 10 mA, with a neutron intensity of 10{sup 1}1 n.s{sup 1}, are obtained. Also, we report some research made in connection with that project. The role of the contamination in the vacuum system and the performance of the pumps and gauges pumping deuterium gas are studied. Sinusoidal pulses are employed as an analysis method of the discharge in the ion source and the performance of the extracting-focusing system. The parameters of the beam leaving the ion source have been determined; these are used to calculate the electrostatic lenses with the gaussian optics. Measurements concerning deuterium and tritium targets as neutron sources have been made and the processes affecting their practical service life are analyzed. (Author) 71 refs.

  17. Neutron calibration field of bare {sup 252}Cf source in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Ngoc Thiem; Tran, Hoai Nam; Nguyen, Khai Tuan [Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trinh, Glap Van [Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang (Viet Nam)

    2017-02-15

    This paper presents the establishment and characterization of a neutron calibration field using a bare {sup 252}Cf source of low neutron source strength in Vietnam. The characterization of the field in terms of neutron flux spectra and neutron ambient dose equivalent rates were performed by Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code. The anisotropy effect of the source was also investigated. The neutron ambient dose equivalent rates at three reference distances of 75, 125, and 150 cm from the source were calculated and compared with the measurements using the Aloka TPS-451C neutron survey meters. The discrepancy between the calculated and measured values is found to be about 10%. To separate the scattered and the direct components from the total neutron flux spectra, an in-house shadow cone of 10% borated polyethylene was used. The shielding efficiency of the shadow cone was estimated using the MCNP5 code. The results confirmed that the shielding efficiency of the shadow cone is acceptable.

  18. Accelerated Tests of Soft Errors in Network Systems Using a Compact Accelerator- Driven Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Hidenori; Sato, Hirotaka; Arai, Kaoru; Kotanigawa, Takashi; Kino, Koichi; Kamiyama, Takashi; Hiraga, Fujio; Koda, Katsutoshi; Furusaka, Michihiro; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    The frequency of neutron-induced soft errors is increasing as devices become more integrated and miniaturized. Therefore, it has become more important recently to check reliability of a recovery system from the soft errors in network systems. For accelerated test, first we have examined possibility of the acceleration tests at a compact accelerator-driven neutron source, which is easy to adjust for soft-error tests and which also has low experimental costs. We selected the electron accelerator-driven neutron source at Hokkaido University as the compact accelerator-driven neutron source. We prepared a new target-reflector assembly composed of heavy metals to provide the fast neutrons, and conducted neutron-induced soft-error experiments on network equipments. As a result, we found that an accelerated rate of soft errors was about 106 times compared with that of the natural environment. We also investigated network equipment soft-error tolerance, fault detection and backup switching processes. Performing such testing before network equipment is actually deployed is critical for development of future network systems. Hence, the compact accelerator-based neutron source is a very useful tool.

  19. Activation analysis of indium, KCl, and melamine by using a laser-induced neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungman; Lee, Kitae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hyungki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source with a neutron yield of 4 x 10{sup 5} n/pulse and a pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz, which was developed using a deuterated polystyrene film target and a 24-TW femtosecond laser, was applied for laser activation analyses of indium, KCl, and melamine samples. The nuclear reactions of the measured gamma spectra for the activated samples were identified as (n, γ), (n, n'), and (n, 2n) reactions. These indicate possible usage of the neutron source for practical activation analyses of various materials.

  20. Assessment of the neutron cross section database for mercury for the ORNL spallation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, L.C.; Spencer, R.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Gabriel, T.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Neutron source generation based on a high energy particle accelerator has been considered as an alternative to the canceled Advanced Neutron Source project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed technique consists of a spallation neutron source in which neutrons are produced via the interaction of high-energy charged particles in a heavy metal target. Preliminary studies indicate that liquid mercury bombarded with GeV protons provides an excellent neutron source. Accordingly, a survey has been made of the available neutron cross-section data. Since it is expected that spectral modifiers, specifically moderators, will also be incorporated into the source design, the survey included thermal energy, resonance region, and high energy data. It was found that data of individual isotopes were almost non-existent and that the only evaluation found for the natural element had regions of missing data or discrepant data. Therefore, it appears that to achieve the desired degree of accuracy in the spallation source design it is necessary to re-evaluate the mercury database including making new measurements. During the presentation the currently available data will be presented and experiments proposed which can lead to design quality cross sections.

  1. Measurement of angular distribution of neutron flux for the 6 MeV race-track microtron based pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The 6 MeV race track microtron based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products, where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. Electrons impinges on a e-{gamma} target to generate bremsstrahlung radiations, which further produces neutrons by photonuclear reaction in {gamma}-n target. The optimisation of these targets along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium at different scattering angles. Angular distribution of neutron flux indicates that the flux decreases with increase in the angle and are in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  2. Characterization of a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez, A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    A Bonner sphere spectrometer was used to determine the features of a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source used to operate the ESFM-Ipn Subcritical Reactor. The spectrometer is a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter polyethylene spheres, that was located 100 cm from the neutron source. The count rates obtained with the spectrometer were unfolded using the NSDUAZ code and neutron spectrum, total fluence, and ambient dose equivalent were determined. A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNP5 code, was carried out to estimate the spectrum and integral features being less that values obtained experimentally due to the presence of {sup 241}Pu in the Pu used to fabricate the source. Using the experimental information the actual neutron yield and the mass fraction of {sup 241}Pu was estimated. (Author)

  3. Investigation of the neutron spectrum of americium-beryllium sources by Bonner sphere spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Roberts, N.; Thomas, D. J.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Garcia, M. J.; Gentile, A.; Liu, Z. Z.; de-San-Pedro, M.

    2014-11-01

    Americium-beryllium neutron sources are certainly the most widely used in neutron dosimetry laboratories, basically due to their long half-life and their energy distribution, which covers the energy domain of interest for many applications in ambient and personal dosimetry. Nevertheless, the spectrum of this source depends on the materials and dimension of the capsule and on the amount and physical-chemical properties of the active material, thus affecting relevant quantities such as the spectrum-averaged fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficient. A EURAMET (European Association of National Metrology Institutes) project (n. 1104) was initiated to experimentally investigate how the neutron spectrum changes for different source sizes and encapsulations with a view to providing improved data for a planned revision of the ISO 8529 Standard Series. The experimental campaign was carried out in the low scatter facility at NPL. Here three different Bonner sphere spectrometers, BSSs, were exposed to the neutron fields produced by three different neutron sources formats: one X3 capsule (1 Ci) and two X14 capsules (10 Ci and 15 Ci). The specific advantage of the BSS is the large sensitivity to low-energy neutrons (E0.1 MeV; (3) understanding whether the ISO-recommended Am-Be spectrum needs to be amended, and for which source formats.

  4. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  5. Comparison of DT neutron production codes MCUNED, ENEA-JSI source subroutine and DDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čufar, Aljaž, E-mail: aljaz.cufar@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Kodeli, Ivan [Reactor Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Milocco, Alberto [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sauvan, Patrick [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, UNED, C/Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Snoj, Luka [Reactor Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Results of three codes capable of simulating the accelerator based DT neutron generators were compared on a simple model where only a thin target made of mixture of titanium and tritium is present. Two typical deuteron beam energies, 100 keV and 250 keV, were used in the comparison. • Comparisons of the angular dependence of the total neutron flux and spectrum as well as the neutron spectrum of all the neutrons emitted from the target show general agreement of the results but also some noticeable differences. • A comparison of figures of merit of the calculations using different codes showed that the computational time necessary to achieve the same statistical uncertainty can vary for more than 30× when different codes for the simulation of the DT neutron generator are used. - Abstract: As the DT fusion reaction produces neutrons with energies significantly higher than in fission reactors, special fusion-relevant benchmark experiments are often performed using DT neutron generators. However, commonly used Monte Carlo particle transport codes such as MCNP or TRIPOLI cannot be directly used to analyze these experiments since they do not have the capabilities to model the production of DT neutrons. Three of the available approaches to model the DT neutron generator source are the MCUNED code, the ENEA-JSI DT source subroutine and the DDT code. The MCUNED code is an extension of the well-established and validated MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The ENEA-JSI source subroutine was originally prepared for the modelling of the FNG experiments using different versions of the MCNP code (−4, −5, −X) and was later extended to allow the modelling of both DT and DD neutron sources. The DDT code prepares the DT source definition file (SDEF card in MCNP) which can then be used in different versions of the MCNP code. In the paper the methods for the simulation of the DT neutron production used in the codes are briefly described and compared for the case of a

  6. The ITER first wall as a source of photo-neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khripunov, V. E-mail: khripuv@itereu.de

    2001-10-01

    The beryllium coverage of the ITER first wall is a source of two kinds of photo-neutrons in the plasma chamber: prompt photo-neutrons during the D-T-operation and delayed photo-neutrons after shutdown. They do not essentially change the radiation conditions either inside or outside the bulk radiation shield. However, the prompt photo-neutron emission {approx}2x10{sup 16} n/s and non-zero delayed photo-neutron fluxes {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, their spectra and possible effects, estimated in the paper, should be taken into account in diagnostics, maintenance and storage considerations.

  7. Optimization aspects of the new nELBE photo-neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwengner R.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The nELBE beamline at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD provides intense neutron beams by stopping primary electrons in a liquid lead target, where neutrons are produced by bremsstrahlung photons via (γ,n reactions. With the aim to increase the neutron yield through the enhancement of the electron beam energy (from the current 40 MeV limit up to 50 MeV, as well as to minimize several sources of background that are presently affecting the measurements, a new neutron beam-line and a new, larger neutron experimental room have been designed. The optimization of the neutron/photon ratio, the minimization of the backscattered radiation from the walls and the possibility to have better experimental conditions are the main advantages of the new design. To optimize the beamline, extensive simulations with the particle interaction and transport code FLUKA have been performed. Starting from the primary electron beam, both the photon and neutron radiation fields have been fully characterized. To have a cross-check of the results, the calculated values of the neutron yields at different energies of the primary beam have been compared both with an independent simulation with the MCNP code and with analytical calculations, obtaining a very satisfactory agreement at the level of few percent. The evaluated radiation fields have been used to optimize the direction of the new neutron beamline, in order to minimize the photon flash contribution. A general overview of the new photo-neutron source, together with all the steps of the optimization study, is here presented and discussed.

  8. Neutron spallation source and the Dubna Cascade Code

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutron multiplicity per incident proton, /, in collision of high energy proton beam with voluminous Pb and W targets has been estimated from the Dubna Cascade Code and compared with the available experimental data for the purpose of benchmarking of the code. Contributions of various atomic and nuclear processes ...

  9. Neutron Spectra, Fluence and Dose Rates from Bare and Moderated Cf-252 Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A new, stronger 252Cf source (serial number SR-CF-3050-OR) was obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2014 to supplement the existing 252Cf sources which had significantly decayed. A new instrument positioning track system was designed and installed by Hopewell Designs, Inc. in 2011. The neutron field from the new, stronger 252Cf source in the modified calibration environment needed to be characterized as well as the modified neutron fields produced by the new source and seven different neutron moderators. Comprehensive information about our 252Cf source, its origin, production, and isotopic content and decay characteristics needed to be compiled as well. This technical report is intended to address these issues.

  10. Investigation of the infinite medium integral neutronic data for incident fusion source neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipek, O. E-mail: oipek@mmf.sdu.edu.tr

    2002-09-01

    In the present work, the physical behavior of integral data in infinite medium has been evaluated for incident fusion neutrons with the help to the 3-D Monte Carlo code. In a fusion reactor blanket with finite dimension, the integral quantities will be more or less different from the infinitive medium results, depending on the neutron leakage fraction. Design studies foresee the reduction of the neutron leakage out of the blanket as possible in order to prevent the nuclear heating in super conducting fusion magnets and to keep all neutrons primarily in the coolant. The most important materials in fusion technology, namely tritium, beryllium, lead, thorium, and uranium have been investigated in infinitive medium. The main purpose of this work is to calculate the integral tritium breeding ratio, {sup 233}U breeding rate, {sup 239}Pu breeding rate, heat release, neutron multiplication ratio through (n,x) and fission (when applicable) reactions in those mixtures which are composed when first UO{sub 2} and ThO{sub 2} are mixed with natural lithium (Nat.Li) or {sup 6}Li for a volume fraction from 0 to 100%. Then the variable UO{sub 2}-Nat.Li (UO{sub 2} mixed with Nat.Li) and UO{sub 2}-{sup 6}Li (UO{sub 2} mixed with {sup 6}Li) compositions will be mixed with Beryllium (Be) and Lead (Pb) for a volume fraction from 0 to 100%. However, the variable TO{sub 2}-Nat.Li (ThO{sub 2} mixed with Nat.Li) and ThO{sub 2}-{sup 6}Li (ThO{sub 2} mixed with {sup 6}Li) compositions will be mixed with Be and Pb for a volume fraction mentioned above.

  11. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  12. Linear Inertial-Electrostatic Fusion Neutron Sources and Highly Enriched Uranium Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, John; Kulcinski, Gerald; Navarro, Marcos; Fancher, Aaron; Bonomo, Richard; Emmert, Gilbert

    2017-10-01

    A newly initiated research project investigates methods for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU) and other special nuclear materials by combining multi-dimensional neutron sources, forward/adjoint calculations modeling neutron and gamma transport, and sparse data analysis of detector signals. An overview of the project will be presented, and progress will be described in: (1) developing optimized, adaptive-geometry, inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) neutron source configurations with neutron pulses distributed in space and/or phased in time, and (2) applying sparse data algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA) to enhance detection fidelity. Research supported by US Dept. of Homeland Security Grant 2015-DN-077-ARI095 and the Grainger Foundation.

  13. A Targeted Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q. D.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Auger Collaboration101, The Pierre

    2014-07-01

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine "target sets," in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  14. Characterization and application of a laser-driven intense pulsed neutron source using Trident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-25

    A team of Los Alamos researchers supported a final campaign to use the Trident laser to produce neutrons, contributed their multidisciplinary expertise to experimentally assess if laser-driven neutron sources can be useful for MaRIE. MaRIE is the Laboratory’s proposed experimental facility for the study of matter-radiation interactions in extremes. Neutrons provide a radiographic probe that is complementary to x-rays and protons, and can address imaging challenges not amenable to those beams. The team's efforts characterize the Laboratory’s responsiveness, flexibility, and ability to apply diverse expertise where needed to perform successful complex experiments.

  15. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  16. Optimization of source-sample-detector geometries for bulk hydrogen analysis using epithermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csikai, J; Dóczi, R

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of epithermal neutrons in qualification of hydrocarbons via their H contents and C/H atomic ratios have been investigated systematically. Sensitivity of this method and the dimensions of the interrogated regions were determined for various types of hydrogenous samples. Results clearly demonstrate the advantages of direct neutron detection, e.g. by BF(3) counters as compared to the foil activation method in addition to using the hardness of the spectral shape of Pu-Be neutrons to that from a (252)Cf source.

  17. Modelisation and distribution of neutron flux in radium-beryllium source (226Ra-Be)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didi, Abdessamad; Dadouch, Ahmed; Jai, Otman

    2017-09-01

    Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP-6), to analyze the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, of 3 millicuries of radium-beryllium, for determine the qualitative and quantitative of many materials, using method of neutron activation analysis. Radium-beryllium source of neutron is established to practical work and research in nuclear field. The main objective of this work was to enable us harness the profile flux of radium-beryllium irradiation, this theoretical study permits to discuss the design of the optimal irradiation and performance for increased the facility research and education of nuclear physics.

  18. A strongly heated neutron star in the transient z source MAXI J0556-332

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue 37-582D, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fridriksson, Joel K.; Wijnands, Rudy [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock St., Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Degenaar, Nathalie [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Linares, Manuel [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/ Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Lin, Dacheng, E-mail: jeroen@space.mit.edu [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations of the quiescent neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary MAXI J0556-332. Observations of the source made during outburst (with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) reveal tracks in its X-ray color-color and hardness-intensity diagrams that closely resemble those of the neutron-star Z sources, suggesting that MAXI J0556-332 had near- or super-Eddington luminosities for a large part of its ∼16 month outburst. A comparison of these diagrams with those of other Z sources suggests a source distance of 46 ± 15 kpc. Fits to the quiescent spectra of MAXI J0556-332 with a neutron-star atmosphere model (with or without a power-law component) result in distance estimates of 45 ± 3 kpc, for a neutron-star radius of 10 km and a mass of 1.4 M {sub ☉}. The spectra show the effective surface temperature of the neutron star decreasing monotonically over the first ∼500 days of quiescence, except for two observations that were likely affected by enhanced low-level accretion. The temperatures we obtain for the fits that include a power law (kT{sub eff}{sup ∞} = 184-308 eV) are much higher than those seen for any other neutron star heated by accretion, while the inferred cooling (e-folding) timescale (∼200 days) is similar to other sources. Fits without a power law yield higher temperatures (kT{sub eff}{sup ∞} = 190-336 eV) and a shorter e-folding time (∼160 days). Our results suggest that the heating of the neutron-star crust in MAXI J0556-332 was considerably more efficient than for other systems, possibly indicating additional or more efficient shallow heat sources in its crust.

  19. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual

  20. Timing reference generators and chopper controllers for neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.; Merl, R.; Rose, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Due to AC-power-grid frequency fluctuations, the designers for accelerator-based spallation-neutron facilities have worked to optimize the competing and contrasting demands of accelerator and neutron chopper performance. Powerful new simulation techniques have enabled the modeling of the timing systems that integrate chopper controllers and chopper hardware. For the first time, we are able to quantitatively access the tradeoffs between these two constraints and design or upgrade a facility to optimize total system performance. Thus, at LANSCE, we now operate multiple chopper systems and the accelerator as simple slaves to a single master-timing-reference generator. For the SNS we recommend a similar system that is somewhat less tightly coupled to the power grid. (author)

  1. Background and Source Term Identification in Active Neutron Interrogation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    Engineering Physics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command...the gamma ray energy peaks for each non-SNM isotope and the gamma ray spectrum continua for the uranium isotopes should have corresponded within...good enough to fully create the expected continua gamma ray spectra for U-235. Below 2 MeV the probability of inelastic scattering and neutron

  2. US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, George H. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    2007-05-25

    This report lays out the agenda for the entire workshop and then lists the abstracts for all 29 presentations. All of these presentations cover small plasma and accelerator neutron sources. A few of the presentations include: Comments about IEC History and Future Directions; Characteristics in Pulse Operation of IEC Device with Confronting Two Plasma Sources; Overview of the University of Wisconsin-Madison IEC Program; Improving IEC Particle Confinement Times Using Multiple Grids; Integral Transport Approach for Molecular Ion Processes in IEC Devices; A Counter Stream Beam D-D Neutron Generator; Low Pressure IECF Operation Using Differentially-Pumped Ion Sources, and more.

  3. Physics Analyses in the Design of the HFIR Cold Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1999-09-27

    Physics analyses have been performed to characterize the performance of the cold neutron source to be installed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the near future. This paper provides a description of the physics models developed, and the resulting analyses that have been performed to support the design of the cold source. These analyses have provided important parametric performance information, such as cold neutron brightness down the beam tube and the various component heat loads, that have been used to develop the reference cold source concept.

  4. Optimization study of normal conductor tokamak for commercial neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T.; Sakai, R.; Okamoto, A.

    2017-05-01

    The optimum conceptual design of tokamak with normal conductor coils was studied for minimizing the cost for producing a given neutron flux by using a system code, PEC. It is assumed that the fusion neutrons are used for burning transuranics from the fission reactor spent fuel in the blanket and a fraction of the generated electric power is circulated to opearate the tokamak with moderate plasma fusion gain. The plasma performance was assumed to be moderate ones; {β\\text{N}}~∼ ~3{--}4 in the aspect ratio A~=~2{--}3 and {{H}98y2}~=~1 . The circulating power is an important factor affecting the cost. Though decreasing the aspect ratio is useful to raise the plasma beta and decrease the toroidal field, the maximum field in the coil starts to rise in the very low aspect ratio range and then the circulating power increases with decrease in the plasma aspect ratio A below A~∼ ~2 , while the construction cost increases with A . As a result, the cost per neutron has its minimum around A~∼ ~2.2 , namely, between ST and the conventional tokamak. The average circulating power fraction is expected to be ~51%.

  5. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  6. Characterisation of an isotopic neutron source: A comparison of conventional neutron detectors and micro-silica glass bead thermoluminescent detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Y. M.; Taggart, M. P.; Alsubaie, A.; Alanazi, A.; Alyahyawi, A.; Lohstroh, A.; Shutt, A.; Jafari, S. M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    As a result of their thermoluminescent response, low cost commercial glass beads have been demonstrated to offer potential use as radiation dosimeters, providing capability in sensing different types of ionising radiation. With a linear response over a large range of dose and spatial resolution that allows measurements down to the order of 1 mm, their performance renders them of interest in situations in which sensitivity, dynamic range, and fine spatial resolution are called for. In the present work, the suitability of glass beads for characterisation of an Americium-Beryllium (241AmBe) neutron source has been assessed. Direct comparison has been made using conventional 3He and boron tri-fluoride neutron detectors as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Good agreement is obtained between the glass beads and gas detectors in terms of general reduction of count rate with distance. Furthermore, the glass beads demonstrate exceptional spatial resolution, leading to the observation of fine detail in the plot of dose versus distance from source. Fine resolution peaks arising in the measured plots, also present in simulations, are interesting features which based on our best knowledge have previously not been reported. The features are reproduced in both experiment and simulation but we do not have a firm reason for their origin. Of greater clarity is that the glass beads have considerable potential for use in high spatial resolution neutron field characterisation, subject to the availability of a suitable automated TLD reader.

  7. A Targeted Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q. D.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as

  8. Using FLUKA to Study Concrete Square Shield Performance in Attenuation of Neutron Radiation Produced by APF Plasma Focus Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M. J.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    In 2010, representatives from the Nuclear Engineering and physics Department of Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete shield for their Plasma Focus as neutron source. The project team in Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering and physics department of Amirkabir University of Technology choose some shape of shield to study on their performance with Monte Carlo code. In the present work, the capability of Monte Carlo code FLUKA will be explored to model the APF Plasma Focus, and investigating the neutron fluence on the square concrete shield in each region of problem. The physical models embedded in FLUKA are mentioned, as well as examples of benchmarking against future experimental data. As a result of this study suitable thickness of concrete for shielding APF will be considered.

  9. Design and Simulation of Photoneutron Source by MCNPX Monte Carlo Code for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Zolfaghari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electron linear accelerator (LINAC can be used for neutron production in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT. BNCT is an external radiotherapeutic method for the treatment of some cancers. In this study, Varian 2300 C/D LINAC was simulated as an electron accelerator-based photoneutron source to provide a suitable neutron flux for BNCT. Materials and Methods Photoneutron sources were simulated, using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In this study, a 20 MeV LINAC was utilized for electron-photon reactions. After the evaluation of cross-sections and threshold energies, lead (Pb, uranium (U and beryllium deuteride (BeD2were selected as photoneutron sources. Results According to the simulation results, optimized photoneutron sources with a compact volume and photoneutron yields of 107, 108 and 109 (n.cm-2.s-1 were obtained for Pb, U and BeD2 composites. Also, photoneutrons increased by using enriched U (10-60% as an electron accelerator-based photoneutron source. Conclusion Optimized photoneutron sources were obtained with compact sizes of 107, 108 and 109 (n.cm-2.s-1, respectively. These fluxs can be applied for BNCT by decelerating fast neutrons and using a suitable beam-shaping assembly, surrounding electron-photon and photoneutron sources.

  10. Influence of Neutron Sources and 10B Concentration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Shallow and Deeper Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyan; Tang, Xiaobin; Shu, Diyun; Liu, Yuanhao; Geng, Changran; Gong, Chunhui; Hang, Shuang; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that combines biological targeting and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET). It is considered a potential therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It could avoid the inaccurate treatment caused by the lung motion during radiotherapy, because the dose deposition mainly depends on the boron localization and neutron source. Thus, B concentration and neutron sources are both principal factors of BNCT, and they play significant roles in the curative effect of BNCT for different cases. The purpose was to explore the feasibility of BNCT treatment for NSCLC with either of two neutron sources (the epithermal reactor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology named "MIT source" and the accelerator neutron source designed in Argentina named "MEC source") and various boron concentrations. Shallow and deeper lung tumors were defined in the Chinese hybrid radiation phantom, and the Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dose to tumors and healthy organs. The MEC source was more appropriate to treat the shallow tumor (depth of 6 cm) with a shorter treatment time. However, the MIT source was more suitable for deep lung tumor (depth of 9 cm) treatment, as the MEC source is more likely to exceed the skin dose limit. Thus, a neutron source consisting of more fast neutrons is not necessarily suitable for deep treatment of lung tumors. Theoretical distribution of B in tumors and organs at risk (especially skin) was obtained to meet the treatable requirement of BNCT, which may provide the references to identify the feasibility of BNCT for the treatment of lung cancer using these two neutron sources in future clinical applications.

  11. Use Recirculator "SALO" in the Mode of the Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Guk, Ivan S; Dovbnya, Anatoly N; Kononenko, Stanislav; Peev, Fedor; Tarasenko, Alexander; Van der Wiel, Marnix

    2005-01-01

    The opportunity of use developed in NSC KIPT recirculator SALO* with superconducting accelerating structure TESLA for reception of intensive neutron streams surveyed. As an injector it is supposed to use RF-gun with superconducting accelerating structure. An electron beam with the peak energy 130 ??? is transported on a target located apart of 100 m from recirculator. System of the focusing are designed allowing to gain on a target the required density of a beam. Tolerances on precision of an alignment of magnetooptical devices are calculated.

  12. Neutron spallation source and the Dubna cascade code

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, V; Goel, U; Barashenkov, V S

    2003-01-01

    Neutron multiplicity per incident proton, n/p, in collision of high energy proton beam with voluminous Pb and W targets has been estimated from the Dubna cascade code and compared with the available experimental data for the purpose of benchmarking of the code. Contributions of various atomic and nuclear processes for heat production and isotopic yield of secondary nuclei are also estimated to assess the heat and radioactivity conditions of the targets. Results obtained from the code show excellent agreement with the experimental data at beam energy, E < 1.2 GeV and differ maximum up to 25% at higher energy. (author)

  13. Analysis and optimization of minor actinides transmutation blankets with regards to neutron and gamma sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooyman Timothée

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous loading of minor actinides in radial blankets is a potential solution to implement minor actinides transmutation in fast reactors. However, to compensate for the lower flux level experienced by the blankets, the fraction of minor actinides to be loaded in the blankets must be increased to maintain acceptable performances. This severely increases the decay heat and neutron source of the blanket assemblies, both before and after irradiation, by more than an order of magnitude in the case of neutron source for instance. We propose here to implement an optimization methodology of the blankets design with regards to various parameters such as the local spectrum or the mass to be loaded, with the objective of minimizing the final neutron source of the spent assembly while maximizing the transmutation performances of the blankets. In a first stage, an analysis of the various contributors to long- and short-term neutron and gamma source is carried out whereas in a second stage, relevant estimators are designed for use in the effective optimization process, which is done in the last step. A comparison with core calculations is finally done for completeness and validation purposes. It is found that the use of a moderated spectrum in the blankets can be beneficial in terms of final neutron and gamma source without impacting minor actinides transmutation performances compared to more energetic spectrum that could be achieved using metallic fuel for instance. It is also confirmed that, if possible, the use of hydrides as moderating material in the blankets is a promising option to limit the total minor actinides inventory in the fuel cycle. If not, it appears that focus should be put upon an increased residence time for the blankets rather than an increase in the acceptable neutron source for handling and reprocessing.

  14. Analysis and optimization of minor actinides transmutation blankets with regards to neutron and gamma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooymana, Timothée; Buiron, Laurent; Rimpault, Gérald

    2017-09-01

    Heterogeneous loading of minor actinides in radial blankets is a potential solution to implement minor actinides transmutation in fast reactors. However, to compensate for the lower flux level experienced by the blankets, the fraction of minor actinides to be loaded in the blankets must be increased to maintain acceptable performances. This severely increases the decay heat and neutron source of the blanket assemblies, both before and after irradiation, by more than an order of magnitude in the case of neutron source for instance. We propose here to implement an optimization methodology of the blankets design with regards to various parameters such as the local spectrum or the mass to be loaded, with the objective of minimizing the final neutron source of the spent assembly while maximizing the transmutation performances of the blankets. In a first stage, an analysis of the various contributors to long and short term neutron and gamma source is carried out while in a second stage, relevant estimators are designed for use in the effective optimization process, which is done in the last step. A comparison with core calculations is finally done for completeness and validation purposes. It is found that the use of a moderated spectrum in the blankets can be beneficial in terms of final neutron and gamma source without impacting minor actinides transmutation performances compared to more energetic spectrum that could be achieved using metallic fuel for instance. It is also confirmed that, if possible, the use of hydrides as moderating material in the blankets is a promising option to limit the total minor actinides inventory in the fuel cycle. If not, it appears that focus should be put upon an increased residence time for the blankets rather than an increase in the acceptable neutron source for handling and reprocessing.

  15. The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, T

    2008-12-23

    Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT

  16. UCN sources at external beams of thermal neutrons. An example of PIK reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lychagin, E.V., E-mail: lychag@nf.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6 Joliot-Curie, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Mityukhlyaev, V.A., E-mail: victim@pnpi.spb.ru [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Roscha, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Muzychka, A.Yu., E-mail: muz@nf.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6 Joliot-Curie, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Nekhaev, G.V., E-mail: grigorijnekhaev@yandex.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6 Joliot-Curie, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Nesvizhevsky, V.V., E-mail: nesvizhevsky@ill.eu [Institut Max von Laue – Paul Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38042 (France); Onegin, M.S., E-mail: oneginm@gmail.com [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Roscha, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Sharapov, E.I., E-mail: sharapov@nf.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6 Joliot-Curie, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Strelkov, A.V., E-mail: str@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6 Joliot-Curie, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium ({sup 4}He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of application of this idea, which consists of installing {sup 4}He UCN source in the beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with moderator-reflector, which plays the role of cold neutron (CN) source feeding the UCN source. CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator–reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of {sup 4}He source with solid methane (CH{sub 4}) or/and liquid deuterium (D{sub 2}) moderator–reflector. We show that such a source with CH{sub 4} moderator–reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1·10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}, and the UCN production rate of ~2·10{sup 7} s{sup −1}. These values are respectively 1000 and 20 times larger than those for the most intense UCN user source. The UCN density in a source with D{sub 2} moderator-reflector would reach the value of ~2·10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}, and the UCN production rate would be equal ~8·10{sup 7} s{sup −1}. Installation of such a source in a beam of CNs would slightly increase the density and production rate.

  17. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one

  18. Continuous monitoring of a mountain snowpack in the Austrian Alps by above-ground neutron sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattan, Paul; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.; Schöber, Johannes; Fey, Christine; Francke, Till; Huttenlau, Matthias; Achleitner, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    In alpine catchments the knowledge of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous dynamics of snow accumulation and depletion is crucial for modelling and managing water resources. While snow covered area can be retrieved operationally from remote sensing data, continuous measurements of other snow state variables like snow depth (SD) or snow water equivalent (SWE) remain challenging. Existing methods of retrieving both variables in alpine terrain face severe issues like a lack of spatial representativeness, labour-intensity or discontinuity in time. Recently, promising new measurement techniques combining a larger support with low maintenance cost like above-ground gamma-ray scintillators, GPS interferometric reflectometry or above-ground cosmic-ray neutron sensors (CRNS) have been suggested. While CRNS has proven its potential for monitoring soil moisture in a wide range of environments and applications, the empirical knowledge of using CRNS for snowpack monitoring is still very limited and restricted to shallow snowpacks with rather uniform evolution. The characteristics of an above-ground cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS) were therefore evaluated for monitoring a mountain snowpack in the Austrian Alps (Kaunertal, Tyrol) during three winter seasons. The measurement campaign included a number of measurements during the period from 03/2014 to 06/2016: (i) neutron count measurements by CRNS, (ii) continuous point-scale SD and SWE measurements from an automatic weather station and (iii) 17 Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) with simultaneous SD and SWE surveys. The highest accumulation in terms of SWE was found in 04/2014 with 600 mm. Neutron counts were compared to all available snow data. While previous studies suggested a signal saturation at around 100 mm of SWE, no complete signal saturation was found. A strong non-linear relation was found for both SD and SWE with best fits for spatially distributed TLS based snow data. Initially slightly different shapes were

  19. Thermal neutron equivalent dose assessment around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jarad, F; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M N; Al-jarallah, M I

    2002-01-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7) layer for thermal neutron detection via 10B(n,alpha)7Li and 6Li(n,alpha)3H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks x cm(-2) x microSv(-1) using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSvx h(-1) up to 11 microSv x h(-1). The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv x h(-1), which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems.

  20. Assessment of Laser-Driven Pulsed Neutron Sources for Poolside Neutron-based Advanced NDE – A Pathway to LANSCE-like Characterization at INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Markus [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bourke, Mark Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocko, Michael Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Glenzer, Siegfried [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Leemans, Wim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siders, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Haefner, Constantin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-19

    A variety of opportunities for characterization of fresh nuclear fuels using thermal (~25meV) and epithermal (~10eV) neutrons have been documented at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They include spatially resolved non-destructive characterization of features, isotopic enrichment, chemical heterogeneity and stoichiometry. The LANSCE spallation neutron source is well suited in neutron fluence and temporal characteristics for studies of fuels. However, recent advances in high power short pulse lasers suggest that compact neutron sources might, over the next decade, become viable at a price point that would permit their consideration for poolside characterization on site at irradiation facilities. In a laser-driven neutron source the laser is used to accelerate deuterium ions into a beryllium target where neutrons are produced. At this time, the technology is new and their total neutron production is approximately four orders of magnitude less than a facility like LANSCE. However, recent measurements on a sub-optimized system demonstrated >1010 neutrons in sub-nanosecond pulses in predominantly forward direction. The compactness of the target system compared to a spallation target may allow exchanging the target during a measurement to e.g. characterize a highly radioactive sample with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons as well as hard X-rays, thus avoiding sample handling. At this time several groups are working on laser-driven neutron production and are advancing concepts for lasers, laser targets, and optimized neutron target/moderator systems. Advances in performance sufficient to enable poolside fuels characterization with LANSCE-like fluence on sample within a decade may be possible. This report describes the underlying physics and state-of-the-art of the laser-driven neutron production process from the perspective of the DOE/NE mission. It also discusses the development and understanding that will be necessary to provide customized capability for

  1. Feasibility of a multi-purpose demonstration neutron source based on a compact superconducting spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaut, C., E-mail: christophe.guillemaut@ccfe.ac.uk [Insituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Ciudad Universitaria, 04511 Coyoacán, D.F. (Mexico); Herrera Velázquez, J.J.E. [Insituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Ciudad Universitaria, 04511 Coyoacán, D.F. (Mexico); Suarez, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Asociación EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Tokamak neutron sources would allow near term applications of fusion such as fusion–fission hybrid reactors, elimination of nuclear wastes, production of radio-isotopes for nuclear medicine, material testing and tritium production. The generation of neutrons with fusion plasmas does not require energetic efficiency; thus, nowadays tokamak technologies would be sufficient for such purposes. This paper presents some key technical details of a compact (∼1.8 m{sup 3} of plasma) superconducting spherical tokamak neutron source (STNS), which aims to demonstrate the capabilities of such a device for the different possible applications already mentioned. The T-11 transport model was implemented in ASTRA for 1.5 D simulations of heat and particle transport in the STNS core plasma. According to the model predictions, total neutron production rates of the order of ∼10{sup 15} s{sup −1} and ∼10{sup 13} s{sup −1} can be achieved with deuterium/tritium and deuterium/deuterium respectively, with 9 MW of heating power, 1.4 T of toroidal magnetic field and 1.5 MA of plasma current. Engineering estimates indicate that such scenario could be maintained during ∼20 s and repeated every ∼5 min. The viability of most of tokamak neutron source applications could be demonstrated with a few of these cycles and around ∼100 cycles would be required in the worst cases.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkian, Mohsen, E-mail: mohsenm@ethz.ch

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a 252Cf source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a 252Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  4. SU-G-IeP4-04: DD-Neutron Source Collimation for Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, G; Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize collimation and shielding for a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for an inexpensive and compact clinical neutron imaging system. The envisioned application is cancer diagnosis through Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). Methods: Collimator designs were tested with an isotropic 2.5 MeV neutron source through GEANT4 simulations. The collimator is a 52×52×52 cm{sup 3} polyethylene block coupled with a 1 cm lead sheet in sequence. Composite opening was modeled into the collimator to permit passage of neutrons. The opening varied in shape (cylindrical vs. tapered), size (1–5 cm source-side and target-side openings) and aperture placements (13–39 cm from source-side). Spatial and energy distribution of neutrons and gammas were tracked from each collimator design. Parameters analyzed were primary beam width (FWHM), divergence, and efficiency (percent transmission) for different configurations of the collimator. Select resultant outputs were then used for simulated NSECT imaging of a virtual breast phantom containing a 2.5 cm diameter tumor to assess the effect of the collimator on spatial resolution, noise, and scan time. Finally, composite shielding enclosure made of polyethylene and lead was designed and evaluated to block 99.99% of neutron and gamma radiation generated in the system. Results: Analysis of primary beam indicated the beam-width is linear to the aperture size. Increasing source-side opening allowed at least 20% more neutron throughput for all designs relative to the cylindrical openings. Maximum throughput for all designs was 364% relative to cylindrical openings. Conclusion: The work indicates potential for collimating and shielding a DD neutron generator for use in a clinical NSECT system. The proposed collimator designs produced a well-defined collimated neutron beam that can be used to image samples of interest with millimeter resolution. Balance in output efficiency, noise reduction, and scan

  5. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  6. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  7. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); McDaniel, Floyd Del (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  8. New shielding material development for compact accelerator-driven neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Source (CANS, especially the transportable neutron source is longing for high effectiveness shielding material. For this reason, new shielding material is researched in this investigation. The component of shielding material is designed and many samples are manufactured. Then the attenuation detection experiments were carried out. In the detections, the dead time of the detector appeases when the proton beam is too strong. To grasp the linear range and nonlinear range of the detector, two currents of proton are employed in Pb attenuation detections. The transmission ratio of new shielding material, polyethylene (PE, PE + Pb, BPE + Pb is detected under suitable current of proton. Since the results of experimental neutrons and γ-rays appear as together, the MCNP and PHITS simulations are applied to assisting the analysis. The new shielding material could reduce of the weight and volume compared with BPE + Pb and PE + Pb.

  9. Experiment Automation with a Robot Arm using the Liquids Reflectometer Instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A [ORNL; Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL; Sundaram, Madhan [ORNL; Parizzi, Andre A [ORNL; Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Hoffmann, Michael C [ORNL; Greene, Gayle C [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Liquids Reflectometer instrument installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) enables observations of chemical kinetics, solid-state reactions and phase-transitions of thin film materials at both solid and liquid surfaces. Effective measurement of these behaviors requires each sample to be calibrated dynamically using the neutron beam and the data acquisition system in a feedback loop. Since the SNS is an intense neutron source, the time needed to perform the measurement can be the same as the alignment process, leading to a labor-intensive operation that is exhausting to users. An update to the instrument control system, completed in March 2013, implemented the key features of automated sample alignment and robot-driven sample management, allowing for unattended operation over extended periods, lasting as long as 20 hours. We present a case study of the effort, detailing the mechanical, electrical and software modifications that were made as well as the lessons learned during the integration, verification and testing process.

  10. Design status of an intense 14 MeV neutron source for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Z E; Cheng, S W; Jia, W B

    2002-01-01

    Design and development of an intense 14 MeV neutron source for cancer therapy is in progress at the Institute of Nuclear Research of Lanzhou University. The neutrons from the T(d,n) sup 4 He reaction are produced by bombarding a rotating titanium tritide target with a 40 mA deuteron beam at 600 keV. The designed neutron yield is 8x10 sup 1 sup 2 n/s and the maximum dose rate at a 100 cm source-to-skin distance is 25 cGy/min. The HV terminal, accelerating column and HV power supply are enclosed inside a stainless steel pressure vessel containing 6 atm SF sub 6 gas to provide the electrical insulation.

  11. Neutron Flux Monitoring Based on Blind Source Separation Algorithms in Moroccan TRIGA MARK II Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Arahmane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of fission chamber’s functioning modes, theoretical aspects of the nonnegative matrix factorization methods, and the opportunities that offer neutron data processing in order to achieve neutron flux monitoring tasks. Indeed, it is a part of research project that aimed at applying Blind Source Separation methods for in-core and ex-core neutron flux monitoring while analyzing the outputs of fission chamber. The latter could be used as a key issue for control, fuel management, safety concerns, and material irradiation experiments. The Blind Source Separation methods had been used in many scientific fields such as biomedical engineering and telecommunications. Recently, they were used for gamma spectrometry data processing. The originality of this research work is to apply these powerful methods to process the fission chamber output signals. We illustrated the effectiveness of this tool using simulated fission chamber signals.

  12. Measurement of the energy spectrum from the neutron source p lanned for IGISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Mattera, A; Rakopoulos, V; Lantz, M; Pomp, S; Solders, A; Al-Adili, A; Andersson, P; Hjalmarsson, A; Valldor-Blücher, B; Prokofiev, A; Passoth, E; Gentile, A; Bortot, D; Esposito, A; Introini, M V; Pola, A; Penttilä, H; Gorelov, D; Rinta-Antila, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the characterisation measurements of the energ y spectra from a Be (p,xn) neutron source to be installed at the IGISOL-JYFLTRA P facility for studies of neutron-induced independent fission yields. The measurements were performed at The Svedberg Laboratory (Uppsala, Sweden), during 50 hours of beam-time in June, 2012. A 30 MeV p roton beam impinged on a mock-up of the proton-neutron converter; this was a 5 mm-thick beryllium disc inserted in an aluminium holder, with a 1-cm t hick layer of cool- ing water on the backside. The geometry of the mock-up has bee n chosen to reproduce the one that will be used as the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP so urce. During the experiment, two configurations for the neutron so urce have been used: a fast neutron field, produced using the bare target; an d a moderated field, obtained adding a 10 cm-thick Polyethylene block after the t arget assembly. The neutron fields have been measured using an Extended Range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS), able to simultaneously determine ...

  13. Design of an electron-accelerator-driven compact neutron source for non-destructive assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, A.; Ikeda, S.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2017-09-01

    The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism remains one of the greatest challenges to international security, and the threat is constantly evolving. In order to prevent nuclear terrorism, it is important to avoid unlawful import of nuclear materials, such as uranium and plutonium. Development of technologies for non-destructive measurement, detection and recognition of nuclear materials is essential for control at national borders. At Tokyo Institute of Technology, a compact neutron source system driven by an electron-accelerator has been designed for non-destructive assay (NDA). This system is composed of a combination of an S-band (2.856 GHz) RF-gun, a tungsten target to produce photons by bremsstrahlung, a beryllium target, which is suitable for use in generating neutrons because of the low threshold energy of photonuclear reactions, and a moderator to thermalize the fast neutrons. The advantage of this system can accelerate a short pulse beam with a pulse width less than 1 μs which is difficult to produce by neutron generators. The amounts of photons and neutron produced by electron beams were simulated using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS 2.82. When the RF-gun is operated with an average electron beam current of 0.1 mA, it is expected that the neutron intensities are 1.19 × 109 n/s and 9.94 × 109 n/s for incident electron beam energies of 5 MeV and 10 MeV, respectively.

  14. SOURCES 4A: A Code for Calculating (alpha,n), Spontaneous Fission, and Delayed Neutron Sources and Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madland, D.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Estes, G.P.; Stewart, J.E.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.; Parish, T.A.; Brown, T.H.; England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Charlton, W.S.

    1999-09-01

    SOURCES 4A is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to the decay of radionuclides. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., a mixture of {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 43 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 89 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron source. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem.

  15. INEL and ISU BNCT research using a 2 MeV RFQ-based neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A radio frequency quadrapole (RFQ) proton linear accelerator manufactured by AccSys Corp. was purchased by the U.S. Department of Energy and was installed in the Particle Beam Laboratory at Idaho State University (ISU). It is available for physics studies consistent with the INEL mission such as those related to accelerator produced neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). It is an AccSys model PL-1 and is designed to produce 2 MeV protons at an average current of 150{mu}A. The overall objective of the INEL BNCT/ISU collaborative program is to evaluate neutron filter design concepts which use a 2 MeV proton accelerator with a lithium target as the neutron source. This paper will discuss the overall plan of INEL/ISU collaborative program and how it relates to other university and government laboratory studies, the methods being employed in this study and results of neutron spectra and angular distribution measurements for different lithium target configurations.

  16. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  17. Neutrons for technology and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeppli, G.

    1995-10-01

    We reviewed recent work using neutrons generated at nuclear reactors an accelerator-based spallation sources. Provided that large new sources become available, neutron beams will continue to have as great an impact on technology and science as in the past.

  18. Research activities on structure materials of spallation neutron source at SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.S.; Dai, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    With the growing interests on powerful spallation neutron sources, especially with liquid metal targets, and accelerator driven energy systems, spallation materials science and technology have been received wide attention. At SINQ, material research activities are focused on: a) liquid metal corrosion; b) radiation damage; and c) interaction of corrosion and radiation damage. (author) 1 fig., refs.

  19. SOURCES 4C : a code for calculating ([alpha],n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, W. B. (William B.); Perry, R. T. (Robert T.); Shores, E. F. (Erik F.); Charlton, W. S. (William S.); Parish, Theodore A.; Estes, G. P. (Guy P.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Arthur, Edward D. (Edward Dana),; Bozoian, Michael; England, T. R.; Madland, D. G.; Stewart, J. E. (James E.)

    2002-01-01

    SOURCES 4C is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to radionuclide decay. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., an intimate mixture of a-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code provides the magnitude and spectra, if desired, of the resultant neutron source in addition to an analysis of the'contributions by each nuclide in the problem. LASTCALL, a graphical user interface, is included in the code package.

  20. Continuous monitoring of snowpack dynamics in alpine terrain by aboveground neutron sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattan, Paul; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.; Schöber, Johannes; Fey, Christine; Kormann, Christoph; Huttenlau, Matthias; Achleitner, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    The characteristics of an aboveground cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS) are evaluated for monitoring a mountain snowpack in the Austrian Alps from March 2014 to June 2016. Neutron counts were compared to continuous point-scale snow depth (SD) and snow-water-equivalent (SWE) measurements from an automatic weather station with a maximum SWE of 600 mm (April 2014). Several spatially distributed Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS)-based SD and SWE maps were additionally used. A strong nonlinear correlation is found for both SD and SWE. The representative footprint of the CRNS is in the range of 230-270 m. In contrast to previous studies suggesting signal saturation at around 100 mm of SWE, no complete signal saturation was observed. These results imply that CRNS could be transferred into an unprecedented method for continuous detection of spatially averaged SD and SWE for alpine snowpacks, though with sensitivity decreasing with increasing SWE. While initially different functions were found for accumulation and melting season conditions, this could be resolved by accounting for a limited measurement depth. This depth limit is in the range of 200 mm of SWE for dense snowpacks with high liquid water contents and associated snow density values around 450 kg m-3 and above. In contrast to prior studies with shallow snowpacks, interannual transferability of the results is very high regardless of presnowfall soil moisture conditions. This underlines the unexpectedly high potential of CRNS to close the gap between point-scale measurements, hydrological models, and remote sensing of the cryosphere in alpine terrain.

  1. Computational characterization and experimental validation of the thermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy research at the University of Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekman, J. D. [University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, 1513 Research Park Drive, Columbia, MO 65211-3400 (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hawthorne, M. F. [University of Missouri, International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine, 1514 Research Park Dr., Columbia, MO 65211-3450 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline constructed for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. Validation protocols based on neutron activation spectrometry measurements and rigorous least-square adjustment techniques show that the beam produces a neutron spectrum that has the anticipated level of thermal neutron flux and a somewhat higher than expected, but radio-biologically insignificant, epithermal neutron flux component. (authors)

  2. Test of adiabatic spin flippers for application at pulsed neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraan, W.H. E-mail: kraan@iri.tudelft.nl; Grigoriev, S.V.; Rekveldt, M.Th.; Fredrikze, H.; Vroege, C.F. de; Plomp, J

    2003-09-11

    Experimental results on the flipping efficiency are shown for a set of 2 V-coils as spin flipper and for a high-frequency flipper with adiabatic transition. The influence of the adiabaticity parameter is discussed. The merits of these adiabatic flippers are compared with the use of 'monochromatic' flippers, when operated in a beam from a pulsed neutron source. It is concluded that for 'long pulse' sources adiabatic flippers will be superior.

  3. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Akimov, D; Barbeau, P; Barton, P; Bolozdynya, A; Cabrera-Palmer, B; Cavanna, F; Cianciolo, V; Collar, J; Cooper, R J; Dean, D; Efremenko, Y; Etenko, A; Fields, N; Foxe, M; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fomin, N; Gallmeier, F; Garishvili, I; Gerling, M; Green, M; Greene, G; Hatzikoutelis, A; Henning, R; Hix, R; Hogan, D; Hornback, D; Jovanovic, I; Hossbach, T; Iverson, E; Klein, S R; Khromov, A; Link, J; Louis, W; Lu, W; Mauger, C; Marleau, P; Markoff, D; Martin, R D; Mueller, P; Newby, J; Orrell, J; O'Shaughnessy, C; Pentilla, S; Patton, K; Poon, A W; Radford, D; Reyna, D; Ray, H; Scholberg, K; Sosnovtsev, V; Tayloe, R; Vetter, K; Virtue, C; Wilkerson, J; Yoo, J; Yu, C H

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  4. Efficient, High Brightness Sources of Polarized Neutrons and Photons and Their Uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James E.

    2000-05-18

    There are many applications that could benefit from an easily accessible source of monochromatic, high brightness, polarized gammas and neutrons. A compact and comparatively inexpensive system is discussed based on a low-energy, electron storage ring with undulators that is expected to provide 10{sup 11} epithermal n/s and 10{sup 15} {gamma}/s. This method could provide a more efficient, cleaner way to produce epithermal neutrons than conventional means. Technical innovations that make it feasible are described together with some fundamental and practical applications that also take advantage of developments in the field of high power lasers.

  5. Elemental analysis of a concrete sample by capture gamma rays with a radioisotope neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collico Savio, D.L. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Mariscotti, M.A.J. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Ribeiro Guevara, S. [Laboratorio Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1995-03-15

    Gamma radiation from capture of neutrons in concrete has been studied in the energy region from 0.3 to 10.5 MeV with a HPGe spectrometer and an AmBe neutron source. A careful analysis of the Fe, Si, Ca, and Cl peak intensities made it possible to determine their relative concentrations in the sample. A comparison has been made between this nuclear method and chemical techniques, resulting in good agreement. The employment of these nuclear reactions constitutes a promising technique for the bulk analysis of samples in the concrete industry, because of its nondestructive and in-situ nature. ((orig.)).

  6. Design and development of quasi-monoenergetic neutron source using the inverse kinematics of (p,n) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Hachiya, S.; Nakamura, H.; Tanaka, Y. [Kyushu Univ., Department of Advanced Energy Engineering and Science, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Ikeda, N.; Sagara, K. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2000-03-01

    We has started to develop a new quasi-monoenergetic neutron source using the inverse kinematics of (p,n) reaction at Kyushu University Tandem Laboratory. A preliminary experiment was performed for a neutron source using the {sup 1}H({sup 13}C,n){sup 13}N reaction at an incident energy of 59.3 MeV. It was experimentally observed that monoenergetic neutrons with about 7 MeV were produced at 0deg in the laboratory system and the produced neutrons were collimated to a forward cone restricted by the kinematics. (author)

  7. The performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at a long-pulse spallation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R.

    1995-04-01

    The first conclusion the author wants to draw is that comparison of the performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at CW and pulsed sources is simpler for long-pulsed sources than it is for the short-pulse variety. Even though detailed instrument design and assessment will require Monte Carlo simulations (which have already been performed at Los Alamos for SANS and reflectometry), simple arguments are sufficient to assess the approximate performance of spectrometers at an LPSS and to support the contention that a 1 MW long-pulse source can provide attractive performance, especially for instrumentation designed for soft-condensed-matter science. Because coupled moderators can be exploited at such a source, its time average cold flux is equivalent to that of a research reactor with a power of about 15 MW, so only a factor of 4 gain from source pulsing is necessary to obtain performance that is comparable with the ILL. In favorable cases, the gain from pulsing can be even more than this, approaching the limit set by the peak flux, giving about 4 times the performance of the ILL. Because of its low duty factor, an LPSS provides the greatest performance gains for relatively low resolution experiments with cold neutrons. It should thus be considered complementary to short pulse sources which are most effective for high resolution experiments using thermal or epithermal neutrons.

  8. Technical concepts for a long-wavelength target station for the Spallation Neutron Source.

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, J M

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a major new user facility for materials research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), see the Spallation Neutron Source web site at: www.sns.gov/aboutsns/source/htm. The SNS will operate at a proton beam power of 1.4 MW delivered in short pulses at 60 Hz; this power level is an order of magnitude higher than that of the current most intense pulsed spallation neutron facility in the world, ISIS at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom: 160 kW at 50 Hz. When completed in 2006, the SNS will supply the research community with neutron beams of unprecedented intensity and a powerful, diverse instrument suite with exceptional capabilities. Together, these will enable a new generation of experimental studies of interest to chemists, condensed matter physicists, biologists, materials scientists, and engineers, in an ever-increasing range of applications. The Long-Wavelength Target Station (L...

  9. Plasma focus sources: Supplement to the neutron resonance radiography workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardi, V.; Brzosko, J.

    1989-01-01

    Since their discovery, plasma focus discharges have been recognized as very intense pulsed sources of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion-reaction neutrons, with outstanding capabilities. Specifically, the total neutron emission/shot, YN, and the rate of neutron emission, Y/sub n/, of an optimized plasma focus (PF) are higher than the corresponding quantities observed in any other type of pinched discharge at the same level of powering energy W/sub 0/. Recent developments have led to the concept and experimental demonstration of an Advanced Plasma Focus System (APF) that consists of a Mather-geometry plasma focus in which field distortion elements (FDEs) are inserted in the inter-electrode gap for increasing the neutron yield/shot, Y/sub n/. The FDE-induced redistribution of the plasma current increases Y/sub n/ by a factor approx. =5-10 above the value obtained without FDEs under otherwise identical conditions of operation of the plasma focus. For example, an APF that is fed by a fast capacitor bank with an energy, W/sub 0/ = 6kJ, and voltage, V/sub 0/ = 16.5 kV provides Y/sub n/ /congruent/ 4 /times/ 10/sup 9/ D-D neutrons/shot (pure D/sub 2/ filling) and Y/sub n/ = 4 /times/ 10/sup 11/ D-T neutrons/shot (filling is 50% deuterium and 50% tritium). The FDE-induced increase of Y/sub n/ for fixed values of (W/sub 0/, V/sub 0/), the observed scaling law Y/sub n/ /proportional to/ W/sub 0//sup 2/ for optimized plasma focus systems, and our experience with neutron scattering in bulk objects lead us to the conclusion that we can use an APF as a source of high-intensity neutron pulses (10/sup 14/ n/pulse) in the field off neutron radiography (surface and bulk) with a nanosecond or millisecond time resolution.

  10. Integral experiments on thorium assemblies with D-T neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Rong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To validate nuclear data and code in the neutronics design of a hybrid reactor with thorium, integral experiments in two kinds of benchmark thorium assemblies with a D-T fusion neutron source have been performed. The one kind of 1D assemblies consists of polyethylene and depleted uranium shells. The other kind of 2D assemblies consists of three thorium oxide cylinders. The capture reaction rates, fission reaction rates, and (n, 2n reaction rates in 232Th in the assemblies are measured by ThO2 foils. The leakage neutron spectra from the ThO2 cylinders are measured by a liquid scintillation detector. The experimental uncertainties in all the results are analyzed. The measured results are compared to the calculated ones with MCNP code and ENDF/B-VII.0 library data.

  11. Integral experiments on thorium assemblies with D-T neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Yiwei; Feng, Song; Zheng, Lei; Lai, Caifeng; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Mei; Jiang, Li

    2017-09-01

    To validate nuclear data and code in the neutronics design of a hybrid reactor with thorium, integral experiments in two kinds of benchmark thorium assemblies with a D-T fusion neutron source have been performed. The one kind of 1D assemblies consists of polyethylene and depleted uranium shells. The other kind of 2D assemblies consists of three thorium oxide cylinders. The capture reaction rates, fission reaction rates, and (n, 2n) reaction rates in 232Th in the assemblies are measured by ThO2 foils. The leakage neutron spectra from the ThO2 cylinders are measured by a liquid scintillation detector. The experimental uncertainties in all the results are analyzed. The measured results are compared to the calculated ones with MCNP code and ENDF/B-VII.0 library data.

  12. A SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antici'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Rio, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2012-01-01

    A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 degrees to +15 degrees in

  13. Rapid calibaration of the control rod of miniature neutron source ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An innovative method of combining the well-known computer codes WIMS and CITATION in an interactive Windows environment to calculate the control rod worth and generate the calibration data/curve of single-contr-ol rod miniature source reactor (MNSR) types has been developed and tested. In the scheme, once ...

  14. Monte Carlo study on secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy: identification of the main source and reduction in the secondary neutron dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2009-10-01

    Recent successful results in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy allow the patient to live for a longer time and allow younger patients to receive the radiotherapy. Undesired radiation exposure in normal tissues far from the target volume is considerably lower than that close to the treatment target, but it is considered to be non-negligible in the estimation of the secondary cancer risk. Therefore, it is very important to reduce the undesired secondary neutron exposure in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy without influencing the clinical beam. In this study, the source components in which the secondary neutrons are produced during passive carbon-ion radiotherapy were identified and the method to reduce the secondary neutron dose effectively based on the identification of the main sources without influencing the clinical beam was investigated. A Monte Carlo study with the PHITS code was performed by assuming the beamline at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). At first, the authors investigated the main sources of secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy. Next, they investigated the reduction in the neutron dose with various modifications of the beamline device that is the most dominant in the neutron production. Finally, they investigated the use of an additional shield for the patient. It was shown that the main source is the secondary neutrons produced in the four-leaf collimator (FLC) used as a precollimator at HIAMC, of which contribution in the total neutron ambient dose equivalent is more than 70%. The investigations showed that the modification of the FLC can reduce the neutron dose at positions close to the beam axis by 70% and the FLC is very useful not only for the collimation of the primary beam but also the reduction in the secondary neutrons. Also, an additional shield for the patient is very effective to reduce the neutron dose at positions farther than 50 cm from the beam axis. Finally, they showed that the neutron dose can be

  15. Simulation of neutron multiplicity measurements using Geant4. Open source software for nuclear arms control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuett, Moritz

    2016-07-07

    Nuclear arms control, including nuclear safeguards and verification technologies for nuclear disarmament typically use software as part of many different technological applications. This thesis proposes to use three open source criteria for such software, allowing users and developers to have free access to a program, have access to the full source code and be able to publish modifications for the program. This proposition is presented and analyzed in detail, together with the description of the development of ''Open Neutron Multiplicity Simulation'', an open source software tool to simulate neutron multiplicity measurements. The description includes physical background of the method, details of the developed program and a comprehensive set of validation calculations.

  16. Calculated neutron air kerma strength conversion factors for a generically encapsulated Cf-252 brachytherapy source

    CERN Document Server

    Rivard, M J; D'Errico, F; Tsai, J S; Ulin, K; Engler, M J

    2002-01-01

    The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron air kerma strength conversion factor (S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f) is a parameter needed to convert the radionuclide mass (mu g) provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory into neutron air kerma strength required by modern clinical brachytherapy dosimetry formalisms indicated by Task Group No. 43 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The impact of currently used or proposed encapsulating materials for sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf brachytherapy sources (Pt/Ir-10%, 316L stainless steel, nitinol, and Zircaloy-2) on S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f was calculated and results were fit to linear equations. Only for substantial encapsulation thicknesses, did S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f decrease, while the impact of source encapsulation composition is increasingly negligible as Z increases. These findings are explained on the basis of the non-relativistic kinematics governing the majority of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron interactions. Neutron kerma and energy spectra resul...

  17. 124Sb-Be photo-neutron source for BNCT: Is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshanian, Mohadeseh; Rajabi, Ali Akbar; Kasesaz, Yaser

    2016-11-01

    In this research a computational feasibility study has been done on the use of 124SbBe photo-neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. For this purpose, a special beam shaping assembly has been designed to provide an appropriate epithermal neutron beam suitable for BNCT. The final result shows that using 150 kCi of 124Sb, the epithermal neutron flux at the designed beam exit is 0.23×109 (n/cm2 s). In-phantom dose analysis indicates that treatment time for a brain tumor is about 40 min which is a reasonable time. This high activity 124Sb could be achieved using three 50 kCi rods of 124Sb which can be produced in a research reactor. It is clear, that as this activity is several hundred times the activity of a typical cobalt radiotherapy source, issues related to handling, safety and security must be addressed.

  18. {sup 124}Sb–Be photo-neutron source for BNCT: Is it possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golshanian, Mohadeseh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahrood University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, Ali Akbar [Department of Physics, Shahrood University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kasesaz, Yaser, E-mail: ykasesaz@aeoi.org.ir [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    In this research a computational feasibility study has been done on the use of {sup 124}SbBe photo-neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. For this purpose, a special beam shaping assembly has been designed to provide an appropriate epithermal neutron beam suitable for BNCT. The final result shows that using 150 kCi of {sup 124}Sb, the epithermal neutron flux at the designed beam exit is 0.23×10{sup 9} (n/cm{sup 2} s). In-phantom dose analysis indicates that treatment time for a brain tumor is about 40 min which is a reasonable time. This high activity {sup 124}Sb could be achieved using three 50 kCi rods of {sup 124}Sb which can be produced in a research reactor. It is clear, that as this activity is several hundred times the activity of a typical cobalt radiotherapy source, issues related to handling, safety and security must be addressed.

  19. Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of neutrons from californium-252 source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Rekas, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Kim, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of neutrons from a Californium-252 source in the induction of various abnormalities in the Tradescantia clone 4430 stamen hair cells (TSH-assay) was studied. The special attention was paid to check whether any enhancement in effects caused by process of boron neutron capture is visible in the cells enriched with boron ions. Two chemicals (borax and BSH) were applied to introduce boron-10 ions into cells. Inflorescence, normal or pretreated with chemicals containing boron, were irradiated in the air with neutrons from a Cf-252 source at KAERI, Taejon, Korea. To estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of gene mutations of the neutron beam under the study, Tradescantia inflorescences, without any chemical pretreatment, were irradiated with various doses of X-rays. The ranges of radiation doses used were 0-0.1 Gy in neutrons and 0-0.5 Gy in X-rays. After the time needed to complete the postirradiation repair Tradescantia cuttings were transferred to Cracow, where screening of gene and lethal; mutations, cell cycle alterations in somatic cells have been done, and dose response relationships were figured. The maximal RBE values were estimated in the range of 4.6-6.8. Alterations of RBE value were observed; from 6.8 to 7.8 in the case of plants pretreated with 240 ppm of B-10 from borax, and 4.6 to 6.1 in the case of 400 ppm of B-10 from BSH. Results showed a slight, although statistically insignificant increase in biological efficacy of radiation from the Cf-252 source in samples pretreated with boron containing chemicals. (author)

  20. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  1. The Feasibility of Monitoring Continuous Wave Sources with Seismic Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claassen, J.P.; Elbring, G.; Ladd, M.

    1999-03-15

    This paper identifies and explores the technical requirements and issues associated with remotely monitoring continuous wave (CW) sources with seismic arrays. Potential approaches to this monitoring problem will be suggested and partially evaluated to expose the monitoring challenges which arise when realistic local geologies and cultural noise sources are considered. The selective directionality and the adaptive noise cancellation properties of arrays are required to observe weak signals while suppressing a colored background punctuated with an unknown distribution of point and sometimes distributive sources. The array is also required to characterize the emitters and propagation environment so as to properly focus on the CW sources of interest while suppressing the remaining emitters. The proper application of arrays requires an appreciation of the complexity of propagation in a non-homogeneous earth. The heterogeneity often limits the available spatial coherence and therefore the size of the army. This adversely impacts the array gain and the array's ability to carefully resolve various emitters. Arrays must also contend with multipath induced by the source and the heterogeneous earth. If the array is to focus on an emitter and realize an enhancement in the signal to noise ratio, methods must be sought to coherently add the desired signal components while suppressing interference which may be correlated with the desired signal. The impact of these and other issues on army design and processing are described and discussed.

  2. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallmeier, F. X., E-mail: gallmeierfz@ornl.gov; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS6466, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} to 20 × 20 mm{sup 2}. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments’ sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  3. The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A W; Simonen, T C

    2009-07-17

    This report summarizes discussions and conclusions of the workshop to 'Assess The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification'. The workshop was held at LBNL, Berkeley, CA on March 12, 2009. Most workshop attendees have worked on magnetic mirror systems, several have worked on similar neutron source designs, and others are knowledgeable of materials, fusion component, and neutral beams The workshop focused on the gas dynamic trap DT Neutron Source (DTNS) concept being developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in Novosibirsk, Russia. The DTNS may be described as a line source of neutrons, in contrast to a spallation or a D-Lithium source with neutrons beaming from a point, or a tokamak volume source. The DTNS is a neutral beam driven linear plasma system with magnetic mirrors to confine the energetic deuterium and tritium beam injected ions, which produce the 14 MeV neutrons. The hot ions are imbedded in warm-background plasma, which traps the neutral atoms and provides both MHD and micro stability to the plasma. The 14 MeV neutron flux ranges typically at the level of 1 to 4 MW/m2.

  4. Low-loss design for the high-intensity accumulator ring of the Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wei

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the low-loss design for the Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring [“Spallation Neutron Source Design Manual” (unpublished]. A hybrid lattice consisting of FODO arcs and doublet straights provides optimum matching and flexibility for injection and collimation. For this lattice, optimization focuses on six design goals: a space-charge tune shift low enough (below 0.15 to avoid strong resonances, adequate transverse and momentum acceptance for efficient beam collimation, injection optimized for desired target beam shape and minimal halo development, compensation of magnet field errors, control of impedance and instability, and prevention against accidental system malfunction. With an expected collimation efficiency of more than 90%, the uncontrolled fractional beam loss is expected to be at the 10^{-4} level.

  5. A Feasibility Study on the Inspection System Development of Underground Cavities Using Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Che Wook; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The detection efficiency using the gravimetry method is significantly low; therefore, it requires large surveying time. The magnetometry method detects the cavities by the magnitude of the magnetic field. However, the magnetometry method is problematical in urban areas due to pipes and electrical installations. GPR is the method that uses high frequency electromagnetic wave. This method is widely used for the inspection; however, the detection accuracy of sinkholes can be low in specific soil types. In this study, to verify the feasibility of the neutron source-based inspection system to detect the cavity detection, the Monte Carlo simulation was performed using neutron source. The analysis shows that the detection of the cavity with the given condition is possible when the diameter of cavity is over 100 cm. However, the detection efficiency can be enough increased if some optimization strategies for the inspection are developed. Also, it is expected that the proposed inspection method can detect the expected locations of the cavities.

  6. Studies Performed in Preparation for the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Henderson, Stuart; Holmes, Jeffrey Alan; Plum, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring will compress 1.5?1014, 1 GeV protons from a 1 ms bunch train to a single 695 ns proton bunch for use in neutron spallation. Due to the high beam power, unprecedented control of beam loss will be required in order to control radiation and allow for hands-on maintenance in most areas of the ring. A number of detailed investigations have been performed to understand the primary sources of beam loss and to predict and mitigate problems associated with radiation hot spots in the ring. The ORBIT particle tracking code is used to perform realistic simulations of the beam accumulation in the ring, including detailed modeling of the injection system, transport through the measured magnet fields including higher order multipoles, and beam loss and collimation. In this paper we present the results of a number of studies performed in preparation for the 2006 commissioning of the accumulator ring.

  7. Performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, J.; Sobolev, Yu.; Beck, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Hampel, G.; Heil, W.; Kieser, R.; Reich, T.; Trautmann, N.; Ziegner, M.

    2014-04-01

    The performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz with a maximum peak energy of 10MJ is described. The solid deuterium converter with a volume of cm3 (8mol), which is exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of n/cm2, delivers up to 240000 UCN ( m/s) per pulse outside the biological shield at the experimental area. UCN densities of 10 cm3 are obtained in stainless-steel bottles of 10 L. The measured UCN yields compare well with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source and to optimize its performance for the upcoming upgrade of the TRIGA Mainz into a user facility for UCN physics.

  8. Probing light sterile neutrino signatures at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the impact of a fourth sterile neutrino at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino detectors. Specifically, we explore the discovery potential of the TEXONO and COHERENT experiments to subleading sterile neutrino effects through the measurement of the coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering event rate. Our dedicated χ2-sensitivity analysis employs realistic nuclear structure calculations adequate for high purity sub-keV threshold Germanium detectors.

  9. Polarisation modulated crosscorrelation neutron spectroscopy using sup 3 He polarising filters on a pulsed source

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, W G

    1999-01-01

    A polarisation modulated cross-correlation spectrometer using polarised sup 3 He spin filters is outlined. Current developments in polarised sup 3 He technology indicate that this spectrometer will be viable on the third generation pulsed neutron sources now being planned, providing a novel spectroscopic tool for magnetic studies. This paper focusses on discussing the optimisation of the performance of the sup 3 He polarising filters.

  10. Initial global 2-D shielding analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source core and reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    This document describes the initial global 2-D shielding analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, the D{sub 2}O reflector, the reflector vessel, and the first 200 mm of light water beyond the reflector vessel. Flux files generated here will later serve as source terms in subsequent shielding analyses. In addition to reporting fluxes and other data at key points of interest, a major objective of this report was to document how these analyses were performed, the phenomena that were included, and checks that were made to verify that these phenomena were properly modeled. In these shielding analyses, the fixed neutron source distribution in the core was based on the `lifetime-averaged` spatial power distribution. Secondary gamma production cross sections in the fuel were modified so as to account intrinsically for delayed fission gammas in the fuel as well as prompt fission gammas. In and near the fuel, this increased the low-energy gamma fluxes by 50 to 250%, but out near the reflector vessel, these same fluxes changed by only a few percent. Sensitivity studies with respect to mesh size were performed, and a new 2-D mesh distribution developed after some problems were discovered with respect to the use of numerous elongated mesh cells in the reflector. All of the shielding analyses were performed sing the ANSL-V 39n/44g coupled library with 25 thermal neutron groups in order to obtain a rigorous representation of the thermal neutron spectrum throughout the reflector. Because of upscatter in the heavy water, convergence was very slow. Ultimately, the fission cross section in the various materials had to be artificially modified in order to solve this fixed source problem as an eigenvalue problem and invoke the Vondy error-mode extrapolation technique which greatly accelerated convergence in the large 2-D RZ DORT analyses. While this was quite effective, 150 outer iterations (over energy) were still required.

  11. Neutron and gamma spectra measurements and calculations in benchmark spherical iron assemblies with sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron source in the centre

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, B; Turzik, Z; Kyncl, J; Cvachovec, F; Trykov, L A; Volkov, V S

    2002-01-01

    The neutron and gamma spectra measurements have been made for benchmark iron spherical assemblies with the diameter of 30, 50 and 100 cm. The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron sources with different emissions were placed into the centre of iron spheres. In the first stage of the project, independent laboratories took part in the leakage spectra measurements. The proton recoil method was used with stilbene crystals and hydrogen proportional counters. The working range of spectrometers for neutrons is in energy range from 0.01 to 16 MeV, and for gamma from 0.40 to 12 MeV. Some adequate calculations have been carried out. The propose to carefully analyse the leakage mixed neutron and gamma spectrum from iron sphere of diameter 50 cm and then adopt that field as standard.

  12. Particle identification technique using grid ionization chamber at China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingtan; Fan, Ruirui; Zhang, Qingmin; He, Yuefeng; Sun, Zhijia; Zhou, Liang; Tang, Jingyu; Bai, Huaiyong; Jiang, Haoyu; Zhang, Guohui

    2017-11-01

    Back-n white neutron source at China Spallation Neutron Source facility requires a detector with charged-particle identification ability for measuring nuclear cross sections. Therefore, a grid ionization chamber (GIC) with an adjustable distance between the cathode and grid was designed and built. Moreover, a corresponding particle identification algorithm is proposed in order to use the signals of the anode (QA) and cathode (QC), or the signal (QA) of the anode and the time difference (Δ t) between the cathode and anode signals, based on the interactive behaviors of charged particles and the GIC's working principle. First, the GIC performance was measured using a 241Am α source for preliminary performance testing, which provided an energy resolution of 5.25%. Its good particle identification performance was demonstrated by identifying 3H and 4He from neutron reactions with 6Li using a 2D QC-QA plot and Δ t-QA plot. Furthermore, 3H and 4He can be completely distinguished from the updated 2D QC-QA plot and Δ t-QA plot, in which 3H with a small incident angle is selected. Finally, it was concluded that our GIC with the proposed particle identification algorithm could identify charged particles effectively for the future measurement of nuclear cross sections.

  13. Background Studies at the Spallation Neutron Source for the COHERENT Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Matthew; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is attempting a first measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab. CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction, and as a background for dark matter searches. COHERENT is placing a suite of four detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: point contact germanium detectors, CsI[Na] crystals, NaI[Tl] crystals, and single phase liquid argon. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high rates of backgrounds due to the low energy thresholds required. Accelerator-correlated neutrons are the most troublesome background for COHERENT because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove them. To understand these backgrounds, COHERENT features measurements from the SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC). Important neutron measurements from both SciBath and the NSC, as well as gamma measurements from the SNS basement location where the four detector technologies for COHERENT will be placed will be discussed. COHERENT collaborators are supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Sloan Foundation.

  14. A Petawatt-Laser-Driven, High-Flux Neutron Source for Fusion Micro-Materials Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, B. G.; Perkins, L. J.; Ditmire, T.; Rosen, M. D.; Perry, M. D.; Key, M. H.; Diaz de La Rubia, T.; Wolfer, W. G.

    1998-11-01

    We are examining the application of petawatt lasers to create beam-target fusion neutrons via ponderomotive-driven, electrostatic coupling. This offers a low cost, high-flux, “micro” 14MeV neutron source for testing tensile strengths of small ( ~100μm) fibers of C, Al_2O_3, SiC, etc., to ~100dpa. Such fibers can form porous fabric tubes for flowing coolant/breeders ( Flibe, LiPb, LiO_2-sand) in a various applications (direct-drive ICF, spheromaks, etc.). Under very short, intense laser heating of a thin tritium-frost layer, ejection of hot (multi-MeV) tail electrons driven by the ponderomotive pressure of the laser field competes with thermal electron heat conduction. Hot ions are ejected from the tritium layer by the resulting potential and move into a deuterium-ice substrate, pre-heated by the hot electrons. Beam-target fusion neutrons are produced at high efficiency (i.e., Q ~0.01-0.1 relative to Q ~0.001 for conventional solid, cold targets), while small target dimensions yield high neutron fluxes. Formal treatment of laser-induced electrostatic potentials is required to accurately model electron/ion transport.

  15. The D-D Neutron Generator as an Alternative to Am(Li) Isotopic Neutron Source in the Active Well Coincidence Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cleveland, Steven L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The 235U mass assay of bulk uranium items, such as oxide canisters, fuel pellets, and fuel assemblies, is not achievable by traditional gamma-ray assay techniques due to the limited penetration of the item by the characteristic 235U gamma rays. Instead, fast neutron interrogation methods such as active neutron coincidence counting must be used. For international safeguards applications, the most commonly used active neutron systems, the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC), Uranium Neutron Collar (UNCL) and 252Cf Shuffler, rely on fast neutron interrogation using an isotopic neutron source [i.e., 252Cf or Am(Li)] to achieve better measurement accuracies than are possible using gamma-ray techniques for high-mass, high-density items. However, the Am(Li) sources required for the AWCC and UNCL systems are no longer manufactured, and newly produced systems rely on limited supplies of sources salvaged from disused instruments. The 252Cf shuffler systems rely on the use of high-output 252Cf sources, which while still available have become extremely costly for use in routine operations and require replacement every five to seven years. Lack of a suitable alternative neutron interrogation source would leave a potentially significant gap in the safeguarding of uranium processing facilities. In this work, we made use of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Large Volume Active Well Coincidence Counter (LV-AWCC) and a commercially available deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator to examine the potential of the D-D neutron generator as an alternative to the isotopic sources. We present the performance of the LV-AWCC with D-D generator for the assay of 235U based on the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulations and measurements of depleted uranium (DU), low enriched uranium (LEU), and highly enriched uranium (HEU) items.

  16. Continuous speech segmentation determined by blind source separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.; Xie, Da-Hong

    1998-03-01

    One of the problems of 5 percent error rate encountered in continuous speech recognition is partly due to the difficulty in the identification of a mixed up to two phonemes in a close concatenation. For instance, one speaks of 'Let's go' instead of 'Let us go'. There are two kinds of speech segmentations: the linguistic segmentation and the acoustic segmentation. The linguistic segmentation relies on a combination of acoustic, lexical, semantic, and statistical knowledge sources, which has been studied. Daily spoken conversations are usually abbreviated for speakers' convenience. The acoustic segmentation is to separate the mixed sounds such as /ts/ into /t/ and /s/ for automatically finding linguistic units. Adaptive wavelet transform (AWT) developed by Szu is a linear superposition of banks of constant-Q zero-mean mother wavelets implemented by an ANN called a 'wavenet'. Each neuron is represented by a daughter wavelet, which can be an affine scale change of identical or different method wavelet for a continuous AWT. AWT was designed for the cocktail party effect and to solve the acoustic segmentation of phonemes using a supervised learning ANN architecture. In this paper, we reviewed AWT from Independent Component Analysis viewpoint, and then applied blind source separation to the acoustic de-mixing and segmentation.

  17. (International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1991-02-14

    Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials.

  18. Stabilized operation of the Spallation Neutron Source radio-frequency quadrupole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-ho Kim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ had resonance control instabilities at duty factors higher than approximately 4%. Systematic investigations have been carried out to understand the cause of the instability and to ensure the operational stability of the RFQ. The most critical source of the instability is revealed to be an interaction between hydrogen released by beam bombardments and the RFQ rf field resulting in a discharge, which consumes additional rf power and could cause the RFQ to operate in an unstable region. This paper reports improvement of the SNS RFQ operational stability based on the findings during the SNS operation.

  19. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source: A White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Bolozdynya, A; Efremenko, Y; Garvey, G T; Gudkov, V; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hix, W R; Louis, W C; Link, J M; Markoff, D M; Mills, G B; Patton, K; Ray, H; Scholberg, K; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C; White, D H; Yen, S; Yoo, J

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this document, the product of a workshop at the SNS in May 2012, we describe this free, high-quality stopped-pion neutrino source and outline various physics that could be done using it. We describe without prioritization some specific experimental configurations that could address these physics topics.

  20. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source: A White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolozdynya, A. [Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Cavanna, F. [INFN, Aquila; Efremenko, Y. [Tennessee U.; Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos; Gudkov, V. [South Carolina U.; Hatzikoutelis, A. [Tennessee U.; Hix, W. R. [Oak Ridge; Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos; Link, J. M. [Virginia Tech.; Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central U.; Mills, G. B. [Los Alamos; Patton, K. [North Carolina State U.; Ray, H. [Florida U.; Scholberg, K. [Duke U.; Van de Water, R. G. [Los Alamos; Virtue, C. [Laurentian U.; White, D. H. [Los Alamos; Yen, S. [TRIUMF; Yoo, J. [Fermilab

    2012-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this document, the product of a workshop at the SNS in May 2012, we describe this free, high-quality stopped-pion neutrino source and outline various physics that could be done using it. We describe without prioritization some specific experimental configurations that could address these physics topics.

  1. Deuteron nuclear data for the design of accelerator-based neutron sources: Measurement, model analysis, evaluation, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kin, Tadahiro; Araki, Shouhei; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Iwamoto, Osamu

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive research program on deuteron nuclear data motivated by development of accelerator-based neutron sources is being executed. It is composed of measurements of neutron and gamma-ray yields and production cross sections, modelling of deuteron-induced reactions and code development, nuclear data evaluation and benchmark test, and its application to medical radioisotopes production. The goal of this program is to develop a state-of-the-art deuteron nuclear data library up to 200 MeV which will be useful for the design of future (d,xn) neutron sources. The current status and future plan are reviewed.

  2. Energy spectra unfolding of fast neutron sources using the group method of data handling and decision tree algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl, E-mail: sahosseini@sharif.edu [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 8639-11365 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afrakoti, Iman Esmaili Paeen [Faculty of Engineering & Technology, University of Mazandaran, Pasdaran Street, P.O. Box: 416, Babolsar 47415 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-11

    Accurate unfolding of the energy spectrum of a neutron source gives important information about unknown neutron sources. The obtained information is useful in many areas like nuclear safeguards, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. In the present study, the energy spectrum of a poly-energetic fast neutron source is reconstructed using the developed computational codes based on the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) and Decision Tree (DT) algorithms. The neutron pulse height distribution (neutron response function) in the considered NE-213 liquid organic scintillator has been simulated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT computational code (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology). The developed computational codes based on the GMDH and DT algorithms use some data for training, testing and validation steps. In order to prepare the required data, 4000 randomly generated energy spectra distributed over 52 bins are used. The randomly generated energy spectra and the simulated neutron pulse height distributions by MCNPX-ESUT for each energy spectrum are used as the output and input data. Since there is no need to solve the inverse problem with an ill-conditioned response matrix, the unfolded energy spectrum has the highest accuracy. The {sup 241}Am-{sup 9}Be and {sup 252}Cf neutron sources are used in the validation step of the calculation. The unfolded energy spectra for the used fast neutron sources have an excellent agreement with the reference ones. Also, the accuracy of the unfolded energy spectra obtained using the GMDH is slightly better than those obtained from the DT. The results obtained in the present study have good accuracy in comparison with the previously published paper based on the logsig and tansig transfer functions. - Highlights: • The neutron pulse height distribution was simulated using MCNPX-ESUT. • The energy spectrum of the neutron source was unfolded using GMDH. • The energy spectrum of the neutron source was

  3. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzec, B. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the authors have made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

  4. A neutron booster for spallation sources--application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Galy, J; Van Dam, H; Valko, J

    2002-01-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the mu m-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology--for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and 'fast' islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module cou...

  5. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the author shave made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

  6. Bubble detector's evaluation for neutron field measurement in a very known source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramalho, Eduardo; Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: jdantas@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Reina, Luiz, E-mail: reina@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Facure, Alessandro, E-mail: facure@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Measurements on neutron fields, mainly for dosimetric purposes, have been a major concern for ionizing radiation workers, because of the radiation protection issues. The present work aims to study the using of bubble detectors in neutron dosimetry and the Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) was chosen for this task. Several experiments were performed in order to obtain spectra from such devices and their respective analysis and then they were compared to those which were obtained by other ways. An Am-Be calibration neutron source from Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IRD/CNEN) was used and its spectrum was compared to the one obtained by BDS. The possibility of the use of such devices as ambient dosimeters was also evaluated. Despite the uncertainties, especially in the lowest energy thresholds, the spectrum from BDS is in good agreement with the known ones and the use of BDS as a dosimeter demands a more detailed study due to some characteristics of the Am-Be source that produce high uncertainties in low energy thresholds. (author)

  7. A GDT-based fusion neutron source for academic and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Mirnov, V. V.; Peterson, E. E.; Waleffe, R.; Wallace, J.; Harvey, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    The design of a fusion neutron source based on the gas dynamic trap (GDT) configuration is underway. The motivation is both the ends and the means. There are immediate applications for neutrons including medical isotope production and actinide burners. Taking the next step in the magnetic mirror path will leverage advances in high-temperature superconducting magnets and additive manufacturing in confining a fusion plasma, and both the technological and physics bases exist. Recent breakthrough results at the GDT facility in Russia demonstrate stable confinement of a beta 60% mirror plasma at high Te ( 1 keV). These scale readily to a fusion neutron source with an increase in magnetic field, mirror ratio, and ion energy. Studies of a next-step compact device focus on calculations of MHD equilibrium and stability, and Fokker-Planck modeling to optimize the heating scenario. The conceptualized device uses off-the-shelf MRI magnets for a 1 T central field, REBCO superconducting mirror coils (which can currently produce fields in excess of 30T), and existing 75 keV NBI and 140 GHz ECRH. High harmonic fast wave injection is damped on beam ions, dramatically increasing the fusion reactivity for an incremental bump in input power. MHD stability is achieved with the vortex confinement scheme, where a biasing profile imposes optimal ExB rotation of the plasma. Liquid metal divertors are being considered in the end cells. Work supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation.

  8. Simulation of e-{gamma}-n targets by FLUKA and measurement of neutron flux at various angles for accelerator based neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-10-15

    A 6 MeV Race track Microtron (an electron accelerator) based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. The bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by impinging 6 MeV electron on the e-{gamma} primary target, was made to fall on the {gamma}-n secondary target to produce neutrons. The optimisation of bremsstrahlung and neutron producing target along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium and the measured fluxes were 1.1878 x 10{sup 5}, 0.9403 x 10{sup 5}, 0.7428 x 10{sup 5}, 0.6274 x 10{sup 5}, 0.5659 x 10{sup 5}, 0.5210 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}/s at 0{sup o}, 30{sup o}, 60{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 115{sup o}, 140{sup o} respectively. The results indicate that the neutron flux was found to be decreased as increase in the angle and in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  9. Beam shaping assembly of a D-T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-08-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D-T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D-T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor.

  10. Versatile fusion source integrator AFSI for fast ion and neutron studies in fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, Paula; Varje, Jari; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Asunta, Otto; Giroud, Carine; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Weisen, Henri; JET Contributors, The

    2018-01-01

    ASCOT Fusion Source Integrator AFSI, an efficient tool for calculating fusion reaction rates and characterizing the fusion products, based on arbitrary reactant distributions, has been developed and is reported in this paper. Calculation of reactor-relevant D–D, D–T and D–3He fusion reactions has been implemented based on the Bosch–Hale fusion cross sections. The reactions can be calculated between arbitrary particle populations, including Maxwellian thermal particles and minority energetic particles. Reaction rate profiles, energy spectra and full 4D phase space distributions can be calculated for the non-isotropic reaction products. The code is especially suitable for integrated modelling in self-consistent plasma physics simulations as well as in the Serpent neutronics calculation chain. Validation of the model has been performed for neutron measurements at the JET tokamak and the code has been applied to predictive simulations in ITER.

  11. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources using spherical harmonic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, P. L.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Grim, G.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.

    2017-11-01

    Neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray imaging are important diagnostic tools at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measuring the two-dimensional (2D) size and shape of the neutron producing region, for probing the remaining ablator and measuring the extent of the DT plasmas during the stagnation phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. Due to the difficulty and expense of building these imagers, at most only a few two-dimensional projections images will be available to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) sources. In this paper, we present a technique that has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources from a minimal number of 2D projections using spherical harmonics decomposition. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from experimental neutron and x-ray data collected at OMEGA and NIF.

  13. Recent advances in high pressure neutron scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulk, C.; dos Santos, A.; Klug, D.; Guthrie, M.; Machida, S.; Molaison, J.

    2012-12-01

    There have been significant improvements in the operation of the high pressure diffractometer, SNAP, at the Spallation Neutron Source over the past two years. This talk will highlight the current capacities which include low temperature systems, high temperature systems, and the introduction of new pressure cell technology that is based on supported diamond anvils and, with advances in software, is particularly suited for powder diffraction. Specific examples of our recent research will focus on high pressure transitions in hydrogen bonded systems such as methane and CO2 hydrate. The high pressure hexagonal phase of methane hydrate is studied to determine the nature of the hydrate cage loading, this provides detailed experimental data that will lead to better intermolecular potentials for methane - methane interactions, particularly when methane molecules are in close contact and strongly repelling. The high pressure structural systematics of carbon dioxide hydrate is reported. While the structural transformation sequence of most hydrates progress from sI (or sII) to the hexagonal form then to a flied ice structure, CO2 hydrate is an example of a system that skips the hexagonal phase and transforms directly into the filled ice structure. Finally examples of using SNAP to study disorder in amorphous systems will be given. Particularly amorphous vapor co-deposits of water, known as amorphous solid water, and clathrate forming molecules such as CO2, and the structural response of these systems to increased pressure at low temperature.

  14. High-density ultracold neutron sources for the WWR-M and PIK reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A. P., E-mail: serebrov@pnpi.spb.ru; Fomin, A. K.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Ivanov, S. A.; Erykalov, A. N.; Onegin, M. S. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gridnev, K. A. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    It is proposed to equip the PIK and WWR-M research reactors at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) with high-density ultracold neutron (UCN) sources, where UCNs will be obtained based on the effect of their accumulation in superfluid helium (due to the specific features of this quantum fluid). The maximum UCN storage time in superfluid helium is obtained at temperatures on the order of 1 K. These sources are expected to yield UCN densities of 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, i.e., approximately three orders of magnitude higher than the density from existing UCN sources throughout the world. The development of highest intensity UCN sources will make PNPI an international center of fundamental UCN research.

  15. Basics of Neutrons for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-05

    These are slides from a presentation on the basics of neutrons. A few topics covered are: common origins of terrestrial neutron radiation, neutron sources, neutron energy, interactions, detecting neutrons, gammas from neutron interactions, neutron signatures in gamma-ray spectra, neutrons and NaI, neutron fluence to dose (msV), instruments' response to neutrons.

  16. Determination of neutron spectrum outside the lateral shielding of Taiwan Photon Source using high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A homemade Bonner cylinder spectrometer was used to determine the neutron spectrum from thermal energy up to several GeV at a heavily-shielded light source facility. The spectrometer, similar to the design of Bonner spheres, features high sensitivity of neutron detection because of using a long cylindrical 3He proportional counter. The spectrum measurement was performed during the facility commissioning by intentionally parking the injected electrons at the septum of the storage ring. Based on a high-fidelity FLUKA simulation, the predicted neutron spectrum at the location of measurement was adopted as the initial guess of spectrum unfolding. The unfolded result indicated an underestimation of the calculated neutron spectrum in the high-energy portion, leading to a substantial revision of the neutron dose rate at the location.

  17. MCNP simulation of the incident and Albedo neutron response of the IRD Albedo Neutron Dosemeter for {sup 241}Am-Be moderated sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Martins, Marcelo M.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P. da, E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The IRD TLD Albedo dosemeter measures both incident and albedo neutron component. The incident to Albedo ratio is used to take into account the energy dependence of its response. In this paper, the behavior of the IRD Albedo dosemeter response as a function of the incident to Albedo ratio for {sup 241}Am-Be sources was simulated to improve its algorithm. The simulation was performed in MCNPX transport code and presents a good agreement with experimental measurements. The results obtained in this work are very useful to improve the accuracy of the IRD Albedo dosemeter at real neutron workplace. (author)

  18. Overview of the conceptual design of the future VENUS beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Keener, Wylie S [ORNL; Davis, Larry E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    VENUS will be a world-class neutron-imaging instrument that will uniquely utilize the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) time-of-flight (TOF) capabilities to measure and characterize objects across several length scales (mm to m). When completed, VENUS will provide academia, industry and government laboratories with the opportunity to advance scientific research in areas such as energy, materials, additive manufacturing, geosciences, transportation, engineering, plant physiology, biology, etc. It is anticipated that a good portion of the VENUS user community will have a strong engineering/industrial research focus. Installed at Beamline 10 (BL10), VENUS will be a 25-m neutron imaging facility with the capability to fully illuminate (i.e., umbra illumination) a 20 cm x 20 cm detector area. The design allows for a 28 cm x 28 cm field of view when using the penumbra to 80% of the full illumination flux. A sample position at 20 m will be implemented for magnification measurements. The optical components are comprised of a series of selected apertures, T0 and bandwidth choppers, beam scrapers, a fast shutter to limit sample activation, and flight tubes filled with Helium. Techniques such as energy selective, Bragg edge and epithermal imaging will be available at VENUS

  19. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  20. Hydrogen-Oxygen Reaction Assessment in the HANARO Cold Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Kim, Young Ki; Kim, Seok Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2006-04-15

    Liquid hydrogen, filled in the moderator cell of the in-pool assembly (IPA), is selected as a moderator to moderate thermal neutrons into cold neutrons for the HANARO Cold Neutron Source. Since the IPA will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, the vacuum chamber (VC), the pressure boundary against the reactor, should withstand the detonation pressure so as to avoid any physical damage on the reactor under the hydrogen-oxygen chemical reaction. Accordingly, not only will the vacuum chamber be designed to keep its integrity against the hydrogen accident, but also the hydrogen and vacuum system will be designed with the leak-tight concept and also designed to be surrounded by the inert gas blanket system to prevent any air intrusion into the system. Also, in order to confirm the design concept of the CNS as well as VC integrity against the hydrogen accident, the hydrogen-oxygen chemical reaction is evaluated in this report by several methodologies: AICC methodology, Equivalent TNT detonation methodology, Explosion test result, and Calculation of VC strain under the maximum reflected explosion load.

  1. Energy spectra unfolding of fast neutron sources using the group method of data handling and decision tree algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl; Afrakoti, Iman Esmaili Paeen

    2017-04-01

    Accurate unfolding of the energy spectrum of a neutron source gives important information about unknown neutron sources. The obtained information is useful in many areas like nuclear safeguards, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. In the present study, the energy spectrum of a poly-energetic fast neutron source is reconstructed using the developed computational codes based on the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) and Decision Tree (DT) algorithms. The neutron pulse height distribution (neutron response function) in the considered NE-213 liquid organic scintillator has been simulated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT computational code (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology). The developed computational codes based on the GMDH and DT algorithms use some data for training, testing and validation steps. In order to prepare the required data, 4000 randomly generated energy spectra distributed over 52 bins are used. The randomly generated energy spectra and the simulated neutron pulse height distributions by MCNPX-ESUT for each energy spectrum are used as the output and input data. Since there is no need to solve the inverse problem with an ill-conditioned response matrix, the unfolded energy spectrum has the highest accuracy. The 241Am-9Be and 252Cf neutron sources are used in the validation step of the calculation. The unfolded energy spectra for the used fast neutron sources have an excellent agreement with the reference ones. Also, the accuracy of the unfolded energy spectra obtained using the GMDH is slightly better than those obtained from the DT. The results obtained in the present study have good accuracy in comparison with the previously published paper based on the logsig and tansig transfer functions.

  2. Radiological consequences of a bounding event sequence of Advanced Fusion Neutron Source (A-FNS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Makoto M., E-mail: nakamura.makoto@qst.go.jp; Ochiai, Kentaro

    2017-05-15

    Advanced Fusion Neutron Source (A-FNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source utilizing Li(d,xn) nuclear stripping reactions to simulate D-T fusion neutrons for testing and qualifying structural and functional materials of fusion reactor components, which is to be constructed at the Rokkasho site of National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Japan, in the near future. The purpose of the study reported here is to demonstrate the ultimate safety margins of A-FNS in the worst case of release of radioactive materials outside the A-FNS confinement system. For this purpose, we analyzed a ‘bounding event’ postulated in A-FNS. The postulated event sequence consists of fire of the purification system of the liquid Li loop during the maintenance, of mobilization of the tritium and {sup 7}Be, which are the impurities of the loop, and of the entire loss of confinement of the radioactive materials. We have calculated the early doses to the public due to the release of the tritium and {sup 7}Be source terms to the environment. The UFOTRI/COSYMA simulations have been performed considering the site boundary of 500 m away from the facility. The obtained results indicate that the early dose is below the level that requires the emergent public evacuation. Such results demonstrate that the A-FNS complies with the defined safety objective against its radiation hazard. The simulation results suggest that the inherent, ultimate safety characteristic found by this study may assist a licensing process for installation of A-FNS.

  3. Source Redshifts from Gravitational-Wave Observations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Messenger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inspiraling compact binaries as standard sirens will become an invaluable tool for cosmology when we enter the gravitational-wave detection era. However, a degeneracy in the information carried by gravitational waves between the total rest-frame mass M and the redshift z of the source implies that neither can be directly extracted from the signal; only the combination M(1+z, the redshifted mass, can be directly extracted from the signal. Recent work has shown that for third-generation detectors, a tidal correction to the gravitational-wave phase in the late-inspiral signal of binary neutron star systems can be used to break the mass-redshift degeneracy. Here, we propose to use the signature encoded in the postmerger signal allowing the accurate extraction of the intrinsic rest-frame mass of the source, in turn permitting the determination of source redshift and luminosity distance. The entirety of this analysis method and any subsequent cosmological inference derived from it would be obtained solely from gravitational-wave observations and, hence, would be independent of the cosmological distance ladder. Using numerical simulations of binary neutron star mergers of different mass, we model gravitational-wave signals at different redshifts and use a Bayesian parameter estimation to determine the accuracy with which the redshift and mass can be extracted. We find that for a known illustrative neutron star equation of state and using the Einstein telescope, the median of the 1σ confidence regions in redshift corresponds to ∼10%–20% uncertainties at redshifts of z<0.04.

  4. Investigating a cyclotron HM-30 based neutron source for BNCT of deep-seated tumors by using shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharyana; Riyatun; Octaviana, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    We have successfully proposed a simulation of a neutron beam-shaping assembly using MCNPX Code. This simulation study deals with designing a compact, optimized, and geometrically simple beam shaping assembly for a neutron source based on a proton cyclotron for BNCT purpose. Shifting method was applied in order to lower the fast neutron energy to the epithermal energy range by choosing appropriate materials. Based on a set of MCNPX simulations, it has been found that the best materials for beam shaping assembly are 3 cm Ni layered with 7 cm Pb as the reflector and 13 cm AlF3 the moderator. Our proposed beam shaping assembly configuration satisfies 2 of 5 of the IAEA criteria, namely the epithermal neutron flux 1.25 × 109 n.cm-2 s-1 and the gamma dose over the epithermal neutron flux is 0.18×10 -13 Gy.cm 2 n -1. However, the ratio of the fast neutron dose rate over neutron epithermal flux is still too high. We recommended that the shifting method must be accompanied by the filter method to reduce the fast neutron flux.

  5. Circular arc fuel plate stability experiments and analyses for the advanced neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The thin fuel plates planned for the Advanced Neutron Source are to be cooled by forcing heavy water at high velocity, 25 m/s, through thin cooling channels on each side of each plate. Because the potential for structural failure of the plates is a design concern, considerable effort has been expended in assessing this potential. As part of this effort, experimental flow tests and analyses to evaluate the structural response of circular arc plates have been conducted, and the results are given in this report.

  6. Overview of ten-year operation of the superconducting linear accelerator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-H.; Afanador, R.; Barnhart, D. L.; Crofford, M.; Degraff, B. D.; Doleans, M.; Galambos, J.; Gold, S. W.; Howell, M. P.; Mammosser, J.; McMahan, C. J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Peters, C.; Saunders, J. W.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2017-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has acquired extensive operational experience of a pulsed proton superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) as a user facility. Numerous lessons have been learned in its first 10 years operation to achieve a stable and reliable operation of the SCL. In this paper, an overview of the SNS SCL design, qualification of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and ancillary subsystems, an overview of the SNS cryogenic system, the SCL operation including SCL output energy history and downtime statistics, performance stability of the SRF cavities, efforts for SRF cavity performance recovery and improvement at the SNS, and maintenance activities for cryomodules are introduced.

  7. Novel directed search strategy to detect continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in low- and high-eccentricity binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaci, Paola; Astone, Pia; D'Antonio, Sabrina; Frasca, Sergio; Palomba, Cristiano; Piccinni, Ornella; Mastrogiovanni, Simone

    2017-06-01

    We describe a novel, very fast and robust, directed search incoherent method (which means that the phase information is lost) for periodic gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems. As a directed search, we assume the source sky position to be known with enough accuracy, but all other parameters (including orbital ones) are supposed to be unknown. We exploit the frequency modulation due to source orbital motion to unveil the signal signature by commencing from a collection of time and frequency peaks (the so-called "peakmap"). We validate our algorithm (pipeline), adding 131 artificial continuous-wave signals from pulsars in binary systems to simulated detector Gaussian noise, characterized by a power spectral density Sh=4 ×10-24 Hz-1 /2 in the frequency interval [70, 200] Hz, which is overall commensurate with the advanced detector design sensitivities. The pipeline detected 128 signals, and the weakest signal injected (added) and detected has a gravitational-wave strain amplitude of ˜10-24, assuming one month of gapless data collected by a single advanced detector. We also provide sensitivity estimations, which show that, for a single-detector data covering one month of observation time, depending on the source orbital Doppler modulation, we can detect signals with an amplitude of ˜7 ×10-25. By using three detectors, and one year of data, we would easily gain a factor 3 in sensitivity, translating into being able to detect weaker signals. We also discuss the parameter estimate proficiency of our method, as well as computational budget: sifting one month of single-detector data and 131 Hz-wide frequency range takes roughly 2.4 CPU hours. Hence, the current procedure can be readily applied in ally-sky schemes, sieving in parallel as many sky positions as permitted by the available computational power. Finally, we introduce (ongoing and future) approaches to attain sensitivity improvements and better accuracy on parameter estimates in view of the

  8. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  9. Recovery of {sup 241}Am/Be neutron sources, Wooster, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompkins, J.A.; Wannigman, D.; Hatler, V.

    1998-07-01

    In August 1997, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) submitted to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a partial list of licensed radioactive sealed sources to be recovered under a pilot project initiating Radioactive Source Recovery Program (RSRP) operations. The first of the pilot project recoveries was scheduled for September 1997 at Eastern Well Surveys in Wooster, Ohio, a company with five unwanted sealed sources on the NRC list. The sources were neutron emitters, each containing {sup 241}Am/Be with activities ranging from 2.49 to 3.0 Ci. A prior radiological survey had established that one of these sources, a Gulf Nuclear Model 71-1 containing 3 Ci of {sup 241}Am, was contaminated with {sup 241}Am and might be leaking. The other four sources were obsolete and could no longer be used by Eastern Well Surveys for their intended application in well-logging applications due to NRC decertification of these sources. All of the sources exceeded the limits established for Class C waste under 10 CFR 61.55 and, as a result, are the ultimate responsibility of the DOE under the provisions of PL 99-240. This report describes the cooperative effort between the DOE and NRC to recover the sources and transport them to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for deactivation under the RSRP. This operation alleviated any potential risk to the public health and safety from the site which might result from the leaking neutron sources or the potential mismanagement of unwanted sources. The on-site recovery occurred on September 23, 1997, and was performed by personnel from LANL and its contractor and was observed by staff from the Region III office of the NRC. All aspects of the recovery were successfully accomplished, and the sources were received at LANL on September 29, 1997. Experience gained during this operation will be used to formulate operational poilicies and procedures which will contribute to the eventual routine recovery operations of a full-scale RSRP.

  10. Analytical solution of neutron transport equation in an annular reactor with a rotating pulsed source; Resolucao analitica da equacao de transporte de neutrons em um reator anelar com fonte pulsada rotativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Paulo Cleber Mendonca

    2002-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution of the neutron transport equation in an annular reactor is presented with a short and rotating neutron source of the type S(x) {delta} (x- Vt), where V is the speed of annular pulsed reactor. The study is an extension of a previous study by Williams [12] carried out with a pulsed source of the type S(x) {delta} (t). In the new concept of annular pulsed reactor designed to produce continuous high flux, the core consists of a subcritical annular geometry pulsed by a rotating modulator, producing local super prompt critical condition, thereby giving origin to a rotating neutron pulse. An analytical solution is obtained by opening up of the annular geometry and applying one energy group transport theory in one dimension using applied mathematical techniques of Laplace transform and Complex Variables. The general solution for the flux consists of a fundamental mode, a finite number of harmonics and a transient integral. A condition which limits the number of harmonics depending upon the circumference of the annular geometry has been obtained. Inverse Laplace transform technique is used to analyse instability condition in annular reactor core. A regenerator parameter in conjunction with perimeter of the ring and nuclear properties is used to obtain stable and unstable harmonics and to verify if these exist. It is found that the solution does not present instability in the conditions stated in the new concept of annular pulsed reactor. (author)

  11. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  12. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  13. Structural design study of a proton beam window for a 1-MW spallation neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Teraoku, T; Ishikura, S; Kaminaga, M; Maekawa, F; Meigo, S I; Terada, A

    2003-01-01

    A 1-MW spallation neutron source aiming at materials and life science researches will be constructed under the JAERI-KEK High-intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC). A proton beam passes through a proton beam window, and be injected into a target of the neutron source. The proton beam window functions as a boundary wall between a high vacuum area in the proton beam line and a helium atmosphere at about atmospheric pressure in a helium vessel which contains the target and moderators. The proton beam window is cooled by light water because high heat-density is generated in the window material by interactions with the proton beam. Then, uniformity of the water flow is requested at the window to suppress a hot-spot that causes excessive thermal stress and cooling water boiling. Also, the window has to be strong enough in its structure for inner stress due to water pressure and thermal stress due to heat generation. In this report, we propose two types of proton beam windows; one flat-type that is easy to m...

  14. Mercury target R&D for the Oak Ridge spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; DiStefano, J.; Farrell, K.; Gabriel, T.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) incorporates liquid mercury as its reference target material. A flowing liquid target was selected mainly because of the increased power handling capability possible with the convective transport process. The major reasons for choosing mercury as the liquid target material are because it: (1) is a liquid at room temperature, (2) has good heat transport properties, and (3) has a high atomic number and mass density resulting in high neutron yield and source brightness. Since liquid targets are not widely utilized in presently operating accelerator targets and because of the challenges posed by the intense, pulsed thermal energy deposition ({approximately}20-100 kJ deposited during each 1-10 {mu}s pulse), considerable R&D is planned for the mercury target concept. The key feasibility issue that will be addressed in early R&D efforts are the effects of the thermal shock environment, which will include development and testing of approaches to mitigate these effects. Materials compatiblity and ES&H issues associated with the use of liquid mercury are also of major importance in early R&D efforts. A brief description of the mercury target design concept, results of initial evaluations of its performance characteristics, identification of its critical issues, and an outline of the R&D program aimed at addressing these issues will be presented.

  15. Upgrade of the ultracold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, J.; Ries, D.; Ross, K. U.; Siemensen, C.; Beck, M.; Geppert, C.; Heil, W.; Hild, N.; Karch, J.; Karpuk, S.; Kories, F.; Kretschmer, M.; Lauss, B.; Reich, T.; Sobolev, Y.; Trautmann, N.

    2017-11-01

    The performance of the upgraded solid deuterium ultracold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz is described. The current configuration stage comprises the installation of a He liquefier to run UCN experiments over long-term periods, the use of stainless steel neutron guides with improved transmission as well as sputter-coated non-magnetic 58NiMo alloy at the inside walls of the thermal bridge and the converter cup. The UCN yield was measured in a "standard" UCN storage bottle (stainless steel) with a volume of 32 litres outside the biological shield at the experimental area yielding UCN densities of 8.5/cm3; an increase by a factor of 3.5 compared to the former setup. The measured UCN storage curve is in good agreement with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source. The growth and formation of the solid deuterium converter during freeze-out are affected by the ortho/para ratio of the H2 premoderator.

  16. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Salehi; Dariush, Sardari; M. Salehi, Jozani

    2013-07-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  17. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-09

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects.

  18. Numerical calculation of transverse coupling impedances: Comparison to Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Doliwa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of beam dynamics and the localization of potential sources of instabilities are important tasks in the design of modern, high-intensity particle accelerators. In the case of synchrotrons and storage rings, coupling impedance data are needed to characterize the parasitic interaction of critical components with the beam. In this article we demonstrate the application of numerical field simulations to the computation of transverse kicker coupling impedances. Based on the 3D simulation results, a parametrized model is developed to incorporate the impedance of an arbitrary pulse-forming network attached to the kicker. Detailed comparisons of numerical results with twin-wire and direct measurements are discussed at the example of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker.

  19. Numerical calculation of transverse coupling impedances: Comparison to Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doliwa, B.; Arévalo, E.; Weiland, T.

    2007-10-01

    The study of beam dynamics and the localization of potential sources of instabilities are important tasks in the design of modern, high-intensity particle accelerators. In the case of synchrotrons and storage rings, coupling impedance data are needed to characterize the parasitic interaction of critical components with the beam. In this article we demonstrate the application of numerical field simulations to the computation of transverse kicker coupling impedances. Based on the 3D simulation results, a parametrized model is developed to incorporate the impedance of an arbitrary pulse-forming network attached to the kicker. Detailed comparisons of numerical results with twin-wire and direct measurements are discussed at the example of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker.

  20. A new method to determine in situ the transmission of a neutron-guide system at a reactor source

    CERN Document Server

    Haan, V O D; Gommers, R M; Labohm, F; Well, A A V; De Leege, P F A; Schebetov, A; Pusenkov, V

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a description of a new method to determine the transmission of neutron guides after they are installed in a beam-tube at a reactor source is given. The method is based on activation measurements of gold foils at the entrance of the beam-tube and at the exit of the neutron guides compared to Monte-Carlo calculations. In this method, a quality factor is defined as the ratio between the actual transmission and the theoretical maximum attainable transmission. This method is used to determine the quality of an optimised neutron-guide system developed for beam-tube R2 of the HOR. The HOR is a pool-type nuclear research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute of the Delft University of Technology. It is shown that the quality factors of the newly installed neutron guides are between 0.49 and 0.63.

  1. Global shielding analysis for the three-element core advanced neutron source reactor under normal operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations were performed for a model of the three-element core Advanced Neutron Source reactor design under normal operating conditions. The core consists of two concentric upper elements and a lower element radially centered in the annulus between the upper elements. The initial radiation transport calculations were performed with the DORT two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code using the 39-neutron-group/44-gamma-ray-group ANSL-V cross-section library, an S{sub 6} quadrature, and a P{sub 1} Legendre polynomial expansion of the cross sections to determine the fission neutron source distribution in the core fuel elements. These calculations were limited to neutron groups only. The final radiation transport calculations, also performed with DORT using the 39-neutron-group/44-gamma-ray-group ANSL-V cross-section library, an S{sub l0} quadrature, and a P{sub 3} Legendre polynomial expansion of the cross sections, produced neutron and gamma-ray fluxes over the full extent of the geometry model. Responses (or activities) at various locations in the model were then obtained by folding the appropriate response functions with the fluxes at those locations. Some comparisons were made with VENTURE-calculated (diffusion theory) 20-group neutron fluxes that were summed into four broad groups. Tne results were in reasonably good agreement when the effects of photoneutrons were not included, thus verifying the physics model upon which the shielding model was based. Photoneutrons increased the fast-neutron flux levels deep within the D{sub 2}0 several orders of magnitude. Results are presented as tables of activity values for selected radial and axial traverses, plots of the radial and axial traverse data, and activity contours superimposed on the calculational geometry model.

  2. External neutron source anomalies analysis using Hurst's exponent for the Myrrha reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrice Junior, Edson; Goncalves, Alessandro C., E-mail: ejunior@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeir, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Anomalous diffusion is usually marked by the non-linear growth of the variance in time, that is, the diffusion will be considered as anomalous if there is a deviation in the behaviour described before. This paper aims to identify anomalies in the neutron flux during the operation of an ADS (Accelerator Driven System) nuclear reactor as a result of a trip that originates in the proton accelerator as per project bases, from two different calculation methods for Hurst exponents. These methods are the R/S Method and the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) Method. For that the Myrrha Reactor will be simulated using the SERPENT code and the neutron source will be subjected to a production peak at a given instant. The Hurst exponent has a direct application on determining the order of derivatives in fractional point-kinetics equations and the estimate for the fractional derivative can be related as being twice that of Hurst's exponent, according to the co-variance function in the Gauss' processes. After getting the Hurst's exponent a numerically solution is proposed. This subject being a theme very much in focus nowadays. (author)

  3. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  4. Demonstrating the likely neutron star nature of five M31 globular cluster sources with Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann

    2016-01-01

    for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis...... are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested......We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those...

  5. Thermal-hydraulic design concept of the solid-target system of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, F.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.; Takeda, T.; Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In relation to thermal-hydraulic design of the N-Arena solid-target system of the JHF project, heat transfer experiments were performed to obtain experimental data systematically on heat transfer coefficient and CHF for vertical upward and horizontal flows in a thin rectangular channel simulating a coolant channel of the proposed spallation neutron source. Thermal-hydraulic correlations which can be used for design calculations were proposed based on the obtained data. Finally tentative results of feasibility study on maximum beam power which could be attained with a solid target were presented. The result indicated that the condition for the onset of nucleate boiling is the most significant limiting factor to the maximum beam power. (author)

  6. Transverse beam resonance in the superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A weak transverse resonance in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS superconducting linac is identified in computer simulations, and is believed to be one of the mechanisms behind measured beam losses. This weak resonance is induced by the nonlinear dodecapole component of the linac quadrupole magnets. It occurs when the linac focusing lattice has a transverse phase advance close to 60°. By reducing the phase advance to approximately 50° to avoid the resonance, we observe significant reduction in beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac. We present theory and computer simulation results supporting the notion that a suppression of the 60° resonance may contribute to reduction in the beam loss.

  7. Low-level rf control of Spallation Neutron Source: System and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengjie Ma

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The low-level rf control system currently commissioned throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS LINAC evolved from three design iterations over 1 yr intensive research and development. Its digital hardware implementation is efficient, and has succeeded in achieving a minimum latency of less than 150 ns which is the key for accomplishing an all-digital feedback control for the full bandwidth. The control bandwidth is analyzed in frequency domain and characterized by testing its transient response. The hardware implementation also includes the provision of a time-shared input channel for a superior phase differential measurement between the cavity field and the reference. A companion cosimulation system for the digital hardware was developed to ensure a reliable long-term supportability. A large effort has also been made in the operation software development for the practical issues such as the process automations, cavity filling, beam loading compensation, and the cavity mechanical resonance suppression.

  8. EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

  9. Aerodynamic levitation and laser heating: Applications at synchrotron and neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennet, L.; Pozdnyakova, I.; Drewitt, J.W.E.; Leydier, M.; Brassamin, S.; Zanghi, D.; Magazu, S.; Price, D.L. [CEMHTI and University of Orleans, 45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Cristiglio, V.; Kozaily, J.; Fischer, H.E.; Cuello, G.J.; Koza, M. [ILL, BP. 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Bytchkov, A. [ESRF, BP. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Thiaudiere, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gruner, S. [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz UT, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Greaves, G.N. [IMAPS, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Aerodynamic levitation is an effective way to suspend samples which can be heated with CO{sub 2} lasers. The advantages of this container-less technique are the simplicity and compactness of the device, making it possible to integrate it easily in different kinds of experiments. In addition, all types of materials can be used, including metals and oxides. The integration of aerodynamic levitation at synchrotron and neutron sources provides powerful tools to study the structure and dynamics of molten materials. We present here an overview of the existing techniques (electromagnetic levitation, electrostatic levitation, single-axis acoustic levitation, and aerodynamic levitation) and of the developments made at the CEMHTI in Orleans, as well as a few examples of experimental results already obtained. (authors)

  10. Detection of Special Nuclear Material from Delayed Neutron Emission Induced by a Dual-Particle Monoenergetic Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Michael F.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I

    2016-06-30

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n gamma)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time- dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  11. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I., E-mail: ijov@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the {sup 11}B(d,n γ){sup 12}C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from {sup 238}U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  12. Analysis of radiation environmental safety for China's Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Bin; Wu, Qing-Biao; Ma, Zhong-Jian; Zhang, Qing-Jiang; Li, Nan; Wu, Jing-Min; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Gang

    2010-07-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is going to be located in Dalang Town, Dongguan City in the Guangdong Province. In this paper we report the results of the parameters related with environment safety based on experiential calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. The main project of the accelerator is an under ground construction. On top there is a 0.5 m concrete and 5.0 m soil covering for shielding, which can reduce the dose out of the tunnel's top down to 0.2 μSv/h. For the residents on the boundary of the CSNS, the dose produced by skyshine, which is caused by the penetrated radiation leaking from the top of the accelerator, is no more than 0.68 μSv/a. When CSNS is operating normally, the maximal annual effective dose due to the emission of gas from the tunnel is 2.40×10-3 mSv/a to the public adult, and 2.29×10-3 mSv/a to a child, both values are two orders of magnitude less than the limiting value for control and management. CSNS may give rise to an activation of the soil and groundwater in the nearest tunnels, where the main productions are 3H, 7Be, 22Na, 54Mn, etc. But the specific activity is less than the exempt specific activity in the national standard GB13376-92. So it is safe to say that the environmental impact caused by the activation of soil and groundwater is insignificant. To sum up, for CSNS, as a powerful neutron source device, driven by a high-energy high-current proton accelerator, a lot of potential factors affecting the environment exist. However, as long as effective shieldings for protection are adopted and strict rules are drafted, the environmental impact can be kept under control within the limits of the national standard.

  13. Structural design study of a proton beam window for a 1-MW spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Terada, Atsuhiko; Maekawa, Fujio; Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Kaminaga, Masanori; Ishikura, Syuichi; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    A 1-MW spallation neutron source aiming at materials and life science researches will be constructed under the JAERI-KEK High-intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC). A proton beam passes through a proton beam window, and be injected into a target of the neutron source. The proton beam window functions as a boundary wall between a high vacuum area in the proton beam line and a helium atmosphere at about atmospheric pressure in a helium vessel which contains the target and moderators. The proton beam window is cooled by light water because high heat-density is generated in the window material by interactions with the proton beam. Then, uniformity of the water flow is requested at the window to suppress a hot-spot that causes excessive thermal stress and cooling water boiling. Also, the window has to be strong enough in its structure for inner stress due to water pressure and thermal stress due to heat generation. In this report, we propose two types of proton beam windows; one flat-type that is easy to manufacture, and the other, curved-type that has high stress resistivity. As a part of design study for the windows, evaluation of strength of structure and thermal hydraulic analysis were conducted. As a result, it was found that sufficient heat removal was assured with uniform water flow at the window, and stress caused by internal water pressure and thermal stress could be maintained below allowable stress values. Accordingly, it was confirmed that the proton beam window designs were feasible. (author)

  14. Basic of Neutron NDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this presentation are to introduce the basic physics of neutron production, interactions and detection; identify the processes that generate neutrons; explain the most common neutron mechanism, spontaneous and induced fission and (a,n) reactions; describe the properties of neutron from different sources; recognize advantages of neutron measurements techniques; recognize common neutrons interactions; explain neutron cross section measurements; describe the fundamental of 3He detector function and designs; and differentiate between passive and active assay techniques.

  15. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D-T fusion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2-5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  16. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D–T fusion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14.6 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2 to 5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  17. Quasisoft X-Ray Sources: White Dwarfs? Neutron Stars? Black Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    Two of the most exciting areas of current research in astrophysics are black holes and Type Ia supernovae. We propose archival work that has the potential to shed light on both areas. The focus of our research is a newly-established class of x-ray sources called Quasisoft X-ray Sources (QSSs). Although they comprise a significant fraction of the x- ray sources in galaxies of all types, including M31, it has proved difficult to identify members of this class in the Milky Way or Magellanic Clouds. We have developed methods to find these sources, and have begun to meet with success in the application of our methods. The three-year project we propose will allow us to identify QSSs. We will then use the full range of archived data to determine which QSS candidates are highly luminous, and which are members of less luminous classes, such as quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries (qLMXBs), or even isolated neutron stars. Many will be nearby x-ray active stars, or else distant AGN, whose discovery will also be of interest to a range of researchers. In the end, we will have a subset of intriguing physical systems, some of which may be accreting black holes and some of which may be unusual states of neutron stars or even of nuclear-burning white dwarfs. The systems identified through this ADAP program will be targets of future observing programs, from space and from the ground. The information we derive from NASA archived data will provide insight into important astrophysical questions. Do intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) exist? It has only been during the past 15 years or so that accreting compact objects that were considered as black hole candidates have been promoted to black holes. This achievement required years of observations of candidates in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. The discovery of ultraluminous X- ray source in external galaxies suggests that there are black holes with masses larger than the 10-30 solar masses typical of the known black holes. To

  18. Continuing Education in the Professions. Current Information Sources, No. 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse Univ., NY. ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Education.

    Beginning with bibliographies, surveys, and other general works, this 225-item annotated bibliography on professional continuing education covers the following areas: engineering and technical education; chemistry and clinical psychology; medicine and health (including psychiatry); inservice education and retraining for lawyers, law enforcement…

  19. Characterization of thermal neutron beam monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Issa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutron beam monitors with a wide range of efficiencies, low γ sensitivity, and high time and space resolution are required in neutron beam experiments to continuously diagnose the delivered beam. In this work, commercially available neutron beam monitors have been characterized using the R2D2 beamline at IFE (Norway and using a Be-based neutron source. For the γ sensitivity measurements different γ sources have been used. The evaluation of the monitors includes, the study of their efficiency, attenuation, scattering, and sensitivity to γ. In this work we report the results of this characterization.

  20. Feasibility study for the implementation of an intense linac-based neutron source facility in Sao Paulo

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda-Neto, J D T

    1999-01-01

    The implementation of an intense linac-based neutron source is proposed here, using the forthcoming 30 MeV electron CW-Microtron under construction in Sao Paulo. A method to estimate photoneutron fluxes, based on thin target bremsstrahlung approximation, has been developed. The versatility and possible broad range of applications associated with such a facility are addressed.

  1. Characterization of a neutron source of {sup 239}PuBe; Caracterizacion de una fuente de neutrones de {sup 239}PuBe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez V, R.; Chacon R, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Mercado, G. A.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Ramirez G, J. [Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informatica, Direccion General de Innovacion y Tecnologia de Informacion, Av. Heroes de Nacozari Sur 2301, Fracc. Jardines del Parque, 20276 Aguascalientes (Mexico)], e-mail: ruben_zac@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    The spectrum equivalent dose and environmental equivalent dose f a {sup 239}PuBe source have been determined. The appropriate handling of a neutron source depends on the knowledge of its characteristics, such as its energy distribution, total rate of flowing and dosimetric magnitudes. In many facilities have not spectrometer that allows to determine the spectrum and then area monitors are used that give a dosimetric magnitude starting from measuring the flowing rate and the use of conversion factors, however this procedure has many limitations and it is preferable to measure the spectra and starting from this information the interest dosimetric magnitudes are calculated. In this work a Bonner sphere spectrometer has been used with a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) scintillator obtaining the count rates that produce, to a distance of 100 cm, a {sup 239}PuBe source of 1.85E(11) Bq. The spectrum was reconstructed starting from the count rates using BUNKIUT code and response matrix UTA4. With the spectrum information was calculated the source intensity, total flow, energy average, equivalent dose rate, environmental equivalent dose rate, equivalent dose coefficient and environmental equivalent dose coefficient. By means of two area monitors for neutrons, Eberline ASP-1 and LB 6411 of Berthold the equivalent dose and environmental equivalent dose were measured. The determinate values were compared with those reported in literature and it found that are coincident inside 17%. (Author)

  2. An efficient source of continuous variable polarization entanglement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, R.; Heersink, J.; Yoshikawa, J.-I.

    2007-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated the efficient creation of highly entangled bipartite continuous variable polarization states. Exploiting an optimized scheme for the production of squeezing using the Kerr non-linearity of a glass fibre we generated polarization squeezed pulses with a mean...... classical excitation in Ŝ3. Polarization entanglement was generated by interfering two independent polarization squeezed fields on a symmetric beam splitter. The resultant beams exhibit strong quantum noise correlations in the dark Ŝ1-Ŝ2 polarization plane. To verify entanglement generation, we...

  3. Suzaku View of the Neutron Star in the Dipping Source 4U 1822-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Makoto; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakurai, Soki; Zhang, Zhongli; Enoto, Teruaki

    2013-01-01

    The dipping X-ray source 4U 1822-37 was observed by Suzaku on 2006 Octrober 20 for a net exposure of 37 ks. The source was detected with the XIS at a 1-10 keV flux of 5.5 ×10(exp -10) erg per square centimeter per second, and with the HXD (HXD-PIN) at a 10-50 keV flux of 8.9 ×10(exp -10) erg per square centimeter per second. With HXD-PIN, the pulsation was detected at a barycentric period of 0.592437 seconds, and its change rate was reconfirmed as -2.43 × 10(exp -12) seconds per second. The 1-50 keV spectra of 4U 1822-37 were found to be very similar to those of Her X- 1 in the slopes, cutoff and iron lines. Three iron lines (Fe Kalpha, Fe XXV, and Fe XXVI) were detected, on top of a 1-50 keV continuum that is described by an NPEX model plus a soft blackbody. In addition, a cyclotron resonance scattering feature was detected significantly ( greater than 99% confidence), at an energy of 33+/-2 keV with a depth of 0.4(sup +0.6)/(sub -0.3). Therefore, the neutron star in this source is concluded to have a strong magnetic field of 2.8 × 10(exp 12) G. Further assuming that the source has a relatively high intrinsic luminosity of several times 10(exp 37) erg per second, its spectral and timing properties are consistently explained.

  4. High-field neutral beam injection for improving the Q of a gas dynamic trap-based fusion neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiusun; Chen, Dehong; Wang, Minghuang

    2017-12-01

    In order to improve the fusion energy gain (Q) of a gas dynamic trap (GDT)-based fusion neutron source, a method in which the neutral beam is obliquely injected at a higher magnetic field position rather than at the mid-plane of the GDT is proposed. This method is beneficial for confining a higher density of fast ions at the turning point in the zone with a higher magnetic field, as well as obtaining a higher mirror ratio by reducing the mid-plane field rather than increasing the mirror field. In this situation, collision scattering loss of fast ions with higher density will occur and change the confinement time, power balance and particle balance. Using an updated calculation model with high-field neutral beam injection for a GDT-based fusion neutron source conceptual design, we got four optimal design schemes for a GDT-based fusion neutron source in which Q was improved to two- to three-fold compared with a conventional design scheme and considering the limitation for avoiding plasma instabilities, especially the fire-hose instability. The distribution of fast ions could be optimized by building a proper magnetic field configuration with enough space for neutron shielding and by multi-beam neutral particle injection at different axial points.

  5. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Walton, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes(1,2). Their X-ray luminosities in the 0...... at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear...... region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity...

  6. Overview of the Neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation gives an overview of the neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE. The layout is mentioned in detail, with a map of the south-side experimental facilities, information on Target-4 and the Lujan Center. Then it goes into detail about neutron sources, specifically continuous versus pulsed. Target 4 is then discussed. In conclusion, we have introduced the south-side experimental facilities in operation at LANSCE. 1L target and Target 4 provide complementary neutron energy spectra. Two spallation neutron sources taken together cover more than 11 orders of magnitude in neutron energy.

  7. Neural sources of performance decline during continuous multitasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashimi, Omar; Zanto, Theodore P; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Multitasking performance costs have largely been characterized by experiments that involve two overlapping and punctuated perceptual stimuli, as well as punctuated responses to each task. Here, participants engaged in a continuous performance paradigm during fMRI recording to identify neural signatures associated with multitasking costs under more natural conditions. Our results demonstrated that only a single brain region, the superior parietal lobule (SPL), exhibited a significant relationship with multitasking performance, such that increased activation in the multitasking condition versus the singletasking condition was associated with higher task performance (i.e., least multitasking cost). Together, these results support previous research indicating that parietal regions underlie multitasking abilities and that performance costs are related to a bottleneck in control processes involving the SPL that serves to divide attention between two tasks. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T; Itagaki, H; Numasawa, H; Terashima, Y; Hirano, Y; Hirose, A

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  9. Design of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument at the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron Source: Applications to the study of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmes, Nicholas B.

    The Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) located at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) is a prototypical long-pulse accelerator-based neutron source. The Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) instrument is one of several planned instruments at the LENS facility. The SANS instrument is a time-of-flight instrument which utilizes a pinhole collimation system and neutron wavelengths up to 20A giving it a q range from about 0.006A-1 to 0.5A-1 with a maximum divergence at the sample of about +/-8mrad. The neutron flux on the sample at the anticipated 8kW mode of operation is anticipated to be greater than 2 x 104n/s.cm 2. The design, calibration, and testing of the LENS SANS instrument is discussed, including Monte-Carlo simulations and analytical calculations used to optimize the collimation design, the placement and design of the pulse-overlap chopper system, and other aspects of the instrument's geometry. The expected resolution, count rates, and other general performance parameters of the instrument are presented and, where possible, compared with experimental results. SANS measurements of a family of tripodal organo-silicon dendrimer molecules using the IPNS SAND and the NCNR NG3 SANS instruments are presented. Variations in the scattering curves are compared for solutions of the dendrimers at multiple concentrations in d-heptane, d-DCM, and d-toluene. Models of both the particle form factor and the structure factor are presented. The measurements suggest a distinct difference between the size and behavior of the highest generation dendrimer in two of the solvents (d-DCM and d-toluene) as compared to a third (d-heptane). Additionally, the dendrimer molecules appear to be forming short chains in solution. A brief study of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles is also presented. This study includes a presentation of the magnetic measurements of the nanoparticles using a SQUID magnetometer. The measurements indicate contributions by a larger dispersion of

  10. Source-jerk method for application on ADS neutronics study The ADS is stated for Accelerator Driven sub-critical System

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu Qing Fu; Li Yi; Xia Pu; Zheng Wu Qing; Zhu Guo Sheng

    2003-01-01

    The paper is concerned in the source-jerk method used to measure the sub-criticality, and the sub-critical experiment facility, which is used for the study on the neutronics of ADS, driven by external neutron source sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf. The effects of the location of neutron source and material buffer where is at the location of the pipe of proton beam and target of fission-product dispersion on the sub-criticality of reactor are studied by source-jerk method

  11. Design of a 100 J Dense Plasma Focus Z-pinch Device as a Portable Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sheng; Higginson, Drew; Link, Anthony; Liu, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are capable of accelerating ions to high energies through MV/mm-scale electric fields. When deuterium is used as the filling gas, neutrons are generated through beam-target fusion when fast D beams collide with the bulk plasma. The neutron yield on a DPF scales favorably with current, and could be used as portable sources for active interrogation. Past DPF experiments have been optimized empirically. Here we use the particle-in-cell (PIC) code LSP to optimize a portable DPF for high neutron yield prior to building it. In this work, we are designing a DPF device with about 100 J of energy which can generate 106 - 107 neutrons. The simulations are run in the fluid mode for the rundown phase and are switched to kinetic to capture the anomalous resistivity and beam acceleration process during the pinch. A scan of driver parameters, anode geometries and gas pressures are studied to maximize the neutron yield. The optimized design is currently under construction. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (15-ERD-034) at LLNL.

  12. Demonstrating the Likely Neutron Star Nature of Five M31 Globular Cluster Sources with Swift-NuSTAR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret D.; Antoniou, Vallia; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Padi; Kennea, Jamie; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disc winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.

  13. Neutron spectroscopy of 26Mg states: Constraining the stellar neutron source 22Ne(α,n25Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Massimi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on accurate, high-resolution measurements of the 25Mg(n,γ26Mg and 25Mg(n,tot cross sections in the neutron energy range from thermal to about 300 keV, leading to a significantly improved 25Mg(n,γ26Mg parametrization. The relevant resonances for n+25Mg were characterized from a combined R-matrix analysis of the experimental data. This resulted in an unambiguous spin/parity assignment of the corresponding excited states in 26Mg. With this information experimental upper limits of the reaction rates for 22Ne(α,n25Mg and 22Ne(α,γ26Mg were established, potentially leading to a significantly higher (α,n/(α,γ ratio than previously evaluated. The impact of these results has been studied for stellar models in the mass range 2 to 25 M⊙.

  14. Design of a TOF-SANS instrument for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K.; Seeger, P. A.

    2000-11-28

    We have designed a versatile high-throughput SANS instrument [Broad Range Intense Multipurpose SANS (BRIMS)] for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the SNS by using acceptance diagrams and the Los Alamos NISP Monte Carlo simulation package. This instrument has been fully optimized to take advantage of the 10 Hz source frequency (broad wavelength bandwidth) and the cold neutron spectrum from a tall coupled solid methane moderator (12 cm x 20 cm). BRIMS has been designed to produce data in a Q range spanning from 0.001 to 0.7 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} in a single measurement by simultaneously using neutrons with wavelengths ranging from 1 to 14.5 {angstrom} in a time of flight mode. A supermirror guide and bender assembly is employed to separate and redirect the useful portion of the neutron spectrum with {lambda} > 1 {angstrom}, by 2.3{degree} away from the direct beam containing high energy neutrons and {gamma} rays. The effects of the supermirror coating of the guide, the location of the bender assembly with respect to the source, the bend angle, and various collimation choices on the flux, resolution and Q{sub min} have been characterized using spherical particle and delta function scatterers. The overall performance of BRIMS has been compared with that of the best existing reactor-based SANS instrument D22 at ILL.

  15. Accelerator-based neutron source using a cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Phillips

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A neutron generator is considered in which a beam of tritons is incident on a hypothetical cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons. The energy efficiency of neutron generation is found to increase substantially with electron density. Recent reports of potential targets are discussed.

  16. Voluminous D2 source for intense cold neutron beam production at the ESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Batkov, K.; Mezei, F.

    2014-01-01

    the target for the complementary needs of certain fundamental physics experiments. To facilitate experiments depending on the total number of neutrons in a sizable beam, the option of a voluminous D2 moderator, in a large cross-section extraction guide is discussed and its neutronic performance is assessed....

  17. Results from the Commissioning of the n-TOF Spallation Neutron Source at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Borcea, C; Dahlfors, M; Ferrari, A; García-Muñoz, G; Haefner, P; Herrera-Martínez, A; Kadi, Y; Lacoste, V; Radermacher, E; Saldaña, F; Vlachoudis, V; Zanini, L; Rubbia, Carlo; Buoni, S; Dangendorf, V; Nolte, R; Weierganz, M

    2003-01-01

    The new neutron time-of-flight facility (n_TOF) has been built at CERN and is now operational. The facility is intended for the measurement of neutron induced cross sections of relevance to Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and to fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by spallation of the 20 GeV/c proton beam, delivered by the Proton Synchrotron (PS), on a massive target of pure lead. A measuring station is placed at about 185 m from the neutron producing target, allowing high-resolution measurements. The facility was successfully commissioned with two campaigns of measurements, in Nov. 2000 and Apr. 2001. The main interest was concentrated in the physical parameters of the installation (neutron flux and resolution function), along with the target behavior and various safety-related aspects. These measurements confirmed the expectations from Monte Carlo simulations of the facility, thus allowing to initiate the foreseen physics program.

  18. Search for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in globular cluster NGC 6544

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoebeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Sigurdsson, S.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a directed search for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth initial LIGO science run. The target was the nearby globular cluster NGC 6544 at a distance of approximate to 2.7 kpc. The search covered a broad band of frequencies along with first and second frequency

  19. Validation of a Monte Carlo Model of the Fork Detector with a Calibrated Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Alessandro; Mihailescu, Liviu-Cristian

    2014-02-01

    The investigation of experimental methods for safeguarding spent fuel elements is one of the research areas at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN. A version of the so-called Fork Detector has been designed at SCK•CEN and is in use at the Belgian Nuclear Power Plant of Doel for burnup determination purposes. The Fork Detector relies on passive neutron and gamma measurements for the assessment of the burnup and safeguards verification activities. In order to better evaluate and understand the method and in view to extend its capabilities, an effort to model the Fork detector was made with the code MCNPX. A validation of the model was done in the past using spent fuel measurement data. This paper reports about the measurements carried out at the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) of SCK•CEN with a 252Cf source calibrated according to ISO 8529 standards. The experimental data are presented and compared with simulations. In the simulations, not only was the detector modeled but also the measurement room was taken into account based on the available design information. The results of this comparison exercise are also presented in this paper.

  20. Investigation of the vertical instability at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoheng Wang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid cycling synchrotron of the intense pulsed neutron source at Argonne National Laboratory normally operates at an average beam current of 14 to 15  μA, accelerating protons from 50 to 450 MeV 30 times per second. The beam current is limited by a single-bunch vertical instability that occurs in the later part of the 14 ms acceleration cycle. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor data, two cases of vertical beam centroid oscillations were discovered. The oscillations start from the tail of the bunch, build up, and develop toward the head of the bunch. The development stops near the bunch center and oscillations remain localized in the tail for a relatively long time (2–4 ms, 1–2×10^{4} turns. This vertical instability is identified as the cause of the beam loss. We compared this instability with a head-tail instability that was purposely induced by switching off sextupole magnets. It appears that the observed vertical instability is different from the classical head-tail instability.

  1. Testing a scale pulsed modulator for an IEC neutron source into a resistive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wheat, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A 1/10th scaled prototype pulse modulator for an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) neutron source has been designed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The scaled prototype modulator is based on a solid-state Marx architecture and has an output voltage of 13 kV and an output current of 10 A. The modulator has a variable pulse width between 50 {micro}s and 1 ms with < 5% droop at all pulse widths. The modulator operates with a duty factor up to 5% and has a maximum pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz. The use of a solid-state Marx modulator in this application has several potential benefits. These benefits include variable pulse width and amplitude, inherent switch overcurrent and transient overvoltage protection, and increased efficiency over DC supplies used in this application. Several new features were incorporated into this design including inductorless charging, fully snubberless operation, and stage fusing. The scaled prototype modulator has been tested using a 1 k{Omega} resistive load. Test results are given. Short (50 {micro}s) and long (1 ms) pulses are demonstrated as well as high duty factor operation (1 kHz rep rate at a 50 {micro}s pulse width for a 5% duty factor). Pulse agility of the modulator is demonstrated through turning the individual Marx stages on and off in sequence producing ramp, pyramid, and reverse pyramid waveforms.

  2. Thermohydraulic behavior of the liquid metal target of a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y.

    1996-06-01

    The author presents work done on three main problems. (1) Natural circulation in double coaxial cylindircal container: The thermohydraulic behaviour of the liquid metal target of the spallation neutron source at PSI has been investigated. The configuration is a natural-circulation loop in a concentric double-tube-type container. The results show that the natural-circulation loop concept is valid for the design phase of the target construction, and the current specified design criteria will be fulfilled with the proposed parameter values. (2) Flow around the window: Water experiments were performed for geometry optimisation of the window shape of the SINQ container for avoiding generating recirculation zones at peripheral area and the optimal cooling of the central part of the beam entrance window. Flow visualisation technique was mainly used for various window shapes, gap distance between the window and the guide tube edge. (3) Flow in window cooling channels: Flows in narrow gaps of cooling channels of two different types of windows were studied by flow visualisation techniques. One type is a slightly curved round cooling channel and the other is hemispherical shape, both of which have only 2 mm gap distance and the water inlet is located on one side and flows out from the opposite side. In both cases, the central part of the flow area has lower velocity than peripheral area.

  3. Cumulative beam break-up study of the spallation neutron source superconducting linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, D; Krafft, G A; Yunn, B; Sundelin, R; Delayen, J; Kim, S; Doleans, M

    2002-01-01

    Beam instabilities due to High Order Modes (HOMs) are a concern to superconducting (SC) linacs such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac. The effects of pulsed mode operation on transverse and longitudinal beam breakup instability are studied for H sup - beam in a consistent manner for the first time. Numerical simulation indicates that cumulative transverse beam breakup instabilities are not a concern in the SNS SC linac, primarily due to the heavy mass of H sup - beam and the HOM frequency spread resulting from manufacturing tolerances. As little as +-0.1 MHz HOM frequency spread stabilizes all the instabilities from both transverse HOMs, and also acts to stabilize the longitudinal HOMs. Such an assumed frequency spread of +-0.1 MHz HOM is small, and hence conservative compared with measured values of sigma=0.00109(f sub H sub O sub M -f sub 0)/f sub 0 obtained from Cornell and the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser cavities. However, a few cavities may hit resonance lines and generate a high heat lo...

  4. New controller for high voltage converter modulator at spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wezensky, Mark W [ORNL; Brown, David L [ORNL; Lee, Sung-Woo [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL; Geng, Xiaosong [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has developed a new control system for the High Voltage Convertor Modulator (HVCM) at the SNS to replace the original control system which is approaching obsolescence. The original system was based on controllers for similar high voltage systems that were already in use [1]. The new controller, based on National Instruments PXI/FlexRIO Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform, offers enhancements such as modular construction, flexibility and non-proprietary software. The new controller also provides new capabilities like various methods for modulator pulse flattening, waveform capture, and first fault detection. This paper will discuss the design of the system, including the human machine interface, based on lessons learned at the SNS and other projects. It will also discuss performance and other issues related to its operation in an accelerator facility which requires high availability. To date, 73% of the operational HVCMs have been upgraded to with the new controller, and the remainder are scheduled for completion by mid-2017.

  5. Using CFD as Preventative Maintenance Tool for the Cold Neutron Source Thermosiphon System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cold neutron source (CNS system of the Open Pool Australian Light-Water (OPAL reactor is a 20 L cryogenically cooled liquid deuterium thermosiphon system. The CNS is cooled by forced convective helium which is held at room temperature during stand-by (SO mode and at ~20 K during normal operation (NO mode. When helium cooling stops, the reactor is shut down to prevent the moderator cell from overheating. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD study aims to determine whether the combined effects of conduction and natural convection would provide sufficient cooling for the moderator cell under the influence of reactor decay heat after reactor shutdown. To achieve this, two commercial CFD software packages using an identical CFD mesh were first assessed against an experimental heat transfer test of the CNS. It was found that both numerical models were valid within the bounds of experimental uncertainty. After this, one CFD model was used to simulate the thermosiphon transient condition after the reactor is shut down. Two independent shutdown conditions of different decay-heat power profiles were simulated. It was found that the natural convection and conduction cooling in the thermosiphon were sufficient for dissipating both decay-heat profiles, with the moderator cell remaining below the safe temperature of 200°C.

  6. Design specification for the European Spallation Source neutron generating target element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, A. [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Sordo, F., E-mail: fernando.sordo@essbilbao.org [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Mora, T. [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Mena, L. [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Mancisidor, M.; Aguilar, J.; Bakedano, G.; Herranz, I.; Luna, P. [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Magan, M.; Vivanco, R. [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Villacorta, F. [Consorcio ESS-BILBAO. Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia. Poligono Ugaldeguren III, Pol. A, 7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Sjogreen, K.; Oden, U. [European Spallation Source ERIC, P.O Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Perlado, J.M. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2017-06-01

    The paper addresses some of the most relevant issues concerning the thermal hydraulics and radiation damage of the neutron generation target to be built at the European Spallation Source as recently approved after a critical design review. The target unit consists of a set of Tungsten blocks placed inside a wheel of 2.5 m diameter which rotates at some 0.5 Hz in order to distribute the heat generated from incoming protons which reach the target in the radial direction. The spallation material elements are composed of an array of Tungsten pieces which rest on a rotating steel support (the cassette) and are distributed in a cross-flow configuration. The thermal, mechanical and radiation effects resulting from the impact of a 2 GeV proton pulse are analysed in detail as well as an evaluation of the inventory of spallation products. The current design is found to conform to specifications and found to be robust enough to deal with several accident scenarios.

  7. Analysis of the electric power system of HANARO cold neutron source using ETAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. K.; Jung, H. S.; Kim, Y. K

    2005-05-15

    The analysis of load flow is for searching the optimal operation condition by computer simulation. The analyzed items are as follows. Active and reactive power from KAERI substation. Voltage drop on Tus. Analysis of load flow of active power and reactive power on Bus The motor starting current of most ac motors is several times normal full load current. Motor starting torque varies directly as square of the applied voltage. If the terminal voltage drop is excessive, the motor may not have enough starting torque to accelerate up to running speed. Running motors may stall from excessive voltage drops. Short-circuit studies are done to determine the magnitude of the prospective currents flowing throughout the power system at various time intervals after a fault occurs. Short-circuit studies can be performed at the planning stage in order to help finalize the system layout, determine voltage levels, and size cables, transformers, and conductors. For existing systems, fault studies are necessary in the cases of installation of extra rotating loads, system layout modifications, rearrangement of protection equipment, verification of the adequacy of existing breakers. This technical report deals with the load flow study, motor starting study and short circuit study for CNS(Cold Neutron Source) power system using ETAP(Electrical Transient Analyzer Program) to determine the optimal operating condition.

  8. Thermal-hydraulic criteria for the APT tungsten neutron source design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    1998-03-01

    This report presents the thermal-hydraulic design criteria (THDC) developed for the tungsten neutron source (TNS). The THDC are developed for the normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis accidents. The requirements of the safety analyses are incorporated into the design criteria, consistent with the integrated safety management and the safety-by-design philosophy implemented throughout the APT design process. The phenomenology limiting the thermal-hydraulic design and the confidence level requirements for each limit are discussed. The overall philosophy of the uncertainty analyses and the confidence level requirements also are presented. Different sets of criteria are developed for normal operations, operational transients, anticipated accidents, unlikely accidents, extremely unlikely accidents, and accidents during TNS replacement. In general, the philosophy is to use the strictest criteria for the high-frequency events. The criteria is relaxed as the event frequencies become smaller. The THDC must be considered as a guide for the design philosophy and not as a hard limit. When achievable, design margins greater than those required by the THDC must be used. However, if a specific event sequence cannot meet the THDC, expensive design changes are not necessary if the single event sequence results in sufficient margin to safety criteria and does not challenge the plant availability or investment protection considerations.

  9. Thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 138}Ba and {sup 141}Pr using Am-Be neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Karnataka (India)

    2016-09-15

    The thermal-neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 138}Ba(n, γ){sup 139}Ba and {sup 141}Pr(n, γ){sup 142}Pr were measured by activation method using an isotopic Am-Be neutron source. The estimations were with respect to that of {sup 55}Mn(n, γ){sup 56}Mn and {sup 197}Au(n, γ){sup 198}Au reference monitors. The measured thermal-capture cross section of {sup 138}Ba with respect to {sup 55}Mn is 0.410±0.023 b and with respect to {sup 197}Au is 0.386±0.019 b. The measured thermal-capture cross section of {sup 141}Pr with respect to {sup 55}Mn is 11.36±1.29 b and with respect to {sup 197}Au is 10.43±1.14 b. The resonance integrals for {sup 138}Ba are 0.380±0.033 b ({sup 55}Mn) and 0.364±0.027 b ({sup 197}Au) and for {sup 141}Pr are 21.05±2.88 b ({sup 55}Mn) and 15.27±1.87 b ({sup 197}Au). The comparison between the present measurements and various reported values are discussed. The cross sections corresponding to the selected isotopes are measured using an Am-Be source facility for the first time. (orig.)

  10. REFRACTIVE NEUTRON LENS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, P. V.; Kolchevsky, N. N.

    2013-01-01

    Compound concave refractive lenses are used for focusing neutron beam. Investigations of spectral and focusing properties of a refractive neutron lens are presented. Resolution of the imaging system on the base of refractive neutron lenses depends on material properties and parameters of neutron source. Model of refractive neutron lens are proposed. Results of calculation diffraction resolution and focal depth of refractive neutron lens are discussed.

  11. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  12. Theoretic programs related to spallation neutron source for ADS. Pt.2: Thick target simulations The ADS is stated for Accelector Driven System

    CERN Document Server

    Fan Sheng; Shen Qing Biao; Zhao Zhi Xiang

    2002-01-01

    The spallation neutron target for intermediate energy proton incident is an important link for accelerator and subcritical reactor of accelerator driven system (ADS). The theoretic programs and Monte-Carlo codes are a useful approach for solving the physics of spallation neutron source. The authors discuss those codes at present work and introduce the application and development of SHIELD code

  13. Spectrometry and dosimetry of isotopic sources of neutrons by means of artificial neural networks; Espectrometria y dosimetria de fuentes isotopicas de neutrones mediante redes neuronales artificiales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Hernandez D, V. M; Martinez B, M. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Barquero, R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.co [Hospital del Rio Hortega, C/Dulzaina No. 2, 47012 Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    The artificial neural networks technology has been applied to reconstruct the neutrons spectra of two isotopic sources: {sup 252}Cf, and {sup 241}Am-Be. Also, this technology has been applied to obtain the effective dose, E, and the personal dose equivalents, Hp(10) and environmental, H *(10). To obtain the spectra and the doses only were used the count rates produced in a Bonner Spheres spectrometer with a scintillator of {sup 6}LiI(Eu) of 0.4 {phi} x 0.4 cm{sup 2}. The equivalent environmental dose and the spectra of the sources were also obtained by means of the reconstruction code BUNKIUT. When comparing the results obtained by means of both procedures it was found that they are consistent. (Author)

  14. Continuous measurement of secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation at mountain altitudes and close to the North Pole--a discussion in terms of H*(10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, W; Mares, V; Pioch, C; Simmer, G; Weitzenegger, E

    2009-10-01

    Two Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) have recently been installed to measure secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation continuously, one at the environmental research station 'Schneefernerhaus' at an altitude of 2650 m in Germany and the other at the Koldewey station close to the North Pole in Ny-Alesund, Spitsbergen. After unfolding, both systems provide neutron fluence energy distributions as a function of time. Based on these distributions and on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, mean ambient dose equivalent rate values of 75.0 +/- 2.9 nSv h(-1) and 8.7 +/- 0.6 nSv h(-1) were obtained for October 2008, respectively (quoted uncertainties represent standard deviations of 124 values obtained during the measurement period). Ambient dose equivalent rates measured by means of an extended rem counter at the Schneefernerhaus agree with those based on the BSS neutron energy distributions within 5 %. The ambient dose equivalent rate was also calculated based on simulated FLUKA neutron energy distributions in the atmosphere. Even without detailed modelling of the local environment, an agreement better than 30 % was obtained between the ambient dose equivalent rate based on the FLUKA distributions and those based on the BSS measurements at the Schneefernerhaus, for neutrons above about 20 MeV. This agreement is expected to be even better if the influence of the local environment on the measured neutron fluence energy distribution will be calculated.

  15. Basic design of shield blocks for a spallation neutron source under the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, K; Takada, H

    2003-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC), a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed as a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. Overall dimensions of a biological shield of the neutron source had been determined by evaluation of shielding performance by Monte Carlo calculations. This report describes results of design studies on an optimum dividing scheme in terms of cost and treatment and mechanical strength of shield blocks for the biological shield. As for mechanical strength, it was studied whether the shield blocks would be stable, fall down or move to a horizontal direction in case of an earthquake of seismic intensity of 5.5 (250 Gal) as an abnormal load. For ceiling shielding blocks being supported by both ends of the long blocks, maximum bending moment and an amount of maximum deflection of their center were evaluated.

  16. Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  17. Period variations in pulsating X-ray sources. I. Accretion flow parameters and neutron star structure from timing observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, F.K.; Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1978-09-15

    We show that valuable information about both accretion flows and neutron star structure can be obtained from X-ray timing observations of period variations in pulsating sources. Such variations can result from variations in the accretion flow, or from internal torque variations, associated with oscillations of the fluid core or the unpinning of vortices in the inner crust. We develop a statistical description of torque variations in terms of noise processes, indicate how the applicability of such a description may be tested observationally, and show how it may be used to determine from observation both the properties of accretion flows and the internal structure of neutron stars, including the relative inertial moments of the crust and superfluid neutron core, the crust-core coupling time, and the frequencies of any low-frequency internal collective modes. Particular attention is paid to the physical origin of spin-down episodes; it is shown that usyc episodes may result either from external torque reversals or from internal torque variations.With the aid of the statistical description, the response of the star to torque fluctuations is calculated for three stellar models: (i) a completely rigid star; (ii) a two-component star; and (iii) a two-component star with a finite-frequency internal mode, such as the Tkachenko mode of a rotating neutron superfluid. Our calculations show that fluctuating torques could account for the period the period variations and spin-down episodes observed in Her X-1 and Cen X-3, including the large spin-down event observed in the latter source during 1972 September-October. The torque noise strengths inferred from current timing observations using the simple two-component models are shown to be consistent with those to be expected from fluctuations in accretion flows onto magnetic neutron stars.

  18. Development of a compact neutron source based on field ionization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, Arun; Allen, Ian; Dickinson, Michael R.; Schenkel, Thomas; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2010-11-25

    The authors report on the use of carbon nanofiber nanoemitters to ionize deuterium atoms for the generation of neutrons in a deuterium-deuterium reaction in a preloaded target. Acceleration voltages in the range of 50-80 kV are used. Field emission of electrons is investigated to characterize the emitters. The experimental setup and sample preparation are described and first data of neutron production are presented. Ongoing experiments to increase neutron production yields by optimizing the field emitter geometry and surface conditions are discussed.

  19. Uses of advanced pulsed neutron sources. Report of a workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory October 21--24, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Werner, S.A. (eds.)

    1975-01-01

    The report contains the conclusions that were drawn by nine panels of scientists in the fields of Biology; Chemical Spectroscopy; Chemical Structures of Crystalline Solids; Chemical Structures of Disordered Solids and Inhomogeneous Systems; Dynamics of Solids, Liquids, Glasses and Gases; Magnetism; Neutron Sources; and Radiation Effects. The nine panel reports describe the applications found in these scientific areas, accompanying them with conceptual instruments designed for the measurements and with calculations to establish feasibility.

  20. CONTINUED NEUTRON STAR CRUST COOLING OF THE 11 Hz X-RAY PULSAR IN TERZAN 5: A CHALLENGE TO HEATING AND COOLING MODELS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Fridriksson, J. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brown, E. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cackett, E. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock St, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Homan, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 4-183 CCIS, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Pooley, D., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX (United States)

    2013-09-20

    The transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446 in the globular cluster Terzan 5 exhibited an 11 week accretion outburst in 2010. Chandra observations performed within five months after the end of the outburst revealed evidence that the crust of the neutron star became substantially heated during the accretion episode and was subsequently cooling in quiescence. This provides the rare opportunity to probe the structure and composition of the crust. Here, we report on new Chandra observations of Terzan 5 that extend the monitoring to ≅2.2 yr into quiescence. We find that the thermal flux and neutron star temperature have continued to decrease, but remain significantly above the values that were measured before the 2010 accretion phase. This suggests that the crust has not thermally relaxed yet, and may continue to cool. Such behavior is difficult to explain within our current understanding of heating and cooling of transiently accreting neutron stars. Alternatively, the quiescent emission may have settled at a higher observed equilibrium level (for the same interior temperature), in which case the neutron star crust may have fully cooled.

  1. Development of a kinematically focused neutron source with the p({sup 7}Li,n){sup 7}Be inverse reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebois, M., E-mail: lebois@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay, 15 Rue G. Clémenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Wilson, J.N.; Halipré, P.; Leniau, B.; Matea, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay, 15 Rue G. Clémenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Oberstedt, A. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Fundamental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Oberstedt, S. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Verney, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay, 15 Rue G. Clémenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-21

    Directional beams of neutrons can be produced, if a nuclear reaction, which emits neutrons, is initiated in inverse kinematics with a heavy ion projectile bombarding a light target. In this paper we investigate the use of the p({sup 7}Li,n){sup 7}Be inverse reaction to produce kinematically focused, quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams with a view to develop such an unusual neutron source for fundamental and applied nuclear physics studies. An experiment was carried out to validate the concept and to test the viability of two types of hydrogen-rich solid targets: polypropylene and TiH{sub 2}. Neutron time-of-flight/energy spectra at 3 m distance from the source have been measured at {sup 7}Li bombarding energies of 13.5, 15, 15.5, 16, and 17 MeV, and neutron backgrounds from parasitic reactions have been characterized. The neutron angular distribution in the laboratory has been measured at 15 MeV. A Monte-Carlo code based on two-body relativistic kinematics has been developed and validated by comparison with the experimental data. Code-based extrapolations have then been used to deduce neutron energy spectra and maximum neutron fluxes available for future irradiation of samples placed in the neutron beam at small distances. For neutrons produced with thin (4μm) and thick (28μm) polypropylene targets the maximum available fluxes are calculated to be 10{sup 7}n/s/sr and 7×10{sup 7} n/s/sr respectively. The development of a dedicated facility to produce kinematically focused neutrons is discussed.

  2. Design of a TOF-SANS instrument for the proposed long wavelength target station at the spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K. [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Seeger, P.A.

    2001-03-01

    We have designed a versatile high-throughput SANS instrument [Broad Range Intense Multipurpose SANS (BRIMS)] for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the SNS by using acceptance diagrams and the Los Alamos NISP Monte Carlo simulation package. This instrument has been fully optimized to take advantage of the 10 Hz source frequency (broad wavelength bandwidth) and the cold neutron spectrum from a tall coupled solid methane moderator (12 cm x 20 cm). BRIMS has been designed to produce data in a Q range spanning from 0.0025 to 0.7 A{sup -1} in a single measurement by simultaneously using neutrons with wavelengths ranging from 1 to 14.5 A in a time of flight mode. A supermirror guide and bender assembly is employed to separate and redirect the useful portion of the neutron spectrum with {lambda}>1 A, by 2.3deg away from the direct beam containing high energy neutrons and {gamma} rays. The effects of various collimation choices on count rate, resolution and Q{sub min} have been characterized using spherical particle and delta function scatterers. The overall performance of BRIMS has been compared with that of the best existing reactor-based SANS instrument D22 at ILL. (author)

  3. Method of using deuterium-cluster foils for an intense pulsed neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Yang, Xiaoling

    2013-09-03

    A method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: providing a converter foil comprising deuterium clusters; focusing a laser on the foil with power and energy sufficient to cause deuteron ions to separate from the foil; and striking a surface of a target with the deuteron ions from the converter foil with energy sufficient to cause neutron production by a reaction selected from the group consisting of D-D fusion, D-T fusion, D-metal nuclear spallation, and p-metal. A further method is provided for assembling a plurality of target assemblies for a target injector to be used in the previously mentioned manner. A further method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: splitting a laser beam into a first beam and a second beam; striking a first surface of a target with the first beam, and an opposite second surface of the target with the second beam with energy sufficient to cause neutron production.

  4. NAA using the photoneutrons of a Linac as a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Soto B, T. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: rivera_yo@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Linear accelerators working above 8 MV produce photoneutrons that represent a radiological risk in the patient and hospital staff. In this work a moderator has been designed in the aim to use the photoneutron field to perform neutron activation analysis (NAA) of small samples. The moderator has been designed using Monte Carlo methods, here the photoneutron spectrum is modified by the moderator having the maximum thermal neutron flux in the moderator cavity where the sample to be analyzed is located. (Author)

  5. Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reass, W. A. (William A.); Apgar, S. E. (Sean E.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J. (Jacqueline); Gribble, R. F. (Robert F.); Hardek, T. W. (Thomas W.); Lynch, M. T. (Michael T.); Rees, D. E. (Daniel E.); Tallerico, P. J. (Paul J.); Trujillo, P. B. (Pete B.); Anderson, D. E. (David E.); Heidenreich, D. A. (Dale A.); Hicks, J. D. (Jim D.); Leontiev, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.

  6. Cooperative effort between Consorcio European Spallation Source--Bilbao and Oak Ridge National Laboratory spallation neutron source for manufacturing and testing of the JEMA-designed modulator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, David E [ORNL

    2017-01-02

    The JEMA modulator was originally developed for the European Spallation Source (ESS) when Spain was under consideration as a location for the ESS facility. Discussions ensued and the Spallation Neutron Source Research Accelerator Division agreed to form a collaboration with ESS-Bilbao (ESS-B) consortium to provide services for specifying the requirements for a version of the modulator capable of operating twelve 550 kW klystrons, monitoring the technical progress on the contract with JEMA, installing and commissioning the modulator at SNS, and performing a 30 day full power test. This work was recently completed, and this report discusses those activities with primary emphasis on the installation and testing activities.

  7. The determination by irradiation with a pulsed neutron generator and delayed neutron counting of the amount of fissile material present in a sample; Determination de la quantite de matiere fissile presente dans un echantillon par irradiation au moyen d'une source pulsee de neutrons et comptage des neutrons retardes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliard, L.; Janot, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to determine the amount of fissile material present in a sample. The method used consisted in irradiating the sample by means of a pulsed neutron generator and delayed neutron counting. Results show the validity of this method provided some experimental precautions are taken. Checking on the residual proportion of fissile material in leached hulls seems possible. (authors) [French] Ce rapport rend compte d'une etude preliminaire effectuee en vue de determiner la quantite de matiere fissile presente dans un echantillon. La methode utilisee consiste a irradier l'echantillon considere au moyen d'une source puisee de neutrons et a compter les neutrons retardes produits. Les resultats obtenus permettent de conclure a la validite de la methode moyennant certaines precautions. Un controle de la teneur residuelle en matiere fissile des gaines apres traitement semble possible. (auteurs)

  8. A history of neutrons in biology: the development of neutron protein crystallography at BNL and LANL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenborn, Benno P

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron diffraction data were collected from crystals of myoglobin almost 42 years ago using a step-scan diffractometer with a single detector. Since then, major advances have been made in neutron sources, instrumentation and data collection and analysis, and in biochemistry. Fundamental discoveries about enzyme mechanisms, biological complex structures, protein hydration and H-atom positions have been and continue to be made using neutron diffraction. The promise of neutrons has not changed since the first crystal diffraction data were collected. Today, with the developments of beamlines at spallation neutron sources and the use of the Laue method for data collection, the field of neutrons in structural biology has renewed vitality.

  9. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  10. Measurement and analysis of turbulent liquid metal flow in a high-power spallation neutron source-EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Samec, K; Blumenfeld, L; Kharoua, C; Dementjevs, S; Milenkovic, R Z

    2011-01-01

    The European Isotope Separation On-Line (EURISOL) design study completed in 2009 examined means of producing exotic nuclei for fundamental research. One of the critical components identified in the study was a high-power neutron spallation source in which a target material is impacted by a proton beam producing neutrons by a process known as spallation. Due to the high heat power deposition, liquid metal, in this case mercury, is the only viable choice as target material. Complex issues arise from the use of liquid metal. It is characterised by an unusually low Prandtl number and a higher thermal expansivity than conventional fluids. The turbulence structure in LM is thereby affected and still an object of intense research, hampered in part by measurement difficulties. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) allowed a satisfactory design for the neutron source to be found rapidly with little iteration. However it was feared that the development of the boundary layer and associated turbulence would not b...

  11. Equilibrium and Stability Properties of Low Aspect Ratio Mirror Systems: from Neutron Source Design to the Parker Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ethan; Anderson, Jay; Clark, Mike; Egedal, Jan; Endrizzi, Douglass; Flanagan, Ken; Harvey, Robert; Lynn, Jacob; Milhone, Jason; Wallace, John; Waleffe, Roger; Mirnov, Vladimir; Forest, Cary

    2017-10-01

    Equilibrium reconstructions of rotating magnetospheres in the lab are computed using a user-friendly extended Grad-Shafranov solver written in Python and various magnetic and kinetic measurements. The stability of these equilibria are investigated using the NIMROD code with two goals: understand the onset of the classic ``wobble'' in the heliospheric current sheet and demonstrating proof-of-principle for a laboratory source of high- β turbulence. Using the same extended Grad-Shafranov solver, equilibria for an axisymmetric, non-paraxial magnetic mirror are used as a design foundation for a high-field magnetic mirror neutron source. These equilibria are numerically shown to be stable to the m=1 flute instability, with higher modes likely stabilized by FLR effects; this provides stability to gross MHD modes in an axisymmetric configuration. Numerical results of RF heating and neutral beam injection (NBI) from the GENRAY/CQL3D code suite show neutron fluxes promising for medical radioisotope production as well as materials testing. Synergistic effects between NBI and high-harmonic fast wave heating show large increases in neutron yield for a modest increase in RF power. work funded by DOE, NSF, NASA.

  12. The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A; Kulcinski, J; Molvik, A; Ryutov, D; Santarius, J; Simonen, T; Wirth, B D; Ying, A

    2009-11-23

    The successful operation (with {beta} {le} 60%, classical ions and electrons with Te = 250 eV) of the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) device at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in Novosibirsk, Russia, extrapolates to a 2 MW/m{sup 2} Dynamic Trap Neutron Source (DTNS), which burns only {approx}100 g of tritium per full power year. The DTNS has no serious physics, engineering, or technology obstacles; the extension of neutral beam lines to steady state can use demonstrated engineering; and it supports near-term tokamaks and volume neutron sources. The DTNS provides a neutron spectrum similar to that of ITER and satisfies the missions specified by the materials community to test fusion materials (listed as one of the top grand challenges for engineering in the 21st century by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering) and subcomponents (including tritium-breeding blankets) needed to construct DEMO. The DTNS could serve as the first Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), called for by ReNeW, and could provide the data necessary for licensing subsequent FSNFs.

  13. An attempt to decrease anisotropic emissions of neutrons from a cylindrical 241Am-Be-encapsulation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatari, M; Tanimura, Y; Yoshizawa, M

    2014-10-01

    An attempt to decrease the anisotropic emissions of neutrons from a cylindrical (241)Am-Be-encapsulated X3 source was conducted with Monte Carlo calculations and experiments. The influence of metal materials and shapes of the external casing to the anisotropy factor were focussed on. Results obtained by calculations using MCNP4C implied that a light and spherical-shaped external casing decreases the anisotropic emission of neutrons. Experimental results using the spherical-shaped aluminium protection case also revealed that the anisotropy factor was close to 1.0 with wide zenith angle ranges. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A portable neutron source for landmines detection; Un generatore portabile di neutroni per la rilevazione delle mine nel terreno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapisarda, M.; Samuelli, M. [ENEA, Divisione Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of a joint development of applications of the Plasma Focus machines, by ENEA, University of Ferrara and University of Bologna, a neutron source is studied, suitable for the detection of explosives, either landmines or devices hidden in air luggage, exploiting the emission for radiative capture of the 10.8 MeV gamma ray from the {sup 14}N contained in the majority of explosives. The device is based on a plasma focus neutron source of portable dimensions emitting 10{sup 9} neutrons per second (patent pending). Here it is reported the Monte Carlo simulations performed with the MCNP code to design the device structure for use in landmine detection. The original 2.1 MeV neutrons are focused and moderated by layers of lead and polyethylene toward the ground, and absorbed by layers of borated polyethylene and cadmium toward the air. The shape and the thickness of the shields are optimised to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at various depths (0-15 cm) in an average ground with different contents of water (10% to 30%). Results show that it is possible to generate a flux of at least 10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2} thermalized neutrons (between 0.01 and 0.1 eV) per source neutron in an area of about 1 m{sup 2} around the axis of the source, high enough to generate an adequate number of 10.8 MeV gamma rays in the buried explosive. [Italian] Nell'ambito di una collaborazione fra ENEA, Universita' di Ferrara e Universita' di Bologna sullo sviluppo congiunto di applicazioni delle macchine Plasma Focus viene studiato un generatore di neutroni da impiegare per la rivelazione di mine nel terreno o di bombe nascoste nel bagaglio aereo. I neutroni termici, inducono nell'Azoto 14 contenuto negli esplosivi l'emissione, in seguito a cattura radiattiva, di caratteristici raggi gamma a 10.8 MeV. Il dispositivo e' basato su un Plasma Focus trasportabile capace di emettere 10{sup 9} neutroni al secondo (brevettato). Qui sono riportate le

  15. Explosive detection system using pulsed 14 MeV neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Surender Kumar, E-mail: surender@ipr.res.in [E and ED, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Gandhinagar (India); Jakhar, Shrichand [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Shukla, Rohit; Shyam, Anurag [E and ED, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Gandhinagar (India); Rao, C.V.S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2010-12-15

    The main elements present in the explosives are hydrogen (H), nitrogen (N), oxygen (O) and carbon (C). The elemental density ratios (C/O, N/O, H/N, etc.) of explosives are different from the other substances. The explosives are characterized by low H and C concentration and high N and O concentration. The elemental composition of explosive materials can be found by measuring the {gamma}-rays produced due to the activation of explosive material by 14 MeV neutrons. A pulsed fast neutron system is used for the identification of H, N and O. Ammonium nitrate sample has been irradiated by pulsed 14 MeV neutrons of 10{sup 8} neutrons/pulse and the pulse width less than a microsecond. The material has been irradiated with 5-7 neutron pulse in order to increase the {gamma}-ray count. The resulting {gamma}-ray spectrum due to the activation of ammonium nitrate is recorded and presented in this work. The {gamma}-ray spectrum has been recorded using 3'' x 3'' Bismuth Germanium Orthosilicate (BGO) and fast digitizer with sampling rate of 2 GS/s. The signal is transferred through fiber optic cable to the personal computer for further processing and analyzing. Pulse-height spectrum is constructed through a dedicate MATLAB routine in which the number of energy bins can be kept as per requirement.

  16. First production of ultracold neutrons with a solid deuterium source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, A.; Sobolev, Yu.; Altarev, I.; Eberhardt, K.; Gschrey, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hackl, R.; Hampel, G.; Hartmann, F. J.; Heil, W.; Kratz, J. V.; Lauer, Th.; Liźon Aguilar, A.; Müller, A. R.; Paul, S.; Pokotilovski, Yu.; Schmid, W.; Tassini, L.; Tortorella, D.; Trautmann, N.; Trinks, U.; Wiehl, N.

    2007-11-01

    The production rates of ultracold neutrons (UCN) with a solid deuterium converter have been measured at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz. Exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of ensuremath ˜ 1\\cdot 10^{13} n·cm^-2·pulse^-1, the number of detected very cold and ultracold neutrons ranges up to 200 000 at 7mol of solid deuterium (sD2) in combination with a pre-moderator (mesitylene). About 50% of the measured neutrons can be assigned to UCN with energies E of ensuremath V_F(sD_2)≤ E ≤ V_F(guide) where V F( sD 2) = 105 neV and V F( guide) = 190 neV are the Fermi potentials of the sD2 converter and our stainless steel neutron guides, respectively. Thermal cycling of solid deuterium, which was frozen out from the gas phase, considerably improved the UCN yield, in particular at higher amounts of sD2.

  17. Nondestructive analysis of the natural uranium mass through the measurement of delayed neutrons using the technique of pulsed neutron source; Analise nao destrutiva da massa de uranio natural atraves da medida de neutrons atrasados com o uso da tecnica de fonte pulsada de neutrons rapidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Paulo Rogerio Pinto

    1979-07-01

    This work presents results of non destructive mass analysis of natural uranium by the pulsed source technique. Fissioning is produced by irradiating the test sample with pulses of 14 MeV neutrons and the uranium mass is calculated on a relative scale from the measured emission of delayed neutrons. Individual measurements were normalised against the integral counts of a scintillation detector measuring the 14 MeV neutron intensity. Delayed neutrons were measured using a specially constructed slab detector operated in anti synchronism with the fast pulsed source. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) {sup 4}He reaction using a 400 kV Van de Graaff accelerated operated at 200 kV in the pulsed source mode. Three types of sample were analysed, namely: discs of metallic uranium, pellets of sintered uranium oxide and plates of uranium aluminium alloy sandwiched between aluminium. These plates simulated those of Material Testing Reactor fuel elements. Results of measurements were reproducible to within an overall error in the range 1.6 to 3.9%; the specific error depending on the shape, size and mass of the sample. (author)

  18. Calculated neutron-source spectra from selected irradiated PWR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinard, P.M.; Bosler, G.E.; Phillips, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    The energy spectra of neutrons emitted from a pressurized-water-reactor fuel assembly have been calculated for a variety of exposures and cooling times. They are presented in graphical form. Some effects of initial enrichment are also included. Neutrons from spontaneous fissions were given either a Maxwellian temperature of 1.2 or 1.5 MeV, depending on whether they were due to plutonium and uranium nuclides or curium nuclides. A single (..cap alpha..,n) spectrum was deemed sufficient to represent the neutrons from all the alpha-emitting nuclides. The proportions of the nuclides undergoing spontaneous fission and those emitting alpha particles were determined from calculated atom densities. The particular pressurized-water-reactor fuel assembly assumed for this purpose was of the type used in the H.B. Robinson Unit-2 power plant (740 MWe).

  19. Neutron scattering studies of the dynamics of biopolymer-water systems using pulsed-source spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, H.D. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Miller, A. [Stirling Univ., Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Energy-resolving neutron scattering techniques provide spatiotemporal data suitable for testing and refining analytical models or computer simulations of a variety of dynamical processes in biomolecular systems. This paper reviews experimental work on hydrated biopolymers at ISIS, the UK Pulsed Neutron Facility. Following an outline of basic concepts and a summary of the new instrumental capabilities, the progress made is illustrated by results from recent experiments in two areas: quasi- elastic scattering from highly hydrated polysaccharide gels (agarose and hyaluronate), and inelastic scattering from vibrational modes of slightly hydrated collagen fibers.

  20. A new 2.5 MeV injector and beam test facility for the spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R. F.; Aleksandrov, A.; Han, B. X.; Kang, Y. W.; Middendorf, M. M.; Murray, S. N.; Piller, M.; Pennisi, T. R.; Peplov, V.; Saethre, R.; Santana, M.; Stinson, C.; Stockli, M. P.

    2017-08-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now operates with 1.2 MW of beam power on target with the near-term goal of delivering 1.4 MW and a longer-term goal of delivering >2 MW to support a planned second target station. Presently, H- beam pulses (50-60 mA, 1 ms, 60 Hz) from an RF-driven, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion source are first accelerated to 2.5 MeV by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, injected into a ˜1 GeV linac, compressed to transmission, the initial applications of the BTF will be to conduct 6D beam dynamic studies, develop & demonstrate ion sources capable of meeting the current and future requirements of the SNS, and contribute to neutron moderator development. This report provides a facility update, description of the BTF ion source systems as well as a discussion of the first LEBT and RFQ beam current measurements performed at the BTF.

  1. Searching for gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Rotating neutron stars are one of the important sources of gravitational waves (GW) for the ground based as well as space based detectors. Since the waves are emitted continuously, the source is termed as a continuous gravitational wave (CGW) source. The expected weakness of the signal requires long ...

  2. Vacuum seals design and testing for a linear accelerator of the National Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Chen; C. Gautier; F. Hemez; N. K. Bultman

    2000-02-01

    Vacuum seals are very important to ensure that the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac has an optimum vacuum system. The vacuum joints between flanges must have reliable seals to minimize the leak rate and meet vacuum and electrical requirements. In addition, it is desirable to simplify the installation and thereby also simplify the maintenance required. This report summarizes an investigation of the metal vacuum seals that include the metal C-seal, Energized Spring seal, Helcoflex Copper Delta seal, Aluminum Delta seal, delta seal with limiting ring, and the prototype of the copper diamond seals. The report also contains the material certifications, design, finite element analysis, and testing for all of these seals. It is a valuable reference for any vacuum system design. To evaluate the suitability of several types of metal seals for use in the SNS Linac and to determine the torque applied on the bolts, a series of vacuum leak rate tests on the metal seals have been completed at Los Alamos Laboratory. A copper plated flange, using the same type of delta seal that was used for testing with the stainless steel flange, has also been studied and tested. A vacuum seal is desired that requires significantly less loading than a standard ConFlat flange with a copper gasket for the coupling cavity assembly. To save the intersegment space the authors use thinner flanges in the design. The leak rate of the thin ConFlat flange with a copper gasket is a baseline for the vacuum test on all seals and thin flanges. A finite element analysis of a long coupling cavity flange with a copper delta seal has been performed in order to confirm the design of the long coupling cavity flange and the welded area of a cavity body with the flange. This analysis is also necessary to predict a potential deformation of the cavity under the combined force of atmospheric pressure and the seating load of the seal. Modeling of this assembly has been achieved using both HKS/Abaqus and COSMOS

  3. Neutron energy spectra of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be source and of the D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Tae Park

    2003-01-01

    The neutron energy spectrum of the following sources were measured using a fast neutron spectrometer with the NE-213 liquid scintillator: sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be and D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction from a 3 MeV Pelletron accelerator in Tokyo Institute of Technology. The measured proton recoil pulse height data of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, Am-Be and D(d,n) sup 3 He were unfolded using the mathematical program to obtain the neutron energy spectrum. The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and Am-Be neutron energy spectra were measured and the results obtained showed a good agreement with the spectra usually published in the literature. The neutron energy spectrum from D(d,n) sup 3 He was measured and the results obtained also showed a good agreement with the calculation by time of flight (TOF) methods. (author)

  4. Neutron tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  5. 78 FR 21567 - Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... in the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . To begin the search, select ``ADAMS... for on-the-spot analysis, and to detect ground water movement for environmental surveys. Neutron... requirements to ensure that individuals with access to radioactive materials have adequate knowledge and skills...

  6. Implementation of variance-reduction techniques for Monte Carlo nuclear logging calculations with neutron sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for nuclear logging applications are considered to be highly demanding transport problems. In this paper, the implementation of weight-window variance reduction schemes in a 'manual' fashion to improve the efficiency of calculations for a neutron logging tool is presented.

  7. 3-dimensional shielding design for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaya; Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Evaluation of shielding performance for a 1 MW spallation neutron source facility in the Materials and Life Science Facility being constructed in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) is important from a viewpoint of radiation safety and optimization of arrangement of components. This report describes evaluated results for the shielding performance with modeling three-dimensionally whole structural components including gaps between them in detail. A Monte Carlo calculation method with MCNPX2.2.6 code and LA-150 library was adopted. Streaming and void effects, optimization of shield for cost reduction and optimization of arrangement of structures such as shutters were investigated. The streaming effects were investigated quantitatively by changing the detailed structure of components and gap widths built into the calculation model. Horizontal required shield thicknesses were ranged from about 6.5 m to 7.5 m as a function of neutron beam line angles. A shutter mechanism for a horizontal neutron reflectometer that was directed downward was devised, and it was shown that the shielding performance of the shutter was acceptable. An optimal biological shield configuration was finally determined according to the calculated results. (author)

  8. ALARA Review of the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring and Transfer Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.

    2003-06-30

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to meet the growing need for new tools that will deepen our understanding in materials science, life science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, earth and environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. The SNS is an accelerator-based neutron-scattering facility that when operational will produce an average beam power of 2 MW at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The accelerator complex consists of the front-end systems, which will include an ion source; a 1-GeV full-energy linear accelerator; a single accumulator ring and its transfer lines; and a liquid mercury target. This report documents an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) review of the accumulator ring and transfer lines at their early design stage. An ALARA working group was formed and conducted a review of the SNS ring and transfer lines at the {approx}25% complete design stage to help ensure that ALARA principles are being incorporated into the design. The radiological aspects of the SNS design criteria were reviewed against regulatory requirements and ALARA principles. Proposed features and measures were then reviewed against the SNS design criteria. As part of the overall review, the working group reviewed the design manual; design drawings and process and instrumentation diagrams; the environment, safety, and health manual; and other related reports and literature. The group also talked with SNS design engineers to obtain explanations of pertinent subject matter. The ALARA group found that ALARA principles are indeed being incorporated into the early design stage. Radiation fields have been characterized, and shielding calculations have been performed. Radiological issues are being adequately addressed with regard to equipment selection, access control, confinement structure and ventilation, and contamination control. Radiation monitoring instrumentation for worker and environment protection are also being considered--a good practice at this

  9. Preliminary assessment of the nuclide migration from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR.

  10. Pressure and stress waves in a spallation neutron source mercury target generated by high-power proton pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Futakawa, M; Conrad, H; Stechemesser, H

    2000-01-01

    The international ASTE collaboration has performed a first series of measurements on a spallation neutron source target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in Brookhaven. The dynamic response of a liquid mercury target hit by high-power proton pulses of about 40 ns duration has been measured by a laser Doppler technique and compared with finite elements calculations using the ABAQUS code. It is shown that the calculation can describe the experimental results for at least the time interval up to 100 mu s after the pulse injection. Furthermore, it has been observed that piezoelectric pressure transducers cannot be applied in the high gamma-radiation field of a spallation target.

  11. Time-of-Flight Bragg Scattering from Aligned Stacks of Lipid Bilayers using the Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction experiments on aligned stacks of lipid bilayers using the horizontal Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source are reported. Specific details are given regarding the instrumental setup, data collection and reduction, phase determination of the structure factors, and reconstruction of the one-dimensional neutron scattering length density (NSLD) profile. The validity of using TOF measurements to determine the one-dimensional NSLD profile is demonstrated by reproducing the results of two well known lipid bilayer structures. The method is then applied to show how an antimicrobial peptide affects membranes with and without cholesterol.

  12. Neutron in biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Neutron in biology can provide an experimental method of directly locating relationship of proteins and DNA. However, there are relatively few experimental study of such objects since it takes a lot of time to collect a sufficient number of Bragg reflections and inelastic spectra due to the low flux of neutron illuminating the sample. Since a next generation neutron source of JAERI will be 5MW spallation neutron source and its effective neutron flux will be 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} times higher than the one of JRR-3M, neutron in biology will open a completely new world for structural biology. (author)

  13. Advanced sources and optical components for the McStas neutron scattering instrument simulation package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhi, E.; Monzat, C.; Arnerin, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present new McStas components Virtual_mcnp_input and Virtual_tripoli4_input, Virtual_mcnp_output and Virtual_tripoli_output to be used as interface for the MCNP and Tripoli neutron transport codes. Similarly, the new Lens component can be used to describe any refracting material set......-up, including lenses and prisms. A new library for McStas adds the ability to describe any geometrical arrangement as a set of polygons. This feature has been implemented in most sample scattering components such as Single_crystal, Incoherent, Isotropic_Sqw (liquids/amorphous/powder), PowderN as well...... as in Guide_anyshape component for reflecting or absorbing complex set-up. The PSD_Detector component models a neutron absorbing gas volume, taking into account for instance the penetration depth and the associated parallax effect, the charge cloud generated at the absorption location. This gas volume can...

  14. Characterization of the Energy Spectrum at the Indiana University Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    gamma emission with a half life of 2.6 days such as the unstable 198Au nucleus , this would be considered a capture process. As in the elastic /inelastic...inelastic scattering at the incident proton energies of interest [25]. The three channels are compound nucleus break-up, direct-charge exchange, and multi...considered in the physics list for the NREP beam line simulation. Uncharged Hadrons Charged Hadrons (Neutrons) (Protons) Elastic Scattering Low Energy

  15. Neutron-rich polonium isotopes studied with in-source laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dexters, Wim; Cocolios, T E

    This work studies the unknown region of neutron rich polonium isotopes. The polonium isotopes, with Z=84, lie above the magic lead nuclei (Z=82). The motivation for this research can mainly be found in these lead nuclei. When looking at the changes in the mean square charge radii beyond the N=126 shell gap, a kink is observed. This kink is also found in the radon (Z=86) and radium (Z=88) isotopes. The observed effect cannot be reproduced with our current models. The polonium isotopes yield more information on the kink and they are also able to link the known charge radii in lead isotopes to those in radon and radium. Additionally, the nuclear moments of the odd-neutron isotope $^{211}$Po are investigated. This nucleus has two protons and one neutron more than the doubly magic nucleus $^{208}$Pb. Nuclear moments of isotopes close to this doubly magic nucleus are good tests for the theoretic models. Besides pushing the models to their limits, the nuclear moments of $^{211}$Po also yield new information on the f...

  16. CAMEA ESS – The continuous angle multi-energy analysis indirect geometry spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CAMEA ESS neutron spectrometer is designed to achieve a high detection efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane, and to maximize the use of the long pulse European Spallation Source. It is an indirect geometry time-of-flight spectrometer that uses crystal analysers to determine the final energy of neutrons scattered from the sample. Unlike other indirect geometry spectrometers CAMEA will use ten concentric arcs of analysers to analyse scattered neutrons at ten different final energies, which can be increased to 30 final energies by use of prismatic analysis. In this report we will outline the CAMEA instrument concept, the large performance gain, and the potential scientific advancements that can be made with this instrument.

  17. Response of avalanche photo-diodes of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter to neutrons from an Americium-Beryllium source.

    CERN Document Server

    Deiters, Konrad; Renker, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    The response of avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) used in the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter to low energy neutrons from an Americium-Beryllium source is reported. Signals due to recoil protons from neutron interactions with the hydrogen nuclei in the protective epoxy layer, mainly close to the silicon surface of the APD, have been identified. These signals increase in size with the applied bias voltage more slowly than the nominal gain of the APDs, and appear to have a substantially lower effective gain at the operating voltage. The signals originating from interactions in the epoxy are mostly equivalent to signals of a few GeV in CMS, but range up to a few tens of GeV equivalent. There are also signals not attributed to reactions in the epoxy extending up to the end of the range of these measurements, a few hundreds of GeV equivalent. Signals from the x-rays from the source can also be in the GeV equivalent scale in CMS. Simulations used to describe events due to particle interactions in the APDs need to take ...

  18. Measurement and analysis of thorium fission rate in a polyethylene shell with a D-T neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lei [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang, Yiwei, E-mail: winfield1920@126.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu, Zhujun [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065,China (China); Liu, Rong, E-mail: liurongzy@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jiang, Li; Wang, Mei [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Associated angular dependencies of the source neutron energy and intensity was given. • Two sets of fission yields from evaluated libraries were considered and applied. • Calculated results employing ENDF/B-VII.0 agreed with the experimental ones best. • Small discrepancies exist between thorium fission cross section evaluated libraries. - Abstract: In order to validate the {sup 232}Th fission cross section, an integral experiment was carried out using the activation method in a polyethylene shell with a D-T neutron source. Thorium samples were arranged in the 0° direction to the incident D{sup +} beam. The {sup 232}Th fission rate was determined by measuring the 151.195 keV characteristic γ ray emitted from the fission fragment {sup 85m}Kr, and the experimental uncertainties were about 5.3%. MCNP calculation results employing ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4.0 libraries are in good agreement with that of experiments within uncertainties except that employing ENDF/B-VII.1 (∼6.5%). The experiment results can be used to re-evaluate the {sup 232}Th fission cross section.

  19. Study on bulk shielding for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, F; Takada, H; Teshigawara, M; Watanabe, N

    2002-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed in a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. This report describes results of a study on bulk shielding performance of a biological shield for the spallation neutron source by means of a Monte Carlo calculation method, that is important in terms of radiation safety and cost reduction. A shielding configuration was determined as a reference case by considering preliminary studies and interaction with other components, then shielding thickness that was required to achieve a target dose rate of 1 mu Sv/h was derived. Effects of calculation conditions such as shielding materials and dimensions on the shielding performance was investigated by changing those parameters. By taking all the results and design margins into account, a shielding configuration that was identified as the most appropriate was finally determined as follows. An iron shield regi...

  20. Development and performance test of a continuous source of nitrous acid (HONO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, M.; Roessler, E.; Kalberer, M.; Bruetsch, S.; Schwikowski, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Zellweger, C.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Laboratory investigations involving nitrous acid (HONO) require a stable, continuous source of HONO at ppb levels. A flow type generation system based on the reaction of sodium nitrite with sulfuric acid has been developed. Performance and speciation of gaseous products were tested with denuder and chemiluminescence techniques. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  1. Measurement and fitting of pulse shapes of moderators at IPNS (Intense Pulsed Neutron Source): Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bywater, R.L. Jr.; Williams, R.E.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    We present a progress report on measurements and fitting of pulse shapes for neutrons emerging from one solid and two liquid methane moderators in IPNS. A time-focused crystal spectrometer arrangement was used with a cooled Ge monochromator. Data analysis of one of the liquid methane moderators has shown the need for some generalization of the Ikeda-Carpenter function that worked well for fitting pulse shapes of polyethylene moderators. We describe attempts to model physical insight into the wavelength dependence of function parameters. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Neutron scatter camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  3. Absolute determination of neutron detection efficiencies of NE213 detectors using a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source in time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D

    2001-01-01

    Neutron detection efficiencies of NE213 scintillation detectors were determined by comparison of the measured neutron time-of-flight spectrum of a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source deposited in a parallel-plate, low-mass ionization chamber with its reference neutron energy distribution. Measurement conditions and parameters were systematically varied to study their influence on the efficiencies obtained. The efficiencies derived from the measurement were compared with well-established efficiencies of the detectors used. These efficiencies were calculated with a Monte Carlo code and corrected after comparison with a proton recoil telescope in neutron fluence measurements. Details of the measurement and the data analysis including the corrections needed are discussed.

  4. Simulating neutron star mergers as r-process sources in ultrafaint dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Scannapieco, Evan

    2017-10-01

    To explain the high observed abundances of r-process elements in local ultrafaint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, we perform cosmological zoom simulations that include r-process production from neutron star mergers (NSMs). We model star formation stochastically and simulate two different haloes with total masses ≈108 M⊙ at z = 6. We find that the final distribution of [Eu/H] versus [Fe/H] is relatively insensitive to the energy by which the r-process material is ejected into the interstellar medium, but strongly sensitive to the environment in which the NSM event occurs. In one halo, the NSM event takes place at the centre of the stellar distribution, leading to high levels of r-process enrichment such as seen in a local UFD, Reticulum II (Ret II). In a second halo, the NSM event takes place outside of the densest part of the galaxy, leading to a more extended r-process distribution. The subsequent star formation occurs in an interstellar medium with shallow levels of r-process enrichment that results in stars with low levels of [Eu/H] compared to Ret II stars even when the maximum possible r-process mass is assumed to be ejected. This suggests that the natal kicks of neutron stars may also play an important role in determining the r-process abundances in UFD galaxies, a topic that warrants further theoretical investigation.

  5. Early spectra of the gravitational wave source GW170817: Evolution of a neutron star merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappee, B J; Simon, J D; Drout, M R; Piro, A L; Morrell, N; Prieto, J L; Kasen, D; Holoien, T W-S; Kollmeier, J A; Kelson, D D; Coulter, D A; Foley, R J; Kilpatrick, C D; Siebert, M R; Madore, B F; Murguia-Berthier, A; Pan, Y-C; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rest, A; Adams, C; Alatalo, K; Bañados, E; Baughman, J; Bernstein, R A; Bitsakis, T; Boutsia, K; Bravo, J R; Di Mille, F; Higgs, C R; Ji, A P; Maravelias, G; Marshall, J L; Placco, V M; Prieto, G; Wan, Z

    2017-10-16

    On 17 August 2017, Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) was discovered as the optical counterpart of the binary neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817. We report time-series spectroscopy of SSS17a from 11.75 hours until 8.5 days after merger. Over the first hour of observations the ejecta rapidly expanded and cooled. Applying blackbody fits to the spectra, we measure the photosphere cooling from [Formula: see text] K to [Formula: see text] K, and determine a photospheric velocity of roughly 30% of the speed of light. The spectra of SSS17a begin displaying broad features after 1.46 days, and evolve qualitatively over each subsequent day, with distinct blue (early-time) and red (late-time) components. The late-time component is consistent with theoretical models of r-process-enriched neutron star ejecta, whereas the blue component requires high velocity, lanthanide-free material. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Heat Source Characterization In A TREAT Fuel Particle Using Coupled Neutronics Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunert, Sebastian; Schwen, Daniel; Ghassemi, Pedram; Baker, Benjamin; Zabriskie, Adam; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick; DeHart, Mark; Martineau, Richard

    2017-04-01

    This work presents a multi-physics, multi-scale approach to modeling the Transient Test Reactor (TREAT) currently prepared for restart at the Idaho National Laboratory. TREAT fuel is made up of microscopic fuel grains (r ˜ 20µm) dispersed in a graphite matrix. The novelty of this work is in coupling a binary collision Monte-Carlo (BCMC) model to the Finite Element based code Moose for solving a microsopic heat-conduction problem whose driving source is provided by the BCMC model tracking fission fragment energy deposition. This microscopic model is driven by a transient, engineering scale neutronics model coupled to an adiabatic heating model. The macroscopic model provides local power densities and neutron energy spectra to the microscpic model. Currently, no feedback from the microscopic to the macroscopic model is considered. TREAT transient 15 is used to exemplify the capabilities of the multi-physics, multi-scale model, and it is found that the average fuel grain temperature differs from the average graphite temperature by 80 K despite the low-power transient. The large temperature difference has strong implications on the Doppler feedback a potential LEU TREAT core would see, and it underpins the need for multi-physics, multi-scale modeling of a TREAT LEU core.

  7. Desing study of high voltage plasma focus for a large fluence neutron source by using a water capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Isao; Kobata, Tadasuke (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1983-03-01

    A new possibility for high intensity neutron source (HINS) would be opened by the plasma focus device if we have a high voltage capacitor bank. A scaling law of neutron yield for D-T gas discharge in plasma focus device is obtained after Imshennik, Filippov and Filippova. The resulting scaling law shows the realizability of the D-T HINS by the use of plasma focus, provided that the device is operated under a high voltage condition. Until now, it has been difficult to construct the high voltage capacitor bank of long life, for example with V/sub 0/=300kV, C/sub 0/=200..mu..F and L/sub 0/--5nH necessary in the level of HINS. It becomes possible to design this capacitor bank by using the coaxial water capacitor which has been developed for the electron and ion beam accelerator. The size of a capacitor designed for V/sub 0/=300kV, C/sub 0/=1..mu..F is phi5m x 22m. Two hundred capacitors are used in parallel in order to get the 200..mu..F.

  8. Mass measurements of neutron-rich strontium and rubidium isotopes in the region $A \\approx 100$ and development of an electrospray ionization ion source

    CERN Document Server

    de Roubin, Antoine

    An extension of the atomic mass surface in the region $A \\approx 100$ is performed via mass measurements of the $^{100−102}$Sr and $^{100−102}$Rb isotopes with the ion-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE. The first direct mass measurements of $^{102}$Sr and $^{101,102}$Rb are reported here. These measurements confirm the continuation of the region of nuclear deformation with the increase of neutron number, at least as far as $N = 65$. In order to interpret the deformation in the strontium isotopic chain and to determine whether an onset of deformation is present in heavier krypton isotopes, a comparison is made between experimental values and theoretical calculations available in the literature. To complete this comparison, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations for even and odd isotopes are also presented, illustrating the competition of nuclear shapes in the region. The development of an electrospray ionization ion source is presented. This source can deliver a large range of isobaric masses ...

  9. International Neutron Radiography Newsletter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    At the First World Conference on Neutron Radiography i t was decided to continue the "Neutron Radiography Newsletter", published previously by J.P. Barton, as the "International Neutron Radiography Newsletter" (INRNL), with J.C. Doraanus as editor. The British Journal of Non-Destructive Testing...

  10. Neutron streak camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  11. Probing astrophysically important states in the 26Mg nucleus to study neutron sources for the s process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, R.; Adachi, T.; Berg, G. P. A.; Bin, L.; Bisterzo, S.; Couder, M.; deBoer, R. J.; Fang, X.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Görres, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Itoh, T.; Kadoya, T.; Long, A.; Miki, K.; Patel, D.; Pignatari, M.; Shimbara, Y.; Tamii, A.; Wiescher, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: The 22Ne(α ,n )25Mg reaction is the dominant neutron source for the slow neutron capture process (s process) in massive stars, and contributes, together with 13C (α ,n )16O, to the production of neutrons for the s process in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, the reaction is endothermic and competes directly with 22Ne(α ,γ )26Mg radiative capture. The uncertainties for both reactions are large owing to the uncertainty in the level structure of 26Mg near the α and neutron separation energies. These uncertainties affect the s -process nucleosynthesis calculations in theoretical stellar models. Purpose: Indirect studies in the past have been successful in determining the energies and the γ -ray and neutron widths of the 26Mg states in the energy region of interest. But, the high Coulomb barrier hinders a direct measurement of the res