WorldWideScience

Sample records for continuous morphological evolution

  1. Evolution of zinc morphology during continuous electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The morphology evolution of zinc continuous electrodeposits with nano-sized crystals on the ferrite substrate has been studied by in-situ scanning tunnel spectroscopy (STM). It is found that the morphology of zinc electrodeposits varies from initial granules with a size of about 30 nm to layered platelets with increasing deposition time. Meanwhile, the crystal structure of the zinc electrodeposits is identified to be hexagonal η-phase by X-ray diffraction. The orientation relationship between zinc crystals and the substrate surface can be interpreted in terms of the misfit and the atomic correspondence of the interphase boundary between the η-phase deposits and α-Fe substrate.

  2. Molecular origins of rapid and continuous morphological evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Fondon, John W.; Garner, Harold R

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in cis-regulatory sequences have been implicated as being the predominant source of variation in morphological evolution. We offer a hypothesis that gene-associated tandem repeat expansions and contractions are a major source of phenotypic variation in evolution. Here, we describe a comparative genomic study of repetitive elements in developmental genes of 92 breeds of dogs. We find evidence for selection for divergence at coding repeat loci in the form of both elevated purity and e...

  3. Molecular origins of rapid and continuous morphological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondon, John W; Garner, Harold R

    2004-12-28

    Mutations in cis-regulatory sequences have been implicated as being the predominant source of variation in morphological evolution. We offer a hypothesis that gene-associated tandem repeat expansions and contractions are a major source of phenotypic variation in evolution. Here, we describe a comparative genomic study of repetitive elements in developmental genes of 92 breeds of dogs. We find evidence for selection for divergence at coding repeat loci in the form of both elevated purity and extensive length polymorphism among different breeds. Variations in the number of repeats in the coding regions of the Alx-4 (aristaless-like 4) and Runx-2 (runt-related transcription factor 2) genes were quantitatively associated with significant differences in limb and skull morphology. We identified similar repeat length variation in the coding repeats of Runx-2, Twist, and Dlx-2 in several other species. The high frequency and incremental effects of repeat length mutations provide molecular explanations for swift, yet topologically conservative morphological evolution.

  4. Prediction of the granulometric and morphological evolution of a powder in a continuous conversion kiln; Prediction de l evolution granulometrique et morphologique d une poudre dans un four tournant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patisson, F.; Hebrard, S.; Ablitzer, D. [LSG2M, UMR 7584 CNRS-INPL, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Ablitzer-Thouroude, C.; Hebrard, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA-Cadarache, DEC/SPUA/LCU, batiment 315, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez- Durance (France)

    2006-07-01

    The UO{sub 2} powder used for the preparation of nuclear fuel pellets is obtained in France by a dry way conversion of gaseous UF{sub 6}. The process includes two steps: hydrolysis into UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}, then reducing pyro-hydrolysis into UO{sub 2} in a continuous conversion kiln. The physical characteristics (morphology, grain size distribution) of the obtained UO{sub 2} powder condition its use properties (sintering ability, casting ability and mechanical strength). A model describing the morphological evolution of the powder in the continuous conversion kiln has been developed in order to dispose of a prediction tool for the morphological characteristics of the UO{sub 2} powder according to its formation conditions. The first part of this work has consisted to model the transport of the powder in the kiln, describing particularly the exchanges between the dense phase (powder bed) and the dispersed phase (rain of particles suspension). One of the originality of the developed model is the taking into account of the role of the raising devices for the calculus of the dynamical variables. The second part has consisted to identify, describe and couple to the preceding dynamical model the phenomena responsible of the morphological and granulometric evolution of the powder in the continuous conversion kiln. A population of fractal agglomerates is considered whose number and size evolve by brownian agglomeration, differential sedimentation agglomeration, pre sintering, fragmentation, and chemical transformations by ex-nucleation and growth. This model uses the formalism of the population balances and the grain size distribution is discretized into sections. The results of the dynamical and morphological calculations are compared to the available measurements. At last is analyzed the respective influence of the different morphological evolution mechanisms on the ended grain size distribution. (O.M.)

  5. Morphology Evolution of Polycarbonate-Polystyrene Blends During Compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuai, Chengzhi; Almdal, Kristoffer; Johannsen, Ib;

    2001-01-01

    The morphology evolution of polycarbonate-polystyrene (PC/PS) blends during the compounding process in three blending methods of industrial relevance, namely melt blending, re-melt blending in a twin-screw extruder and tri-melt blending in an injection-moulding machine, was investigated using......-empirical model. The results show that the formation of co-continuous morphology strongly depends on blend composition and melt blending method, whereas the model prediction for phase inversion deviates from the experimental values. Further, we found that the initial mechanism of morphology evolution involves...

  6. Nanoscale Morphology Evolution Under Ion Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Michael J. [President & Fellows of Harvard College, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We showed that the half-century-old paradigm of morphological instability under irradiation due to the curvature-dependence of the sputter yield, can account neither for the phase diagram nor the amplification or decay rates that we measure in the simplest possible experimental system -- an elemental semiconductor with an amorphous surface under noble-gas ion irradiation; We showed that a model of pattern formation based on the impact-induced redistribution of atoms that do not get sputtered away explains our experimental observations; We developed a first-principles, parameter-free approach for predicting morphology evolution, starting with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts, lasting picoseconds, and upscaling through a rigorous crater-function formalism to develop a partial differential equation that predicts morphology evolution on time scales more than twelve orders of magnitude longer than can be covered by the molecular dynamics; We performed the first quantitative comparison of the contributions to morphological instability from sputter removal and from impact-induced redistribution of atoms that are removed, and showed that the former is negligible compared to the latter; We established a new paradigm for impact-induced morphology evolution based on crater functions that incorporate both redistribution and sputter effects; and We developed a model of nanopore closure by irradiation-induced stress and irradiationenhanced fluidity, for the near-surface irradiation regime in which nuclear stopping predominates, and showed that it explains many aspects of pore closure kinetics that we measure experimentally.

  7. Increased morphological asymmetry, evolvability and plasticity in human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Sherwood, Chet C

    2013-06-22

    The study of hominin brain evolution relies mostly on evaluation of the endocranial morphology of fossil skulls. However, only some general features of external brain morphology are evident from endocasts, and many anatomical details can be difficult or impossible to examine. In this study, we use geometric morphometric techniques to evaluate inter- and intraspecific differences in cerebral morphology in a sample of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging scans of chimpanzees and humans, with special emphasis on the study of asymmetric variation. Our study reveals that chimpanzee-human differences in cerebral morphology are mainly symmetric; by contrast, there is continuity in asymmetric variation between species, with humans showing an increased range of variation. Moreover, asymmetric variation does not appear to be the result of allometric scaling at intraspecific levels, whereas symmetric changes exhibit very slight allometric effects within each species. Our results emphasize two key properties of brain evolution in the hominine clade: first, evolution of chimpanzee and human brains (and probably their last common ancestor and related species) is not strongly morphologically constrained, thus making their brains highly evolvable and responsive to selective pressures; second, chimpanzee and, especially, human brains show high levels of fluctuating asymmetry indicative of pronounced developmental plasticity. We infer that these two characteristics can have a role in human cognitive evolution.

  8. Morphological evolution is accelerated among island mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millien, Virginie

    2006-10-01

    Dramatic evolutionary changes occur in species isolated on islands, but it is not known if the rate of evolution is accelerated on islands relative to the mainland. Based on an extensive review of the literature, I used the fossil record combined with data from living species to test the hypothesis of an accelerated morphological evolution among island mammals. I demonstrate that rates of morphological evolution are significantly greater--up to a factor of 3.1--for islands than for mainland mammal populations. The tendency for faster evolution on islands holds over relatively short time scales--from a few decades up to several thousands of years--but not over larger ones--up to 12 million y. These analyses form the first empirical test of the long held supposition of accelerated evolution among island mammals. Moreover, this result shows that mammal species have the intrinsic capacity to evolve faster when confronted with a rapid change in their environment. This finding is relevant to our understanding of species' responses to isolation and destruction of natural habitats within the current context of rapid climate warming.

  9. The morphological evolution of field galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Richard S

    1994-01-01

    I review two observational programs which, together, promise to unravel the detailed astrophysical evolution of normal field galaxies over the last 5-7 Gyr. Systematic ground-based spectroscopy of faint galaxies have revealed an increasing faint end slope for the luminosity function with redshift. The trend is strongest for galaxies undergoing intense star-formation. Deep images taken with the repaired HST can be used to count galaxies as a function of morphological type. Regular `Hubble sequence' galaxies follow the no-evolution prediction, but irregular/peculiar sources have a steeper count slope and provide the excess population. Although the overlap between the spectral and HST samples is currently small, plans to merge similar datasets should reveal the physical explanation for the demise of star formation in faint blue galaxies since z\\simeq0.5-1.

  10. THE CONTINUITY OF OPERATORS IN MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高智民; 杨忠强

    2002-01-01

    In pattern analysis and image management, the information of an objective image can be recovered from a sequence approximate images. In mathematical form of expression it is needed to consider some types of continuity. Many researchers defined the limit and the upper limit of a sequence and, using the concepts, characterized continuity in the space consisted of images. In the present paper, the authors give firstly some examples to show that there are some theoretical shortcomings in those results, then give some corresponding correct results.

  11. Adapting Digital Libraries to Continual Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Finch, Melinda; Ferebee, Michelle; Mackey, Calvin

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe five investment streams (data storage infrastructure, knowledge management, data production control, data transport and security, and personnel skill mix) that need to be balanced against short-term operating demands in order to maximize the probability of long-term viability of a digital library. Because of the rapid pace of information technology change, a digital library cannot be a static institution. Rather, it has to become a flexible organization adapted to continuous evolution of its infrastructure.

  12. Morphology and behaviour : functional links in development and evolution Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertossa, Rinaldo C.

    2011-01-01

    Development and evolution of animal behaviour and morphology are frequently addressed independently, as reflected in the dichotomy of disciplines dedicated to their study distinguishing object of study (morphology versus behaviour) and perspective (ultimate versus proximate). Although traits are

  13. Morphology and behaviour : functional links in development and evolution Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertossa, Rinaldo C.

    2011-01-01

    Development and evolution of animal behaviour and morphology are frequently addressed independently, as reflected in the dichotomy of disciplines dedicated to their study distinguishing object of study (morphology versus behaviour) and perspective (ultimate versus proximate). Although traits are kno

  14. Flowers of annonaceae: Morphology, classification, and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusden, van E.C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper describes the diversity in floral characters of Annonaceae and their distribution over the family, and discusses their value for classification and generic delimitation. Flower morphology predominated historical classifications of this family since Hooker & Thomson (1855)

  15. Morphological evolution, ecological diversification and climate change in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Sabrina; Michaux, Jacques; Schmidt, Daniela N; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Mein, Pierre; Auffray, Jean-Christophe

    2005-03-22

    Among rodents, the lineage from Progonomys hispanicus to Stephanomys documents a case of increasing size and dental specialization during an approximately 9 Myr time-interval. On the contrary, some contemporaneous generalist lineages like Apodemus show a limited morphological evolution. Dental shape can be related to diet and can be used to assess the ecological changes along the lineages. Consequently, size and shape of the first upper molar were measured in order to quantify the patterns of morphological evolution along both lineages and compare them to environmental trends. Climatic changes do not have a direct influence on evolution, but they open new ecological opportunities by changing vegetation and allow the evolution of a specialist like Stephanomys. On the other hand, environmental changes are not dramatic enough to destroy the habitat of a long-term generalist like Apodemus. Hence, our results exemplify a case of an influence of climate on the evolution of specialist species, although a generalist species may persist without change.

  16. Morphology, evolution and taxonomy of Wachendorfia (Haemodoraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Helme

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Wachendorfia Burm. is a small genus endemic to the Cape Floral Region. Pour species are recognised in this study. Two species were originally described by Burman in 1757 and these were followed by numerous other descriptions of what is essentially one very variable species  (W. paniculaia Burm.. This variation is discussed and reasons are given as to why the recognition of formal infraspecific taxa is inappropriate. Formal taxonomic descriptions, distribution maps and a key to the species are provided. Rhizome morphology, leaf anatomy and pollen and seed coat structures were investigated and illustrations are provided. A cladogram was inferred and this is consistent with an ecological speciation model for the genus. The two species with the most restricted distribution (W. brachyandra W.F. Barker and W. pamfiora W.F. Barker are considered to be the most recently evolved. Features of systematic and ecological interest (e.g. floral enantiomorphy are discussed.

  17. Did you say career evolution? (continued)

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    In our previous issue we presented the conclusions of the analysis of the MARS system made by our staff delegates at the mini-assizes on 3 March. This meeting was the starting point for a wider discussion on career evolution in the Organization. The outcome of these discussions is that many improvements are possible. Here are a few of them.

  18. Identifying heterogeneity in rates of morphological evolution: discrete character change in the evolution of lungfish (Sarcopterygii; Dipnoi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Graeme T; Wang, Steve C; Brusatte, Stephen L

    2012-02-01

    Quantifying rates of morphological evolution is important in many macroevolutionary studies, and critical when assessing possible adaptive radiations and episodes of punctuated equilibrium in the fossil record. However, studies of morphological rates of change have lagged behind those on taxonomic diversification, and most authors have focused on continuous characters and quantifying patterns of morphological rates over time. Here, we provide a phylogenetic approach, using discrete characters and three statistical tests to determine points on a cladogram (branches or entire clades) that are characterized by significantly high or low rates of change. These methods include a randomization approach that identifies branches with significantly high rates and likelihood ratio tests that pinpoint either branches or clades that have significantly higher or lower rates than the pooled rate of the remainder of the tree. As a test case for these methods, we analyze a discrete character dataset of lungfish, which have long been regarded as "living fossils" due to an apparent slowdown in rates since the Devonian. We find that morphological rates are highly heterogeneous across the phylogeny and recover a general pattern of decreasing rates along the phylogenetic backbone toward living taxa, from the Devonian until the present. Compared with previous work, we are able to report a more nuanced picture of lungfish evolution using these new methods. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Morphology and Tectonic Evolution of Endeavor Deep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockalny, R. A.; Larson, R. L.; Popham, C. T.; Natland, J. H.; Abrams, L. J.; Sonder, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    Endeavor Deep is located on the Nazca/Juan Fernandez plate boundary near the triple junction of the Pacific, Nazca and Antarctic plates. The deep is the tip of the northward propagating East Ridge, which defines the eastern side of the microplate and is presently exposing ~3 Myr old oceanic crust created at the ultra-fast spreading (~150 km/myr) East Pacific Rise. Recently collected high-resolution EM300 bathymetry, deep-tow DSL120 sidescan, surface-towed magnetics, and near-bottom JASON II observations provide important details about the tectonic character and origin of Endeavor Deep. These data define a 70 km-long, 40 km-wide, and 3 km-deep rift which shoals and narrows toward the rift tip to the NW and is deeper and wider away from the rift tip toward the SE. The southern wall of the rift is uplifted and has a characteristic flexural profile. The northern wall is also uplifted, however, the classic flexural profile is complicated by the presence of a large EW-trending massif, which appears to be a rift-truncated compressional ridge emplaced during a phase of NS-oriented compression. Along both rift walls, a series of terraces suggest a series of down-dropped blocks associated with ongoing extension. Along the rift floor, a relatively flat, featureless bottom in the NW evolves into hummocky terrane in the central part of the basin that is characterized by volcanic features reminiscent of 1-2 km diameter pancakes in plan-view. Farther to the SE, tectonic lineations and pillow ridges oriented parallel to the trend of the rift valley dominate the basin floor. Magnetic profiles across this portion of the survey area indicate a well-formed central magnetic anomaly with a width equivalent to a spreading rate of 20 km/Myr, which is predicted by tectonic reconstructions of the plate boundary. Overall, these observations define a four-phase evolution of Endeavor Deep: 1) initial crustal formation at the ultra-fast spreading East Pacific Rise ~3 Ma, 2) regional compression

  20. Druse-Induced Morphology Evolution in Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitello, K I; Chrenek, M A; Family, F; Grossniklaus, H E; Nickerson, J M; Jiang, Y

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of pathogenesis for many retina diseases. The formation of drusen in the retina is characteristic of retinal degeneration. We investigate morphological changes in the RPE in the presence of soft drusen using an integrated experimental and modeling approach. We collect RPE flat mount images from donated human eyes and develop 1) statistical tools to quantify the images and 2) a cell-based model to simulate the morphology evolution. We compare three different mechanisms of RPE repair evolution, cell apoptosis, cell fusion, and expansion, and Simulations of our RPE morphogenesis model quantitatively reproduce deformations of human RPE morphology due to drusen, suggesting that a purse-string mechanism is sufficient to explain how RPE heals cell loss caused by drusen-damage. We found that drusen beneath tissue promote cell death in a number that far exceeds the cell numbers covering the drusen. Tissue deformations are studied using area distributions, Voronoi doma...

  1. Morphological evolution in land plants: new designs with old genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Nuno D; Dolan, Liam

    2012-02-19

    The colonization and radiation of multicellular plants on land that started over 470 Ma was one of the defining events in the history of this planet. For the first time, large amounts of primary productivity occurred on the continental surface, paving the way for the evolution of complex terrestrial ecosystems and altering global biogeochemical cycles; increased weathering of continental silicates and organic carbon burial resulted in a 90 per cent reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The evolution of plants on land was itself characterized by a series of radical transformations of their body plans that included the formation of three-dimensional tissues, de novo evolution of a multicellular diploid sporophyte generation, evolution of multicellular meristems, and the development of specialized tissues and organ systems such as vasculature, roots, leaves, seeds and flowers. In this review, we discuss the evolution of the genes and developmental mechanisms that drove the explosion of plant morphologies on land. Recent studies indicate that many of the gene families which control development in extant plants were already present in the earliest land plants. This suggests that the evolution of novel morphologies was to a large degree driven by the reassembly and reuse of pre-existing genetic mechanisms.

  2. Beach morphology and coastline evolution in the southern Bohai Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Jianzheng; Li, Weiran; Zhu, Longhai; Hu, Rijun; Jiang, shenghui; Sun, Yonggen; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-10-01

    The beach studied in this paper spans a length of 51 km and is one of several long sandy beaches in the southern Bohai Strait. Due to the obstruction of islands in the northeast and the influence of the underwater topography, the wave environment in the offshore area is complex; beach types and sediment transport characteristics vary along different coasts. The coastlines extracted from six aerial photographs in different years were compared to demonstrate the evolving features. Seven typical beach profiles were selected to study the lateral beach variation characteristics. Continuous wind and wave observation data from Beihuangcheng ocean station during 2009 were employed for the hindcast of the local wave environment using a regional spectral wave model. Then the results of the wave hindcast were incorporated into the LITDRIFT model to compute the sediment transport rates and directions along the coasts and analyze the longshore sand movement. The results show that the coastline evolution of sand beaches in the southern Bohai Strait has spatial and temporal variations and the coast can be divided into four typical regions. Region (I), the north coast of Qimudao, is a slightly eroded and dissipative beach with a large sediment transport rate; Region (II), the southwest coast of Gangluan Port, is a slightly deposited and dissipative beach with moderate sediment transport rate; Region (III), in the central area, is a beach that is gradually transformed from a slightly eroded dissipative beach to a moderately or slightly strong eroded bar-trough beach from west to east with a relatively moderate sediment transport rate. Region (IV), on the east coast, is a strongly eroded and reflective beach with a weak sediment transport rate. The wave conditions exhibit an increasing trend from west to east in the offshore area. The distribution of the wave-induced current inside the wave breaking region and the littoral sediment transport in the nearshore region exhibit a gradual

  3. Rates of morphological evolution are heterogeneous in Early Cretaceous birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Lloyd, Graeme T

    2016-04-13

    The Early Cretaceous is a critical interval in the early history of birds. Exceptional fossils indicate that important evolutionary novelties such as a pygostyle and a keeled sternum had already arisen in Early Cretaceous taxa, bridging much of the morphological gap between Archaeopteryx and crown birds. However, detailed features of basal bird evolution remain obscure because of both the small sample of fossil taxa previously considered and a lack of quantitative studies assessing rates of morphological evolution. Here we apply a recently available phylogenetic method and associated sensitivity tests to a large data matrix of morphological characters to quantify rates of morphological evolution in Early Cretaceous birds. Our results reveal that although rates were highly heterogeneous between different Early Cretaceous avian lineages, consistent patterns of significantly high or low rates were harder to pinpoint. Nevertheless, evidence for accelerated evolutionary rates is strongest at the point when Ornithuromorpha (the clade comprises all extant birds and descendants from their most recent common ancestors) split from Enantiornithes (a diverse clade that went extinct at the end-Cretaceous), consistent with the hypothesis that this key split opened up new niches and ultimately led to greater diversity for these two dominant clades of Mesozoic birds.

  4. Changes in Cis-regulatory Elements during Morphological Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lee Paul

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available How have animals evolved new body designs (morphological evolution? This requires explanations both for simple morphological changes, such as differences in pigmentation and hair patterns between different Drosophila populations and species, and also for more complex changes, such as differences in the forelimbs of mice and bats, and the necks of amphibians and reptiles. The genetic changes and pathways involved in these evolutionary steps require identification. Many, though not all, of these events occur by changes in cis-regulatory (enhancer elements within developmental genes. Enhancers are modular, each affecting expression in only one or a few tissues. Therefore it is possible to add, remove or alter an enhancer without producing changes in multiple tissues, and thereby avoid widespread (pleiotropic deleterious effects. Ideally, for a given step in morphological evolution it is necessary to identify (i the change in phenotype, (ii the changes in gene expression, (iii the DNA region, enhancer or otherwise, affected, (iv the mutation involved, (v the nature of the transcription or other factors that bind to this site. In practice these data are incomplete for most of the published studies upon morphological evolution. Here, the investigations are categorized according to how far these analyses have proceeded.

  5. Morphology Evolution of Primary Particles in Lspsf Rheocasting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong-Min; Yang, Xiang-Jie

    Experimental and microstructure simulation approaches were taken to investigate the morphological evolutions of primary particles in an Al-20wt% pct Cu alloy under LSPSF (low superheat pouring with a shear field) rheocasting conditions. The results indicate that crystals are globular and present in non-entrapped eutectic, after 3s of solidification. The morphology of these crystals during the subsequent free growth is determined by both the number of free crystals and the cooling intensity of melt. Analyzed results from microstructure simulation and two stability models suggest that the primary globular particles formed in the earlier stage of solidification can attain growth stability up to a larger size scale.

  6. The evolution, morphology and development of fern leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eVasco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaves are lateral determinate structures formed in a predictable sequence (phyllotaxy on the flanks of an indeterminate shoot apical meristem. The origin and evolution of leaves in vascular plants has been widely debated. Being the main conspicuous organ of nearl all vascular plants and often easy to recognize as such, it seems surprising that leaves have had multiple origins. For decades, morphologists, anatomists, paleobotanists, and systematists have contributed data to this debate. More recently, molecular genetic studies have provided insight into leaf evolution and development mainly within angiosperms and, to a lesser extent, lycophytes. There has been recent interest in extending leaf evolutionary developmental studies to other species and lineages, particularly in lycophytes and ferns. Therefore, a review of fern leaf morphology, evolution and development is timely. Here we discuss the theories of leaf evolution in ferns, morphology and diversity of fern leaves, and experimental results of fern leaf development. We summarize what is known about the molecular genetics of fern leaf development and what future studies might tell us about the evolution of fern leaf development.

  7. Adaptive evolution on a continuous lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudino, Elder S.; Lyra, M. L.; Gleria, Iram; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2013-03-01

    In the current work, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics of a spatially structured population model defined on a continuous lattice. In the model, individuals disperse at a constant rate v and competition is local and delimited by the competition radius R. Due to dispersal, the neighborhood size (number of individuals competing for reproduction) fluctuates over time. Here we address how these new variables affect the adaptive process. While the fixation probabilities of beneficial mutations are roughly the same as in a panmitic population for small fitness effects s, a dependence on v and R becomes more evident for large s. These quantities also strongly influence fixation times, but their dependencies on s are well approximated by s-1/2, which means that the speed of the genetic wave front is proportional to s. Most important is the observation that the model exhibits a dual behavior displaying a power-law growth for the fixation rate and speed of adaptation with the beneficial mutation rate, as observed in other spatially structured population models, while simultaneously showing a nonsaturating behavior for the speed of adaptation with the population size N, as in homogeneous populations.

  8. Continuing Evolution: The Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horm, Diane M.; O'Keefe, Beverly; Diffendale, Charlotte; Cohen, Amy; Schennum, Ruth; Pucciarelli, Larry; Collins, Cheryl; Merrifield, Margaret; Nardone, Virginia; Martin, Marilyn; Bryan, Linda; DeRobbio, Gail

    2004-01-01

    This narrative chronicles the continued evolution and development of the Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute, an intensive 5-day inservice professional development program designed for educational leaders from various sectors of the early care and education field. The goal is to review the continued use of successful practices…

  9. Cryptic individual scaling relationships and the evolution of morphological scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Austin P; Saleh Ziabari, Omid; Swanson, Eli M; Chawla, Akshita; Frankino, W Anthony; Shingleton, Alexander W

    2016-08-01

    Morphological scaling relationships between organ and body size-also known as allometries-describe the shape of a species, and the evolution of such scaling relationships is central to the generation of morphological diversity. Despite extensive modeling and empirical tests, however, the modes of selection that generate changes in scaling remain largely unknown. Here, we mathematically model the evolution of the group-level scaling as an emergent property of individual-level variation in the developmental mechanisms that regulate trait and body size. We show that these mechanisms generate a "cryptic individual scaling relationship" unique to each genotype in a population, which determines body and trait size expressed by each individual, depending on developmental nutrition. We find that populations may have identical population-level allometries but very different underlying patterns of cryptic individual scaling relationships. Consequently, two populations with apparently the same morphological scaling relationship may respond very differently to the same form of selection. By focusing on the developmental mechanisms that regulate trait size and the patterns of cryptic individual scaling relationships they produce, our approach reveals the forms of selection that should be most effective in altering morphological scaling, and directs researcher attention on the actual, hitherto overlooked, targets of selection.

  10. Morphological evolution of spiders predicted by pendulum mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Moya-Laraño

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals have been hypothesized to benefit from pendulum mechanics during suspensory locomotion, in which the potential energy of gravity is converted into kinetic energy according to the energy-conservation principle. However, no convincing evidence has been found so far. Demonstrating that morphological evolution follows pendulum mechanics is important from a biomechanical point of view because during suspensory locomotion some morphological traits could be decoupled from gravity, thus allowing independent adaptive morphological evolution of these two traits when compared to animals that move standing on their legs; i.e., as inverted pendulums. If the evolution of body shape matches simple pendulum mechanics, animals that move suspending their bodies should evolve relatively longer legs which must confer high moving capabilities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested this hypothesis in spiders, a group of diverse terrestrial generalist predators in which suspensory locomotion has been lost and gained a few times independently during their evolutionary history. In spiders that hang upside-down from their webs, their legs have evolved disproportionately longer relative to their body sizes when compared to spiders that move standing on their legs. In addition, we show how disproportionately longer legs allow spiders to run faster during suspensory locomotion and how these same spiders run at a slower speed on the ground (i.e., as inverted pendulums. Finally, when suspensory spiders are induced to run on the ground, there is a clear trend in which larger suspensory spiders tend to run much more slowly than similar-size spiders that normally move as inverted pendulums (i.e., wandering spiders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that spiders have evolved according to the predictions of pendulum mechanics. These findings have potentially important ecological and evolutionary implications since

  11. Evolution of morphological and climatic adaptations in Veronica L. (Plantaginaceae

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    Jian-Cheng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Perennials and annuals apply different strategies to adapt to the adverse environment, based on ‘tolerance’ and ‘avoidance’, respectively. To understand lifespan evolution and its impact on plant adaptability, we carried out a comparative study of perennials and annuals in the genus Veronica from a phylogenetic perspective. The results showed that ancestors of the genus Veronicawere likely to be perennial plants. Annual life history of Veronica has evolved multiple times and subtrees with more annual species have a higher substitution rate. Annuals can adapt to more xeric habitats than perennials. This indicates that annuals are more drought-resistant than their perennial relatives. Due to adaptation to similar selective pressures, parallel evolution occurs in morphological characters among annual species of Veronica.

  12. Boundary Control of Linear Evolution PDEs - Continuous and Discrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Marthedal

    2004-01-01

    Consider a partial di erential equation (PDE) of evolution type, such as the wave equation or the heat equation. Assume now that you can influence the behavior of the solution by setting the boundary conditions as you please. This is boundary control in a broad sense. A substantial amount...... erential equations. This field has mostly concerned engineers and others with practical applications in mind. This thesis makes an attempt to bridge the two research areas. More specifically, we make finite dimensional approximations to certain evolution PDEs, and analyze how properties of the discrete...... systems resemble the properties of the continuous system. A common framework in which the continuous systems are formulated will be provided. The treatment includes many types of linear evolution PDEs and boundary conditions. We also consider di erent types of controllability, such as approximate, null...

  13. The Formation and Evolution of Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    Supernovae inject metals at high velocities into the interstellar medium (ISM), leading to shocks, plasma heating, and dust destruction and creation in addition to host of other processes. Supernova remnants (SNR) themselves are generally categorized as shell-type, center-filled, or ``mixed morphology.'' These categories, which encapsulate both the structure and evolution of the remnant, seem to depend critically on the precursor star and the surrounding ISM. Mixed morphology remnants, in particular, show a radio shell with a central region that emits primarily thermal X-rays. Observations show that these SNR are typically found near or in molecular clouds and, since they usually contain compact objects, arise from high-mass precursors. However, our theoretical understanding of these remnants lags far behind our observational data. There are at least four distinct models for their appearance, usually explaining observations from one or at most a few of the remnants, but there is no general solution. However, there has been a recent breakthrough in mixed morphology remnants. Suzaku observations of three remnants show that a significant fraction of the thermal X-rays are from a non-equilibrium recombining plasma, a surprising result since SNR are expected to generate ionizing, not recombining, plasmas. This new discovery should severely constrains theoretical predictions. We propose a combined semi-analytic and computational approach to understanding how these remnants develop and evolve. A number of observational studies have already cataloged the emission characteristics and sizes of these remnants. Our study will therefore begin with an exploration of simple 1-D spherically symmetric hydrodynamic plasma models that can generate the observed emission in X-ray and other bandpasses as well as the approximate size of a range of mixed morphology remnants. We will expand these studies using both 2-D and 3-D magnetohydrodynamic explosion models combined with a non

  14. Soil surface morphology evolution under spatiallynon-uniform rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, M.; Rinaldo, A.; Sander, G. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the applicability of a large-scale river network evolution modelused to simulate morphological changes of a laboratory-scale landscape onwhich there were no visible rills. Previously, such models were used onlyat the landscape scale, or in laboratory experiments where rills form in thesoils surface. The flume-scale experiment (1-m × 2-m surface area) was de-signed to allow model calibration. Low-cohesive fine sand was placed in theflume while the slope and relief height were 5% and 25 cm, respectively.Non-uniform rainfall with an average intensity of 85 mmh -1 and a stan-dard deviation of 26% was applied to the sediment surface for 16 h. Highresolution Digital Elevation Models were captured at intervals during theexperiment. Estimates of the overland flow drainage network were derivedand, using these, the river network evolution model was numerically solvedand calibrated. A noticeable feature of the experiment was a steep transitionzone in soil elevation that migrated upstream during the experiment. Physi-cally, this zone indicates where the shear stress is sufficient to cause sediment1erosion. The model was calibrated during the first 4 h of experiment. Af-terwards, it predicted the subsequent 12 h of measured surface morphologychanges. Therefore, the applicability of the landscape evolution model wasextended for non-uniform rainfall and in absence of visible rills.Keywords:Numerical simulation, Particle Swarm Optimization, Sediment transport,River network evolution model.

  15. The continuity of bacterial and physicochemical evolution: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The continuity of chemical and biological evolution, incorporating life's emergence, can be explored experimentally by energizing 'dead' bacterial biomacromolecules with nutrients under cycling physicochemical gradients. This approach arises from three evolutionary principles rooted in physical chemistry: (i) broken bacterial cells cannot spontaneously self-assemble into a living state without the supply of external energy - 2nd law of thermodynamics, (ii) the energy delivery must be cycling - the primary mechanism of chemical evolution at rotating planetary surfaces under solar irradiation, (iii) the cycling energy must act on chemical mixtures of high molecular diversity and crowding - provided by dead bacterial populations.

  16. Continuous Time Random Walks for the Evolution of Lagrangian Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Comolli, Alessandro; Borgne, Tanguy Le; Lester, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steady heterogeneous flows based on a stochastic relaxation process for the streamwise particle velocities. This approach describes persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods, which model persistence over a characteristic time scale. We first establish the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochrone sampling along streamlines, under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop a space continuous CTRW approach for the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lagrangian velocities. While classical CTRW formulations have non-stationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, the proposed approach quantifies the evolution of the Lagrangian velocity statistics under both stationary and non-stationary conditions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity statistics, and determine the behaviors of...

  17. Continuous evolution of B. thuringiensis toxins overcomes insect resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins (Bt toxins) are widely used insecticidal proteins in engineered crops that provide agricultural, economic, and environmental benefits. The development of insect resistance to Bt toxins endangers their long-term effectiveness. We developed a phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE) selection that rapidly evolves high-affinity protein-protein interactions, and applied this system to evolve variants of the Bt toxin Cry1Ac that bind a cadherin-like recept...

  18. The Missing Magnetic Morphology Term in Stellar Rotation Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Cohen, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between magnetic field complexity and mass and angular momentum losses. Observations of open clusters have revealed a bimodal distribution of the rotation periods of solar-like stars that has proven difficult to explain under the existing rubric of magnetic braking. Recent studies suggest that magnetic complexity can play an important role in controlling stellar spin-down rates. However, magnetic morphology is still neglected in most rotation evolution models due to the difficulty of properly accounting for its effects on wind driving and angular momentum loss. Using state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamical magnetized wind simulations we study the effect that different distributions of the magnetic flux at different levels of geometrical complexity have on mass and angular momentum loss rates. Angular momentum loss rates depend strongly on the level of complexity of the field but are independent of the way this complexity is distributed. We deduce the analytical terms repres...

  19. Probing the evolution and morphology of hard carbon spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, Vilas G.; Wen, Jianguo; Lau, Kah Chun; Callear, Samantha; Bowron, Daniel T.; Lin, Chi-Kai; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Curtiss, Larry A.; David, William; Miller, Dean J.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2014-03-01

    Monodispersed hard carbon spheres can be synthesized quickly and reproducibly by autogenic reactions of hydrocarbon precursors, notably polyethylene (including plastic waste), at high temperature and pressure. The carbon microparticles formed by this reaction have a unique spherical architecture, with a dominant internal nanometer layered motif, and they exhibit diamond-like hardness and electrochemical properties similar to graphite. In the present study, in-situ monitoring by X-ray diffraction along with electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron pair-distribution function analysis, and computational modeling has been used to elucidate the morphology and evolution of the carbon spheres that form from the autogenic reaction of polyethylene at high temperature and pressure. A mechanism is proposed on how polyethylene evolves from a linear chain-based material to a layered carbon motif. Heating the spheres to 2400-2800 °C under inert conditions increases their graphitic character, particularly at the surface, which enhances their electrochemical and tribological properties.

  20. Time evolution of morphology in mechanically alloyed Fe-Cu

    KAUST Repository

    Wille, Catharina Gabriele

    2011-05-01

    Being widely accessible as well as already utilised in many applications, Fe-Cu acts as an ideal binary model alloy to elaborate the enforced nonequilibrium enhanced solubility in such a solution system that shows a limited regime of miscibility and characterised by a large positive heat of mixing. In addition to the detailed analysis of ball milled Fe-Cu powders by means of Atom Probe Tomography (APT), site specific structural analysis has been performed in this study using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).In this contribution results on powders with low Cu concentrations (2.5-10 at%) are presented. Combining a ductile element (Cu, fcc) and a brittle one (Fe, bcc), striking differences in morphology were expected and found on all length-scales, depending on the mixing ratio of the two elements. However, not only could the atomic mixing of Fe and Cu be evaluated, but also the distribution of impurities, mostly stemming from the fabrication procedure. The combination of APT and TEM enables a correlation between the structural evolution and the chemical mixing during the milling process. For the first time, a clear distinction can be drawn between the morphological evolution at the surface and in the interior of the powder particles. This became possible owing to the site specific sample preparation of TEM lamellae by Focussed Ion Beam (FIB). Surprisingly, the texture arising from the ball milling process can directly be related to the classical rolling texture of cold rolled Fe. In addition, full homogeneity can be achieved even on the nano-scale for this material as shown by APT, resulting in an extended miscibility region in comparison to the equilibrium phase diagram. Grain sizes were determined by means of XRD and TEM. The strain corrected XRD results are in very good agreement with the values derived by TEM, both confirming a truly nanocrystalline structure. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Evolution Of Precipitate Morphology During Extrusion In Mg ZK60A Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a continuously casted ZK60A magnesium alloy (Mg-Zn-Zr was extruded in two different extrusion ratios, 6:1 and 10:1. The evolution of precipitates was investigated on the two extruded materials and compared with that of as-casted material. The microstructural analysis was performed by electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and the compositional information was obtained using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Several distinct morphologies of precipitates were observed, such as dot, rod, and disk shaped. The formation mechanisms of those precipitates were discussed with respect to the heat and strain during the extrusion process.

  2. Tensile Deformation and Morphological Evolution of Precise Acid Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Luri Robert; Szewczyk, Steve; Schwartz, Eric; Azoulay, Jason; Murtagh, Dustin; Cordaro, Joseph; Wagener, Kenneth; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Acid- and ion-containing polymers have specific interactions that produce complex and hierarchical morphologies that provide tunable mechanical properties. We report tensile testing and in situ x-ray scattering measurements of a homologous series of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymers (pxAA). Upon variation of the number of backbone carbons (x = 9, 15, 21) between pendant acrylic acid groups along the linear polyethylene chain, these materials exhibit pronounced changes in both their tensile properties as well as their morphological evolution during deformation. The hierarchical layered acid aggregate structure coincides with the onset of a strain hardening mechanism and was observed in both a semi-crystalline sample (p21AA) as well as an amorphous sample (p15AA). The polymer with the shortest spacing between acid groups (p9AA) maintains a liquid-like distribution of acid aggregates during deformation, exhibiting low tensile strength which we attribute to facile acid exchange between acid aggregates during deformation. Our results indicate that the formation of the hierarchical layered structure, which coincides with polymer strain-hardening regime, originates from the associating acid groups cooperatively preventing disentanglement. NSF-DMR-1103858.

  3. Morphological Evolution of Disc Galaxies in Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of several numerical simulations of disc binary galaxies. It was performed detailed numerical N-body simulations of the dynamical interaction of two disc galaxies. The disc galaxies are embedded in spherical halos of dark matter and present central bulges. The dynamical evolution of the binary galaxy is analyzed in order to study the morphological evolution of the stellar distribution of the discs. The satellite galaxy is held on fixed, coplanar or polar discs, of eccentric ($e=0.1$, $e=0.4$ or $e=0.7$) orbits. Both galaxies have the same mass and size similar to the Milk Way. We have shown that the merge of two disc galaxy, depending on the initial conditions, can result in a disc or a lenticular galaxy, instead of an elliptical one. Besides, we have demonstrated that the time of merging increases linearly with the initial apocentric distance of the galaxies and decreases with the orbit's eccentricity. We also have shown that the tidal forces and the fusion of the discs can excite tran...

  4. Plastic Deformation and Morphological Evolution of Precise Acid Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, L. Robert; Azoulay, Jason; Murtagh, Dustin; Cordaro, Joseph; Winey, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Acid- and ion-containing polymers have specific interactions that produce complex and hierarchical morphologies that provide remarkable mechanical properties. Historically, correlating the hierarchical structure and the mechanical properties of these polymers has been challenging due to the random arrangements of the polar groups along the backbone, ex situ characterization and the difficulty in deconvolution the effects of crystalline and amorphous regions along with secondary interactions between polymer chains. We address these challenges through in situ deformation of precise acid copolymers and relate the structural evolution to bulk properties by considering a series of copolymers with 9, 15 or 21 carbons between acid groups. Simultaneous synchrotron X-ray scattering and room temperature uniaxial tensile experiments of these precise acid copolymers were conducted. The different deformation mechanisms are compared and the microstructural evolution during deformation is discussed. For example, the liquid-like distribution of acid aggregates within the bulk copolymer transitions into a layered structure concurrent to a dramatic increase in tensile strength. Overall, we evaluate the effect and control of introducing acid groups on mechanical deformation of the bulk copolymers.

  5. History, Evolution, and Continuing Innovations of Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Leon T; O'Neill, Anthea H

    2017-06-01

    Evolution in the surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms is driven by the need to refine and innovate. From an early application of the Hunterian carotid ligation to modern-day sophisticated aneurysm clip designs, progress has been made through dedication and technical maturation of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons to overcome challenges in their practices. The global expansion of endovascular services has challenged the existence of aneurysm surgery, changing the complexity of the aneurysm case mix and volume that are referred for surgical repair. Concepts of how to best treat intracranial aneurysms have evolved over generations and will continue to do so with further technological innovations. As with the evolution of any type of surgery, innovations frequently arise from the criticism of current techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating the distribution of Galaxy Morphologies on a continuous space

    CERN Document Server

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Newman, Jeffrey; Wasserman, Larry; Genovese, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The incredible variety of galaxy shapes cannot be summarized by human defined discrete classes of shapes without causing a possibly large loss of information. Dictionary learning and sparse coding allow us to reduce the high dimensional space of shapes into a manageable low dimensional continuous vector space. Statistical inference can be done in the reduced space via probability distribution estimation and manifold estimation.

  7. Diversity and constraints in the floral morphological evolution of Leandra s.str. (Melastomataceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginato, Marcelo; Michelangeli, Fabián A

    2016-09-01

    Putative processes related to floral diversification and its relation to speciation are still largely unaccounted for in the Melastomataceae. Leandra s.str. is one of the most diverse lineages of the Neotropical Miconieae and ranks among the ten most diverse groups in the Atlantic Forest. Here, we describe the floral diversity of this lineage in a continuous framework and address several questions related to floral evolution and putative developmental and environmental constraints in its morphology. The morphological data set includes individual size measurements and shape scores (from elliptical Fourier analysis) for hypanthia, petals, stamens and styles. We evaluate whether there is evidence of correlation among these floral structures, shifts and convergent patterns, and association of these traits with elevation. Leandra s.str. flower structures present a strong phylogenetic signal and tend to be conserved among close relatives. The extremes in flower regimes seem to be quite distinct, but non-overlapping discrete flower types are not observed. Overall, the morphology of Leandra s.str. floral structures is correlated, and anther colour and inflorescence architecture correlate with flower structures. Additionally, the rates of species diversification and morphological evolution are correlated in most clades. Although some flower regimes tend to occur in different elevational ranges, no significant association is observed. The general idea that hypanthium-ovary fusion is associated with fruit types in the Melastomataceae does not hold for Leandra s.str., where, instead, hypanthium-ovary fusion seems to be associated with anther shape. The lowest rate of flower morphological change, when compared with species diversification rates, is observed in the clade that possesses the most specialized flowers in the group. While stuck on a single general pollination system, Leandra s.str. seems to be greatly wandering around it, given the flower diversity and convergent

  8. Shared services - Implementation and continuous evolution (Article 2 of 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Van der Linde

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Now that an organisation understands the concept of shared services (Article 1, it needs to implement shared services as a business model. The purpose of this second article in the trilogy is to describe the phases during the implementation process, as well as the various models through which a shared services business unit will evolve to continuously add value to the organisation. Methodology: A comprehensive literature study was conducted in order to: - Determine the steps in implementing a shared services business model, - Determine the various models associated with a shared services business unit, - Determine how the continuous evolution of shared services results in moving from one shared services model to the next shared services model. Findings: In this article, a framework is generated to help organisations understand the various phases and steps it needs to go through to successfully implement a shared services business unit. This work has further potential: when applied correctly, organisations will provide a business environment where effectiveness and efficiency is a given. Implications: This article presents the context for organisations to implement a shared services business model and to continuously evolve from one shared services business model to the other to create value for the organisation. The findings are important for organisations that are in the process of implementing or have implemented shared services, as they can easily stagnate and fall into the trap of centralisation. Value: This article provides an understanding of what is required for the successful implementation of shared services. This value is further enhanced through continuous evolution from a basic shared services business model to the virtual shared services business model and beyond.

  9. Probability distributions of continuous measurement results for conditioned quantum evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquet, A.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2017-02-01

    We address the statistics of continuous weak linear measurement on a few-state quantum system that is subject to a conditioned quantum evolution. For a conditioned evolution, both the initial and final states of the system are fixed: the latter is achieved by the postselection in the end of the evolution. The statistics may drastically differ from the nonconditioned case, and the interference between initial and final states can be observed in the probability distributions of measurement outcomes as well as in the average values exceeding the conventional range of nonconditioned averages. We develop a proper formalism to compute the distributions of measurement outcomes, and evaluate and discuss the distributions in experimentally relevant setups. We demonstrate the manifestations of the interference between initial and final states in various regimes. We consider analytically simple examples of nontrivial probability distributions. We reveal peaks (or dips) at half-quantized values of the measurement outputs. We discuss in detail the case of zero overlap between initial and final states demonstrating anomalously big average outputs and sudden jump in time-integrated output. We present and discuss the numerical evaluation of the probability distribution aiming at extending the analytical results and describing a realistic experimental situation of a qubit in the regime of resonant fluorescence.

  10. Gravity and the evolution of cardiopulmonary morphology in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Albert, James S; Sheehy, Coleman M; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-02-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse - significantly longer heart-head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart-to-head distance and length of vascular lung are co-adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes.

  11. Gravity and the Evolution of Cardiopulmonary Morphology in Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Albert, James S.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse – significantly longer heart–head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart–to–head distance and length of vascular lung are co–adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes. PMID:22079804

  12. Morphological transitions and the genetic basis of the evolution of extraembryonic tissues in flies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafiqi, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the genotype influence changes in morphology during evolution, giving rise to the vast diversity of morphological features that we observe. The ability to describe how genetic change causes morphological transformation is key for a mechanistic understanding of evolutionary change. This

  13. Subocclusal dental morphology of sahelanthropus tchadensis and the evolution of teeth in hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonet, Edouard-Georges; Andossa, Likius; Taïsso Mackaye, Hassane; Brunet, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the teeth in hominins is characterized by, among other characters, major changes in root morphology. However, little is known of the evolution from a plesiomorphic, ape-like root morphology to the crown hominin morphology. Here we present a study of the root morphology of the Miocene Chadian hominin Sahelanthropus tchadensis and its comparison to other hominins. The morphology of the whole lower dentition (I1 -M3 ) was investigated and described. The comparison with the species Ardipithecus kaddaba and Ardipithecus ramidus indicates a global homogeneity of root morphology in early hominins. This morphology, characterized notably by a reduction of the size and number of the roots of premolars, is a composite between an ape-like morphology and the later hominin morphology. Trends for root evolution in hominins are proposed, including the transition from a basal hominoid to extant Homo sapiens. This study also illustrates the low association between the evolution of tooth root morphology and the evolution of crowns in hominins.

  14. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Albion Wills, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the "big five" mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing.

  15. Continuous evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins overcomes insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Ahmed H; Guzov, Victor M; Huai, Qing; Kemp, Melissa M; Vishwanath, Prashanth; Kain, Wendy; Nance, Autumn M; Evdokimov, Artem; Moshiri, Farhad; Turner, Keith H; Wang, Ping; Malvar, Thomas; Liu, David R

    2016-05-05

    The Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins (Bt toxins) are widely used insecticidal proteins in engineered crops that provide agricultural, economic, and environmental benefits. The development of insect resistance to Bt toxins endangers their long-term effectiveness. Here we have developed a phage-assisted continuous evolution selection that rapidly evolves high-affinity protein-protein interactions, and applied this system to evolve variants of the Bt toxin Cry1Ac that bind a cadherin-like receptor from the insect pest Trichoplusia ni (TnCAD) that is not natively bound by wild-type Cry1Ac. The resulting evolved Cry1Ac variants bind TnCAD with high affinity (dissociation constant Kd = 11-41 nM), kill TnCAD-expressing insect cells that are not susceptible to wild-type Cry1Ac, and kill Cry1Ac-resistant T. ni insects up to 335-fold more potently than wild-type Cry1Ac. Our findings establish that the evolution of Bt toxins with novel insect cell receptor affinity can overcome insect Bt toxin resistance and confer lethality approaching that of the wild-type Bt toxin against non-resistant insects.

  16. Statistical Quadrature Evolution for Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2016-05-01

    We propose a statistical quadrature evolution (SQE) method for multicarrier continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD). A multicarrier CVQKD protocol utilizes Gaussian subcarrier quantum continuous variables (CV) for information transmission. The SQE framework provides a minimal error estimate of the quadratures of the CV quantum states from the discrete, measured noisy subcarrier variables. We define a method for the statistical modeling and processing of noisy Gaussian subcarrier quadratures. We introduce the terms statistical secret key rate and statistical private classical information, which quantities are derived purely by the statistical functions of our method. We prove the secret key rate formulas for a multiple access multicarrier CVQKD. The framework can be established in an arbitrary CVQKD protocol and measurement setting, and are implementable by standard low-complexity statistical functions, which is particularly convenient for an experimental CVQKD scenario. This work was partially supported by the GOP-1.1.1-11-2012-0092 project sponsored by the EU and European Structural Fund, by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund - OTKA K-112125, and by the COST Action MP1006.

  17. Morphological diversity and evolution of egg and clutch structure in amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altig, Ronald; McDiarmid, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    The first part of this synthesis summarizes the morphology of the jelly layers surrounding an amphibian ovum. We propose a standard terminology and discuss the evolution of jelly layers. The second part reviews the morphological diversity and arrangement of deposited eggs?the ovipositional mode; we recognize 5 morphological classes including 14 modes. We discuss some of the oviductal, ovipositional, and postovipositional events that contribute to these morphologies. We have incorporated data from taxa from throughout the world but recognize that other types will be discovered that may modify understanding of these modes. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary context of the diversity of clutch structure and present a first estimate of its evolution.

  18. Role of chloride in the morphological evolution of organo-lead halide perovskite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Spencer T; Zuo, Fan; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Liao, Chien-Yi; Liang, Po-Wei; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2014-10-28

    A comprehensive morphological study was used to elucidate chloride's role in CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3-x)Cl(x) film evolution on a conducting polymer, PEDOT:PSS. Complex ion equilibria and aggregation in solution, as well as the role they play in nucleation, are found to ultimately be responsible for the unique morphological diversity observed in perovskite films grown in the presence of the chloride ion. An intermediate phase that is generated upon deposition and initial annealing templates continued self-assembly in the case of CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3-x)Cl(x). In the absence of chloride, the film growth of CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3) is directed by substrate interfacial energy. By employing the through-plane TEM analysis, we gain detailed insight into the unique crystallographic textures, grain structures, and elemental distributions across the breadth of films grown from precursor solutions with different chemistries. The lattice coherence seen in morphologies generated under the influence of chloride provides a physical rational for the enhancement in carrier diffusion length and lifetime.

  19. CONTINUOUS, AUTOMATED AND SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN UPTAKE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial respirometers are capable of continuously and automatically measuring oxygen uptake in bioreactors. A method for continuously and automatically measuring carbon dioxide evolution can be retrofitted to commercial respirometers. Continuous and automatic measurements of...

  20. RPAS Monitoring of the Morphological Evolution of Coastal Foredunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, Yuri; Corbau, Corinne; Elena, Zambello; Russo, Valentina; Pellegrinelli, Alberto; Simeoni, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    The coastal environment is in rapid and continuous evolution and it is easily affected by many natural and antropic factors. Beaches are often backed by vegetated dunes and fulfill many different valuable ecosystem functions. They act as protective buffers against storm surge, wave attack and erosion, providing a unique habitat for flora and fauna. Coastal embryo dunes, found above mean high water, are dynamic landform being able to supply sand to the beach when needed. They may form rapidly and may be rapidly destructed due to high tides and storm waves or human interferences. The southern part (3 km long) of Rosolina (Adriatic Sea, Italy) is characterized by a wide beach bordered by a complex dune system. The geomorphological characteristics of embryo dunes have been identified by using an RPAS in order to develop a fast and low-cost surveying technique. The aircraft has flown at a 50 meters altitude, taking photos with a 12Mpix RGB camera and a GSD of about 1 cm. The images overlap of 80% in the flight direction and 60% laterally. Fourteen targets have been collocated in the area as ground control points and were surveyed using Network Real Time Kinematic (NRTK) GNSS. Images and GCPs were elaborated in Agisoft PhotoScan to generate the model. A similar NRTK survey has been performed to integrate the wrong data (due to vegetation) for the creation of a digital elevation model (DEM) in a first step and finally to validate the model obtained through UAV photogrammetry through a comparison with specially surveyed points. The creation of a DEM from photos is one of main tasks and its accuracy is critical. A challenge in this work was to recognize the vegetation in the sand dunes area to exclude all the points not belonging to the ground. This was possible through a classification process based on slope detection. Finally, the suitable elevation accuracy has been reached and the survey has revealed a complex dune system characterized by: • on the upper part of the

  1. Computational Analysis for Morphological Evolution in Pyrolysis for Micro/Nanofabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeongseok Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is recently proposed as an efficient fabrication technique of micro/nanoscale carbon structures. In order to understand the morphological evolution in pyrolysis and design the final shape of carbon structure, this study proposes a comprehensive model that incorporates the essential mechanisms of pyrolysis based on the phase field framework. Computational analysis with the developed model provides information about the effect of interface energy and kinetic rate on the morphological evolution in pyrolysis.

  2. Continuous evolution of cloud droplet spectrum in cumulus cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Saito, Izumi; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new method that can seamlessly simulate the continuous growth of cloud droplets to rain drops from the first principle. A cubic box ascending with a mean updraft was introduced and the updraft velocity was self-consistently determined in such a way that the mean turbulent velocity within the box vanished. All the degrees of freedom were numerically integrated by using the Lagrangian dynamics for the droplets and the Eulerian direct numerical simulation for the turbulence. The key processes included were turbulent transport, condensation/evaporation, Reynolds number dependent drag, collision-coalescence, and entrainment. We have examined the evolution of the droplet spectrum over 400 s for a few of the initial droplet spectra: (1) single peak, (2) double peaks, (3) observed distribution, each of which had the same initial mean radius 10 μm and the same mean droplet density np = 125 cm-3. The turbulence was in steady state at Rλ = 86 and ɛ = 33 cm2s-3. It is found that the mass spectrum peak moves slowly toward the larger radius in the early stage and then quickly evolves to have the second peak through the autoconversion to the accretion state. Effects of the condensation and coalescence would also be reported. Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Nos.15H02218 and hp150088, hp160085 and jh160012.

  3. Biogeography, phylogeny, and morphological evolution of central Texas cave and spring salamanders

    OpenAIRE

    Bendik, Nathan F.; Meik, Jesse M; Gluesenkamp, Andrew G.; Roelke, Corey E; Chippindale, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    Background Subterranean faunal radiations can result in complex patterns of morphological divergence involving both convergent or parallel phenotypic evolution and cryptic species diversity. Salamanders of the genus Eurycea in central Texas provide a particularly challenging example with respect to phylogeny reconstruction, biogeography and taxonomy. These predominantly aquatic species inhabit karst limestone aquifers and spring outflows, and exhibit a wide range of morphological and genetic ...

  4. Evolution of Macao’s Urban Spatial Morphology and Its Influencing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    After more than 450 years’ development, Macao has evolved into a world heritage city and world tourism and leisure city from a traditional Chinese fishing village. Its urban spatial morphology has gone through six stages. Based on the analysis of the historic events in Macao at different stages, this paper elaborates the process, characteristics, and influencing factors of the urban spatial morphology evolution.

  5. Dendrite crystal morphology evolution mechanism of β-BaB2O4 crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE ChongJun; ZHONG WeiZhuo; LIU YouWen

    2009-01-01

    Existence of [B3-O6]3- hexagonal ring growth unit in melt solution of β-BaB2O4 crystal was proved by the results of high temperature Raman measurements. A morphology evolution process of β-BaB2O4 crys-tal was observed by a high temperature in-situ observation device. The crystal morphology varied with the supersaturation of growth melt solution. The mechanism of β-BaB2O4 crystal morphology evolution was analyzed through the growth unit model.

  6. Dendrite crystal morphology evolution mechanism of β-BaB2O4 crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Existence of [B3-O6]3- hexagonal ring growth unit in melt solution of β-BaB2O4 crystal was proved by the results of high temperature Raman measurements.A morphology evolution process of β-BaB2O4 crys-tal was observed by a high temperature in-situ observation device.The crystal morphology varied with the supersaturation of growth melt solution.The mechanism of β-BaB2O4 crystal morphology evolution was analyzed through the growth unit model.

  7. Microstructural evolution and grain morphology of ZrN pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungho; Han, Ilsu; Lee, Hyunjun; Huh, Sunchul; Park, Wonjo

    2009-04-01

    Improvements in the mechanical integrity of zirconium nitride (ZrN) inert matrixes in advanced nuclear fuels were addressed in this work. This was done by first better understanding and then controlling texture and microstructural evolution of the former. Several samples were examined via orientation imaging microscopy: several monolithic specimens were hot isostatically pressed (HIP), and two sintered specimens with 80 % and 85 % density Grain size and crystallographic orientation studies revealed sample microstructure and their evolution during sintering. A correlation between larger grains and orientations near to parallel to the compression axis during cold pressing was present for the 85 % density sample.

  8. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  9. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  10. Evolution of Normal Galaxies HST Morphologies and Deep Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, R

    1996-01-01

    I review progress in understanding the evolution of normal field and cluster galaxies through the combination of HST imaging and ground-based spectroscopy. These data suggest that the bulk of the star formation producing the present-day galaxy population occurred at accessible redshifts, $z$1 Universe. Some possible approaches are briefly discussed.

  11. Evolution of erythrocyte morphology in amphibians (Amphibia: Anura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We compared the morphology of the erythrocytes of five anurans, two toad species - Bufo gargarizans (Cantor, 1842 and Duttaphrynus melanostictus (Schneider, 1799 and three frog species - Fejervarya limnocharis (Gravenhorst, 1829, Microhyla ornata (Duméril & Bibron, 1841, and Rana zhenhaiensis (Ye, Fei & Matsui, 1995. We then reconstructed the ancestral state of erythrocyte size (ES and nuclear size (NS in amphibians based on a molecular tree. Nine morphological traits of erythrocytes were all significantly different among the five species. The results of principal component analysis showed that the first component (49.1% of variance explained had a high positive loading for erythrocyte length, nuclear length, NS and ratio of erythrocyte length/erythrocyte width; the second axis (28.5% of variance explained mainly represented erythrocyte width and ES. Phylogenetic generalized least squares analysis showed that the relationship between NS and ES was not affected by phylogenetic relationships although there was a significant linear relationship between these two variables. These results suggested that (1 the nine morphological traits of erythrocytes in the five anuran species were species-specific; (2 in amphibians, larger erythrocytes generally had larger nuclei.

  12. Sperm competition and the evolution of gamete morphology in frogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Phillip G; Simmons, Leigh W.; Roberts, J. Dale

    2003-01-01

    Despite detailed knowledge of the ultrastructure of spermatozoa, there is a paucity of information on the selective pressures that influence sperm form and function. Theoretical models for both internal and external fertilizers predict that sperm competition could favour the evolution of longer sperm. Empirical tests of the external-fertilization model have been restricted to just one group, the fishes, and these tests have proved equivocal. We investigated how sperm competition affects sperm...

  13. Rates of morphological evolution in Captorhinidae: an adaptive radiation of Permian herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Neil

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of herbivory in early tetrapods was crucial in the establishment of terrestrial ecosystems, although it is so far unclear what effect this innovation had on the macro-evolutionary patterns observed within this clade. The clades that entered this under-filled region of ecospace might be expected to have experienced an "adaptive radiation": an increase in rates of morphological evolution and speciation driven by the evolution of a key innovation. However such inferences are often circumstantial, being based on the coincidence of a rate shift with the origin of an evolutionary novelty. The conclusion of an adaptive radiation may be made more robust by examining the pattern of the evolutionary shift; if the evolutionary innovation coincides not only with a shift in rates of morphological evolution, but specifically in the morphological characteristics relevant to the ecological shift of interest, then one may more plausibly infer a causal relationship between the two. Here I examine the impact of diet evolution on rates of morphological change in one of the earliest tetrapod clades to evolve high-fibre herbivory: Captorhinidae. Using a method of calculating heterogeneity in rates of discrete character change across a phylogeny, it is shown that a significant increase in rates of evolution coincides with the transition to herbivory in captorhinids. The herbivorous captorhinids also exhibit greater morphological disparity than their faunivorous relatives, indicating more rapid exploration of new regions of morphospace. As well as an increase in rates of evolution, there is a shift in the regions of the skeleton undergoing the most change; the character changes in the herbivorous lineages are concentrated in the mandible and dentition. The fact that the increase in rates of evolution coincides with increased change in characters relating to food acquisition provides stronger evidence for a causal relationship between the herbivorous diet and the radiation

  14. Comparative Evolution of Morphological Regulatory Functions in Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Erika; Vipulanandan, Geethanjali; Childers, Delma S.

    2013-01-01

    Morphological transitions play an important role in virulence and virulence-related processes in a wide variety of pathogenic fungi, including the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. While environmental signals, transcriptional regulators, and target genes associated with C. albicans morphogenesis are well-characterized, considerably little is known about morphological regulatory mechanisms and the extent to which they are evolutionarily conserved in less pathogenic and less filamentous non-albicans Candida species (NACS). We have identified specific optimal filament-inducing conditions for three NACS (C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii), which are very limited, suggesting that these species may be adapted for niche-specific filamentation in the host. Only a subset of evolutionarily conserved C. albicans filament-specific target genes were induced upon filamentation in C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii. One of the genes showing conserved expression was UME6, a key filament-specific regulator of C. albicans hyphal development. Constitutive high-level expression of UME6 was sufficient to drive increased filamentation as well as biofilm formation and partly restore conserved filament-specific gene expression in both C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis, suggesting that evolutionary differences in filamentation ability among pathogenic Candida species may be partially attributed to alterations in the expression level of a conserved filamentous growth machinery. In contrast to UME6, NRG1, an important repressor of C. albicans filamentation, showed only a partly conserved role in controlling NACS filamentation. Overall, our results suggest that C. albicans morphological regulatory functions are partially conserved in NACS and have evolved to respond to more specific sets of host environmental cues. PMID:23913541

  15. Convergent evolution of brain morphology and communication modalities in lizards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher D.ROBINSON; Michael S.PATTON; Brittney M.ANDRE; Michele A.JOHNSON

    2015-01-01

    Animals communicate information within their environments via visual,chemical,auditory,and/or tactile modalities.The use of each modalityis generally linked to particular brain regions,but it is not yet known whether the cellular morphology of neurons in these regions has evolved in association with the relative use of a modality.We investigated relationships between the behavioral use of communication modalities and neural morphologies in six lizard species.Two of these species (Anolis carolinensis and Leiocephalus carinatus) primarily use visual signals to communicate with conspecifics and detect potential prey,and two (Aspidoscelis gularis and Scincella lateralis) communicate and forage primarily using chemical signals.Two other species (Hemidactylus turcicus and Sceloporus olivaceus) use both visual and chemical signals.For each species,we performed behavioral observations and quantified rates of visual and chemical behaviors.We then cryosectioned brain tissues from 9-10 males of each species and measured the soma size and density of neurons in two brain regions associated with visual behaviors (the lateral geniculate nucleus and the nucleus rotundus) and one region associated with chemical behaviors (the nucleus sphericus).With analyses conducted in a phylogenetic context,we found that species that performed higher rates of visual displays had a denser lateral geniculatc nucleus,and species that used a higher proportion of chemical displays had larger somas in the nucleus sphericus.These relationships suggest that neural morphologies in the brain have evolved convergently in species with similar communication behaviors [Current Zoology 61 (2):281-291,2015].

  16. Morphological evolution from aquatic to terrestrial in the genus Oreolalax (Amphibia, Anura, Megophryidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Wei; Bin Wang; Ning Xu; Zizhong Li; Jianping Jiang

    2009-01-01

    A phylogeny of 17 species in the genus Oreolalax is reconstructed based on 21 morphological characters from adult specimens, skeleton specimens, tadpoles and eggs. Four species groups are recognized, of which the O. rugosus species group is the most primitive, the O. weigoldi species group is the second, the O. omeimontis species group is the third and the O. pingii species group is the most recently diversified. Based on the evolutional tendency of the morphological characters on the phylogenetic tree, it is proposed that the evolution of tympanum, tympanic annulus, columella, spoon-like cartilage and the web between toes reflect the habit changes from aquatic to terrestrial. Thus, Oreolalax is regarded as one important representative genus to study further the evolution of morphological characters from aquatic to terrestrial.

  17. Modelling rate distributions using character compatibility: implications for morphological evolution among fossil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Peter J

    2012-02-23

    Rate distributions are important considerations when testing hypotheses about morphological evolution or phylogeny. They also have implications about general processes underlying character evolution. Molecular systematists often assume that rates are Poisson processes with gamma distributions. However, morphological change is the product of multiple probabilistic processes and should theoretically be affected by hierarchical integration of characters. Both factors predict lognormal rate distributions. Here, a simple inverse modelling approach assesses the best single-rate, gamma and lognormal models given observed character compatibility for 115 invertebrate groups. Tests reject the single-rate model for nearly all cases. Moreover, the lognormal outperforms the gamma for character change rates and (especially) state derivation rates. The latter in particular is consistent with integration affecting morphological character evolution.

  18. Morphological Evolution of Block Copolymer Particles: Effect of Solvent Evaporation Rate on Particle Shape and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, YongJoo; Yun, Hongseok; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2017-02-28

    Shape and morphology of polymeric particles are of great importance in controlling their optical properties or self-assembly into unusual superstructures. Confinement of block copolymers (BCPs) in evaporative emulsions affords particles with diverse structures, including prolate ellipsoids, onion-like spheres, oblate ellipsoids, and others. Herein, we report that the evaporation rate of solvent from emulsions encapsulating symmetric polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) determines the shape and internal nanostructure of micron-sized BCP particles. A distinct morphological transition from the ellipsoids with striped lamellae to the onion-like spheres was observed with decreasing evaporation rate. Experiments and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations showed that the evaporation rate affected the organization of BCPs at the particle surface, which determined the final shape and internal nanostructure of the particles. Differences in the solvent diffusion rates in PS and PB at rapid evaporation rates induced alignment of both domains perpendicular to the particle surface, resulting in ellipsoids with axial lamellar stripes. Slower evaporation rates provided sufficient time for BCP organization into onion-like structures with PB as the outermost layer, owing to the preferential interaction of PB with the surroundings. BCP molecular weight was found to influence the critical evaporation rate corresponding to the morphological transition from ellipsoid to onion-like particles, as well as the ellipsoid aspect ratio. DPD simulations produced morphologies similar to those obtained from experiments and thus elucidated the mechanism and driving forces responsible for the evaporation-induced assembly of BCPs into particles with well-defined shapes and morphologies.

  19. Morphological classification of radio sources for galaxy evolution and cosmology with SKA-MID

    CERN Document Server

    Makhathini, Sphesihle; Jarvis, Matt; Heywood, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Morphologically classifying radio sources in continuum images with the SKA has the potential to address some of the key questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution. In particular, we may use different classes of radio sources as independent tracers of the dark-matter density field, and thus overcome cosmic variance in measuring large-scale structure, while on the galaxy evolution side we could measure the mechanical feedback from FRII and FRI jets. This work makes use of a \\texttt{MeqTrees}-based simulations framework to forecast the ability of the SKA to recover true source morphologies at high redshifts. A suite of high resolution images containing realistic continuum source distributions with different morphologies (FRI, FRII, starburst galaxies) is fed through an SKA Phase 1 simulator, then analysed to determine the sensitivity limits at which the morphologies can still be distinguished. We also explore how changing the antenna distribution affects these results.

  20. Functional morphology and evolution of aspiration breathing in tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Owerkowicz, Tomasz

    2006-11-01

    In the evolution of aspiration breathing, the responsibility for lung ventilation gradually shifted from the hyobranchial to the axial musculoskeletal system, with axial muscles taking over exhalation first, at the base of Tetrapoda, and then inhalation as well at the base of Amniota. This shift from hyobranchial to axial breathing freed the tongue and head to adapt to more diverse feeding styles, but generated a mechanical conflict between costal ventilation and high-speed locomotion. Some "lizards" (non-serpentine squamates) have been shown to circumvent this speed-dependent axial constraint with accessory gular pumping during locomotion, and here we present a new survey of gular pumping behavior in the tuatara and 40 lizard species. We observed gular pumping behavior in 32 of the 40 lizards and in the tuatara, indicating that the ability to inflate the lungs by gular pumping is a shared-derived character for Lepidosauria. Gular pump breathing in lepidosaurs may be homologous with buccal pumping in amphibians, but non-ventilatory buccal oscillation and gular flutter have persisted throughout amniote evolution and gular pumping may have evolved independently by modification of buccal oscillation. In addition to gular pumping in some lizards, three other innovations have evolved repeatedly in the major amniote clades to circumvent the speed-dependent axial constraint: accessory inspiratory muscles (mammals, crocodylians and turtles), changing locomotor posture (mammals and birds) and respiratory-locomotor phase coupling to reduce the mechanical conflict between aspiration breathing and locomotion (mammals and birds).

  1. Evolution of the Central Sulcus Morphology in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, William D.; Meguerditchian, Adrien; Coulon, Olivier; Bogart, Stephanie; Mangin, Jean- François; Sherwood, Chet C.; Grabowski, Mark W.; Bennett, Allyson J.; Pierre, Peter J.; Fears, Scott; Woods, Roger; Hof, Patrick R.; Vauclair, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The central sulcus (CS) divides the pre- and post-central gyri along the dorsal-ventral plane of which all motor and sensory functions are topographically organized. The motor-hand area of the precentral gyrus or knob has been described as the anatomical substrate of the hand in humans. Given the importance of the hand in primate evolution, here we examined the evolution of the motor-hand area by comparing the relative size and pattern of cortical folding of the CS surface area from magnetic resonance images in 131 primates including Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. We found that humans and great apes have a well-formed motor-hand area that can be seen in the variation in depth of the CS along the dorsal-ventral plane. We further found that great apes have relatively large CS surface areas compared to Old World monkeys. However, relative to great apes, humans have a small motor-hand area in terms of both adjusted and absolute surface areas. PMID:25139259

  2. Integrated speech and morphological processing in a connectionist continuous speech understanding for Korean

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, G; Lee, Geunbae; Lee, Jong-Hyeok

    1996-01-01

    A new tightly coupled speech and natural language integration model is presented for a TDNN-based continuous possibly large vocabulary speech recognition system for Korean. Unlike popular n-best techniques developed for integrating mainly HMM-based speech recognition and natural language processing in a {\\em word level}, which is obviously inadequate for morphologically complex agglutinative languages, our model constructs a spoken language system based on a {\\em morpheme-level} speech and language integration. With this integration scheme, the spoken Korean processing engine (SKOPE) is designed and implemented using a TDNN-based diphone recognition module integrated with a Viterbi-based lexical decoding and symbolic phonological/morphological co-analysis. Our experiment results show that the speaker-dependent continuous can be achieved with over 80.6\\% success rate directly from speech inputs for the middle-level vocabularies.

  3. Ontogenetic convergence and evolution of foot morphology in European cave salamanders (Family: Plethodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nistri Annamaria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major goal in evolutionary biology is to understand the evolution of phenotypic diversity. Both natural and sexual selection play a large role in generating phenotypic adaptations, with biomechanical requirements and developmental mechanisms mediating patterns of phenotypic evolution. For many traits, the relative importance of selective and developmental components remains understudied. Results We investigated ontogenetic trajectories of foot morphology in the eight species of European plethodontid cave salamander to test the hypothesis that adult foot morphology was adapted for climbing. Using geometric morphometrics and other approaches, we found that developmental patterns in five species displayed little morphological change during growth (isometry, where the extensive interdigital webbing in adults was best explained as the retention of the juvenile morphological state. By contrast, three species exhibited significant allometry, with an increase in interdigital webbing during growth. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that multiple evolutionary transitions between isometry and allometry of foot webbing have occurred in this lineage. Allometric parameters of foot growth were most similar to those of a tropical species previously shown to be adapted for climbing. Finally, interspecific variation in adult foot morphology was significantly reduced as compared to variation among juveniles, indicating that ontogenetic convergence had resulted in a common adult foot morphology across species. Conclusions The results presented here provide evidence of a complex history of phenotypic evolution in this clade. The common adult phenotype exhibited among species reveals that selection plays an important part in generating patterns of foot diversity in the group. However, developmental trajectories arriving at this common morphology are distinct; with some species displaying developmental stasis (isometry, while others show an increase

  4. The role of habitat shift in the evolution of lizard morphology: evidence from tropical Tropidurus

    OpenAIRE

    Vitt, Laurie J.; Caldwell, Janalee P; Zani, Peter A.; Titus, Tom A.

    1997-01-01

    We compared morphology of two geographically close populations of the tropical lizard Tropidurus hispidus to test the hypothesis that habitat structure influences the evolution of morphology and ecology at the population level. T. hispidus isolated on a rock outcrop surrounded by tropical forest use rock crevices for refuge and appear dorsoventrally compressed compared with those in open savanna. A principal components analysis revealed that the populations were differentially distributed alo...

  5. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V

    2014-01-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? While bacteria display a myriad of morphologies 1 , the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk 2,3 . The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct sub-cellul...

  6. Hydrothermal preparation of nanostructured MnO2 and morphological and crystalline evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Manganese dioxides with various morphologies were prepared using a common hydrothermal method without any templates or additives.The evolution of the morphology was accompanied by the gradual conversion of the polymorphic forms from γ-type to β-type.Meanwhile,MnO2 microspheres,urchin-like nanostructures and nanowires were successfully synthesized.The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope.The evolution process can be explained by the Ostwald Ripening mechanism.

  7. Evolution and Functional Morphology of the Proboscis in Kalyptorhynchia (Platyhelminthes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julian P S; Litvaitis, Marian K; Gobert, Stefan; Uyeno, Theodore; Artois, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Predatory flatworms belonging to the taxon Kalyptorhynchia are characterized by an anterior muscular proboscis that they use to seize prey. In many cases, the proboscis is armed with hooks, derived either from the extracellular matrix that surrounds the muscles or from intracellular deposits in the epithelium covering the proboscis. Glands associated with the proboscis reportedly are venomous; however, there are few direct tests of this hypothesis. This article reviews the structure and current knowledge of the function of the proboscis in the Kalyptorhynchia, points to areas in which the current understanding of phylogenetic relationships within this taxon is incongruent with our hypothesis of how the proboscis evolved, and addresses areas in need of further research, especially as regards functional morphology and biomechanics.

  8. Evolution of accreditation in continuing nursing education in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Tanya D; Lacey-Haun, Lora

    2008-11-01

    There is widespread agreement that nurses must acquire and maintain the specialized knowledge needed to provide highly skilled care and to demonstrate their competence to the public, their employers, their profession, and patients on an ongoing basis throughout their work lives. Nurses report that continuing nursing education is the third most vital component of nursing skill building. Nurses from states that mandate continuing nursing education, as well as those from states that do not, rank continuing nursing education just after their workplace experience and their basic nursing education in importance. A wide range of organizations create and disseminate continuing nursing education to nurses in states with and without mandated continuing nursing education requirements. Although there is no governmental standard for the field, nursing monitors education across work-life stages. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing monitors nursing licensure and continuing nursing education. The credentialing arm of the American Nurses Association, the American Nurses Credentialing Center, acting in synch with national organizations that call for accreditation standards in the health care professions, provides review and accreditation of providers and approvers of continuing nursing education on a national basis and is, itself, internationally certified by International Standards for a Sustainable World.

  9. Interplay between Micro-Anisotropy and Macro-Isotropy on Evolution of Non-Equilibrium Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Non-equilibrium morphology has received much attention from both scientific and engineering points of view for its intricate pattern selection mechanisms and useful industrial application. Most study of non-equilibrium is about the metal, alloy and other simple system. The complex silicate system is rarely involved. However, silicate is very important in geosciences and ceramic industry. In this paper, two kinds of non-equilibrium crystal morphologies of silicate: dendrite of diopside and spherulite of plagioclase, were introduced. Combining with the other kinds of non-equilibrium morphologies, the characteristics of micro-macro and anisotropy-isotropy of the non-equilibrium morphologies were discussed. Dendrite of diopside is micro- and macro-anisotropic, spherulite of plagioclase is micro-anisotropic, but macro-isotropic, fractal of NH4Cl is also micro-anisotropic, but macro-isotropic, dense-branching morphology (DBM) formed in non-crystalline system is micro-and macro-isotropic. Based on the micro-macro interplay on the pattern formation, it is proposed that the interplay between micro-anisotropy of crystal structure vs macro-isotropy of undercooling in crystal growth system will control the morphological evolution. The nucleation rate related to the anisotropy for the morphological evolution was also discussed. The fact that diopside develops dendrite and plagioclase develop spherulite in our experiment is due to their structural anisotropy difference.

  10. Correlated evolution of body and fin morphology in the cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilich, Kara L

    2016-10-01

    Body and fin shapes are chief determinants of swimming performance in fishes. Different configurations of body and fin shapes can suit different locomotor specializations. The success of any configuration is dependent upon the hydrodynamic interactions between body and fins. Despite the importance of body-fin interactions for swimming, there are few data indicating whether body and fin configurations evolve in concert, or whether these structures vary independently. The cichlid fishes are a diverse family whose well-studied phylogenetic relationships make them ideal for the study of macroevolution of ecomorphology. This study measured body, and caudal and median fin morphology from radiographs of 131 cichlid genera, using morphometrics and phylogenetic comparative methods to determine whether these traits exhibit correlated evolution. Partial least squares canonical analysis revealed that body, caudal fin, dorsal fin, and anal fin shapes all exhibited strong correlated evolution consistent with locomotor ecomorphology. Major patterns included the evolution of deep body profiles with long fins, suggestive of maneuvering specialization; and the evolution of narrow, elongate caudal peduncles with concave tails, a combination that characterizes economical cruisers. These results demonstrate that body shape evolution does not occur independently of other traits, but among a suite of other morphological changes that augment locomotor specialization. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Quantitative characterization of morphological evolution in Q=2 Potts model aluminum thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsem, DH; Stach, EA; de Hosson, JTM; Aziz, MJ; Bartelt, NC; Berbezier,; Hannon, JB; Hearne, SJ

    2003-01-01

    In this research, we have focused on the morphological evolution of a model metal film / silicon substrate system. When aluminum (Al) is physical vapor deposited on (100) oriented single crystal silicon (Si) at 280degreesC it grows heteroepitaxially. Crystallographically, the resulting films are a P

  12. Evolution of morphology, ontogeny and life cycles within the Crustacea Thecostraca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Perez-Losada, M; Glenner, H;

    2009-01-01

    We use a previously published phylogenetic analysis of the Thecostraca to trace character evolution in the major lineages of the taxon. The phylogeny was based on both molecular (6,244 sites from 18S rna, 28S rna and H3 genes) and 41 larval morphological characters with broad taxon sampling acros...

  13. Boundary Control of Linear Evolution PDEs - Continuous and Discrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Marthedal

    2004-01-01

    of literature exists in the area of theoretical results concerning control of partial differential equations. The results have included existence and uniqueness of controls, minimum time requirements, regularity of domains, and many others. Another huge research field is that of control theory for ordinary di......- and exact controllability. We will consider discrete systems with a viewpoint similar to that used for the continuous systems. Most importantly, we study what is required of a discretization scheme in order for computed control functions to converge to the true, continuous, control function. Examples exist...

  14. Wavelength effect on hole shapes and morphology evolution during ablation by picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanqin; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Ben Q.; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study is presented of the effect of wavelength on the shape and morphology evolution of micro holes ablated on stainless steel surface by a 10 ps Q-switched Nd:VAN pulsed laser. Two routes of hole development are associated with the visible (532 nm) and near-infrared (1064 nm) laser beams, respectively. The evolution of various geometric shapes and morphological characteristics of the micro holes ablated with the two different wavelengths is comparatively studied for other given processing conditions such as a laser power levels and the number of pulses applied. Plausible explanations, based on the light-materials interaction associated with laser micromachining, are also provided for the discernable paths of geometric and morphological development of holes under laser ablation.

  15. [Role of genes and their cis-regulatory elements during animal morphological evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boyuan; Tu, Jianbo; Li, Ying; Yang, Mingyao

    2014-06-01

    Cis-regulatory hypothesis is one of the most important theories in evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), which claims that evolution of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) plays a key role during evolution of morphology. However, an increasing number of experimental results show that cis-regulatory hypothesis alone is not far enough to explain the complexity of evo-devo processes. Other modifications, including mutations of protein coding, gene and genome duplications, and flexibility of homeodomains and CREs, also cause the morphological changes in animals. In this review, we retrospect the recent results of evolution of CREs and genes associated with CREs and discuss new methods and trends for research in evo-devo.

  16. Domain evolution and polarization of continuously graded ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roytburd, A.; Roytburd, V.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of graded ferroelectric films demonstrates that in the equilibrium state the films are subdivided into a single-domain band and a polydomain band which consists of wedge-shape domains. Polarization under an external electrostatic field proceeds through an inter-band boundary movement due to growth or shrinkage of the wedge domains. It is shown how the domain structure and evolution are determined by the principal characteristics of the film: the distribution of the spontaneous polarization and dielectric constant. Graded films exhibit a sharp increase of polarization with the field for weak fields, with a drop of the dielectric constant when the field is increasing. A general approach to finding the dependence of the displacement and the wedge-domain shape on the field as well as analytical solutions for the p{sup 4} Landau-Devonshire and parabolic potentials are presented.

  17. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priolisi, Ornella; Fabrizi, Alberto; Deon, Giovanna; Bonollo, Franco; Cattini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  18. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priolisi, Ornella, E-mail: ornella.priolisi@depretto.gov.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Fabrizi, Alberto, E-mail: fabrizi@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Deon, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.deon@depretto-vi.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Bonollo, Franco, E-mail: bonollo@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Cattini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cattini@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering Enzo Ferrari (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  19. Shear Induced Morphology Evolution and Dynamic Viscoelastic Behavior of Binary and Ternary Elastomer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Xianggui; Liu, Wei; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin

    2015-03-01

    The morphology evolution and rheological response of a near-critical composition polybutadiene /polyisoprene blend and solution-polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/silica ternary composites after various shear flow were in situ studied with the rheological and rheo-optical techniques. The relationship between the morphology of the blend during the relaxation after the cessation of steady shear with different shear rates and their corresponding rheological properties was successfully established. It was found that the different shear-induced morphologies under steady shear would relax to the equilibrium states via varied mechanisms after the shear cessation. The storage modulus G' increased significantly in the breakup process of the string-like phase. In long time scale, silica slowed down the succeeding breakup of the string-phase domains and simultaneous coalescence of broken droplets, and then effectively reduced the droplets size and stabilized the morphology. The authors thank the financial support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51173195).

  20. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Morphology and Microsegregation Evolution during Solidification of Al-Si Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dayong GUO; Yuansheng YANG; Wenhui TONG; Zhuangqi HU

    2004-01-01

    A stochastic model coupled with transient calculations for the distributions of temperature, solute and velocity during the solidification of binary alloy is presented. The model can directly describe the evolution of both morphology and segregation during dendritic crystal growth. The model takes into account the curvature and growth anisotropy of dendritic crystals. Finite difference method is used to explicitly track the sharp solid liquid (S/L) interface on a fixed Cartesian grid. Two-dimensional mesoscopic calculations are performed to simulate the evolution of columnar and equiaxed dendritic morphologies of an Al-7 wt pct Si alloy. The effects of heat transfer coefficient on the evolution of both the dendrite morphology and segregation patterns during the solidification of binary alloys are analyzed. This model is applied to the solidification of small casting. Columnar-to-equiaxed transition is analyzed in detail. The effects of heat transfer coefficient on final casting structures are also studied. Final casting structures changing from wholly columnar dendrites to wholly equiaxed dendrites are described. The effect of melt flow on the morphological development during Al-7 wt pct Si alloy soilidification is also described.

  2. Morphology, development, and evolution of fetal membranes and placentation in squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Daniel G; Flemming, Alexander F

    2009-09-15

    Current studies on fetal membranes of reptiles are providing insight into three major historical transformations: evolution of the amniote egg, evolution of viviparity, and evolution of placentotrophy. Squamates (lizards and snakes) are ideal for such studies because their fetal membranes sustain embryos in oviparous species and contribute to placentas in viviparous species. Ultrastructure of the fetal membranes in oviparous corn snakes (Pituophis guttatus) shows that the chorioallantois is specialized for gas exchange and the omphalopleure, for water absorption. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic studies of viviparous thamnophine snakes (Thamnophis, Storeria) have revealed morphological specializations for gas exchange and absorption in the intra-uterine environment that represent modifications of features found in oviparous species. Thus, fetal membranes in oviparous species show morphological differentiation for distinct functions that have been recruited and enhanced under viviparous conditions. The ultimate in specialization of fetal membranes is found in viviparous skinks of South America (Mabuya) and Africa (Trachylepis, Eumecia), in which placentotrophy accounts for nearly all of the nutrients for development. Ongoing research on these lizards has revealed morphological specializations of the chorioallantoic placenta through which nutrient transfer is accomplished. In addition, African Trachylepis show an invasive form of implantation, in which uterine epithelium is replaced by invading chorionic cells. Ongoing analysis of these lizards shows how integration of multiple lines of evidence can provide insight into the evolution of developmental and reproductive specializations once thought to be confined to eutherian mammals.

  3. Growth morphology and evolution of quasicrystal in as-solidified Y-rich Mg-Zn-Y ternary alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A petal-like icosahedral quasicrystal with five branches, which is considered to be the representative morphology of the icosahedral quasicrystal, has been observed in the Y-rich Mg-Zn-Y ternary alloys. Moreover, the polygon-like morphology, another pattern of the icosahedral quasicrystal, has also been found in the Y-rich Mg-Zn-Y ternary alloys. The latter morphology results from the evolution of the former one. The growth mechanism of the petal-like morphology of the icosahedral quasicrystal was also discussed. Alloying composition, i.e., Y element content, is a major factor inducing the morphology evolution of the icosahedral quasicrystal.

  4. Morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in Fe-0.15C binary alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an in situ observation method, combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron backscattering diffraction, was used to investigate the morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in a Fe-0.15C binary alloy. The nucleation at a grain boundary and inclusions, sympathetic nucleation, and impingement event of bainitic ferrite were directly shown in real time. The variant evolution during bainite transformation and misorientation between bainitic ferrites were clarified. Strong variant selection was observed during sympathetic nucleation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Craters and basins on Ganymede and Callisto - Morphological indicators of crustal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Q. R.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    The morphologic characteristics of craters and palimpsests on Ganymede and Callisto are surveyed, and the crustal properties of these satellites and the evolution of the properties are studied. The morphology of bowl-shaped craters, smooth-floored craters, craters without central peaks, craters with central pits, chain craters on Callisto, the Gilgamesh and Western Equatorial Basins on Ganymede, crater palimpsests and penepalimpsests, multiring structures on Callisto, and the Galileo Regio rimmed furrow system on Ganymede are described individually. The crustal evolution is addressed by examining the development of the Galileo Regio system, the distribution of crater retention ages, the record of ray clusters, the thermal history of the lithosphere of Ganymede, and the origin of the central pits. It is suggested that as the lithosphere of each satellite cooled and thickened, crater retentivity spread as a wave from the polar regions and the antapex toward the apex; at any given location, progressively larger craters were retained with the passage of time.

  6. Coastal Foredune Evolution, Part 1: Environmental Factors and Forcing Processes Affecting Morphological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) is the first of two CHETNs focused on improving technologies to forecast coastal foredune...morphodynamic evolution of coastal foredunes. Part 2 reviews modeling approaches to forecast these changes and develops a probabilistic modeling framework to...cell in the U.S. Pacific Northwest over seasonal - to-century timescales using observations and models. They observed two types of dune growth— the

  7. MORPHOLOGY EVOLUTION OF POLY(St-co-BuA)/SILICA NANOCOMPOSITE PARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY EMULSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li; Shu-xue Zhou; Bo You; Li-min Wu

    2006-01-01

    Poly(St-co-BuA)/silica nanocomposite latexes were synthesized via conventional emulsion polymerization in the presence of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate modified colloidal nano-silica. The effects of surface property, particle size and content of colloidal nano-silica as well as the concentrations of monomer and surfactant on the morphology of nanocomposite latex particles were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) in detail. Various interesting morphologies such as grape-like, Chinese gooseberry-like, pomegranate-like and normal core-shell structures were observed. Droplet nucleation mechanism competing with micelle nucleation mechanism was proposed to explain the morphological evolution of the nanocomposite particles.

  8. Mona Lisa smile: the morphological enigma of human and great ape evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grehan, John R

    2006-07-01

    The science of human evolution is confronted with the popular chimpanzee theory and the earlier but largely ignored orangutan theory. The quality and scope of published documentation and verification of morphological features suggests there is very little in morphology to support a unique common ancestor for humans and chimpanzees. A close relationship between humans and African apes is currently supported by only eight unproblematic characters. The orangutan relationship is supported by about 28 well-supported characters, and it is also corroborated by the presence of orangutan-related features in early hominids. The uniquely shared morphology of humans and orangutans raises doubts about the almost universal belief that DNA sequence similarities necessarily demonstrate a closer evolutionary relationship between humans and chimpanzees. A new evolutionary reconstruction is proposed for the soft tissue anatomy, physiology, and behavioral biology of the first hominids that includes concealed ovulation, male beard and mustache, prolonged mating, extended pair-bonding, "house" construction, mechanical "genius," and artistic expression.

  9. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randich, Amelia M; Brun, Yves V

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  10. Molecular mechanisms for the evolution of bacterial morphologies and growth modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia M Randich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria exhibit a rich diversity of morphologies. Within this diversity, there is a uniformity of shape for each species that is replicated faithfully each generation, suggesting that bacterial shape is as selectable as any other biochemical adaptation. We describe the spatiotemporal mechanisms that target peptidoglycan synthesis to different subcellular zones to generate the rod-shape of model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We then demonstrate, using the related genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis as examples, how the modularity of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery permits repositioning of the machinery to achieve different growth modes and morphologies. Finally, we highlight cases in which the mechanisms that underlie morphological evolution are beginning to be understood, and how they depend upon the expansion and diversification of the core components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery.

  11. Evolution of nanodot morphology on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces by 40 keV Ar{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Meetika, E-mail: meetika89@gmail.com; Chawla, Mahak; Gupta, Divya; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra - 136119 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In the present paper we have discussed the effect of 40 keV Ar{sup +} ions irradiation on nanoscale surface morphology of Polycarbonate (PC) substrate. Specimens were sputtered at off normal incidences of 30°, 40° and 50° with the fluence of 1 × 10{sup 16} Ar{sup +}cm{sup −2}. The topographical behaviour of specimens was studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) technique. AFM study demonstrates the evolution of nano dot morphology on PC specimens on irradiating with 1 × 10{sup 16} Ar{sup +}cm{sup −2}. Average size of dots varied from 37-95 nm in this specified range of incidence while density of dots varied from 0.17-3.0 × 107 dotscm{sup −2}. Such variations in morphological features have been supported by estimation of ion range and sputtering yield through SRIM simulations.

  12. Disentangling Morphology, Star Formation, Stellar Mass, and Environment in Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Christlein, D; Christlein, Daniel; Zabludoff, Ann

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the spectroscopic and photometric properties of galaxies in six nearby clusters. We perform a partial correlation analysis on our dataset to investigate whether the correlation between star formation rates in galaxies and their environment is merely another aspect of correlations of morphology, stellar mass, or mean stellar age with environment, or whether star formation rates vary independently of these other correlations. We find a residual correlation of ongoing star formation with environment, indicating that even galaxies with similar morphologies, stellar masses, and mean stellar ages have lower star formation rates in denser environments. Thus, the current star formation gradient in clusters is not just another aspect of the morphology-density, stellar mass-density, or mean stellar age-density relations. Furthermore, the star formation gradient cannot be solely the result of initial conditions, but must partly be due to subsequent evolution through a mechanism (or mechanisms) sens...

  13. Morphology evolution of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanostructures on gallium doping and their defect structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda-Hernandez, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Escobedo-Morales, A., E-mail: alejandroescobedo@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Pal, U. [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal J-48, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Chigo-Anota, E. [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2012-08-15

    In the present article, the effect of gallium doping on the morphology, structural, and vibrational properties of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanostructures has been studied. It has been observed that incorporated gallium plays an important role on the growth kinetics and hence on the morphology evolution of the ZnO crystals. Ga doping in high concentration results in the contraction of ZnO unit cell, mainly along c-axis. Although Ga has high solubility in ZnO, heavy doping promotes the segregation of Ga atoms as a secondary phase. Incorporated Ga atoms strongly affect the vibrational characteristics of ZnO lattice and induce anomalous Raman modes. Possible mechanisms of morphology evolution and origin of anomalous Raman modes in Ga doped ZnO nanostructures are discussed. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ga doped ZnO nanostructures were successfully grown by hydrothermal chemical route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ga doping has strong effect on the resulting morphology of ZnO nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anomalous vibrational modes in wurtzite ZnO lattice are induced by Ga doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incorporated Ga atoms accommodate at preferential lattice sites.

  14. Life on the rocks: habitat use drives morphological and performance evolution in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brett A; Miles, Donald B; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2008-12-01

    As a group, lizards occupy a vast array of habitats worldwide, yet there remain relatively few cases where habitat use (ecology), morphology, and thus, performance, are clearly related. The best known examples include: increased limb length in response to increased arboreal perch diameter in anoles and increased limb length in response to increased habitat openness for some skinks. Rocky habitats impose strong natural selection on specific morphological characteristics, which differs from that imposed on terrestrial species, because moving about on inclined substrates of irregular sizes and shapes constrains locomotor performance in predictable ways. We quantified habitat use, morphology, and performance of 19 species of lizards (family Scincidae, subfamily Lygosominae) from 23 populations in tropical Australia. These species use habitats with considerable variation in rock availability. Comparative phylogenetic analyses revealed that occupation of rock-dominated habitats correlated with the evolution of increased limb length, compared to species from forest habitats that predominantly occupied leaf litter. Moreover, increased limb length directly affected performance, with species from rocky habitats having greater sprinting, climbing, and clinging ability than their relatives from less rocky habitats. Thus, we found that the degree of rock use is correlated with both morphological and performance evolution in this group of tropical lizards.

  15. Ecological causes of morphological evolution in the three-spined stickleback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Rowena; Wootton, Robert J; Barber, Iain; Przybylski, Mirosław; Smith, Carl

    2013-06-01

    The central assumption of evolutionary theory is that natural selection drives the adaptation of populations to local environmental conditions, resulting in the evolution of adaptive phenotypes. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) displays remarkable phenotypic variation, offering an unusually tractable model for understanding the ecological mechanisms underpinning adaptive evolutionary change. Using populations on North Uist, Scotland we investigated the role of predation pressure and calcium limitation on the adaptive evolution of stickleback morphology and behavior. Dissolved calcium was a significant predictor of plate and spine morph, while predator abundance was not. Stickleback latency to emerge from a refuge varied with morph, with populations with highly reduced plates and spines and high predation risk less bold. Our findings support strong directional selection in three-spined stickleback evolution, driven by multiple selective agents.

  16. Evolution of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hierarchical morphology during slow gelation process and its superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianfeng; Zhou, Chong; Du, Runhong; Li, Nana; Han, Xutong; Zhang, Yufeng; An, Shulin; Xiao, Changfa

    2013-06-26

    In the paper, we proposed an evolution process of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) macromolecular aggregation in a mixed solvent through the simple and slow gelation process at room temperature. The mixed solvent is prepared with a room-temperature solvent and a high-temperature solvent. The evolution process can be terminated by quenching and exchanging with nonsolvent in a nonsolvent coagulation bath properly, and then the vivid petal-like nanostructure and microspherulite is formed simultaneously. This hierarchical morphology endows PVDF with superhydrophobic and self-cleaning properties, which is useful to PVDF coating and membrane materials. The evolution processes are investigated through the measurements of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the rheological properties of solution, dry gel and wet gel, are explored.

  17. Evolution of morphology, ontogeny and life cycles within the Crustacea Thecostraca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Perez-Losada, M; Glenner, H

    2009-01-01

    metamorphosis and endoparasitism known from the Rhizocephala and strongly indicated for the Facetotecta are the result of convergent evolution. We also discuss reproductive systems, which range from separate sexes, over hermaphrodites combined with a separate male sex (androdioecy), to pure hermaphroditism......We use a previously published phylogenetic analysis of the Thecostraca to trace character evolution in the major lineages of the taxon. The phylogeny was based on both molecular (6,244 sites from 18S rna, 28S rna and H3 genes) and 41 larval morphological characters with broad taxon sampling across...... for the Cirripedia and reinforce the concept that this larva was a prerequisite to the tremendous success of that taxon. The evolution of parasitism, obligatory in three major taxa, is discussed. We conclude that the last common ancestor to the Cirripedia was most likely a suspension feeder, and the advanced...

  18. Continued-fraction expansion of eigenvalues of generalized evolution operators in terms of periodic orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Fujisaka, H; Eckhardt, B; Fujisaka, Hirokazu; Shigematsu, Hideto; Eckhardt, Bruno

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: A new expansion scheme to evaluate the eigenvalues of the generalized evolution operator (Frobenius-Perron operator) $H_{q}$ relevant to the fluctuation spectrum and poles of the order-$q$ power spectrum is proposed. The ``partition function'' is computed in terms of unstable periodic orbits and then used in a finite pole approximation of the continued fraction expansion for the evolution operator. A solvable example is presented and the approximate and exact results are compared; good agreement is found.

  19. Biogeography, phylogeny, and morphological evolution of central Texas cave and spring salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendik, Nathan F; Meik, Jesse M; Gluesenkamp, Andrew G; Roelke, Corey E; Chippindale, Paul T

    2013-09-17

    Subterranean faunal radiations can result in complex patterns of morphological divergence involving both convergent or parallel phenotypic evolution and cryptic species diversity. Salamanders of the genus Eurycea in central Texas provide a particularly challenging example with respect to phylogeny reconstruction, biogeography and taxonomy. These predominantly aquatic species inhabit karst limestone aquifers and spring outflows, and exhibit a wide range of morphological and genetic variation. We extensively sampled spring and cave populations of six Eurycea species within this group (eastern Blepsimolge clade), to reconstruct their phylogenetic and biogeographic history using mtDNA and examine patterns and origins of cave- and surface-associated morphological variation. Genetic divergence is generally low, and many populations share ancestral haplotypes and/or show evidence of introgression. This pattern likely indicates a recent radiation coupled with a complex history of intermittent connections within the aquatic karst system. Cave populations that exhibit the most extreme troglobitic morphologies show no or very low divergence from surface populations and are geographically interspersed among them, suggesting multiple instances of rapid, parallel phenotypic evolution. Morphological variation is diffuse among cave populations; this is in contrast to surface populations, which form a tight cluster in morphospace. Unexpectedly, our analyses reveal two distinct and previously unrecognized morphological groups encompassing multiple species that are not correlated with spring or cave habitat, phylogeny or geography, and may be due to developmental plasticity. The evolutionary history of this group of spring- and cave-dwelling salamanders reflects patterns of intermittent isolation and gene flow influenced by complex hydrogeologic dynamics that are characteristic of karst regions. Shallow genetic divergences among several species, evidence of genetic exchange, and

  20. An automated for simultaneous and continuous monitoring of oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide evolution in bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.; Gao, C. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tabak, H.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A precision respiratory system for continuous and simultaneous on-line measurement of both oxygen uptake rate and carbon dioxide evolution rate was developed to assess the primary and ultimate biodegradability of organics in aqueous, soil slurry and other types of bioreactors. Oxygen uptake was measured with a conventional respirometer and carbon dioxide evolution was quantified by continuously measuring the change of conductivity of barium hydroxide solution, placed in a holder inside the respirometer flask. Continuous stirring of the barium hydroxide solution ensured that the absorption of carbon dioxide was not the controlling rate. The respiratory system was tested using aqueous biodegradation of phenol and crude oil in a soil slurry reactor. Results showed that the system is capable of continuously and automatically measuring on-line the cumulative oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide evolution. Further, the respiratory quotient, which is the ratio of oxygen uptake to carbon dioxide evolution rate, is usually close to one, but less than one before the oxygen curve plateau. This means that primary degradation is very similar to ultimate degradation. After the oxygen curve plateau, the carbon dioxide evolution rate is larger than the oxygen uptake rate, primarily due to biomass decay.

  1. Surfactant-directed synthesis of silver nanorods and characteristic spectral changes occurred by their morphology evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Guansong; Zhang, Wanzhong; Qiao, Xueliang; Wu, Kai; Chen, Qingyuan; Cai, Yuchun

    2014-11-01

    Silver nanorods with different polydispersity were synthesized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) rod-shaped micelles by inducing the orientation growth of silver seeds and adjusting the volumes of CTAB. The reaction for the formation of silver nanorods had basically finished in 10 min. A suitable volume of CTAB (i.e., 15.0 mL of 0.1 M CTAB) is beneficial to obtain high-quality silver nanorods in the given reaction system. That is, the volume of added CTAB is a key factor to determine the polydispersity of the formed nanorods. The aging time plays a critical role in the morphology evolution of silver nanorods due to the oxidation of silver nanorods with Br-, O2 and the Ostwald ripening of the nanoparticles. As a result, the characteristic spectral changes occurred due to the morphology evolution of silver nanorods. The ablation in the top ends of the longer nanorods is often accompanied by the growth of some shorter nanorods and nanospheres. The size distribution of silver nanorods might be more uniform in the early aging stage. All the nanorods in the colloidal solution should turn into the near-spherical nanoparticles with larger sizes and thus the characteristic absorption should change to single peak centered at about 400 nm. Based on the research results, mathematical models are proposed for explaining the formation and morphology changes of silver nanorods. The morphology evolution of silver nanorods may be important and can be used as a reference for preparing silver nanorods, nanowires and other anisotropic nanomaterials.

  2. Morphological Evolution of Gyroid-Forming Block Copolymer Thin Films with Varying Solvent Evaporation Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lo, Ting-Ya; She, Ming-Shiuan; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2015-08-05

    In this study, we aim to examine the morphological evolution of block copolymer (BCP) nanostructured thin films through solvent evaporation at different rates for solvent swollen polystyrene-block-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA). Interesting phase transitions from disorder to perpendicular cylinder and then gyroid can be found while using a partially selective solvent for PS to swell PS-PLLA thin film followed by solvent evaporation. During the transitions, gyroid-forming BCP thin film with characteristic crystallographic planes of (111)G, (110)G, and (211)G parallel to air surface can be observed, and will gradually transform into coexisting (110)G and (211)G planes, and finally transforms to (211)G plane due to the preferential segregation of constituted block to the surface (i.e., the thermodynamic origin for self-assembly) that affects the relative amount of each component at the air surface. With the decrease on the evaporation rate, the disorder phase will transform to parallel cylinder and then directly to (211)G without transition to perpendicular cylinder phase. Most importantly, the morphological evolution of PS-PLLA thin films is strongly dependent upon the solvent removal rate only in the initial stage of the evaporation process due to the anisotropy of cylinder structure. Once the morphology is transformed back to the isotropic gyroid structure after long evaporation, the morphological evolution will only relate to the variation of the surface composition. Similar phase transitions at the substrate can also be obtained by controlling the ratio of PLLA-OH to PS-OH homopolymers to functionalize the substrate. As a result, the fabrication of well-defined nanostructured thin films with controlled orientation can be achieved by simple swelling and deswelling with controlled evaporation rate.

  3. Morphology Evolution and Dynamic Viscoelastic Behavior of Ternary Elastomer Blends under Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Xianggui; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin

    The influence of nanoparticle geometry, such as size and shape, on the phase morphology of partially miscible binary polymer blends under and after shear has been examined by rheological and rheo-optical techniques. The phase morphologies of the solution-polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber and low vinyl content polyisoprene (SSBR/LPI) blend systems were affected by the dispersion status of fillers which were determined by filler shapes and shear strength. Under weak shear flow, the domain morphology of the OMMT filled blend was much thinner than that of the SiO2 filled blend. Under strong shear flow, the string-like phase interface of the OMMT filled blend was much blurred compared with that of the SiO2 filled blend. After shear cessation, the orientation status of OMMT sheets determined the orientation of newborn domains. Combined morphology observation and rheological analysis showed that the anisotropic structure and the unfavorable bending energy of OMMT sheets played important roles on phase morphology and its evolution process during or after shear. The authors thank the financial support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.51173195).

  4. The evolution of morphological diversity in continental assemblages of passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2015-04-01

    Understanding geographic variation in the species richness and lineage composition of regional biotas is a long-standing goal in ecology. Why do some evolutionary lineages proliferate while others do not, and how do new colonists fit into an established fauna? Here, we analyze the morphological structure of assemblages of passerine birds in four biogeographic regions to examine the relative influence of colonization history and niche-based processes on continental communities of passerine birds. Using morphological traits related to habitat choice, foraging technique, and movement, we quantify the morphological spaces occupied by different groups of passerine birds. We further quantify morphological overlap between groups by multivariate discriminant analysis and null model analyses of trait dispersion. Finally, we use subclade disparity through time to assess the temporal component of morphological evolution. We find mixed support for the prediction, based on priority, that first colonizers constrain subsequent colonizers. Indeed, our results show that the assembly of continental communities is idiosyncratic with regards to the diversification of new clades and the filling of morphospace. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Role of Acid Functionality and Placement on Morphological Evolution and Strengthening of Acid Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Luri Robert; Schwartz, Eric; Winey, Karen

    Functional polymers with specific interactions produce hierarchical morphologies that directly impact mechanical properties. We recently reported that the formation of acid-rich layered morphologies in precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymers improves tensile strength. We now explore the generality of this phenomenon through variations in pendant acid chemistries, acid content and precision in placement of acid groups in polyethylene-based copolymers. In situ X-ray scattering measurements during tensile deformation reveal that the precision in acid group placement is critical to forming well-defined layered morphologies. This phenomenon was observed in both semi-crystalline and amorphous precise acid copolymers with varied acid chemistries (acrylic, geminal acrylic and phosphonic acids). Compositionally identical polymers but with pseudo random acid placement do not form layered morphologies. Acid chemistry and acid content influence morphological evolution predominately though modification of the copolymer Tg and crystallinity. Our results indicate that hierarchical layered structures, commensurate with improved mechanical properties, form in the presence of uniformity in chemical structure and sufficient chain mobility to strongly align during deformation.

  6. Developmental programmes in the evolution of Equisetum reproductive morphology: a hierarchical modularity hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomescu, Alexandru M F; Escapa, Ignacio H; Rothwell, Gar W; Elgorriaga, Andrés; Cúneo, N Rubén

    2017-03-01

    The origin of the Equisetum strobilus has long been debated and the fossil record has played an important role in these discussions. The paradigm underlying these debates has been the perspective of the shoot as node-internode alternation, with sporangiophores attached at nodes. However, fossils historically excluded from these discussions (e.g. Cruciaetheca and Peltotheca ) exhibit reproductive morphologies that suggest attachment of sporangiophores along internodes, challenging traditional views. This has rekindled discussions around the evolution of the Equisetum strobilus, but lack of mechanistic explanations has led discussions to a stalemate. A shift of focus from the node-internode view to a perspective emphasizing the phytomer as a modular unit of the shoot, frees the debate of homology constraints on the nature of the sporangiophore and inspires a mechanism-based hypothesis for the evolution of the strobilus. The hypothesis, drawing on data from developmental anatomy, regulatory mechanisms and the fossil record, rests on two tenets: (1) the equisetalean shoot grows by combined activity of the apical meristem, laying down the phytomer pattern, and intercalary meristems responsible for internode elongation; and (2) activation of reproductive growth programmes in the intercalary meristem produces sporangiophore whorls along internodes. Hierarchical expression of regulatory modules responsible for (1) transition to reproductive growth; (2) determinacy of apical growth; and (3) node-internode differentiation within phytomers, can explain reproductive morphologies illustrated by Cruciaetheca (module 1 only), Peltotheca (modules 1 and 2) and Equisetum (all three modules). This model has implications - testable by studies of the fossil record, phylogeny and development - for directionality in the evolution of reproductive morphology ( Cruciaetheca - Peltotheca - Equisetum ) and for the homology of the Equisetum stobilus. Furthermore, this model implies that

  7. Continued internal and external research efforts of RAG. New insights for the geological evolution of the Molasse Basin of Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinsch, R. [Rohoel-Aufsuchungs AG, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-10-23

    The understanding of the detailed geological evolution of the Molasse Basin is crucial for the continued success of exploration in this mature basin. Results from several research projects help to find new play types and increase the understanding of stratigraphic traps by characterising the sedimentological processes that control them. Risks associated with play types can be better assessed considering their evolutionary framework. Several studies focussed on that subject have been concluded in recent years or are still ongoing. This presentation will give an overview of the objectives, results and implications of these initiatives for evaluation and analysis of the geological evolution and for exploration of the Molasse Basin. An initial collaboration with Stanford University integrated sedimentological core analyses with 3D seismic, wireline log data interpretation and outcrop studies in analogue settings. The study yielded a modern sedimentological model for the Upper Puchkirchen Formation which was subsequently applied to exploration. A sequence stratigraphic study examined the sequence framework of the Molasse Basin fill and was able to correlate 5 sequences from the shelf into the deep basin. Studies on seismic and core analyses from the south slope of the Puchkirchen trough show how slope morphology and confinement control sediment distribution in the southern slope deposits. The transition from deep to more shallow marine conditions and the progradation of deltaic sequences into the basin in Eggenburgian/Burdigalian times is described by an intense 3-D seismic interpretation in combination with sedimentological core work. Working on a more local scale, other projects are improving the understanding of the detailed architecture of distinct play elements such as the Upper Puchkirchen Channel or the Basal Hall Formation Channel. In general, these studies highlight the complex interaction of processes that control sediment distribution in the basin. Morphology

  8. Continued internal and external research efforts of RAG. New insights for the geological evolution of the Molasse Basin of Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinsch, R. [Rohoel-Aufsuchungs AG, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-10-23

    The understanding of the detailed geological evolution of the Molasse Basin is crucial for the continued success of exploration in this mature basin. Results from several research projects help to find new play types and increase the understanding of stratigraphic traps by characterising the sedimentological processes that control them. Risks associated with play types can be better assessed considering their evolutionary framework. Several studies focussed on that subject have been concluded in recent years or are still ongoing. This presentation will give an overview of the objectives, results and implications of these initiatives for evaluation and analysis of the geological evolution and for exploration of the Molasse Basin. An initial collaboration with Stanford University integrated sedimentological core analyses with 3D seismic, wireline log data interpretation and outcrop studies in analogue settings. The study yielded a modern sedimentological model for the Upper Puchkirchen Formation which was subsequently applied to exploration. A sequence stratigraphic study examined the sequence framework of the Molasse Basin fill and was able to correlate 5 sequences from the shelf into the deep basin. Studies on seismic and core analyses from the south slope of the Puchkirchen trough show how slope morphology and confinement control sediment distribution in the southern slope deposits. The transition from deep to more shallow marine conditions and the progradation of deltaic sequences into the basin in Eggenburgian/Burdigalian times is described by an intense 3-D seismic interpretation in combination with sedimentological core work. Working on a more local scale, other projects are improving the understanding of the detailed architecture of distinct play elements such as the Upper Puchkirchen Channel or the Basal Hall Formation Channel. In general, these studies highlight the complex interaction of processes that control sediment distribution in the basin. Morphology

  9. From Bipolar to Elliptical: Simulating the Morphological Evolution of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martín; Balick, Bruce; Blackman, Eric G; De Marco, Orsola; Kastner, Joel H; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2011-01-01

    The majority of Proto-planetary nebulae (PPN) are observed to have bipolar morphologies. The majority of mature PN are observed to have elliptical shapes. In this paper we address the evolution of PPN/PN morphologies attempting to understand if a transition from strongly bipolar to elliptical shape can be driven by changes in the parameters of the mass loss process. To this end we present 2.5D hydrodynamical simulations of mass loss at the end stages of stellar evolution for intermediate mass stars. We track changes in wind velocity, mass loss rate and mass loss geometry. In particular we focus on the transition from mass loss dominated by a short duration jet flow (driven during the PPN phase) to mass loss driven by a spherical fast wind (produced by the central star of the PN). We address how such changes in outflow characteristics can change the nebula from a bipolar to an elliptical morphology. Our results show that including a period of jet formation in the temporal sequence of PPN to PN produces realist...

  10. Morphological evolution of cluster red sequence galaxies in the past 9 Gyr

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, Roberto; Phillipps, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies arrive on the red sequences of clusters at high redshift ($z>1$) once their star formation is quenched and evolve passively thereafter. However, we have previously found that cluster red sequence galaxies (CRSGs) undergo significant morphological evolution subsequent to the cessation of star formation, at some point in the past 9-10~Gyr. Through a detailed study of a large sample of cluster red sequence galaxies spanning $0.2evolution. Below $z \\sim 0.5-0.6$ (in the last 5-6 Gyr) there is little or no morphological evolution in the population as a whole, unlike in the previous 4-5 Gyrs. Over this earlier time (i) disk-like systems with S{\\'e}rsic $n < 2$ progressively disappear, as (ii) the range of their axial ratios similarly decreases, removing the most elongated systems (those consistent with thin disks seen at an appreciable inclination angle), and (iii) radial colour gradients (bluer outwards) decrease in an absolute sense from significant age-r...

  11. Sediment replenishment: Influence of the geometrical configuration on the morphological evolution of channel-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisacco, E.; Franca, M. J.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2016-11-01

    Dams trap sediment in the upstream reservoir, which may lead to river bed armoring, streambank erosion and failure, channel incision and reduction of the morphological diversity in the downstream river reaches. The replenishment of sediment is a mitigation measure for this problem to be applied in river reaches downstream of dams. Previously performed field experiments always used one single volume of sediment replenishment. To explore different alternatives, the replenished volume was here divided in four deposits with the motivation to influence also the morphological evolution downstream. Six different geometrical configurations together with three submergence conditions of sediment replenishment were tested for the first time in a laboratory experiment and are herein discussed. The results of the sediment replenishment mitigation technique are described in terms of occupied surface of the flume bed and the temporal evolution of erosion and transport of the introduced sediments. It is shown that, under our experimental conditions, complete submersion of the replenishment volume results in complete erosion of the placed sediment, with a high persistence of the added material along the channel length. The geometrical configuration of the replenishment volume plays a key role for the evolution of bed-forms downstream. Parallel configurations lead to a wider spread of material across the channel. Alternated configurations are suitable to produce sediment clustering and high persistence of placed material in the channel. Observed periodic mounds, considered as the initiating condition for alternate bars, follow a wavelength related to the length of the replenishment when the replenishment volumes are alternating.

  12. Asymmetric ecological conditions favor Red-Queen type of continued evolution over stasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin; Stenseth, Nils C

    2016-02-16

    Four decades ago, Leigh Van Valen presented the Red Queen's hypothesis to account for evolution of species within a multispecies ecological community [Van Valen L (1973) Evol Theory 1(1):1-30]. The overall conclusion of Van Valen's analysis was that evolution would continue even in the absence of abiotic perturbations. Stenseth and Maynard Smith presented in 1984 [Stenseth NC, Maynard Smith J (1984) Evolution 38(4):870-880] a model for the Red Queen's hypothesis showing that both Red-Queen type of continuous evolution and stasis could result from a model with biotically driven evolution. However, although that contribution demonstrated that both evolutionary outcomes were possible, it did not identify which ecological conditions would lead to each of these evolutionary outcomes. Here, we provide, using a simple, yet general population-biologically founded eco-evolutionary model, such analytically derived conditions: Stasis will predominantly emerge whenever the ecological system contains only symmetric ecological interactions, whereas both Red-Queen and stasis type of evolution may result if the ecological interactions are asymmetrical, and more likely so with increasing degree of asymmetry in the ecological system (i.e., the more trophic interactions, host-pathogen interactions, and the like there are [i.e., +/- type of ecological interactions as well as asymmetric competitive (-/-) and mutualistic (+/+) ecological interactions]). In the special case of no between-generational genetic variance, our results also predict dynamics within these types of purely ecological systems.

  13. Structure directing agents induced morphology evolution and phase transition from indium-based rho- to sod-ZMOF

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yanshu

    2017-06-23

    In this report, indium-based rho-and sod-ZMOFs with different morphologies and sizes were prepared. Simultaneous morphology evolution and phase transformation from porous rho-to nonporous sod-ZMOFs were reported for the first time by simply varying the concentration of structure directing agents (SDAs).

  14. Evolution of bower building in Lake Malawi cichlid fish: Phylogeny, morphology, and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eYork

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research, we still know little about the proximate and ultimate causes behind behavioral evolution. This is partly because understanding the forces acting on behavioral phenotypes requires the study of species-rich clades with extensive variation in behavioral traits, of which we have few current examples. In this paper, we introduce the bower-building cichlids of the Lake Malawi adaptive radiation, a lineage with over 100 species, each possessing a distinct male extended phenotype used to signal reproductive fitness. Extended phenotypes are useful units of analysis for the study of behavior since they are static structures that can be precisely measured within populations. To this end we recognize two core types of bowers - mounds (castles and depressions (pits. We employ an established framework for the study of adaptive radiations to ask how traits related to other stages of radiations, macrohabitat and feeding morphology, are associated with the evolution of pit and castle phenotypes. We demonstrate that pits and castles are evolutionarily labile traits and have been derived numerous times in multiple Malawi genera. Using public ecological and phenotypic data sets we find significant and correlated differences in macrohabitat (depth, sensory ability (opsin expression, and feeding style (jaw morphology and biomechanics between pit-digging and castle-building species. Phylogeny-corrected comparisons also show significant differences in several measures of jaw morphology while indicating non-significant differences in depth. Finally, using laboratory observations we assay courtship behaviors in a pit-digging (Copadichromis virginalis and a castle-building species (Mchenga conophoros. Together, these results show that traits at multiple biological levels act to regulate the evolution of a courtship behavior within natural populations.

  15. Bayesian Morphological Clock Methods Resurrect Placoderm Monophyly and Reveal Rapid Early Evolution in Jawed Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benedict; Qiao, Tuo; Lee, Michael S Y; Zhu, Min; Long, John A

    2017-07-01

    The phylogeny of early gnathostomes provides an important framework for understanding one of the most significant evolutionary events, the origin and diversification of jawed vertebrates. A series of recent cladistic analyses have suggested that the placoderms, an extinct group of armoured fish, form a paraphyletic group basal to all other jawed vertebrates. We revised and expanded this morphological data set, most notably by sampling autapomorphies in a similar way to parsimony-informative traits, thus ensuring this data (unlike most existing morphological data sets) satisfied an important assumption of Bayesian tip-dated morphological clock approaches. We also found problems with characters supporting placoderm paraphyly, including character correlation and incorrect codings. Analysis of this data set reveals that paraphyly and monophyly of core placoderms (excluding maxillate forms) are essentially equally parsimonious. The two alternative topologies have different root positions for the jawed vertebrates but are otherwise similar. However, analysis using tip-dated clock methods reveals strong support for placoderm monophyly, due to this analysis favoring trees with more balanced rates of evolution. Furthermore, enforcing placoderm paraphyly results in higher levels and unusual patterns of rate heterogeneity among branches, similar to that generated from simulated trees reconstructed with incorrect root positions. These simulations also show that Bayesian tip-dated clock methods outperform parsimony when the outgroup is largely uninformative (e.g., due to inapplicable characters), as might be the case here. The analysis also reveals that gnathostomes underwent a rapid burst of evolution during the Silurian period which declined during the Early Devonian. This rapid evolution during a period with few articulated fossils might partly explain the difficulty in ascertaining the root position of jawed vertebrates. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University

  16. Simultaneous comparison of cultural, genetic and morphological evolution among reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matessi, Giuliano; Pilastro, Andrea; Marin, Guglielmo

    2004-01-01

    similarly to microsatellite frequencies, and could be actually more genetic in nature. This could explain the incongruent results given by the analysis of the two "cultural" variation measures, which may refer to different aspects of song evolution. Acoustic properties of song may have evolved in response......We compared cultural, genetic and morphological variation in a set of 10 reed bunting  Emberiza schoeniclus populations of two subspecies groups, the northern thin billed and southern thick billed. We used four different markers of variation: two cultural divergence measures, quantitative...... characters and memetic frequencies; one measure of genetic divergence, i.e. microsatellite allele frequencies; and one measure of morphological divergence of populations, i.e. bill height. We calculated correlations among the divergence measures and estimated cultural evolutionary rates between and within...

  17. Surface morphology evolution of Si(110) by ion sputtering as a function of sample temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Le-Jun; Ling Li; Li Wei-Qing; Yang Xin-Ju; Gu Chang-Xin; Lu Ming

    2005-01-01

    Si(110) surface morphology evolution under normal-incident Ar+ ion sputtering has been studied as a function of Si temperature with the ion energy of 1.5keV and the ion flux 20μA/cm2. During temperature rising from room temperature to 800℃, Si(110) surface morphology changes from a dim dot/hole pattern to a distinct dot one, meanwhile the surface roughness increases steadily. The usually-accepted Bradley-Harper model fails to explain these data. By taking into account the Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect in the nanostructuring process, a simulation work was conducted based on a continuum dynamic model, which reproduces the experimental results.

  18. Morphological evolution of copper nanoparticles: Microemulsion reactor system versus batch reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming; Tang, Zengmin; Kim, Woo-Sik; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2017-07-01

    In the synthesis of nanoparticles, the reaction rate is important to determine the morphology of nanoparticles. We investigated morphology evolution of Cu nanoparticles in this two different reactors, microemulsion reactor and batch reactor. In comparison with the batch reactor system, the enhanced mass and heat transfers in the emulsion system likely led to the relatively short nucleation time and the highly homogeneous environment in the reaction mixture, resulting in suppressing one or two dimensional growth of the nanoparticles. We believe that this work can offer a good model system to quantitatively understand the crystal growth mechanism that depends strongly on the local monomer concentration, the efficiency of heat transfer, and the relative contribution of the counter ions (Br- and Cl-) as capping agents.

  19. From Bipolar to Elliptical: Morphological Changes in the Temporal Evolution of PN

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, Martin Huarte; Balick, Bruce; De Marco, Orsola; Kastner, Joel H; Sahai, Raghvendra; Blackman, Eric G

    2010-01-01

    Proto-planetary nebulae (pPN) and planetary nebulae (PN) seem to be formed by interacting winds from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The observational issue that most pPN are bipolar but most older PN are elliptical is addressed. We present 2.5D hydrodynamical numerical simulations of episodic cooling interacting winds to investigate the long term evolution of PN morphologies. We track wind acceleration, decrease in mass-loss and episodic change in wind geometry from spherical (AGB) to collimated (pPN) and back to spherical again (PN). This outflow sequence is found to produce realistic PN dynamics and morphological histories. Effects from different AGB distributions and jet duty cycles are also investigated.

  20. Morphology Evolution of High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells via Vapor Induced Intermediate Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lijian; Dong, Shiqi; De Marco, Nicholas; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Sun, Pengyu; Yang, Yang

    2016-12-07

    Morphology is critical component to achieve high device performance hybrid perovskite solar cells. Here, we develop a vapor induced intermediate phase (VIP) strategy to manipulate the morphology of perovskite films. By exposing the perovskite precursor films to different saturated solvent vapor atmospheres, e.g., dimethylformamide and dimethylsufoxide, dramatic film morphological evolution occurs, associated with the formation of different intermediate phases. We observe that the crystallization kinetics is significantly altered due to the formation of these intermediate phases, yielding highly crystalline perovskite films with less defect states and high carrier lifetimes. The perovskite solar cells with the reconstructed films exhibits the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 19.2% under 1 sun AM 1.5G irradiance, which is among the highest planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Also, the perovskite solar cells with VIP processing shows less hysteresis behavior and a stabilized power output over 18%. Our work opens up a new direction for morphology control through intermediate phase formation, and paves the way toward further enhancing the device performances of perovskite solar cells.

  1. Convergent Evolution of Unique Morphological Adaptations to a Subterranean Environment in Cave Millipedes (Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weixin; Golovatch, Sergei; Wesener, Thomas; Tian, Mingyi

    2017-01-01

    Animal life in caves has fascinated researchers and the public alike because of the unusual and sometimes bizarre morphological adaptations observed in numerous troglobitic species. Despite their worldwide diversity, the adaptations of cave millipedes (Diplopoda) to a troglobitic lifestyle have rarely been examined. In this study, morphological characters were analyzed in species belonging to four different orders (Glomerida, Polydesmida, Chordeumatida, and Spirostreptida) and six different families (Glomeridae, Paradoxosomatidae, Polydesmidae, Haplodesmidae, Megalotylidae, and Cambalopsidae) that represent the taxonomic diversity of class Diplopoda. We focused on the recently discovered millipede fauna of caves in southern China. Thirty different characters were used to compare cave troglobites and epigean species within the same genera. A character matrix was created to analyze convergent evolution of cave adaptations. Males and females were analyzed independently to examine sex differences in cave adaptations. While 10 characters only occurred in a few phylogenetic groups, 20 characters were scored for in all families. Of these, four characters were discovered to have evolved convergently in all troglobitic millipedes. The characters that represented potential morphological cave adaptations in troglobitic species were: (1) a longer body; (2) a lighter body color; (3) elongation of the femora; and (4) elongation of the tarsi of walking legs. Surprisingly, female, but not male, antennae were more elongated in troglobites than in epigean species. Our study clearly shows that morphological adaptations have evolved convergently in different, unrelated millipede orders and families, most likely as a direct adaptation to cave life.

  2. Molecular phylogenetics and morphological evolution of St. John's wort (Hypericum; Hypericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürk, Nicolai M; Madriñán, Santiago; Carine, Mark A; Chase, Mark W; Blattner, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic hypotheses for the large cosmopolitan genus Hypericum (St. John's wort) have previously been based on morphology, and molecular studies have thus far included only a few species. In this study, we used 360 sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) for 206 species representing Hypericum (incl. Triadenum and Thornea) and three other genera of Hypericaceae to generate an explicit phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus using parsimony and model-based methods. The results indicate that the small genus Triadenum is nested in a clade within Hypericum containing most of the New World species. Sister to Hypericum is Thornea from Central America. Within Hypericum, three large clades and two smaller grades were found; these are based on their general morphology, especially characters used previously in taxonomy of the genus. Relative to the most recent classification, around 60% of the sections of Hypericum were monophyletic. We used a Bayesian approach to reconstruct ancestral states of selected morphological characters, which resulted in recognition of characters that support major clades within the genus and a revised interpretation of morphological evolution in Hypericum. The shrubby habit represents the plesiomorphic state from which herbs evolved several times. Arborescent species have radiated convergently in high-elevation habitats in tropical Africa and South America.

  3. Deep time perspective on turtle neck evolution: chasing the Hox code by vertebral morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Christine; Werneburg, Ingmar

    2017-08-21

    The unparalleled ability of turtle neck retraction is possible in three different modes, which characterize stem turtles, living side-necked (Pleurodira), and hidden-necked (Cryptodira) turtles, respectively. Despite the conservatism in vertebral count among turtles, there is significant functional and morphological regionalization in the cervical vertebral column. Since Hox genes play a fundamental role in determining the differentiation in vertebra morphology and based on our reconstruction of evolutionary genetics in deep time, we hypothesize genetic differences among the turtle groups and between turtles and other land vertebrates. We correlated anterior Hox gene expression and the quantifiable shape of the vertebrae to investigate the morphological modularity in the neck across living and extinct turtles. This permitted the reconstruction of the hypothetical ancestral Hox code pattern of the whole turtle clade. The scenario of the evolution of axial patterning in turtles indicates shifts in the spatial expression of HoxA-5 in relation to the reduction of cervical ribs in modern turtles and of HoxB-5 linked with a lower morphological differentiation between the anterior cervical vertebrae observed in cryptodirans. By comparison with the mammalian pattern, we illustrate how the fixed count of eight cervical vertebrae in turtles resulted from the emergence of the unique turtle shell.

  4. Correlated evolution of beak morphology and song in the neotropical woodcreeper radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derryberry, Elizabeth Perrault; Seddon, Nathalie; Claramunt, Santiago; Tobias, Joseph Andrew; Baker, Adam; Aleixo, Alexandre; Brumfield, Robb Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Mating signals may diversify as a byproduct of morphological adaptation to different foraging niches, potentially driving speciation. Although many studies have focused on the direct influence of ecological and sexual selection on signal divergence, the role of indirect mechanisms remains poorly understood. Using phenotypic and molecular datasets, we explored the interplay between morphological and vocal evolution in an avian radiation characterized by dramatic beak variation, the Neotropical woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptinae). We found evidence of a trade-off between the rate of repetition of song syllables and frequency bandwidth: slow paced songs had either narrow or wide frequency bandwidths, and bandwidth decreased as song pace increased. This bounded phenotypic space for song structure supports the hypothesis that passerine birds face a motor constraint during song production. Diversification of acoustic characters within this bounded space was correlated with diversification of beak morphology. In particular, species with larger beaks produced slower songs with narrower frequency bandwidths, suggesting that ecological selection on beak morphology influences the diversification of woodcreeper songs. Because songs in turn mediate mate choice and species recognition in birds, these results indicate a broader role for ecology in avian diversification.

  5. Rates of speciation and morphological evolution are correlated across the largest vertebrate radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Santini, Francesco; Eastman, Jonathan; Smith, Stephen A; Sidlauskas, Brian; Chang, Jonathan; Alfaro, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Several evolutionary theories predict that rates of morphological change should be positively associated with the rate at which new species arise. For example, the theory of punctuated equilibrium proposes that phenotypic change typically occurs in rapid bursts associated with speciation events. However, recent phylogenetic studies have found little evidence linking these processes in nature. Here we demonstrate that rates of species diversification are highly correlated with the rate of body size evolution across the 30,000+ living species of ray-finned fishes that comprise the majority of vertebrate biological diversity. This coupling is a general feature of fish evolution and transcends vast differences in ecology and body-plan organization. Our results may reflect a widespread speciational mode of character change in living fishes. Alternatively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that phenotypic 'evolvability'-the capacity of organisms to evolve-shapes the dynamics of speciation through time at the largest phylogenetic scales.

  6. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Franz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH, which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  7. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Guilherme; Delpey, Matthias T.; Brito, David; Pinto, Lígia; Leitão, Paulo; Neves, Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH), which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica) located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal) to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  8. Role of the FUL-SHP network in the evolution of fruit morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrándiz, Cristina; Fourquin, Chloé

    2014-08-01

    Arabidopsis research in the last decade has started to unravel the genetic networks directing gynoecium and fruit patterning in this model species. Only recently, the work from several groups has also started to address the conservation of these networks in a wide number of species with very different fruit morphologies, and we are now beginning to understand how they might have evolved. This review summarizes recent advances in this field, focusing mainly on MADS-box genes with a well-known role in dehiscence zone development, while also discussing how these studies may contribute to expand our views on fruit evolution.

  9. Kinematic Morphology of Large-scale Structure: Evolution from Potential to Rotational Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Neyrinck, Mark C; Eyink, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative way of describing the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. Before shell-crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with cosmic web structure, because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell-crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatia...

  10. Decadal morphological evolution of the Yangtze Estuary in response to river input changes and estuarine engineering projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hua Long; Ding, Ping Xing; Wang, Zheng Bing; Ge, Jian Zhong; Yang, Shi Lun

    2016-07-01

    The Yangtze Estuary in China has been intensively influenced by human activities including altered river and sediment discharges in its catchment and local engineering projects in the estuary over the past half century. River sediment discharge has significantly decreased since the 1980s because of upstream dam construction and water-soil conservation. We analyzed bathymetric data from the Yangtze Estuary between 1958 and 2010 and divided the entire estuary into two sections: inner estuary and mouth bar area. The deposition and erosion pattern exhibited strong temporal and spatial variations. The inner estuary and mouth bar area underwent different changes. The inner estuary was altered from sedimentation to erosion primarily at an intermediate depth (5-15 m) along with river sediment decline. In contrast, the mouth bar area showed continued accretion throughout the study period. The frequent river floods during the 1990s and simultaneously decreasing river sediment probably induced the peak erosion of the inner estuary in 1986-1997. We conclude that both sediment discharge and river flood events played important roles in the decadal morphological evolution of the Yangtze Estuary. Regarding the dredged sediment, the highest net accretion rate occurred in the North Passage where jetties and groins were constructed to regulate the navigation channel in 1997-2010. In this period, the jetties induced enhanced deposition at the East Hengsha Mudflat and the high accretion rate within the mouth bar area was maintained. The impacts of estuarine engineering projects on morphological change extended beyond their sites.

  11. A Discussion on Evolution of Microstructures and Influence Factors during Continuous Rolling of Compact Strip Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo DONG; Yonglin KANG; Hao YU

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of microsturctures and influence factors of ultrathin hot strips of low carbon steel produced by compact strip production (CSP) techniques were investigated. The steel blocking samples of CSP six-passes were obtained, and microstructures at the different positions of workpiece for each pass were studied. At the same time, an explicit finite element technique was used to reveal the continuous rolling process. By combining experiment results with simulation analysis, the effects of plastic strain, temperature, precipitation and interval time on evolution and refinement of crystal grains have been investigated. The results are useful for the development of high strength hot strips.

  12. Synergistic effect of silver seeds and organic modifiers on the morphology evolution mechanism of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aili; Yin, Hengbo; Ren, Min; Liu, Yuming; Jiang, Tingshun

    2008-08-01

    Triangular, truncated triangular, quadrangular, hexagonal, and net-structured silver nanoplates as well as decahedral silver nanoparticles were manipulatively prepared starting from silver nitrate and silver seeds in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly( N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), and Tween 80 at room temperature, respectively. UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, SAED, and FTIR were used to illustrate the crystal growth process and to characterize the resultant silver nanoparticles. It was found that the silver seeds and organic modifiers synergistically affected the morphology evolution of the silver nanoparticles. The co-presence of silver seeds and PEG was beneficial to the formation of triangular and truncated triangular silver nanoplates; the silver seeds and PVP favored the formation of polygonal silver nanoplates; the silver seeds and Tween 80 preferred to the formation of net-structured silver plates. The morphology evolution of the resultant silver nanoparticles was correlated with the crystallinity of the silver seeds and the adsorption ability of the organic modifiers on the crystal surfaces.

  13. Effect of fast mold surface temperature evolution on iPP part morphology gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liparoti, Sara [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Sorrentino, Andrea [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials (IPCB), National Research Council (CNR), P. Enrico Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Guzman, Gustavo; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Titomanlio, Giuseppe, E-mail: gtitomanlio@unisa.it [Department of Polymer Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States)

    2016-03-09

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that affects the sample surface morphology as well as the structural gradients (orientation crystal size, and type) as well as cooling stresses. The frozen layer thickness formed during the filling stage also has a very significant effect on the flow resistance and thus on the resulting pressure drop and flow length in thin wall parts. The possibility to have a hot mold during filling and a quick cooling soon afterward is a significant process enhancement particularly for specialized applications such as micro injection molding and for the reproduction of micro structured surfaces. Up to now, several methods (electromagnetic, infrared, hot vapor fleshing etc,) were tried to achieve fast temperature evolution of the mold. Unfortunately, all these methods require a complex balance between thermal and mechanical problems, equipment cost, energy consumption, safety, molding cycle time and part quality achievable. In this work, a thin electrical resistance was designed and used to generate a fast and confined temperature variation on mold surface (by joule effect). Since the whole temperature evolution can take place in a few seconds, one can couple the advantages of a high surface temperature during filling with the advantages of a low mold temperature, fast cooling and low heating dissipation. Some experiments were performed with a commercial iPP resin. The effects of the surface temperature and of the heating time (under constant electric power) on surface finishing and on the final morphology (thickness and structure of the different layers) are explored and discussed.

  14. A liquid-like model for the morphology evolution of ion bombarded thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, L., E-mail: luca.repetto@unige.it [Department of Physics and Nanomed Labs, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lo Savio, R. [Department of Physics and Nanomed Labs, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Šetina Batič, B. [Inštitut Za Kovinske Materiale in Tehnologije, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Firpo, G.; Angeli, E.; Valbusa, U. [Department of Physics and Nanomed Labs, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Thin solid films exposed to ion irradiation exhibit a peculiar evolution that can differ substantially from what is observed for bulk samples. The phenomenology of the patterns that self-organize on the substrate is very rich, with morphologies that display several degrees of order upon the modification of initial film characteristics and irradiation parameters. This richness paves the way for the fabrication of novel functional surfaces, but it is also an indication of the complexity of the underlying driving mechanisms. A remarkable simplification for the comprehension of these phenomena can come from the noteworthy similarity of the obtained patterns with those showing up when liquids dewet from their substrates. Here, we analyze the possibility to apply a liquid-like model to explain the morphology evolution of ion bombarded thin films for the whole phenomenology showing up in experiments. In establishing this connection between liquids and ion bombarded thin films, we propose to use also for liquids the insight gained for our system with recent experiments that stress the importance of the substrate topography for the selection of the dewetting mechanism. If confirmed, this result would lead to a reconsideration of the importance of capillary waves in spinodal dewetting, and will help to understand the low reproducibility of the related experimental results.

  15. STM/AFM studies of the evolution of morphology of electroplated Ni/W alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Younes, O.; Ashkenasy, N.; Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Gileadi, E.

    2002-11-01

    The surface morphology evolution of Ni/W alloys was studied, as a function of the alloy composition. Using the modified plating baths developed in our laboratory recently, electroplated Ni/W alloys with different W content, in the range of 7-67 atom percent (a/o), can be obtained. This was found to lead to different structures, ranging from polycrystalline fcc-Ni type structure to amorphous, followed by orthorhombic with increasing W content in the alloy. Powder XRD was studied to determine the crystal structures. Ex situ STM, AFM and SEM were used to study in detail the surface morphologies of the different alloys, and their evolution with increasing W content. The important findings are that a mixture of two crystalline forms can give rise to an amorphous structure. Hillocks that are usually a characteristic of epitaxial growth can also exist in the amorphous alloys. Oriented scratches caused by stress can also be formed. Up to 20 a/o of W is deposited in the alloys in crystalline form, with the fcc-Ni type structure. Between 20 and about 40 a/o an amorphous structure is observed, and above that an orthorhombic crystal structure is seen, which is characteristic of the NiW binary alloy. Careful choice of the composition of the plating bath allowed us to deposit an alloy containing 67 a/o W, which corresponds to the composition NiW 2.

  16. Imitation, genetic lineages, and time influenced the morphological evolution of the violin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Chitwood

    Full Text Available Violin design has been in flux since the production of the first instruments in 16th century Italy. Numerous innovations have improved the acoustical properties and playability of violins. Yet, other attributes of the violin affect its performance less, and with fewer constraints, are potentially more sensitive to historical vagaries unrelated to quality. Although the coarse shape of violins is integral to their design, details of the body outline can vary without significantly compromising sound quality. What can violin shapes tell us about their makers and history, including the degree that luthiers have influenced each other and the evolution of complex morphologies over time? Here, I provide an analysis of morphological evolution in the violin family, sampling the body shapes of over 9,000 instruments over 400 years of history. Specific shape attributes, which discriminate instruments produced by different luthiers, strongly correlate with historical time. Linear discriminant analysis reveals luthiers who likely copied the outlines of their instruments from others, which historical accounts corroborate. Clustering of averaged violin shapes places luthiers into four major groups, demonstrating a handful of discrete shapes predominate in most instruments. Violin shapes originating from multi-generational luthier families tend to cluster together, and familial origin is a significant explanatory factor of violin shape. Together, the analysis of four centuries of violin shapes demonstrates not only the influence of history and time leading to the modern violin, but widespread imitation and the transmission of design by human relatedness.

  17. Evolution of syncarpy and other morphological characters in African Annonaceae: a posterior mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, T L P; Richardson, J E; Sosef, M S M; Erkens, R H J; Chatrou, L W

    2008-04-01

    The congenital fusion of carpels, or syncarpy, is considered a key innovation as it is found in more than 80% of angiosperms. Within the magnoliids however, syncarpy has rarely evolved. Two alternative evolutionary origins of syncarpy were suggested in order to explain the evolution of this feature: multiplication of a single carpel vs. fusion of a moderate number of carpels. The magnoliid family Annonaceae provides an ideal situation to test these hypotheses as two African genera, Isolona and Monodora, are syncarpous in an otherwise apocarpous family with multicarpellate and unicarpellate genera. In addition to syncarpy, the evolution of six other morphological characters was studied. Well-supported phylogenetic relationships of African Annonaceae and in particular those of Isolona and Monodora were reconstructed. Six plastid regions were sequenced and analyzed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. The Bayesian posterior mapping approach to study character evolution was used as it accounts for both mapping and phylogenetic uncertainty, and also allows multiple state changes along the branches. Our phylogenetic analyses recovered a fully resolved clade comprising twelve genera endemic to Africa, including Isolona and Monodora, which was nested within the so-called long-branch clade. This is the largest and most species-rich clade of African genera identified to date within Annonaceae. The two syncarpous genera were inferred with maximum support to be sister to a clade characterized by genera with multicarpellate apocarpous gynoecia, supporting the hypothesis that syncarpy arose by fusion of a moderate number of carpels. This hypothesis was also favoured when studying the floral anatomy of both genera. Annonaceae provide the only case of a clear evolution of syncarpy within an otherwise apocarpous magnoliid family. The results presented here offer a better understanding of the evolution of syncarpy in Annonaceae and within angiosperms in general.

  18. Cocontinuous polymer blends: The role of block copolymer in blend morphology evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Joel Richard

    Cocontinuous morphologies are distinguished by the mutual interpenetration of two polymer phases and allow for enhanced mechanical properties, static charge dissipation, and barrier properties. Cocontinuous morphologies form over a range of compositions, depending largely on mixing history and the relative polymer viscosities, elasticities, and interfacial tension. Because cocontinuous morphologies are thermodynamically unstable, they will coarsen when held above their glass or melt transition temperature. Since the unique properties of these blends depend directly on the continuous nature of the microstructure and its phase size, stabilization of the cocontinuous morphology is extremely important. To address this challenge, compatibilizers, e.g. block copolymers (bcp), are often added to hinder phase coarsening in blends of immiscible polymers and can improve bonding at interfaces. The effects of bcp on the cocontinuous morphology of polystyrene (PS)/polyethylene (PE) and PS/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with image analysis, 3D imaging, mercury porosimetry, solvent extraction, and rheology. It was shown that diblock copolymers were able to suppress coarsening during annealing in cocontinuous PS/PE and PS/PMMA blends. Bcp effectiveness was dependent on molecular weight, concentration, and architecture. Self consistent mean field theory and bending elasticity theory were used to estimate the proper bcp architecture for maximum reduction in interfacial tension; experimental results agreed well with the theory. In addition to slowing coarsening, bcp was shown to widen the range of cocontinuity for both the PS/PE and PS/PMMA systems. To aid determination of the range of cocontinuity, a new technique for analyzing SEM micrographs was developed. The new technique classifies blend morphology according to the normalized fraction of drops present in the 2D microstructure. It was found that a blend becomes

  19. Molecular systematics of eastern North American Phalangodidae (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores), demonstrating convergent morphological evolution in caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Marshal; Thomas, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    The phalangodid harvestmen (Opiliones: Laniatores) fauna of the southeastern United States has remained obscure since original descriptions of many genera and species over 60 years ago. The obscurity of this interesting group is pervasive, with uncertainty regarding basic systematic information such as generic limits, species limits, and geographic distributions. This situation is unfortunate, as the fauna includes several cave-obligate forms of interest from both conservation and evolutionary perspectives, and the group likely exhibits interesting biogeographic patterns because of their low dispersal ability. Here, we use DNA sequence data from two genes to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of southeastern phalangodid taxa, for a sample of all described genera from the region. Our results demonstrate that the southeastern fauna is likely monophyletic, and is most-closely related to western North American phalangodids with a similar penis morphology. Within the southeastern clade, trends in the evolution of penis morphology correspond broadly to molecular phylogenetic patterns, although penis evolution is overall relatively conservative in the group. Biogeographically, it appears that western taxa in the southeast (i.e., from west of the Appalachian Valley) are early diverging, with later diversification in the montane southern Blue Ridge, and subsequent diversification back towards the west. This W>E>W pattern has been observed in other groups from the southeast. The multiple cave-modified species in the region are genetically divergent and appear phylogenetically isolated; explicit topological hypothesis testing suggests that troglomorphism has evolved convergently in at least three independent lineages. The total number of species in the region remains uncertain-mitochondrial COI data reveal many highly divergent, geographically coherent groups that might represent undescribed species, but these divergent mitochondrial lineages do not always exhibit

  20. Postcopulatory sexual selection is associated with accelerated evolution of sperm morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Melissah; Albrecht, Tomáš; Cramer, Emily R A; Johnsen, Arild; Laskemoen, Terje; Weir, Jason T; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2015-04-01

    Rapid diversification of sexual traits is frequently attributed to sexual selection, though explicit tests of this hypothesis remain limited. Spermatozoa exhibit remarkable variability in size and shape, and studies report a correlation between sperm morphology (sperm length and shape) and sperm competition risk or female reproductive tract morphology. However, whether postcopulatory processes (e.g., sperm competition and cryptic female choice) influence the speed of evolutionary diversification in sperm form is unknown. Using passerine birds, we quantified evolutionary rates of sperm length divergence among lineages (i.e., species pairs) and determined whether these rates varied with the level of sperm competition (estimated as relative testes mass). We found that relative testes mass was significantly and positively associated with more rapid phenotypic divergence in sperm midpiece and flagellum lengths, as well as total sperm length. In contrast, there was no association between relative testes mass and rates of evolutionary divergence in sperm head size, and models suggested that head length is evolutionarily constrained. Our results are the first to show an association between the strength of sperm competition and the speed of sperm evolution, and suggest that postcopulatory sexual selection promotes rapid evolutionary diversification of sperm morphology. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Morphological homoplasy, life history evolution, and historical biogeography of plethodontid salamanders inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Macey, J. Robert; Jaekel, Martin; Wake, David B.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-08-01

    The evolutionary history of the largest salamander family (Plethodontidae) is characterized by extreme morphological homoplasy. Analysis of the mechanisms generating such homoplasy requires an independent, molecular phylogeny. To this end, we sequenced 24 complete mitochondrial genomes (22 plethodontids and two outgroup taxa), added data for three species from GenBank, and performed partitioned and unpartitioned Bayesian, ML, and MP phylogenetic analyses. We explored four dataset partitioning strategies to account for evolutionary process heterogeneity among genes and codon positions, all of which yielded increased model likelihoods and decreased numbers of supported nodes in the topologies (PP > 0.95) relative to the unpartitioned analysis. Our phylogenetic analyses yielded congruent trees that contrast with the traditional morphology-based taxonomy; the monophyly of three out of four major groups is rejected. Reanalysis of current hypotheses in light of these new evolutionary relationships suggests that (1) a larval life history stage re-evolved from a direct-developing ancestor multiple times, (2) there is no phylogenetic support for the ''Out of Appalachia'' hypothesis of plethodontid origins, and (3) novel scenarios must be reconstructed for the convergent evolution of projectile tongues, reduction in toe number, and specialization for defensive tail loss. Some of these novel scenarios imply morphological transformation series that proceed in the opposite direction than was previously thought. In addition, they suggest surprising evolutionary lability in traits previously interpreted to be conservative.

  2. Convergence and divergence in the evolution of cat skulls: temporal and spatial patterns of morphological diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Sakamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies of biological shape evolution are greatly enhanced when framed in a phylogenetic perspective. Inclusion of fossils amplifies the scope of macroevolutionary research, offers a deep-time perspective on tempo and mode of radiations, and elucidates life-trait changes. We explore the evolution of skull shape in felids (cats through morphometric analyses of linear variables, phylogenetic comparative methods, and a new cladistic study of saber-toothed cats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new phylogenetic analysis supports the monophyly of saber-toothed cats (Machairodontinae exclusive of Felinae and some basal felids, but does not support the monophyly of various saber-toothed tribes and genera. We quantified skull shape variation in 34 extant and 18 extinct species using size-adjusted linear variables. These distinguish taxonomic group membership with high accuracy. Patterns of morphospace occupation are consistent with previous analyses, for example, in showing a size gradient along the primary axis of shape variation and a separation between large and small-medium cats. By combining the new phylogeny with a molecular tree of extant Felinae, we built a chronophylomorphospace (a phylogeny superimposed onto a two-dimensional morphospace through time. The evolutionary history of cats was characterized by two major episodes of morphological divergence, one marking the separation between saber-toothed and modern cats, the other marking the split between large and small-medium cats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ancestors of large cats in the 'Panthera' lineage tend to occupy, at a much later stage, morphospace regions previously occupied by saber-toothed cats. The latter radiated out into new morphospace regions peripheral to those of extant large cats. The separation between large and small-medium cats was marked by considerable morphologically divergent trajectories early in feline evolution. A chronophylomorphospace has wider

  3. Resolution of Brassicaceae Phylogeny Using Nuclear Genes Uncovers Nested Radiations and Supports Convergent Morphological Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Sun, Renran; Hu, Yi; Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Liming; Zhang, Qiang; Koch, Marcus A; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan; Edger, Patrick P; Pires, J Chris; Tan, Dun-Yan; Zhong, Yang; Ma, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Brassicaceae is one of the most diverse and economically valuable angiosperm families with widely cultivated vegetable crops and scientifically important model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. The evolutionary history, ecological, morphological, and genetic diversity, and abundant resources and knowledge of Brassicaceae make it an excellent model family for evolutionary studies. Recent phylogenetic analyses of the family revealed three major lineages (I, II, and III), but relationships among and within these lineages remain largely unclear. Here, we present a highly supported phylogeny with six major clades using nuclear markers from newly sequenced transcriptomes of 32 Brassicaceae species and large data sets from additional taxa for a total of 55 species spanning 29 out of 51 tribes. Clade A consisting of Lineage I and Macropodium nivale is sister to combined Clade B (with Lineage II and others) and a new Clade C. The ABC clade is sister to Clade D with species previously weakly associated with Lineage II and Clade E (Lineage III) is sister to the ABCD clade. Clade F (the tribe Aethionemeae) is sister to the remainder of the entire family. Molecular clock estimation reveals an early radiation of major clades near or shortly after the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and subsequent nested divergences of several tribes of the previously polytomous Expanded Lineage II. Reconstruction of ancestral morphological states during the Brassicaceae evolution indicates prevalent parallel (convergent) evolution of several traits over deep times across the entire family. These results form a foundation for future evolutionary analyses of structures and functions across Brassicaceae. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Changing ideas about the evolution and functional morphology of Machairodontine felids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sabre-toothed felids, the machairodontines, have attracted much attention among palaeontologists for many decades, not only because of their spectacular morphology but also because they are a striking example of convergent evolution that is most probably linked to strong selective pressures. In this paper we provide a summary of the changing interpretations of their functional anatomy and evolution, from early hypotheses proposing a stabbing mode of attack and a pleiotropic control of the complex of machairodont morphologies, to the current views favouring the canine shear-bite model and a mosaic evolution of anatomical features.

    Los félidos de dientes de sable, los macairodontinos, han ejercido una especial atracción entre los paleontólogos durante muchas décadas, no sólo por su espectacular morfología, sino también debido a que son un llamativo ejemplo de evolución convergente, probablemente ligada a una fuerte presión selectiva. En este trabajo suministramos una recopilación de los cambios de interpretación acerca de su anatomía functional y evolución, desde las primeras hipótesis en las que se proponía un ataque por apuñalamiento y un control pleitrópico del complejo morfológico macairodontino, hasta los actuales puntos de vista que favorecen un modelo de mordedura muy especializado y una evolución en mosaico de los carácteres anatómicos.

  5. Evolution of life cycle, colony morphology, and host specificity in the family Hydractiniidae (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietta, Maria Pia; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2012-12-01

    Biased transitions are common throughout the tree of life. The class hydrozoa is no exception, having lost the feeding medusa stage at least 70 times. The family hydractiniidae includes one lineage with pelagic medusae (Podocoryna) and several without (e.g., Hydractinia). The benthic colony stage also varies widely in host specificity and in colony form. The five-gene phylogeny presented here requires multiple transitions between character states for medusae, host specificity, and colony phenotype. Significant phylogenetic correlations exist between medusoid form, colony morphology, and host specificity. Species with nonfeeding medusae are usually specialized on a single host type, and reticulate colonies are correlated with nonmotile hosts. The history of feeding medusae is less certain. Podocoryna is nested within five lineages lacking medusae. This requires either repeated losses of medusae, or the remarkable re-evolution of a feeding medusa after at least 150 million years. Traditional ancestral reconstruction favors medusa regain, but a likelihood framework testing biased transitions cannot distinguish between multiple losses versus regain. A hypothesis of multiple losses of feeding medusae requires transient selection pressure favoring such a loss. Populations of species with feeding medusae are always locally rare and lack of feeding medusae does not result in restricted species distribution around the world. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Cure kinetics, morphologies, and mechanical properties of thermoplastic/MWCNT modified multifunctional glassy epoxies prepared via continuous reaction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaole

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to develop a novel continuous reactor method to prepare partially cured epoxy prepolymers for aerospace prepreg applications with the aim of replacing traditional batch reactors. Compared to batch reactors, the continuous reactor is capable of solubilizing and dispersing a broad range of additives including thermoplastic tougheners, stabilizers, nanoparticles and curatives and advancing epoxy molecular weights and viscosities while reducing energy consumption. In order to prove this concept, polyethersulfone (PES) modified 4, 4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (44DDS)/tetraglycidyl-4, 4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (TGDDM) epoxy prepolymers were firstly prepared using both continuous reactor and batch reactor methods. Kinetic studies confirmed the chain extension reaction in the continuous reactor is similar to the batch reactor, and the molecular weights and viscosities of prepolymers were readily controlled through reaction kinetics. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed similar cured network morphologies for formulations prepared from batch and continuous reactors. Additionally tensile strength, tensile modulus and fracture toughness analyses concluded mechanical properties of cured epoxy matrices produced from both reactors were equivalent. Effects of multifunctional epoxy compositions on thermoplastics phase-separated morphologies were systematically studied using a combination of AFM with nanomechanical mapping, spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques to provide new insights to tailor cured reaction induced phase separation (CRIPS) in multifunctional epoxy blend networks. Furthermore, how resultant crosslinked glassy polymer network and phase-separated morphologies correlated with mechanical properties are discussed in detail. Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TGDDM epoxy prepolymers were further prepared by combining the successful strategies for advancing epoxy chemistries and dispersing nanotubes using the continuous reactor

  7. Evolution of the axial system in craniates: morphology and function of the perivertebral musculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Nadja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The axial musculoskeletal system represents the plesiomorphic locomotor engine of the vertebrate body, playing a central role in locomotion. In craniates, the evolution of the postcranial skeleton is characterized by two major transformations. First, the axial skeleton became increasingly functionally and morphologically regionalized. Second, the axial-based locomotion plesiomorphic for craniates became progressively appendage-based with the evolution of extremities in tetrapods. These changes, together with the transition to land, caused increased complexity in the planes in which axial movements occur and moments act on the body and were accompanied by profound changes in axial muscle function. To increase our understanding of the evolutionary transformations of the structure and function of the perivertebral musculature, this review integrates recent anatomical and physiological data (e.g., muscle fiber types, activation patterns with gross-anatomical and kinematic findings for pivotal craniate taxa. This information is mapped onto a phylogenetic hypothesis to infer the putative character set of the last common ancestor of the respective taxa and to conjecture patterns of locomotor and muscular evolution. The increasing anatomical and functional complexity in the muscular arrangement during craniate evolution is associated with changes in fiber angulation and fiber-type distribution, i.e., increasing obliqueness in fiber orientation and segregation of fatigue-resistant fibers in deeper muscle regions. The loss of superficial fatigue-resistant fibers may be related to the profound gross anatomical reorganization of the axial musculature during the tetrapod evolution. The plesiomorphic function of the axial musculature -mobilization- is retained in all craniates. Along with the evolution of limbs and the subsequent transition to land, axial muscles additionally function to globally stabilize the trunk against inertial and extrinsic

  8. Morphology and biomechanics of the pinniped jaw: mandibular evolution without mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katrina E; Ruff, Christopher B; Goswami, Anjali

    2013-07-01

    Pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) underwent a shift in jaw function away from typical carnivoran mastication to more novel marine behaviors during the terrestrial-aquatic transition. Here we test the effect of aquatic prey capture and male-male combat on the morphological evolution of a mammal jaw that does not masticate. Nine three-dimensional landmarks were taken along the mandible for 25 species (N = 83), and corpus and symphysis external and cortical breadths for a subset of five species (N = 33). Principal components analysis was performed on size-corrected landmark data to assess variation in overall jaw morphology across pinnipeds. Corpus breadths were input to a beam model to calculate strength properties and estimated bite force of specific species with contrasting behaviors (filter feeding, suction feeding, grip-and-tear feeding, and male-male combat). Results indicate that, although phylogenetic signal in jaw shape is strong, function is also important in determining morphology. Filter feeders display an elongate symphysis and a long toothrow that may play a role in filtering krill. Grip-and-tear feeders have a long jaw and large estimated bite force relative to non-biting species. However, the largest estimated bite forces were observed in males of male-male combative species, likely due to the high selection pressure associated with male success in highly polygynous species. The suction feeding jaw is weak in biting but has a different morphology in the two suction feeding taxa. In conclusion, familial patterns of pinniped jaw shape due to phylogenetic relatedness have been modified by adaptations to specialized behavior of individual taxa.

  9. Molecular evolution of calcification genes in morphologically similar but phylogenetically unrelated scleractinian corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirshing, Herman H; Baker, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    cases, these taxa shared aspects of their skeletal morphology (i.e., convergence or diversification relative to the "non-calcification" loci), but in other cases they did not. For example, the "non-calcification" loci recovered Atlantic and Pacific mussids as separate evolutionary lineages, whereas with CIII-MBSα-CA, clones of two species of Atlantic mussids (Isophyllia sinuosa and Mycetophyllia sp.) and two species of Pacific mussids (Acanthastrea echinata and Lobophyllia hemprichii) were united in a distinct clade (except for one individual of Mycetophyllia). However, this clade also contained other taxa which were not unambiguously correlated with morphological features. BMP2/4 also contained clones that likely represent different gene copies. However, many of the sequences showed no significant deviation from neutrality, and reconstructed phylogenies were similar to the "non-calcification" tree topologies with a few exceptions. Although individual calcification genes are unlikely to precisely explain the diverse morphological features exhibited by scleractinian corals, this study demonstrates an approach for identifying cases where morphological taxonomy may have been misled by convergent and/or divergent molecular evolutionary processes in corals. Studies such as this may help illuminate our understanding of the likely complex evolution of genes involved in the calcification process, and enhance our knowledge of the natural history and biodiversity within this central ecological group.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis using Lévy processes: finding jumps in the evolution of continuous traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Michael J; Schraiber, Joshua G; Liang, Mason

    2013-03-01

    Gaussian processes, a class of stochastic processes including Brownian motion and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, are widely used to model continuous trait evolution in statistical phylogenetics. Under such processes, observations at the tips of a phylogenetic tree have a multivariate Gaussian distribution, which may lead to suboptimal model specification under certain evolutionary conditions, as supposed in models of punctuated equilibrium or adaptive radiation. To consider non-normally distributed continuous trait evolution, we introduce a method to compute posterior probabilities when modeling continuous trait evolution as a Lévy process. Through data simulation and model testing, we establish that single-rate Brownian motion (BM) and Lévy processes with jumps generate distinct patterns in comparative data. We then analyzed body mass and endocranial volume measurements for 126 primates. We rejected single-rate BM in favor of a Lévy process with jumps for each trait, with the lineage leading to most recent common ancestor of great apes showing particularly strong evidence against single-rate BM.

  11. Fitting models of continuous trait evolution to incompletely sampled comparative data using approximate Bayesian computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Graham J; Harmon, Luke J; Wegmann, Daniel; Joyce, Paul; Revell, Liam J; Alfaro, Michael E

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, a suite of methods has been developed to fit multiple rate models to phylogenetic comparative data. However, most methods have limited utility at broad phylogenetic scales because they typically require complete sampling of both the tree and the associated phenotypic data. Here, we develop and implement a new, tree-based method called MECCA (Modeling Evolution of Continuous Characters using ABC) that uses a hybrid likelihood/approximate Bayesian computation (ABC)-Markov-Chain Monte Carlo approach to simultaneously infer rates of diversification and trait evolution from incompletely sampled phylogenies and trait data. We demonstrate via simulation that MECCA has considerable power to choose among single versus multiple evolutionary rate models, and thus can be used to test hypotheses about changes in the rate of trait evolution across an incomplete tree of life. We finally apply MECCA to an empirical example of body size evolution in carnivores, and show that there is no evidence for an elevated rate of body size evolution in the pinnipeds relative to terrestrial carnivores. ABC approaches can provide a useful alternative set of tools for future macroevolutionary studies where likelihood-dependent approaches are lacking.

  12. Control of Crystal Morphology for Mold Flux During High-Aluminum AHSS Continuous Casting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, Jing; SEO, Myung-Duk; SHI, Cheng-Bin; CHO, Jung-Wook; KIM, Seon-Hyo

    2016-08-01

    In the present manuscript, the efforts to control the crystal morphology are carried out aiming at improving the lubrication of lime-alumina-based mold flux for casting advanced high-strength steel with high aluminum. Jackson α factors for crystals of melt crystallization in multi-component mold fluxes are established and reasonably evaluated by applying thermodynamic databases to understand the crystal morphology control both in lime-alumina-based and lime-silica-based mold fluxes. The results show that Jackson α factor and supercooling are the most critical factors to determine the crystal morphology in a mold flux. Crystals precipitating in mold fluxes appear with different morphologies due to their different Jackson α factors and are likely to be more faceted with higher Jackson α factor. In addition, there is a critical supercooling degree for crystal morphology dendritic transition. When the supercooling over the critical value, the crystals transform from faceted shape to dendritic ones in morphology as the kinetic roughening occurs. Typically, the critical supercooling degrees for cuspidine dendritic transition in the lime-silica-based mold fluxes are evaluated to be between 0.05 and 0.06. Finally, addition of a small amount of Li2O in the mold flux can increase the Jackson α factor and decrease the supercooling for cuspidine precipitation; thus, it is favorable to enhance a faceted cuspidine crystal.

  13. Morphological evolution of γ′ phase in K465 superalloy during thermal fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-xia; ZHENG Qi; SUN Xiao-feng; GUAN Heng-rong; HU Zhuang-qi

    2006-01-01

    The alternative heating/cooling cycles(thermal fatigue)of K465 superalloy were carried out. The specimens were held at 1 050 ℃ for 300 s, then quenched into 20 ℃ recycling water for 10 s as a cycle. During thermal fatigue, γ′ precipitates changed typically from cubical to irregular shape after 10 cycles, to complex configuration after 20 cycles and raft-like shape after 30 cycles. The very fine γ′ particles precipitated inter the original γ′ particles. The elastic energy dominated morphological evolution of large γ′ precipitates, and the thermal stress induced the directional growth of precipitates that minimized the total energy of the system, and the nucleation theory controlled the formation of fine γ′ precipitate. The results show that the volume fraction of γ′ precipitates is increased with the increase of heating/cooling cycles, which improves the mechanical property of this alloy.

  14. Kinetics and cluster morphology evolution of shear-driven aggregation of well-stabilized colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xia; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-27

    We investigate the shear-driven aggregation of polystyrene colloids that are stabilized by both fixed and surfactant charges, using a microchannel device, in various particle volume fractions. The objective is to understand how the primary particles evolve to clusters with shearing time, how the cluster morphology develops along the aggregation with the effect of breakage and restructuring, and whether non-Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions are present, affecting the kinetics. The time evolution of the primary particle conversion to big clusters is characterized by an induction time, followed by an explosive increase when the cluster size reaches a certain critical value, which confirms the self-acceleration kinetics developed in the literature. The size of the critical clusters has been quantified for the first time, and its scaling with the shear rate follows the literature prediction well. Moreover, analysis of the shear-driven kinetics confirms the presence of substantial non-DLVO interactions in the given system.

  15. Surface morphological evolution and nanoneedle formation of 18Cr-ODS steel by focused ion beam bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Guang, E-mail: gran@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen City, Fujian Province 361102 (China); Chen, Nanjun; Qiang, Rui [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen City, Fujian Province 361102 (China); Wang, Lumin [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen City, Fujian Province 361102 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Li, Ning [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen City, Fujian Province 361102 (China); Lian, Jie, E-mail: lianj@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace & Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Morphological evolution of the 18Cr-ODS was studied under intense ion radiation. • The initial surface morphology of the steel significantly affects the nanoneedle formation, and the microstructure of the nanoneedle was characterized by TEM. • The formation mechanism of nano-needle structure of the 18Cr-ODS was discussed. • Surface defects enhance kinetics of surface roughening and pattern formation. - Abstract: Morphological evolution upon intense energetic particle–matter interactions is of fundamental importance for materials utilized in extreme radiation environment, and controlling surface morphology by radiation also provides a new pathway for exploring non-equilibrium process at surface. In this work, surface morphology and microstructural evolution upon low energy ion irradiation of 18Cr-ODS, a candidate structural material for cladding and first wall of future fission and fusion reactors, were investigated by in situ focused Ga{sup +} ion beam/scanning electron microscopy and ex situ transmission electron microscopy. A surface roughening through pore formation, coalescence and eventually nanoneedle formation was induced on 18Cr-ODS steel surface. Cross-section microstructure analysis indicates that the formation of nanoneedle was not a result of grain recrystallization or chemical composition change. Pre-irradiated materials by He{sup +} and Fe{sup +} ions displays enhanced kinetics for surface morphological evolution and lower fluences of focused Ga{sup +} are required for the nanoneedle formation. These results suggest that the surface roughening and morphological evolution of 18Cr-ODS under low energy ion irradiation is an interplay between a curvature-dependent sputtering and defect accumulation near the surface.

  16. Shared human-chimpanzee pattern of perinatal femoral shaft morphology and its implications for the evolution of hominin locomotor adaptations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Morimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of bipedality is a hallmark of human evolution. How bipedality evolved from great ape-like locomotor behaviors, however, is still highly debated. This is mainly because it is difficult to infer locomotor function, and even more so locomotor kinematics, from fossil hominin long bones. Structure-function relationships are complex, as long bone morphology reflects phyletic history, developmental programs, and loading history during an individual's lifetime. Here we discriminate between these factors by investigating the morphology of long bones in fetal and neonate great apes and humans, before the onset of locomotion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative morphometric analysis of the femoral diaphysis indicates that its morphology reflects phyletic relationships between hominoid taxa to a greater extent than taxon-specific locomotor adaptations. Diaphyseal morphology in humans and chimpanzees exhibits several shared-derived features, despite substantial differences in locomotor adaptations. Orangutan and gorilla morphologies are largely similar, and likely represent the primitive hominoid state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings are compatible with two possible evolutionary scenarios. Diaphyseal morphology may reflect retained adaptive traits of ancestral taxa, hence human-chimpanzee shared-derived features may be indicative of the locomotor behavior of our last common ancestor. Alternatively, diaphyseal morphology might reflect evolution by genetic drift (neutral evolution rather than selection, and might thus be more informative about phyletic relationships between taxa than about locomotor adaptations. Both scenarios are consistent with the hypothesis that knuckle-walking in chimpanzees and gorillas resulted from convergent evolution, and that the evolution of human bipedality is unrelated to extant great ape locomotor specializations.

  17. Non-unity molecular heritability demonstrated by continuous evolution in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T.; Lehman, N.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: When catalytic RNA is evolved in vitro, the molecule's chemical reactivity is usually the desired selection target. Sometimes the phenotype of a particular RNA molecule cannot be unambiguously determined from its genotype, however. This can occur if a nucleotide sequence can adopt multiple folded states, an example of non-unity heritability (i.e. one genotype gives rise to more than one phenotype). In these cases, more rounds of selection are required to achieve a phenotypic shift. We tested the influence of non-unity heritability at the molecular level by selecting for variants of a ligase ribozyme via continuous evolution. RESULTS: During 20 bursts of continuous evolution of a 152-nucleotide ligase ribozyme in which the Mg2+ concentration was periodically lowered, a nine-error variant of the starting 'wild-type' molecule became dominant in the last eight bursts. This variant appears to be more active than the wild type. Kinetic analyses of the mutant suggest that it may not possess a higher first-order catalytic rate constant, however. Examination of the multiple RNA conformations present under the continuous evolution conditions suggests that the mutant is superior to the wild type because it is less likely to misfold into inactive conformers. CONCLUSIONS: The evolution of genotypes that are more likely to exhibit a particular phenotype is an epiphenomenon usually ascribed only to complex living systems. We show that this can occur at the molecular level, demonstrating that in vitro systems may have more life-like characteristics than previously thought, and providing additional support for an RNA world.

  18. Non-unity molecular heritability demonstrated by continuous evolution in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T.; Lehman, N.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: When catalytic RNA is evolved in vitro, the molecule's chemical reactivity is usually the desired selection target. Sometimes the phenotype of a particular RNA molecule cannot be unambiguously determined from its genotype, however. This can occur if a nucleotide sequence can adopt multiple folded states, an example of non-unity heritability (i.e. one genotype gives rise to more than one phenotype). In these cases, more rounds of selection are required to achieve a phenotypic shift. We tested the influence of non-unity heritability at the molecular level by selecting for variants of a ligase ribozyme via continuous evolution. RESULTS: During 20 bursts of continuous evolution of a 152-nucleotide ligase ribozyme in which the Mg2+ concentration was periodically lowered, a nine-error variant of the starting 'wild-type' molecule became dominant in the last eight bursts. This variant appears to be more active than the wild type. Kinetic analyses of the mutant suggest that it may not possess a higher first-order catalytic rate constant, however. Examination of the multiple RNA conformations present under the continuous evolution conditions suggests that the mutant is superior to the wild type because it is less likely to misfold into inactive conformers. CONCLUSIONS: The evolution of genotypes that are more likely to exhibit a particular phenotype is an epiphenomenon usually ascribed only to complex living systems. We show that this can occur at the molecular level, demonstrating that in vitro systems may have more life-like characteristics than previously thought, and providing additional support for an RNA world.

  19. Evolution through mutation and selection of biological and morphological features in the intertidal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lio, C.; D'Alpaos, A.; Marani, M.

    2011-12-01

    The presence and continued existence of tidal morphologies, and in particular of salt marshes, is intimately connected with the presence/absence of halophytic vegetation. In fact, observations and models coupling morphodynamic and biological processes indicate that vegetation crucially affects the marsh equilibrium configurations in relation to the dissipation of wind waves and to the production of organic soil associated with the presence of plants. Often, different vegetation species live within very narrow elevation intervals, associated with similarly narrow ranges of environmental pressures (chiefly hypersalinity and hypoxia). Here we develop and use a 1D model of coupled biological-morphological mutation and selection to study how observed ecosystem properties emerge and how feedbacks between biological and morphological properties concur to select observed bio-morphic 'traits'. We see that the ability to transform their own environment, through increased inorganic deposition and organic soil production, allows vegetation species to more quickly develop adaptations to a changing forcing (e.g. sea level rise). Furthermore, we observe the emergence of zonation and succession and characterize the emerging biodiversity and ecosystem properties as a function of forcing characteristics (e.g. tidal range, rate of sea level rise, and inorganic sediment availability).

  20. Origin and evolution of Petrocosmea (Gesneriaceae) inferred from both DNA sequence and novel findings in morphology with a test of morphology-based hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Jing; Lu, Yuan-Xue; Li, Chao-Qun; Dong, Yang; Smith, James F; Wang, Yin-Zheng

    2015-07-03

    Petrocosmea Oliver (Gesneriaceae) currently comprises 38 species with four non-nominate varieties, nearly all of which have been described solely from herbarium specimens. However, the dried specimens have obscured the full range of extremely diverse morphological variation that exists in the genus and has resulted in a poor subgeneric classification system that does not reflect the evolutionary history of this group. It is important to develop innovative methods to find new morphological traits and reexamine and reevaluate the traditionally used morphological data based on new hypothesis. In addition, Petrocosmea is a mid-sized genus but exhibits extreme diverse floral variants. This makes the genus of particular interest in addressing the question whether there are any key factors that is specifically associated with their evolution and diversification. Here we present the first phylogenetic analyses of the genus based on dense taxonomic sampling and multiple genes combined with a comprehensive morphological investigation. Maximum-parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of molecular data from two nuclear DNA and six cpDNA regions support the monophyly of Petrocosmea and recover five major clades within the genus, which is strongly corroborated by the reconstruction of ancestral states for twelve new morphological characters directly observed from living material. Ancestral area reconstruction shows that its most common ancestor was likely located east and southeast of the Himalaya-Tibetan plateau. The origin of Petrocosmea from a potentially Raphiocarpus-like ancestor might have involved a series of morphological modifications from caulescent to acaulescent habit as well as from a tetrandrous flower with a long corolla-tube to a diandrous flower with a short corolla-tube, also evident in the vestigial caulescent habit and transitional floral form in clade A that is sister to the remainder of the genus. Among the five clades in Petrocosmea, the

  1. The morphological development of newly inundated intertidal areas: the mechanisms driving the early evolution of an estuarine environment designed and constructed by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jonathan; Burgess, Heidi; Cundy, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    elevation excavated during site construction, drained by a series of natural and engineered channels. Results indicate different rates and patterns of sedimentation and resulting morphology across the site. Near the breach continuous sedimentation of > 15cm over a 1 year period was measured, compared to rhythmic periods of accretion and erosion inland. These variations have been related to site design, former land-use and different sediment sources. The evolution of developing creek networks, formed by pluvial action and sediment "piping", are controlled by unconformities found in the sub-surface sediment related to Holocene site evolution. Analysis of the sedimentary processes and subsequent morphological development of these areas provides a new insight into coastal and estuarine evolution in an anthropogenically designed and constructed estuarine environment.

  2. Artificial evolution of the morphology and kinematics in a flapping-wing mini-UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Margerie, E; Mouret, J B; Doncieux, S; Meyer, J-A

    2007-12-01

    Birds demonstrate that flapping-wing flight (FWF) is a versatile flight mode, compatible with hovering, forward flight and gliding to save energy. This extended flight domain would be especially useful on mini-UAVs. However, design is challenging because aerodynamic efficiency is conditioned by complex movements of the wings, and because many interactions exist between morphological (wing area, aspect ratio) and kinematic parameters (flapping frequency, stroke amplitude, wing unfolding). Here we used artificial evolution to optimize these morpho-kinematic features on a simulated 1 kg UAV, equipped with wings articulated at the shoulder and wrist. Flight tests were conducted in a dedicated steady aerodynamics simulator. Parameters generating horizontal flight for minimal mechanical power were retained. Results showed that flight at medium speed (10-12 m s(-1)) can be obtained for reasonable mechanical power (20 W kg(-1)), while flight at higher speed (16-20 m s(-1)) implied increased power (30-50 W kg(-1)). Flight at low speed (6-8 m s(-1)) necessitated unrealistic power levels (70-500 W kg(-1)), probably because our simulator neglected unsteady aerodynamics. The underlying adaptation of morphology and kinematics to varying flight speed were compared to available biological data on the flight of birds.

  3. Evolution of ripple morphology on Si(1 0 0) by 60-keV argon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, Sandeep Kumar, E-mail: sandeep@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Venugopal, V.; Basu, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Sinha, O.P. [Amity Institute of Nano Technology, Amity University, Noida 201303 (India); Rath, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-Univeristy Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, we report on evolution of ripple morphology on Si(1 0 0) surface due to 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion implantation to the fluence of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup -2} and over a large incident angular window of 075 Degree-Sign . Room temperature implantations were carried out by using a uniform current density of 20 {mu}A cm{sup -2}. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) studies indicate that ripple morphology starts to appear at an incident angle 45 Degree-Sign and becomes more prominent at higher incident angles. AFM studies also reveal that while the ripple wavelength decreases with increasing angle of incidence, the amplitude increases with the same. We also observe a systematic variation in the surface roughness with incident angle. Micro-Raman studies show that the sub-surface silicon layer becomes amorphous whose depth keeps reducing at higher incident angles. The results are attributed to viscous flow mechanism.

  4. Vitamin D3 suppresses morphological evolution of the cribriform cancerous phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Ravi K; McClements, Jane; McCloskey, Karen D; Fatehullah, Aliya; Tkocz, Dorota; Javadi, Arman; Higginson, Robyn; Marsh Durban, Victoria; Jansen, Marnix; Clarke, Alan; Loughrey, Maurice B; Campbell, Frederick C

    2016-08-02

    Development of cribriform morphology (CM) heralds malignant change in human colon but lack of mechanistic understanding hampers preventive therapy. This study investigated CM pathobiology in three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 culture models of colorectal glandular architecture, assessed translational relevance and tested effects of 1,25(OH)2D3,theactive form of vitamin D. CM evolution was driven by oncogenic perturbation of the apical polarity (AP) complex comprising PTEN, CDC42 and PRKCZ (phosphatase and tensin homolog, cell division cycle 42 and protein kinase C zeta). Suppression of AP genes initiated a spatiotemporal cascade of mitotic spindle misorientation, apical membrane misalignment and aberrant epithelial configuration. Collectively, these events promoted "Swiss cheese-like" cribriform morphology (CM) comprising multiple abnormal "back to back" lumens surrounded by atypical stratified epithelium, in 3D colorectal gland models. Intestinal cancer driven purely by PTEN-deficiency in transgenic mice developed CM and in human CRC, CM associated with PTEN and PRKCZ readouts. Treatment of PTEN-deficient 3D cultures with 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulated PTEN, rapidly activated CDC42 and PRKCZ, corrected mitotic spindle alignment and suppressed CM development. Conversely, mutationally-activated KRAS blocked1,25(OH)2D3 rescue of glandular architecture. We conclude that 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulates AP signalling to reverse CM in a KRAS wild type (wt), clinically predictive CRC model system. Vitamin D could be developed as therapy to suppress inception or progression of a subset of colorectal tumors.

  5. Did Adult Diurnal Activity Influence the Evolution of Wing Morphology in Opoptera Butterflies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penz, C M; Heine, K B

    2016-02-01

    The butterfly genus Opoptera includes eight species, three of which have diurnal habits while the others are crepuscular (the usual activity period for members of the tribe Brassolini). Although never measured in the field, it is presumed that diurnal Opoptera species potentially spend more time flying than their crepuscular relatives. If a shift to diurnal habits potentially leads to a higher level of activity and energy expenditure during flight, then selection should operate on increased aerodynamic and energetic efficiency, leading to changes in wing shape. Accordingly, we ask whether diurnal habits have influenced the evolution of wing morphology in Opoptera. Using phylogenetically independent contrasts and Wilcoxon rank sum tests, we confirmed our expectation that the wings of diurnal species have higher aspect ratios (ARs) and lower wing centroids (WCs) than crepuscular congeners. These wing shape characteristics are known to promote energy efficiency during flight. Three Opoptera wing morphotypes established a priori significantly differed in AR and WC values. The crepuscular, cloud forest dweller Opoptera staudingeri (Godman & Salvin) was exceptional in having an extended forewing tip and the highest AR and lowest WC within Opoptera, possibly to facilitate flight in a cooler environment. Our study is the first to investigate how butterfly wing morphology might evolve as a response to a behavioral shift in adult time of activity.

  6. Production and packaging of a biological arsenal: evolution of centipede venoms under morphological constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Eivind A B; Hamilton, Brett R; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Bowlay, Greg; Cribb, Bronwen W; Merritt, David J; Fry, Bryan G; King, Glenn F; Venter, Deon J

    2015-03-31

    Venom represents one of the most extreme manifestations of a chemical arms race. Venoms are complex biochemical arsenals, often containing hundreds to thousands of unique protein toxins. Despite their utility for prey capture, venoms are energetically expensive commodities, and consequently it is hypothesized that venom complexity is inversely related to the capacity of a venomous animal to physically subdue prey. Centipedes, one of the oldest yet least-studied venomous lineages, appear to defy this rule. Although scutigeromorph centipedes produce less complex venom than those secreted by scolopendrid centipedes, they appear to rely heavily on venom for prey capture. We show that the venom glands are large and well developed in both scutigerid and scolopendrid species, but that scutigerid forcipules lack the adaptations that allow scolopendrids to inflict physical damage on prey and predators. Moreover, we reveal that scolopendrid venom glands have evolved to accommodate a much larger number of secretory cells and, by using imaging mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that toxin production is heterogeneous across these secretory units. We propose that the differences in venom complexity between centipede orders are largely a result of morphological restrictions of the venom gland, and consequently there is a strong correlation between the morphological and biochemical complexity of this unique venom system. The current data add to the growing body of evidence that toxins are not expressed in a spatially homogenous manner within venom glands, and they suggest that the link between ecology and toxin evolution is more complex than previously thought.

  7. The growth of galactic bulges through mergers in LCDM haloes revisited. II. Morphological mix evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Lacerna, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The mass aggregation and merger histories of present-day distinct haloes selected from the cosmological Millennium Simulations I and II are mapped into stellar mass aggregation and galaxy merger histories of central galaxies by using empirical stellar-to-halo and stellar-to-gas mass relations. The growth of bulges driven by the galaxy mergers/interactions is calculated using analytical recipes. The predicted bulge demographics at redshift z~0 is consistent with observations (Zavala+2012). Here we present the evolution of the morphological mix (traced by the bulge-to-total mass ratio, B/T) as a function of mass up to z=3. This mix remains qualitatively the same up to z~1: B/T0.45 at large masses. At z>1, the fractions of disc-dominated and bulgeless galaxies increase strongly, and by z~2 the era of pure disc galaxies is reached. Bulge-dominated galaxies acquire such a morphology, and most of their mass, following a downsizing trend. Since our results are consistent with several recent observational studies of ...

  8. a New Model for Describing Evolution and Control of Disaster System Including Instantaneous and Continuous Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Kun; Li, Zhi; Sun, Yun-Feng

    A new model for describing the disaster system including instantaneous and continuous action synchronously has been developed. The model is composed of three primary parts, that is, the impact from its causative disaster events, stochastic noise of disaster node and self-healing function, and every part is modeled concretely in terms of their characteristics in practice. Some key parameters, namely link appearance probability, retardation coefficient, ultimate repair capacity of government, dynamical modes considering different disaster evolving chains, and the positions of link with the specific performance in disaster network system are involved. Combined with a case study, the proposed model is applied to a certain disaster evolution system, and the influence law of different parameters on disaster evolution process, in disaster networks with instantaneous-action and/or continuous-action, is presented and compared. The results indicate that the destructive impact in the networks by link in continuous action is far greater an order of magnitude than that in instantaneous action. If a link in continuous action emerges in the disaster network system, properties of the causative event for the link, link appearance probability and its position in the network all have a notable influence to the severity of the disaster network. In addition, some peculiar phenomena are also commendably observed in the disaster evolution process based on the model, such as the multipeaks emerging in the destroyed rate number curve for some crisis nodes caused by their various inducing paths together with the relevant retardation coefficients, the existence of the critical value for ultimate repair capacity to recover the disaster node, and so on.

  9. Evolution of Morphological and Physical Properties of Laboratory Interstellar Organic Residues with Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piani, L.; Tachibana, S.; Hama, T.; Tanaka, H.; Endo, Y.; Sugawara, I.; Dessimoulie, L.; Kimura, Y.; Miyake, A.; Matsuno, J.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Fujita, K.; Nakatsubo, S.; Fukushi, H.; Mori, S.; Chigai, T.; Yurimoto, H.; Kouchi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Refractory organic compounds formed in molecular clouds are among the building blocks of the solar system objects and could be the precursors of organic matter found in primitive meteorites and cometary materials. However, little is known about the evolutionary pathways of molecular cloud organics from dense molecular clouds to planetary systems. In this study, we focus on the evolution of the morphological and viscoelastic properties of molecular cloud refractory organic matter. We found that the organic residue, experimentally synthesized at ∼10 K from UV-irradiated H2O-CH3OH-NH3 ice, changed significantly in terms of its nanometer- to micrometer-scale morphology and viscoelastic properties after UV irradiation at room temperature. The dose of this irradiation was equivalent to that experienced after short residence in diffuse clouds (≤104 years) or irradiation in outer protoplanetary disks. The irradiated organic residues became highly porous and more rigid and formed amorphous nanospherules. These nanospherules are morphologically similar to organic nanoglobules observed in the least-altered chondrites, chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles, and cometary samples, suggesting that irradiation of refractory organics could be a possible formation pathway for such nanoglobules. The storage modulus (elasticity) of photo-irradiated organic residues is ∼100 MPa irrespective of vibrational frequency, a value that is lower than the storage moduli of minerals and ice. Dust grains coated with such irradiated organics would therefore stick together efficiently, but growth to larger grains might be suppressed due to an increase in aggregate brittleness caused by the strong connections between grains.

  10. Doping concentration driven morphological evolution of Fe doped ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, A.; Kumar, Y.; Agarwal, V.; Olive-Méndez, S. F.; Goswami, N.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, systematic study of structural, vibrational, and optical properties of undoped and 1-10 at.% Fe doped ZnO nanostructures, synthesized adopting chemical precipitation route, has been reported. Prepared nanostructures were characterized employing an assortment of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, namely Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μRS), and UV-visible and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. With Fe incorporation, a gradual morphological transformation of nanostructures is demonstrated vividly through SEM/TEM characterizations. Interestingly, the morphology of nanostructures evolves with 1-10 at. % Fe doping concentration in ZnO. Nanoparticles obtained with 1 at. % Fe evolve to nanorods for 3 at. % Fe; nanorods transform to nanocones (for 5 at. % and 7 at. % Fe) and finally nanocones transform to nanoflakes at 10 at. % Fe. However, at all these stages, concurrence of primary hexagonal phase of Zn1-xFexO along with the secondary phases of cubic ZnFe2O4 and rhombohedric Fe2O3, is revealed through XRD analysis. Based on collective XRD, SEM, TEM, and EDX interpretations, a model for morphological evolution of nanostructures was proposed and the pivotal role of Fe dopant was deciphered. Furthermore, vibrational properties analyzed through Raman and FTIR spectroscopies unravel the intricacies of formation and gradual enhancement of secondary phases with increased Fe concentration. UV-visible and PL spectroscopic analyses provided further insight of optical processes altering with Fe incorporation. The blue shift and gradual quenching of visible photoluminescence with Fe doping was found in accordance with structural and vibrational analyses and explicated accordingly.

  11. Doping concentration driven morphological evolution of Fe doped ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, A.; Goswami, N., E-mail: navendugoswami@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, A-10, Sector-62, Noida-201307 (India); Kumar, Y.; Agarwal, V. [CIICAp-UAEM, Av. Universidad 1001, Col Chamilpa, Cuernavaca 62209 (Mexico); Olive-Méndez, S. F. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., CIMAV, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico)

    2014-10-28

    In this paper, systematic study of structural, vibrational, and optical properties of undoped and 1-10 at.% Fe doped ZnO nanostructures, synthesized adopting chemical precipitation route, has been reported. Prepared nanostructures were characterized employing an assortment of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, namely Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μRS), and UV-visible and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. With Fe incorporation, a gradual morphological transformation of nanostructures is demonstrated vividly through SEM/TEM characterizations. Interestingly, the morphology of nanostructures evolves with 1–10 at. % Fe doping concentration in ZnO. Nanoparticles obtained with 1 at. % Fe evolve to nanorods for 3 at. % Fe; nanorods transform to nanocones (for 5 at. % and 7 at. % Fe) and finally nanocones transform to nanoflakes at 10 at. % Fe. However, at all these stages, concurrence of primary hexagonal phase of Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}O along with the secondary phases of cubic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and rhombohedric Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is revealed through XRD analysis. Based on collective XRD, SEM, TEM, and EDX interpretations, a model for morphological evolution of nanostructures was proposed and the pivotal role of Fe dopant was deciphered. Furthermore, vibrational properties analyzed through Raman and FTIR spectroscopies unravel the intricacies of formation and gradual enhancement of secondary phases with increased Fe concentration. UV-visible and PL spectroscopic analyses provided further insight of optical processes altering with Fe incorporation. The blue shift and gradual quenching of visible photoluminescence with Fe doping was found in accordance with structural and vibrational analyses and explicated accordingly.

  12. The first 50Myr of dinosaur evolution: macroevolutionary pattern and morphological disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Benton, Michael J; Ruta, Marcello; Lloyd, Graeme T

    2008-12-23

    The evolutionary radiation of dinosaurs in the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic was a pivotal event in the Earth's history but is poorly understood, as previous studies have focused on vague driving mechanisms and have not untangled different macroevolutionary components (origination, diversity, abundance and disparity). We calculate the morphological disparity (morphospace occupation) of dinosaurs throughout the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic and present new measures of taxonomic diversity. Crurotarsan archosaurs, the primary dinosaur 'competitors', were significantly more disparate than dinosaurs throughout the Triassic, but underwent a devastating extinction at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. However, dinosaur disparity showed only a slight non-significant increase after this event, arguing against the hypothesis of ecological release-driven morphospace expansion in the Early Jurassic. Instead, the main jump in dinosaur disparity occurred between the Carnian and Norian stages of the Triassic. Conversely, dinosaur diversity shows a steady increase over this time, and measures of diversification and faunal abundance indicate that the Early Jurassic was a key episode in dinosaur evolution. Thus, different aspects of the dinosaur radiation (diversity, disparity and abundance) were decoupled, and the overall macroevolutionary pattern of the first 50Myr of dinosaur evolution is more complex than often considered.

  13. Evolution of Prolate Molecular Clouds at Hii Boundaries: II. Formation of BRCs of asymmetrical morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Kinnear, T M; White, G J; Sugitani, K; Goodwin, S

    2015-01-01

    A systematic investigation on the evolution of a prolate cloud at an Hii boundary is conducted using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in order to understand the mechanism for a variety of irregular morphological structures found at the boundaries of various Hii regions. The prolate molecular clouds in this investigation are set with their semi-major axes at inclinations between 0 and 90 degrees to a plane parallel ionizing radiation flux. A set of 4 parameters, the number density n, the ratio of major to minor axis gamma, the inclination angle phi and the incident flux F_EUV, are used to define the initial state of the simulated clouds. The dependence of the evolution of a prolate cloud under Radiation Driven Implosion (RDI) on each of the four parameters is investigated. It is found that: i) in addition to the well studied standard type A, B or C Bright Rimmed Clouds (BRCs), many other types such as asymmetrical BRCs, filamentary structures and irregular horse-head structures could also be developed at ...

  14. Impact constraints on the environment for chemical evolution and the continuity of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Fogleman, Guy

    1990-03-01

    The Moon and the Earth were bombarded heavily by planetesimals and asteroids that were capable of interfering with chemical evolution and the origin of life. In this paper, we explore the frequency of giant terrestrial impacts able to stop prebiotic chemistry in the probable regions of chemical evolution. The limited time available between impacts disruptive to prebiotic chemistry at the time of the oldest evidence of life suggests the need for a rapid process for chemical evolution of life. The classical hypothesis for the origin of life through the slow accumulation of prebiotic reactants in the primordial soup in the entire ocean may not be consistent with constraints imposed by the impact history of Earth. On the other hand, rapid chemical evolution in cloud systems and lakes or other shallow evaporating water bodies would have been possible because reactants could have been concentrated and polymerized rapidly in this environment. Thus, life probably could have originated near the surface between frequent surface sterilizing impacts. There may not have been continuity of life depending on sunlight because there is evidence that life, existing as early as 3.8 Gyr ago, may have been destroyed by giant impacts. The first such organisms on Earth where probably not the ancestors of present life.

  15. Surface morphology evolution during plasma etching of silicon: roughening, smoothing and ripple formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kouichi; Nakazaki, Nobuya; Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-10-01

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale roughness on feature surfaces has become an important issue to be resolved in the fabrication of nanoscale devices in industry. Moreover, in some cases, smoothing of initially rough surfaces is required for planarization of film surfaces, and controlled surface roughening is required for maskless fabrication of organized nanostructures on surfaces. An understanding, under what conditions plasma etching results in surface roughening and/or smoothing and what are the mechanisms concerned, is of great technological as well as fundamental interest. In this article, we review recent developments in the experimental and numerical study of the formation and evolution of surface roughness (or surface morphology evolution such as roughening, smoothing, and ripple formation) during plasma etching of Si, with emphasis being placed on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms or plasma–surface interactions that are responsible for. Starting with an overview of the experimental and theoretical/numerical aspects concerned, selected relevant mechanisms are illustrated and discussed primarily on the basis of systematic/mechanistic studies of Si etching in Cl-based plasmas, including noise (or stochastic roughening), geometrical shadowing, surface reemission of etchants, micromasking by etch inhibitors, and ion scattering/chanelling. A comparison of experiments (etching and plasma diagnostics) and numerical simulations (Monte Carlo and classical molecular dynamics) indicates a crucial role of the ion scattering or reflection from microscopically roughened feature surfaces on incidence in the evolution of surface roughness (and ripples) during plasma etching; in effect, the smoothing/non-roughening condition is characterized by reduced effects of the ion reflection, and the roughening-smoothing transition results from reduced ion reflections caused by a change in the predominant ion flux due to that in plasma conditions. Smoothing of initially rough

  16. Anatomy, morphology and evolution of the patella in squamate lizards and tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnault, Sophie; Jones, Marc E H; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-05-01

    The patella (kneecap) is the largest and best-known of the sesamoid bones, postulated to confer biomechanical advantages including increasing joint leverage and reinforcing the tendon against compression. It has evolved several times independently in amniotes, but despite apparently widespread occurrence in lizards, the patella remains poorly characterised in this group and is, as yet, completely undescribed in their nearest extant relative Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia). Through radiography, osteological and fossil studies we examined patellar presence in diverse lizard and lepidosauromorph taxa, and using computed tomography, dissection and histology we investigated in greater depth the anatomy and morphology of the patella in 16 lizard species and 19 Sphenodon specimens. We have found the first unambiguous evidence of a mineralised patella in Sphenodon, which appears similar to the patella of lizards and shares several gross and microscopic anatomical features. Although there may be a common mature morphology, the squamate patella exhibits a great deal of variability in development (whether from a cartilage anlage or not, and in the number of mineralised centres) and composition (bone, mineralised cartilage or fibrotendinous tissue). Unlike in mammals and birds, the patella in certain lizards and Sphenodon appears to be a polymorphic trait. We have also explored the evolution of the patella through ancestral state reconstruction, finding that the patella is ancestral for lizards and possibly Lepidosauria as a whole. Clear evidence of the patella in rhynchocephalian or stem lepidosaurian fossil taxa would clarify the evolutionary origin(s) of the patella, but due to the small size of this bone and the opportunity for degradation or loss we could not definitively conclude presence or absence in the fossils examined. The pattern of evolution in lepidosaurs is unclear but our data suggest that the emergence of this sesamoid may be related to the evolution of secondary

  17. Secondary Austenite Morphologies in Fusion Zone of Welded Joint after Postweld Heat Treatment with a Continuous Wave Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Liu; Xuejun Jin

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the weldability of duplex stainless steels,obtaining more secondary austenite in the weld metal is an effective way.Therefore,optimizing the secondary austenite by changing its morphology,volume fraction and stability may be expected to enhance the ductility of the weld.The secondary austenite morphologies in the fusion zone of the laser continuously heat treated welds of 2205 duplex stainless steel were investigated.The secondary austenite morphologies were found to be influenced by different laser power level.The secondary austenite with penniform,freely grown and dendritic shape appeared in the course of 4,6 and 8 kW continuous heat treatment,respectively.It was found that there were three kinds of morphologies of secondary austenite in the fusion zone treated by different power,i.e.,widmannst¨atten austenite,grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite.The results demonstrated that the mechanism of the secondary austenite formation was a displacement mechanism during the initial austenite lath formation and a diffusion mechanism during cooling.The nitrides provided the nitrogen for the transformation and at the same time acted as nucleation sites for the secondary austenite.

  18. Bi-stage time evolution of nano-morphology on inductively coupled plasma etched fused silica surface caused by surface morphological transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lijuan; Bai, Yang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhengkun; Qiu, Keqiang; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Chuanchao; Yang, Ke; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Yilan; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the surface nano-roughness during the inductively coupled plasma etching of fused silica, and discover a novel bi-stage time evolution of surface nano-morphology. At the beginning, the rms roughness, correlation length and nano-mound dimensions increase linearly and rapidly with etching time. At the second stage, the roughening process slows down dramatically. The switch of evolution stage synchronizes with the morphological change from dual-scale roughness comprising long wavelength underlying surface and superimposed nano-mounds to one scale of nano-mounds. A theoretical model based on surface morphological change is proposed. The key idea is that at the beginning, etched surface is dual-scale, and both larger deposition rate of etch inhibitors and better plasma etching resistance at the surface peaks than surface valleys contribute to the roughness development. After surface morphology transforming into one-scale, the difference of plasma resistance between surface peaks and valleys vanishes, thus the roughening process slows down.

  19. Evolution of channel morphology in a large river subject to rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zen, Simone; Bertoldi, Walter; Prà, Elena Dai; Comiti, Francesco; Surian, Nicola; Zolezzi, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Many large rivers in Europe have been subject to heavy modifications for land reclamation and flood mitigation through centuries. As a consequence, the study of the pre-alteration morphological patterns and of the related channel evolution following the anthropic modifications is rather challenging. The Adige River is the second longest river in Italy and drains 12,100 km2 of the Eastern Italian Alps. Currently, it features a straight to sinuous pattern and an average channel width of 40-60 m. A massive rectification scheme aiming at land reclamation of the Adige valley bottom was planned in the late 18th century, and implemented starting in the first decades of 19th century. Nowadays, it can be considered one of the most altered rivers in Italy, not only due to channelization but also to the presence of many hydropower reservoirs and check-dams along its tributaries. This study aims to the reconstruction of the Adige River's evolutionary trajectory over the last 250 years, and comprehension of key control factors driving channel evolution. A multi-temporal analysis of historical maps and orthophotos from 1776, to 2006 was performed in order to assess channel modifications. In addition, land use changes at the basin scale, years of occurrence of most relevant flood events, and climate variability over the investigated period were analyzed. The detailed topographical map surveyed in 1803 was taken as a reference, and the study sector (115 km long) was divided into 39 reaches. Active channel, bars, riparian vegetation and channel control works were geo-processed. Results show that the Adige River suffered the most intense alteration from 1803 to 1855, and especially from 1847 to 1855. During this period channel narrowing ranged from 14% to 70%, coupled with pattern changes and decreases in the braiding, sinuosity and anabrancing indices. Most important alterations occurred in the reaches presenting a multi-thread morphology in 1803, as their average width declined

  20. Convergent, parallel and correlated evolution of trophic morphologies in the subfamily schizothoracinae from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Delin; Chao, Yan; Guo, Songchang; Zhao, Lanying; Li, Taiping; Wei, Fulei; Zhao, Xinquan

    2012-01-01

    Schizothoracine fishes distributed in the water system of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau (QTP) and adjacent areas are characterized by being highly adaptive to the cold and hypoxic environment of the plateau, as well as by a high degree of diversity in trophic morphology due to resource polymorphisms. Although convergent and parallel evolution are prevalent in the organisms of the QTP, it remains unknown whether similar evolutionary patterns have occurred in the schizothoracine fishes. Here, we constructed for the first time a tentative molecular phylogeny of the schizothoracine fishes based on the complete sequences of the cytochrome b gene. We employed this molecular phylogenetic framework to examine the evolution of trophic morphologies. We used Pagel's maximum likelihood method to estimate the evolutionary associations of trophic morphologies and food resource use. Our results showed that the molecular and published morphological phylogenies of Schizothoracinae are partially incongruent with respect to some intergeneric relationships. The phylogenetic results revealed that four character states of five trophic morphologies and of food resource use evolved at least twice during the diversification of the subfamily. State transitions are the result of evolutionary patterns including either convergence or parallelism or both. Furthermore, our analyses indicate that some characters of trophic morphologies in the Schizothoracinae have undergone correlated evolution, which are somewhat correlated with different food resource uses. Collectively, our results reveal new examples of convergent and parallel evolution in the organisms of the QTP. The adaptation to different trophic niches through the modification of trophic morphologies and feeding behaviour as found in the schizothoracine fishes may account for the formation and maintenance of the high degree of diversity and radiations in fish communities endemic to QTP.

  1. Functional evolution in the ancestral lineage of vertebrates or when genomic complexity was wagging its morphological tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburomia, Rami; Khaner, Oded; Sidow, Arend

    2003-01-01

    Early vertebrate evolution is characterized by a significant increase of organismal complexity over a relatively short time span. We present quantitative evidence for a high rate of increase in morphological complexity during early vertebrate evolution. Possible molecular evolutionary mechanisms that underlie this increase in complexity fall into a small number of categories, one of which is gene duplication and subsequent structural or regulatory neofunctionalization. We discuss analyses of two gene families whose regulatory and structural evolution shed light on the connection between gene duplication and increases in organismal complexity.

  2. Comet 67P's morphological dichotomy and surface evolution from the Rosetta/OSIRIS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramy El-Maarry, M.; Thomas, Nicolas; Gracia-Berná, Antonio; Pajola, Maurizio; Groussin, Olivier; ROSETTA/OSIRIS

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission orbited comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Aug, 2014 to Sep, 2016. During this time, it obtained the most comprehensive image dataset for a comet's nucleus in terms of resolution, as well as spatial and temporal coverage, using the OSIRIS camera. These images have shown the surface of the comet to be very diverse in its texture and geology. In particular, the 2-year duration of the mission permitted imaging of both hemispheres and the possibility to assess the morphology and surface evolution of comet's 67P's northern hemisphere before and after perihelion passage (in Aug, 2015). The northern hemisphere (NH) is morphologically diverse including regions of consolidated, often fractured materials, smooth terrains showing aeolian-like landforms and seasonal variations, dust-covered areas suggestive of an air-fall-like mechanism, and irregular large-scale depressions suggestive of massive outburst activities. On the other hand, the southern hemisphere (SH) shows a clear dichotomy with the North showing regionally rougher terrains with little or no smooth deposits. Similarly, dusty coatings that were observed in the northern hemisphere are generally lacking in addition to the absence of large depressions. Overall, the SH shows significantly less topographical variation in comparison to the NH. The difference in relief between the NH and SH may be explained by the differences in erosional extent between both hemispheres. The SH has a shorter yet more intensive summer (close to perihelion), which could result in levels of erosion in the SH that are up to a factor of 3 higher than that of the NH. Another notable difference between both hemispheres is the absence of smooth deposits and dust coatings in the SH. The absence of similar deposits in the south may suggest that activity in the SH occurs with much higher intensity leading to ejection of dust particles at velocities exceeding comet's escape velocity. During the meeting, we plan to summarize the

  3. Influence of surface morphology evolution of SubPc layers on the performance of SubPc/C60 organic photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyun; Yim, Sanggyu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, small-molecule organic solar cells based on choloro[subphthalocyaninato]boron (III) (SubPc) as an electron donor and fullerene (C60) as an electron acceptor were fabricated by varying the thickness, d, of the SubPc layer. The power conversion efficiency was maximized to 1.8% at d ˜ 130 Å due to the relatively large values of the short-circuit current density (JSC) and fill factor (FF). This optimal thickness was also strongly related to the surface morphology evolution of the SubPc thin films. The corrugated surface nanostructures were continually formed until the thickness of the film increased up to 130 Å, which is advantageous for the formation of an interdigitated electron donor-acceptor interface. In contrast, for films thicker than 130 Å, the corrugated surface structures were filled with subsequently deposited molecules, leading to a smoother morphology and consequently reduced JSC and FF value of the cells.

  4. A New LC-MS-based Strategy to integrate chemistry, morphology, and evolution of eggplant (Solanum) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The economically valuable giant genus Solanum, containing dozens of functional food species such as eggplant and tomato, affords an excellent system to compare and correlate metabolic chemistry with species morphology and evolution. Here, we devised a strategy based on repeatable reversed-phase LC-T...

  5. Application of morphological synthesis for understanding electrode microstructure evolution as a function of applied charge/discharge cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazoff, Michael V.; Dufek, Eric J.; Shalashnikov, Egor V.

    2016-10-01

    Morphological synthesis operations were employed for understanding electrode microstructure transformations and evolution accompanying the application of charge/discharge cycles to electrochemical storage systems (batteries). Using state-of-the-art morphological algorithms, it was possible to predict microstructure evolution in porous Si electrodes for Li-ion batteries with reasonable accuracy. The developed techniques could be considered supplementary to a phase-field mesoscopic approach to microstructure evolution that is based upon clear and definitive changes in the appearance of microstructure. However, unlike in phase field, the governing equations for the morphological approach are geometry, not physics, based. A similar non-physics-based approach to understanding different phenomena was attempted with the introduction of cellular automata. It is anticipated that morphological synthesis will represent a useful supplementary tool to phase field and will render assistance to unraveling the underlying microstructure-property relationships. The paper contains data on electrochemical characterization of different electrode materials that was conducted in parallel to the morphological study.

  6. Kinematic and morphological evolution and dynamics of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poomvises, Watanachak

    2010-12-01

    Studies of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are scientifically intriguing and practically important. CMEs are the main driver of space weather that specifies plasma, magnetic and particle conditions in near-Earth space. When CMEs pass through and interact with the Earth's magnetosphere, they can cause significant disruption in space and produce a variety of harmful effects on human's technological systems from space to the ground. Many studies have been carried out to understand their evolution. However, their kinematic and morphological evolution as they pass from Sun to Earth is still poorly understood, largely due to the lack of direct observations. Since the launch of the twin-STEREO spacecraft in 2006, tracking of CMEs in interplanetary space was made available for the first time. Further, one could make unprecedented 3-D measurement of CMEs, thanks to the simultaneous observations from two vantage points in space. In this dissertation, I make use of STEREO observations to study the kinematic and morphological evolution of CMEs in interplanetary space. The Raytrace model is utilized as a powerful tool to measure CMEs evolution in 3D. I find that CME leading edge (LE) velocity converges from an initial range between 400 km/s and 1500 km/s at 5 to 10 RS to a narrow range between 500 km/s and 750 km/s at 50 RS. The expansion velocity is also found to converge into a narrow range between 75 km/s and 175 km/s. Both LE and expansion velocities are nearly constant after 50 RS. I further find that the acceleration of CMEs in the inner heliosphere from ˜ 10 to 90 RS can be described by an exponential function, with an initial value as large as ˜ 80 m/s2 but exponentially decreasing to almost zero (more precisely, less than +/- 5 m/s2 considering the uncertainty of measurements). These results are important for constructing accurate space weather prediction models. In addition to the observational study, I have used the theoretical flux rope model to explain the

  7. From discrete to continuous evolution models: a unifying approach to drift-diffusion and replicator dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chalub, Fabio A C C

    2008-01-01

    We study the large population limit of the Moran process, assuming weak-selection, and for different scalings. Depending on the particular choice of scalings, we obtain a continuous model that may highlight the genetic-drift (neutral evolution) or natural selection; for one precise scaling, both effects are present. For the scalings that take the genetic-drift into account, the continuous model is given by a singular diffusion equation, together with two conservation laws that are already present at the discrete level. For scalings that take into account only natural selection, we obtain a hyperbolic singular equation that embeds the Replicator Dynamics and satisfies only one conservation law. The derivation is made in two steps: a formal one, where the candidate limit model is obtained, and a rigorous one, where convergence of the probability density is proved. Additional results on the fixation probabilities are also presented.

  8. Plateau-Rayleigh Instability Morphology Evolution (PRIME): From Electrospun Core-Shell Polymer Fibers to Polymer Microbowls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Jing; Tseng, Hsiao-Fan; Lo, Yu-Ching; Wu, Bo-Hao; Chen, Jiun-Tai

    2017-03-01

    Electrospun core-shell fibers have great potentials in many areas, such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, and organic solar cells. Although many core-shell fibers have been prepared and studied, the morphology transformation of core-shell fibers have been rarely studied. In this work, the morphology evolution of electrospun core-shell polymer fibers driven by the Plateau-Rayleigh instability is investigated. Polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS/PMMA) core-shell fibers are first prepared by using blend solutions and a single axial electrospinning setup. After PS/PMMA core-shell fibers are annealed on a PS film, the fibers undulate and sink into the polymer film, forming core-shell hemispheres. The evolution process, which can be observed in situ by optical microscopy, is mainly driven by achieving lower surface and interfacial energies. The morphologies of the transformed structures can be confirmed by a selective removal technique, and polymer microbowls can be obtained.

  9. Plantain starch granules morphology, crystallinity, structure transition, and size evolution upon acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jaimes, C; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2013-06-05

    Plantain native starch was hydrolysed with sulphuric acid for twenty days. Hydrolysis kinetics was described by a logistic function, with a zero-order rate during the first seven days, followed by a slower kinetics dynamics at longer times. X-ray diffraction results revealed a that gradual increase in crystallinity occurred during the first seven days, followed by a decrease to values similar to those found in the native starch. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested a sharp structure transition by the seventh day probably due to a molecular rearrangement of the starch blocklets and inhomogeneous erosion of the amorphous regions and semi crystalline lamellae. Scanning electron micrographs showed that starch granules morphology was continually degraded from an initial oval-like shape to irregular shapes due to aggregation effects. Granule size distribution broadened as hydrolysis time proceeded probably due to fragmentation and agglomeration phenomena of the hydrolysed starch granules.

  10. Pupal remodeling and the evolution and development of alternative male morphologies in horned beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moczek Armin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How novel morphological traits originate and diversify represents a major frontier in evolutionary biology. Horned beetles are emerging as an increasingly popular model system to explore the genetic, developmental, and ecological mechanisms, as well as the interplay between them, in the genesis of novelty and diversity. The horns of beetles originate during a rapid growth phase during the prepupal stage of larval development. Differential growth during this period is either implicitly or explicitly assumed to be the sole mechanism underlying differences in horn expression within and between species. Here I focus on male horn dimorphisms, a phenomenon at the center of many studies in behavioral ecology and evolutionary development, and quantify the relative contributions of a previously ignored developmental process, pupal remodeling, to the expression of male dimorphism in three horned beetle species. Results Prepupal growth is not the only determinant of differences in male horn expression. Instead, following their initial prepupal growth phase, beetles may be extensively remodeled during the subsequent pupal stage in a sex and size-dependent manner. Specifically, male dimorphism in the three Onthophagus species studied here was shaped not at all, partly or entirely by such pupal remodeling rather than differential growth, suggesting that pupal remodeling is phylogenetically widespread, evolutionarily labile, and developmentally flexible. Conclusion This study is the first to document that male dimorphism in horned beetles is the product of two developmentaly dissociated processes: prepupal growth and pupal remodeling. More generally, adult morphology alone appears to provide few clues, if any, as to the relative contributions of both processes to the expression of alternative male morphs, underscoring the importance of developmental studies in efforts aimed at understanding the evolution of adult diversity patterns.

  11. The octopus genome and the evolution of cephalopod neural and morphological novelties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Simakov, Oleg; Mitros, Therese; Wang, Z. Yan; Pungor, Judit R.; Edsinger-Gonzalez, Eric; Brenner, Sydney; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) are active, resourceful predators with a rich behavioral repertoire1. They have the largest nervous systems among the invertebrates2 and present other striking morphological innovations including camera-like eyes, prehensile arms, a highly derived early embryogenesis, and the most sophisticated adaptive coloration system among all animals1,3. To investigate the molecular bases of cephalopod brain and body innovations we sequenced the genome and multiple transcriptomes of the California two-spot octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. We found no evidence for hypothesized whole genome duplications in the octopus lineage4–6. The core developmental and neuronal gene repertoire of the octopus is broadly similar to that found across invertebrate bilaterians, except for massive expansions in two gene families formerly thought to be uniquely enlarged in vertebrates: the protocadherins, which regulate neuronal development, and the C2H2 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors. Extensive mRNA editing generates transcript and protein diversity in genes involved in neural excitability, as previously described7, as well as in genes participating in a broad range of other cellular functions. We identified hundreds of cephalopod-specific genes, many of which showed elevated expression levels in such specialized structures as the skin, the suckers, and the nervous system. Finally, we found evidence for large-scale genomic rearrangements that are closely associated with transposable element expansions. Our analysis suggests that substantial expansion of a handful of gene families, along with extensive remodeling of genome linkage and repetitive content, played a critical role in the evolution of cephalopod morphological innovations, including their large and complex nervous systems. PMID:26268193

  12. The octopus genome and the evolution of cephalopod neural and morphological novelties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Caroline B; Simakov, Oleg; Mitros, Therese; Wang, Z Yan; Pungor, Judit R; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Brenner, Sydney; Ragsdale, Clifton W; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2015-08-13

    Coleoid cephalopods (octopus, squid and cuttlefish) are active, resourceful predators with a rich behavioural repertoire. They have the largest nervous systems among the invertebrates and present other striking morphological innovations including camera-like eyes, prehensile arms, a highly derived early embryogenesis and a remarkably sophisticated adaptive colouration system. To investigate the molecular bases of cephalopod brain and body innovations, we sequenced the genome and multiple transcriptomes of the California two-spot octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. We found no evidence for hypothesized whole-genome duplications in the octopus lineage. The core developmental and neuronal gene repertoire of the octopus is broadly similar to that found across invertebrate bilaterians, except for massive expansions in two gene families previously thought to be uniquely enlarged in vertebrates: the protocadherins, which regulate neuronal development, and the C2H2 superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors. Extensive messenger RNA editing generates transcript and protein diversity in genes involved in neural excitability, as previously described, as well as in genes participating in a broad range of other cellular functions. We identified hundreds of cephalopod-specific genes, many of which showed elevated expression levels in such specialized structures as the skin, the suckers and the nervous system. Finally, we found evidence for large-scale genomic rearrangements that are closely associated with transposable element expansions. Our analysis suggests that substantial expansion of a handful of gene families, along with extensive remodelling of genome linkage and repetitive content, played a critical role in the evolution of cephalopod morphological innovations, including their large and complex nervous systems.

  13. Molecular phylogenetics of the Brazilian giant bromeliads (Alcantarea, Bromeliaceae): implications for morphological evolution and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versieux, Leonardo M; Barbará, Thelma; Wanderley, Maria das Graças Lapa; Calvente, Alice; Fay, Michael F; Lexer, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The genus Alcantarea comprises near 30 species endemic to rocky outcrops from eastern Brazil. Most species are ornamental and several are threatened due to habitat loss and over collection. In this paper we examine the phylogenetics of Alcantarea and its relationship with the Brazilian members of Vriesea, a genus of which Alcantarea has been treated as a subgenus. We discuss the morphological evolution of the stamen position and its implication for pollination and the occurrence of Alcantarea in the Espinhaço mountain range rocky savanna-like habitat vegetation. DNA sequence data derived from two plastid markers (trnK-rps16, trnC-petN) and from a low copy nuclear gene (Floricaula/Leafy) together with 20 nuclear microsatellite loci were the data source to perform analyses and construct phylogenetic and Neighbor Joining trees for the genus. Alcantarea is well supported as monophyletic in both Bayesian and parsimony analyses, but sections of Vriesea, represented by the eastern Brazilian species, appear paraphyletic. Microsatellites delimit geographically isolated species groups. Nevertheless individuals belonging to a single species may appear related to distinct clusters of species, suggesting that hybridization and/or homoplasy and/or incomplete lineage sorting are also influencing the analysis based on such markers and may be the reasons for some unexpected results. Alcantarea brasiliana is hypothesized as putative hybrid between A. imperialis and A. geniculata. Spreading stamens, a morphological floral characteristic assumed to be related to Chiropterophily, apparently evolved multiple times within the genus, and invasion of rocky savanna-like habitat vegetation by Atlantic rainforest ancestors seems to have occurred multiple times as well.

  14. Elephant brain. Part I: gross morphology, functions, comparative anatomy, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshani, Jeheskel; Kupsky, William J; Marchant, Gary H

    2006-06-30

    We report morphological data on brains of four African, Loxodonta africana, and three Asian elephants, Elephas maximus, and compare findings to literature. Brains exhibit a gyral pattern more complex and with more numerous gyri than in primates, humans included, and in carnivores, but less complex than in cetaceans. Cerebral frontal, parietal, temporal, limbic, and insular lobes are well developed, whereas the occipital lobe is relatively small. The insula is not as opercularized as in man. The temporal lobe is disproportionately large and expands laterally. Humans and elephants have three parallel temporal gyri: superior, middle, and inferior. Hippocampal sizes in elephants and humans are comparable, but proportionally smaller in elephant. A possible carotid rete was observed at the base of the brain. Brain size appears to be related to body size, ecology, sociality, and longevity. Elephant adult brain averages 4783 g, the largest among living and extinct terrestrial mammals; elephant neonate brain averages 50% of its adult brain weight (25% in humans). Cerebellar weight averages 18.6% of brain (1.8 times larger than in humans). During evolution, encephalization quotient has increased by 10-fold (0.2 for extinct Moeritherium, approximately 2.0 for extant elephants). We present 20 figures of the elephant brain, 16 of which contain new material. Similarities between human and elephant brains could be due to convergent evolution; both display mosaic characters and are highly derived mammals. Humans and elephants use and make tools and show a range of complex learning skills and behaviors. In elephants, the large amount of cerebral cortex, especially in the temporal lobe, and the well-developed olfactory system, structures associated with complex learning and behavioral functions in humans, may provide the substrate for such complex skills and behavior.

  15. Evolution of unusual morphologies in Lentibulariaceae (bladderworts and allies) and Podostemaceae (river-weeds): a pictorial report at the interface of developmental biology and morphological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Various groups of flowering plants reveal profound ('saltational') changes of their bauplans (architectural rules) as compared with related taxa. These plants are known as morphological misfits that appear as rather large morphological deviations from the norm. Some of them emerged as morphological key innovations (perhaps 'hopeful monsters') that gave rise to new evolutionary lines of organisms, based on (major) genetic changes. This pictorial report places emphasis on released bauplans as typical for bladderworts (Utricularia, approx. 230 secies, Lentibulariaceae) and river-weeds (Podostemaceae, three subfamilies, approx. 54 genera, approx. 310 species). Bladderworts (Utricularia) are carnivorous, possessing sucking traps. They live as submerged aquatics (except for their flowers), as humid terrestrials or as epiphytes. Most Podostemaceae are restricted to rocks in tropical river-rapids and waterfalls. They survive as submerged haptophytes in these extreme habitats during the rainy season, emerging with their flowers afterwards. The recent scientific progress in developmental biology and evolutionary history of both Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae is summarized. Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae follow structural rules that are different from but related to those of more typical flowering plants. The roots, stems and leaves - as still distinguishable in related flowering plants - are blurred ('fuzzy'). However, both families have stable floral bauplans. The developmental switches to unusual vegetative morphologies facilitated rather than prevented the evolution of species diversity in both families. The lack of one-to-one correspondence between structural categories and gene expression may have arisen from the re-use of existing genetic resources in novel contexts. Understanding what developmental patterns are followed in Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae is a necessary prerequisite to discover the genetic alterations that led to the evolution of these

  16. Development of a lecithotrophic pilidium larva illustrates convergent evolution of trochophore-like morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Marie K; Maslakova, Svetlana A

    2017-01-01

    's morphological and developmental features are best explained by transition from planktotrophy to lecithotrophy in the context of pilidial development, rather than by retention of or reversal to what is often assumed to be the spiralian ancestral larval type - the trochophore. Development of pilidium nielseni is a compelling example of convergent evolution of a trochophore-like body plan within Spiralia.

  17. The tempo and mode of three-dimensional morphological evolution in male reproductive structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeek, Mark A; Shen, Li; Torrey, John Z; Farid, Hany

    2008-05-01

    Various evolutionary forces may shape the evolution of traits that influence the mating decisions of males and females. Phenotypic traits that males and females use to judge the species identify of potential mates should evolve in a punctuated fashion, changing significantly at the time of speciation but changing little between speciation events. In contrast, traits experiencing sexual selection or sexually antagonistic interactions are generally expected to change continuously over time because of the directional selection pressures imposed on one sex by the actions of the other. To test these hypotheses, we used spherical harmonic representations of the shapes of male mating structures in reconstructions of the evolutionary tempo of these structures across the history of the Enallagma damselfly clade. Our analyses show that the evolution of these structures is completely consistent with a punctuated model of evolutionary change and a constant evolutionary rate throughout the clade's history. In addition, no interpopulation variation in shape was detected across the range of one species. These results indicate that male mating structures in this genus are used primarily for identifying the species of potential mates and experience little or no selection from intraspecific sexual selection or sexual antagonism. The implications of these results for speciation are discussed.

  18. Continuous "in vitro" Evolution of a Ribozyme Ligase: A Model Experiment for the Evolution of a Biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Michael P.; Hwang, Tony W.; Stovall, Gwendolyn M.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution is a defining criterion of life and is central to understanding biological systems. However, the timescale of evolutionary shifts in phenotype limits most classroom evolution experiments to simple probability simulations. "In vitro" directed evolution (IVDE) frequently serves as a model system for the study of Darwinian…

  19. Continuous "in vitro" Evolution of a Ribozyme Ligase: A Model Experiment for the Evolution of a Biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Michael P.; Hwang, Tony W.; Stovall, Gwendolyn M.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution is a defining criterion of life and is central to understanding biological systems. However, the timescale of evolutionary shifts in phenotype limits most classroom evolution experiments to simple probability simulations. "In vitro" directed evolution (IVDE) frequently serves as a model system for the study of Darwinian…

  20. Morphology evolution of TiO2 facets and vital influences on photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lun; Zou, Ji-Jun; Wang, Songbo; Liu, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li

    2012-03-01

    Modulation of anatase toward highly active facets has been attracting much attention, but the mechanism and photoactivity are still ambiguous. Here we demonstrate the inherent mechanisms for facets nucleation and morphology evolution, and clarify some vital influences of facets and surface nature on the photoactivity. Simply tuning the Ti/F ratio in the synthetic mixture leads to single anatase crystal exposed with different facets like {001}, {010}, or {110}. And complex sphere structure exposed with {001} facets can be formed by secondary nucleation and growth. Prolonging the hydrothermal treatment time causes selective etching on {001} facets, whereas defluorination via thermal calcination produces many pores on the surface. The photodegradation of positively and negatively charged, and zwitterionic dyes indicates that the type of reactant, adsorption mode and surface area play significant roles in photocatalysis. This work makes a step toward understanding the formation of facet-mediated structure and designing highly active materials for environmental remediation, hydrogen production, and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  1. Phylogenetic estimation and morphological evolution of Arundinarieae (Bambusoideae: Poaceae) based on plastome phylogenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attigala, Lakshmi; Wysocki, William P; Duvall, Melvin R; Clark, Lynn G

    2016-08-01

    We explored phylogenetic relationships among the twelve lineages of the temperate woody bamboo clade (tribe Arundinarieae) based on plastid genome (plastome) sequence data. A representative sample of 28 taxa was used and maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses were conducted to estimate the Arundinarieae phylogeny. All the previously recognized clades of Arundinarieae were supported, with Ampelocalamus calcareus (Clade XI) as sister to the rest of the temperate woody bamboos. Well supported sister relationships between Bergbambos tessellata (Clade I) and Thamnocalamus spathiflorus (Clade VII) and between Kuruna (Clade XII) and Chimonocalmus (Clade III) were revealed by the current study. The plastome topology was tested by taxon removal experiments and alternative hypothesis testing and the results supported the current plastome phylogeny as robust. Neighbor-net analyses showed few phylogenetic signal conflicts, but suggested some potentially complex relationships among these taxa. Analyses of morphological character evolution of rhizomes and reproductive structures revealed that pachymorph rhizomes were most likely the ancestral state in Arundinarieae. In contrast leptomorph rhizomes either evolved once with reversions to the pachymorph condition or multiple times in Arundinarieae. Further, pseudospikelets evolved independently at least twice in the Arundinarieae, but the ancestral state is ambiguous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Soil evolution in spruce forest ecosystems: role and influence of humus studied by morphological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chersich S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the role and the mutual influences of humus and soil in alpine spruce forest ecosystems we studied and classified 7 soil - humic profiles on the 4 main forestry dynamics: open canopy, regeneration, young stand, tree stage. We studied the role of humification process in the pedologic process involving soils and vegetations studing humic and soil horizons. Study sites are located at an altitude of 1740 m a.s.l near Pellizzano (TN, and facing to the North. The parent soil material is predominantly composed of morenic sediments, probably from Cevedale glacier lying on a substrate of tonalite from Presanella (Adamello Tertiary pluton. The soil temperature regime is frigid, while the moisture regime is udic. The characteristics observed in field were correlated with classical chemical and physical soil analyses (MIPAF 2000. In order to discriminate the dominant soil forming process, the soils were described and classified in each site according to the World Reference Base (FAO-ISRIC-ISSS 1998. Humus was described and classified using the morphological-genetic approach (Jabiol et al. 1995. The main humus forms are acid and they are for the greater part Dysmoder on PODZOLS. The main pedogenetic processes is the podzolization, locally there are also hydromorphic processes. We associate a definite humus form with a pedological process at a particular step of the forest evolution. We concluded thath the soil study for a correct pedological interpretation must take count of the characteristics of the humic epipedon.

  3. The evolution of morphology and kinetics during the foaming process of aluminium foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, I.; Mascarenhas, J. [Inst. Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisbon (Portugal); Ferreira, A. [Mechanical Eng. Dept., Univ. of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Banhart, J. [Fraunhofer-Inst. for Advanced Materials, Bremen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Aluminium foams were produced by powder metallurgical method that was developed and patented by Fraunhofer-Institute for Advanced Materials (in Bremen) and it is known as Fraunhofer-Process. The process consists of mixing aluminium and foaming agent powders and subsequent pressing them (hot extrusion or hot pressing) to a dense semi-finished product, as called the foamable precursor material. This precursor material is then heated up to its melting point inside a ''laser expandometer'', which allow both control of the expansion (in volume) and temperature, throughout the entire process. The expansion of foamable precursor material and its temperature, which characterise the kinetics, were monitored during the entire foaming process by means of a laser sensor and a thermocouple, respectively. The evolution of morphology (shape and size of the cellular pores) and microstructure during the foaming process was discussed. The scope of this work is to discuss the phenomena, which occur during the foam formation metal, i.e. how the foam emerges from the liquid, how it changes with time and what mechanisms are responsible for its formation. (orig.)

  4. The evolution of the plant genome-to-morphology auxin circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2016-09-01

    In his Generelle Morphologie der Organismen (1866), 150 years ago, Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919) combined developmental patterns in animals with the concept of organismic evolution, and 50 years ago, a new era of plant research started when focus shifted from crop species (sunflower, maize etc.) to thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model organism. In this contribution, we outline the general principles of developmental evolutionary biology sensu Haeckel and describe the evolutionary genome-to-morphology-plant hormone auxin (IAA, indole-3-acetic acid)-circuit with reference to other phytohormones and a focus on land plants (embryophytes) plus associated epiphytic microbes. Our primary conclusion is that a system-wide approach is required to truly understand the ontogeny of any organism, because development proceeds according to signal pathways that integrate and respond to external as well as internal stimuli. We also discuss IAA-regulated embryology in A. thaliana and epigenetic phenomena in the gametophyte development, and outline how these processes are connected to the seminal work of Ernst Haeckel.

  5. Planetary Nebula Abundances and Morphology: Probing the Chemical Evolution of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Stanghellini, L; Cunha, K; Manchado, A; Villaver, E

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a homogeneous study of abundances in a sample of 79 northern galactic planetary nebulae whose morphological classes have been uniformly determined. Ionic abundances and plasma diagnostics were derived from selected optical line strengths in the literature, and elemental abundances were estimated with the Ionization Correction Factor developed by Kingsbourgh & Barlow (1994). We compare the elemental abundances to the final yields obtained from stellar evolution models of low-and intermediate-mass stars, and we confirm that most Bipolar planetary nebulae have high nitrogen and helium abundance, and are the likely progeny of stars with main-sequence mass larger than 3 solar masses. We derive =0.27, and discuss the implication of such a high ratio in connection with the solar neon abundance. We determine the galactic gradients of oxygen and neon, and found Delta log (O/H)/Delta R=-0.01 dex/kpc$ and Delta log (Ne/H)/Delta R=-0.01 dex/kpc. These flat PN gradients do not reconcile with galact...

  6. Karyotype morphology and evolution in some Lathyrus (Fabaceae species of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klamt Adriane

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of Lathyrus nervosus Lam., L. pubescens Hook. et Arn., L. paranensis Burk. and L. crassipes Gill ap. Hook et Arn., native to Rio Grande do Sul (southern Brazil, are described in detail for the first time. All taxa have 2n = 14 chromosomes. The karyotypic formulae were 2 m + 12 sm for L. nervosus, L. pubescens and L. paranensis and 4 m + 10 sm for L. crassipes. In all species, the smallest chromosome pair bore a secondary constriction with a satellite in the long arm. Intraspecific variability in the position and number of secondary constrictions was observed in L. nervosus and L. pubescens. All of the species had a conservative and similar karyotype morphology, but differed in total complement size by as much as 20% between the highest (L. nervosus and lowest (L. crassipes values. These results suggest that changes in chromosome size during evolution have been similar for all the chromosomes of the complement. Together with data on the life cycle and mode of reproduction, these results also indicate that L. crassipes is a derived taxon, if an evolutionary trend towards a decrease in chromosome size is accepted.

  7. Polymer Brush Grafted Nanoparticles and Their Impact on the Morphology Evolution of Polymer Blend Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Joong; Ohno, Kohji; Composto, Russell

    2013-03-01

    We present an novel pathway to control the location of nanoparticles (NPs) in phase-separating polymer blend films containing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(styrene-ran-acrylonitrile) (SAN). Because hydrophobic polymer phases have a small interfacial energy, ~1 mJ/m2, subtle changes in the NP surface functionality can be used to guide NPs to either the interface between immiscible polymers or into one of the phases. Based on this idea, we designed a class of NPs grafted with PMMA brushes. These PMMA brushes were grown from the NP surface by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), which results in chains terminated with chlorine atoms. The chain end can be substituted with protons (H) by dehalogenation. As a result, the NPs are strongly segregated at the interface when grafted PMMA chains are short (Mn =1.8K) and the end group is Cl, whereas NPs partition into PMMA-rich phase when chains are long (Mn =160K) and/or when chains are terminated with hydrogen. The Cl end groups and shorter chain length cause an increase in surface energy for the NPs. The increase in surface energy of short-chained NPs can be attributed to (i) an extended brush conformation (entropic) and/or (ii) a high density of ``unfavorable'' end groups (enthalpic). Finally, the impact of NPs on the morphological evolution of the polymer blend films will be discussed. Ref: H.-J.Chung et al., ACS Macro Lett. 1(1), 252-256 (2012).

  8. Morphological evolution and heritability estimates for some biometric traits in the Murgese horse breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, C; Carnicella, D; Dario, M; Bufano, G

    2006-06-30

    A data set concerning 1,816 subjects entered in the Italian Horse Registry from 1925 to 2002 was analyzed to investigate the morphological evolution of the Murgese horse and to obtain useful elements to enhance breeding practices. Three basic body measurements (height at withers, chest girth, and cannon bone circumference) were considered for each subject. Heritabilities were calculated for each parameter to infer the growth and development traits of this breed. Over the past 20 years the Murgese horse has undergone considerable changes, passing from a typical mesomorphic structure (height at withers: 156.30 and 151.04 cm; chest girth: 185.80 and 176.11 cm; cannon bone: 21.10 and 19.82 cm for males and females, respectively) to a mesodolichomorphic structure (height at withers: 160.31 and 156.44 cm; chest girth: 187.89 and 182.48 cm; cannon bone: 21.07 and 20.37 cm, for males and females, respectively). Due to these changes and to its characteristic strength and power, the Murgese, which was once used in agriculture and for meat production (at the end of its life), is now involved in sports, mainly in trekking and equestrian tourism. The heritability estimates for the three body measurements were found to be 0.24, 0.39 and 0.44.

  9. Temporal evolution of surface structure and morphology in thin-film growth and etching processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotar, Jason Todd

    The temporal evolution of surface structure and morphology in growth and etching processes is of great importance to the understanding of such processes. For example, by looking at the time dependence of the surface roughness, one can often discover the scaling symmetries inherent in a process. In addition to providing clues about what mechanisms might be at work, these symmetries are also of practical interest. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the basic mechanisms that influence the temporal scaling of such systems, many systems still cannot be explained in terms of the known universality classes. Studies of both continuum and discrete models of surface roughening are presented. The temporal scaling of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation has been studied using direct numerical integration, and the existence of two distinct scaling regimes is observed. The results are discussed in the context of previous computational and analytical results and compared to existing experimental studies of ion sputtering. It is found that low-energy ion sputtering experiments are consistent with the early-time KS scaling regime; while high-energy ion sputtering experiments are consistent with asymptotic Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) behavior. Next, the temporal scaling behavior of a line-of-sight model of surface roughening has been studied. The model can be applied to both growth and etching processes. Several different limiting cases for the sticking coefficients have been examined using analytical arguments and computational techniques, and it is found that the scaling exponents are, in some cases, universal. The predicted scaling exponents, in some cases, do not belong to any of the known universality classes and therefore define a new universality class. In another case, the exponents are identical to the exponents predicted by the Edwards-Wilkinson equation. The newly discovered universality classes are used to explain experimentally observed behavior of

  10. Molecular and morphological systematics of the Ellisellidae (Coelenterata: Octocorallia): Parallel evolution in a globally distributed family of octocorals

    KAUST Repository

    Bilewitch, Jaret P.

    2014-04-01

    The octocorals of the Ellisellidae constitute a diverse and widely distributed family with subdivisions into genera based on colonial growth forms. Branching patterns are repeated in several genera and congeners often display region-specific variations in a given growth form. We examined the systematic patterns of ellisellid genera and the evolution of branching form diversity using molecular phylogenetic and ancestral morphological reconstructions. Six of eight included genera were found to be polyphyletic due to biogeographical incompatibility with current taxonomic assignments and the creation of at least six new genera plus several reassignments among existing genera is necessary. Phylogenetic patterns of diversification of colony branching morphology displayed a similar transformation order in each of the two primary ellisellid clades, with a sea fan form estimated as the most-probable common ancestor with likely origins in the Indo-Pacific region. The observed parallelism in evolution indicates the existence of a constraint on the genetic elements determining ellisellid colonial morphology. However, the lack of correspondence between levels of genetic divergence and morphological diversity among genera suggests that future octocoral studies should focus on the role of changes in gene regulation in the evolution of branching patterns. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Eco-evolution in size-structured ecosystems: simulation case study of rapid morphological changes in alewife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Koo; Thibert-Plante, Xavier

    2017-02-27

    Over the last 300 years, interactions between alewives and zooplankton communities in several lakes in the U.S. have caused the alewives' morphology to transition rapidly from anadromous to landlocked. Lakes with landlocked alewives contain smaller-bodied zooplankton than those without alewives. Landlocked adult alewives display smaller body sizes, narrower gapes, smaller inter-gill-raker spacings, reach maturity at an earlier age, and are less fecund than anadromous alewives. Additionally, landlocked alewives consume pelagic prey exclusively throughout their lives whereas anadromous alewives make an ontogenetic transition from pelagic to littoral prey. These rapid, well-documented changes in the alewives' morphology provide important insights into the morphological evolution of fish. Predicting the morphological evolution of fish is crucial for fisheries and ecosystem management, but the involvement of multiple trophic interactions make predictions difficult. To obtain an improved understanding of rapid morphological change in fish, we developed an individual-based model that simulated rapid changes in the body size and gill-raker count of a fish species in a hypothetical, size-structured prey community. Model parameter values were based mainly on data from empirical studies on alewives. We adopted a functional trait approach; consequently, the model explicitly describes the relationships between prey body size, alewife body size, and alewife gill-raker count. We sought to answer two questions: (1) How does the impact of alewife populations on prey feed back to impact alewife size and gill raker number under several alternative scenarios? (2) Will the trajectory of the landlocked alewives' morphological evolution change after 150-300 years in freshwater? Over the first 250 years, the alewives' numbers of gill-rakers only increased when reductions in their body size substantially improved their ability to forage for small prey. Additionally, alewives' gill

  12. Simulations of Debris-Flow Dominated Margins with Relevance to Morphologic Evolution of Trough-Mouth Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, D. B.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2001-12-01

    Large-scale morphology of glacier-fed continental slopes is influenced by the rate and method of sediment delivery to the slope through time. Slopes fed by fast flowing ice streams (i.e. at trough-mouth fans) and dominated by debris flow deposition exhibit a morphology that is inherently different from other types of glacial margins. Empirical analyses suggest that the average gradient of a trough mouth fan is related to the width of the adjacent continental shelf and, correlatively, to the amount of sediment delivered to the margin by the ice stream. This gradient relationship is not observed for other polar margins. A process-based stratigraphic model (SedFlux) is used to examine the evolution of debris-flow dominated continental slopes under differing boundary conditions and flow properties. Margins are simulated as building from initial bathymetry of a simple shelf-slope-rise configuration. The angle of the continental slope varies between simulations ranging from 1 to 10 degrees. In addition to boundary conditions, the kinematic viscosity (0.0001 m2/s to 0.1 m2/s) and yield strength (1 pa to 500 pa) of the debris flows varies between model runs. The changing morphology of the margin is tracked by measuring the gradient of the margin profile throughout the simulation. Also tracked are the runout distances of the flows and their deposit thickness. Hydroplaning debris flows are not explicitly modeled but are approximated by implementing very low viscosities. Results show that basin depth influences the runout length of debris flows and subsequently the length of the margin slope. The rate of sediment input influences the number and frequency of slope failures leading to debris flows although the overall morphology does not change in response to sediment input rate. All simulations show an evolution of profile morphology as the margin progrades outward, with the continental slope becoming less steep through time. This morphologic evolution is coupled with a

  13. Phase field simulation of the interface morphology evolution and its stability during directional solidification of binary alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The influences of pulling speed V and temperature gradient G on morphology evolution, concentration distribution, solute trapping and interface stability during directional solidification of binary alloys have been studied with the B-S phase field model. Simulated results reproduced the morphology transitions of deep cell to shallow cell and shallow cell to plane front. The primary cellular spacing, depth of groove and effective solute redistribution coefficient for different V and G are compared. The absolute stability under high pulling speed and high temperature gradient has also been predicted, which is in agreement with the Mullins-Sekerka (M-S) stability theory.

  14. Monitoring the morphological evolution of complex glaciers: the Planpincieux case-study (Mont Blanc - Aosta Valley)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordan, Daniele; Manconi, Andrea; Allasia, Paolo; Curtaz, Michèle; Vagliasindi, Marco; Bertolo, Davide

    2014-05-01

    The Planpincieux Glacier (PG) is located on the Italian side of the Grandes Jorasses massif, Mont Blanc, Italy. This area is historically known for the occasional activation of ice falls events from the frontal part of the glacier. The PG is a so-called "polythermal" glacier, meaning that the liquid water present at contact between ice and the bedrock in the lower part of the glacier itself plays an important role in the glacier dynamics, and ice falls might occur in a sudden and unpredictable fashion. In this scenario, the accurate analysis of the glacier morphological evolution assumes a crucial role. Starting from 2012, within the framework of the regional plan for glaciers risk detection, a research project was set up to study the Planpincieux Glacier and evaluate the potential hazard concerning the possible activation of large ice or ice-snow avalanches triggered by icefall events in that area. Dynamics of such avalanches, as well as potentially endangered areas, have been evaluated in an expertise by the SLF Institute. Therefore, the availability of both qualitative information and quantitative measurements relevant to the glacier movements represented a primary goal. After a careful evaluation of several possible technical solutions to achieve displacement monitoring also based on the results of a preliminary study managed by the ETH Zurich (prof. M. Funk), we installed an experimental monitoring station located on the opposite side of the valley, at the top of the Mt. de la Saxe, ca. 3.5 km away from the main target. The monitoring station is composed of two modules, including: (i) a surveillance module, based on a medium resolution digital camera, observing large part of the slope; (ii) a photogrammetric module, based on a high resolution digital camera equipped with a 300mm optical zoom, pointed on the Planpincieux glacier front. At this stage, our analyses focused mainly on the qualitative assessment and recognition of impulsive phenomena affecting the

  15. Meso-Cenozoic morphological evolution of NW Africa, the case of the Tuareg swell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, S.; Gautheron, C.; Barbarand, J.; Missenard, Y.; Zeyen, H.; Pinna, R.; Bonin, B.; Liégeois, J.-P.; Ouabadi, A.; Frizon de Lamotte, D.

    2012-04-01

    The continental crust of Africa, largely built during the Pan-African orogeny (late Neoproterozoic) has acquired in its northern part, during Paleozoic times, an arch and basin morphology. Meso-Cenozoic large scale topographic anomalies, associated to Cenozoic intraplate volcanism, such as Hoggar, Tibesti or Darfur domes, are superimposed to these structures. Precise ages of swells, as well as their relations with Paleozoic arch and basin morphology of the area, remain controversial. The aim of this study, focussed on the Hoggar dome, in southern Algeria, is to produce new constraints on the Post-Paleozoic evolution of this region. The Tuareg shield, from which Hoggar is the main central part and Aïr a SE extension, forms a topographic high reaching an altitude >2900m (Mt Tahat, Atakor district), exposing Precambrian rocks over 500000km2. While presumed Cretaceous sedimentary remnants suggest a possible stage of slightly positive topography during the Mesozoic, current high topography is emphasized by Cenozoic volcanic formations, mostly basaltic in composition. We present new low-temperature thermochronology data, with apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He ages on Hoggar and Aïr substratum. We combine these results with thermal, gravimetric and isostatic two-dimensional lithosphere-scale geophysical models, following the method of Zeyen & Fernandez (1994). Preliminary thermochronological results present ages from 99+-6 to 166+-10 Myr for AFT, and AHe from 10 to 300 Myr. Thermal simulations of these data suggest that currently outcropping Precambrian Hoggar basement could have experienced temperatures of approximately 80°C between Upper Cretaceous and Eocene. We propose that these elevated temperatures are related to burial beneath a 1 to 3 km thick sedimentary cover, depending on thermal gradient. The base of this sedimentary cover could correspond to the poorly described Upper Cretaceous remnants, currently uplifted up to 1450 m. These results are in agreement

  16. Synthesis and morphological evolution of inorganic nanoparticles in gas phase flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yangchuan

    The formation and growth of flame-generated inorganic nanoparticles at low particle volume fractions (ca. 0.1 ppm) were investigated experimentally. Alumina nanoparticles were synthesized from precursor trimethylaluminum in a well-defined/characterized laminar counterflow diffusion flame (CHsb4/Nsb2/Osb2) reactor. Experimental techniques included spatially resolved angle-dependent/polarized laser light scattering and thermophoretic sampling/TEM image analysis. Local aggregate morphology was characterized via. spherule size, aggregate size and aggregate fractal structure. The effects of flame temperature, precursor concentration and flame strain rate were also systematically studied. Higher precursor concentration resulted in larger spherule diameters, found to be in the range 13-26 nm under current experimental conditions. Nominal strain rate, varied from 11 to 20 ssp{-1}, was found to have a negligible effect on spherule size. Aggregate structure was characterized by fractal dimension, Dsb{f}, found by image analysis to be 1.55 ± 0.03 for aggregates without apparent restructuring (early in the flames). Dsb{f} approached 3 after the flame sheet due to the collapse of aggregates. Alumina aggregate morphological evolution was tracked using both TEM-image analysis and laser light scattering. Significant aggregate shrinkage due to high temperature sintering was found near the flame sheet, with a gyration-radius shrinkage rate of about 16 mum/s at temperatures near 2000 K. A theoretical approach was also developed to model spherule growth (and, hence, specific surface area) in such aerosol processes. This formulation, based on the competition between coalescence and Brownian coagulation rates, incorporates the surface melting concept into the surface self-diffusion coefficient, now dependent on particle size via. curvature and surface energy. This approach was used to calculate spherule growth in heating (and cooling) environments. Predicted spherule sizes show

  17. Finite Element Simulation of Hot Strip Continuous Rolling Process Coupling Microstructural Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Min-ting; ZANG Xin-liang; LI Xue-tong; DU Feng-shan

    2007-01-01

    Using the nonlinear rigid-viscoplastic finite element method (FEM), a finite element simulation of the hot strip continuous rolling process was done, which completely integrates different phenomena such as the metallurgical behavior of the strip and the thermo-mechanics in the strip based on the physical metallurgical microstructural evolution law. By combining with the process parameters of certain 2 050 mm hot strip rolling, an actual rolling process of low carbon steel SS400 was simulated using the FEM model. Based on the simulation results, the distributions of the strain field, the temperature field, and the microstructure were presented. Meanwhile, the simulated rolling force, temperature, and microstructure are in good agreement with the measured results.

  18. Connections between morphological and mechanical evolution during galvanic corrosion of micromachined polycrystalline and monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Kotula, Paul G.; Stoldt, Conrad R.

    2008-06-01

    Many microsystems fabrication technologies currently employ a metallic overlayer, such as gold, in electrical contact with silicon structural layers. During postprocessing in hydrofluoric-based acid solutions, a galvanic cell is created between the silicon and the metallic layer. Micromachined tensile specimens reveal that such etching in the presence of a galvanic cell can cause a catastrophic reduction in the tensile strength and apparent modulus of silicon. Detailed failure analysis was also used to compare fractured corroded Si to otherwise identical reference specimens via surface based (electron and scanning probe) microscopy as well as cross-section based structural- and composition-characterization techniques. For both polycrystalline and single-crystal silicon, galvanic corrosion can result in a thick corroded surface layer created via porous silicon formation, and/or generalized material removal depending on the etch chemistry and conditions. Under certain etching conditions, the porous silicon formation process results in cavity formation as well as preferential grain-boundary attack leading to intergranular fracture. The nature and severity of corrosion damage are shown to be influenced by the surface wetting characteristics of the etch chemistry, with poor wetting resulting in localized attack facilitated by the microstructure and good wetting resulting in generalized attack. The measured stiffness of the tensile specimens can be used to determine the effective modulus and porosity of the corroded surface layer. Extending beyond previous investigations, the present work examines the quantitative connection between the choice of chemical etchant, the corresponding damage morphology, and the resulting degradation in strength and apparent modulus. The present work also uniquely identifies important differences in polycrystalline and single-crystal Si based on their disparate damage evolution and related mechanical performance.

  19. Co-extrusion of biocompatible polymers for scaffolds with co-continuous morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Newell R; Simon, Carl G; Tona, Alessandro; Elgendy, Hoda M; Karim, Alamgir; Amis, Eric J

    2002-04-01

    A methodology for the preparation of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering using co-extrusion is presented. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) is blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in a twinscrew extruder to form a two-phase material with micron-sized domains. Selective dissolution of the poly(ethylene oxide) with water results in a porous material. A range of blend volume fractions results in co-continuous networks of polymer and void spaces. Annealing studies demonstrate that the characteristic pore size may be increased to larger than 100 microm. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds are characterized by a compressive modulus on the order of 1 MPa at low strains but displaying a marked strain-dependence. The results of osteoblast seeding suggest it is possible to use co-extrusion to prepare polymer scaffolds without the introduction of toxic contaminants. Polymer co-extrusion is amenable to both laboratory- and industrial-scale production of scaffolds for tissue engineering and only requires rheological characterization of the blend components. This method leads to scaffolds that have continuous void space and controlled characteristic length scales without the use of potentially toxic organic solvents.

  20. Morphology and Precipitation Kinetics of MnS in Low-Carbon Steel During Thin Slab Continuous Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hao; KANG Yong-lin; ZHAO Zheng-zhi; SUN Hao

    2006-01-01

    The morphology of manganese sulfide formed during thin slab continuous casting process in low-carbon steel produced by compact strip production (CSP) technique was investigated. Using transmission electron microscopy analysis, it was seen that a majority of manganese sulfides precipitated at austenite grain boundaries, the morphologies of which were spherical or close to the spherical shape and the size of MnS precipitates ranged from 30 nm to 100 nm. A mathematical model of the manganese sulfide precipitation in this process was developed based on classical nucleation theory. Under the given conditions, the starting and finishing precipitation temperatures of MnS in the continuous casting thin slab of the studied low-carbon steel are 1 189 ℃ and 1 171 ℃, respectively, and the average diameter of MnS precipitates is about 48 nm within this precipitation temperature range. The influences of chemical components and thermo-mechanical processing conditions on the precipitation behavior of MnS in the same process were also discussed.

  1. Smart Brix—a continuous evolution framework for container application deployments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Schleicher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Container-based application deployments have received significant attention in recent years. Operating system virtualization based on containers as a mechanism to deploy and manage complex, large-scale software systems has become a popular mechanism for application deployment and operation. Packaging application components into self-contained artifacts has brought substantial flexibility to developers and operation teams alike. However, this flexibility comes at a price. Practitioners need to respect numerous constraints ranging from security and compliance requirements, to specific regulatory conditions. Fulfilling these requirements is especially challenging in specialized domains with large numbers of stakeholders. Moreover, the rapidly growing number of container images to be managed due to the introduction of new or updated applications and respective components, leads to significant challenges for container management and adaptation. In this paper, we introduce Smart Brix, a framework for continuous evolution of container application deployments that tackles these challenges. Smart Brix integrates and unifies concepts of continuous integration, runtime monitoring, and operational analytics. Furthermore, it allows practitioners to define generic analytics and compensation pipelines composed of self-assembling processing components to autonomously validate and verify containers to be deployed. We illustrate the feasibility of our approach by evaluating our framework using a case study from the smart city domain. We show that Smart Brix is horizontally scalable and runtime of the implemented analysis and compensation pipelines scales linearly with the number of container application packages.

  2. The evolution of continuous learning of the structure of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodny, Oren; Edelman, Shimon; Lotem, Arnon

    2014-03-06

    Continuous, 'always on', learning of structure from a stream of data is studied mainly in the fields of machine learning or language acquisition, but its evolutionary roots may go back to the first organisms that were internally motivated to learn and represent their environment. Here, we study under what conditions such continuous learning (CL) may be more adaptive than simple reinforcement learning and examine how it could have evolved from the same basic associative elements. We use agent-based computer simulations to compare three learning strategies: simple reinforcement learning; reinforcement learning with chaining (RL-chain) and CL that applies the same associative mechanisms used by the other strategies, but also seeks statistical regularities in the relations among all items in the environment, regardless of the initial association with food. We show that a sufficiently structured environment favours the evolution of both RL-chain and CL and that CL outperforms the other strategies when food is relatively rare and the time for learning is limited. This advantage of internally motivated CL stems from its ability to capture statistical patterns in the environment even before they are associated with food, at which point they immediately become useful for planning.

  3. Continuing evolution of equine influenza virus in Central Asia, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamendin, Kobey; Kydyrmanov, A; Kasymbekov, Y; Khan, E; Daulbayeva, K; Asanova, S; Zhumatov, K; Seidalina, A; Sayatov, M; Fereidouni, S R

    2014-09-01

    Equine influenza (EI) continues to be an important respiratory pathogen of horses worldwide. Since 2007 several outbreaks of EI have occurred in Central Asian countries, including Kazakhstan, western Mongolia, India and western China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) isolates from Kazakhstan, A/equine/Almaty/26/2007 and A/equine/South Kazakhstan/236/12, were related to Florida sublineage 2, with high similarity to EIVs circulating in the same period in neighbouring countries. New outbreaks of EI during 2011 and 2012 in Kazakhstan and other Central Asian countries were caused by viruses of the same lineage. Genetic characterization of the viruses showed formation of a small EIV cluster with specific genetic signatures and continued evolution of this lineage in Central Asia between 2007 and 2012. The main genetic changes were observed in hemagglutinin gene without any antigenic drift. Although no vaccination policy was carried out in Kazakhstan, application of Florida clade 2-based vaccines is recommended.

  4. Unpacking boxes: Integration of molecular, morphological and ecological approaches reveals extensive patterns of reticulate evolution in box eucalypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Rymer, Paul D; Riegler, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Reticulate evolution by hybridization is considered a common process shaping the evolution of many plant species, however, reticulation could also be due to incomplete lineage sorting in biodiverse systems. For our study we selected a group of closely related plant taxa with contrasting yet partially overlapping geographic distributions and different population sizes, to distinguish between reticulated patterns due to hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. We predicted that sympatric or proximal populations of different species are more likely to have gene flow than geographically distant populations of the same widespread species. Furthermore, for species with restricted distributions, and therefore, small effective population sizes, we predicted complete lineage sorting. Eastern grey box eucalypt species (Eucalyptus supraspecies Moluccanae) provide an ideal system to explore patterns of reticulate evolution. They form a diverse, recently evolved and phylogenetically undefined group within Eucalyptus, with overlapping morphological features and hybridization in nature. We used a multi-faceted approach, combining analyses of chloroplast and nuclear DNA, as well as seedling morphology, flowering time and ecological spatial differentiation in order to test for species delimitation and reticulate evolution in this group. The multiple layers of results were consistent and suggested a lack of monophyly at different hierarchical levels due to multidirectional gene flow among several species, challenging species delimitation. Chloroplast and nuclear haplotypes were shared among different species in geographic proximity, consistent with hybridization zones. Furthermore, species with restricted distributions appeared better resolved due to lineage sorting in the absence of hybridization. We conclude that a combination of molecular, morphological and ecological approaches is required to disentangle patterns of reticulate evolution in the box eucalypts. Published by

  5. Morphology evolution of two-phase Cu-Ag alloys under different conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-li HU; Jin-dong ZHANG; Liang MENG

    2009-01-01

    Cu-Ag filamentary microeomposites with different Ag contents were prepared by cold drawing and intermediate heat treatments. The microstructure characterization and filamentary distribution were observed for two-phase alloys under different conditions. The effect of heavy drawing strain on the microstructure evolution of Cu-Ag alloys was investigated. The results show that the microstructure components consist of Cu dendrites, eutectic colonies and secondary Ag precipitates in the alloys con-mining 6%~24% (mass fraction) Ag. With the increase in Ag content, the eutectic colonies in the microstructure increase and gradually change into a continuous net-like distribution. The Cu dendrites, eutectic colonies and secondary Ag precipitates are elongated in an axial direction and developed into the composite filamentary structure during cold drawing deformation. The eutectic colonies tend to evolve into filamentary bundles. The filamentary diameters decrease with the increase in drawing strain degree for the two-phase alloys, in particular for the alloys with low Ag content. The reduction in filamentary diameters becomes slow once the drawing strain has exceeded a certain level.

  6. Controllable synthesis, morphology evolution and electrochemical properties of LiFePO4 cathode materials for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jianjun; Wang, Lin; Shao, Guangjie; Shi, Meiwu; Ma, Zhipeng; Wang, Guiling; Song, Wei; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Caixia

    2014-05-07

    Monodispersed LiFePO4 nanocrystals with diverse morphologies were successfully synthesized via a mild and controllable solvothermal approach with a mixture of ethylene glycol and oleic acid as the solvent. Morphology evolution of LiFePO4 nanoparticles from nanoplates to nanorods can be simply realized by varying the volume ratio of oleic acid to ethylene glycol. Moreover, the mechanism of competitive adsorption between ethylene glycol and oleic acid was proposed for the formation of different morphologies. Electrochemical measurements show that the LiFePO4/C nanorods have an initial discharge capacity of 155 mA h g(-1) at 0.5 C with a capacity retention of 80% at a high rate of 5 C, which confirms that LiFePO4/C nanorods exhibit excellent rate capability and cycling stability.

  7. Crystal Growth and Dissolution of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite in Sequential Deposition: Correlation between Morphology Evolution and Photovoltaic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Huang, Chi-Kai; Su, Tzu-Sen; Hong, Cheng-You; Wei, Tzu-Chien

    2017-03-01

    Crystal morphology and structure are important for improving the organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite semiconductor property in optoelectronic, electronic, and photovoltaic devices. In particular, crystal growth and dissolution are two major phenomena in determining the morphology of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite in the sequential deposition method for fabricating a perovskite solar cell. In this report, the effect of immersion time in the second step, i.e., methlyammonium iodide immersion in the morphological, structural, optical, and photovoltaic evolution, is extensively investigated. Supported by experimental evidence, a five-staged, time-dependent evolution of the morphology of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite crystals is established and is well connected to the photovoltaic performance. This result is beneficial for engineering optimal time for methylammonium iodide immersion and converging the solar cell performance in the sequential deposition route. Meanwhile, our result suggests that large, well-faceted methylammonium lead iodide perovskite single crystal may be incubated by solution process. This offers a low cost route for synthesizing perovskite single crystal.

  8. Ecology and caudal skeletal morphology in birds: the convergent evolution of pygostyle shape in underwater foraging taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Ryan N; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Birds exhibit a specialized tail that serves as an integral part of the flight apparatus, supplementing the role of the wings in facilitating high performance aerial locomotion. The evolution of this function for the tail contributed to the diversification of birds by allowing them to utilize a wider range of flight behaviors and thus exploit a greater range of ecological niches. The shape of the wings and the tail feathers influence the aerodynamic properties of a bird. Accordingly, taxa that habitually utilize different flight behaviors are characterized by different flight apparatus morphologies. This study explores whether differences in flight behavior are also associated with variation in caudal vertebra and pygostyle morphology. Details of the tail skeleton were characterized in 51 Aequornithes and Charadriiformes species. Free caudal vertebral morphology was measured using linear metrics. Variation in pygostyle morphology was characterized using Elliptical Fourier Analysis, a geometric morphometric method for the analysis of outline shapes. Each taxon was categorized based on flight style (flap, flap-glide, dynamic soar, etc.) and foraging style (aerial, terrestrial, plunge dive, etc.). Phylogenetic MANOVAs and Flexible Discriminant Analyses were used to test whether caudal skeletal morphology can be used to predict flight behavior. Foraging style groups differ significantly in pygostyle shape, and pygostyle shape predicts foraging style with less than 4% misclassification error. Four distinct lineages of underwater foraging birds exhibit an elongate, straight pygostyle, whereas aerial and terrestrial birds are characterized by a short, dorsally deflected pygostyle. Convergent evolution of a common pygostyle phenotype in diving birds suggests that this morphology is related to the mechanical demands of using the tail as a rudder during underwater foraging. Thus, distinct locomotor behaviors influence not only feather attributes but also the underlying

  9. Ecology and caudal skeletal morphology in birds: the convergent evolution of pygostyle shape in underwater foraging taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan N Felice

    Full Text Available Birds exhibit a specialized tail that serves as an integral part of the flight apparatus, supplementing the role of the wings in facilitating high performance aerial locomotion. The evolution of this function for the tail contributed to the diversification of birds by allowing them to utilize a wider range of flight behaviors and thus exploit a greater range of ecological niches. The shape of the wings and the tail feathers influence the aerodynamic properties of a bird. Accordingly, taxa that habitually utilize different flight behaviors are characterized by different flight apparatus morphologies. This study explores whether differences in flight behavior are also associated with variation in caudal vertebra and pygostyle morphology. Details of the tail skeleton were characterized in 51 Aequornithes and Charadriiformes species. Free caudal vertebral morphology was measured using linear metrics. Variation in pygostyle morphology was characterized using Elliptical Fourier Analysis, a geometric morphometric method for the analysis of outline shapes. Each taxon was categorized based on flight style (flap, flap-glide, dynamic soar, etc. and foraging style (aerial, terrestrial, plunge dive, etc.. Phylogenetic MANOVAs and Flexible Discriminant Analyses were used to test whether caudal skeletal morphology can be used to predict flight behavior. Foraging style groups differ significantly in pygostyle shape, and pygostyle shape predicts foraging style with less than 4% misclassification error. Four distinct lineages of underwater foraging birds exhibit an elongate, straight pygostyle, whereas aerial and terrestrial birds are characterized by a short, dorsally deflected pygostyle. Convergent evolution of a common pygostyle phenotype in diving birds suggests that this morphology is related to the mechanical demands of using the tail as a rudder during underwater foraging. Thus, distinct locomotor behaviors influence not only feather attributes but also

  10. PartitionFinder 2: New Methods for Selecting Partitioned Models of Evolution for Molecular and Morphological Phylogenetic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfear, Robert; Frandsen, Paul B; Wright, April M; Senfeld, Tereza; Calcott, Brett

    2017-03-01

    PartitionFinder 2 is a program for automatically selecting best-fit partitioning schemes and models of evolution for phylogenetic analyses. PartitionFinder 2 is substantially faster and more efficient than version 1, and incorporates many new methods and features. These include the ability to analyze morphological datasets, new methods to analyze genome-scale datasets, new output formats to facilitate interoperability with downstream software, and many new models of molecular evolution. PartitionFinder 2 is freely available under an open source license and works on Windows, OSX, and Linux operating systems. It can be downloaded from www.robertlanfear.com/partitionfinder. The source code is available at https://github.com/brettc/partitionfinder. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Testing for X-Ray-SZ Differences and Redshift Evolution in the X-Ray Morphology of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgaliev, D.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L.; Bocquet, S.; Forman, W. R.; Garmire, G. P.; Gupta, N.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Mohr, J. J.; Nagai, D.; Rapetti, D.; Stark, A. A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2017-05-01

    We present a quantitative study of the X-ray morphology of galaxy clusters, as a function of their detection method and redshift. We analyze two separate samples of galaxy clusters: a sample of 36 clusters at 0.35clusters at 0.25Clusters from both samples have similar-quality Chandra observations, which allow us to quantify their X-ray morphologies via two distinct methods: centroid shifts (w) and photon asymmetry ({A}{phot}). The latter technique provides nearly unbiased morphology estimates for clusters spanning a broad range of redshift and data quality. We further compare the X-ray morphologies of X-ray- and SZ-selected clusters with those of simulated clusters. We do not find a statistically significant difference in the measured X-ray morphology of X-ray and SZ-selected clusters over the redshift range probed by these samples, suggesting that the two are probing similar populations of clusters. We find that the X-ray morphologies of simulated clusters are statistically indistinguishable from those of X-ray- or SZ-selected clusters, implying that the most important physics for dictating the large-scale gas morphology (outside of the core) is well-approximated in these simulations. Finally, we find no statistically significant redshift evolution in the X-ray morphology (both for observed and simulated clusters), over the range of z˜ 0.3 to z˜ 1, seemingly in contradiction with the redshift-dependent halo merger rate predicted by simulations.

  12. Morphologic evolution of the wilderness area breach at Fire Island, New York—2012–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Nelson, Timothy R.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Brenner, Owen T.; Miselis, Jennifer L.

    2017-09-18

    IntroductionHurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, near Atlantic City, New Jersey, had a significant impact on the coastal system along the south shore of Long Island, New York. A record significant wave height of 9.6 meters (m) was measured at wave buoy 44025, approximately 48 kilometers offshore of Fire Island, New York. Surge and runup during the storm resulted in extensive beach and dune erosion and breaching of the Fire Island barrier island system at two locations, including a breach that formed within the Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness area on the eastern side of Fire Island.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long history of conducting morphologic change and processes research at Fire Island. One of the primary objectives of the current research effort is to understand the morphologic evolution of the barrier system on a variety of time scales (from storm scale to decade(s) to century). A number of studies that support the project objectives have been published. Prior to Hurricane Sandy, however, little information was available on specific storm-driven change in this region. The USGS received Hurricane Sandy supplemental funding (project GS2–2B: Linking Coastal Processes and Vulnerability, Fire Island, New York, Regional Study) to enhance existing research efforts at Fire Island. The existing research was greatly expanded to include inner continental shelf mapping and investigations of processes of inner shelf sediment transport; beach and dune response and recovery; and observation, analysis, and modeling of the newly formed breach in the Otis Pike High Dune Wilderness area, herein referred to as the wilderness breach. The breach formed at the site of Old Inlet, which was open from 1763 to 1825. The location of the initial island breaching does not directly correspond with topographic lows of the dunes, but instead the breach formed in the location of a cross-island boardwalk that was destroyed during Hurricane Sandy

  13. Functional and morphological evolution of remnant pancreas after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Young; Park, Keun-Myoung; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Hur, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Keon-Young; Ahn, Seung-Ik

    2017-07-01

    Functional and morphological evolution of remnant pancreas after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma is investigated.The medical records of 45 patients who had undergone radical resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma from March 2010 to September 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 34 patients in the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) group and 10 patients in the distal pancreatectomy (DP) group. One patient received total pancreatectomy. The endocrine function was measured using the glucose tolerance index (GTI), which was derived by dividing daily maximum serum glucose fluctuation by daily minimum glucose. Remnant pancreas volume (RPV) was estimated by considering pancreas body and tail as a column, and head as an ellipsoid, respectively. The pancreatic atrophic index (PAI) was defined as the ratio of pancreatic duct width to total pancreas width. Representative indices of each patient were compared before and after resection up to 2 years postoperatively.The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of GTI for diagnosing DM was 0.823 (95% confidence interval, 0.699-0.948, P < .001). Overall, GTI increased on postoperative day 1 (POD#1, mean ± standard deviation, 1.79 ± 1.40 vs preoperative, 1.02 ± 1.41; P = .001), and then decreased by day 7 (0.89 ± 1.16 vs POD#1, P < .001). In the PD group, the GTI on POD#14 became lower than preoperative (0.51 ± 0.38 vs 0.96 ± 1.37; P = .03). PAI in the PD group was significantly lower at 1 month postoperatively (0.22 ± 0.12 vs preoperative, 0.38 ± 0.18; P < .001). In the PD group, RPV was significantly lower at 1 month postoperatively (25.3 ± 18.3 cm vs preoperative, 32.4 ± 20.1 cm; P = .02), due to the resolution of pancreatic duct dilatation. RPV of the DP group showed no significant change. GTI was negatively related to RPV preoperatively (r = -0.317, P = .04), but this correlation disappeared postoperatively (r = -0

  14. Surface Evolution of Nano-Textured 4H–SiC Homoepitaxial Layers after High Temperature Treatments: Morphology Characterization and Graphene Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingfang Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nano-textured 4H–SiC homoepitaxial layers (NSiCLs were grown on 4H–SiC(0001 substrates using a low pressure chemical vapor deposition technique (LPCVD, and subsequently were subjected to high temperature treatments (HTTs for investigation of their surface morphology evolution and graphene growth. It was found that continuously distributed nano-scale patterns formed on NSiCLs which were about submicrons in-plane and about 100 nanometers out-of-plane in size. After HTTs under vacuum, pattern sizes reduced, and the sizes of the remains were inversely proportional to the treatment time. Referring to Raman spectra, the establishment of multi-layer graphene (MLG on NSiCL surfaces was observed. MLG with sp2 disorders was obtained from NSiCLs after a high temperature treatment under vacuum at 1700 K for two hours, while MLG without sp2 disorders was obtained under Ar atmosphere at 1900 K.

  15. Modeling the effects of dust evolution on the SEDs of galaxies of different morphological type

    CERN Document Server

    Schurer, A; Silva, L; Pipino, A; Granato, G L; Matteucci, F; Maiolino, R

    2009-01-01

    We present photometric evolution models of galaxies, in which, in addition to the stellar component, the effects of an evolving dusty interstellar medium have been included with particular care. Starting from the work of Calura, Pipino & Matteucci (2008), in which chemical evolution models have been used to study the evolution of both the gas and dust components of the interstellar medium in the solar neighbourhood, elliptical and irregular galaxies, it has been possible to combine these models with a spectrophotometric stellar code that includes dust reprocessing (GRASIL) (Silva et al. 1998) to analyse the evolution of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of these galaxies. We test our models against observed SEDs both in the local universe and at high redshift and use them to predict how the percentage of reprocessed starlight evolves for each type of galaxy. The importance of following the dust evolution is investigated by comparing our results with those obtained by adopting simple assumptions to t...

  16. Investigation of the operating conditions to morphology evolution of β-L-glutamic acid during seeded cooling crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangkun; Liu, Tao; Huo, Yan; Guan, Runduo; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the effects of operating conditions including cooling rate, initial supersaturation, and seeding temperature were investigated on the morphology evolution of β-L-glutamic acid (β-LGA) during seeded cooling crystallization. Based on the results of in-situ image acquisition of the crystal morphology evolution during the crystallization process, it was found that the crystal products tend to be plate-like or short rod-like under a slow cooling rate, low initial supersaturation, and low seeding temperature. In the opposite, the operating conditions of a faster cooling rate, higher initial supersaturation, and higher seeding temperature tend to produce long rod-like or needle-like crystals, and meanwhile, the length and width of crystal products will be increased together with a wider crystal size distribution (CSD). The aspect ratio of crystals, defined by the crystal length over width measured from in-situ or sample images, was taken as a shape index to analyze the crystal morphologies. Based on comparative analysis of the experimental results, guidelines on these operating conditions were given for obtaining the desired crystal shapes, along with the strategies for obtaining a narrower CSD for better product quality. Experimental verifications were performed to illustrate the proposed guidelines on the operating conditions for seeded cooling crystallization of LGA solution.

  17. Effect of Phase Contiguity and Morphology on the Evolution of Deformation Texture in Two-Phase Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurao, N. P.; Suwas, Satyam

    2017-02-01

    Deformation texture evolution in two-phase xFe- yNi-(100- x- y)Cr model alloys and Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy was studied during rolling to develop an understanding of micro-mechanisms of deformation in industrially relevant two-phase FCC-BCC steels and HCP-BCC titanium alloys, respectively. It was found that volume fraction and contiguity of phases lead to systematic changes in texture, while morphology affects the strength of texture. There was a characteristic change in texture from typical Brass-type to a weaker Copper-type texture in the austenite phase accompanied with a change from alpha fiber to gamma fiber in ferrite phase for Fe-Ni-Cr alloys with increase in fraction of harder ferrite phase. However, similar characteristic texture evolution was noted in both α and β phase irrespective of the different initial morphologies in Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy. Viscoplastic self-consistent simulations with two-phase scheme were able to qualitatively predict texture evolution in individual phases. It is proposed that the transition from iso-strain-type behavior for equiaxed microstructure at low strain to iso-stress-type behavior at higher strain is aided by the presence of higher volume fraction of the second phase and increasing aspect ratio of individual phases in two-phase alloys.

  18. Flow Stress and Mathematical Model for DRX Evolution of Semi-continuous Cast AZ80 Alloy During Hot Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Haicheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using electromagnetic fields application ways, AZ80 magnesium alloy is semi-continuously cast into billets with diameter of 165 mm. And the dynamic recrystallization (DRX evolution of the semi-continuous cast AZ80 magnesium alloy during hot compression has been experimentally studied on Gleeble 2000 thermal-mechanical simulator, at temperatures from 260 to 410 °C and strain rates from 0.001 to 10s-1. It is found that the chief microstructure evolution is dynamic recrystallization, and the effect of deformation process parameters on DRX evolution is analyzed. The mathematical models including critical recrystallization model, kinetics model and grain size model of DRX are established and the results show good agreement between experiments and the models.

  19. Molecular phylogenetics and character evolution of morphologically diverse groups, Dendrobium section Dendrobium and allies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takamiya, Tomoko; Wongsawad, Pheravut; Sathapattayanon, Apirada; Tajima, Natsuko; Suzuki, Shunichiro; Kitamura, Saki; Shioda, Nao; Handa, Takashi; Kitanaka, Susumu; Iijima, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Tomohisa

    2014-01-01

    .... The genus Dendrobium, one of the largest genera in the Orchidaceae, includes ∼1100 species, and enormous morphological diversification has hindered the establishment of consistent classification systems covering all major groups of this genus...

  20. The thorax morphology of Epiophlebia (Insecta: Odonata) nymphs – including remarks on ontogenesis and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsse, Sebastian; Helmker, Benjamin; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The species of Epiophlebia are unique among the recent Odonata in showing a mixture of morphological characters of dragonflies (Anisoptera) and damselflies (Zygoptera). The status of the four described extant species of Epiophlebia is disputable from a genetic as well as from a morphological point of view. Here we present an analysis of the thoracic musculature of different nymphal instars of Epiophlebia laidlawi and Epiophlebia superstes to elucidate their morphology and ontogenetic development. In total, 75 muscles have been identified in the thorax of Epiophlebia. This represents the highest number of thoracic muscles ever found in any odonate. It includes six muscles that are reported for the first time for Odonata, and three of these are even new for Pterygota. In total, our results indicate that Epiophlebia has the most ancestral thoracic morphology among Odonata. PMID:26246088

  1. The thorax morphology of Epiophlebia (Insecta: Odonata) nymphs--including remarks on ontogenesis and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsse, Sebastian; Helmker, Benjamin; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas

    2015-08-06

    The species of Epiophlebia are unique among the recent Odonata in showing a mixture of morphological characters of dragonflies (Anisoptera) and damselflies (Zygoptera). The status of the four described extant species of Epiophlebia is disputable from a genetic as well as from a morphological point of view. Here we present an analysis of the thoracic musculature of different nymphal instars of Epiophlebia laidlawi and Epiophlebia superstes to elucidate their morphology and ontogenetic development. In total, 75 muscles have been identified in the thorax of Epiophlebia. This represents the highest number of thoracic muscles ever found in any odonate. It includes six muscles that are reported for the first time for Odonata, and three of these are even new for Pterygota. In total, our results indicate that Epiophlebia has the most ancestral thoracic morphology among Odonata.

  2. Mathematical and computational analyses of cracking formation fracture morphology and its evolution in engineering materials and structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sumi, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the pattern formation and the evolution of crack propagation in engineering materials and structures, bridging mathematical analyses of cracks based on singular integral equations, to computational simulation of engineering design. The first two parts of this book focus on elasticity and fracture and provide the basis for discussions on fracture morphology and its numerical simulation, which may lead to a simulation-based fracture control in engineering structures. Several design concepts are discussed for the prevention of fatigue and fracture in engineering structures, including safe-life design, fail-safe design, damage tolerant design. After starting with basic elasticity and fracture theories in parts one and two, this book focuses on the fracture morphology that develops due to the propagation of brittle cracks or fatigue cracks.   In part three, the mathematical analysis of a curved crack is precisely described, based on the perturbation method. The stability theory of interactive ...

  3. Phase- and morphology-controlled synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanocrystals and comparison of their catalytic activities for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan; Liu, Yunqi; Liu, Chenguang

    2015-12-01

    Colalt sulfide nanocrystals (NCs), including dandelion-like Co9S8 and sphere-like Co3S4, have been synthesized via a thermal decomposition approach using cobalt acetylacetonate as the cobalt source, 1-dodecanethiol as the sulfur source and oleic acid or oleylamine as the high boiling organic solvent. It is found that the molar ratio of the Co:S precursor and the species of solvent play an important role in the control of phase and morphology of cobalt sulfide nanostructures. The phase structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nickel sulfide NCs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2 adsorption-desorption. Then we further compare the electrocatalytic activity and stability of as-synthesized cobalt sulfide NCs for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The results show that sphere-like Co3S4 exhibits better electrocatalytic activity than the dandelion-like Co9S8 NCs for HER, which can be attributed to the difference of phase structure and morphology. The sphere-like Co3S4 NCs have large surface area and high electrical conductivity, both are beneficial to enhance the catalytic activity. This study indicates that the crystalline phase structure and morphology of cobalt sulfide NCs are important for designing HER electrocatalysts with high efficiency and good stability.

  4. Recent human impacts on the morphological evolution of the Yangtze River delta foreland: A review and new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing-Long; Yang, Shi-Lun; Feng, Huan

    2016-11-01

    This paper reviews the morphological change in the Yangtze River delta due to increasing human impacts from three major aspects. The first is the reduction of sediment supply to the ocean due to dam construction, soil conservation, and sand mining within the Yangtze River basin. The reduced sediment supply has decreased the progradation rate of the delta and triggered erosion in the front of the delta. The second impact relates to the reclamation of intertidal wetlands by human activities. Since the 1950s, approximately 1100 km2 of intertidal land has been embanked, resulting in the disappearance of salt marshes and even the entire intertidal zone along some sections of the coastline. The third change in the delta due to human interference is the construction of deep-waterway structures at the mouth bar, which has greatly modified the local hydrodynamics and morphology. Sediment accretion has increased significantly in these areas as a result of sheltering by these deep-waterway structures. This review shows that human activities have severely altered the natural balance among the hydrodynamics and sediment supply, affecting the morphological features of the Yangtze River watershed and delta. Human impacts on the morphological evolution of deltaic coasts in general are becoming an increasingly concern, and more attention should be paid to the management and mitigation of these effects.

  5. Evolution and diversity in avian vocal system: an Evo-Devo model from the morphological and behavioral perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    Birds use various vocalizations to mark their territory and attract mates. Three groups of birds (songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds) learn their vocalizations through imitation. In the brain of such vocal learners, there is a neural network called the song system specialized for vocal learning and production. In contrast, birds such as chickens and pigeons do not have such a neural network and can only produce innate sounds. Since each avian species shows distinct, genetically inherited vocal learning abilities that are related to its morphology, the avian vocal system is a good model for studying the evolution of functional neural circuits. Nevertheless, studies on avian vocalization from an evolutionary developmental-biological (Evo-Devo) perspective are scant. In the present review, we summarize the results of songbird studies and our recent work that used the Evo-Devo approach to understand the evolution of the avian vocal system.

  6. Convergent evolution across the Australian continent: ecotype diversification drives morphological convergence in two distantly related clades of Australian frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-García, M; Keogh, J S

    2015-12-01

    Animals from different clades but subject to similar environments often evolve similar body shapes and physiological adaptations due to convergent evolution, but this has been rarely tested at the transcontinental level and across entire classes of animal. Australia's biome diversity, isolation and aridification history provide excellent opportunities for comparative analyses on broad-scale macroevolutionary patterns. We collected morphological and environmental data on eighty-four (98%) Australian hylid frog species and categorized them into ecotypes. Using a phylogenetic framework, we tested the hypothesis that frogs from the same ecotype display similar body shape patterns: (i) across all the Australian hylids, and (ii) through comparison with a similar previous study on 127 (97%) Australian myobatrachid species. Body size and shape variation did not follow a strong phylogenetic pattern and was not tightly correlated with environment, but there was a stronger association between morphotype and ecotype. Both arboreal and aquatic frogs had long limbs, whereas limbs of fossorial species were shorter. Other terrestrial species were convergent on the more typical frog body shape. We quantified the strength of morphological convergence at two levels: (i) between fossorial myobatrachid and hylid frogs, and (ii) in each ecomorph within the hylids. We found strong convergence within ecotypes, especially in fossorial species. Ecotypes were also reflected in physiological adaptations: both arboreal and cocooned fossorial frogs tend to have higher rates of evaporative water loss. Our results illustrate how adaptation to different ecological niches plays a crucial role in morphological evolution, boosting phenotypic diversity within a clade. Despite phylogenetic conservatism, morphological adaptation to repeatedly emerging new environments can erase the signature of ancestral morphotypes, resulting in phenotypic diversification and convergence both within and between diverse

  7. Bayesian inference of phylogeny, morphology and range evolution reveals a complex evolutionary history in St. John's wort (Hypericum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Andrea Sánchez; Aldasoro, Juan Jose; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2013-05-01

    The genus Hypericum L. ("St. John's wort", Hypericaceae) comprises nearly 500 species of shrubs, trees and herbs distributed mainly in temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, but also in high-altitude tropical and subtropical areas. Until now, molecular phylogenetic hypotheses on infra-generic relationships have been based solely on the nuclear marker ITS. Here, we used a full Bayesian approach to simultaneously reconstruct phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and patterns of morphological and range evolution in Hypericum, using nuclear (ITS) and plastid DNA sequences (psbA-trnH, trnS-trnG, trnL-trnF) of 186 species representing 33 of the 36 described morphological sections. Consistent with other studies, we found that corrections of the branch length prior helped recover more realistic branch lengths in by-gene partitioned Bayesian analyses, but the effect was also seen within single genes if the overall mutation rate differed considerably among sites or regions. Our study confirms that Hypericum is not monophyletic with the genus Triadenum embedded within, and rejects the traditional infrageneric classification, with many sections being para- or polyphyletic. The small Western Palearctic sections Elodes and Adenotrias are the sister-group of a geographic dichotomy between a mainly New World clade and a large Old World clade. Bayesian reconstruction of morphological character states and range evolution show a complex pattern of morphological plasticity and inter-continental movement within the genus. The ancestors of Hypericum were probably tropical shrubs that migrated from Africa to the Palearctic in the Early Tertiary, concurrent with the expansion of tropical climates in northern latitudes. Global climate cooling from the Mid Tertiary onwards might have promoted adaptation to temperate conditions in some lineages, such as the development of the herbaceous habit or unspecialized corollas.

  8. Morphological Evolution of Electrochemically Plated/Stripped Lithium Microstructures Investigated by Synchrotron X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fu; Zielke, Lukas; Markötter, Henning; Hilger, André; Zhou, Dong; Moroni, Riko; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-08-23

    Due to its low redox potential and high theoretical specific capacity, Li metal has drawn worldwide research attention because of its potential use in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O2. Unfortunately, uncontrollable growth of Li microstructures (LmSs, e.g., dendrites, fibers) during electrochemical Li stripping/plating has prevented their practical commercialization. Despite various strategies proposed to mitigate LmS nucleation and/or block its growth, a fundamental understanding of the underlying evolution mechanisms remains elusive. Herein, synchrotron in-line phase contrast X-ray tomography was employed to investigate the morphological evolution of electrochemically deposited/dissolved LmSs nondestructively. We present a 3D characterization of electrochemically stripped Li electrodes with regard to electrochemically plated LmSs. We clarify fundamentally the origin of the porous lithium interface growing into Li electrodes. Moreover, cleavage of the separator caused by growing LmS was experimentally observed and visualized in 3D. Our systematic investigation provides fundamental insights into LmS evolution and enables us to understand the evolution mechanisms in Li electrodes more profoundly.

  9. K/Ar ages, magnetic stratigraphy and morphological evolution of La Gomera: implications for the Canary Islands hotspot evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, R.; Guillou, H.; Carracedo, J. C.; Pérez Torrado, F. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Canary Islands are a group of seven volcanic islands, 100-700 km west of the Sahara continental margin. The spatial and chronological evolution of the canarian volcanism, from east to west, is due to the progression of the slow-moving african plate on a hotspot. La Gomera is located between the western shield-growing stage islands (La Palma, 1,7 Ma and El Hierro, 1,1 Ma) and the central "rejuvaneted stage" islands (Tenerife, 11,9 Ma and Gran Canaria, 14,5 Ma). After 23 K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism datas, we determine the main volcanic phases of La Gomera : (1) the submarine shield volcano (> 9,5 Ma), (2) the first subaeriel shield volcano (9,43-7,36 Ma), (3) the Vallehermoso stratovolcan, (4) the peripheral "planèzes" and domes forming series (6,67-1,94 Ma) and the Garajonay horizontal series (5,42-4,25 Ma). The stratovolcano and the horizontal series fill a 10 km wide depression that is supposed to be a giant landslide embayment. The scarps of this landslide correspond to the main discontinuity in the island structure. After 4 M.y. of very scarce volcanism, the whole structure of La Gomera is in relief inversion, with a radial pattern of deep barrancos. The erosion rates are lower during the hiatus (< 0,2 m/ka) than during the shield stage (0,2-0,9 m/ka), pointing out the fact that the volcanic construction rates and the erosion rates are strongly correlated. La Gomera is one of the best example of a hiatus stage of hotspot evolution. The volcanic load La Gomera and Tenerife may have delayed the western islands volcanism, favouring a dual-line.

  10. Morphological evolution of prussian yellow Fe[Fe(CN)6] colloidal nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianmin; Fu, Shaoyan; Jin, Cuihong; Liu, Xin; Gao, Yahui; Wu, Jingxiao; Bian, Zhenpan; Tian, Hua; Wang, Lin; Gao, Faming

    2016-07-01

    A simple hydrothermal system was developed for controllable morphologies of the Prussian yellow Fe[Fe(CN)6] nanostructures in the presence of organic additives. Hollow and solid nanospheres of the Prussian yellow materials were successfully synthesized with suitable experimental conditions. It is found that the amounts of organic additives CTAB could result in the formation of the spherical nanocrystals and the hydrolysis of phosphate in the solution could play a role in the final morphology of the products. A possible formation mechanism of the Prussian yellow nanostructures is proposed.

  11. Morphological Snakes

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez, Luis; Baumela Molina, Luis; Henríquez, Pedro; Márquez Neila, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a morphological approach to curve evolution. The differential operators used in the standard PDE snake models can be approached using morphological operations on a binary level set. By combining the morphological operators associated to the PDE components we achieve a new snakes evolution algorithm. This new solution is based on numerical methods which are very simple, fast and stable. Moreover, since the level set is just a binary piecewise constant function, this approach does ...

  12. Historical Biogeography of the Marine Snail Littorina saxatilis Inferred from Haplotype and Shell Morphology Evolution in NW Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Terencia; Saura, María; Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio; Quesada, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    The marine snail Littorina saxatilis exhibits extreme morphological variation between and within geographical regions and represents an excellent model for assessing local adaptation. Previous studies support the hypothesis of parallel evolution in sympatry of two morphologically different ecotypes (named as RB and SU) that co-inhabit different habitats from Galician rocky shores (NW Spain), and which are interrupted by sheltered areas inhabited by a different morph never studied before (named as SRB). Here, we use morphological and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data to test hypotheses on the origin and diversification of SRB snails and to assess their evolutionary relationships with RB and SU ecotypes. Our results show that the SRB morph displays the largest size and shell elongation and the smallest relative shell aperture, representing an extreme type of the RB vs. SU polymorphism, which has been linked to adaptation to sheltered ecological factors. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the SRB morph shares ancestry with RB and SU ecotypes, rejecting the hypothesis that the SRB morph marks relict populations from which these ecotypes evolved in Galician coasts. Our data support that genetic differentiation among SRB, RB and SU morphs results from a general pattern of restricted gene flow and isolation by distance linked to the colonization of Galician coasts by two independent mtDNA lineages, rather than from a random fragmentation of the initial distributional range. Therefore, the confinement of distinct lineages to specific geographical areas denote evident limits to the distances these snails can disperse. Morphological analysis indicates no association between mtDNA lineage and a specific morphotype, and suggests the independent gain of convergent morphological patterns within each mtDNA lineage in populations occupying contrasting habitats following the colonization of Galician coasts.

  13. Understanding the influence of electrolyte additives on the electrochemical performance and morphology evolution of silicon nanowire based lithium-ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Tadhg; Brandon, Michael; Laffir, Fathima; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2017-08-01

    Here we report new insights into the effect various electrolyte additives have on the cycling stability and rate capability of Si nanowire (NW) Li-ion battery anodes. The additives tested were vinylene carbonate, vinyl ethylene carbonate, fluoroethylene carbonate and lithium bis(oxalato)borate. All four significantly improve the capacity retention of the electrodes over 250 cycles compared to the additive-free electrolyte, with vinylene carbonate being the outstanding performer. The results provide a new understanding of the cycling behaviour of Si in the presence of electrolyte additives, revealing that not only is the stability of the SEI layer affected but that this consequently has a profound influence on the morphology evolution and chemical composition of the Si active material. Ex-situ characterisation of the electrodes post-cycling demonstrates that the improvement in cycling stability arises as the additives minimise irreversible decomposition reactions at the surface and facilitate a transformation from a NW morphology into a porous sponge-like network. This transformation process does not occur in the absence of any stable SEI forming additives as instability in the passivating layer leads to the continuous and irreversible consumption of Si to form Li silicates.

  14. Multiple phylogenetically distinct events shaped the evolution of limb skeletal morphologies associated with bipedalism in the jerboas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Talia Y; Organ, Chris L; Edwards, Scott V; Biewener, Andrew A; Tabin, Clifford J; Jenkins, Farish A; Cooper, Kimberly L

    2015-11-02

    Recent rapid advances in experimental biology have expanded the opportunity for interdisciplinary investigations of the evolution of form and function in non-traditional model species. However, historical divisions of philosophy and methodology between evolutionary/organismal biologists and developmental geneticists often preclude an effective merging of disciplines. In an effort to overcome these divisions, we take advantage of the extraordinary morphological diversity of the rodent superfamily Dipodoidea, including the bipedal jerboas, to experimentally study the developmental mechanisms and biomechanical performance of a remarkably divergent limb structure. Here, we place multiple limb character states in a locomotor and phylogenetic context. Whereas obligate bipedalism arose just once in the ancestor of extant jerboas, we find that digit loss, metatarsal fusion, between-limb proportions, and within-hindlimb proportions all evolved independently of one another. Digit loss occurred three times through at least two distinct developmental mechanisms, and elongation of the hindlimb relative to the forelimb is not simply due to growth mechanisms that change proportions within the hindlimb. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for punctuated evolution of allometric scaling of hindlimb elements during the radiation of Dipodoidea. Our work demonstrates the value of leveraging the evolutionary history of a clade to establish criteria for identifying the developmental genetic mechanisms of morphological diversification.

  15. Does morphological convergence imply functional similarity? A test using the evolution of quadrupedalism in ornithischian dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, Susannah C R; Barrett, Paul M

    2012-09-22

    Convergent morphologies are thought to indicate functional similarity, arising because of a limited number of evolutionary or developmental pathways. Extant taxa displaying convergent morphologies are used as analogues to assess function in extinct taxa with similar characteristics. However, functional studies of extant taxa have shown that functional similarity can arise from differing morphologies, calling into question the paradigm that form and function are closely related. We test the hypothesis that convergent skeletal morphology indicates functional similarity in the fossil record using ornithischian dinosaurs. The rare transition from bipedality to quadrupedality occurred at least three times independently in this clade, resulting in a suite of convergent osteological characteristics. We use homology rather than analogy to provide an independent line of evidence about function, reconstructing soft tissues using the extant phylogenetic bracket and applying biomechanical concepts to produce qualitative assessments of muscle leverage. We also optimize character changes to investigate the sequence of character acquisition. Different lineages of quadrupedal ornithischian dinosaur stood and walked differently from each other, falsifying the hypothesis that osteological convergence indicates functional similarity. The acquisition of features correlated with quadrupedalism generally occurs in the same order in each clade, suggesting underlying developmental mechanisms that act as evolutionary constraints.

  16. Preparation of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles with a Continuous Gas-liquid Membrane Contactor:Particles Morphology and Membrane Fouling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Zhiqian; CHANG Qing; QIN Jin; MAMAT Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Nanosized calcium carbonate particles were prepared with a continuous gas-liquid membrane contactor.The effects of Ca(OH)2 concentration,CO2 pressure and liquid flow velocity on the particles morphology,pressure drop and membrane fouling were studied.With rising Ca(OH)2 concentrations,the average size of the particles increased.The effects of Ca(OH)2 concentration and CO2 pressure on particles were not apparent under the experimental conditions.When the Ca(OH)2 concentration and liquid flow velocity were high,or the CO2 pressure was low,the fouling on the membrane external surface at the contactor entrance was serious due to liquid leakage,whereas the fouling was slight at exit.The fouling on the membrane inner-surface at entrance was apparent due to adsorption of raw materials.The membrane can be recovered by washing with dilute hydrochloric acid and reused for at least 6 times without performance deterioration.

  17. Structure and morphology evolution of silica-modified pseudoboehmite aerogels during heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakharukova, V.P., E-mail: verapakh@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, SB RAS, Pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Research and Educational Center for Energy Efficient Catalysis, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Shalygin, A.S.; Gerasimov, E. Yu.; Tsybulya, S.V.; Martyanov, O.N. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, SB RAS, Pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Research and Educational Center for Energy Efficient Catalysis, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Silica-modified pseudoboehmite aerogels (0, 10, 20 at% of Si) were prepared by sol–gel method followed by supercritical drying. The phase transformations, changes in structure and morphology upon calcination were thoroughly investigated by advanced X-Ray diffraction (XRD) techniques and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Obtained pseudoboehmite samples had specific nanostructure: ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) crystallites were loosely packed. The silica dopant drastically enhanced the crystallite anisotropy. Thus, the aerogel with Al:Si atomic ratio of 9:1 consisted of the pseudoboehmite nanosheets with thickness of one unit cell (average dimensions of 14.0×1.2×14.5 nm). The specific nanostructure caused remarkable features of experimental XRD patterns, including anisotropic peak broadening and appearance of forbidden reflection. Direct simulation of XRD patterns with using the Debye Scattering Equation allowed the size and morphology of pseudoboehmite crystallites to be determined. The silica addition strongly delayed formation of γ-alumina and further phase transformations upon calcinaton. Thermal stability of alumina was suggested to be affected by the particle morphology inherited from the pseudoboehmite precursor. - Graphical abstract: Pseudoboehmite samples had specific nanostructure: ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) crystallites were loosely packed. - Highlights: • Silica-doped boehmites were prepared by sol–gel method with supercritical drying. • Ultrathin two-dimensional crystallites of pseudoboehmite were obtained. • Changes in structure and morphology upon calcination were studied. • Simulation of XRD patterns was performed with use of the Debye Scattering Equation. • Thermal stability of alumina depended on morphology inherited from pseudoboehmite.

  18. Evolution of cementite morphology in pearlitic steel wire during wet wire drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Godfrey, Andrew; Hansen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the cementite phase during wet wire drawing of a pearlitic steel wire has been followed as a function of strain. Particular attention has been given to a quantitative characterization of changes in the alignment and in the dimensions of the cementite phase. Scanning electron...

  19. Review. Flower morphology, a source of evidence for evolution as a physiological process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.

    1955-01-01

    Evolution has for a century and a half been the subject of both speculation and research. It has been approached from almost every imaginable side. However, while on the one hand the fossil evidence has provided us with the main lines of development both of characters and of taxa, and on the other c

  20. Bath temperature impact on morphological evolution of Ni(OH)2 thin films and their supercapacitive behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U M Patil; K V Gurav; J H Kim; C D Lokhande; S C Jun

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured Ni(OH)2 thin films were deposited over stainless steel (SS) and glass substrate via simple chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. NiCl2 :6H2O were used as source of nickel and aqueous ammonia as a complexing agent. The coating process of Ni(OH)2 material over substrate is based on the decomposition of ammonia complexed nickel ions at two different bath temperatures. The changes in structural, morphological and electro-chemical properties are examined as an impact of bath temperature. XRD studies reveal formation of mixed phase of and at lower bath temperature (313 K) while, pure phase of Ni(OH)2 thin films deposited was observed at higher bath temperature (353 K). The morphological evolution from honeycomb structure to vertically aligned flakes over the substrate is observed as the influence of bath temperature. The supercapacitive performance based on the morphology examined by using cyclic voltammetric measurements in 1 M KOH. The maximum specific capacitances of 610 and 460 F/g were observed for the vertical flake and honeycomb structured Ni(OH)2 thin films, respectively.

  1. Morphology evolution via self-organization and lateral and vertical diffusion in polymer:fullerene solar cell blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Ferenczi, Toby; Agostinelli, Tiziano; Etchegoin, Pablo G; Kim, Youngkyoo; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Stavrinou, Paul N; Bradley, Donal D C; Nelson, Jenny

    2008-02-01

    Control of blend morphology at the microscopic scale is critical for optimizing the power conversion efficiency of plastic solar cells based on blends of conjugated polymer with fullerene derivatives. In the case of bulk heterojunctions of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and a soluble fullerene derivative ([6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester, PCBM), both blend morphology and photovoltaic device performance are influenced by various treatments, including choice of solvent, rate of drying, thermal annealing and vapour annealing. Although the protocols differ significantly, the maximum power conversion efficiency values reported for the various techniques are comparable (4-5%). In this paper, we demonstrate that these techniques all lead to a common arrangement of the components, which consists of a vertically and laterally phase-separated blend of crystalline P3HT and PCBM. We propose a morphology evolution that consists of an initial crystallization of P3HT chains, followed by diffusion of PCBM molecules to nucleation sites, at which aggregates of PCBM then grow.

  2. Anodic Oxidation on Structural Evolution and Tensile Properties of Polyacrylonitrile Based Carbon Fibers with Different Surface Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaorui Li; Jianbin Wang; Yuanjian Tong; Lianghua Xu

    2012-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers with different surface morphology were electrochemically treated in 3 wt% NH4HCO3 aqueous solution with current density up to 3.47 A/m 2 at room temperature, and surface structures, surface morphology and residual mechanical properties were characterized. The crystallite size (La) of carbon fibers would be interrupted due to excessive electrochemical etching, while the crystallite spacing (d(002)) increased as increasing current density. The disordered structures on the surface of carbon fiber with rough surface increased at the initial oxidation stage and then removed by further electrochemical etching, which resulting in continuous increase of the extent of graphitization on the fiber surface. However, the electrochemical etching was beneficial to getting ordered morphology on the surface for carbon fiber with smooth surface, especially when the current density was lower than 1.77 A/m 2 . The tensile strength and tensile modulus could be improved by 17.27% and 5.75%, respectively, and was dependent of surface morphology. The decreasing density of carbon fibers probably resulted from the volume expansion of carbon fibers caused by the abundant oxygen functional groups intercalated between the adjacent graphite layers.

  3. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: The neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Claramunt, Santiago; Derryberry, Graham; Chesser, R. Terry; Cracraft, Joel; Aleixo, Alexandre; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Remsen, J.V.; Brumfield, Robb T.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

  4. Evolution of microhabitat association and morphology in a diverse group of cryptobenthic coral reef fishes (Teleostei: Gobiidae: Eviota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornabene, Luke; Ahmadia, Gabby N; Berumen, Michael L; Smith, Dave J; Jompa, Jamaluddin; Pezold, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Gobies (Teleostei: Gobiidae) are an extremely diverse and widely distributed group and are the second most species rich family of vertebrates. Ecological drivers are key to the evolutionary success of the Gobiidae. However, ecological and phylogenetic data are lacking for many diverse genera of gobies. Our study investigated the evolution of microhabitat association across the phylogeny of 18 species of dwarfgobies (genus Eviota), an abundant and diverse group of coral reef fishes. In addition, we also explore the evolution of pectoral fin-ray branching and sensory head pores to determine the relationship between morphological evolution and microhabitat shifts. Our results demonstrate that Eviota species switched multiple times from a facultative hard-coral association to inhabiting rubble or mixed sand/rubble habitat. We found no obvious relationship between microhabitat shifts and changes in pectoral fin-ray branching or reduction in sensory pores, with the latter character being highly homoplasious throughout the genus. The relative flexibility in coral-association in Eviota combined with the ability to move into non-coral habitats suggests a genetic capacity for ecological release in contrast to the strict obligate coral-dwelling relationship commonly observed in closely related coral gobies, thus promoting co-existence through fine scale niche partitioning. The variation in microhabitat association may facilitate opportunistic ecological speciation, and species persistence in the face of environmental change. This increased speciation opportunity, in concert with a high resilience to extinction, may explain the exceptionally high diversity seen in Eviota compared to related genera in the family.

  5. Evolution of vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells and inner ears: toward identifying stimuli that select mutation driven altered morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Straka, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Among the major distance senses of vertebrates, the ear is unique in its complex morphological changes during evolution. Conceivably, these changes enable the ear to adapt toward sensing various physically well-characterized stimuli. This review develops a scenario that integrates sensory cell with organ evolution. We propose that molecular and cellular evolution of the vertebrate hair cells occurred prior to the formation of the vertebrate ear. We previously proposed that the genes driving hair cell differentiation were aggregated in the otic region through developmental re-patterning that generated a unique vertebrate embryonic structure, the otic placode. In agreement with the presence of graviceptive receptors in many vertebrate outgroups, it is likely that the vertebrate ear originally functioned as a simple gravity-sensing organ. Based on the rare occurrence of angular acceleration receptors in vertebrate outgroups, we further propose that the canal system evolved with a more sophisticated ear morphogenesis. This evolving morphogenesis obviously turned the initial otocyst into a complex set of canals and recesses, harboring multiple sensory epithelia each adapted to the acquisition of a specific aspect of a given physical stimulus. As support for this evolutionary progression, we provide several details of the molecular basis of ear development.

  6. Evolution of Cluster Red-Sequence Galaxies from redshift 0.8 to 0.4: ages, metallicities and morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Blazquez, P; Noll, S; Poggianti, B M; Moustakas, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Halliday, C; Aragón-Salamanca, A; Saglia, R P; Desai, V; De Lucia, G; Clowe, D I; Pellò, R; Rudnick, G; Simard, L; White, S D M; Zaritsky, D

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the stellar population properties (age, metallicity and the alpha-element enhancement [E/Fe]) and morphologies of red-sequence galaxies in 24 clusters and groups from z~0.75 to z~0.45. The dataset, consisting of 215 spectra drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey, constitutes the largest spectroscopic sample at these redshifts for which such an analysis has been conducted. Analysis reveals that the evolution of the stellar population properties of red-sequence galaxies depend on their mass: while the properties of most massive are well described by passive evolution and high-redshift formation, the less massive galaxies require a more extended star formation history. We show that these scenarios reproduce the index-sigma relations as well as the galaxy colours. The two main results of this work are (1) the evolution of the line-strength indices for the red-sequence galaxies can be reproduced if 40% of the galaxies with sigma < 175 km/s entered the red-sequence betwe...

  7. In situ observation of surface morphology evolution in tungsten under focused Ga{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Guang, E-mail: gran@umich.edu [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Liu Xiang; Wu Jihong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li Ning [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zu Xiaotao [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Wang Lumin, E-mail: lmwang@umich.edu [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The effects of energetic Ga ion bombardment on the surface morphology of mechanically polished polycrystalline tungsten are investigated by focused Ga{sup +} ion beam irradiation with in situ scanning electron microscopy, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy. The amount of removed material from the tungsten surface increased with increasing of incident ion angle, and also increased with ion energy from 5 to 30 keV while keeping all other bombardment parameters constant. The nanoneedle-shaped morphology formed by self-assembly in the surface of tungsten under off-normal angle bombardment, the larger the incident angle, the easier for the needle formation. In contrast, only a net-like microstructure formed under normal incident angle. Moreover, more Ga{sup +} ion fluence was needed to form pores at normal incident angle comparing to that under 52 Degree-Sign incident angle.

  8. Evolution of dark-spored Myxomycetes (slime-molds): molecules versus morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Meyer, Marianne; Baldauf, Sandra L; Pawlowski, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The Myxomycetes are a major component of soil amoebae, displaying a complex life cycle that terminates in the formation of often macroscopic fruiting bodies. The classification of Myxomycetes is controversial and strongly depends on the weight given by different authors to morphological and developmental characters. We used a molecular approach to establish the phylogenetic relationships in the dark-spored orders Stemonitales and Physarales. Twenty-five small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences were obtained, with focus on two Stemonitales genera, Lamproderma and Comatricha. Unexpectedly, our results show that Stemonitales are paraphyletic with Physarales arising from within a Lamproderma clade. The genus Lamproderma itself is polyphyletic and can be divided into two distinct clades. Additionally, we found that Comatricha nigricapillitia comprises two cryptic species, both related to Enerthenema. Our study allows the reappraisal of morphological and developmental characters in the light of molecular data and sets foundations for a new classification of Myxomycetes.

  9. The octopus genome and the evolution of cephalopod neural and morphological novelties

    OpenAIRE

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Simakov, Oleg; Mitros, Therese; Wang, Z. Yan; Pungor, Judit R.; Edsinger-Gonzalez, Eric; Brenner, Sydney; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) are active, resourceful predators with a rich behavioral repertoire 1 . They have the largest nervous systems among the invertebrates 2 and present other striking morphological innovations including camera-like eyes, prehensile arms, a highly derived early embryogenesis, and the most sophisticated adaptive coloration system among all animals 1,3 . To investigate the molecular bases of cephalopod brain and body innovations we sequenced the g...

  10. Evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies: the influence of morphology, stellar mass and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongyao; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Conselice, Christopher J.

    2015-11-01

    Using a sample of 425 nearby brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from von der Linden et al., we study the relationship between their internal properties (stellar masses, structural parameters and morphologies) and their environment. More massive BCGs tend to inhabit denser regions and more massive clusters than lower mass BCGs. Furthermore, cDs, which are BCGs with particularly extended envelopes, seem to prefer marginally denser regions and tend to be hosted by more massive haloes than elliptical BCGs. cD and elliptical BCGs show parallel positive correlations between their stellar masses and environmental densities. However, at a fixed environmental density, cDs are, on average, ˜40 per cent more massive. Our results, together with the findings of previous studies, suggest an evolutionary link between elliptical and cD BCGs. We suggest that most present-day cDs started their life as ellipticals, which subsequently grew in stellar mass and size due to mergers. In this process, the cD envelope developed. The large scatter in the stellar masses and sizes of the cDs reflects their different merger histories. The growth of the BCGs in mass and size seems to be linked to the hierarchical growth of the structures they inhabit: as the groups and clusters became denser and more massive, the BCGs at their centres also grew. This process is nearing completion since the majority (˜60 per cent) of the BCGs in the local Universe have cD morphology. However, the presence of galaxies with intermediate morphological classes (between ellipticals and cDs) suggests that the growth and morphological transformation of some BCGs is still ongoing.

  11. The morphological and hydrological evolution of the sinking creek Puljica potok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Radislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The karst morphology of the river basin of Mala Ukrina is characterized apart from superficial and ground karst forms, by karst hydrography, which gives to this area a specific hydrological mark. In this part of the basin as a hydrological peculiarity of limestone plain, we can single out the lost river Puljica potok, which is the water most lost river in the south rim of the Panonion basin of the Republic of Srpska that has been discovered so far.

  12. Evidence for tidal interaction and merger as the origin of galaxy morphology evolution in compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    Coziol, R

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a morphological study based on NIR images of 25 galaxies, with different levels of nuclear activity, in 8 Compact Groups of Galaxies (CGs). We perform independently two different analysis: a isophotal study and a study of morphological asymmetries. The results yielded by the two analysis are highly consistent. For the first time, it is possible to show that deviations from pure ellipses are produced by inhomogeneous stellar mass distributions related to galaxy interactions and mergers. We find evidence of mass asymmetries in 74% of the galaxies in our sample. In 59% of these cases, the asymmetries come in pairs, and are consistent with tidal effects produced by the proximity of companion galaxies. The symmetric galaxies are generally small in size or mass, inactive, and have an early-type morphology. In 20% of the galaxies we find evidence for cannibalism. In 36% of the early-type galaxies the color gradient is positive (blue nucleus) or flat. Summing up these results, as much as 52%...

  13. Effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front in a fluid-saturated porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Lai, Geng-Xin; Ni, Chuen-Fa

    2009-06-01

    SummaryThe dissolution-induced finger or wormhole patterns in porous medium or fracture rock play a crucial role in a variety of scientific, industrial, and engineering practices. Although previous studies have extensively presented a number of numerical models which couples a system of nonlinear governing equations of porosity change due to mineral dissolution, the conservations of groundwater flow and transport of chemical species to investigate the morphological pattern of a chemical dissolution front within a fluid-saturated porous medium, whereas the mechanical dispersion effect has generally been neglected in the model development. This study addresses the effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front for a variety of cases. Mechanical dispersion processes is incorporated with the coupled nonlinear governing equation system so as to rebuild a newly numerical model. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that mechanical dispersion has pronounced impacts on the morphological pattern of the chemical dissolution front. For single local non-uniformity case, mechanical dispersion reduces the finger length of an unstable single-fingering front or retains the shape of a stable planar front while speeding up the front advancement. In the case of two local non-uniformities, adding mechanical dispersion with different flow conditions can yield one of the following results: (1) the shape of the stable planar front is maintained but its advancement is accelerated; (2) the shape of the unstable single-fingering front is maintained but its length is reduced; (3) the unstable double-fingering front is merged into an unstable single-fingering front; and (4) the shape of the unstable double-fingering front is preserved but its fingering length is reduced. A comparison between the behavior diagrams of dissolution front morphology (with and without considering mechanical dispersion) shows that the double-fingering front

  14. Phase- and morphology-controlled synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanocrystals and comparison of their catalytic activities for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yuan; Liu, Yunqi, E-mail: linypy@126.com; Liu, Chenguang

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanostructured dandelion-like Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} and sphere-like Co{sub 3}S{sub 4} were synthesized via a thermal decomposition approach. • The phase and morphology of cobalt sulfide can be controlled by changing the molar ratio of the Co:S precursor and the species of solvent. • The sphere-like Co{sub 3}S{sub 4} exhibits better electrocatalytic activity than the dandelion-like Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} for HER. • The crystalline phase and morphology of cobalt sulfide are important factors for designing HER electrocatalysts. - Abstract: Colalt sulfide nanocrystals (NCs), including dandelion-like Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} and sphere-like Co{sub 3}S{sub 4}, have been synthesized via a thermal decomposition approach using cobalt acetylacetonate as the cobalt source, 1-dodecanethiol as the sulfur source and oleic acid or oleylamine as the high boiling organic solvent. It is found that the molar ratio of the Co:S precursor and the species of solvent play an important role in the control of phase and morphology of cobalt sulfide nanostructures. The phase structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nickel sulfide NCs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption. Then we further compare the electrocatalytic activity and stability of as-synthesized cobalt sulfide NCs for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The results show that sphere-like Co{sub 3}S{sub 4} exhibits better electrocatalytic activity than the dandelion-like Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} NCs for HER, which can be attributed to the difference of phase structure and morphology. The sphere-like Co{sub 3}S{sub 4} NCs have large surface area and high electrical conductivity, both are beneficial to enhance the catalytic activity. This study indicates that the crystalline phase structure and morphology of

  15. A continued role for signaling functions in the early evolution of feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Persons Iv, W Scott; Currie, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    Persons and Currie (2015) argued against either flight, thermoregulation, or signaling as a functional benefit driving the earliest evolution of feathers; rather, they favored simple feathers having an initial tactile sensory function, which changed to a thermoregulatory function as density increased. Here, we explore the relative merits of early simple feathers that may have originated as tactile sensors progressing instead toward a signaling, rather than (or in addition to) a thermoregulatory function. We suggest that signaling could act in concert with a sensory function more naturally than could thermoregulation. As such, the dismissal of a possible signaling function and the presumption that an initial sensory function led directly to a thermoregulatory function (implicit in the title "bristles before down") are premature. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Real-time observation of drying kinetics and morphology evolution in organic bulk heterojunctions (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldal, Nusret S.; Ameri, Tayebeh; Osvet, Andres; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-08-01

    In organic photovoltaics field, an optimized bulk heterojunction film consists of an electron-donating conjugated polymer and an electron-accepting fullerene derivative, which is organized in a well phase-separated, yet interconnected network. This sensitive morphology, affecting the light absorption, exciton dissociation and subsequent charge generation-extraction, is determined by the film formation during solution casting under certain processing conditions. Therefore, a number of previous studies focused on characterizing the thin film formation during solution casting, mainly with in-situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering methods, accompanied by various optical methods, such as ellipsometry/reflectometry and UV-VIS absorption. Although these studies provided invaluable information on the matter, the development of nanoscale morphology is yet to be fully understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a portable in-situ characterization chamber, which can characterize any organic/hybrid thin film during solution casting. The chamber is a miniature doctor blade under controlled atmosphere, equipped with white light reflectometry (WLR), photoluminescence (PL) and laser light scattering (LLS). WLR was used to monitor the thickness reduction of the thin film during the drying, enabling to establish a drying curve. LLS informed the time scale of aggregate/crystallite formation. PL monitored molecular arrangement and enabled the estimation of microstructure. The combined data is used to understand the competition between thermodynamics (e.g. solubility, miscibility) and kinetics of morphology formation. In this study, we measured different BHJ systems with binary and ternary solvent mixtures under different processing conditions, from which we built a roadmap for microstructure formation in organic thin films, used in organic photovoltaics.

  17. Quantitative Flow Morphology, Recent Volcanic Evolution and Future Activity of the Kameni Islands, Santorini, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. R.; Pyle, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    The fundamental importance of careful field investigation, and the long term value of detailed published volcanic eruption reports, means that much can be learned about eruption processes even many decades after an eruption has ceased. We illustrate this with reference to the young dacite lava flows of the Kameni islands, Santorini. We have created a new, high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) for the intra-caldera Kameni islands, Santorini, based on new data from a recent airborne laser-ranging (LiDAR) and aerial photography mission. This DEM reveals a wealth of surface morphological information on the dacite lava flows that comprise the Kameni islands. When combined with a re-analysis of contemporary eruption accounts, these data yield important insights into the physical properties and flow behaviour of dacite magma during slow effusive eruptions. Kameni island lava flows exhibit the classic surface morphologies associated with viscous aa: levees, and compression folds. Levee heights and flow widths are consistent with a Bingham rheology, and lava yield strengths of (3 to 7)× 104 Pa. Analysis of the shapes of flow edges confirms that the blocky aa dacite lava flows show a scale-invariant morphology with a typical fractal dimension that is indistinguishable from Hawaiian aa. Dome-growth rates during eruptions of the Kameni islands in 1866 and 1939 are consistent with a model of slow inflation of a dome with a strong crust. Lava domes on the Kameni islands have a crustal yield strength (4×107 Pa) that is lower by a factor of 2 to 4 than the domes at Pinatubo and Mount St Helens. The dome height model, combined with the apparent time-predictable nature of volcanic eruptions of the Kameni islands, allows us to predict that the next eruption of the Kameni islands will last for > 2.6 years (in 2005) and will involve formation of a dome ca. 115 to 123 m high.

  18. Convergent evolution of morphology and habitat use in the explosive Hawaiian fancy case caterpillar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, A Y; Rubinoff, D

    2013-08-01

    Species occurring in unconnected, but similar habitats and under similar selection pressures often display strikingly comparable morphology, behaviour and life history. On island archipelagos where colonizations and extinctions are common, it is often difficult to separate whether similar traits are a result of in situ diversification or independent colonization without a phylogeny. Here, we use one of Hawaii's most ecologically diverse and explosive endemic species radiations, the Hawaiian fancy case caterpillar genus Hyposmocoma, to test whether in situ diversification resulted in convergence. Specifically, we examine whether similar species utilizing similar microhabitats independently developed largely congruent larval case phenotypes in lineages that are in comparable, but isolated environments. Larvae of these moths are found on all Hawaiian Islands and are characterized by an extraordinary array of ecomorphs and larval case morphology. We focus on the 'purse cases', a group that is largely specialized for living within rotting wood. Purse cases were considered a monophyletic group, because morphological, behavioural and ecological traits appeared to be shared among all members. We constructed a phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from 38 Hyposmocoma species, including all 14 purse case species and 24 of non-purse case congeners. Divergence time estimation suggests that purse case lineages evolved independently within dead wood and developed nearly identical case morphology twice: once on the distant Northwest Hawaiian Islands between 15.5 and 9 Ma and once on the younger main Hawaiian Islands around 3.0 Ma. Multiple ecomorphs are usually found on each island, and the ancestral ecomorph of Hyposmocoma appears to have lived on tree bark. Unlike most endemic Hawaiian radiations that follow a clear stepwise progression of colonization, purse case Hyposmocoma do not follow a pattern of colonization from older to younger island. We

  19. Evolution of morphology and microstructure of GaAs/GaSb nanowire heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Suixing; Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhenyu; Shu, Haibo; Chen, Pingping; Li, Ning; Zou, Jin; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we successfully grow GaAs/GaSb core-shell heterostructure nanowires (NWs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The as-grown GaSb shell layer forms a wurtzite structure instead of the zinc blende structure that has been commonly reported. Meanwhile, a bulgy GaSb nanoplate also appears on top of GaAs/GaSb core-shell NWs and possesses a pure zinc blende phase. The growth mode for core-shell morphology and underlying mechanism for crystal phase selection of GaAs/GaSb nanowire heterostructures are discussed in detail.

  20. Morphologies of ˜190,000 Galaxies at z = 0-10 Revealed with HST Legacy Data. I. Size Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ouchi, Masami; Harikane, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    We present the redshift evolution of the galaxy effective radius re obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) samples of ˜190,000 galaxies at z = 0-10. Our HST samples consist of 176,152 photo-z galaxies at z = 0-6 from the 3D-HST+CANDELS catalog and 10,454 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 4-10 identified in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), HUDF 09/12, and HFF parallel fields, providing the largest data set to date for galaxy size evolution studies. We derive re with the same technique over the wide redshift range of z = 0-10, evaluating the optical-to-UV morphological K correction and the selection bias of photo-z galaxies+LBGs as well as the cosmological surface-brightness dimming effect. We find that re values at a given luminosity significantly decrease toward high z, regardless of statistics choices (e.g., {r}{{e}}\\propto {(1+z)}-1.10+/- 0.06 for median). For star-forming galaxies, there is no evolution of the power-law slope of the size-luminosity relation and the median Sérsic index (n˜ 1.5). Moreover, the re distribution is well represented by log-normal functions whose standard deviation {σ }{ln{r}{{e}}} does not show significant evolution within the range of {σ }{ln{r}{{e}}}˜ 0.45-0.75. We calculate the stellar-to-halo size ratio from our re measurements and the dark-matter halo masses estimated from the abundance-matching study, and we obtain a nearly constant value of {r}{{e}}/{r}{vir}=1.0%-3.5% at z = 0-8. The combination of the re-distribution shape+standard deviation, the constant {r}{{e}}/{r}{vir}, and n˜ 1.5 suggests a picture in which typical high-z star-forming galaxies have disk-like stellar components in a sense of dynamics and morphology over cosmic time of z˜ 0-6. If high-z star-forming galaxies are truly dominated by disks, the {r}{{e}}/{r}{vir} value and the disk-formation model indicate that the specific angular momentum of the disk normalized by the host halo is {j

  1. Superhydrophobic Polyimide via Ultraviolet Photooxidation: The Evolution of Surface Morphology and Hydrophobicity under Different Ultraviolet Intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV photooxidation has recently been developed to fabricate superhydrophobic polyimide (PI films in combination with fluoroalkylsilane modification. However, it remains unclear whether the surface morphology and hydrophobicity are sensitive to technical parameters such as UV intensity and radiation environment. Herein, we focus on the effects of UV intensity on PI surface structure and wettability to gain comprehensive understanding and more effective control of this technology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM results showed that UV intensity governed the evolutionary pattern of surface morphology: lower UV intensity (5 mW/cm2 facilitated in-plane expansion of dendritic protrusions while stronger UV (10 and 15 mW/cm2 encouraged localized growth of protrusions in a piling-up manner. Surface roughness and hydrophobicity maximized at the intensity of 10 mW/cm2, as a consequence of the slowed horizontal expansion and preferred vertical growth of the protrusions when UV intensity increased. Based on these results, the mechanism that surface micro/nanostructures developed in distinct ways when exposed to different UV intensities was proposed. Though superhydrophobicity (water contact angle larger than 150° can be achieved at UV intensity not less than 10 mW/cm2, higher intensity decreased the effectiveness. Therefore, the UV photooxidation under 10 mW/cm2 for 72 h is recommended to fabricate superhydrophobic PI films.

  2. Evolution of eye morphology and rhodopsin expression in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Posnien

    Full Text Available A striking diversity of compound eye size and shape has evolved among insects. The number of ommatidia and their size are major determinants of the visual sensitivity and acuity of the compound eye. Each ommatidium is composed of eight photoreceptor cells that facilitate the discrimination of different colours via the expression of various light sensitive Rhodopsin proteins. It follows that variation in eye size, shape, and opsin composition is likely to directly influence vision. We analyzed variation in these three traits in D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana. We show that D. mauritiana generally has larger eyes than its sibling species, which is due to a combination of larger ommatidia and more ommatidia. In addition, intra- and inter-specific differences in eye size among D. simulans and D. melanogaster strains are mainly caused by variation in ommatidia number. By applying a geometric morphometrics approach to assess whether the formation of larger eyes influences other parts of the head capsule, we found that an increase in eye size is associated with a reduction in the adjacent face cuticle. Our shape analysis also demonstrates that D. mauritiana eyes are specifically enlarged in the dorsal region. Intriguingly, this dorsal enlargement is associated with enhanced expression of rhodopsin 3 in D. mauritiana. In summary, our data suggests that the morphology and functional properties of the compound eyes vary considerably within and among these closely related Drosophila species and may be part of coordinated morphological changes affecting the head capsule.

  3. Morphology Evolution on the Fracture Surface and Fracture Mechanisms of Multiphase Nanostructured ZrCu-Base Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base bulk alloy which showed a unique microstructure consisting of sub-micrometer scale Zr2Cu solid solution, nano-sized twinned plate-like ZrCu martensite (ZrCu (M, and retained ZrCu (B2 austenite was fabricated by copper mold casting. The observation of periodic morphology evolution on the fracture surface of the multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base alloys has been reported, which suggested a fluctuant local stress intensity along the crack propagation. It is necessary to investigate the compressive deformation behavior and the fracture mechanism of the multiphase alloy and the relation to the unique microstructures. The results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the deformation and fracture mechanisms of multiphase hybrid nanostructured ZrCu-based alloys and give guidance on how to improve the ductility/toughness of bulk ZrCu-based alloys.

  4. Morphological Evolution During Tensile Deformation in Semi-Crystalline Precise Functional Copolymers via Fitting of In Situ Xray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Edward B.; Middleton, L. Robert; Aitken, Brian S.; Azoulay, Jason; Murtagh, Dustin; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Cordaro, Joseph; Winey, Karen I.

    Morphological evolution during tensile deformation of semi-crystalline polymers is often described qualitatively. The layered crystal structures of precise copolymers, in which functional groups are bonded at precise intervals along the polymer backbone, allow for quantitative fitting of oriented X-ray scattering peaks to provide additional information. The crystallites in precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) align with the acid group layers' normal vector parallel to the tensile direction, while those in precise poly(ethylene-co-imidazolium bromide) align with the layers' normal vector perpendicular to the tensile direction. We present fits of in situ X-ray scattering during tensile deformation of semi-crystalline precise copolymers, to quantify the size, shape, and degree of orientation of the crystallites during the deformation process. Mathematical descriptions of the X-ray scattering in these two cases is explored, and a physical explanation for the difference in alignment direction is proposed.

  5. Morphological and Kinematic Evolution of Three Interacting Coronal Mass Ejections of 2011 February 13-15

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Wageesh

    2014-01-01

    During 2011 February 13 to 15, three Earth-directed CMEs launched in successively were recorded as limb CMEs by coronagraphs (COR) of STEREO. These CMEs provided an opportunity to study their geometrical and kinematic evolution from multiple vantage points. In this paper, we examine the differences in geometrical evolution of slow and fast speed CMEs during their propagation in the heliosphere. We also study their interaction and collision using STEREO/SECCHI COR and Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. We have found evidence of interaction and collision between the CMEs of February 15 and 14 in COR2 and HI1 FOV, respectively, while the CME of February 14 caught the CME of February 13 in HI2 FOV. By estimating the true mass of these CMEs and using their pre and post-collision dynamics, the momentum and energy exchange between them during collision phase are studied. We classify the nature of observed collision between CME of February 14 and 15 as inelastic, reaching close to elastic regime. Relating imaging...

  6. Aswan site on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Morphology, boulder evolution, and spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Oklay, Nilda; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Bertini, Ivano; El-Maarry, M. R.; Marzari, Francesco; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Höfner, Sebastian; Lee, Jui-Chi; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Groussin, Olivier; Naletto, Giampiero; Lazzarin, Monica; Barbieri, Cesare; Sierks, Holger; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst U.; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Barucci, Maria A.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; De Cecco, Mariolino; Debei, Stefano; Ferri, Francesca; Fornasier, Sonia; Fulle, Marco; Güttler, Carsten; Gutierrez, Pedro J.; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kramm, J.-Rainer; Küppers, Michael; Kürt, Ekkehard; Lara, Luisa M.; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lopez Moreno, Jose J.; Magrin, Sara; Michalik, Harald; Mottola, Stefano; Thomas, Nicholas; Tubiana, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We provide a detailed morphological analysis of the Aswan site on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). We derive the size-frequency distribution of boulders ≥2 m and correlate this distribution with the gravitational slopes for the first time on a comet. We perform the spectral analysis of this region to understand if possible surface variegation is related to thedifferent surface textures observable on the different units. Methods: We used two OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) image data sets acquired on September 19 and 22, 2014, with a scale of 0.5 m/px. Gravitational slopes derived from the 3D shape model of 67P were used to identify and interpret the different units of the site. By means of the high-resolution NAC data sets, boulders ≥2.0 m can be unambiguously identified and extracted using the software ArcGIS. Coregistered and photometrically corrected color cubes were used to perform the spectral analyses, and we retrieved the spectral properties of the Aswan units. Results: The high-resolution morphological map of the Aswan site (0.68 km2) shows that this site is characterized by four different units: fine-particle deposits located on layered terrains, gravitational accumulation deposits, taluses, and the outcropping layered terrain. Multiple lineaments are identified on the Aswan cliff, such as fractures, exposed layered outcrops, niches, and terraces. Close to the terrace margin, several arched features observed in plan view suggest that the margin progressively retreats as a result of erosion. The size-frequency of boulders ≥2 m in the entire study area has a power-law index of -3.9 +0.2/-0.3 (1499 boulders ≥2 m/km2), suggesting that the Aswan site is mainly dominated by gravitational events triggered by sublimation and/or thermal insolation weathering causing regressive erosion. The boulder size-frequency distribution versus gravitational slopes indicates that when higher gravitational slope terrains are considered, only boulders ≤10 m

  7. Evolution of Morphology and Crystallinity of Silica Minerals Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.

    2011-12-01

    Silica minerals are quite common mineral species in surface environment of the terrestrial planets. They are good indicator of terrestrial processes including hydrothermal alteration, diagenesis and soil formation. Hydrothermal quartz, metastable low temperature cristobalite and amorphous silica show characteristic morphology and crystallinity depending on their formation processes and kinetics under wide range of temperature, pressure, acidity and thermal history. In this study, silica minerals produced by acidic hydrothermal alteration related to volcanic activities and hydrothermal crystallization experiments from diatom sediment are examined with crystallographic analysis and morphologic observations. Low temperature form of cistobalite is a metastable phase and a common alteration product occured in highly acidic hydrothermal environment around fumaroles in geothermal / volcanic areas. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree of whole rock is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Detailed powder XRD analysis show that the primary diffraction peak of cristobalite composed with two or three phases with different d-spacing and FWHM by peak profile fitting analysis. Shorter d-spacing and narrower FWHM cristobalite crystallize from precursor materials with less-crystallized, longer d-spacing and wider FWHM cristobalite. Textures of hydrothermal cristobalite in altered rock shows remnant of porphylitic texture of the host rock, pyroxene-amphibole andesite. Diatom has amorphous silica shell and makes diatomite sediment. Diatomite found in less diagenetic Quarternary formation keeps amorphous silica diatom shells. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of amorphous silica diatomite sediment are carried out from 300 °C to 550 °C. Mineral composition of run products shows crystallization of cristobalite and quartz progress depending on temperature and run durations. Initial crystallization product, cristobalite grains occur as characteristic lepispheres and

  8. Morphological and Molecular Evolution of Flesh Flies of Sarcophaginae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buenaventura Ruiz, Ingrid Eliana

    A sizeable part of the large majority of animal life on Earth is the outcome of a fewevolutionary bursts of a certain lineage of insects: the episodic radiations of flies. Dipteransconstitute one of the most familiar groups of insects, since they are ubiquitous and of worldwidedistribution...... in Sarcophaginae are informative in resolvingphylogenetic relationships at various taxonomic levels. Despite the many interesting aspects in theevolution, biogeography, morphology, and biology of these flies, the evolutionary relationshipswithin this dipteran radiation are very poorly understood and the few...... to other regional faunas in the Afrotropical, Australasian, and Oriental regions.Hopefully, this thesis will inspire similar phylogenetic studies on other fly families, to betterunderstand Diptera radiations and how to troubleshoot challenging rapid evolutionary radiations.First and foremost...

  9. Morphological Evolution of Multilayer Ni/NiO Thin Film Electrodes during Lithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evmenenko, Guennadi; Fister, Timothy T; Buchholz, D Bruce; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Wu, Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P; Hersam, Mark C; Fenter, Paul; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2016-08-10

    Oxide conversion reactions in lithium ion batteries are challenged by substantial irreversibility associated with significant volume change during the phase separation of an oxide into lithia and metal species (e.g., NiO + 2Li(+) + 2e(-) → Ni + Li2O). We demonstrate that the confinement of nanometer-scale NiO layers within a Ni/NiO multilayer electrode can direct lithium transport and reactivity, leading to coherent expansion of the multilayer. The morphological changes accompanying lithiation were tracked in real-time by in-operando X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and ex-situ cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy on well-defined periodic Ni/NiO multilayers grown by pulsed-laser deposition. Comparison of pristine and lithiated structures reveals that the nm-thick nickel layers help initiate the conversion process at the interface and then provide an architecture that confines the lithiation to the individual oxide layers. XRR data reveal that the lithiation process starts at the top and progressed through the electrode stack, layer by layer resulting in a purely vertical expansion. Longer term cycling showed significant reversible capacity (∼800 mA h g(-1) after ∼100 cycles), which we attribute to a combination of the intrinsic bulk lithiation capacity of the NiO and additional interfacial lithiation capacity. These observations provide new insight into the role of metal/metal oxide interfaces in controlling lithium ion conversion reactions by defining the relationships between morphological changes and film architecture during reaction.

  10. Morphological Evolution of Multilayer Ni/NiO Thin Film Electrodes during Lithiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evmenenko, Guennadi; Fister, Timothy T.; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Wu, Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Hersam, Mark C.; Fenter, Paul; Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2016-08-10

    Oxide conversion reactions in lithium ion batteries are challenged by substantial irreversibility associated with significant volume change during the phase separation of an oxide into lithia and metal species (e.g., NiO + 2Li(+) + 2e(-) -> Ni + Li2O). We demonstrate that the confinement of nanometer-scale NiO layers within a Ni/NiO multilayer electrode can direct lithium transport and reactivity, leading to coherent expansion of the multilayer. The morphological changes accompanying lithiation were tracked in real-time by in-operando X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and ex situ cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy on well-defined periodic Ni/NiO multilayers grown by pulsed-laser deposition. Comparison of pristine and lithiated structures reveals that the nm-thick nickel layers help initiate the conversion process at the interface and then provide an architecture that confines the lithiation to the individual oxide layers. XRR data reveal that the lithiation process starts at the top and progressed through the electrode stack, layer by layer resulting in a purely vertical expansion. Longer term cycling showed significant reversible capacity (similar to 800 mA h g(-1) after similar to 100 cycles), which we attribute to a combination of the intrinsic bulk lithiation capacity of the NiO and additional interfacial lithiation capacity. These observations provide new insight into the role of metal/metal oxide interfaces in controlling lithium ion conversion reactions by defining the relationships between morphological changes and film architecture during reaction.

  11. Evolution of increased competitiveness in cows trades off with reduced milk yield, fertility and more masculine morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Cristina; Mazza, Serena; Guzzo, Nadia; Mantovani, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    In some species females compete for food, foraging territories, mating, and nesting sites. Competing females can exhibit morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations typical of males, which are commonly considered as secondary sexual traits. Competition and the development of traits increasing competitiveness require much energy and may exert adverse effects on fecundity and survival. From an evolutionary perspective, positive selection for increased competitiveness would then result in evolution of reduced values for traits related to fitness such as fecundity and survival. There is recent evidence for such evolutionary trade-offs involving male competition, but no study has considered competing females so far. Using data from competitions for dominance in cows (Bos taurus), we found negative genetic correlations between traits providing success in competition, that is, fighting ability and fitness traits related to milk production and with fertility (the inverse of parity-conception interval). Fighting ability also showed low but positive genetic correlations with "masculine" morphological traits, and negative correlations with "feminine" traits. A genetic change in traits over time has occurred due to selection on competitiveness, corresponding to an evolutionary process of "masculinization" counteracting the official selection for milk yield. Similar evolutionary trade-off between success in competition and fitness components may be present in various species experiencing female competition.

  12. Comparative morphology of the postpharyngeal gland in the Philanthinae (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae) and the evolution of an antimicrobial brood protection mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Katharina; Strohm, Erhard; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Herzner, Gudrun

    2015-12-21

    Hymenoptera that mass-provision their offspring have evolved elaborate antimicrobial strategies to ward off fungal infestation of the highly nutritive larval food. Females of the Afro-European Philanthus triangulum and the South American Trachypus elongatus (Crabronidae, Philanthinae) embalm their prey, paralyzed bees, with a secretion from a complex postpharyngeal gland (PPG). This coating consists of mainly unsaturated hydrocarbons and reduces water accumulation on the prey's surface, thus rendering it unfavorable for fungal growth. Here we (1) investigated whether a North American Philanthus species also employs prey embalming and (2) assessed the occurrence and morphology of a PPG among females of the subfamily Philanthinae in order to elucidate the evolution of prey embalming as an antimicrobial strategy. We provide clear evidence that females of the North American Philanthus gibbosus possess large PPGs and embalm their prey. The comparative analyses of 26 species from six genera of the Philanthinae, using histological methods and 3D-reconstructions, revealed pronounced differences in gland morphology within the subfamily. A formal statistical analysis based on defined characters of the glands confirmed that while all members of the derived tribe Philanthini have large and complex PPGs, species of the two more basal tribes, Cercerini and Aphilanthopsini, possess simple and comparatively small glands. According to an ancestral state reconstruction, the complex PPG most likely evolved in the last common ancestor of the Philanthini, thus representing an autapomorphy of this tribe. Prey embalming, as described for P. triangulum and T. elongatus, and now also for P. gibbosus, most probably requires a complex PPG. Hence, the morphology and size of the PPG may allow for inferences about the origin and distribution of the prey embalming behavior within the Philanthinae. Based on our results, we suggest that prey embalming has evolved as an antimicrobial strategy in

  13. Growth evolution and phase transition from chalcocite to digenite in nanocrystalline copper sulfide: Morphological, optical and electrical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Vasthi Quintana-Ramirez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide is a promising p-type inorganic semiconductor for optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, due its small band gap energy and its electrical properties. In this work nanocrystalline copper sulfide (CuxS, with two stoichiometric ratios (x = 2, 1.8 was obtained by one-pot synthesis at 220, 230, 240 and 260 °C in an organic solvent and amorphous CuxS was obtained in aqueous solution. Nanoparticle-like nucleation centers are formed at lower temperatures (220 °C, mixtures of morphologies (nanorods, nanodisks and nanoprisms are seen at 230 and 240 °C, in which the nanodisks are predominant, while big hexagonal/prismatic crystals are obtained at 260 °C according to TEM results. A mixture of chalcocite and digenite phases was found at 230 and 240 °C, while a clear transition to a pure digenite phase was seen at 260 °C. The evolution of morphology and transition of phases is consistent to the electrical, optical, and morphological properties of the copper sulfide. In fact, digenite Cu1.8S is less resistive (346 Ω/sq and has a lower energy band gap (1.6 eV than chalcocite Cu2S (5.72 × 105 Ω/sq, 1.87 eV. Low resistivity was also obtained in CuxS synthesized in aqueous solution, despite its amorphous structure. All CuxS products could be promising for optoelectronic applications.

  14. Morphological evolution of InAs/InP quantum wires through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, D L; Varela, M; Pennycook, S J; Galindo, P L; González, L; González, Y; Fuster, D; Molina, S I

    2010-08-13

    Evolution of the size, shape and composition of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum wires through the Stranski-Krastanov transition has been determined by aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging. High resolution compositional maps of the wires in the initial, intermediate and final formation stages are presented. (001) is the main facet at their very initial stage of formation, which is gradually reduced in favour of [114] or [118], ending with the formation of mature quantum wires with {114} facets. Significant changes in wire dimensions are measured when varying slightly the amount of InAs deposited. These results are used as input parameters to build three-dimensional models that allow calculation of the strain energy during the quantum wire formation process. The observed morphological evolution is explained in terms of the calculated elastic energy changes at the growth front. Regions of the wetting layer close to the nanostructure perimeters have higher strain energy, causing migration of As atoms towards the quantum wire terraces, where the structure is partially relaxed; the thickness of the wetting layer is reduced in these zones and the island height increases until the (001) facet is removed.

  15. Morphological evolution of InAs/InP quantum wires through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, D L; Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Varela, M; Pennycook, S J [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Gonzalez, L; Gonzalez, Y [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Fuster, D, E-mail: david.sales@uca.es [UMDO - Unidad Asociada al CSIC-IMM, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, PO Box 22085, 4607 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-13

    Evolution of the size, shape and composition of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum wires through the Stranski-Krastanov transition has been determined by aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging. High resolution compositional maps of the wires in the initial, intermediate and final formation stages are presented. (001) is the main facet at their very initial stage of formation, which is gradually reduced in favour of {l_brace}114{r_brace} or {l_brace}118{r_brace}, ending with the formation of mature quantum wires with {l_brace}114{r_brace} facets. Significant changes in wire dimensions are measured when varying slightly the amount of InAs deposited. These results are used as input parameters to build three-dimensional models that allow calculation of the strain energy during the quantum wire formation process. The observed morphological evolution is explained in terms of the calculated elastic energy changes at the growth front. Regions of the wetting layer close to the nanostructure perimeters have higher strain energy, causing migration of As atoms towards the quantum wire terraces, where the structure is partially relaxed; the thickness of the wetting layer is reduced in these zones and the island height increases until the (001) facet is removed.

  16. SANS investigation on evolution of pore morphology for varying sintering time in porous ceria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Patra; S Ramanathan; D Sen; S Mazumder

    2004-08-01

    Precipitates of ceria were synthesized by homogeneous precipitation method using cerium nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at 80°C. The precipitates were ground to fine particles of average size ∼0.7 m. Circular disks with 10 mm diameter, 2 and 3 mm thickness were prepared from the green compacts by sintering at 1300°C for three different sintering times. Evolution of the pore structures in these specimens with sintering time was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the peak of the pore size distribution shifts towards the larger size with increasing sintering time although the extent of porosity decreases. This indicates that finer pores are eliminated from the system at a faster rate than the coarser ones as sintering proceeds and some of the finer pores coalesce to form bigger ones.

  17. CFD-DEM Simulations of Current-Induced Dune Formation and Morphological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', `small dune', `vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver...

  18. Evolution of microhabitat association and morphology in a diverse group of cryptobenthic coral reef fishes (Teleostei: Gobiidae: Eviota)

    KAUST Repository

    Tornabene, Luke

    2013-01-01

    Gobies (Teleostei: Gobiidae) are an extremely diverse and widely distributed group and are the second most species rich family of vertebrates. Ecological drivers are key to the evolutionary success of the Gobiidae. However, ecological and phylogenetic data are lacking for many diverse genera of gobies. Our study investigated the evolution of microhabitat association across the phylogeny of 18 species of dwarfgobies (genus Eviota), an abundant and diverse group of coral reef fishes. In addition, we also explore the evolution of pectoral fin-ray branching and sensory head pores to determine the relationship between morphological evolution and microhabitat shifts. Our results demonstrate that Eviota species switched multiple times from a facultative hard-coral association to inhabiting rubble or mixed sand/rubble habitat. We found no obvious relationship between microhabitat shifts and changes in pectoral fin-ray branching or reduction in sensory pores, with the latter character being highly homoplasious throughout the genus. The relative flexibility in coral-association in Eviota combined with the ability to move into non-coral habitats suggests a genetic capacity for ecological release in contrast to the strict obligate coral-dwelling relationship commonly observed in closely related coral gobies, thus promoting co-existence through fine scale niche partitioning. The variation in microhabitat association may facilitate opportunistic ecological speciation, and species persistence in the face of environmental change. This increased speciation opportunity, in concert with a high resilience to extinction, may explain the exceptionally high diversity seen in Eviota compared to related genera in the family. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Loss of YABBY2-like gene expression may underlie the evolution of the laminar style in Canna and contribute to floral morphological diversity in the Zingiberales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie eMorioka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zingiberales is an order of tropical monocots that exhibits diverse floral morphologies. The evolution of petaloid, laminar stamens, staminodes, and styles contributes to this diversity. The laminar style is a derived trait in the family Cannaceae and plays an important role in pollination as its surface is used for secondary pollen presentation. Previous work in the Zingiberales has implicated YABBY2-like genes, which function in promoting laminar outgrowth, in the evolution of stamen morphology. Here, we investigate the evolution and expression of Zingiberales YABBY2-like genes in order to understand the evolution of the laminar style in Canna. Phylogenetic analyses show that multiple duplication events have occurred in this gene lineage prior to the diversification of the Zingiberales. Reverse transcription-PCR in Canna, Costus, and Musa reveals differential expression across floral organs, taxa, and gene copies, and a role for YABBY2-like genes in the evolution of the laminar style is proposed. Selection tests indicate that almost all sites in conserved domains are under purifying selection, consistent with their functional relevance, and a motif unique to monocot YABBY2-like genes is identified. These results contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of floral morphologies.

  20. Scientific controversies on biological knowledge construction: investigating a continued formation course for teachers with respect for human biological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Erdmann Bulla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The research here presented has as central theme the human biological evolution, its scientific controversies and the continued formation of science and biology teachers. We evaluate the development of a teaching sequence on the topic, emphasizing the scientific controversy regarding the supposed fossil hominid Ardipithecus ramidus (“Ardi” in a continued formation course for teachers of science and biology of basic public network Cascavel-PR and region. The empirical work involved collecting data from the responses provided by teachers to an initial questionnaire and a final. The analysis and data discussion has highlighted the importance of scientific controversy for the development of scientific knowledge and the urgency to insert the contents of human evolution in subjects on the initial formation of courses in licentiate of Biological Sciences. It is necessary also to offer continued formation courses to include such content for teachers already inserted in schools. We conclude that teaching biology and science using scientific controversies may be in satisfactory teaching tool to introduce the history and nature of science, since scientific activity is permeated by conflicts.

  1. Maternal care in Acanthosomatinae (Insecta: Heteroptera: Acanthosomatidae)--correlated evolution with morphological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jing-Fu; Kudo, Shin-ichi; Yoshizawa, Kazunori

    2015-11-19

    Maternal care (egg-nymph guarding behavior) has been recorded in some genera of Acanthosomatidae. However, the origin of the maternal care in the family has remained unclear due to the lack of phylogenetic hypotheses. Another reproductive mode is found in non-caring species whose females smear their eggs before leaving them. They possess pairs of complex organs on the abdominal venter called Pendergrast's organ (PO) and spread the secretion of this organ onto each egg with their hind legs, which is supposed to provide a protective function against enemies. Some authors claim that the absence of PO may be associated with the presence of maternal care. No study, however, has tested this hypothesis of a correlated evolution between the two traits. We reconstructed the molecular phylogeny of the subfamily Acanthosomatinae using five genetic markers sequenced from 44 species and one subspecies with and without maternal care. Eight additional species from the other two acanthosomatid subfamilies were included as outgroups. Our results indicated that maternal care has evolved independently at least three times within Acanthosomatinae and once in the outgroup species. Statistical tests for correlated evolution showed that the presence of maternal care is significantly correlated with the secondary loss or reduction of PO. Ancestral state reconstruction for the node of Acanthosoma denticaudum (a non-caring species in which egg smearing with developed POs occurs) and A. firmatum (a caring species with reduced POs) suggested egg smearing was still present in their most recent common ancestor and that maternal care in A. firmatum has evolved relatively recently. We showed that maternal care is an apomorphic trait that has arisen multiple times from the presence of PO within the subfamily Acanthosomatinae. The acquisition of maternal care is correlated with the reduction or loss of PO, which suggests an evolutionary trade-off between the two traits resulting from physiological

  2. H-ATLAS/GAMA: quantifying the morphological evolution of the galaxy population using cosmic calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Stephen; Fullard, Andrew; Allen, Matthew; Smith, M. W. L.; Baldry, Ivan; Bourne, Nathan; Clark, C. J. R.; Driver, Simon; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Graham, Alister W.; Ibar, Edo; Hopkins, Andrew; Ivison, Rob; Kelvin, Lee S.; Maddox, Steve; Maraston, Claudia; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Smith, Dan; Taylor, Edward N.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Werf, Paul van der; Baes, Maarten; Brough, Sarah; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Gomez, Haley; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steven; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Using results from the Herschel Astrophysical Terrahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) project, we show that, for galaxy masses above ≃ 108 M⊙, 51 per cent of the stellar mass-density in the local Universe is in early-type galaxies (ETGs; Sérsic n > 2.5) while 89 per cent of the rate of production of stellar mass-density is occurring in late-type galaxies (LTGs; Sérsic n < 2.5). From this zero-redshift benchmark, we have used a calorimetric technique to quantify the importance of the morphological transformation of galaxies over the history of the Universe. The extragalactic background radiation contains all the energy generated by nuclear fusion in stars since the big bang. By resolving this background radiation into individual galaxies using the deepest far-infrared survey with the Herschel Space Observatory and a deep near-infrared/optical survey with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and using measurements of the Sérsic index of these galaxies derived from the HST images, we estimate that ≃83 per cent of the stellar mass-density formed over the history of the Universe occurred in LTGs. The difference between this value and the fraction of the stellar mass-density that is in LTGs today implies there must have been a major transformation of LTGs into ETGs after the formation of most of the stars.

  3. Surface morphology and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Ni Mo nanocomposites as cathodes for hydrogen evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elhachmi Guettaf Temam; Hachemi Ben Temam; Said Benramache

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the infl uences of current density on surface morphology and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Ni–Mo. The Ni–Mo composite coatings are deposited on pretreated copper substrates by electrolytic deposition. The Ni–Mo solution is taken from nickel sulfate fl uid and ammonium heptamolybdate with 10 g/l. The Ni–Mo composite coatings are deposited at a temperature of 303 K with an applied current density of jdep=10 A/dm2–30 A/dm2. We find that the corrosion resistance is improved by incorporating Mo particles into Ni matrix in 0.6-M NaCl solution. From the potentiodynamic polarization curve of electrodeposited Ni–Mo it is confirmed that the corrosion resistance decreases with increasing applied current density. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of Ni–Mo coatings indicate three phases of MoNi4, Mo1.24Ni0.76, and Ni3Mo phases crystallites of nickel and molybdenum. The scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) tests indicate that Ni–Mo coatings present cracks and pores.

  4. Generalized Synthesis of EAs [E = Fe, Co, Mn, Cr] Nanostructures and Investigating Their Morphology Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates a novel route for the synthesis of nanostructured transition metal arsenides including those of FeAs, CoAs, MnAs, and CrAs through a generalized protocol. The key feature of the method is the use of one-step hot-injection and the clever use of a combination of precursors which are low-melting and highly reactive such as metal carbonyls and triphenylarsine in a solventless setup. This method also facilitates the formation of one-dimensional nanostructures as we move across the periodic table from CrAs to CoAs. The chemical basis of this reaction is simple redox chemistry between the transition metals, wherein the transition metal is oxidized from elemental state (E0 to E3+in lieu of reduction of As3+ to As3−. While the thermodynamic analysis reveals that all these conversions are spontaneous, it is the kinetics of the process that influences morphology of the product nanostructures, which varies from extremely small nanoparticles to nanorods. Transition metal pnictides show interesting magnetic properties and these nanostructures can serve as model systems for the exploration of their intricate magnetism as well as their applications and can also function as starting materials for the arsenide based nanosuperconductors.

  5. Evolution of complex symbiotic relationships in a morphologically derived family of lichen-forming fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar, Pradeep K; Crespo, Ana; Wedin, Mats; Leavitt, Steven D; Hawksworth, David L; Myllys, Leena; McCune, Bruce; Randlane, Tiina; Bjerke, Jarle W; Ohmura, Yoshihito; Schmitt, Imke; Boluda, Carlos G; Alors, David; Roca-Valiente, Beatriz; Del-Prado, Ruth; Ruibal, Constantino; Buaruang, Kawinnat; Núñez-Zapata, Jano; Amo de Paz, Guillermo; Rico, Víctor J; Molina, M Carmen; Elix, John A; Esslinger, Theodore L; Tronstad, Inger Kristin K; Lindgren, Hanna; Ertz, Damien; Gueidan, Cécile; Saag, Lauri; Mark, Kristiina; Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Parnmen, Sittiporn; Beck, Andreas; Benatti, Michel Navarro; Blanchon, Dan; Candan, Mehmet; Clerc, Philippe; Goward, Trevor; Grube, Martin; Hodkinson, Brendan P; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kantvilas, Gintaras; Kirika, Paul M; Lendemer, James; Mattsson, Jan-Eric; Messuti, María Inés; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Nelsen, Matthew; Ohlson, Jan I; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; Saag, Andres; Sipman, Harrie J M; Sohrabi, Mohammad; Thell, Arne; Thor, Göran; Truong, Camille; Yahr, Rebecca; Upreti, Dalip K; Cubas, Paloma; Lumbsch, H Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    We studied the evolutionary history of the Parmeliaceae (Lecanoromycetes, Ascomycota), one of the largest families of lichen-forming fungi with complex and variable morphologies, also including several lichenicolous fungi. We assembled a six-locus data set including nuclear, mitochondrial and low-copy protein-coding genes from 293 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The lichenicolous lifestyle originated independently three times in lichenized ancestors within Parmeliaceae, and a new generic name is introduced for one of these fungi. In all cases, the independent origins occurred c. 24 million yr ago. Further, we show that the Paleocene, Eocene and Oligocene were key periods when diversification of major lineages within Parmeliaceae occurred, with subsequent radiations occurring primarily during the Oligocene and Miocene. Our phylogenetic hypothesis supports the independent origin of lichenicolous fungi associated with climatic shifts at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Moreover, diversification bursts at different times may be crucial factors driving the diversification of Parmeliaceae. Additionally, our study provides novel insight into evolutionary relationships in this large and diverse family of lichen-forming ascomycetes.

  6. The stratigraphy and evolution of lower Mount Sharp from spectral, morphological, and thermophysical orbital data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Edwards, C. S.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Milliken, R. E.; Quinn, D. P.; Rice, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a refined geologic map and stratigraphy for lower Mount Sharp using coordinated analyses of new spectral, thermophysical, and morphologic orbital data products. The Mount Sharp group consists of seven relatively planar units delineated by differences in texture, mineralogy, and thermophysical properties. These units are (1-3) three spatially adjacent units in the Murray formation which contain a variety of secondary phases and are distinguishable by thermal inertia and albedo differences, (4) a phyllosilicate-bearing unit, (5) a hematite-capped ridge unit, (6) a unit associated with material having a strongly sloped spectral signature at visible near-infrared wavelengths, and (7) a layered sulfate unit. The Siccar Point group consists of the Stimson formation and two additional units that unconformably overlie the Mount Sharp group. All Siccar Point group units are distinguished by higher thermal inertia values and record a period of substantial deposition and exhumation that followed the deposition and exhumation of the Mount Sharp group. Several spatially extensive silica deposits associated with veins and fractures show that late-stage silica enrichment within lower Mount Sharp was pervasive. At least two laterally extensive hematitic deposits are present at different stratigraphic intervals, and both are geometrically conformable with lower Mount Sharp strata. The occurrence of hematite at multiple stratigraphic horizons suggests redox interfaces were widespread in space and/or in time, and future measurements by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover will provide further insights into the depositional settings of these and other mineral phases.

  7. Surface morphology and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Ni-Mo nanocomposites as cathodes for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhachmi Guettaf, Temam; Hachemi Ben, Temam; Said, Benramache

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we study the influences of current density on surface morphology and electrochemical characterization of electrodeposited Ni-Mo. The Ni-Mo composite coatings are deposited on pretreated copper substrates by electrolytic deposition. The Ni-Mo solution is taken from nickel sulfate fluid and ammonium heptamolybdate with 10 g/l. The Ni-Mo composite coatings are deposited at a temperature of 303 K with an applied current density of jdep = 10 A/dm2-30 A/dm2. We find that the corrosion resistance is improved by incorporating Mo particles into Ni matrix in 0.6-M NaCl solution. From the potentiodynamic polarization curve of electrodeposited Ni-Mo it is confirmed that the corrosion resistance decreases with increasing applied current density. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of Ni-Mo coatings indicate three phases of MoNi4, Mo1.24Ni0.76, and Ni3Mo phases crystallites of nickel and molybdenum. The scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) tests indicate that Ni-Mo coatings present cracks and pores.

  8. Evolution of residual stress and crack morphologies during 3D FIB tomographic analysis of alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfallagh, F; Inkson, B J

    2008-05-01

    Three-dimensional focused ion beam (FIB) tomography is increasingly being used for 3D characterization of microstructures in the 50 nm-20 microm range. FIB tomography is a destructive, invasive process, and microstructural changes may potentially occur during the analysis process. Here residual stress and crack morphologies in single-crystal sapphire samples have been concurrently analyzed using Cr3+ fluorescence spectroscopy and FIB tomography. Specifically, maps of surface residual stress have been obtained from optically polished single-crystal alumina [surface orientation (1 ī 0 2)], from FIB milled surface trenches, from Vickers micro-indentation sites (loads 50 g-300 g), and from Vickers micro-indentation sites during FIB serial sectioning. The residual stress maps clearly show that FIB sputtering generates residual stress changes. For the case of the Vickers micro-indentations, FIB sputtering causes significant changes in residual stress during the FIB tomographic serial sectioning. 3D reconstruction of the crack distribution around micro-indentation sites shows that the cracks observed are influenced by the location of the FIB milled surface trenches due to localized stress changes.

  9. H-ATLAS/GAMA: Quantifying the Morphological Evolution of the Galaxy Population Using Cosmic Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Eales, Stephen; Allen, Matthew; Smith, M W L; Baldry, Ivan; Bourne, Nathan; Clark, C J R; Driver, Simon; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Graham, Alister W; Ibar, Edo; Hopkins, Andrew; Ivison, Rob; Kelvin, Lee S; Maddox, Steve; Maraston, Claudia; Robotham, Aaron S G; Smith, Dan; Taylor, Edward N; Valiante, Elisabetta; van der Werf, Paul; Baes, Maarten; Brough, Sarah; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Gomez, Haley; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steven; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Using results from the Herschel Astrophysical Terrahertz Large-Area Survey and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly project, we show that, for galaxy masses above approximately 1.0e8 solar masses, 51% of the stellar mass-density in the local Universe is in early-type galaxies (ETGs: Sersic n > 2.5) while 89% of the rate of production of stellar mass-density is occurring in late-type galaxies (LTGs: Sersic n < 2.5). From this zero-redshift benchmark, we have used a calorimetric technique to quantify the importance of the morphological transformation of galaxies over the history of the Universe. The extragalactic background radiation contains all the energy generated by nuclear fusion in stars since the Big Bang. By resolving this background radiation into individual galaxies using the deepest far-infrared survey with the Herschel Space Observatory and a deep near-infrared/optical survey with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and using measurements of the Sersic index of these galaxies derived from the HST images, w...

  10. Evolution of morphological integration. I. Functional units channel stress-induced variation in shrew mandibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyaev, Alexander V; Foresman, Kerry R

    2004-06-01

    Stress-induced deviations from normal development are often assumed to be random, yet their accumulation and expression can be influenced by patterns of morphological integration within an organism. We studied within-individual developmental variation (fluctuating asymmetry) in the mandible of four shrew species raised under normal and extreme environments. Patterns of among-individual variation and fluctuating asymmetry were strongly concordant in traits that were involved in the attachment of the same muscles (i.e., functionally integrated traits), and fluctuating asymmetry was closely integrated among these traits, implying direct developmental interactions among traits involved in the same function. Stress-induced variation was largely confined to the directions delimited by functionally integrated groups of traits in the pattern that was concordant with species divergence--species differed most in the same traits that were most sensitive to stress within each species. These results reveal a strong effect of functional complexes on directing and incorporating stress-induced variation during development and might explain the historical persistence of sets of traits involved in the same function in shrew jaws despite their high sensitivity to environmental variation.

  11. Evolution of Morphology and Structure During Crystallization and Melting in Syndiotactic Polypropylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Structure and morphology development during isothermal crystallization andsubsequent melting of syndiotactic polypropylene (Spp) was studied by time-resolvedsimultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD)methods with synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). The timeand temperature dependent parameters such as long period, L, crystal lamellar thickness, lc,amorphous layer thickness, la, scattering invariant, 6, crystallinity, Xc, lateral crystalsizes, L200 and L020, and unit cell parameters a and b were extracted from SAXS and WAXDprofiles. Decreasing long period and crystal thickness indicate that thinner secondary crystallamellae are formed. The decreases in unit cell parameters a and b during isothermalcrystallization process suggest that crystal perfection takes place. The changes in themorphological parameters (the invariant, Q, crystallinity, Xc, long period, L, and thecrystal thickness, lc) during subsequent melting were found to follow a two-stage meltingprocess, corresponding to the dual endotherm behavior in the DSC scan. We conclude that the dual melting peaks are due to the melting of secondary and primary lamellae(first peak)and the subsequent recrystallization-melting process (second peak). Additional minorendothermic peak located at the lowest temperature was also detected and might be related tomelting of secondary, thinner and defective lamellae. WAXD showed that during melting,thermal expansion was greater along the b axis than that along the a axis.

  12. Surface morphology and microstructure evolution of IG-110 graphite after xenon ion irradiation and subsequent annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing; Li, Jianjian; Liu, Renduo; Yan, Long; Huang, Hefei

    2017-08-01

    IG-110 graphite samples were polished and irradiated with Xe ions at various fluences, then annealed at high temperatures up to 1100 °C. After irradiation, small hills were found on the polished surfaces, indicating an anisotropic swelling induced by irradiation. Around 30% swelling at a fluence of 2 × 1015 ions/cm2 was characterized using atomic force microscopy. Severe swelling of the graphite crystallites caused stresses between adjacent crystallites, but leaved no intergranular cracks on the polished surface, which was ascribed to irradiation-induced creep of graphite. The pore morphology was affected by the anisotropic swelling. We found many contracted pores but only one expanded pore, indicating a decreased porosity induced by irradiation. After annealing at 1100 °C, TEM characterization showed clearly increased lattice order and decreased width of the (002) diffraction arc, indicating the annihilation of dislocations and recovery of basal plane rotations. Annealing-induced recrystallization of damaged graphite led to recovery of the crystallites' swelling and many small cracks appearing on the samples' surfaces.

  13. Evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies: the influence of morphology, stellar mass and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Dongyao; Conselice, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 425 nearby Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) from von der Linden et al. (2007), we study the relationship between their internal properties (stellar masses, structural parameters and morphologies) and their environment. More massive BCGs tend to inhabit denser regions and more massive clusters than lower mass BCGs. Furthermore, cDs, which are BCGs with particularly extended envelopes, seem to prefer marginally denser regions and tend to be hosted by more massive halos than elliptical BCGs. cD and elliptical BCGs show parallel positive correlations between their stellar masses and environmental densities. However, at a fixed environmental density, cDs are, on average, ~40% more massive. Our results, together with the findings of previous studies, suggest an evolutionary link between elliptical and cD BCGs. We suggest that most present-day cDs started their life as ellipticals, which subsequently grew in stellar mass and size due to mergers. In this process, the cD envelope developed. The larg...

  14. Morphology of the triggering and evolution of a deep moist convective system in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Elisabetta; Ferraris, Luca; Molini, Luca; Siccardi, Franco; Kranzlmueller, Dieter; Parodi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Gaining a deeper physical understanding of the high impact weather events (HIWE) which affected the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) in the last years (Cinqueterre 2011, Southern France 2011, Genoa 2011, Southern Spain 2012, and Genoa 2014) is strongly motivated by the social request to reduce the casualties and the economical impacts due to these highly-localized and hardly-predictable phenomena. One of the most recent HIWE observed in the WMB hit the Genoa city center, on October 2014 less than 3 years after the very similar one which already affected the city on November 2011. Taking advantage of the availability of both observational data and modelling results (WRF-ARW runs) at the micro-α meteorological scale (2 km - 0.2 km and 1 hour or less, Orlanski, 1975), this paper provides new insights about the triggering mechanism and the subsequent spatio-temporal evolution of 2014 HIWE. The major feature that emerged from the very fine grid spacing simulations is the effect of a kind of virtual topography created on the Ligurian sea by the convergence of the cold current outflowing from the Po valley and the warm and moist south-easterly flow.

  15. The evolution of cursorial carnivores in the Tertiary: implications of elbow-joint morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ki; Werdelin, Lars

    2003-11-01

    The evolution of cursorial adaptations in Tertiary (65-1.65 Myr ago) carnivores has been a contentious issue. Most such studies have focused on the relationship between hind limb proportions and running speed. Here, we show morphometrically that in extant carnivores, the elbow joint has evolved in two distinct directions with mutually exclusive implications for locomotor ability and prey procurement. Some carnivores retain supinatory ability, allowing them to manipulate prey and other items with the forepaws. Such carnivores can become very large. Other carnivores lose the ability to supinate and become cursors. This allows for only moderate size increase. Modern carnivores above ca. 20 kg body mass are committed to one or other of these strategies. This threshold coincides with a postulated threshold in carnivore physiology. The biaxial pattern mostly follows phylogenetic lines, but a strong selective regime can override this signal, as shown by the extant cheetah. Oligocene (33.7-23.8 Myr ago) and early-middle Miocene (23.8-11.2 Myr ago) carnivores follow the same pattern, though in the Miocene the pattern is shifted towards larger body mass, which may be owing to the extraordinary richness of browsing ungulates at this time.

  16. Microestrutural evolution in a CuZnAl shape memory alloy: kinetics and morphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Sanguinetti Ferreira

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural evolution of the CuZnAl shape memory alloys was studied by indirect techniques relating to the atomic migration rate of grain boundaries. Addition elements were used in a Cu-15,5Zn-8,0Al alloy to provide a comparison with the same alloy without microelement additions. The alloys were melted in an induction furnace of 24 kVA. After casting, the bulk samples of the alloys were homogenized. Then they were solution treated and hot-rolled followed by water-quenching to initiate the recrystallization. Finally, annealing produced at different temperature ranges was made in different samples in order to establish a law for the grain growth. Following the heat treatments, all annealed samples were examined by statistical metallography and the grain sizes were measured. After measurements, the same empirical law of grain growth was found for the different alloys and the ln [D-Do] x 1/T diagrams were plotted in order to establish the kinetic behavior. Based on the estimated values of the activation energy, important conclusions were obtained concerning the addition elements.

  17. Evolution of cementite morphology in pearlitic steel wire during wet wire drawing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaodan [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 (China); Godfrey, Andrew, E-mail: awgodfrey@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 (China); Hansen, Niels; Huang Xiaoxu [Center for Fundamental Research: Metal Structures in Four Dimensions, Materials Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Liu Wei [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 (China); Liu Qing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400030 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The evolution of the cementite phase during wet wire drawing of a pearlitic steel wire has been followed as a function of strain. Particular attention has been given to a quantitative characterization of changes in the alignment and in the dimensions of the cementite phase. Scanning electron microscope observations show that cementite plates become increasingly aligned with the wire axis as the drawing strain is increased. Measurements in the transmission electron microscope show that the cementite deforms plastically during wire drawing , with the average thickness of the cementite plates decreasing from 19 nm ({epsilon} = 0) to 2 nm ({epsilon} = 3.7) in correspondence with the reduction in wire diameter. The deformation of the cementite is strongly related to plastic deformation in the ferrite, with coarse slip steps, shear bands and cracks in the cementite plates/particles observed parallel to either {l_brace}110{r_brace}{sub {alpha}} or {l_brace}112{r_brace}{sub {alpha}} slip plane traces in the ferrite.

  18. Morphological diversity and evolution of the spermatozoon in the mouse-related clade of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, William G; Leigh, Chris M; Aplin, Ken P; Shahin, Adel A B; Avenant, Nico L

    2014-05-01

    Most species in the three highly speciose families of the mouse-related clade of rodents, the Muridae, Cricetidae, and Nesomyidae (superfamily Muroidea), have a highly complex sperm head in which there is an apical hook but there are few data available for the other related families of these rodents. In the current study, using light and electron microscopies, we investigated the structure of the spermatozoon in representative species of four other families within the mouse-related clade, the Dipodidae, Spalacidae, Pedetidae, and Heteromyidae, that diverged at or near the base of the muroid lineage. Our results indicate that a diverse array of sperm head shapes and tail lengths occurs but none of the species in the families Spalacidae, Dipodidae, or Pedetidae has a sperm head with an apical hook. By contrast, a rostrally extending apical hook is present in spermatozoa of members of the Family Heteromyidae which also invariably have comparatively long sperm tails. These findings suggest that the hook-shaped sperm head in the murid, cricetid, and nesomyid rodents evolved after divergence of this lineage from its common ancestor with the other families of the mouse-related clade, and that separate, and independent, convergent evolution of a similar sperm head form, and long sperm tail, occurred in the Heteromyidae.

  19. Evolution of morphological novelty: a phylogenetic analysis of growth patterns in Streptocarpus (Gesneriaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, M; Cronk, Q C

    2001-05-01

    Streptocarpus shows great variation in vegetative architecture. In some species a normal shoot apical meristem never forms and the entire vegetative plant body may consist of a single giant cotyledon, which may measure up to 0.75 m (the unifoliate type) or with further leaves arising from this structure (the rosulate type). A molecular phylogeny of 87 taxa (77 Streptocarpus species, seven related species, and three outgroup species) using the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S region of nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests that Streptocarpus can be divided into two major clades. One of these broadly corresponds to the caulescent group (with conventional shoot architecture) classified as subgenus Streptocarpella, whereas the other is mainly composed of acaulescent species with unusual architecture (subgenus Streptocarpus). Some caulescent species (such as S. papangae) are anomalously placed with the acaulescent clade. Available cytological data are, however, completely congruent with the two major clades: the caulescent clade is x = 15 and the acaulescent clade (including the caulescent S. papangae) is x = 16 (or polyploid multiples of 16). The genera Linnaeopsis, Saintpaulia, and Schizoboea are nested within Streptocarpus. The sequenced region has evolved, on average, 2.44 times faster in the caulescent clade than in the acaulescent clade and this is associated with the more rapid life cycle of the caulescents. Morphological variation in plant architecture within the acaulescent clade is homoplastic and does not appear to have arisen by unique abrupt changes. Instead, rosulate and unifoliate growth forms have evolved several times, reversals have occurred, and intermediate architectures are found. An underlying developmental plasticity seems to be a characteristic of the acaulescent clade and is reflected in a great lability of form.

  20. The Pianosa Contourite Depositional System (Northern Tyrrhenian Sea): drift morphology and Plio-Quaternary stratigraphic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramontes Garcia, Elda; Cattaneo, Antonio; Jouet, Gwenael; Thereau, Estelle; Thomas, Yannick; Rovere, Marzia; Cauquil, Eric; Trincardi, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Pianosa Contourite Depositional System (CDS) is located in the Corsica Trough (Northern Tyrrhenian Sea), a confined basin dominated by mass transport and contour currents in the eastern flank and by turbidity currents in the western flank. The morphologic and stratigraphic characterisation of the Pianosa CDS is based on multibeam bathymetry, seismic reflection data (multi-channel high resolution mini GI gun, single-channel sparker and CHIRP), sediment cores and ADCP data. The Pianosa CDS is located at shallow to intermediate water depths (170 to 850 m water depth) and is formed under the influence of the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW). It is 120 km long, has a maximum width of 10 km and is composed of different types of muddy sediment drifts: plastered drift, separated mounded drift, sigmoid drift and multicrested drift. The reduced tectonic activity in the Corsica Trough since the early Pliocene permits to recover a sedimentary record of the contourite depositional system that is only influenced by climate fluctuations. Contourites started to develop in the Middle-Late Pliocene, but their growth was enhanced since the Middle Pleistocene Transition (0.7-0.9 Ma). Although the general circulation of the LIW, flowing northwards in the Corsica Trough, remained active all along the history of the system, contourite drift formation changed, controlled by sediment influx and bottom current velocity. During periods of sea level fall, fast bottom currents often eroded the drift crest in the middle and upper slope. At that time the proximity of the coast to the shelf edge favoured the formation of bioclastic sand deposits winnowed by bottom currents. Higher sediment accumulation of mud in the drifts occurred during periods of fast bottom currents and high sediment availability (i.e. high activity of turbidity currents), coincident with periods of sea level low-stands. Condensed sections were formed during sea level high-stands, when bottom currents were more sluggish

  1. Continuous and discontinuous phase transitions in the evolution of a polygenic trait under stabilizing selective pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Annalisa; Cocozza, Sergio; Monticelli, Antonella; Scala, Giovanni; Miele, Gennaro

    2017-06-01

    The presence of phenomena analogous to phase transition in Statistical Mechanics has been suggested in the evolution of a polygenic trait under stabilizing selection, mutation and genetic drift. By using numerical simulations of a model system, we analyze the evolution of a population of N diploid hermaphrodites in random mating regime. The population evolves under the effect of drift, selective pressure in form of viability on an additive polygenic trait, and mutation. The analysis allows to determine a phase diagram in the plane of mutation rate and strength of selection. The involved pattern of phase transitions is characterized by a line of critical points for weak selective pressure (smaller than a threshold), whereas discontinuous phase transitions, characterized by metastable hysteresis, are observed for strong selective pressure. A finite-size scaling analysis suggests the analogy between our system and the mean-field Ising model for selective pressure approaching the threshold from weaker values. In this framework, the mutation rate, which allows the system to explore the accessible microscopic states, is the parameter controlling the transition from large heterozygosity ( disordered phase) to small heterozygosity ( ordered one).

  2. Continuing the International Roadmapping Effort - An Introduction to the Evolution of the ISECG Global Exploration Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlutz, Juergen; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Laurini, Kathy; Spiero, Francois

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration goals call for sending humans and robots beyond low Earth orbit and establishing sustained access to destinations such as the Moon, asteroids and Mars. Space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are discussing an international approach for achieving these goals, documented in ISECG's Global Exploration Roadmap (GER). The GER reference scenario reflects a step-wise evolution of critical capabilities from ISS to missions in the lunar vicinity in preparation for the journey of humans to Mars. As ISECG agencies advance their individual planning, they also advance the mission themes and reference architecture of the GER to consolidate common goals, near-term mission scenarios and initial opportunities for collaboration. In this context, particular focus has been given to the Better understanding and further refinement of cislunar infrastructure and potential lunar transportation architecture Interaction with international science communities to identify and articulate the scientific opportunities of the near-term exploration mission themes Coordination and consolidation of interest in lunar polar volatiles prospecting and potential for in-situ resource utilisation Identification and articulation of the benefits from exploration and the technology transfer activities The paper discusses the ongoing roadmapping activity of the ISECG agencies. It provides an insight into the status of the above activities and an outlook towards the evolution of the GER that is currently foreseen in the 2017 timeframe.

  3. CFD-DEM simulations of current-induced dune formation and morphological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', 'small dune', 'vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver developed by the authors. This is a general-purpose solver for particle-laden flows tailed for particle transport problems. Validation tests are performed to demonstrate the capability of CFD-DEM in the full range of sediment transport regimes. Comparison of simulation results with experimental and numerical benchmark data demonstrates the merits of CFD-DEM approach. In addition, the improvements of the present simulations over existing studies using CFD-DEM are presented. The present solver gives more accurate prediction of sediment transport rate by properly accounting for the influence of particle volume fraction on the fluid flow. In summary, this work demonstrates that CFD-DEM is a promising particle-resolving approach for probing the physics of current-induced sediment transport.

  4. Morphological and pathological evolution of the brain microcirculation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Hunter

    Full Text Available Key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD, including amyloid plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA and neurofibrillary tangles do not completely account for cognitive impairment, therefore other factors such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathologies, may contribute to AD. In order to elucidate the microvascular changes that contribute to aging and disease, direct neuropathological staining and immunohistochemistry, were used to quantify the structural integrity of the microvasculature and its innervation in three oldest-old cohorts: 1 nonagenarians with AD and a high amyloid plaque load; 2 nonagenarians with no dementia and a high amyloid plaque load; 3 nonagenarians without dementia or amyloid plaques. In addition, a non-demented (ND group (average age 71 years with no amyloid plaques was included for comparison. While gray matter thickness and overall brain mass were reduced in AD compared to ND control groups, overall capillary density was not different. However, degenerated string capillaries were elevated in AD, potentially suggesting greater microvascular "dysfunction" compared to ND groups. Intriguingly, apolipoprotein ε4 carriers had significantly higher string vessel counts relative to non-ε4 carriers. Taken together, these data suggest a concomitant loss of functional capillaries and brain volume in AD subjects. We also demonstrated a trend of decreasing vesicular acetylcholine transporter staining, a marker of cortical cholinergic afferents that contribute to arteriolar vasoregulation, in AD compared to ND control groups, suggesting impaired control of vasodilation in AD subjects. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker of noradrenergic vascular innervation, was reduced which may also contribute to a loss of control of vasoconstriction. The data highlight the importance of the brain microcirculation in the pathogenesis and evolution of AD.

  5. Development of bat flight: morphologic and molecular evolution of bat wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Karen E; Behringer, Richard R; Rasweiler, John J; Niswander, Lee A

    2006-04-25

    The earliest fossil bats resemble their modern counterparts in possessing greatly elongated digits to support the wing membrane, which is an anatomical hallmark of powered flight. To quantitatively confirm these similarities, we performed a morphometric analysis of wing bones from fossil and modern bats. We found that the lengths of the third, fourth, and fifth digits (the primary supportive elements of the wing) have remained constant relative to body size over the last 50 million years. This absence of transitional forms in the fossil record led us to look elsewhere to understand bat wing evolution. Investigating embryonic development, we found that the digits in bats (Carollia perspicillata) are initially similar in size to those of mice (Mus musculus) but that, subsequently, bat digits greatly lengthen. The developmental timing of the change in wing digit length points to a change in longitudinal cartilage growth, a process that depends on the relative proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes. We found that bat forelimb digits exhibit relatively high rates of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. We show that bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) can stimulate cartilage proliferation and differentiation and increase digit length in the bat embryonic forelimb. Also, we show that Bmp2 expression and Bmp signaling are increased in bat forelimb embryonic digits relative to mouse or bat hind limb digits. Together, our results suggest that an up-regulation of the Bmp pathway is one of the major factors in the developmental elongation of bat forelimb digits, and it is potentially a key mechanism in their evolutionary elongation as well.

  6. A comparative analysis of the morphology and evolution of permanent sperm depletion in spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michalik

    Full Text Available Once thought to be energetically cheap and easy to produce, empirical work has shown that sperm is a costly and limited resource for males. In some spider species, there is behavioral evidence that sperm are permanently depleted after a single mating. This extreme degree of mating investment appears to co-occur with other reproductive strategies common to spiders, e.g. genital mutilation and sexual cannibalism. Here we corroborate that sperm depletion in the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes is permanent by uncovering its mechanistic basis using light and electron microscopy. In addition, we use a phylogeny-based statistical analysis to test the evolutionary relationships between permanent sperm depletion (PSD and other reproductive strategies in spiders. Male testes do not produce sperm during adulthood, which is unusual in spiders. Instead, spermatogenesis is nearly synchronous and ends before the maturation molt. Testis size decreases as males approach their maturation molt and reaches its lowest point after sperm is transferred into the male copulatory organs (pedipalps. As a consequence, the amount of sperm available to males for mating is limited to the sperm contained in the pedipalps, and once it is used, males lose their ability to fertilize eggs. Our data suggest that PSD has evolved independently at least three times within web-building spiders and is significantly correlated with the evolution of other mating strategies that limit males to monogamy, including genital mutilation and sexual cannibalism. We conclude that PSD may be an energy-saving adaptation in species where males are limited to monogamy. This could be particularly important in web-building spiders where extreme sexual size dimorphism results in large, sedentary females and small, searching males who rarely feed as adults and are vulnerable to starvation. Future work will explore possible energetic benefits and the evolutionary lability of PSD relative to other

  7. The Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes): a model to study the molecular basis of eukaryote-prokaryote mutualism and the development and evolution of morphological novelties in cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patricia N; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Callaerts, Patrick; de Couet, H Gert

    2009-11-01

    The Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, is a cephalopod whose small size, short lifespan, rapid growth, and year-round availability make it suitable as a model organism. E. scolopes is studied in three principal contexts: (1) as a model of cephalopod development; (2) as a model of animal-bacterial symbioses; and (3) as a system for studying adaptations of tissues that interact with light. E. scolopes embryos can be obtained continually and can be reared in the laboratory over an entire generation. The embryos and protective chorions are optically clear, facilitating in situ developmental observations, and can be manipulated experimentally. Many molecular protocols have been developed for studying E. scolopes development. This species is best known, however, for its symbiosis with the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and has been used to study determinants of symbiont specificity, the influence of symbiosis on development of the squid light organ, and the mechanisms by which a stable association is achieved. Both partners can be grown independently under laboratory conditions, a feature that offers the unusual opportunity to manipulate the symbiosis experimentally. Molecular and genetic tools have been developed for V. fischeri, and a large expressed sequence tag (EST) database is available for the host symbiotic tissues. Additionally, comparisons between light organ form and function to those of the eye can be made. Both types of tissue interact with light, but have divergent embryonic development. As such, they offer an opportunity to study the molecular basis for the evolution of morphological novelties.

  8. Morphology of the prosomal endoskeleton of Scorpiones (Arachnida) and a new hypothesis for the evolution of cuticular cephalic endoskeletons in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Jeffrey W

    2007-03-01

    Skeletomuscular anatomy of the scorpion prosoma is examined in an attempt to explain the evolution of two endoskeletal features, a muscular diaphragm dividing the prosoma and opisthosoma and cuticular epistomal entapophyses with a uniquely complex arrangement of muscles, tendons and ligaments. Both structures appear to be derived from modifications of the mesodermal intersegmental endoskeleton that is primitive for all major arthropod groups. The scorpion diaphragm is a compound structure comprising axial muscles and pericardial ligaments of segments VI to VIII and extrinsic muscles of leg 4 brought into contact by longitudinal reduction of segment VII and integrated into a continuous subvertical sheet. This finding reconciles a long-standing conflict between one interpretation of opisthosomal segmentation based on scorpion embryology and another derived from comparative skeletomuscular anatomy. A new evolutionary-developmental mechanism is proposed to account for the complex morphology of the epistomal entapophyses. Each entapophysis receives 14 muscles and tendons that in other taxa would attach to the anterior connective endoskeleton in the same relative positions. This observation suggests that the embryological precursor to the connective endoskeleton can initiate and guide ectodermal invagination and thereby serve as a spatial template for the development of cuticular apodemes. This mesoderm-template model of ectodermal invagination is potentially applicable to all arthropods and may explain structural diversity and convergence in cephalic apodemes throughout the group. The model is used to interpret the cephalic endoskeletons of two non-chelicerate arthropods, Archaeognatha (Hexapoda) and Symphyla (Myriapoda), to demonstrate the generality of the model.

  9. When size makes a difference: allometry, life-history and morphological evolution of capuchins (Cebus) and squirrels (Saimiri) monkeys (Cebinae, Platyrrhini)

    OpenAIRE

    Marroig Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background How are morphological evolution and developmental changes related? This rather old and intriguing question had a substantial boost after the 70s within the framework of heterochrony (changes in rates or timing of development) and nowadays has the potential to make another major leap forward through the combination of approaches: molecular biology, developmental expe...

  10. Exploring Quenching, Morphological Transformation and AGN-Driven Winds with Simulations of Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ryan; CANDELS

    2017-01-01

    We present an examination of the spheroid growth and star formation quenching experienced by galaxies since z~3 by studying the evolution with redshift of the quiescent and spheroid-dominated fractions of galaxies from the CANDELS and GAMA surveys. We compare these fractions with predictions from a semi-analytic model which includes prescriptions for bulge growth and AGN feedback due to mergers and disk instabilities. We then subdivide our population into the four quadrants of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR)-Sersic index plane. We find that the fraction of star forming disks declines steadily while the fraction of quiescent spheroids increases with cosmic time. The fraction of star-forming spheroids and quiescent disks are both non-negligible and remain nearly constant. Our model is qualitatively successful at reproducing these fractions, suggesting a plausible explanation for the observed correlations between star formation activity and galaxy structure.Next, we study the correlation of galaxy structural properties with their location relative to the star-formation rate-stellar mass correlation, or the star forming main sequence. We find that as we move from observed galaxies above the main sequence to those below it, we see a nearly monotonic trend towards higher median Sersic index, smaller radius, lower SFR density and higher stellar mass density. Our model again qualitatively reproduces these trends, supporting a picture in which bulges and black holes co-evolve and AGN feedback plays a critical role in galaxy quenching.Finally, we examine AGN-driven winds in a suite of cosmological zoom simulations including a novel mechanical and radiation-driven AGN feedback prescription and compare the gas cycle with a matched suite of zoom simulations that include only feedback from supernovae and young stars. We find that while stellar feedback can drive mass out of galaxies, it is unlikely to be able to keep the gas from re-accreting, whereas in our AGN runs it

  11. A new finite element model in studying earthquake triggering and continuous evolution of stress field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU CaiBo; ZHOU YiJie; CAI YongEn

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new finite element model (FEM) In consideration of regional stress field and an earthquake triggering factor C are proposed for studying earthquake triggering and stress field evolution in an earthquake sequence. The factor C is defined as a ratio between the shear stress and the frictional strength on a slip surface, and it can be used to tell if earthquake is triggered or not. The new FEM and the factor C are used to study the aftershock triggering of the 1976 Tangshan earthquake sequence. The results indicate that the effects of the stress field and the heterogeneity of the Tangshan earthquake fault zone on the aftershock triggering are very important. The affershocks fallen in the earthquake triggering regions predicted by the new FEM are more than those fallen in the regions of △CFS≥0 predicted by seismic dislocation theory.

  12. A new finite element model in studying earthquake triggering and continuous evolution of stress field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new finite element model (FEM) in consideration of regional stress field and an earthquake triggering factor C are proposed for studying earthquake triggering and stress field evolution in an earthquake sequence. The factor C is defined as a ratio between the shear stress and the frictional strength on a slip surface, and it can be used to tell if earthquake is triggered or not. The new FEM and the factor C are used to study the aftershock triggering of the 1976 Tangshan earthquake sequence. The results indicate that the effects of the stress field and the heterogeneity of the Tangshan earthquake fault zone on the aftershock triggering are very important. The aftershocks fallen in the earthquake triggering regions predicted by the new FEM are more than those fallen in the regions of ΔCFS≥ 0 predicted by seismic dislocation theory.

  13. Functional morphology and evolution of the hyper-elongated intromittent organ in Cassida leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yoko; Michels, Jan; Appel, Esther; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2017-02-01

    The peculiar phenomenon of hyper-elongation of intromittent organs is well known in a number of insect groups. However, the unresolved questions of how and why such a phenomenon originated independently many times continue to attract biologists' attention. To be able to detect the evolutionary driving mechanisms that enabled insects to repeatedly acquire such a peculiarity, first of all the structural key features and the mechanics of these organs have to be determined. In the present study, the morphology of the reproductive organs of two species of the beetle genus Cassida, with a special focus on the male structures, was scrutinised in detail during copulation and at rest using different microscopy techniques. We found that the hyper-elongated structure of the intromittent organ, called flagellum, is part of the male ejaculatory duct. When the flagellum is inserted into the female spermathecal duct, longitudinal muscles of the ejaculatory duct, but not the flagellum, are shortened. These results strongly suggest that the contraction of the longitudinal muscles of the ejaculatory duct causes propulsion of the flagellum into the highly spiralled spermathecal duct of the female. The tip of the cuticular flagellum is curled up, which can suggest that its physical properties differ from those of the rest of the flagellum. Considering the preceding modelling studies, this property aids the flagellum in penetrating within the highly spiralled and very variable female duct. Based on our morphological results and in comparison with the morphology of intromittent organs of other beetles, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the hyper-elongation in the Cassida species and propose a hypothesis that explains the independent origin of the hyper-elongation of intromittent organs.

  14. Cellular automaton simulation of microstructure evolution during austenite decomposition under continuous cooling conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Varma; R Sasikumar; S G K Pillai; P K Nair

    2001-06-01

    A two-dimensional diffusion based model is developed to describe transformation of austenite into ferrite and pearlite under continuous cooling conditions. The nucleation of ferrite is assumed to occur over grain boundaries and the nucleation of pearlite is assumed to be taking place all over the grain and at growing ferrite–austenite interfaces, when the composition and temperature conditions are favourable. A cellular automaton algorithm, with transformation rules based on this model is used for the growth of ferrite and pearlite. Model predicted results for continuous cooling transformations are verified by comparing the model predicted microstructure features with the experimental measurements for two sets of plain carbon steels of different composition and austenite grain size. Using the model, it is possible to generate results like undercooling to start ferrite and pearlite transformations, which are difficult to obtain experimentally.

  15. Morphology and microstructure evolution of Ti-50 at.% Al cathodes during cathodic arc deposition of Ti-Al-N coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Bilal; Zhu, Jianqiang; Polcik, Peter; Kolozsvari, Szilard; Hâkansson, Greger; Johnson, Lars; Ahlgren, Mats; Jöesaar, Mats; Odén, Magnus

    2017-06-01

    Today's research on the cathodic arc deposition technique and coatings therefrom primarily focuses on the effects of, e.g., nitrogen partial pressure, growth temperature, and substrate bias. Detailed studies on the morphology and structure of the starting material—the cathode—during film growth and its influence on coating properties at different process conditions are rare. This work aims to study the evolution of the converted layer, its morphology, and microstructure, as a function of the cathode material grain size during deposition of Ti-Al-N coatings. The coatings were reactively grown in pure N2 discharges from powder metallurgically manufactured Ti-50 at.% Al cathodes with grain size distribution averages close to 1800, 100, 50, and 10 μm, respectively, and characterized with respect to microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties. The results indicate that for the cathode of 1800 μm grain size the disparity in the work function among parent phases plays a dominant role in the pronounced erosion of Al, which yields the coatings rich in macro-particles and of high Al content. We further observed that a reduction in the grain size of Ti-50 at.% Al cathodes to 10 μm provides favorable conditions for self-sustaining reactions between Ti and Al phases upon arcing to form γ phase. The combination of self-sustaining reaction and the arc process not only result in the formation of hole-like and sub-hole features on the converted layer but also generate coatings of high Al content and laden with macro-particles.

  16. Development of a modelling methodology for simulation of long-term morphological evolution of the southern Baltic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Harff, Jan; Schneider, Ralf; Wu, Chaoyu

    2010-10-01

    The Darss-Zingst peninsula at the southern Baltic Sea is a typical wave-dominated barrier island system which includes an outer barrier island and an inner lagoon. The formation of the Darss-Zingst peninsula dates back to the Littorina Transgression onset about 8,000 cal BP. It originated from several discrete islands, has been reshaped by littoral currents, wind-induced waves during the last 8,000 years and evolved into a complex barrier island system as today; thus, it may serve as an example to study the coastal evolution under long-term climate change. A methodology for developing a long-term (decadal-to-centennial) process-based morphodynamic model for the southern Baltic coastal environment is presented here. The methodology consists of two main components: (1) a preliminary analysis of the key processes driving the morphological evolution of the study area based on statistical analysis of meteorological data and sensitivity studies; (2) a multi-scale high-resolution process-based model. The process-based model is structured into eight main modules. The two-dimensional vertically integrated circulation module, the wave module, the bottom boundary layer module, the sediment transport module, the cliff erosion module and the nearshore storm module are real-time calculation modules which aim at solving the short-term processes. A bathymetry update module and a long-term control function set, in which the ‘reduction’ concepts and technique for morphological update acceleration are implemented, are integrated to up-scale the effects of short-term processes to a decadal-to-centennial scale. A series of multi-scale modelling strategies are implemented in the application of the model to the research area. Successful hindcast of the coastline change of the Darss-Zingst peninsula for the last 300 years validates the modelling methodology. Model results indicate that the coastline change of the Darss-Zingst peninsula is dominated by mechanisms acting on different

  17. Morphological evolution and reconstruction of silver nanoparticles in aquatic environments: The roles of natural organic matter and light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Xiaoyan; Shi, Junpeng [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Zhang, Hongwu, E-mail: hwzhang@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Ningbo Research Center for Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • In the dark, AgNPs formed chain-like structures through bridging effects with NOM. • NOM decelerated the photoreaction of AgNPs but did not stop the photoconversion. • Under extended irradiation, NOM substituted for citrate as a stabilizer. • In different aquatic systems AgNPs would suffer distinct environmental behavior. - Abstract: With the proliferation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their potential entry into the environment has attracted increasing concern. Although photochemical transformation is an important fate of AgNPs in aquatic environments due to their strong light absorption, little is known about the evolution and transformation mechanisms of AgNPs. This study investigated the morphological evolution and reconstruction of AgNPs during photoconversion in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). In the dark, the AgNPs formed chain-like structures through bridging effects with NOM at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mg/L, and the proportion of Ag{sup +} in solution in the presence of 10 mg/L NOM was reduced by roughly half compared with that in the absence of NOM. Under irradiation, NOM participated in the photoreaction of AgNPs and can decelerate the photoreaction of AgNPs via several mechanisms, including light attenuation, the formation of a NOM coating, and competing with Ag for photons. Additionally, NOM can substitute for citrate as a stabilizing agent to compensate for the loss of AgNP stability due to citrate mineralization under extended irradiation, producing stable triangular nanosilver in aquatic environments. This study sheds light on the behavioral differences of AgNPs in different aquatic systems, which create uncertainties and difficulties in assessing the environmental risks of AgNPs.

  18. Morphological Evolution and Its Response to the Navigational Improvements in the North Passage, Yangtze Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By use of bathymetric chart, recent change of the riverbed in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary has been studied in this paper. The main channel of the upper, middle and lower (section) in the North Passage has been successively eroded and its groin field significantly deposited. At the same time, sediment has been deposited on the entrance region. Erosion and deposition had responded rapidly to the construction of the regulation engineering. There was about one year duration of lagging between erosion in the deep channel and the construction of the regulation engineering. The siltation lag of time in the groin field varied with the initial depth, but the average deposited thickness was about 0.5 m per year. Volumetric analysis demonstrates that there is a increasing trend of siltation in the North Passage after 2002, because of the difference in duration and quantity between erosion in the deep channel and deposition in the groin field. The water volume of the North Passage was reduced by ≈9%(280 million m3) between 2002 and 2006. Sediment budget reveals that the main sediment deposited in the North Passage takes its source from the river and the ocean. The decreasing water volume was attributable to shoaling in the groin field. Its triggering factors for increased sedimentation are the navigational improvements(jetties and groins) after 1998,which altered the passage boundary and destroyed the equilibrium state on the average ebb and flood sediment fluxes. The establishment of a stable estuary is attributed to a reduction in depth of the groin field. The forecast on the sediment deposition quantity and continuous infilling time in the groin system is about 325×106m3 and 6~7 years, respectively.

  19. Evolution of udder morphology, alveolar and cisternal milk compartment during lactation and their relationship with milk yield in Najdi sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moez Ayadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 30 multiparous Najdi ewes were used to study the evolution of udder morphology traits and milk fractions in the udder during suckling (3rd, 6th, 9thwk and milking (10th, 11th, 12thwk periods. During suckling period, daily milk yield was estimated by using the double oxytocin injections method 4-h after milking. During milking period, ewes were hand-milked once daily. Udder and teat morphology traits for all ewes were measured 4-h after milking. Udder compartments were evaluated 8-h after milking by using atosiban and oxytocin; milk samples of each fraction were collected. Najdi ewes had a medium and healthy udders (CMT<1, with medium sized teats (length, 3.2±0.1 cm and width, 1.7±0.1 cm attached at 35.7 ± 11º angle. Milk yield averaged 1.88±0.18 and 0.44±0.12 L d-1 during suckling and milking periods, respectively. A drop in milk yield (-75%, p<0.01 was found in the transition from suckling to milking. Udder traits, teats angle and width, and distance between teats declined (p<0.05 throughout lactation, whereas teat lengths did not show any change. Positive correlations (p<0.05 were observed between milk yield and udder depth (r=0.47-0.49, width (r=0.31-0.39 and distance between teats (r=0.26-0.39. The cisternal milk volumes decreased (p<0.05 after weaning, whilst the corresponding percentages increased (p<0.05. Cisternal milk accounted for 55% and 67% of the total udder milk during suckling and milking periods, respectively. Cisternal milk was positively correlated (r=0.93, p<0.05 with total milk yield. The percentages of protein and total solids in alveolar and cisternal milk increased significantly (p<0.05 after weaning, whilst fat percentages in cisternal milk did not change. In conclusion, the evaluated Najdi ewes showed medium sized cisterns and teats, which considered adequate for machine milking. Udder morphology traits had positive correlations with milk yield and hence, can be utilized in breeding programs.

  20. Submarine canyon morphologies and evolution on a modern carbonate system: the Northern Slope of Little Bahama Bank (Bahamas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournadour, Elsa; Mulder, Thierry; Borgomano, Jean; Hanquiez, Vincent; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Gillet, Hervé; Sorriaux, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    The recent CARAMBAR cruise (Nov. 2010) on the northern slope of Little Bahama Bank (LBB, Bahamas) provided new seafloor and subsurface data, that improve our knowledge on carbonate slope systems. The new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry data (Kongsberg EM302 echosounder) and very high resolution (3.5 kHz/Chirp subbotom profiler) seismic data show that the upper LBB slope is dissected by 18 canyons. These canyons evolve sharply into short channels opening to depositional fan-shaped lobes. These architectural elements form a narrow carbonate gravity system extending over 40 km along the LBB slope. The features previously described as small linear canyons have a more complex morphology than originally supposed. The several architectural elements that can be distinguished share similar characteristics with siliciclastic canyons. The average morphological features of the canyons are: minimum and maximum water depths of 460 and 970 m resp., mean length = 16.3 km and sinuosity = 1.14. Canyons are floored with flat elongated morphologies interpreted as terraces. Some of these terraces are located at the toe of slide scars on canyon heads and canyon sides which suggest that they result from sediment failures. On the Chirp seismic data, wedge-shape aggrading terraces interpreted as "internal levees" can be observed. These terraces would then be formed by overbanking of the upper part of turbidity currents. Between 530 and 630 m water depth, some canyons exhibit an amphitheater-shaped head with a head wall height ranging from 80 to 100 m. The wall edges of these canyon heads consist of coalescing arcuate slump scars, which suggests that the canyons formed by retrogressive erosion. Other canyons show an amphitheater-shaped head that evolves upslope into linear valleys incising the upper slope between 460 m and 530 m water depth. The onset and the spatial distribution of these linear valleys seem to be influenced by sediments transported from oolitic shoals of Walker Cay

  1. Generic role of the anisotropic surface free energy on the morphological evolution in a strained-heteroepitaxial solid droplet on a rigid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurtani, Tarik Omer; Celik, Aytac; Oren, Ersin Emre

    2010-11-01

    A systematic study based on self-consistent dynamical simulations is presented for the spontaneous evolution of an isolated thin solid droplet on a rigid substrate, which is driven by the surface drift diffusion induced by the anisotropic capillary forces (surface stiffness) and mismatch stresses. In this work, we studied the effect of surface free energy anisotropies [weak and strong (anomalous)] on the development kinetics of the "Stranski-Krastanow" island type morphologies. The anisotropic surface free energy and the surface stiffness were treated with well accepted trigonometric functions. Although, various tilt angles and anisotropy constants were considered during simulations, the main emphasis was given on the effect of rotational symmetries associated with the surface Helmholtz free energy topography in two-dimensional space. Our computer simulations revealed the formation of an extremely thin wetting layer during the development of the bell-shaped Stranski-Krastanow island through the mass accumulation at the central region of the droplet via surface drift-diffusion. For weak anisotropy constant levels, instead of singlet islanding, we observed formation of doublet islanding, separated by a shallow wetting layer, for a set of specific tilt angles, ϕ =90° and ϕ =45°, respectively, for the twofold and fourfold rotational symmetry axis. No such formation has been detected for the sixfold symmetry. In the strong (anomalous) anisotropy constant domain, we demonstrated the existence of two distinct morphological modes: (i) the complete stability of the initial Cosine-shaped droplet just above a certain anisotropy constant threshold level by spontaneous slight readjustments of the base and the height of the cluster; (ii) the Frank-van der Merwe mode of thin film formation for very large values of the anisotropy constant by the spreading and coalescence of the droplets over the substrate surface. During the course of the simulations, we continuously tracked

  2. Influence of the substrate on the morphological evolution of gold thin films during solid-state dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsimama, Patrick D.; Herz, Andreas; Wang, Dong; Schaaf, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of electron-beam evaporated Au thin films deposited on crystalline TiO2 (c-TiO2) and amorphous TiO2 (a-TiO2) as well as amorphous SiO2 substrates are investigated. The kinetic of dewetting is clearly dependent on the type of substrate and is faster on TiO2 substrates than on SiO2 substrates. This difference can result from the difference in adhesion energy. Furthermore, the kinetic of dewetting is faster on a-TiO2 than on c-TiO2, possibly due to the crystallization of TiO2 during annealing induced dewetting process. The morphologies of dewetted Au films deposited on crystalline TiO2 are characterized by branched holes. The XRD patterns of the Au films deposited on TiO2 substrates constituted peaks from both metallic Au and anatase TiO2. The activation energy of Au films deposited on crystalline TiO2 substrates was higher than that that of the films deposited on amorphous TiO2 substrates.

  3. Phylogeny of the basal angiosperm genus Pseuduvaria (Annonaceae) inferred from five chloroplast DNA regions, with interpretation of morphological character evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yvonne C F; Smith, Gavin J D; Saunders, Richard M K

    2008-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the magnoliid basal angiosperm genus Pseuduvaria (Annonaceae) are investigated using chloroplast DNA sequences from five regions: psbA-trnH spacer, trnL-F, matK, rbcL, and atpB-rbcL spacer. Over 4000 nucleotides from 51 species (of the total 53) were sequenced. The five cpDNA datasets were analyzed separately and in combination using maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML), and Bayesian methods. The phylogenetic trees constructed using all three phylogenetic methods, based on the combined data, strongly support the monophyly of Pseuduvaria following the inclusion of Craibella phuyensis. The trees generated using MP were less well resolved, but relationships are similar to those obtained using the other methods. ML and Bayesian analyses recovered trees with short branch lengths, showing five main clades. This study highlights the evolutionary changes in seven selected morphological characters (floral sex, stamen and carpel numbers, inner petal color, presence of inner petal glands, flowering peduncle length, and monocarp size). Although floral unisexuality is ancestral within the genus, several evolutionary lineages reveal reversal to bisexuality. Other phylogenetic transitions include the evolution of sapromyophily, and fruit-bat frugivory and seed dispersal, thus allowing a wide range of adaptations for species survival.

  4. Studying the Role of Mergers in Black Hole - Galaxy Co-evolution via a Morphological Analysis of Redshift 1 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Meredith; Urry, C. Megan

    2016-06-01

    We study the role of mergers in the quenching of star formation in galaxies at the dominant epoch of their evolution, by examining their color-mass distributions for different morphology types. We use HST ACS data from the CANDELS/GOODS North and South fields for galaxies in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.3 and use GALFIT to fit them with sersic profiles, enabling us to classify each as bulge-dominated (early type) or disk-dominated (late type). We find that spirals and ellipticals have distinct color-mass distributions, similar to studies at z=0, in that each have quenching modes of differing time scales. The smooth decay to the red sequence for the disky galaxies corresponds to a slow exhaustion of gas, while the lack of elliptical galaxies in the `green valley' indicates a faster quenching time for galaxies that underwent a major merger. We compare the inactive galaxies to the AGN hosts and find that the AGN phase lasts well into the red sequence for both types of host galaxy, spanning the full color space. The results suggest that the AGN trigger mechanism, as well as the significance of AGN feedback, is dependent on the merger history of the host galaxy.

  5. Growth hormone, exercise, and athletic performance: a continued evolution of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Clark, James E; Nindl, Bradley C

    2010-01-01

    Growth hormone (hGH) presents pleiotropic effects in many tissues encompassing a diverse range of physiological actions. Its complexity as a family of hormones with different isoforms and different somatotroph molecular functions continues to challenge the status quo of our understanding of its release, function, and signaling. Owing to the fact that the majority of the literature has viewed hGH from the perspective of the primary 22 kD monomer, further investigation is needed as to the influence and biological activity of other aggregate and splice variant isoforms that are released into circulation. Its role over the life span and with supplementation yields equivocal results with more study needed. Testing for the use of hGH has progressed, and the first positive test was recently documented. Understanding of pituitary function and physiology will remain complex until the use of a broader range of analytical techniques, including assays, becomes mainstream.

  6. Continuity and Evolution: The Idea of “Co-creativity” in Chinese Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JINLI HE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to explore an important characteristic of both traditional and contemporary Chinese art, that is, co-creativity. The author believes that co-creativity is a particular Chinese cultural sensibility that establishes the continuity of Chinese art and allows it to endure despite historical, societal and political changes throughout the centuries. This paper starts with an introduction of the idea of co-creativity in Chinese culture. One of its embodiments is the relationship between 'yin' and 'yang'. 'Yin 'and 'yang' both engender and fulfill each other, which is a co-relational and co-creative process. It then analyzes how the idea of co-creativity is demonstrated in traditional landscape painting through the expression of the oneness with nature and invitation to join a journey with the artist. Lastly, it demonstrates this continious co-creative cultural sensibility through analyzing two contemporary artists’ works. The author reads the submissive openness and vulnerability in Chinese female artist Chen Lingyang’s works as a continuity of the co-creative spirit of 'yin' and 'yang', nature and human. Chen’s work, rooted in her cultural sensibility, expresses a totally different statement of women’s desires and conditions than does that of American feminist artists Judy Chicago and Carolee Schneemann. Likewise, performance artist Ma Liuming’s 'Fen-Ma Liuming in… 'series seems inspired by nature’s image of co-creating the world. Different as these works may be in their formal aspects—from painting to poetry, from photography to performance— “co-creativity” is at the heart of Chinese cultural expression.

  7. General continuous-time Markov model of sequence evolution via insertions/deletions: are alignment probabilities factorable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-11

    Insertions and deletions (indels) account for more nucleotide differences between two related DNA sequences than substitutions do, and thus it is imperative to develop a stochastic evolutionary model that enables us to reliably calculate the probability of the sequence evolution through indel processes. Recently, indel probabilistic models are mostly based on either hidden Markov models (HMMs) or transducer theories, both of which give the indel component of the probability of a given sequence alignment as a product of either probabilities of column-to-column transitions or block-wise contributions along the alignment. However, it is not a priori clear how these models are related with any genuine stochastic evolutionary model, which describes the stochastic evolution of an entire sequence along the time-axis. Moreover, currently none of these models can fully accommodate biologically realistic features, such as overlapping indels, power-law indel-length distributions, and indel rate variation across regions. Here, we theoretically dissect the ab initio calculation of the probability of a given sequence alignment under a genuine stochastic evolutionary model, more specifically, a general continuous-time Markov model of the evolution of an entire sequence via insertions and deletions. Our model is a simple extension of the general "substitution/insertion/deletion (SID) model". Using the operator representation of indels and the technique of time-dependent perturbation theory, we express the ab initio probability as a summation over all alignment-consistent indel histories. Exploiting the equivalence relations between different indel histories, we find a "sufficient and nearly necessary" set of conditions under which the probability can be factorized into the product of an overall factor and the contributions from regions separated by gapless columns of the alignment, thus providing a sort of generalized HMM. The conditions distinguish evolutionary models with

  8. Evolution of anthozoan polyp retraction mechanisms: convergent functional morphology and evolutionary allometry of the marginal musculature in order Zoanthidea (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; Schellinger, Jennifer L; Strimaitis, Anna M; Reuter, Kim E

    2015-06-30

    Retraction is among the most important basic behaviors of anthozoan Cnidaria polyps and is achieved through the coordinated contraction of at least six different muscle groups. Across the Anthozoa, these muscles range from unrecognizable atrophies to massive hypertrophies, producing a wide diversity of retraction abilities and functional morphologies. The marginal musculature is often the single largest component of the retraction mechanism and is composed of a diversity of muscular, attachment, and structural features. Although the arrangements of these features have defined the higher taxonomy of Zoanthidea for more than 100 years, a decade of inferring phylogenies from nucleotide sequences has demonstrated fundamental misconceptions of their evolution. Here we expand the diversity of known marginal muscle forms from two to at least ten basic states and reconstruct the evolution of its functional morphology across the most comprehensive molecular phylogeny available. We demonstrate that the evolution of these forms follows a series of transitions that are much more complex than previously hypothesized and converge on similar forms multiple times. Evolution of the marginal musculature and its attachment and support structures are partially scaled according to variation in polyp and muscle size, but also vary through evolutionary allometry. Although the retraction mechanisms are diverse and their evolutionary histories complex, their morphologies are largely reflective of the evolutionary relationships among Zoanthidea higher taxa and may offer a key feature for integrative systematics. The convergence on similar forms across multiple linages of Zoanthidea mirrors the evolution of the marginal musculature in another anthozoan order (Actiniaria). The marginal musculature varies through evolutionary allometry of functional morphologies in response to requirements for additional force and resistance, and the specific ecological and symbiotic functions of individual

  9. Effect of V and N on the microstructure evolution during continuous casting of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.; Boom, R.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Low Carbon (LC) steel is not expected to be sensitive to hot tearing and/or cracking while microalloyed steels are known for their high cracking sensitivity during continuous casting. Experience of the Direct Sheet Plant caster at Tata Steel in Ijmuiden (the Netherlands), seems to contradict this statement. It is observed that a LC steel grade has a high risk of cracking alias hot tearing, while a High Strength Low Alloyed (HSLA) steel has a very low cracking occurrence. Another HSLA steel grade, with a similar composition but less N and V is however very sensitive to hot tearing. An extreme crack results in a breakout. A previous statistical analysis of the breakout occurrence reveals a one and a half times higher possibility of a breakout for the HSLA grade compared to the LC grade. HSLA with extra N, V shows a four times smaller possibility of breakout than LC. This study assigns the unexpected effect of the chemical composition on the hot tearing sensitivity to the role of some alloying elements such as V and N as structure refiners.

  10. Evolution of Cooperation in Continuous Prisoner's Dilemma Games on Barabasi—Albert Networks with Degree-Dependent Guilt Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Jia; Quan, Ji; Liu, Wei-Bing

    2012-05-01

    This paper studies the continuous prisoner's dilemma games (CPDG) on Barabasi—Albert (BA) networks. In the model, each agent on a vertex of the networks makes an investment and interacts with all of his neighboring agents. Making an investment is costly, but which benefits its neighboring agents, where benefit and cost depend on the level of investment made. The payoff of each agent is given by the sum of payoffs it receives in its interactions with all its neighbors. Not only payoff, individual's guilty emotion in the games has also been considered. The negative guilty emotion produced in comparing with its neighbors can reduce the utility of individuals directly. We assume that the reduction amount depends on the individual's degree and a baseline level parameter. The group's cooperative level is characterized by the average investment of the population. Each player makes his investment in the next step based on a convex combination of the investment of his best neighbors in the last step, his best history strategies in the latest steps which number is controlled by a memory length parameter, and a uniformly distributed random number. Simulation results show that this degree-dependent guilt mechanism can promote the evolution of cooperation dramatically comparing with degree-independent guilt or no guilt cases. Imitation, memory, uncertainty coefficients and network structure also play determinant roles in the cooperation level of the population. All our results may shed some new light on studying the evolution of cooperation based on network reciprocity mechanisms.

  11. Multilocus phylogeny of the avian family Alaudidae (larks) reveals complex morphological evolution, non-monophyletic genera and hidden species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alström, Per; Barnes, Keith N; Olsson, Urban; Barker, F Keith; Bloomer, Paulette; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Qureshi, Masood Ahmed; Guillaumet, Alban; Crochet, Pierre-André; Ryan, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    The Alaudidae (larks) is a large family of songbirds in the superfamily Sylvioidea. Larks are cosmopolitan, although species-level diversity is by far largest in Africa, followed by Eurasia, whereas Australasia and the New World have only one species each. The present study is the first comprehensive phylogeny of the Alaudidae. It includes 83.5% of all species and representatives from all recognised genera, and was based on two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci (in total 6.4 kbp, although not all loci were available for all species). In addition, a larger sample, comprising several subspecies of some polytypic species was analysed for one of the mitochondrial loci. There was generally good agreement in trees inferred from different loci, although some strongly supported incongruences were noted. The tree based on the concatenated multilocus data was overall well resolved and well supported by the data. We stress the importance of performing single gene as well as combined data analyses, as the latter may obscure significant incongruence behind strong nodal support values. The multilocus tree revealed many unpredicted relationships, including some non-monophyletic genera (Calandrella, Mirafra, Melanocorypha, Spizocorys). The tree based on the extended mitochondrial data set revealed several unexpected deep divergences between taxa presently treated as conspecific (e.g. within Ammomanes cinctura, Ammomanes deserti, Calandrella brachydactyla, Eremophila alpestris), as well as some shallow splits between currently recognised species (e.g. Certhilauda brevirostris-C. semitorquata-C. curvirostris; Calendulauda barlowi-C. erythrochlamys; Mirafra cantillans-M. javanica). Based on our results, we propose a revised generic classification, and comment on some species limits. We also comment on the extraordinary morphological adaptability in larks, which has resulted in numerous examples of parallel evolution (e.g. in Melanocorypha mongolica and Alauda leucoptera [both

  12. Quaternary Tectonic Tilting Governed by Rupture Segments Controls Surface Morphology and Drainage Evolution along the South-Central Coast of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtler, H. P.; Bookhagen, B.; Melnick, D.; Strecker, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Chilean coast represents one of the most active convergent margins in the Pacific rim, where major earthquakes (M>8) have repeatedly ruptured the surface, involving vertical offsets of several meters. Deformation along this coast takes place in large-scale, semi-independent seismotectonic segments with partially overlapping transient boundaries. They are possibly related to reactivated inherited crustal anisotropies; internal seismogenic deformation may be accommodated by structures that have developed during accretionary wedge evolution. Seismotectonic segmentation and the identification of large-scale rupture zones, however, are based on limited seismologic und geodetic observations over short timespans. In order to better define the long-term behavior and deformation rates of these segments and to survey the tectonic impact on the landscape on various temporal and spatial scales, we investigated the south-central coast of Chile (37-38S). There, two highly active, competing seismotectonic compartments influence the coastal and fluvial morphology. A rigorous analysis of the geomorphic features is a key for an assessment of the tectonic evolution during the Quaternary and beyond. We studied the N-S oriented Santa María Island (SMI), 20 km off the coast and only ~70km off the trench, in the transition between the two major Valdivia (46-37S) and Concepción (38-35S) rupture segments. The SMI has been tectonically deformed throughout the Quaternary and comprises two tilt domains with two topographic highs in the north and south that are being tilted eastward. The low-lying and flat eastern part of the island is characterized by a set of emergent Holocene strandlines related to coseismic uplift. We measured detailed surface morphology of these strandlines and E-W traversing ephemeral stream channels with a laser-total station and used these data to calibrate and validate high-resolution, digital imagery. In addition, crucial geomorphic markers were dated by the

  13. Fish foot prints : Morphology and energetics of the wake behind a continuously swimming mullet (Chelon labrosus risso)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, UK; VandenHeuvel, BLE; Stamhuis, EJ; Videler, JJ

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the wake behind a continuously swimming mullet was analysed qualitatively and quantitatively by applying two-dimensional particle image velocimetry. A detailed analysis of the flow pattern and of the swimming movements of the fish allowed us to derive a kinematic explanation of the

  14. Fish foot prints : Morphology and energetics of the wake behind a continuously swimming mullet (Chelon labrosus risso)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, U.K; van den Heuvel, B.L.E.; Stamhuis, Eize; Videler, J.J

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the wake behind a continuously swimming mullet was analysed qualitatively and quantitatively by applying two-dimensional particle image velocimetry. A detailed analysis of the flow pattern and of the swimming movements of the fish allowed us to derive a kinematic explanation of the

  15. Impact of the cord-grass Spartina alterniflora on sedimentary and morphological evolution of tidal salt marshes on the Jiangsu coast, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Aijun; GAO Shu; JIA Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    The tidal flats of the Wanggang area, on the Jiangsu coast, represent the largest continuously distributed coastal wetland in terms of area coverage in China, and the dynamics of tidal flat accretion and erosion is highly complicated. The cord-grass Spartina alterniflora, which was introduced artificially into the Jiangsu coast, has significant influences on the regional tidal flat evolution in terms of deposition rate, spacial sediment distribution patterns and tidal creek morphology. On the basis of the data set of bed elevation and accumulation rate for different periods of time, the applicability of the Pethick-Allen model to the Jiangsu tidal salt marshes is discussed. In addition, caesium-137 dating was carried out for sediment samples collected from the salt marsh of the Wangang area. In combination with the caesium-137 analysis and the data collected from literature, the Pethick-Allen model was used to derive the accumulation rate in the Wanggang tidal flat for the various periods. The results show that the pattern of tidal flat accretion has been modified, due to more rapid accretion following the introduction of S.alterniflora to the region. Surficial sediment samples were collected from representative profiles and analyzed for grain size with a laser particle analyzer. The result shows that fine-grained sediment has been trapped by the plant, with most of the sediment deposited on the Suaeda salsa and Spartina angelica flats being derived from drainage creeks rather than the from gently sloping tidal flats. Remote sensing analysis and in situ observations indicate that the creeks formed in the S.alterniflora flat have a relatively small ratio of width to depth, a relatively high density, and are more stable than the other tidal flat creek systems in the study area.

  16. Positive selection on the K domain of the AGAMOUS protein in the Zingiberales suggests a mechanism for the evolution of androecial morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Ana Maria R; Yockteng, Roxana; Otoni, Wagner C; Specht, Chelsea D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABC model of flower development describes the molecular basis for specification of floral organ identity in model eudicots such as Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum. According to this model, expression of C-class genes is linked to stamen and gynoecium organ identity. The Zingiberales is an order of tropical monocots in which the evolution of floral morphology is characterized by a marked increase in petaloidy in the androecium. Petaloidy is a derived characteristic of the ginger fam...

  17. Precise Morphology Control and Continuous Fabrication of Perovskite Solar Cells Using Droplet-Controllable Electrospray Coating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Chan; Lee, Gunhee; Ha, Kyungyeon; Yoon, Jungjin; Ahn, Namyoung; Cho, Woohyung; Park, Mincheol; Choi, Mansoo

    2017-03-08

    Herein, we developed a novel electrospray coating system for continuous fabrication of perovskite solar cells with high performance. Our system can systemically control the size of CH3NH3PbI3 precursor droplets by modulating the applied electrical potential, shown to be a crucial factor for the formation of perovskite films. As a result, we have obtained pinhole-free and large grain-sized perovskite solar cells, yielding the best PCE of 13.27% with little photocurrent hysteresis. Furthermore, the average PCE through the continuous coating process was 11.56 ± 0.52%. Our system demonstrates not only the high reproducibility but also a new way to commercialize high-quality perovskite solar cells.

  18. The Evolution of Slow-Intermediate Oceanic Crust in the South Atlantic: A Continuous Seismic Reflection Transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, R.; Christeson, G. L.; Carlson, R. L.; Estep, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    High-quality seismic transects spanning a range of crustal ages are limited to intermediate-spreading and fast-spreading (28-85 mm/yr half rate), young (Rise. The CREST (Crustal Reflectivity Experiment Southern Transect) expedition in the South Atlantic acquired 2680 km of 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data including a 1500 km east-west continuous MCS transect from east of the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) to the Rio Grande Rise. The transect continuously images 70 myr of crust formed at the same ridge segment with spreading rates varying from 13- 28 mm/yr. This is the first geophysical study of oceanic crust produced at any spreading rate to cover such a long span of time. Additionally, with a 12.6 km, 1008 channel streamer, the CREST data provide a longer offset than that utilized for previous studies of oceanic crust. Preliminary seismic reflection results show complex crustal structure that appears to vary highly with spreading rate. Many of these crustal reflectors exhibit high amplitude and extensive lateral continuity deep into the crust. Interestingly, crustal structure is more evident in ridge parallel profiles than in ridge normal profiles, potentially providing insight into the process of deep crust formation at the ridge. In spite of this, the data have no indications of lower crustal dipping reflectors identified in other studies. In the western portion of the study area the seismic data exhibit extensive faults cutting the seafloor in sedimentary basins at the foot of Rio Grande Rise, possibly indicating the influence of Rise processes, ie, via isostasy, on the seafloor and crust of the surrounding region. This study of South Atlantic crust will extend studies of crustal structure and evolution to lower spreading rates, and address several key questions regarding the nature of oceanic crust, including: how structure of crust produced at slow-to-intermediate rates varies with age and spreading rate, how crustal structure varies along a single flow line over

  19. Phase diagrams and morphological evolution in wrapping of rod-shaped elastic nanoparticles by cell membrane: a two-dimensional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xin; Gao, Huajian

    2014-06-01

    A fundamental understanding of cell-nanomaterial interaction is essential for biomedical diagnostics, therapeutics, and nanotoxicity. Here, we perform a theoretical analysis to investigate the phase diagram and morphological evolution of an elastic rod-shaped nanoparticle wrapped by a lipid membrane in two dimensions. We show that there exist five possible wrapping phases based on the stability of full wrapping, partial wrapping, and no wrapping states. The wrapping phases depend on the shape and size of the particle, adhesion energy, membrane tension, and bending rigidity ratio between the particle and membrane. While symmetric morphologies are observed in the early and late stages of wrapping, in between a soft rod-shaped nanoparticle undergoes a dramatic symmetry breaking morphological change while stiff and rigid nanoparticles experience a sharp reorientation. These results are of interest to the study of a range of phenomena including viral budding, exocytosis, as well as endocytosis or phagocytosis of elastic particles into cells.

  20. The evolution of galaxy size and morphology at z~0.5-3.0 in the GOODS-N region with HST/WFC3 data

    CERN Document Server

    Morishita, Takahiro; Kajisawa, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the recent released HST/WFC3 IR images in the GOODS-N region to study the formation and evolution of Quiescent galaxies (QGs). After examining the reliability with artificial galaxies, we obtain the morphological parameters with S'ersic profile of 299 QGs and 1,083 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z ~ 0.5-3.0, finding the evolution of re and n of massive (M* > 10^10.5 Msun) QGs while weaker evolution of SFGs and less massive (M* < 10^10.5 Msun) QGs. The regression of the size evolution of massive QGs follows re \\propto (1 + z)-{\\alpha}re with {\\alpha}re = 1.06 \\pm 0.19 (a factor of ~ 2.2 increase from z ~ 2.5 to ~ 0.5), which is consistent with the general picture of the significant size growth. For the further understanding of the evolution scenario, we study the evolution of S'ersic index, n, and find that of massive QGs to significantly evolve as n \\propto (1 + z)-{\\alpha}n with {\\alpha}n = 0.74 \\pm 0.23 (n ~ 1 at z ~ 2.5 to n ~ 4 at z ~ 0.5), while those of the other populations are unchanged...

  1. Continuous hydrogen evolution by an immobilized combined system of Phormidium valderianum, Halobacterium halobium and Escherichia coli in a packed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, S.; Madamwar, D. [Sardar Patel Univ., Vallabh Vidyanagar (India)

    1995-12-01

    Long-term hydrogen evolution (11 days) was obtained when Phormidium valderianum was coupled with a mixture of halophilic Halobacterium halobium and salt tolerant Escherichia coli under a cyclic illumination on/off cycle of 18 h dark and 6 h light in an immobilized packed bed reactor. Various conditions such as flow rate, temperature and pH have been optimized for maximum continuous evolution. (author)

  2. Morphological Evolution of Directional Solidification Interfaces in Microgravity: An Analysis of Model Experiments Performed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Grugel, R. N.; Trivedi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments performed using the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus within the glovebox facility (GBX) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has provided video images of the morphological evolution of a three-dimensional interface in a diffusion controlled regime. The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with "alloys" of succinonitrile (SCN) and water in an atmosphere of nitrogen at 450 millibar pressure. The compositions of the samples processed and analyzed are 0.25,0.5 and 1.0 wt% water. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall !3pace Flight Center. During the experiments, the sample was first subjected to a unidirectional melt back, generally at 10 microns per second, with a constant temperature gradient ahead of the melting interface. Following the melt back, the interface was allowed to stabilize before translation is initiated. The temperatures in the sample were monitored by six in situ thermocouples and the position is monitored by an optical linear encoder. For the experiments performed and analyzed, the gradients ranged from 2.5 - 3.3 K/mm and the initial pulling velocities ranged from 0.7 micron per second to 1 micron per second with subsequent transition velocities of up to 100 microns per second. The data provided by the PFMI for analysis includes near-real-time (NRT) video captured on the ground during the experiment runs, ISS Video Tape Recorder (VTR) data dumped from the VTR at the end of the experiment run and recorded on the ground, telemetry data including temperature and position measurements, and limited flight HI-8 tapes in 2 camera views of experiment runs for which tapes have been returned to the investigators from ISS. Because of limited down mass from the ISS

  3. The Subparsec-Scale Structure and Evolution of Centaurus A. II. Continued Very Long Baseline Array Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, S. J.; Preston, R. A.; Jauncey, D. L.

    2001-10-01

    We present the results of continued 8.4 GHz Very Long Baseline Array monitoring of the subparsec-scale structure and evolution of Centaurus A, following on from the initial results presented in 1998 by Tingay et al. We include, for the first time, multiepoch VLBI images at 22.2 GHz that show that the jet is linear and well collimated on scales as small as 0.02 pc (~1000rs). Two components in the subparsec-scale jet continue to evolve slowly with a speed of 0.12c. We confirm that an additional component, close to the core, has no significant motion. Some evidence is seen for rapid variations within individual components, as noted dramatically in 1991-1992 by Tingay et al., albeit at a lower level of activity. Both the stationary behavior of the component close to the core and the internal variability of components in the subparsec-scale jet of Centaurus A may be explained as being due to the existence of shocks created in the wake of major component ejections from the nucleus, as simulated by Agudo et al. (published in 2001). Tentative evidence is found to suggest that two subparsec-scale counterjet components are in motion away from the nucleus. The estimated apparent speeds of the jet and counterjet components are consistent with the previously suggested likely jet viewing angle range, 50°-80°. We also compare our Centaurus A images with high-resolution VLBI images of M87 to show that the region of the Centaurus A jet in which collimation likely first occurs lies a factor of 10 below our current resolution limit. Future space VLBI missions at high frequency will be required to resolve this region.

  4. Effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of the reaction front during transport in a homogeneous porous medium with initial small non-uniformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-S.; Lai, G.-X.

    2009-04-01

    The morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front is an important topic in geological processes and engineering practices. Although previous studies have extensively presented a number of numerical models which couples a system of nonlinear governing equations of porosity change due to mineral dissolution, the conservations of groundwater flow and transport of chemical species to investigate the morphological pattern of a chemical dissolution front within a fluid-saturated porous medium, whereas the mechanical dispersion effect has generally been neglected in the model development. This study addresses the effects of mechanical dispersion on the morphological evolution of a chemical dissolution front for a variety of cases. Mechanical dispersion processes is incorporated with the coupled nonlinear governing equation system so as to rebuild a newly numerical model. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that mechanical dispersion has pronounced impacts on the morphological pattern of the chemical dissolution front. For single local non-uniformity case, mechanical dispersion reduces the finger length of an unstable single-fingering front or retains the shape of a stable planar front while speeding up the front advancement. In the case of two local non-uniformities, adding mechanical dispersion with different flow conditions can yield one of the following results: (1) the shape of the stable planar front is maintained but its advancement is accelerated; (2) the shape of the unstable single-fingering front is maintained but its length is reduced; (3) the unstable double-fingering front is merged into an unstable single-fingering front; and (4) the shape of the unstable double-fingering front is preserved but its fingering length is reduced.. A comparison between the behavior diagrams of dissolution front morphology (with and without considering mechanical dispersion) shows that the double-fingering front occurs under condition where the upstream

  5. Defining a relationship between incident wave parameters and morphologic evolution of shoals on ebb tidal deltas using long term X-band radar observation from RIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humberston, J. L.; McNinch, J.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology of tidal inlet ebb-shoals varies dynamically over time, particularly in response to large wave events. Understanding which wave qualities most influence shoals' evolution would support advancements in sediment bypassing models as well as targeted maintenance dredging for hydrographic purposes. Unfortunately, shallow and rapidly changing bathymetry, turbid waters and ambiguous wave speeds resulting from multiple shoaling and de-shoaling areas limits many traditional surveying techniques from obtaining the spatial and temporal resolution necessary to effectively characterize shoal development. The Radar Inlet Observing System (RIOS) is a uniquely designed mobile X-band radar system that can be deployed to inlet environments and, using roof-mounted solar panels and an automatically triggered highly efficient diesel generator, run automated hourly collections and wirelessly stream data for up to several months at a time in nearly all weather and water conditions. During 2015 and early 2016, RIOS was deployed to St. Augustine Inlet, FL., New River Inlet, N.C., and Oregon Inlet, N.C. for periods of one to six months to allow for measureable shoal evolution. During deployments, ten minute collections (at 1 Hz) were conducted every hour and the data gridded to a 5m alongshore/cross-shore grid. Raw intensity returns were time-averaged and analyzed to define three metrics of shoal evolution: movement direction, movement velocity and inferred bathymetry. For each location and time period, wave frequencies, wave directions and significant wave heights were collected from the nearest wave-buoy. Time lapse videos of shoal positions were inspected and used in concert with cross-correlations values from each pair of shoal and wave parameters to determine the incident wave qualities most strongly relating to shoal evolution. Preliminary results suggest wave height, more than frequency, controls shoal movement. Wave direction and size collaboratively appear to direct

  6. Evolution of Surface Morphology and Chemistry in ZnO Thin Films and Steel Surfaces studied by Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua

    Thin film and surface treatment play an important role in developing materials with unique properties. They have been widely used in energy generation and storage, optical devices, LEDS, electrical semiconductor devices, etc. The stability and functionality of them under operational environment are important, especially the surface morphology and chemical evolution at micro-scale. This information is critical to understand the behaviors of the materials under various environments for a wide range of applications. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) are suitable techniques on investigating surface morphology and chemical evolution. Here, we use both techniques to investigate chemical and morphological heterogeneity of zinc oxide thin films after environmental humidity exposure, as well as surface and chemical evolution of iron oxidation states during iron redox process for samples with/without surface anti-corrosion treatment. Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been reported to suffer from degradation in electrical properties, leading to failure of electronics due to environmental factors, such as heat and humidity. While degradation appears to be linked to water and oxygen penetration in the ZnO film, a direct observation in ZnO film morphological evolution, in conjunction with structural and chemical changes is lacking. Here, we systematically investigated the chemical and morphological heterogeneity of ZnO thin films caused by steam treatment. X-ray fluorescence microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, grazing incident small angle and wide angle scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra-high-resolution SEM and optical microscopy were carried out to examine ZnO, Al-doped ZnO and Ga-doped ZnO thin films, on two different substrates - silicon wafer and PET film. The environmental aging introduced pin-holes in the un-doped ZnO thin film. More significant morphological features formed in the Al-doped ZnO thin

  7. 力和扩散机理下外延形貌的演化分析∗%Analysis of epitaxial morphology evolution due to stress and diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振飞; 冯露; 赵洋; 齐红蕊

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new phase-field model based on diffusion interface is put forward to describe the epitaxial growth including island nucleation, growth, and ripening. Thermodynamics and kinetics play an important role in epitaxial morphology evolution. This model includes combined effects of the following processes, such as elastic field, surface energy, deposition, diffusion, desorption, and energy barrier etc. We use the classical BCF model to describe the atomic diffusion and nucleation processes, and use a new free energy function, including elastic strain energy, to obtain a phase-field equation that can describe the growth of dynamic multi-island by variation method. This model can effectively simulates the complex morphology in epitaxial growth. The nonlinear coupled equations can be solved by finite difference scheme. Numerical result shows that this model can reproduce the real multilayer epitaxial growth structure, and the simulation results are consistent with the experimental results. At the same time we also simulate the complex growth stress with morphology evolution. Results show that, accompanied with the epitaxial growth, a complex stress distribution is produced, and the stress reaches a local maximum on the boundaries of the island, which is consistent with the experimental results. Most importantly, the stress significantly affects the atomic diffusion process. While the stress exists, the epitaxial structure will change faster. These results can make a significance effect on the research of physical mechanism in epitaxial growth.

  8. Morphological analysis of Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico): new insights into the structure and evolution of an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Capra, Lucia; De Beni, Emanuela

    2004-09-01

    We present a morphological analysis of Nevado de Toluca volcano located 80 km WSW of Mexico City based on digital elevation model study, where slope and aspect maps have been generated and analysed. Aerial photograph and satellite image observations improve the morphological analysis. The synoptic view which is offered by this analysis allowed for recognition and localization of the main volcanic and tectonic features of the area. On the basis of digital elevation model value distribution and surface textures, five morphological domains were defined. The most interesting domain, south of the crater, reflects the occurrence of an ancient complex volcano distinct from the adjacent areas. Interaction between the volcanic and volcano-tectonic evolution and the basement produced the other domains. Single volcanic edifices, like lava domes and scoria cones, and eruptive fractures were recognized. Finally, flank collapse scarps opened to the east and to the north were identified and four relevant morphostructural lineaments and their possible role in the Nevado de Toluca geological and structural evolution are discussed.

  9. [BEHAVIORAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH POST-TRAUMATIC RESPONSE TO CONTINUOUS EXPOSURE VERSUS ALTERNATE EXPOSURE IN AN ANIMAL MODEL OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostfeld, Ishay; Kaplan, Zeev; Cohen, Hagit

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to approximate these conditions in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More specifically, the neurobiological basis of these conditions, focusing on stress-related behavioral changes, HPA-axis and morphological were evaluated. The intention was to employ this well-validated, reproducible and reliable model for PTSD, to elicit data which will provide some guidance in the planning of a prospective study involving military personal. Combat personnel are exposed to significant stress and hardship, both physical and emotional, during their service and especially during active combat. Military forces are increasingly involved in conflicts involving nonmilitary or paramilitary adversaries in which they are exposed not to battles but to sporadic events, in what has come to be labeled "low intensity conflict". "Low intensity conflict" refers to a level of hostilities or use of military power that falls short of a full scale conventional or general war. These are characterized by brief periods of extreme stress and tangible danger interspersed by prolonged periods of siege. Whereas the potentially traumatizing effect of battle conditions is well documented, the risks of the sporadic highly stressful nature of "low intensity conflict" have not been studied. Furthermore, in recent years, soldiers commonly receive "relaxation periods" before re-engaging in battle. This new policy may possibly contradict the traditional treatment principles, focusing on "proximity" and "continuity" to the battlefield and its effects have not been studied. Continuous and sporadic stresses, representing battlefield conditions, were induced in a validated rat animalmodel for PTSD and behavioral changes, hormonal levels and brain morphology were evaluated. Behavioral response, hormonal levels and brain morphological changes suggest that PTSD-like reactions were significantly higher in rats exposed to continuous stress compared to those exposed to

  10. Fluctuating helical asymmetry and morphology of snails (Gastropoda in divergent microhabitats at 'Evolution Canyons I and II,' Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Raz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developmental instability of shelled gastropods is measured as deviations from a perfect equiangular (logarithmic spiral. We studied six species of gastropods at 'Evolution Canyons I and II' in Carmel and the Galilee Mountains, Israel, respectively. The xeric, south-facing, 'African' slopes and the mesic, north-facing, 'European' slopes have dramatically different microclimates and plant communities. Moreover, 'Evolution Canyon II' receives more rainfall than 'Evolution Canyon I.' METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined fluctuating asymmetry, rate of whorl expansion, shell height, and number of rotations of the body suture in six species of terrestrial snails from the two 'Evolution Canyons.' The xeric 'African' slope should be more stressful to land snails than the 'European' slope, and 'Evolution Canyon I' should be more stressful than 'Evolution Canyon II.' Only Eopolita protensa jebusitica showed marginally significant differences in fluctuating helical asymmetry between the two slopes. Contrary to expectations, asymmetry was marginally greater on the 'European' slope. Shells of Levantina spiriplana caesareana at 'Evolution Canyon I,' were smaller and more asymmetric than those at 'Evolution Canyon II.' Moreover, shell height and number of rotations of the suture were greater on the north-facing slopes of both canyons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data is consistent with a trade-off between drought resistance and thermoregulation in snails; Levantina was significantly smaller on the 'African' slope, for increasing surface area and thermoregulation, while Eopolita was larger on the 'African' slope, for reducing water evaporation. In addition, 'Evolution Canyon I' was more stressful than Evolution Canyon II' for Levantina.

  11. Evolution of primary care referrals to urology. Impact of a protocol on prostate disease and continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña-Sutil, R; Tejido-Sánchez, A; Galván-Ortiz de Urbina, M; Guerrero-Ramos, F; García-Álvarez, G; Passas-Martínez, J B

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the evolution of primary care referrals to the Urology Department after the implementation of a joint protocol on prostate disease and a continuing education program in our healthcare area. In January 2011, we launched an action protocol on prostate disease, which was complemented by training sessions and an e-mail-based consultation system. We analyzed primary care referrals to the Urology Department between 2011 and 2013 and determined the reasons for the consultations and the compliance with the established criteria on prostate disease. We obtained data from the "Request for Appointment in Specialized Care" program of the Community of Madrid. We calculated the sample size with a 95% confidence level and a 50% heterogeneity. A total of 19,048 referrals were conducted. The most common reason for the referrals was lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostate hyperplasia, with a 27% reduction and a compliance that went from 46% at 67%. Although prostate-specific antigen consultations increased by 40%, they improved their appropriateness (from 55% to 72%). This was the main type of consultation for suspicion of malignancy (30%). Also worth mentioning were female incontinence, which doubled in number, and a 41% reduction in erectile dysfunction, which could be due to the primary care training. The collaboration between the Department of Urology and primary care succeeded in improving the appropriateness of prostate disease referrals and modified the tendency to refer the rest of the diseases included in the project. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuous 1.3-million-year record of East African hydroclimate, and implications for patterns of evolution and biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Robert P.; Scholz, Christopher A.; Cohen, Andrew S.; King, John W.; Brown, Erik T.; Ivory, Sarah J.; Johnson, Thomas C.; Deino, Alan L.; Reinthal, Peter N.; McGlue, Michael M.; Blome, Margaret W.

    2015-12-01

    The transport of moisture in the tropics is a critical process for the global energy budget and on geologic timescales, has markedly influenced continental landscapes, migratory pathways, and biological evolution. Here we present a continuous, first-of-its-kind 1.3-My record of continental hydroclimate and lake-level variability derived from drill core data from Lake Malawi, East Africa (9-15° S). Over the Quaternary, we observe dramatic shifts in effective moisture, resulting in large-scale changes in one of the world's largest lakes and most diverse freshwater ecosystems. Results show evidence for 24 lake level drops of more than 200 m during the Late Quaternary, including 15 lowstands when water levels were more than 400 m lower than modern. A dramatic shift is observed at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), consistent with far-field climate forcing, which separates vastly different hydroclimate regimes before and after ∼800,000 years ago. Before 800 ka, lake levels were lower, indicating a climate drier than today, and water levels changed frequently. Following the MPT high-amplitude lake level variations dominate the record. From 800 to 100 ka, a deep, often overfilled lake occupied the basin, indicating a wetter climate, but these highstands were interrupted by prolonged intervals of extreme drought. Periods of high lake level are observed during times of high eccentricity. The extreme hydroclimate variability exerted a profound influence on the Lake Malawi endemic cichlid fish species flock; the geographically extensive habitat reconfiguration provided novel ecological opportunities, enabling new populations to differentiate rapidly to distinct species.

  13. Postsplenectomy sclerosing extramedullary hematopoietic tumor with unexpected good clinical evolution: morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis of one case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Ojopi, Elida B P; Chioato, Lucimara; Cordeiro, Danielle Leão; Negretti, Fabio; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-05-01

    Sclerosing extramedullary hematopoietic tumor has been described as a rare manifestation of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm. The lack of knowledge about this entity has caused it to be mistaken for many types of nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic tumors. We present the case of a 71-year-old lady with a long history of primary myelofibrosis, which developed multiple abdominal sclerosing extramedullary hematopoietic tumors with good clinical evolution. Nonchronic myeloid leukemia myeloproliferative neoplasm included a JAK2 mutation as part of the diagnosis algorithm. Particularly, idiopathic myelofibrosis is related with a JAK2 mutation in 50% of the cases with a pejorative prognosis. The absence of JAK2 demonstrated in the paraffin samples of the tumors may be related to the unusual evolution in this particular case. Morphologically differential diagnoses considered in the evaluation of this entity and in our case included sarcomas mainly liposarcoma, anaplastic carcinoma, and Hodgkin lymphoma.

  14. Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Morphological Engineering of CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides for Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution (Adv. Mater. 29/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Jianping; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-08-01

    On page 6207, Y. Zhang, Z. Liu and co-workers describe morphologically engineered 2D-MoS2 for the facilitation of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction. Two pathways to achieve such a purpose are highlighted, either by non-equilibrium growth of MoS2 dendrites or by high-density nucleation of MoS2 nanoflakes directly on the electrode materials. Future research directions are also proposed and discussed to further enhance the efficiency of such unique catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Geologic control on the evolution of the inner shelf morphology offshore of the Mississippi barrier islands, northern Gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, James G.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Kelso, Kyle W.

    2015-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2013, high-resolution geophysical surveys were conducted around the Mississippi barrier islands and offshore. The sonar surveys included swath and single-beam bathymetry, sidescan, and chirp subbottom data collection. The geophysical data were groundtruthed using vibracore sediment collection. The results provide insight into the evolution of the inner shelf and the relationship between the near surface geologic framework and the morphology of the coastal zone. This study focuses on the buried Pleistocene fluvial deposits and late Holocene shore-oblique sand ridges offshore of Petit Bois Island and Petit Bois Pass. Prior to this study, the physical characteristics, evolution, and interrelationship of the ridges between both the shelf geology and the adjacent barrier island platform had not been evaluated. Numerous studies elsewhere along the coastal margin attribute shoal origin and sand-ridge evolution to hydrodynamic processes in shallow water (influences the long-term response of the coastal zone to sea-level rise. The study also contributes to a growing body of work characterizing shore-oblique sand ridges which, along with the related geology, are recognized as increasingly important components to a nearshore framework whose origins and evolution must be understood and inventoried to effectively manage the coastal zone.

  16. A multi-gene phylogeny of Cephalopoda supports convergent morphological evolution in association with multiple habitat shifts in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Annie R; Pankey, Molly S; Hochberg, Frederick G; Oakley, Todd H

    2012-07-28

    The marine environment is comprised of numerous divergent organisms living under similar selective pressures, often resulting in the evolution of convergent structures such as the fusiform body shape of pelagic squids, fishes, and some marine mammals. However, little is known about the frequency of, and circumstances leading to, convergent evolution in the open ocean. Here, we present a comparative study of the molluscan class Cephalopoda, a marine group known to occupy habitats from the intertidal to the deep sea. Several lineages bear features that may coincide with a benthic or pelagic existence, making this a valuable group for testing hypotheses of correlated evolution. To test for convergence and correlation, we generate the most taxonomically comprehensive multi-gene phylogeny of cephalopods to date. We then create a character matrix of habitat type and morphological characters, which we use to infer ancestral character states and test for correlation between habitat and morphology. Our study utilizes a taxonomically well-sampled phylogeny to show convergent evolution in all six morphological characters we analyzed. Three of these characters also correlate with habitat. The presence of an autogenic photophore (those relying upon autonomous enzymatic light reactions) is correlated with a pelagic habitat, while the cornea and accessory nidamental gland correlate with a benthic lifestyle. Here, we present the first statistical tests for correlation between convergent traits and habitat in cephalopods to better understand the evolutionary history of characters that are adaptive in benthic or pelagic environments, respectively. Our study supports the hypothesis that habitat has influenced convergent evolution in the marine environment: benthic organisms tend to exhibit similar characteristics that confer protection from invasion by other benthic taxa, while pelagic organisms possess features that facilitate crypsis and communication in an environment lacking

  17. A multi-gene phylogeny of Cephalopoda supports convergent morphological evolution in association with multiple habitat shifts in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindgren Annie R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marine environment is comprised of numerous divergent organisms living under similar selective pressures, often resulting in the evolution of convergent structures such as the fusiform body shape of pelagic squids, fishes, and some marine mammals. However, little is known about the frequency of, and circumstances leading to, convergent evolution in the open ocean. Here, we present a comparative study of the molluscan class Cephalopoda, a marine group known to occupy habitats from the intertidal to the deep sea. Several lineages bear features that may coincide with a benthic or pelagic existence, making this a valuable group for testing hypotheses of correlated evolution. To test for convergence and correlation, we generate the most taxonomically comprehensive multi-gene phylogeny of cephalopods to date. We then create a character matrix of habitat type and morphological characters, which we use to infer ancestral character states and test for correlation between habitat and morphology. Results Our study utilizes a taxonomically well-sampled phylogeny to show convergent evolution in all six morphological characters we analyzed. Three of these characters also correlate with habitat. The presence of an autogenic photophore (those relying upon autonomous enzymatic light reactions is correlated with a pelagic habitat, while the cornea and accessory nidamental gland correlate with a benthic lifestyle. Here, we present the first statistical tests for correlation between convergent traits and habitat in cephalopods to better understand the evolutionary history of characters that are adaptive in benthic or pelagic environments, respectively. Discussion Our study supports the hypothesis that habitat has influenced convergent evolution in the marine environment: benthic organisms tend to exhibit similar characteristics that confer protection from invasion by other benthic taxa, while pelagic organisms possess features that

  18. Self-Etching-Induced Morphological Evolution of ZnO Microrods Grown on FTO Glass by Hydrothermal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Dung; Tsai, Jenn-Kai; Meen, Teen-Hang; Wu, Tian-Chiuan; He, Yan-Kuan; Lai, Yu-Da

    2015-10-01

    In this research, the zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods were grown by hydrothermal method on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass functionalized by self-assembled monolayer of octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS; CH3(CH2)17Si(OCH3)3). The sharp-tip or polygonal shape with specific facets at the top end of ZnO microrods can be obtained by post retention at low temperature. The morphologies were characterized by the field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the morphology change at the top end is due to self-etching. The mechanism responsible for the formation of various top-end morphologies was proposed. The specific facets that left after 6-h retention were identified. The room-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectra showed a strong ultraviolet emission at 387 nm, and a broad emission at a range of from 500 to 700 nm. The morphology change also influences the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. A satellite peak in the UV emission spectra was observed. The peak may be attributed to the morphology effect of the microrods.

  19. Testing for X-ray-SZ Differences and Redshift Evolution in the X-ray Morphology of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Nurgaliev, D; Benson, B A; Bleem, L; Bocquet, S; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; Gupta, N; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Mohr, J J; Nagai, D; Rapetti, D; Stark, A A; Stubbs, C W; Vikhlinin, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative study of the X-ray morphology of galaxy clusters, as a function of their detection method and redshift. We analyze two separate samples of galaxy clusters: a sample of 36 clusters at 0.35 < z < 0.9 selected in the X-ray with the ROSAT PSPC 400 deg2 survey, and a sample of 90 clusters at 0.25 < z < 1.2 selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope. Clusters from both samples have similar-quality Chandra observations, which allow us to quantify their X-ray morphologies via two distinct methods: centroid shifts and photon asymmetry. The latter technique provides nearly unbiased morphology estimates for clusters spanning a broad range of redshift and data quality. We further compare the X-ray morphologies of X-ray- and SZ-selected clusters with those of simulated clusters. We do not find a statistically significant difference in the measured X-ray morphology of X-ray and SZ-selected clusters over the redshift range probed by these samples, sugg...

  20. Potential rapid evolution of foot morphology in Italian plethodontid salamanders (Hydromantes strinatii) following the colonization of an artificial cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvidio, S; Crovetto, F; Adams, D C

    2015-07-01

    How organisms respond to environmental change is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. Species invading novel habitats provide an opportunity to examine contemporary evolution in action and decipher the pace of evolutionary change over short timescales. Here, we characterized phenotypic evolution in the Italian plethodontid salamander, Hydromantes strinatii, following the recent colonization of an artificial cave by a forest floor population. When compared with a nearby and genetically related population in the natural forest floor and a nearby cave population, the artificial cave population displayed significant differences in overall foot shape, with more interdigital webbing relative to the other populations. Further, this population evolved significantly larger feet, which corresponded more closely to those found in other cave populations than to forest floor populations to which the cave population is closely related. Finally, we quantified the rate of evolution for both foot shape and foot area, and found that both traits displayed large and significant evolutionary rates, at levels corresponding to other classic cases of rapid evolution in vertebrates. Together, these findings reveal that the response to novel environmental pressures can be large and rapid and that the anatomical shifts observed in the artificial cave population of H. strinatii may represent a case of rapid evolution in response to novel environmental pressures.

  1. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He+ ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C+ ion impurities in He+ ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C+ ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He+ ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He+ ions) and 100% H+ ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04-2.0% H+ ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 1024 ions m-2), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He+ ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C+ ion impurities in He+ ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C+ ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H+ ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H+ ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04-2.0% H+ ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications.

  2. Flow, sedimentation, and biomass production on a vegetated salt marsh in South Carolina: toward a predictive model of marsh morphologic and ecologic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagherazzi, S.; Mudd, S. M.; Morris, J. T.; Furbish, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    A 1-D model for exploring the interaction between hydrodynamics, sedimentation, and plant community evolution on a salt marsh populated by Spartina alterniflora is developed. In the model tidally induced flows over marsh platforms are affected by S. alterniflora through drag forces. In general macrophyte characteristics are determined by a wide range of processes; here, based on field studies at North Inlet estuary, South Carolina, the biomass of the S. alterniflora on the marsh platform is simply related to their time of submergence under tidally induced flows. Additionally, field data collected at North Inlet are used to relate biomass to plant area per unit volume, stem diameter, and an empirical drag coefficient. Sedimentation is also related to biomass, through either organogenic deposition or trapping of suspended sediment particles. The morphologic evolution of simulated marshes is explored by varying the sedimentation process and the rate of sea level rise. Different sedimentation processes result in marshes with different morphologies. An organogenic marsh is predicted to evolve under a regime of steady sea level rise into a platform with a relatively flat surface, whereas a marsh developed primarily through a trapping mechanism is predicted to have a surface that slopes gently away from the salt marsh creek. As predicted by 0-D modeling studies, sea level rise may be accommodated up to a certain critical sea level rise rate, after which the salt marsh platform will drown. Marshes that accrete through sediment trapping adjust to changes in sea level more rapidly than marshes that accrete through organogenic deposition.

  3. Morphology controlled synthesis of 2-D Ni-Ni3S2 and Ni3S2 nanostructures on Ni foam towards oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nitin Kaduba; Oh, Aram; Sa, Young Jin; Jin, Haneul; Baik, Hionsuck; Kim, Sang Gu; Lee, Suk Joong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2017-03-01

    Catalysts for oxygen evolution reactions (OER) are at the heart of key renewable energy technologies, and development of non-precious metal catalysts with high activity and stability remain a great challenge in this field. Among various material candidates, metal sulfides are receiving increasing attention. While morphology-dependent catalytic performances are well established in noble metal-based catalysts, relatively little is known for the morphology‒catalytic performance relationship in metal sulfide catalysts. In this study, uniform spider web-like Ni nanosheets-Ni3S2 and honeycomb-like Ni3S2 structures are deposited on nickel foam (Ni3S2/NF) by a facile one-step hydrothermal synthetic route. When used as an oxygen evolution electrode, the spider web-like Ni-Ni3S2/NF with the large exposed surface area shown excellent catalytic activity and stability with an overpotential of 310 mV to achieve at 10 mA/cm2 and a Tafel slope of 63 mV/dec in alkaline media, which is superior to the honeycomb-like structure without Ni nanosheet. The low Tafel slope of the spider web-like Ni-Ni3S2/NF represents one of the best OER kinetics among nickel sulfide-based OER catalysts. The results point to the fact that performance of the metal sulfide electrocatalysts might be fine-tuned and optimized with morphological controls.

  4. Observations of Seasonal Morphological Evolution at a Moderately Energetic Beach in Rincón, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Nieves, A.; Loubriel, M.; Rodriguez-Abudo, S.; Canals, M.; Salgado-Domínguez, G.

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal variations in the wave climate near Rincón, Puerto Rico include high winter swells associated with meteorological disturbances in the north and mid Atlantic, short period waves resulting from local storms, and the occasional south swell. The resulting beach morphology is therefore a complex function of the wave climate, wave-induced currents, and local and remote meteorology, among others. Over the past 75 years, this particular stretch of beach has suffered severe erosion problems, losing as much as 100 meters of beach width at particular locations. The purpose of this study is to develop a high-resolution time series of beach morphology to examine in more detail the seasonal variations at the site. Beach profiles will be collected on a weekly basis using an RTK GPS system at three permanent stations spanning 2 km of coast. Sediment samples will be collected along the profiles to identify sediment properties associated with distinct morphological features, while digital photographs will provide a qualitative sense of beach width. The resulting morphological changes will be assessed in light of the Rincon's directional Waverider buoy data and CariCOOS' SWAN high-resolution wave model. This study will provide quantifiable insights into seasonal erosion/accretion trends at a highly touristic stretch of coast in the US Caribbean.

  5. Morphology and channel evolution of small streams in the southern Blue Ridge mountains of western North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Small streams are understudied in the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, yet they constitute a huge portion of the drainage network and are relevant with respect to human impact on the landscape and stream restoration efforts. Morphologies of 44 streams (0.01 to 20 km2 watersheds) from western North Carolina are characterized and couched in the context of historical...

  6. The evolution of jumping in frogs: morphological evidence for the basal anuran locomotor condition and the radiation of locomotor systems in crown group anurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Stephen M; Jorgensen, Michael E

    2011-02-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of frog locomotion follows from the work of Emerson in which anurans are proposed to possess one of three different iliosacral configurations: 1) a lateral-bending system found in walking and hopping frogs; 2) a fore-aft sliding mechanism found in several locomotor modes; and 3) a sagittal-hinge-type pelvis posited to be related to long-distance jumping performance. The most basal living (Ascaphus) and fossil (Prosalirus) frogs are described as sagittal-hinge pelvic types, and it has been proposed that long-distance jumping with a sagittal-hinge pelvis arose early in frog evolution. We revisited osteological traits of the pelvic region to conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the relationships between pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Using two of Emerson's diagnostic traits from the sacrum and ilium and two new traits from the urostyle, we resampled the taxa originally studied by Emerson and key paleotaxa and conducted an analysis of ancestral-character state evolution in relation to locomotor mode. We present a new pattern for the evolution of pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Character analysis shows that the lateral-bender, walker/hopper condition is both basal and generally conserved across the Anura. Long-distance jumping frogs do not appear until well within the Neobatrachia. The sagittal-hinge morphology is correlated with long-distance jumping in terrestrial frogs; however, it evolved convergently multiple times in crown group anurans with the same four pelvic traits described herein. Arboreal jumping has appeared in multiple crown lineages as well, but with divergent patterns of evolution involving each of the three pelvic types. The fore-aft slider morph appears independently in three different locomotor modes and, thus, is a more complex system than previously thought. Finally, it appears that the advent of a bicondylar sacro-urostylic articulation was originally related to providing axial rigidity

  7. When size makes a difference: allometry, life-history and morphological evolution of capuchins (Cebus and squirrels (Saimiri monkeys (Cebinae, Platyrrhini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marroig Gabriel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How are morphological evolution and developmental changes related? This rather old and intriguing question had a substantial boost after the 70s within the framework of heterochrony (changes in rates or timing of development and nowadays has the potential to make another major leap forward through the combination of approaches: molecular biology, developmental experimentation, comparative systematic studies, geometric morphometrics and quantitative genetics. Here I take an integrated approach combining life-history comparative analyses, classical and geometric morphometrics applied to ontogenetic series to understand changes in size and shape which happen during the evolution of two New World Monkeys (NWM sister genera. Results Cebus and Saimiri share the same basic allometric patterns in skull traits, a result robust to sexual and ontogenetic variation. If adults of both genera are compared in the same scale (discounting size differences most differences are small and not statistically significant. These results are consistent using both approaches, classical and geometric Morphometrics. Cebus is a genus characterized by a number of peramorphic traits (adult-like while Saimiri is a genus with paedomorphic (child like traits. Yet, the whole clade Cebinae is characterized by a unique combination of very high pre-natal growth rates and relatively slow post-natal growth rates when compared to the rest of the NWM. Morphologically Cebinae can be considered paedomorphic in relation to the other NWM. Geometric morphometrics allows the precise separation of absolute size, shape variation associated with size (allometry, and shape variation non-associated with size. Interestingly, and despite the fact that they were extracted as independent factors (principal components, evolutionary allometry (those differences in allometric shape associated with intergeneric differences and ontogenetic allometry (differences in allometric shape

  8. Development of the trigeminal motor neurons in parrots: implications for the role of nervous tissue in the evolution of jaw muscle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi; Nakayama, Tomoki

    2014-02-01

    Vertebrates have succeeded to inhabit almost every ecological niche due in large part to the anatomical diversification of their jaw complex. As a component of the feeding apparatus, jaw muscles carry a vital role for determining the mode of feeding. Early patterning of the jaw muscles has been attributed to cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme, however, much remains to be understood about the role of nonneural crest tissues in the evolution and diversification of jaw muscle morphology. In this study, we describe the development of trigeminal motor neurons in a parrot species with the uniquely shaped jaw muscles and compare its developmental pattern to that in the quail with the standard jaw muscles to uncover potential roles of nervous tissue in the evolution of vertebrate jaw muscles. In parrot embryogenesis, the motor axon bundles are detectable within the muscular tissue only after the basic shape of the muscular tissue has been established. This supports the view that nervous tissue does not primarily determine the spatial pattern of jaw muscles. In contrast, the trigeminal motor nucleus, which is composed of somata of neurons that innervate major jaw muscles, of parrot is more developed compared to quail, even in embryonic stage where no remarkable interspecific difference in both jaw muscle morphology and motor nerve branching pattern is recognized. Our data suggest that although nervous tissue may not have a large influence on initial patterning of jaw muscles, it may play an important role in subsequent growth and maintenance of muscular tissue and alterations in cranial nervous tissue development may underlie diversification of jaw muscle morphology.

  9. Growth and erosion: The volcanic geology and morphological evolution of La Fossa (Island of Vulcano, Southern Italy) in the last 1000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, F.; Pistolesi, M.; Rosi, M.; Bonadonna, C.; Fusillo, R.; Roverato, M.

    2013-07-01

    The Island of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Southern Italy) consists of several volcanic edifices whose formation overlapped in time and space beginning 120 ka ago. The most recent volcano is the La Fossa cone, a 391 m-high active composite cone that began to erupt 5.5 ka ago. Eruptive activity at the La Fossa cone occurred in several cyclic phases separated by prolonged periods of erosion. The last 1000 years of eruptive activity and morphological variations in the cone and its surrounding area were investigated through a stratigraphic reconstruction. This was based on 139 natural cuts, 26 machine-excavated and 5 hand-dug trenches in the volcaniclastic succession. The revised stratigraphy of the volcanic and volcaniclastic sequence was compared with geological maps based on the Unconformity-bounded Stratigraphic Units criteria compiled in 2006-2010. It was found that the last 1000-year period can be divided into (in hierarchical order) Eruptive Clusters and Units. Several unconformities of different hierarchical order were also identified (erosional surfaces and/or palaeosols). Stratigraphic relationships with the Vulcanello products and with rhyolitic tephras related to the eruptions of Mt. Pilato (the last-formed volcanic edifice of the Island of Lipari) were fundamental in assigning a calendar age to most of the tephra units in the studied sequence. The morphological evolution of the upper part of the cone was also reconstructed in order to assess the average cone growth rate. This work suggests a new stratigraphic and chronological interpretation of the evolution and "cyclic" activity of the La Fossa cone in the last 1000 years. Several eruptions occurred in two main clusters. The stratigraphic record and morphological features reveal that the areas around the cone were affected by the deposition of reworked materials, with large amounts of tephra deposited on the steep slopes and within the major streams.

  10. Morphology and the Color-mass Diagram as Clues to Galaxy Evolution at z&approx1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Meredith C.; Urry, C. Megan; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Schawinski, Kevin; Young, Sydney; Kawakatsu, Mari

    2017-01-01

    We study the significance of mergers in the quenching of star formation in galaxies at z∼ 1 by examining their color–mass distributions for different morphology types. We perform two-dimensional light profile fits to GOODS iz images of ∼5000 galaxies and X-ray selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosts in the CANDELS/GOODS-north and south fields in the redshift range 0.7< z< 1.3. Distinguishing between bulge-dominated and disk-dominated morphologies, we find that disks and spheroids have distinct color–mass distributions, in agreement with studies at z∼ 0. The smooth distribution across colors for the disk galaxies corresponds to a slow exhaustion of gas, with no fast quenching event. Meanwhile, blue spheroids most likely come from major mergers of star-forming disk galaxies, and the dearth of spheroids at intermediate green colors is suggestive of rapid quenching. The distribution of moderate luminosity X-ray AGN hosts is even across colors, in contrast, and we find similar numbers and distributions among the two morphology types with no apparent dependence on Eddington ratio. The high fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies that host an AGN in the blue cloud and green valley is consistent with the scenario in which the AGN is triggered after a major merger, and the host galaxy then quickly evolves into the green valley. This suggests AGN feedback may play a role in the quenching of star formation in the minority of galaxies that undergo major mergers.

  11. The Evolution of the Field and Cluster Morphology-Density Relation for Mass-Selected Samples of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Wel, A; Franx, M; Illingworth, G D; Postman, M P; Kelson, D D; Labbé, I; Blakeslee, J P; Ford, H C

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and photometric/spectroscopic surveys in the GOODS-South field (the Chandra Deep Field-South, CDFS) are used to construct volume-limited, stellar mass-selected samples of galaxies at redshifts 02.5. The fraction of E+S0 galaxies is 43+/-3%$ at z~0.03 and 48+/-7% at z~0.8, i.e., it has not changed significantly since z~0.8. When combined with recent results for cluster galaxies in the same redshift range, we find that the morphology-density relation for galaxies more massive than 0.5M* has remained constant since at least z~0.8. This implies that galaxies evolve in mass, morphology and density such that the morphology-density relation does not change. In particular, the decline of star formation activity and the accompanying increase in the stellar mass density of red galaxies since z~1 must happen without large changes in the early-type galaxy fraction in a given environment.

  12. Morphological evolution of z~1 galaxies from deep K-band AO imaging in the COSMOS deep field

    CERN Document Server

    Huertas-Company, M; Soucail, G; Lefèvre, O; Tasca, L; Contini, T

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of an imaging programme of distant galaxies (z~0.8) at high spatial resolution (~0.1").We observed 7 fields of 1'*1' with the NACO Adaptive Optics system (VLT) in Ks (2.16um) band with typical V ~ 14 guide stars and 3h integration time per field. Observed fields are selected within the COSMOS survey area. High angular resolution K-band data have the advantage to probe old stellar populations in the rest-frame, enabling to determine galaxy morphological types unaffected by recent star formation, better linked to the underlying mass than classical optical morphology studies (HST). Adaptive optics on ground based telescopes is the only method today to obtain such high resolution in the K-band. In this paper we show that reliable results can be obtained and establish a first basis for larger observing programmes. We analyze the morphologies by means of B/D (Bulge/Disk) decomposition with GIM2D and CAS (Concentration-Asymmetry) estimators for 79 galaxies with magnitudes between Ks = 17-23 an...

  13. Nickel-induced microwheel-like surface morphological evolution of ZnO thin films by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarwal, N. L.; Shinde, P. S.; Oh, Y. W.; Cerc Korošec, Romana; Patil, P. S.

    2012-11-01

    Nickel-zinc oxide (Ni-ZnO) thin films were deposited onto glass and tin-doped indium oxide-coated glass substrates by using a pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique at 450 °C from aqueous solutions of zinc acetate and nickel acetate precursors. The effect of nickel doping on structural, morphological and optical properties of the ZnO thin films has been studied. The X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the polycrystalline nature of the films having hexagonal crystal structure. Ni-ZnO films with appropriate nickel doping revealed the occurrence of novel wheel-like surface morphology. The absorption edge of the Ni-ZnO films showed a red shift, meaning that the optical band gap energy decreases as the nickel doping concentration increases. A growth model is developed and proposed for the novel wheel-like morphology. All the thin films exhibited room-temperature photoluminescence. Pure ZnO and Ni-ZnO thin films were tested for their photoelectrochemical performance in 0.5 M Na2SO4 electrolyte solution. The values of fill factor and open circuit voltage were improved for the Ni-ZnO thin films.

  14. Nickel-induced microwheel-like surface morphological evolution of ZnO thin films by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarwal, N.L.; Shinde, P.S.; Patil, P.S. [Shivaji University, Thin Film Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India); Oh, Y.W. [Kyungnam University, Department of Nano Engineering, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Cerc Korosec, Romana [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-15

    Nickel-zinc oxide (Ni-ZnO) thin films were deposited onto glass and tin-doped indium oxide-coated glass substrates by using a pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique at 450 C from aqueous solutions of zinc acetate and nickel acetate precursors. The effect of nickel doping on structural, morphological and optical properties of the ZnO thin films has been studied. The X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the polycrystalline nature of the films having hexagonal crystal structure. Ni-ZnO films with appropriate nickel doping revealed the occurrence of novel wheel-like surface morphology. The absorption edge of the Ni-ZnO films showed a red shift, meaning that the optical band gap energy decreases as the nickel doping concentration increases. A growth model is developed and proposed for the novel wheel-like morphology. All the thin films exhibited room-temperature photoluminescence. Pure ZnO and Ni-ZnO thin films were tested for their photoelectrochemical performance in 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte solution. The values of fill factor and open circuit voltage were improved for the Ni-ZnO thin films. (orig.)

  15. Gene expression analysis of aquatic angiosperms podostemaceae to gain insight into the evolution of their enigmatic morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koi, Satoshi; Katayama, Natsu

    2013-01-01

    Podostemaceae is a family of aquatic angiosperms growing submerged on rocks in fast-flowing water and called moss-like or alga-like riverweeds. It evolved remarkable innovations to adapt to such an extreme environment, one of which is reduced shoots borne on roots adhering to rock surface. Recent observations revealed that the basal subfamily Tristichoideae, like most other angiosperms, has typical shoot apical meristems (SAMs). In species of the subfamily Podostemoideae, however, shoot apical meristems (SAMs) are not formed during development and new leaves arise from the meristematic basal region of preexisting leaves. The genetic basis of this shoot organogenesis process, e.g., the expression patterns of genes homologous to transcription factors regulating shoot development, is essential to better understand the evolution of Podostemaceae. A gene expression analysis found that the SAM-less Podostemoideae leaf has mixed identity of SAM and leaf, and provided insight into the evolution of the shoot in Podostemaceae.

  16. Gonadogenesis in Pristionchus pacificus and organ evolution: development, adult morphology and cell-cell interactions in the hermaphrodite gonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2005-01-01

    The nematode gonad is an exemplary system for the study of organogenesis and fundamental problems in developmental and cellular biology. Nematode gonads vary dramatically across species (Chitwood, B.G., Chitwood, M.B., 1950. Introduction to Nematology." University Park Press, Baltimore; Felix, M.A., Sternberg, P.W., 1996. Symmetry breakage in the development of one-armed gonads in nematodes. Development 122, 2129-2142). As such, comparative developmental biology of gonadogenesis offers the potential to investigate changes in developmental and cellular processes that result in novel organ morphologies and thus may give insights into how these changes can affect animal bauplane. Pristionchus pacificus is a free-living nematode that diverged from the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans around 200-300 million years ago. The morphology and development of P. pacificus is highly homologous to that of C. elegans. However, many differences in morphology and the underlying molecular signaling networks are easy to identify, making P. pacificus ideal for a comparative approach. Here, we report a detailed description of the P. pacificus hermaphrodite gonad using electron and fluorescent microscopy that will provide a basis for both phenotypic studies of genetic mutations and in vivo molecular studies of cloned genes involved in P. pacificus gonad development. We report that the morphology of the P. pacificus gonad is distinct from that of C. elegans. Among these differences are germ line patterning differences, heterochronic differences, novel gonadal arm-migrations, novel cellular composition of some somatic tissues (e.g., the number of cells that comprise the sheath and different spermathecal regions are different), the absence of a somatic tissue (e.g., the spermathecal valve cells), a novel architecture for the sheath, and changes in the cellular and sub-cellular morphology of the individual sheath cells. Additionally, we report a set of cell ablations in P. pacificus

  17. Continuous Electrical Current and Zinc Sulphate Administered by Transdermal Iontophoresis Improves Skin Healing in Diabetic Rats Induced by Alloxan: Morphological and Ultrastructural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Langoni Cassettari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Evaluated the effects of continuous electrical current (CEC or zinc administrated by transdermal iontophoresis (Zn+TDI. Methods. 120 male Wistar rats were submitted to an incision surgery at the anterior region of abdomen and distributed into 6 experimental groups with 40 animals: 3 diabetic groups and 3 normal groups, untreated and treated with CEC alone or with Zn + TDI. Each group was further divided into 4 subgroups with 10 rats each to be evaluated on the 4th, 7th, 14th, and 21st day after surgery. In each period, clinical and laboratory parameters from the animals were analyzed. Results. The analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy showed a delay in the phases of wound healing in diabetic rats without treatment in all periods of the experiment; breaking strength (BS was significantly reduced in skin scars of untreated diabetic rats when compared to other groups. In contrast, BS in skin scars of nondiabetic groups and diabetic rats treated with Zn + TDI showed significant increase in those, besides not presenting delayed healing. Conclusion. Electrical stimulation of surgical wounds used alone or in association with zinc by TDI is able to consistently improve the morphological and ultrastructural changes observed in the healing of diabetic animals.

  18. Stepwise morphological evolution of the active Yellow River (Huanghe) delta lobe (1976-2013): Dominant roles of riverine discharge and sediment grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao; Bi, Naishuang; Xu, Jingping; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Yang, Zuosheng; Saito, Yoshiki; Wang, Houjie

    2017-09-01

    The presently active Yellow River (Huanghe) delta lobe has been formed since 1976 when the river was artificially diverted. The process and driving forces of morphological evolution of the present delta lobe still remain unclear. Here we examined the stepwise morphological evolution of the active Yellow River delta lobe including both the subaerial and the subaqueous components, and illustrated the critical roles of riverine discharge and sediment grain size in dominating the deltaic evolution. The critical sediment loads for maintaining the delta stability were also calculated from water discharge and sediment load measured at station Lijin, the last gauging station approximately 100 km upstream from the river mouth. The results indicated that the development of active delta lobe including both subaerial and subaqueous components has experienced four sequential stages. During the first stage (1976-1981) after the channel migration, the unchannelized river flow enhanced deposition within the channel and floodplain between Lijin station and the river mouth. Therefore, the critical sediment supply calculated by the river inputs obtained from station Lijin was the highest. However, the actual sediment load at this stage (0.84 Gt/yr) was more than twice of the critical sediment load ( 0.35 Gt/yr) for sustaining the active subaerial area, which favored a rapid seaward progradation of the Yellow River subaerial delta. During the second stage (1981-1996), the engineering-facilitated channelized river flow and the increase in median grain size of suspended sediment delivered to the sea resulted in the critical sediment load for keeping the delta stability deceasing to 0.29 Gt/yr. The active delta lobe still gradually prograded seaward at an accretion rate of 11.9 km2/yr at this stage as the annual sediment load at Lijin station was 0.55 Gt/yr. From 1996 to 2002, the critical sediment load further decreased to 0.15 Gt/yr with the sediment grain size increased to 22.5

  19. Evolutionary developmental pathology and anthropology: A new field linking development, comparative anatomy, human evolution, morphological variations and defects, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Smith, Christopher M; Ziermann, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new subfield of the recently created field of Evolutionary-Developmental-Anthropology (Evo-Devo-Anth): Evolutionary-Developmental-Pathology-and-Anthropology (Evo-Devo-P'Anth). This subfield combines experimental and developmental studies of nonhuman model organisms, biological anthropology, chordate comparative anatomy and evolution, and the study of normal and pathological human development. Instead of focusing on other organisms to try to better understand human development, evolution, anatomy, and pathology, it places humans as the central case study, i.e., as truly model organism themselves. We summarize the results of our recent Evo-Devo-P'Anth studies and discuss long-standing questions in each of the broader biological fields combined in this subfield, paying special attention to the links between: (1) Human anomalies and variations, nonpentadactyly, homeotic transformations, and "nearest neighbor" vs. "find and seek" muscle-skeleton associations in limb+facial muscles vs. other head muscles; (2) Developmental constraints, the notion of "phylotypic stage," internalism vs. externalism, and the "logic of monsters" vs. "lack of homeostasis" views about human birth defects; (3) Human evolution, reversions, atavisms, paedomorphosis, and peromorphosis; (4) Scala naturae, Haeckelian recapitulation, von Baer's laws, and parallelism between phylogeny and development, here formally defined as "Phylo-Devo parallelism"; and (5) Patau, Edwards, and Down syndrome (trisomies 13, 18, 21), atavisms, apoptosis, heart malformations, and medical implications.

  20. Effects of continual burial by sediment on seedling emergence and morphology of Suaeda salsa in the coastal marsh of the Yellow River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhigao; Song, Hongli; Sun, Jingkuan; Sun, Wenguang

    2014-03-15

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the impacts of continual burial on seedling emergence and morphology of Suaeda salsa, a pioneer species in the coastal marsh of the Yellow River estuary. From May to June 2012, seeds of S. salsa were artificially buried to depths of 0 cm (no burial), 2 cm (burial of 1 mm d(-1)), 4 cm (burial of 2 mm d(-1)), 6 cm (burial of 3 mm d(-1)), 8 cm (burial of 4 mm d(-1)) and 10 cm (burial of 5 mm d(-1)) in plastic pots filled with unsterilized sediment. Results showed that the percent emergence of seedlings had a significantly negative correlation with continual burial depth (p burial depths, with the highest emergence (56.00 ± 6.60%) occurring from 2 cm depth. The shortest emergence time occurred at 4 cm burial depth and seeds buried at 10 cm depth took longer to emerge than those at other depths. At shallow or moderate burials, a stimulatory effect on seedling height, stem diameter, number and length of branch, taproot length and dry mass were observed. With increasing burial depth, root-mass and leaf-mass ratios generally increased while stem-mass ratio decreased. Sediment burial also stimulated part of the hypocotyl below the sediment to form adventitious roots, implying that S. salsa seedlings had a special adaptive strategy in response to the rapid and dynamic burial environment in the coastal marsh of the Yellow River estuary. The use of thin-layer continual burial (1-2 mm d(-1)) to promote the emergence of S. salsa seedlings in degraded marsh was feasible, and our study provided another way for the restoration of S. salsa marsh during the initial stage of seedling establishment and laid a good foundation for the scientific decision-making and management of restoration project at a large scale.

  1. Surficial deposits on salt diapirs (Zagros Mountains and Persian Gulf Platform, Iran): Characterization, evolution, erosion and the influence on landscape morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruthans, Jiří; Filippi, Michal; Asadi, Naser; Zare, Mohammad; Šlechta, Stanislav; Churáčková, Zdenka

    2009-06-01

    The surfaces of salt diapirs in the Zagros Mountains are mostly covered by surficial deposits, which significantly affect erosion rates, salt karst evolution, land use and the density of the vegetation cover. Eleven salt diapirs were selected for the study of surficial deposits in order to cover variability in the geology, morphology and climate in a majority of the diapirs in the Zagros Mountains and Persian Gulf Platform. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of 80 selected samples were studied mainly by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray fluorescence. Changes in salinity along selected vertical profiles were studied together with the halite and gypsum distribution. The subaerial residuum formed from minerals and rock detritus released from the dissolved rock salt is by far the most abundant material on the diapirs. Fluvial sediments derived from this type of residuum are the second most common deposits found, while submarine residuum and marine sediments have only local importance. The mineralogical/chemical composition of surficial deposits varies amongst the three end members: evaporite minerals (gypsum/anhydrite and minor halite), carbonates (dolomite and calcite) and silicates-oxides (mainly quartz, phyllosilicates, and hematite). Based on infiltration tests on different types of surficial deposits, most of the rainwater will infiltrate, while overland flow predominates on rock salt exposures. Recharge concentration and thick accumulations of fine sediment support relatively rich vegetation cover in some places and even enable local agricultural activity. The source material, diapir relief, climatic conditions and vegetation cover were found to be the main factors affecting the development and erosion of surficial deposits. A difference was found in residuum type and landscape morphology between the relatively humid NW part of the studied area and the arid Persian Gulf coast: In the NW, the medium and thick residuum seems to be stable under current

  2. Comparative morphology of the hominin and African ape hyoid bone, a possible marker of the evolution of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, James; Clegg, Margaret; Martelli, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the morphology of the hyoid in three closely related species, Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, and Gorilla gorilla. Differences and similarities between the hyoids of these species are characterized and used to interpret the morphology and affi nities of the Dikika A. afarensis, Kebara 2 Neanderthal, and other fossil hominin hyoid bones. Humans and African apes are found to have distinct hyoid morphologies. In humans the maximum width across the distal tips of the articulated greater horns is usually slightly greater than the maximum length (distal greater horn tip to most anterior point of the hyoid body in the midline). A different pattern is usually found in the African ape hyoids, which have much greater maximum lengths. In humans, the hyoid body is also much more anteroposteriorly shallow in proportion to its height and width, and this is true for all age classes. The Dikika australopithecine hyoid body proportions are chimpanzeelike. A discriminant function analysis, using a larger subadult sample from the three extant species than that reported by Alemseged et al. (2006), confirms this finding. The Kebara hyoid dimensions (body alone, and articulated body and greater horns) are almost all within the observed range for human hyoids. Discriminant functions clearly distinguish human from African ape hyoids and classify the Kebara 2 hyoid as human (confirming the finding of Arensburg et al. 1989). Our virtual dissection of a chimpanzee air sac system shows its subhyoid extension into the dorsal hyoid body. Following Alemseged et al. (2006), the expanded bulla characteristic of the African ape and australopithecine hyoid body is therefore interpreted as refl ecting the presence of such a laryngeal air sac extension. Its absence in the human, Neanderthal, and H. heidelbergensis (Atapuerca SH) hyoids implicates the loss of the laryngeal air sacs as a derived Neanderthal and modern human trait, which evolved no later than the middle Pleistocene. If

  3. Molecular Phylogeny, Recent Radiation and Evolution of Gross Morphology of the Rhubarb genus Rheum (Polygonaceae) Inferred from Chloroplast DNA trnL-F Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, AILAN; YANG, MEIHUA; LIU, JIANQUAN

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Rheum, a highly diversified genus with about 60 species, is mainly confined to the mountainous and desert regions of the Qinghai–Tibetan plateau and adjacent areas. This genus represents a good example of the extensive diversification of the temperate genera in the Qinghai–Tibetan plateau, in which the forces to drive diversification remain unknown. To date, the infrageneric classification of Rheum has been mainly based on morphological characters. However, it may have been subject to convergent evolution under habitat pressure, and the systematic position of some sections are unclear, especially Sect. Globulosa, which has globular inflorescences, and Sect. Nobilia, which has semi-translucent bracts. Recent palynological research has found substantial contradictions between exine patterns and the current classification of Rheum. Two specific objectives of this research were (1) to evaluate possible relationships of some ambiguous sections with a unique morphology, and (2) to examine possible occurrence of the radiative speciation with low genetic divergence across the total genus and the correlation between the extensive diversification time of Rheum and past geographical events, especially the recent large-scale uplifts of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau. • Methods The chloroplast DNA trnL-F region of 29 individuals representing 26 species of Rheum, belonging to seven out of eight sections, was sequenced and compared. The phylogenetic relationships were further constructed based on the sequences obtained. • Key Results Despite the highly diversified morphology, the genetic variation in this DNA fragment is relatively low. The molecular phylogeny is highly inconsistent with gross morphology, pollen exine patterns and traditional classifications, except for identifying all samples of Sect. Palmata, three species of Sect. Spiciformia and a few species of Sect. Rheum as corresponding monophyletic groups. The monotypic Sect. Globulosa

  4. Morphological evolution in single-crystalline Bi2Te3 nanoparticles, nanosheets and nanotubes with different synthesis temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Punita Srivastava; Kedar Singh

    2013-10-01

    A general surfactant-assisted wet chemical route has been developed for the synthesis of a variety of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) single-crystalline nanostructures with varied morphologies at different temperatures in which hydrazine hydrate plays as an important solvent. Bi2Te3 sheet grown nanoparticles, nanosheets and nanotubes have been synthesized by a simplest wet chemical route at 50, 70 and 100 °C within 4 h. Bi2Te3 sheet grown nanoparticles are obtained in agglomerate state and they are found with many wrinkles. Various types of Bi2Te3 nanotubes are also found which are tapered with one end open and the other closed. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were employed to characterize the powder product. It is found that all nanoparticles, nanosheets and nanotubes are well-crystallized nanocrystals and morphologies of the powder products are greatly affected by different synthesis temperatures. The formation mechanisms of bismuth telluride nanostructures are also discussed.

  5. Phylogeny, classification and evolution of ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) based on simultaneous analysis of molecular and morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Ainsley E; Giorgi, Jose Adriano; Li, Jiahui; Slipiński, Adam

    2011-07-01

    Ladybird beetles (family Coccinellidae) are a species-rich, ecologically diverse group of substantial agricultural significance, yet have been consistently problematic to classify, with evolutionary relationships poorly understood. In order to identify major clades within Coccinellidae, evaluate the current classification system, and identify likely drivers of diversification in this polyphagous group, we conducted the first simultaneous Bayesian analysis of morphological and multi-locus molecular data for any beetle family. Addition of morphological data significantly improved phylogenetic resolution and support for early diverging lineages, thereby better resolving evolutionary relationships than either data type alone. On the basis of these results, we formally recognize the subfamilies Microweisinae and Coccinellinae sensuŚlipiński (2007). No significant support was found for the subfamilies Coccidulinae, Scymninae, Sticholotidinae, or Ortaliinae. Our phylogenetic results suggest that the evolutionary success of Coccinellidae is in large part attributable to the exploitation of ant-tended sternorrhynchan insects as a food source, enabled by the key innovation of unusual defense mechanisms in larvae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Morphological evolution of coexisting amphipod species pairs from sulfidic caves suggests competitive interactions and character displacement, but no environmental filtering and convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišer, Cene; Luštrik, Roman; Sarbu, Serban; Flot, Jean-François; Trontelj, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypically similar species coexisting in extreme environments like sulfidic water are subject to two opposing eco-evolutionary processes: those favoring similarity of environment-specific traits, and those promoting differences of traits related to resource use. The former group of processes includes ecological filtering and convergent or parallel evolution, the latter competitive exclusion, character displacement and divergent evolution. We used a unique eco-evolutionary study system composed of two independent pairs of coexisting amphipod species (genus Niphargus) from the sulfidic caves Movile in Romania and Frasassi in Italy to study the relative contribution and interaction of both processes. We looked at the shape of the multifunctional ventral channel as a trait ostensibly related to oxygenation and sulfide detoxification, and at body size as a resource-related trait. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the sulfidic caves were colonized separately by ancestors of each species. Species within pairs were more dissimilar in their morphology than expected according to a null model based on regional species pool. This might indicate competitive interactions shaping the morphology of these amphipod species. Moreover, our results suggest that the shape of the ventral channel is not subject to long-term convergent selection or to the process of environmental filtering, and as such probably does not play a role in sulfide tolerance. Nevertheless, the ancestral conditions reconstructed using the comparative method tended to be more similar than null-model expectations. This shift in patterns may reflect a temporal hierarchy of eco-evolutionary processes, in which initial environmental filtering became later on superseded by character displacement or other competition-driven divergent evolutionary processes.

  7. Temperature-Driven Structural and Morphological Evolution of Zinc Oxide Nano-Coalesced Microstructures and Its Defect-Related Photoluminescence Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karkeng; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Al-Hardan, N H; Mansor, Ishak; Chiu, Weesiong

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we address the synthesis of nano-coalesced microstructured zinc oxide thin films via a simple thermal evaporation process. The role of synthesis temperature on the structural, morphological, and optical properties of the prepared zinc oxide samples was deeply investigated. The obtained photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy outcomes will be used to discuss the surface structure defects of the prepared samples. The results indicated that the prepared samples are polycrystalline in nature, and the sample prepared at 700 °C revealed a tremendously c-axis oriented zinc oxide. The temperature-driven morphological evolution of the zinc oxide nano-coalesced microstructures was perceived, resulting in transformation of quasi-mountain chain-like to pyramidal textured zinc oxide with increasing the synthesis temperature. The results also impart that the sample prepared at 500 °C shows a higher percentage of the zinc interstitial and oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the intensity of the photoluminescence emission in the ultraviolet region was enhanced as the heating temperature increased from 500 °C to 700 °C. Lastly, the growth mechanism of the zinc oxide nano-coalesced microstructures is discussed according to the reaction conditions.

  8. Catalog of Galaxy Morphology in Four Rich Clusters: Luminosity Evolution of Disk Galaxies at 0.33

    CERN Document Server

    Saintonge, A; Ellingson, E; Yee, H K C; Carlberg, R G; Saintonge, Amelie; Schade, David; Ellingson, Erica; Yee, Howard K.C.; Carlberg, Raymond G.

    2005-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of four rich, X-ray luminous, galaxy clusters (0.33morphological measurements for galaxies in their fields. Catalogs of these measurements are presented for 1642 galaxies brighter than F814W(AB)=23.0 . Galaxy luminosity profiles are fitted with three models: exponential disk, de Vaucouleurs bulge, and a disk-plus-bulge hybrid model. The best fit is selected and produces a quantitative assessment of the morphology of each galaxy: the principal parameters derived being B/T, the ratio of bulge to total luminosity, the scale lengths and half-light radii, axial ratios, position angles and surface brightnesses of each component. Cluster membership is determined using a statistical correction for field galaxy contamination, and a mass normalization factor (mass within boundaries of the observed fields) is derived for each cluster. In the present paper, this catalog of measurements is used to investigate the luminosity evolution of di...

  9. Microwave-Assisted Morphology Evolution of Fe-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks and Their Derived Fe2O3 Nanostructures for Li-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenxiang; Sun, Weiwei; Lv, Li-Ping; Kong, Shaofeng; Wang, Yong

    2017-04-25

    The metal-organic-framework (MOF) approach is demonstrated as an effective strategy for the morphology evolution control of MIL-53(Fe) with assistance of microwave irradiation. Owing to the homogeneous nucleation offered by microwave irradiation and confined porosity and skeleton by MOF templates, various porous Fe2O3 nanostructures including spindle, concave octahedron, solid octahedron, yolk-shell octahedron, and nanorod with porosity control are derived by simply adjusting the irradiation time. The formation mechanism for the MOF precursors and their derived iron oxides with morphology control is investigated. The main product of the mesoporous yolk-shell octahedron-in-octahedron Fe2O3 nanostructure is also found to be a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries due to its excellent Li-storage performance. It can deliver a reversible larger-than-theoretical capacity of 1176 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 100 mA g(-1) and good high-rate performance (744 mAh g(-1) after 500 cycles at 1 A g(-1)).

  10. From nanoplates to microtubes and microrods: a surfactant-free rolling mechanism for facile fabrication and morphology evolution of Ag2S films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Peng; Zheng, Zhi; Lei, Yan; Yang, Feng-Ling; Ge, Su-Xiang; Zhang, Yi-Dong; Huang, Bao-Jun; Gao, Yuan-Hao; Wong, Ka-Wai; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2011-06-27

    By a simple and facile wet-chemistry technique without any surfactant, various shapes of Ag(2)S crystals--including leaflike pentagonal nanoplates, crinkly nanoscrolls, hexagonal prismlike microtubes, and microrods--were fabricated in situ on a large-area silver-foil surface separately. Detailed experiments revealed that the Ag(2)S nanoplates were formed just by immersing the silver foil in a sulfur/ethanol solution at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, and they subsequently rolled into nanoscrolls and further grew into microtubes and microrods under solvothermal conditions. Inspired by the natural curling of a piece of foliage, we proposed a surfactant-free rolling mechanism to interpret the observed morphological evolution from lamellar to tubular structures. Based on these simple, practical, and green chemical synthetic routes, we can easily synthesize lamellar, scrolled, tubular, and clubbed Ag(2)S crystals by simply adjusting the reaction temperature, pressure, and time. It is very interesting to note that the current rolling process is quite different from the previous reported rolling mechanism that highly depends on the surfactants; we revealed that the lamellar Ag(2)S could be rolled into tubular structures without using any surfactant or other chemical additives, just like the natural rolling process of a piece of foliage. Therefore, this morphology-controlled synthetic route of Ag(2)S crystals may provide new insight into the synthesis of metal sulfide semiconducting micro-/nanocrystals with desired morphologies for further industrial applications. The optical properties of the pentagonal Ag(2)S nanoplates/film were also investigated by UV/Vis and photoluminescence (PL) techniques, which showed large blue-shift of the corresponding UV/Vis and PL spectra.

  11. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Thompson, T., E-mail: velusamy@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: timthompson3@verizon.net [1947C East Huntington Drive, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  12. Modelling the long-term morphological evolution of a coupled open coast, inlet and estuary system to explore climate change impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Barend; Walkden, Mike; Barnes, John; Nicholls, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Coastal and shoreline management increasingly needs to account for morphological change occurring at decadal to centennial timescales. Critical aspects of geomorphic behaviour at these temporal scales emerge at a system level, such that accounting for the feedbacks between different landform components is of key importance. In this study we develop new methods to simulate the large-scale evolution of a coupled open coast - inlet - estuary system, allowing us to explore the system's response to climate change impacts and management interventions. The system explored here encompasses the Deben estuary (eastern England) and its adjacent shorelines. The estuary itself mainly consists of finer sediments. Sediments throughout the inlet, on the other hand, including the ebb-tidal delta itself, comprise a mixture of gravel and sand. The ebb-tidal shoals and sediment bypassing show broadly cyclic behaviour on a 10 to 30 year timescale. Neighbouring beaches consist of mixed sediment and are partially backed up by sedimentary cliffs, the behaviour of which is potentially influenced by the sediment bypassing at the inlet. In addition, the open coast has undergone major transformations as a result of numerous sea defences which have altered sediment availability and supply. The interlinked behaviour of this system is approached by coupling a new inlet model (MESO_i) with an existing, and recently extended, model for the open coast (SCAPE+). MESOi simulates the evolution at the mouth of the Deben at an aggregated scale, conceptualizing the inlet by different geomorphic features that are characterized mainly by their volume. The behaviour of the inlet shoals is influenced by the estuarine tidal prism, linking estuarine processes with inlet dynamics. SCAPE+ computes the shaping of the shore profile and has proven capable of providing valuable information in terms of decadal evolution and related cliff recession rates. Simulations conducted with this composition of models highlight

  13. Phylogenetics of Anthyllis (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae: Loteae): Partial incongruence between nuclear and plastid markers, a long branch problem and implications for morphological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtjareva, Galina V; Valiejo-Roman, Carmen M; Samigullin, Tahir H; Guara-Requena, Miguel; Sokoloff, Dmitry D

    2012-02-01

    Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Anthyllis (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae: Loteae) were investigated using data from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) and three plastid regions (psbA-trnH intergenic spacer, petB-petD region and rps16 intron). Bayesian and maximum parsimony (MP) analysis of a concatenated plastid dataset recovered well-resolved trees that are topologically similar, with many clades supported by unique indels. MP and Bayesian analyses of the ITS sequence data recovered trees that have several well-supported topological differences, both among analyses, and to trees inferred from the plastid data. The most substantial of these concerns A. vulneraria and A. lemanniana, whose placement in the parsimony analysis of the ITS data appears to be due to a strong long-branch effect. Analysis of the secondary structure of the ITS1 spacer showed a strong bias towards transitions in A. vulneraria and A. lemanniana, many of which were also characteristic of certain outgroup taxa. This may contribute to the conflicting placement of this clade in the MP tree for the ITS data. Additional conflicts between the plastid and ITS trees were more taxonomically focused. These differences may reflect the occurrence of reticulate evolution between closely related species, including a possible hybrid origin for A. hystrix. The patterns of incongruence between the plastid and the ITS data seem to correlate with taxon ranks. All of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Anthyllis (incl. Hymenocarpos). Although they are often taxonomically associated with Anthyllis, the genera Dorycnopsis and Tripodion are shown here to be more closely related to other genera of Loteae. We infer up to six major clades in Anthyllis that are morphologically well-characterized, and which could be recognized as sections. Four of these agree with various morphology-based classifications, while the other two are novel. We reconstruct the evolution of

  14. Morphology of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wadadekar, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    The study of the morphology of galaxies is important in order to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies and their sub-components as a function of luminosity, environment, and star-formation and galaxy assembly over cosmic time. Disentangling the many variables that affect galaxy evolution and morphology, requires large galaxy samples and automated ways to measure morphology. The advent of large digital sky surveys, with unprecedented depth and resolution, coupled with sophisticated quantitative methods for morphology measurement are providing new insights in this fast evolving field of astronomical research.

  15. Exceptional Morphology-Preserving Evolution of Formamidinium Lead Triiodide Perovskite Thin Films via Organic-Cation Displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yang, Mengjin; Pang, Shuping; Zhu, Kai; Padture, Nitin P

    2016-05-04

    Here we demonstrate a radically different chemical route for the creation of HC(NH2)2PbI3 (FAPbI3) perovskite thin films. This approach entails a simple exposure of as-synthesized CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) perovskite thin films to HC(═NH)NH2 (formamidine or FA) gas at 150 °C, which leads to rapid displacement of the MA(+) cations by FA(+) cations in the perovskite structure. The resultant FAPbI3 perovskite thin films preserve the microstructural morphology of the original MAPbI3 thin films exceptionally well. Importantly, the myriad processing innovations that have led to the creation of high-quality MAPbI3 perovskite thin films are directly adaptable to FAPbI3 through this simple, rapid chemical-conversion route. Accordingly, we show that efficiencies of perovskite solar cells fabricated with FAPbI3 thin films created using this route can reach ∼18%.

  16. Morphological and molecular evolution of the ultimobranchial gland of nonmammalian vertebrates, with special reference to the chicken C cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Yoko

    2017-10-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the nonmammalian ultimobranchial gland from morphological and molecular perspectives. Ultimobranchial anlage of all animal species develops from the last pharyngeal pouch. The genes involved in the development of pharyngeal pouches are well conserved across vertebrates. The ultimobranchial anlage of nonmammalian vertebrates and monotremes does not merge with the thyroid, remaining as an independent organ throughout adulthood. Although C cells of all animal species secrete calcitonin, the shape, cellular components and location of the ultimobranchial gland vary from species to species. Avian ultimobranchial gland is unique in several phylogenic aspects; the organ is located between the vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves at the upper thorax and is densely innervated by branches emanating from them. In chick embryos, TuJ1-, HNK-1-, and PGP 9.5-immunoreactive cells that originate from the distal vagal (nodose) ganglion, colonize the ultimobranchial anlage and differentiate into C cells; neuronal cells give rise to C cells. Like C cells of mammals, the cells of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and also a subset of C cells of birds, appear to be derived from the endodermal epithelium forming ultimobranchial anlage. Thus, the avian ultimobranchial C cells may have dual origins, neural progenitors and endodermal epithelium. Developmental Dynamics 246:719-739, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exceptional Morphology-Preserving Evolution of Formamidinium Lead Triiodide Perovskite Thin Films via Organic-Cation Displacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yang, Mengjin; Pang, Shuping; Zhu, Kai; Padture, Nitin P.

    2016-05-04

    Here we demonstrate a radically different chemical route for the creation of HC(NH2)2PbI3 (FAPbI3) perovskite thin films. This approach entails a simple exposure of as-synthesized CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) perovskite thin films to HC(=NH)NH2 (formamidine or FA) gas at 150 degrees C, which leads to rapid displacement of the MA+ cations by FA+ cations in the perovskite structure. The resultant FAPbI3 perovskite thin films preserve the microstructural morphology of the original MAPbI3 thin films exceptionally well. Importantly, the myriad processing innovations that have led to the creation of high-quality MAPbI3 perovskite thin films are directly adaptable to FAPbI3 through this simple, rapid chemical-conversion route. Accordingly, we show that efficiencies of perovskite solar cells fabricated with FAPbI3 thin films created using this route can reach -18%.

  18. Graphitic carbon nanospheres: A Raman spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity and morphological evolution by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were prepared by a unique acidic treatment of multi-walled nanotubes. Spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The room temperature Raman spectra showed a clear signature of D- and G-peaks at around 1350 and 1591 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements were performed to understand the phonon dynamics and first order temperature coefficients related to the D- and G-peaks. The temperature dependent Raman spectra in a range of 83–473 K were analysed, where the D-peak was observed to show a red-shift with increasing temperature. The relative intensity ratio of D- to G-peaks also showed a significant rise with increasing temperature. Such a temperature dependent behaviour can be attributed to lengthening of the C-C bond due to thermal expansion in material. The estimated value of the thermal conductivity of GCNSs ∼0.97 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} was calculated using Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of pulsed laser treatment on the GCNSs was demonstrated by analyzing the Raman spectra of post irradiated samples.

  19. Morphological evolution and electronic alteration of ZnO nanomaterials induced by Ni/Fe co-doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Cameron; Jiang, Yijiao; Sun, Chenghua; Amal, Rose

    2014-07-07

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals mono- and co-doped with nickel/iron were prepared using a facile solvothermal procedure. A significant change in the surface morphology from nanorods to plate-like nanoparticles was observed with an increase in the dopant concentration. The variations of their optical and electronic properties induced by metal dopants were investigated using a combination of characterization techniques and ab initio calculations. It is found that both nickel and iron atoms have been successfully incorporated into the crystal lattice rather than forming a secondary phase, suggesting good dispersion of dopants within the ZnO matrix. Doping with iron has red-shifted the absorption edges of ZnO towards the visible portion resulting in lower band gap energies with increasing dopant concentration. Evidenced by Raman and EPR spectroscopy, the addition of iron has been shown to promote the formation of more oxygen vacancy and crystal defects within the host lattice as well as increasing the free-electron density of the nanomaterial. The DFT plus Hubbard model calculations confirm that low concentration Ni-doping does not induce band gap narrowing but results in localized states. The calculations show that Fe-doping has the potential to greatly improve the optical absorption characteristics and lead to structural deformation, corroborating the UV-Vis, Raman, and EPR spectra.

  20. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed. PMID:28054600

  1. One-year cardiac morphological and functional evolution following permanent pacemaker implantation in right ventricular septal position in chagasic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otaviano da Silva Júnior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The septal position is an alternative site for cardiac pacing (CP that is potentially less harmful to cardiac function. METHODS: Patients with Chagas disease without heart failure submitted to permanent pacemaker (PP implantation at the Clinics Hospital of the Triângulo Mineiro Federal University (UFTM, were selected from February 2009 to February 2010. The parameters analyzed were ventricular remodeling, the degree of electromechanical dyssynchrony (DEM, exercise time and VO2 max during exercise testing (ET and functional class (NYHA. Echocardiography was performed 24 to 48h following implantation and after one year follow-up. The patients were submitted to ET one month postprocedure and at the end of one year. RESULTS: Thirty patients were included. Patient mean age was 59±13 years-old. Indication for PP implantation was complete atrioventricular (AV block in 22 (73.3% patients and 2nd degree AV block in the other eight (26.7%. All patients were in NYHA I and no changes occurred in the ET parameters. No variations were detected in echocardiographic remodeling measurements. Intraventricular dyssynchrony was observed in 46.6% of cases and interventricular dyssynchrony in 33.3% of patients after one year. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this work suggest that there is not significant morphological and functional cardiac change following pacemaker implantation in septal position in chagasic patients with normal left ventricular function after one year follow-up. Thus, patients may remain asymptomatic, presenting maintenance of functional capacity and no left ventricular remodeling.

  2. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Singarete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes.

  3. The Evolution of Massive Morphological Spheroid and Disk Galaxies in CANDELS from 11 to 6 Billion Years Ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Daniel H.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The premiere HST/WFC3 Treasury program CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey) has produced detailed visual classifications for statistically useful samples of bright (H>24.5mag) galaxies during and after z~2, the epoch of peak galaxy development. By averaging multiple classifications per galaxy that encompass spheroid-only, bulge-dominated, disk-dominated, disk-only, and irregular/peculiar appearances at visible rest-frame wavelengths, we find that 90% of massive (>1e10 Msun) galaxies at 0.62 to mostly Q at later times. Combining morphologies, structural properties, and SF nature, we find clear differences in the histories of spheroid and disk populations that are robust to selections based on visual or Sersic selection, and to either Q/SF divisor. Massive spheroids experience strong number density growth, substantial size growth, and rapid changes in SF fraction suggesting quenching processes that act on theory comparison is needed to better constrain which physical processes drive the transformation and quenching of massive galaxies.

  4. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed.

  5. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singarete, Marina E.; Grizante, Mariana B.; Milograna, Sarah R.; Nery, Mariana F.; Kin, Koryu; Wagner, Günter P.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS) using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes. PMID:26500429

  6. A QUARTER-CENTURY OF OBSERVATIONS OF COMET 10P/TEMPEL 2 AT LOWELL OBSERVATORY: CONTINUED SPIN-DOWN, COMA MORPHOLOGY, PRODUCTION RATES, AND NUMERICAL MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Christensen, Samantha R. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Farnham, Tony L., E-mail: knight@lowell.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1983 through 2011. We measured a nucleus rotation period of 8.950 {+-} 0.002 hr from 16 nights of imaging acquired between 2010 September and 2011 January. This rotation period is longer than the period we previously measured in 1999, which was itself longer than the period measured in 1988, and demonstrates that Tempel 2 is continuing to spin down, presumably due to torques caused by asymmetric outgassing. A nearly linear jet was observed which varied little during a rotation cycle in both R and CN images acquired during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions. We measured the projected direction of this jet throughout the two apparitions and, under the assumption that the source region of the jet was near the comet's pole, determined a rotational pole direction of R.A./decl. = 151 Degree-Sign /+59 Degree-Sign from CN measurements and R.A./decl. = 173 Degree-Sign /+57 Degree-Sign from dust measurements (we estimate a circular uncertainty of 3 Degree-Sign for CN and 4 Degree-Sign for dust). Different combinations of effects likely bias both gas and dust solutions and we elected to average these solutions for a final pole direction of R.A./decl. = 162 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign /+58 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign . Photoelectric photometry was acquired on 3 nights in 1983, 2 nights in 1988, 19 nights in 1999/2000, and 10 nights in 2010/2011. The activity exhibited a steep 'turn-on' {approx}3 months prior to perihelion (the exact timing of which varies) and a relatively smooth decline after perihelion. The activity during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions was similar; limited data in 1983 and 1988 (along with IUE data from the literature) were systematically higher and the difference cannot be explained entirely by the smaller perihelion distance. We measured a 'typical' composition, in agreement with previous investigators. Monte Carlo numerical modeling

  7. Genetic, Cytogenetic and Morphological Trends in the Evolution of the Rhodnius (Triatominae: Rhodniini) Trans-Andean Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián; Panzera, Francisco; Jaramillo-O, Nicolás; Pérez, Ruben; Fernández, Rosina; Vallejo, Gustavo; Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, Jose E.; Triana, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodnius Pacific group is composed of three species: Rhodnius pallescens, R. colombiensis and R. ecuadoriensis, which are considered important vectors of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli) infecting humans. This group is considered as a recent trans-Andean lineage derived from the widespread distributed sister taxa R. pictipes during the later uplift of northern Andes mountain range. The widest spread species R. pallescens may be a complex of two divergent lineages with different chromosomal attributes and a particular biogeographical distribution across Central America and Colombia with several southern populations in Colombia occupying the same sylvatic habitat as its sister species R. colombiensis. Although the taxonomy of Rhodnius Pacific group has been well studied, the unresolved phylogenetic and systematic issues are the target of this paper. Here we explore the molecular phylogeography of this species group analyzing two mitochondrial (ND4 and cyt b) and one nuclear (D2 region of ribosomal 28S gene) gene sequences. The molecular analyses suggest an early divergence of the species R. ecuadoriensis and R. colombiensis, followed by a recent expansion of R. pallescens lineages. The phylogenetic relationship between sympatric R. pallescens Colombian lineage and R. colombiensis was further explored using wing morphometry, DNA genome size measurements, and by analyzing chromosomal behavior of hybrids progeny obtained from experimental crosses. Our results suggest that the diversification of the two R. pallescens lineages was mainly influenced by biogeographical events such as (i) the emergence of the Panama Isthmus, while the origin and divergence of R. colombiensis was associated with (ii) the development of particular genetic and chromosomal features that act as isolation mechanisms from its sister species R. pallescens (Colombian lineage). These findings provide new insights into the evolution of the Rhodnius Pacific group and the underlying

  8. Genetic, cytogenetic and morphological trends in the evolution of the Rhodnius (Triatominae: Rhodniini trans-Andean group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Díaz

    Full Text Available The Rhodnius Pacific group is composed of three species: Rhodnius pallescens, R. colombiensis and R. ecuadoriensis, which are considered important vectors of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli infecting humans. This group is considered as a recent trans-Andean lineage derived from the widespread distributed sister taxa R. pictipes during the later uplift of northern Andes mountain range. The widest spread species R. pallescens may be a complex of two divergent lineages with different chromosomal attributes and a particular biogeographical distribution across Central America and Colombia with several southern populations in Colombia occupying the same sylvatic habitat as its sister species R. colombiensis. Although the taxonomy of Rhodnius Pacific group has been well studied, the unresolved phylogenetic and systematic issues are the target of this paper. Here we explore the molecular phylogeography of this species group analyzing two mitochondrial (ND4 and cyt b and one nuclear (D2 region of ribosomal 28S gene gene sequences. The molecular analyses suggest an early divergence of the species R. ecuadoriensis and R. colombiensis, followed by a recent expansion of R. pallescens lineages. The phylogenetic relationship between sympatric R. pallescens Colombian lineage and R. colombiensis was further explored using wing morphometry, DNA genome size measurements, and by analyzing chromosomal behavior of hybrids progeny obtained from experimental crosses. Our results suggest that the diversification of the two R. pallescens lineages was mainly influenced by biogeographical events such as (i the emergence of the Panama Isthmus, while the origin and divergence of R. colombiensis was associated with (ii the development of particular genetic and chromosomal features that act as isolation mechanisms from its sister species R. pallescens (Colombian lineage. These findings provide new insights into the evolution of the Rhodnius Pacific group and the

  9. Sedimentary process and recent morphological evolution in the Arcahon lagoon, France: a long and short term approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada-Gonzalez, Joselyn; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    The Arcachon lagoon is a mesotidal embayment in the south Atlantic coast of France. Its total surface is about 174 km2, where 65% is formed of tidal flats. Previous studies have shown a relative stable morphology over a period of 126 years, and a very long infilling trend, with a total accretion rarely exceeding + 0.5m in some areas. This is consistent with the fact that fine sediment input from rivers is very low. However at the tidal short term, erosion of mudflats can reach several centimeters, especially under energetic windy conditions. Additionally, recent high-frequency monitoring showed that tidal flats experience erosion and accretion of several dm at the seasonal scale, following the annual cycle of seagrass Zostera noltei, which develops on the intertidal areas. These patterns support the most recent observations made by end-users of the lagoon, which point out relative infilling of the channels and increase of turbidity in the water. The whole set the observations suggest that a mobile stock of surficial sediment is available in the lagoon, which contributes to the accretion of the flats, but is also transported towards the channels, when erosive conditions prevail. The aim of this presentation is to show the patterns and conditions of mobility of this stock of sediment. In this work, a set of unpublished data of physical forcing, sediment dynamics and bathymetry of the lagoon, are analyzed over a period of 148 years (1864-2012), which an intermediate scale between the long-term and short-term scales, with bathymetric and LIDAR surveys. In addition, we performed a short-term analysis based on the monitoring of altimetric and granulometric variations in the northern area of the lagoon. We show that accretion and erosion rates are significant at the annual scale with clear trends of exchanges between the center of the lagoon and the internal banks. There is a spatial and temporal difference in the long-term sedimentary balance between each period analyzed

  10. Effect of processing routes in a multi-pass continuous hybrid process on mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture evolutions of low-carbon steel wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun Kwang; Baek, Hyun Moo; Joo, Ho Seon; Im, Yong-Taek

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a multi-pass continuous hybrid (CH) process was experimentally applied with up to five passes with three processing routes, A, Bc, and C, to check the practicality of the processing routes and investigate their effect on the mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture evolutions of low-carbon steel wires. According to the present investigation, the wires processed by the 5th pass CH process with route A showed the highest ultimate tensile strength value (762 MPa) compared to those for routes Bc (718 MPa) and C (720 MPa), respectively. Based on the compression test results, the CH processed wire showed good workability when the aspect ratio was smaller than 2.4 for all the processing routes. According to the microstructure and texture evolutions, the grain sizes of the 5th pass CH processed wires decreased for all the processing routes than that of the initial specimen, and the wires showed mixed texture distribution of shear and drawing texture components. From the present investigation, it was concluded that the processing routes of the CH process could strongly affect the microstructure and texture evolutions, resulting in changes of the mechanical properties and workability of the low-carbon steel wires.

  11. 水下沙丘形态演化的数值模拟实验%An evolution of subaqueous dune morphology:numerical experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜晓琴; 高抒

    2012-01-01

    水下沙丘在海洋、湖泊、河流等浅水砂质沉积区广泛分布.基于过程的数值实验方法探讨了沙丘形态演化问题,试图解释在沙丘形成过程中各因素的作用及它们之间的关系.模拟中考虑了以下的变量:水深、沉积物粒度、沉积层厚度以及台风作用.模拟结果显示,沙丘的空间分布控制了空间流场的参数k2,沙丘波高受水深、沉积物粒度以及沉积层厚度等因素的影响,沉积层厚度决定了沙丘的形态是否饱满.在台风作用中,沙丘波峰的沉积物被侵蚀,高程降低,波高渐小;台风作用后,沉积物被重新输运至波峰,沙丘高度逐渐恢复.因此,沙丘的高度取决于台风作用的时间以及2次台风作用之间的间隔.沙丘形态和尺度在台风作用前后变化较小,但沙丘演化的速度却有所提高.根据台湾浅滩和北海南部地貌系统数据的验证,模拟具有较好的效果.%Subaqueous dunes are widely distributed in shallow marine environments. The morphological characteristics and the evolution of these bed forms have been a focus for many studies. The evolution of sand dunes associated with tidal flows is discussed using a one-dimensional modeling approach, in an attempt to identify the role played by the various factors and their interrelationships. The variables considered in this model include a water depth,a sediment grain size, and the thickness of sediment layer,and a typhoon. The simulation results show that the dune morphology and the evolution time are influenced by these factors. The spatial distribution of sand dunes is controlled by the flow field parameter; the dune height is influenced by the water depth, the sediment grain size and the thickness of sediment layer while the shape of sand dune depends on the thickness of sediment layer. The evolution time to reach equilibrium is controlled by all of the above factors. During a typhoon, the sediment is washed away from the ridge of dunes

  12. Continuous flow synthesis and cleaning of nano layered double hydroxides and the potential of the route to adjust round or platelet nanoparticle morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flegler, A.; Schneider, M.; Prieschl, J.; Stevens, R.; Vinnay, T.; Mandel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a continuous flow synthesis of nano LDH, comprising a continuous precipitation process using static mixers and followed by an immediate cleaning process via a semi-continuous centrifuge to obtain the final product in one-go. Via this synthesis setup, it is possible to independently

  13. MC消费者持续使用行为演化分析%Continuance and Its Evolution of Consumer in Mobile Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖怀云

    2011-01-01

    移动商务服务最终的成功依赖于消费者的持续使用。已有研究将焦点集中于移动商务相关服务的采纳和接受,忽视对消费者采纳后的持续使用行为研究。通过与采纳行为的比较,分析持续使用行为的特征,剖析了持续使用行为演化的内外部过程:外部演化是由短期有意识的持续使用行为向长期习惯性持续使用行为转变;内在演化是以基于ECM-IT模型隐含的认知变化为基本过程,行为反馈和惯例化阶段是对基本过程的补充。%The success of mobile commerce relies on consumers' continuance not on initial acceptance.Existing research focuses on pre-adoption phase(initial usage) and neglects the post-adoption phase,especially the continuance usage.This paper compares continuance with adoption,focuses on analyzing the characteristics of continuance,such as rational decision,Hedonic value,enjoyment value and network externality.The paper puts forward the external process of behavior evolution is from short-term and conscious continuance to long-term and habitual continuance,and internal process is the cognitive changes based on ECM-IT,while feedback of behavior and habitual phase is a complement of primary process.

  14. Functional continuity: did field-induced oriented aperiodic constraints at Life's origin aid its sequence-based evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra-Delmotte, G.; Mitra, A. N.

    2014-04-01

    A non-biological analog undergoing Darwinian-like evolution could have enhanced the probability of many crucial independent bottom-up emergent steps, engendered within its premises, and smoothen the inanimate-animate transition. Now, the higher-level environment-mutable DNA sequences influence the lower-level pattern of oriented templates (enzymes, lipid membranes, RNA) in the organized cell matrix and hence their associated substrate-dynamics; note how templates are akin to local fields, kinetically constraining reactant orientations. Since the lowerlevel is likely the more primitive of the two (rather than Cairns-Smith's "readily available" rigid clay crystal sequence-based replicators as a memory-like basis for slowly mutating predecessor-patterns enroute to complex RNA-based Darwinian evolution), a gradual thermodynamic-to-kinetic transition in an isotropic medium, is proposed as driven by some order-parameter --via "available" field-responsive dipolar colloid networks, as apart from bio-organics, mineral colloids also can display liquid crystal (LC) phases (see [1]). An access to solid-like orientational order in a fluid matrix suggests how aperiodic patterns can be influenced and sustained (a la homeostasis) via external inhomogeneous fields (e.g. magnetic rocks); this renders these cooperative networks with potential as confining host-media, whose environment-sensitivity can not only influence their sterically-coupled guest-substrates but also their network properties (the latter can enable 'functions' like spontaneous transport under non-equilibrium suggesting a natural basis for their selection by the environment). In turn LC systems could have been preceded by even simpler anisotropic fluid hosts, viz., external field-induced mineral magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) aggregates. Indeed, the capacity of an MNP to couple its magnetic and rotational d.o.f.s suggests how an environment-sensitive field-influenced network of interacting dipolar colloids close to

  15. Strict or graduated punishment? Effect of punishment strictness on the evolution of cooperation in continuous public goods games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Shimao

    Full Text Available Whether costly punishment encourages cooperation is one of the principal questions in studies on the evolution of cooperation and social sciences. In society, punishment helps deter people from flouting rules in institutions. Specifically, graduated punishment is a design principle for long-enduring common-pool resource institutions. In this study, we investigate whether graduated punishment can promote a higher cooperation level when each individual plays the public goods game and has the opportunity to punish others whose cooperation levels fall below the punisher's threshold. We then examine how spatial structure affects evolutionary dynamics when each individual dies inversely proportional to the game score resulting from the social interaction and another player is randomly chosen from the population to produce offspring to fill the empty site created after a player's death. Our evolutionary simulation outcomes demonstrate that stricter punishment promotes increased cooperation more than graduated punishment in a spatially structured population, whereas graduated punishment increases cooperation more than strict punishment when players interact with randomly chosen opponents from the population. The mathematical analysis also supports the results.

  16. Strict or graduated punishment? Effect of punishment strictness on the evolution of cooperation in continuous public goods games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimao, Hajime; Nakamaru, Mayuko

    2013-01-01

    Whether costly punishment encourages cooperation is one of the principal questions in studies on the evolution of cooperation and social sciences. In society, punishment helps deter people from flouting rules in institutions. Specifically, graduated punishment is a design principle for long-enduring common-pool resource institutions. In this study, we investigate whether graduated punishment can promote a higher cooperation level when each individual plays the public goods game and has the opportunity to punish others whose cooperation levels fall below the punisher's threshold. We then examine how spatial structure affects evolutionary dynamics when each individual dies inversely proportional to the game score resulting from the social interaction and another player is randomly chosen from the population to produce offspring to fill the empty site created after a player's death. Our evolutionary simulation outcomes demonstrate that stricter punishment promotes increased cooperation more than graduated punishment in a spatially structured population, whereas graduated punishment increases cooperation more than strict punishment when players interact with randomly chosen opponents from the population. The mathematical analysis also supports the results.

  17. Geomorphological evolution of volcanic fluvial channels: Eighteen years of morphological monitoring of the upper strect of the Tenenepanco Gorge, Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanarro, Luis Miguel; Juan Zamorano, Jose; Andres, Nuria; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    , February 5, 2008, November 5, 2009, November 5, 2010, November 9, 2011, November 6, 2013). An additional map (May-1989) was made based on photo-interpretation of aerial photographs taken during that period. A set of 13 morphological units were recognized in each of the maps. Subsequently, the maps were georeferenced using a 2010 orthophoto and the image of Google Earth from 2013. In a second step the 15 maps were digitized and the topology created in a CAD environment (Bentley Microstation V8i). Finally a spatial analysis was carried out in a GIS (ESRI ArcMap 10) in order to study the morphological variations of the channel gorge. The preliminary results show that during the initial period (1995-2001) channel evolution is more variable, with episodes in which the bottom of the gorge is eroded with multiple channels alternating with others where there is only a single channel. These moments presumably coincide with volcanic activity which provides abundant material that fills the smaller gullies and concentrates the lahars in a single channel. However, the secondary flows in the 2002-2013 period tend to merge into one wide channel that drops in depth, creating pseudo-terraces. Research funded by Cryocrisis project (CGL2012-35858), Government of Spain

  18. Eruptive history of western and central Aeolian Islands volcanoes (South Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy): temporal evolution of magmatism and of morphological structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leocat, E.; Gillot, P.; Peccerillo, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Aeolian Island archipelago is a complex volcanic province located on the continental margin of the Calabro-Peloritan basement. It emplaced in a geodynamic setting linked to the convergence of African and European plates. In this study, we focused on the western and central volcanoes that are respectively Alicudi-Filicudi-Salina and Lipari-Vulcano. They erupted the whole range of magmas typical of convergence settings : from calc-alkaline (CA) to potassic series (KS) through high-K CA (HKCA) and shoshonitic series (SHO). All these magma products were emitted in a span time of less than 300 ka that attests to the complexity of the volcano-tectonic evolution of this province. We report new geochronological data, based on the K/Ar Cassignol-Gillot technique, which is well suited for dating Quaternary volcanic materials. New geochemical analyses were realized on the dated samples in order to study the temporal evolution of the magmatism. These data sets were coupled with geomorphological analysis to study the relation between main morphological structures and eruptive styles. Before 180 ka, only the Filicudi, Salina and Lipari volcanoes had emerged activity. Their magmas have relatively the same CA composition, whereas some Lipari lavas have early HKCA affinity. Around 120-130 ka, Alicudi and Vulcano emerged simultaneously at the extremities of the archipelago. Alicudi products are less various and have the more primitive composition. SHO and HKCA products were emitted on Lipari and Vulcano, while only CA magmas were emplaced on Filicudi and Salina. After 40 ka, the last activity of Filicudi is characterized by mafic magmas of HKCA affinity. To the other extremity, similar products of SHO affinity were emplaced in southern Lipari and northern Vulcano. At this period, explosive activity with dacitic pumices occurred in Salina. The degree of differentiation and the K enrichment increase from western sector to central sector volcanoes and through time except at

  19. Microstructure evolution of nanostructured and submicrometric porous refractory ceramics induced by a continuous high-energy proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Bruetsch, Roland; Catherall, Richard; Groeschel, Friedrich; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Lettry, Jacques; Manfrin, Enzo; Marzari, Stefano; Noah, Etam; Sgobba, Stefano; Stora, Thierry; Zanini, Luca

    2011-09-01

    The production of radioactive ion beams by the isotope mass separation online (ISOL) method requires a fast diffusion and effusion of nuclear products from thick refractory target materials under high-energy particle beam irradiation. A new generation of ISOL nanostructured and submicrometric porous materials have been developed, exhibiting enhanced release of exotic isotopes, compared to previously used conventional micrometric materials. A programme was developed at PSI within the framework sof the Design Study of EURISOL, the next generation European ISOL-type facility to study aging under irradiation on porous ceramic pellets and dense thin metal foils at high temperatures. Ceramic oxides and carbide samples underwent proton damage with fluence up to 3.0 × 10 20 and 1.3 × 10 21 cm -2 respectively. The post-irradiation examination on Al 2O 3, Y 2O 3 and SiC - C nanotube composite matrices show a proton-induced densification region in which a moderate grain growth occurred. The microstructural evolution effects were associated to the combination of radiation-enhanced diffusion and thermal diffusion. The irradiated Al 2O 3 shows higher sintering rates than in similar non-irradiation isothermal conditions, in particular at the lowest irradiation temperature, subjected to a proton fluence inferior to 1.1 × 10 15 cm -2. The apparent activation energy for its sintering controlling mechanism was found to be between 44 and 88 kJ mol -1. However, despite the enhanced sintering, shrinkage and increased grain growth, the selected nanostructured and submicrometric TARPIPE materials did not display an average grain diameter above 2 μm, which confirms that these materials are suited as production targets for present and next generation ISOL facilities.

  20. Understanding and controlling morphology evolution via DIO plasticization in PffBT4T-2OD/PC71BM devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Parnell, Andrew J.; Pontecchiani, Fabio; Cooper, Joshaniel F. K.; Thompson, Richard L.; Jones, Richard A. L.; King, Stephen M.; Lidzey, David G.; Bernardo, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that the inclusion of a small amount of the co-solvent 1,8-diiodooctane in the preparation of a bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic device increases its power conversion efficiency by 20%, through a mechanism of transient plasticisation. We follow the removal of 1,8-diiodooctane directly after spin-coating using ellipsometry and ion beam analysis, while using small angle neutron scattering to characterise the morphological nanostructure evolution of the film. In PffBT4T-2OD/PC71BM devices, the power conversion efficiency increases from 7.2% to above 8.7% as a result of the coarsening of the phase domains. This coarsening process is assisted by thermal annealing and the slow evaporation of 1,8-diiodooctane, which we suggest, acts as a plasticiser to promote molecular mobility. Our results show that 1,8-diiodooctane can be completely removed from the film by a thermal annealing process at temperatures ≤100 °C and that there is an interplay between the evaporation rate of 1,8-diiodooctane and the rate of domain coarsening in the plasticized film which helps elucidate the mechanism by which additives improve device efficiency. PMID:28287164

  1. Understanding and controlling morphology evolution via DIO plasticization in PffBT4T-2OD/PC71BM devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Parnell, Andrew J.; Pontecchiani, Fabio; Cooper, Joshaniel F. K.; Thompson, Richard L.; Jones, Richard A. L.; King, Stephen M.; Lidzey, David G.; Bernardo, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that the inclusion of a small amount of the co-solvent 1,8-diiodooctane in the preparation of a bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic device increases its power conversion efficiency by 20%, through a mechanism of transient plasticisation. We follow the removal of 1,8-diiodooctane directly after spin-coating using ellipsometry and ion beam analysis, while using small angle neutron scattering to characterise the morphological nanostructure evolution of the film. In PffBT4T-2OD/PC71BM devices, the power conversion efficiency increases from 7.2% to above 8.7% as a result of the coarsening of the phase domains. This coarsening process is assisted by thermal annealing and the slow evaporation of 1,8-diiodooctane, which we suggest, acts as a plasticiser to promote molecular mobility. Our results show that 1,8-diiodooctane can be completely removed from the film by a thermal annealing process at temperatures ≤100 °C and that there is an interplay between the evaporation rate of 1,8-diiodooctane and the rate of domain coarsening in the plasticized film which helps elucidate the mechanism by which additives improve device efficiency.

  2. Clues to the nature of SN 2009ip - II. The continuing photometric and spectroscopic evolution to 1000 days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M. L.; Bigley, A.; Mauerhan, J. C.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Valenti, S.; McCully, C.; Filippenko, A. V.; Hosseinzadeh, G.

    2017-08-01

    The 2012 brightening of SN 2009ip was dominated by emission from the interaction of ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar material (CSM) produced by episodic mass loss from the progenitor, complicating the diagnosis of whether the underlying explosion was a true supernova (SN) or a non-terminal eruption of a massive star. In this paper, we contribute a time series of optical photometric and spectroscopic observations for SN 2009ip from 1 to 3 yr after the 2012 outburst, collected at the Las Cumbres Observatory and the Keck Observatory. We find that the brightness of SN 2009ip continues to decline with no deviations from a linear slope of 0.0030 ± 0.0005 mag d - 1 in the r΄ band and demonstrate that this is similar to both observations and models of CSM-ejecta interaction. We show that the late-time spectra continue to be dominated by the signature features of CSM interaction, and that the large ratio of LH α/LH β ≈ 40 implies that the material remains optically thick to Balmer photons ('Case C' recombination). We combine our late-time photometry and spectra with early-time data for SN 2009ip and provide a comprehensive discussion that incorporates recently published models and observations for transient phenomena dominated by CSM-ejecta interaction, and conclude that the presence of broad H α at early times remains among the best evidence that a terminal SN has occurred. Finally, we compare our late-time spectra to those of Type IIn SN and SN impostors at late phases and find that although SN 2009ip has some similarities with both types, it has more differences with late-time impostor spectra.

  3. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of Three-Dimensional Reconstructions of Unbiased Sampled Microglia Shows not Continuous Morphological Changes from Stage 1 to 2 after Multiple Dengue Infections in Callithrix penicillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Daniel G.; Silva, Geane O.; Naves, Thaís B.; Fernandes, Taiany N.; Araújo, Sanderson C.; Diniz, José A. P.; de Farias, Luis H. S.; Sosthenes, Marcia C. K.; Diniz, Cristovam G.; Anthony, Daniel C.; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro F.; Picanço Diniz, Cristovam W.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that microglial morphology and function are related, but few studies have explored the subtleties of microglial morphological changes in response to specific pathogens. In the present report we quantitated microglia morphological changes in a monkey model of dengue disease with virus CNS invasion. To mimic multiple infections that usually occur in endemic areas, where higher dengue infection incidence and abundant mosquito vectors carrying different serotypes coexist, subjects received once a week subcutaneous injections of DENV3 (genotype III)-infected culture supernatant followed 24 h later by an injection of anti-DENV2 antibody. Control animals received either weekly anti-DENV2 antibodies, or no injections. Brain sections were immunolabeled for DENV3 antigens and IBA-1. Random and systematic microglial samples were taken from the polymorphic layer of dentate gyrus for 3-D reconstructions, where we found intense immunostaining for TNFα and DENV3 virus antigens. We submitted all bi- or multimodal morphological parameters of microglia to hierarchical cluster analysis and found two major morphological phenotypes designated types I and II. Compared to type I (stage 1), type II microglia were more complex; displaying higher number of nodes, processes and trees and larger surface area and volumes (stage 2). Type II microglia were found only in infected monkeys, whereas type I microglia was found in both control and infected subjects. Hierarchical clus