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Sample records for continuous microbial cultures

  1. Microchemostat - microbial continuous culture in a polymer-based, instrumented microbioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Z.; Bocazzi, P.; Choi, H. G.

    2006-01-01

    -based microbioreactor system integrated with optical density (OD), pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) real-time measurements for continuous cultivation of microbial cells. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells are continuously cultured in a 150 mL, membrane-aerated, well-mixed microbioreactor fed by a pressure-driven flow......In a chemostat, microbial cells reach a steady state condition at which cell biomass production, substrates and the product concentrations remain constant. These features make continuous culture a unique and powerful tool for biological and physiological research. We present a polymer...

  2. Biodesulfurization of Malaysian coals using mixed microbial cultures in batch and continuous processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafpour, G.D.; Azizan, A.; Harun, A. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    The determination of chemolithotrophic microorganisms capable to grown on coal with high sulfur content, made it possible to develop mixed culture processes for coal desulfurization. The ability of the microbial cultures to metabolize different sulfur compounds originated from coal in the range of 3-5% sulfur, were demonstrated in batch experimental stage. Biodesulfurization of coal as suspended solid coal particles were carried out in a broth media for coal content of 1-5% solid. Four species of microbial culture were grown on coal and acclimated for optimal growth. The coal samples obtained from Malaysian coal mine with 2-5% of sulfur content were used in batch and continuous cultures experiments. The microbial cultures were used to reduce pyrite sulfur, inorganic sulfur content of coal. The culture isolated from pharmaceutical wastewater shown that more than 80% of sulfur content of coal was reduced. The growth of microorganisms on coal shown that maximum solid content of 5% was tolerable maximum grow on 3% coal shown high cell density. Nutrient media with acidic PH value of 3-4 was required for growth of Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus fierrooxidans. The growth was limited at PH = 2 but at PH 3-4 growth was stimulated. Phosphate buffer was used with coal solution to monitor the PH. The PH was initially adjusted but was not controlled during the period of incubation. An optimum PH for Thiobacillus species with maximum desulfuriation was 2.65. High coal content about 10% was shown that bacterial was unable to grow. The cell dry weight, cell optical density and sulfur content of coal samples using TGA and elemental analyzer were conducted for all experiments. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Microchemostat - microbial continuous culture in a polymer-based, instrumented microbioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Z.; Bocazzi, P.; Choi, H. G.

    2006-01-01

    of fresh medium through a microchannel. Chemotaxisial back growth of bacterial cells into the medium feed channel is prevented by local heating. Using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) copolymer films, the inner surfaces of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly......In a chemostat, microbial cells reach a steady state condition at which cell biomass production, substrates and the product concentrations remain constant. These features make continuous culture a unique and powerful tool for biological and physiological research. We present a polymer...

  4. Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Laurinavichius, K S

    1998-01-01

    Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

  5. Effects of type of carbohydrate supplementation to lush pasture on microbial fermentation in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, A; Yoon, I K; Stern, M D; Jung, H G; Chester-Jones, H

    1999-01-01

    Eight single-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to study the effects of the type of energy source on ruminal N utilization from high quality pasture. The four dietary treatments included high quality grass and legume pasture alone (50:50; wt/wt), pasture plus soybean hulls, pasture plus beet pulp, and pasture plus corn. Diets supplemented with additional sources of energy (soybean hulls, beet pulp, and corn) were isocaloric but differed in the type and rate of carbohydrate fermentation. Energy supplements constituted 45% of the total dietary dry matter and were fed twice daily at 12-h intervals in place of pasture, which is characteristic of grain feeding at milking when animals are in a grazing situation. Energy supplementation reduced pH, NH3 N flow, and NH3 N concentration and increased bacterial N flow (as a percentage of N intake). The supplementation of corn and soybean hulls resulted in the highest microbial N flow (as a percentage of N intake). Corn had a tendency to reduce fiber digestion because of excessively low NH3 N concentrations. Beet pulp was similar to corn in that it decreased NH3 N concentrations. Supplementation of soybean hulls resulted in a more synchronized fermentation, greater volatile fatty acid production, and greater fiber digestion. Nitrogen utilization by microbes was maximized by supplementation with soybean hulls or corn twice a day. With diets based on pasture, it may be more important to improve bacterial N flow and bacterial utilization of N than to maximize the efficiency of bacterial protein synthesis because better utilization of N by ruminal microorganisms results in higher bacterial N flow and higher fiber digestion.

  6. Intracellular storage of acetate/starch mixture by fast growing microbial culture in sequencing batch reactor under continuous feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciggin, Asli Seyhan; Majone, Mauro; Orhon, Derin

    2012-09-01

    The paper evaluated intracellular storage formation in fast growing microbial culture fed with acetate/starch mixture under continuous feeding. Three parallel laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated at a sludge age of 2 days: one of the SBRs was fed with acetate/starch mixture and the other two with acetate and starch, respectively, for comparing the results with single substrate systems. Despite continuous feeding, both acetate and starch components in the substrate mixture were partially converted to storage biopolymers. Poly-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and glycogen pools were formed during SBR operation at steady state. Only a limited fraction of 12% of the acetate fed during each cycle generated PHB storage while the rest was directly utilized for microbial growth. Around half of the starch fraction of the substrate mixture was converted to glycogen. Increasing the sludge age to 8 days did not affect storage stoichiometry both for acetate and starch in the mixture.

  7. Investigating unsaturated fat, monensin, or bromoethanesulfonate in continuous cultures retaining ruminal protozoa. I. Fermentation, biohydrogenation, and microbial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, S K R; Sylvester, J T; Ribeiro, C V D M; Gilligan, L E; Firkins, J L

    2009-08-01

    Methane is an end product of ruminal fermentation that is energetically wasteful and contributes to global climate change. Bromoethanesulfonate, animal-vegetable fat, and monensin were compared with a control treatment to suppress different functional groups of ruminal prokaryotes in the presence or absence of protozoa to evaluate changes in fermentation, digestibility, and microbial N outflow. Four dual-flow continuous culture fermenter systems were used in 4 periods in a 4 x 4 Latin square design split into 2 subperiods. In subperiod 1, a multistage filter system (50-microm smallest pore size) retained most protozoa. At the start of subperiod 2, conventional filters (300-microm pore size) were substituted to efflux protozoa via filtrate pumps over 3 d; after a further 7 d of adaptation, the fermenters were sampled for 3 d. Treatments were retained during both subperiods. Flow of total N and digestibilities of NDF and OM were 18, 16, and 9% higher, respectively, for the defaunated subperiod but were not different among treatments. Ammonia concentration was 33% higher in the faunated fermenters but was not affected by treatment. Defaunation increased the flow of nonammonia N and bacterial N from the fermenters. Protozoal counts were not different among treatments, but bromoethanesulfonate increased the generation time from 43.2 to 55.6 h. Methanogenesis was unaffected by defaunation but tended to be increased by unsaturated fat. Defaunation did not affect total volatile fatty acid production but decreased the acetate:propionate ratio; monensin increased production of isovalerate and valerate. Biohydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids was impaired in the defaunated fermenters because effluent flows of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were 60, 77, and 69% higher, and the ratio of vaccenic acid:unsaturated FA ratio was decreased by 34% in the effluent. This ratio was increased in both subperiods with the added fat diet, indicating an accumulation of

  8. Ruminal fermentation, microbial growth and amino acid flow in single-flow continuous culture fermenters fed a diet containing olive leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Alcaide, E; Martín-García, A I; Moumen, A; Carro, M D

    2010-04-01

    Six single-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to determine fermentation profile, microbial growth and amino acid (AA) flow promoted by olive leaves supplemented with barley grains and faba beans (OLSUP), and alfalfa hay (AH). Two incubation runs were carried out with three fermenters inoculated with ruminal fluid from wethers and three from goats. The inoculum source did not affect (p = 0.059 to 0.980) any of the parameters. Daily volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and carbohydrate digestibility were greater (p = 0.009 and 0.024, respectively) for AH, therefore the pH values were lower (p = 0.015) than for OLSUP. Acetate was greater (p microbial N flow and efficiency were greater (p = 0.016 and p = 0.041) for diet AH. Individual AA flows were greater (p microbial essential AA proportion was greater for OLSUP (p = 0.015). The results indicate that OLSUP promoted lower bacterial growth and AA flow than AH, which could have been partially due to a limitation of N availability to ruminal microbes.

  9. Continuous Culture Microbioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäpper, Daniel

    . The advance of miniature online measuring techniques makes it possible to measure at least the basic culture variables such as dissolved oxygen (DO), cell density (OD) and pH continuously and without disturbing the cultivation. Online measurements are at this scale very susceptible to the presence of bubbles...... focus was put on the single-use aspect. This includes both being cheap in fabrication and in operation, and also requires the reactor to be sterilizable by industrial methods. It consists entirely of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and contains two optical sensor spots for the measurement of DO and p.......2 mm height. The reactor chamber is a cylinder with 8 mm diameter and 2 mm height resulting in a culture volume of 100 L. The uidic connections are done by piercing the reactor side walls with needles|the PDMS will tightly enclose the needle to prevent leakage. The reactor chamber is sealed with a semi...

  10. Theoretical and methodological studies of continuous microbial bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Kiyoshi

    2003-08-01

    This article reviews most of the author's studies on process development and reactor design for continuous microbial reactions. (1) Enzyme reactions of growing and non-growing microbial cells immobilized in agar gel beads were analyzed pertaining to the effects of external and internal diffusion of substrate on reaction kinetics. (2) Experimental correlations of production rates of beta-fructosidase and acid phosphatase with dilution rate of continuous culture were simulated based on an operon model for enzyme regulation. (3) Population dynamics of an amylase-producing bacteria and their mutant were discussed in relation to enzyme productivity in a continuous culture of spore-forming bacteria. (4) Plasmid mobilization in a mixed population of donor, recipient, and helper cells was investigated in a continuous culture as a model study of accidental release of a genetically modified plasmid into a natural environment. (5) A production rate increase of up to 100-fold was achieved by cell-recycle culturing of continuous acetic acid fermentation using a filter module with a hollow fiber membrane. (6) The feasibility of a continuous surface culture for the biooxidation of organic substances was ascribed to an enhanced oxygen absorption rate in the presence of a microbial film on a liquid surface. (7) Simultaneous separation of inhibitory products using an electrodialysis module during some organic acid fermentations was effective for increasing production in a continuous culture.

  11. Investigating the effects of Salvia mirzayanii essential oil on rumen microbial fermentation and nutrient digestibility using gas production and dual flow continuous culture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Ouladshanbe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different doses of salvia mirzayanii essential oils on gas production parameters, fermentation characteristics using gas production and dual flow continuous culture system. Trearments in the gas production experiment was adding 0, 400, 800, 1200, 1600, 2000, 2400 and 4800 mg/l of salvia mirzayanii essential oils to the media. In the second experiment, five 1750-mL dual-flow continuous culture fermenters were used in 3 replicated periods of 9 d. Temperature (38.5°C and liquid and (10%/h solid (5%/h dilution rates were kept constant in the fermenters. Fermenters were fed daily with 120 g dry matter. Treatments arranged as complete randomized block design included levels of essential oils from salvia mirzayanii (800, 1600, 2400 mg/l and a monensin (0.1 percent of the diet dry matter. Addition essential oils of salvia mirzayanii to diet lead to decrease asymptotic gas production, organic matter degradability and biomass. Dry matter digestibility and NDF with the level of 800 mg/l essential oil compered to control treatment were significantly increased. Concentration of NH3-N was less for pre-feeding (0 h in treatments with T2 and T3 compared with control treatment. The average of concentration NH3-N was lowest in highest level of essential oils eight hours after feeding. The results showed that using of low level of salvia mirzayanii essential oils could improve nutrient digestibility in the rumen.

  12. The DOE Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkwill, David L.

    2006-05-23

    The primary activities associated with maintenance of the Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) were designed to ensure that the collection served as a valuable resource to DOE-funded and other scientists, especially DOE-funded scientists associated with the NABIR Program. These activities were carried out throughout the period covered by this report and in-cluded: (1) assistance in the selection of cultures for research, (2) distribution of cultures and/or data on request, (3) incorporation of newly isolated microbial strains, (4) preservation of newly isolated strains, (5) partial characterization of newly isolated strains, (6) development and main-tenance of representative subsets of cultures, (6) screening of SMCC strains for specific charac-teristics, (7) phylogenetic characterization of SMCC strains, (8) development and maintenance of a SMCC website, (9) maintenance of the SMCC databases, (10) archiving of SMCC records, and (11) quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) activities. We describe in the Final Technical Report our accomplishments related to these activities during the period covered by this report.

  13. Behaviour of marine oil-degrading bacterial populations in a continuous culture system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohandass, C.; David, J.J.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    In pursuit of developing an oil-degrading microbial consortium, we used the principle of "plasmid assisted molecular breeding" (PAMB) in a continuous culture system. Three marine bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, Brevibacterium epidermidis...

  14. Continuing professional development in sensitive cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    Many cultures of the world face threats to their existence due to the homogenizing effects of the global commercial pop culture. These same influences present challenges to vulnerable cultures that seek the benefits of modern medicine, while attempting to preserve their unique identities. This paper briefly reviews some of these challenges and presents one novel approach to providing continuing medical education that minimizes the potential for adverse influences on the sensitive culture.

  15. Continuous microbial fuel cells convert carbohydrates to electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabaey, K.; Ossieur, W.; Verstraete, W. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Laboratory for Microbial Ecology and Technology; Verhaege, M. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Laboratory for Non-ferrous Metallurgy

    2004-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are considered to be a potential new source of renewable energy for power applications. This study examined the electrochemistry of MFCs with particular reference to the problem of overpotential at the electrodes and the high internal resistance. The objective was to optimize the anodes of the biofuel cell using biological and chemical approaches. The fundamentals of electron transfer were studied along with the microbial ecology of the MFC. The problem of inserting redox mediators in the electrode mix was examined. A continuous microbial fuel cell was developed that is capable of efficiently biodegrading carbohydrates (glucose), and thereby produce electricity continuously. This study is a first step towards treating liquid waste streams in the future. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  16. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms.

  17. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on acetate utilization kinetics and population dynamics of fast growing microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kor-Bicakci, G; Pala-Ozkok, I; Rehman, A; Jonas, D; Ubay-Cokgor, E; Orhon, D

    2014-08-01

    The study evaluated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on metabolic activities of fast growing microbial culture. It focused on changes induced on utilization kinetics of acetate and composition of the microbial community. The experiments involved a fill and draw reactor, fed with acetate and continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing of 50 mg/L. The evaluation relied on model evaluation of the oxygen uptake rate profiles, with parallel assessment of microbial community structure by 454-pyrosequencing. Continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing inflicted a retardation effect on acetate utilization in a way commonly interpreted as competitive inhibition, blocked substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration. A fraction of acetate was utilized at a much lower rate with partial biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole. Results of pyrosequencing with a replacement mechanism within a richer more diversified microbial culture, through inactivation of vulnerable fractions in favor of species resistant to antibiotic, which made them capable of surviving and competing even with a slower metabolic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial contaminants of cultured Hibiscus cannabinus and Telfaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    ISSN 1684–5315 © 2004 Academic Journals ... Nine microbial contaminants comprising of five bacteria and four fungi ... Key words: Micro-propagation, plant tissue culture, bacterial and fungal isolates, contamination. .... Surface sterilization of.

  19. Evaluation of an integrated continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor: Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Zhou, Xiangtong; Feng, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER) was developed by integrating anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial electrochemical system (MES). The system was capable of treating high strength artificial wastewater and simultaneously recovering electric and methane energy. Maximum power density of 583±9, 562±7, 533±10 and 572±6 mW m(-2) were obtained by each cell in a four-independent circuit mode operation at an OLR of 12 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). COD removal and energy recovery efficiency were 87.1% and 32.1%, which were 1.6 and 2.5 times higher than that of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Larger amount of Deltaproteobacteria (5.3%) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (47%) can account for the better performance of CSMER, since syntrophic associations among them provided more degradation pathways compared to the CSTR. Results demonstrate the CSMER holds great promise for efficient wastewater treatment and energy recovery.

  20. Microbial dynamics in anaerobic enrichment cultures degrading di-n-butyl phthalic acid ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trably, Eric; Batstone, Damien J.; Christensen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    in enrichment cultures degrading phthalic acid esters under methanogenic conditions. A selection pressure was applied by adding DBP at 10 and 200 mg L(-1) in semi-continuous anaerobic reactors. The microbial dynamics were monitored using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). While only limited abiotic...

  1. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boundy-Mills, K.; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A. R.; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is "to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind." Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections.

  2. Multi-stage microbial system for continuous hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosourov, Sergey; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Seibert, Michael

    2010-06-08

    A method of using sequential chemostat culture vessels to provide continuous H.sub.2 production, in which photosynthetic O.sub.2 evolution and H.sub.2 photoproduction are separated physically into two separate bioreactors, comprising: a) growing a microorganism culture able to continuously generate H.sub.2 by photosynthetically producing cells at about the early-to-late log state in a first photobioreactor operating as a sulfur chemostat under aerobic and/or conditions; b) continuously feeding cells from the first photobioreactor to a second photobioreactor operating under anaerobic conditions and sulfur deprivation conditions resulting from constant uptake of sulfate in the first bioreactor and a low rate of culture flow between the first and second bioreactors, for induction of hydrogenase and H.sub.2 photoproduction to allow for continuous cultivation of the microorganism's cells in the first photobioreactor and constant H.sub.2 production in the second photobioreactor, and c) H.sub.2 gas from the second photobioreactor.

  3. Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie Yiru Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva. As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research.

  4. Culture-independent methods for identifying microbial communities in cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Jany, Jean-Luc; Barbier, Georges

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This review focuses on the culture-independent methods available for the description of both bacterial and fungal communities in cheese. Important steps of the culture-independent strategy, which relies on bulk DNA extraction from cheese and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of selected sequences, are discussed. We critically evaluate the identification techniques already used for monitoring microbial communities in cheese, including PCR-denaturing gradient...

  5. 新疆连作、轮作棉田可培养的土壤微生物区系及活性分析%Dynamics Analysis of Culturable Soil Microflora and Microbial Activity in Continuous and Rotation Cropping Systems of Xinjiang Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩剑; 张静文; 徐文修; 罗明; 吴莉莉

    2011-01-01

    Variation of culturable soil microflora and microbial activity were investigated in continuous and rotation cropping cotton field in Xinjiang.The results showed that culturable microbial population gradually decreased with long-term continuous cropping of cotton.Compared with 5 years continous cropping, the total quantity of soil microbes in 6~8 years, 9~12 years and more than 13 years continuous cropping, decreased by 40.2%, 46.7%, 52.4%,respectively.After more than 5 years continuous cropping, the structure of the soil microbial community transformed from rich nutrition bacteria type to lower nutrition fungi type, the ratio ofbacteria to fungi and actinomycetes to fungi decreased significantly.The amount of nitrogen physiological communities such as ammonifying bacteria, nitrobacteria and aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacteria decreased, while denitrifying bacteria increased.Moreover, continuous cropping resulted in soil respiration intensity and cellulolytic activity reducing.Contrary to continuous cropping, under the cotton/melilotus suavena, tomato, spring wheat or com rotation systems were most beneficial for increasing the total quantity of soil micro-organism, improving the capability of soil microbial activity, adjusting the balance of microbial community.Also there was substantial increasement in the number of azotobacteria.The effects of different rotation modes were different, the benefits of cotton-tomato and cotton-melilotus suavena rotation were more obvious.%研究了新疆连作、轮作棉田土壤可培养微生物区系及活性变化.结果表明,棉花多年连作造成土壤中可培养微生物数量减少,连作6~8年、9~12年、大于13年的棉田与连作小于5年的棉田相比,土壤微生物总量分别下降了40.2%,46.7%,52.4%.连作超过5年后,土壤微生物菌群结构逐渐从高肥的"细菌型"向低肥的"真菌型"转化,细菌/真菌(B/F)和放线菌/真菌(A/F)比值均降低,拮抗菌

  6. Culture Independent Geochemical Tools for Adressing Microbial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomstein, B. A.; Langerhuus, A. T.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Alperin, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Decades of ocean drilling have demonstrated wide-spread microbial life in deep sub-seafloor sediment, and surprisingly high numbers of microbial cells and endospores. Despite the ubiquity of life in the deep biosphere, the large community sizes are not yet understood given the extremely low energy fluxes. We have developed and applied new approaches to the deep sub-seafloor to quantify distributions and turnover times of living microbial biomass, endospores and microbial necromass. The approach combines sensitive analyses of unique bacterial marker molecules (muramic acid and d-amino acids) and the bacterial endospore marker (dipicolinic acid) with a series of models that link microscopic (e.g., racemization dynamics of stereo-isomeric amino acids) and macroscopic (e.g., porewater geochemistry) properties. Model output includes production rates and turnover times of microbial biomass and necromass, concentration profiles of reactive organic carbon, and rates of organic carbon decomposition. In combination, these results allow us to assess the role of microbial activity in the sub-seafloor carbon budget. One key result is that the turnover time of biomass is far longer than turnover times found in cultures and active surface sediments.

  7. Metabolic modelling of polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers production by mixed microbial cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Maria AM

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents a metabolic model describing the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA copolymers in mixed microbial cultures, using mixtures of acetic and propionic acid as carbon source material. Material and energetic balances were established on the basis of previously elucidated metabolic pathways. Equations were derived for the theoretical yields for cell growth and PHA production on mixtures of acetic and propionic acid as functions of the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, P/O ratio. The oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was estimated from rate measurements, which in turn allowed the estimation of the theoretical yield coefficients. Results The model was validated with experimental data collected in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR operated under varying feeding conditions: feeding of acetic and propionic acid separately (control experiments, and the feeding of acetic and propionic acid simultaneously. Two different feast and famine culture enrichment strategies were studied: (i either with acetate or (ii with propionate as carbon source material. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA was performed for the different feeding conditions and culture enrichment strategies. Flux balance analysis (FBA was used to calculate optimal feeding scenarios for high quality PHA polymers production, where it was found that a suitable polymer would be obtained when acetate is fed in excess and the feeding rate of propionate is limited to ~0.17 C-mol/(C-mol.h. The results were compared with published pure culture metabolic studies. Conclusion Acetate was more conducive toward the enrichment of a microbial culture with higher PHA storage fluxes and yields as compared to propionate. The P/O ratio was not only influenced by the selected microbial culture, but also by the carbon substrate fed to each culture, where higher P/O ratio values were consistently observed for acetate than propionate. MFA studies suggest that when mixtures of

  8. Improved apparatus for continuous culture of hydrogen-fixing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. F.; Litchfield, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    Improved apparatus permits the continuous culture of Hydrogenomonas eutropha. System incorporates three essential subsystems - /1/ environmentally isolated culture vessel, /2/ analytical system with appropriate sensors and readout devices, /3/ control system with feedback responses to each analytical measurement.

  9. Semi-continuous methane production from undiluted brown algae using a halophilic marine microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Acclimated marine sediment-derived culture was used for semi-continuous methane production from materials equivalent to raw brown algae, without dilution of salinity and without nutrient supply, under 3 consecutive conditions of varying organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention time (HRT). Methane production was stable at 2.0gVS/kg/day (39-day HRT); however, it became unstable at 2.9gVS/kg/day (28-day HRT) due to acetate and propionate accumulation. OLR subsequently decreased to 1.7gVS/kg/day (46-day HRT), stabilizing methane production beyond steady state. Methane yield was above 300mL/g VS at all OLRs. These results indicated that the acclimated marine sediment culture was able to produce methane semi-continuously from raw brown algae without dilution and nutrient supply under steady state. Microbial community analysis suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominated among archaea during unstable methane production, implying a partial shift of the methanogenic pathway from acetoclastic methanogenesis to acetate oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Restorative culture in school. Continuation of discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pentin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the lack of effective ways of building relationships, parenting responsibility and conflict solving in the school community. It is addressed to the whole school community – to the administration, psychologists and social workers, to the faculty, parents and students. We discuss the key concepts and principles of “restorative culture” and the reasons for its introduction in educational institutions. The restorative culture refers to activities on formation and spread of interpersonal relations value in the aspect of its understanding, trust, acceptance of active responsibility, separation of problems and subjects, and focus on the successful experience. We briefly discuss the theory of restorative justice and narrative practice. Particular attention is paid to the typical methods of school response to conflicts, and to zero-tolerance policy. We propose that the school community needs a number of specific technologies that would optimally suit for different types of situations and would constitute a part of the system

  11. Soluble microbial products and their implications in mixed culture biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Rittmann, Bruce E; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are soluble organic compounds released during normal biomass metabolism in mixed culture biotechnology. In this review, we give the up-to-date status on several essential SMP issues: mechanisms of SMP formation, differentiation between utilization-associated products (UAP) and biomass-associated products (BAP), biodegradability of the SMP components, how formation of SMP by autotrophs controls effluent quality and supports a substantial population of heterotrophs, mathematical modeling that includes SMP, and improving effluent quality by controlling SMP. We also present two timely examples that highlight our current understanding and give an indication of how SMP affects the performance of modern mixed culture biotechnology: membrane fouling of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) and the dynamics of SMP in anaerobic systems.

  12. Microbial responses to various process disturbances in a continuous hydrogen reactor fed with galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, microbial responses of a continuous hydrogen reactor fed with galactose have been investigated. Process disturbances reduced H2 production performance as well as large fluctuations in microbial diversity. The peak values of the hydrogen yield (HY) was not influenced greatly during the steady state period, and accounted as 2.01 ± 0.05 and 2.14 ± 0.03 mol/mol galactoseadded, while hydraulic retention time (HRT) was at 12 and 8 h, respectively. Microbial community analysis via 454 pyrosequencing revealed that functional redundancy following changes in the microbial community distribution led to the stability of the fermentation performance. The butyrate to acetate (B/A) ratio well correlated with changes in the microbial community. The energy generation rate and energy yield resulted in the peak values of 134 kJ/L-d and 612 kJ/moladded.

  13. Microbial community dynamics in continuous microbial fuel cells fed with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotres, Ana; Tey, Laura; Bonmatí, August; Viñas, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Two-chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry were assessed. Additionally, the use of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES-Inh) was studied. The synthetic wastewater-fed MFC (MFCSW) showed a maximum power density (PDmax) of 2138mWm(-3), and the addition of BES-Inh (10mM) did not show any improvement in its performance (PDmax=2078mWm(-3)). When pig slurry was used as feed (MFCPS), PDmax increased up to 5623mWm(-3). The microbial community composition was affected by the type of substrate used. While, Pseudomonadaceae and Clostridiaceae were the most representative families within the acetate-based medium, Flavobacteriaceae, Chitinophagaceae, Comamonadaceae and Nitrosomonadaceae were predominant when pig slurry was used as feed. Otherwise, only the Eubacterial microbial community composition was strongly modified when adding BES-Inh, thus leading to an enrichment of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oppositely, the Archaeal community was less affected by the addition of BES-Inh, and Methanosarcina sp., arose as the predominant family in both situations. Despite all the differences in microbial communities, 6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to Bacteroidetes (Porphyromonadaceae and Marinilabiaceae) and Firmicutes (Clostridiales) were found to be common to both MFCs, also for different contents of COD and N-NH4(+), and therefore could be considered as the bioanode core microbiome.

  14. Effect of continuous oleate addition on microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baserba, Manel Garrido; Angelidaki, Irini; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the microbial diversity in anaerobic reactors, continuously exposed to oleate, added to a manure reactor influent, was investigated. Relative changes in archaeal community were less remarkable in comparison to changes in bacterial community indicating that dominant archaeal ...... a comprehensive picture on oleate degrading microbial communities in high organic strength wastewater. The findings might be utilized for development of strategies for biogas production from lipid-riched wastes....

  15. Synergetic effects of microbial binary cultures on microbial fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  16. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Mlynáriková

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans. Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar.

  17. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-11-24

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar.

  18. An Autonomous System for Experimental Evolution of Microbial Cultures: Test Results Using Ultraviolet-C Radiation and Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouandji, Cynthia; Wang, Jonathan; Arismendi, Dillon; Lee, Alonzo; Blaich, Justin; Gentry, Diana

    2017-01-01

    At its core, the field of microbial experimental evolution seeks to elucidate the natural laws governing the history of microbial life by understanding its underlying driving mechanisms. However, observing evolution in nature is complex, as environmental conditions are difficult to control. Laboratory-based experiments for observing population evolution provide more control, but manually culturing and studying multiple generations of microorganisms can be time consuming, labor intensive, and prone to inconsistency. We have constructed a prototype, closed system device that automates the process of directed evolution experiments in microorganisms. It is compatible with any liquid microbial culture, including polycultures and field samples, provides flow control and adjustable agitation, continuously monitors optical density (OD), and can dynamically control environmental pressures such as ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiation and temperature. Here, the results of the prototype are compared to iterative exposure and survival assays conducted using a traditional hood, UV-C lamp, and shutter system.

  19. Influence of Panax ginseng Continuous Cropping on Metabolic Function of Soil Microbial Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Yi-xin; DING Wan-long; ZHOU Ying-qun; LI Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of Panax ginseng continuous cropping on the carbon substrate metabolic activity of microbes in soils sampled from Dafang,Huangni,and Wulidi in Jilin Province,China.Methods Soil metabolisms of soil communities were characterized by community level physiological profiles using BIOLOGTM EcoPlate.Results Soils sampled from the three sites were analyzed and their metabolic activities were compared.Principal component analysis explored the significant variance in metabolic function of microbial communities in soils,though the Shannon index and the evenness index of them were similar.Futhermore,two principal components(PC1 and PC2),which contributed 67.83% and 10.78% of total variance,were extracted respectively.And also,substrates significantly correlated with PC1 and PC2 at the three sampling sites were identified.Conclusion Characteristic of soil is the primary factor influencing microbial communities,and P.ginseng continuous cropping has significant influence on microbial community.Though soil samples show similar microbial metabolic profiles,microbial communities in rhizosphere soil are changed obviously during the cultivation of P.ginseng,which would finally result in the unbalance of microbial community.Phytopathogens would gradually be the predominants in rhizosphere soil and make P.ginseng sick.

  20. Microbial ecology and starter culture technology in coffee processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinícius de Melo Pereira, Gilberto; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Neto, Ensei; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2017-09-02

    Coffee has been for decades the most commercialized food product and most widely consumed beverage in the world, with over 600 billion cups served per year. Before coffee cherries can be traded and processed into a final industrial product, they have to undergo postharvest processing on farms, which have a direct impact on the cost and quality of a coffee. Three different methods can be used for transforming the coffee cherries into beans, known as wet, dry, and semi-dry methods. In all these processing methods, a spontaneous fermentation is carried out in order to eliminate any mucilage still stuck to the beans and helps improve beverage flavor by microbial metabolites. The microorganisms responsible for the fermentation (e.g., yeasts and lactic acid bacteria) can play a number of roles, such as degradation of mucilage (pectinolytic activity), inhibition of mycotoxin-producing fungi growth, and production of flavor-active components. The use of starter cultures (mainly yeast strains) has emerged in recent years as a promising alternative to control the fermentation process and to promote quality development of coffee product. However, scarce information is still available about the effects of controlled starter cultures in coffee fermentation performance and bean quality, making it impossible to use this technology in actual field conditions. A broader knowledge about the ecology, biochemistry, and molecular biology could facilitate the understanding and application of starter cultures for coffee fermentation process. This review provides a comprehensive coverage of these issues, while pointing out new directions for exploiting starter cultures in coffee processing.

  1. A Small-Volume, Low-Cost, and Versatile Continuous Culture Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick Matteau

    Full Text Available Continuous culture devices can be used for various purposes such as establishing reproducible growth conditions or maintaining cell populations under a constant environment for long periods. However, commercially available instruments are expensive, were not designed to handle small volumes in the milliliter range, and can lack the flexibility required for the diverse experimental needs found in several laboratories.We developed a versatile continuous culture system and provide detailed instructions as well as a graphical user interface software for potential users to assemble and operate their own instrument. Three culture chambers can be controlled simultaneously with the proposed configuration, and all components are readily available from various sources. We demonstrate that our continuous culture device can be used under different modes, and can easily be programmed to behave either as a turbidostat or chemostat. Addition of fresh medium to the culture vessel can be controlled by a real-time feedback loop or simply calibrated to deliver a defined volume. Furthermore, the selected light-emitting diode and photodetector enable the use of phenol red as a pH indicator, which can be used to indirectly monitor the bulk metabolic activity of a cell population rather than the turbidity.This affordable and customizable system will constitute a useful tool in many areas of biology such as microbial ecology as well as systems and synthetic biology.

  2. Multi-stage continuous high cell density culture systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho Nam; Jung, Kwonsu; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Lee, Joon Chul; Woo, Hee-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) system makes it possible to achieve high productivity together with high product titer of many bioproducts. For long-term continuous operation of MSC-HCDC systems, the cell retention time and hydraulic retention time must be decoupled and strains (bacteria, yeast, plant, and animal cells) must be stable. MSC-HCDC systems are suitable for low-value high-volume extracellular products such as fuel ethanol, lactic acid or volatile fatty acids, and high-value products such as monoclonal antibodies as well as intracellular products such as polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHB), microbial lipids or a number of therapeutics. Better understanding of the fermentation kinetics of a specific product and reliable high-density culture methods for the product-generating microorganisms will facilitate timely industrialization of MSC-HCDC systems for products that are currently obtained in fed-batch bioreactors.

  3. Organizational culture, continuous quality improvement, and medication administration error reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, B J; Blegen, M A; Uden-Holman, T; Vaughn, T; Chrischilles, E; Wakefield, D S

    2001-01-01

    This study explores the relationships among measures of nurses' perceptions of organizational culture, continuous quality improvement (CQI) implementation, and medication administration error (MAE) reporting. Hospital-based nurses were surveyed using measures of organizational culture and CQI implementation. These data were combined with previously collected data on perceptions of MAE reporting. A group-oriented culture had a significant positive correlation with CQI implementation, whereas hierarchical and rational culture types were negatively correlated with CQI implementation. Higher barriers to reporting MAE were associated with lower perceived reporting rates. A group-oriented culture and a greater extent of CQI implementation were positively (but not significantly) associated with the estimated overall percentage of MAEs reported. We conclude that health care organizations have implemented CQI programs, yet barriers remain relative to MAE reporting. There is a need to assess the reliability, validity, and completeness of key quality assessment and risk management data.

  4. Bioconversion of energy by Spirulina maxima on continuous culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaumont, D.; Gudin, C.; Delepine, R.; Asensi, A.

    1982-11-01

    The influence of the light intensity, photoperiod and residence time were studied on a continuous culture of Spirulina maxima. A maximum photosynthetic conversion yield of 13% on visible energy and a minimum quantic need of 23 photons per integrated CO/sub 2/ molecule were obtained in this way. By the application of continuous cultivation techniques a strain of Sprirulina developing on sea water was selected.

  5. Sustainable Power Generation in Continuous Flow Microbial Fuel Cell Treating Actual Wastewater: Influence of Biocatalyst Type on Electricity Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Z. Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m2 obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively.

  6. Continuous fungal treatment of non-sterile veterinary hospital effluent: pharmaceuticals removal and microbial community assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Lucas, Daniel; Pereira, Maria Alcina; Alves, Madalena; Pennanen, Taina; Fritze, Hannu; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Vicent, Teresa; Caminal, Glòria

    2016-03-01

    Source point treatment of effluents with a high load of pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs), such as hospital wastewater, is a matter of discussion among the scientific community. Fungal treatments have been reported to be successful in degrading this type of pollutants and, therefore, the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was applied for the removal of PhACs from veterinary hospital wastewater. Sixty-six percent removal was achieved in a non-sterile batch bioreactor inoculated with T. versicolor pellets. On the other hand, the study of microbial communities by means of DGGE and phylogenetic analyses led us to identify some microbial interactions and helped us moving to a continuous process. PhAC removal efficiency achieved in the fungal treatment operated in non-sterile continuous mode was 44 % after adjusting the C/N ratio with respect to the previously calculated one for sterile treatments. Fungal and bacterial communities in the continuous bioreactors were monitored as well.

  7. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt G Vandervoort

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the

  8. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  9. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J.; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost. PMID:27270788

  10. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-06-07

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m(-2). Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost.

  11. A self-feeding roller bottle for continuous cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, R Eric; Friederichs, Goetz

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a self-feeding roller bottle that delivers a continuous supply of fresh media to cells in culture, which is mechanically simplistic and works with existing roller apparatuses, is presented here. A conventional roller bottle is partitioned into two chambers; one chamber contains the fresh culture media reservoir, and the other contains the cell culture chamber. A spiroid of tubing inside the fresh media reservoir acts as a pump when the bottle rotates on its horizontal axis, continuously delivering fresh media through an opening in the partition to the cell culture chamber. The modified bottle proved capable of maintaining steady-state cell densities of a hybridoma cell line over the 10-day period tested, although at lower densities than reached during batch operation due to the continuous volume dilution. Steady-state density proved to be controllable by adjusting the perfusion rate, which changes with the rotation rate of the bottle. Specific antibody production rate is as much as 3.7 times the rate in conventional roller bottles operating with intermittent batch feeding.

  12. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study

  13. Turning Russian specialized microbial culture collections into resource centers for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S

    2013-11-01

    Specialized nonmedical microbial culture collections contain unique bioresources that could be useful for biotechnology companies. Cooperation between collections and companies has suffered from shortcomings in infrastructure and legislation, hindering access to holdings. These challenges may be overcome by the transformation of collections into national bioresource centers and integration into international microbial resource networks.

  14. Continuing Professional Development in Context: Teachers' Continuing Professional Development Culture in Germany and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermke, Wieland

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the continuing professional development (CPD) culture of teachers, and asks how it is influenced by properties of the school system. It reports the results of a questionnaire study with 418 secondary teachers from Sweden and Germany. The results show highly significant differences between Swedish and German teachers'…

  15. Hybrid Modeling and Optimization of Yogurt Starter Culture Continuous Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviya Popova

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents a hybrid model of yogurt starter mixed culture fermentation. The main nonlinearities within a classical structure of continuous process model are replaced by neural networks. The new hybrid model accounts for the dependence of the two microorganisms' kinetics from the on-line measured characteristics of the culture medium - pH. Then the model was used further for calculation of the optimal time profile of pH. The obtained results are with agreement with the experimental once.

  16. Biodeterioration of epoxy resin: a microbial survey through culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangallo, Domenico; Bučková, Maria; Kraková, Lucia; Puškárová, Andrea; Šaková, Nikoleta; Grivalský, Tomaš; Chovanová, Katarina; Zemánková, Milina

    2015-02-01

    During the 20th century, synthetic polymers were greatly used in the field of art. In particular, the epoxy resins were used for both conservation and for creating sculptures. The biodeterioration of these polymers has not been adequately studied. The aim of this investigation was to examine the microflora responsible for the deterioration of an epoxy statue exposed to outdoor conditions. Fungal and bacterial microflora were isolated from the art object, clustered by fluorescence-ITS (internal transcribed spacer), identified by ITS and 16S rRNA sequencing and tested for their lipolytic abilities by three agar assays. Different algal, bacterial, cyanobacterial and fungal clone libraries were constructed. The surrounding airborne microflora was analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The results indicated the presence, on the statue surface, of an interesting and differentiate microbial community composed of rock-inhabiting members, algal photobionts (Trebouxia spp., Chloroidium ellipsoideum and Chlorella angustoellipsoidea), Cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya sp., Phormidium sp., Cylindrospermum stagnale, Hassallia byssoidea and Geitlerinema sp.), black yeasts related to the species Friedmanniomyces endolithicus, Pseudotaeniolina globosa, Phaeococcomyces catenatus and Catenulostroma germanicum and several plant-associated fungi. This investigation provides new information on the potential microfloral inhabitants of epoxy resin discovering a new ecological niche, occupied mainly by several members of rock-colonizing microbial species.

  17. Effect of starter cultures on microbial and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny

    2014-10-22

    Oct 22, 2014 ... microbial and physicochemical characteristics of a dry fermented poultry meat sausage. The microbial ... meat preservation and fermentation processes because they affect both the ... MATERIALS AND METHODS. Bacterial strains and ..... under vacuum and packaging film permeability on processing and.

  18. Microbial Culture Collection (MCC) and International Depositary Authority (IDA) at National Centre for Cell Science, Pune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh

    2014-06-01

    Culture collections are valuable resources for the sustainable use of microbial diversity and its conservation. Advances in biotechnology have further increased their importance and some of these have been recognized as International Depositary Authority (IDA) for the deposition of patent cultures. Microbial Culture Collection at National Centre for Cell Science was established by the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India is country's newest culture collection with largest holdings. It is recognized as an IDA under the Budapest Treaty and Designated National Repository under the Biodiversity Act 2002. This article describes its various service related activities.

  19. Succession of aquatic microbial communities as a result of the water quality variations in continuous water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rong-chang; WEN Xiang-hua; QIAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    The changes of structural and functional parameters of aquatic microbial communities in continuous water on campus of Tsinghua University, China are investigated by polyurethane foam unit(PFU) method. The measured compositions of the communities include alga, protozoa, and some metazoa(such as rotifers). The measured indicators of water quality include water temperature, pH value, dissolved oxygen(DO), potassium permanganate index(CODMn), total nitrogen(TN), total phosphorus(TP) and chlorophyll-a(Chla). The trophic level, expressed by the trophic level indices(TLIc), is assessed with analytic hierarchy process and principal component analysis(AHP-PCA) method. The changing trends of the structural and functional parameters of aquatic microbial communities, such as Margalef index of diversity(D), Shannon-weaver index of diversity (H), Heterotropy index(HI), number of species when the colonization gets equilibrium(Seq), colonizing speed constant(G) and time spent when 90 percent of Seq colonized in PFU(T90%), are also analyzed. The experimental results showed the succession of aquatic microbial communities along the water flow is consistent with the water quality changes, so the parameters of microbial community can reflect the changes of water quality from the ecological view.

  20. Microbial composition during Chinese soy sauce koji-making based on culture dependent and independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yin-zhuo; Qian, Yu-lin; Ji, Feng-di; Chen, Jing-yu; Han, Bei-zhong

    2013-05-01

    Koji-making is a key process for production of high quality soy sauce. The microbial composition during koji-making was investigated by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to determine predominant bacterial and fungal populations. The culture-dependent methods used were direct culture and colony morphology observation, and PCR amplification of 16S/26S rDNA fragments followed by sequencing analysis. The culture-independent method was based on the analysis of 16S/26S rDNA clone libraries. There were differences between the results obtained by different methods. However, sufficient overlap existed between the different methods to identify potentially significant microbial groups. 16 and 20 different bacterial species were identified using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, respectively. 7 species could be identified by both methods. The most predominant bacterial genera were Weissella and Staphylococcus. Both 6 different fungal species were identified using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, respectively. Only 3 species could be identified by both sets of methods. The most predominant fungi were Aspergillus and Candida species. This work illustrated the importance of a comprehensive polyphasic approach in the analysis of microbial composition during soy sauce koji-making, the knowledge of which will enable further optimization of microbial composition and quality control of koji to upgrade Chinese traditional soy sauce product.

  1. Power management systems for sediment microbial fuel cells in high power and continuous power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Conrad Koble

    The objective of this dissertation was to develop power management systems (PMS) for sediment microbial fuel cells (SFMCs) for high power and continuous applications. The first part of this dissertation covers a new method for testing the performance of SMFCs. This device called the microbial fuel cell tester was developed to automatically test power generation of PMS. The second part focuses on a PMS capable of delivering high power in burst mode. This means that for a small amount of time a large amount of power up to 2.5 Watts can be delivered from a SMFC only generating mW level power. The third part is aimed at developing a multi-potentiostat laboratory tool that measures the performance at fixed cell potentials of microbial fuel cells so that I can optimize them for use with the PMS. This tool is capable of controlling the anode potential or cathode potential and measuring current of six separate SMFCs simultaneously. By operating multiple potentiostats, I was able to run experiments that find ideal operating conditions for the sediment microbial fuel cells, and also I can optimize the power management system for these conditions. The fourth part of the dissertation is targeting a PMS that was able to operate a sensor continuously which was powered by an SMFC. In pervious applications involving SMFCs, the PMS operated in batch mode. In this PMS, the firmware on the submersible ultrasonic receiver (SUR) was modified for use with my PMS. This integration of PMS and SUR allowed for the continuous operation of the SUR without using a battery. Finally, the last part of the dissertation recommends a scale-up power management system to overcome the linearity scale up issue of SMFCs as future work. Concluding remarks are also added to summarize the goal and focus of this dissertation.

  2. Rapid culture-independent microbial analysis aboard the international space station (ISS) stage two: quantifying three microbial biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Heather C; Damon, Michael; Maule, Jake; Monaco, Lisa A; Wainwright, Norm

    2012-09-01

    Abstract A portable, rapid, microbial detection unit, the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) as a technology demonstration unit in December 2006. Results from the first series of experiments designed to detect Gram-negative bacteria on ISS surfaces by quantifying a single microbial biomarker lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were reported in a previous article. Herein, we report additional technology demonstration experiments expanding the on-orbit capabilities of the LOCAD-PTS to detecting three different microbial biomarkers on ISS surfaces. Six different astronauts on more than 20 occasions participated in these experiments, which were designed to test the new beta-glucan (fungal cell wall molecule) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacterial cell wall component) cartridges individually and in tandem with the existing Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL; Gram-negative bacterial LPS detection) cartridges. Additionally, we conducted the sampling side by side with the standard culture-based detection method currently used on the ISS. Therefore, we present data on the distribution of three microbial biomarkers collected from various surfaces in every module present on the ISS at the time of sampling. In accordance with our previous experiments, we determined that spacecraft surfaces known to be frequently in contact with crew members demonstrated higher values of all three microbial molecules. Key Words: Planetary protection-Spaceflight-Microbiology-Biosensor. Astrobiology 12, 830-840.

  3. Microbial production of a biofuel (acetone-butanol-ethanol) in a continuous bioreactor: impact of bleed and simultaneous product removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka; Qureshi, Nasib; Blaschek, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced in an integrated continuous one-stage fermentation and gas stripping product recovery system using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and fermentation gases (CO(2) and H(2)). In this system, the bioreactor was fed with a concentrated sugar solution (250-500 g L(-1) glucose). The bioreactor was bled semi-continuously to avoid accumulation of inhibitory chemicals and products. The continuous system was operated for 504 h (21 days) after which the fermentation was intentionally terminated. The bioreactor produced 461.3 g ABE from 1,125.0 g total sugar in 1 L culture volume as compared to a control batch process in which 18.4 g ABE was produced from 47.3 g sugar. These results demonstrate that ABE fermentation can be operated in an integrated continuous one-stage fermentation and product recovery system for a long period of time, if butanol and other microbial metabolites in the bioreactor are kept below threshold of toxicity.

  4. Development of the Continued Improvement System for Nuclear Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H. C.; Park, H. G.; Park, Y. W.; Park, J. Y. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It has been found that almost 80 % of the incidents and accidents occurred recently, such as the Fukushima Daiichi disaster and Domestic SBO accident etc. were analyzed to be caused from human errors. (IAEA NES NG-G-2.1) Which strongly claims the importance of the safety culture system. Accordingly, it should be away from a cursory approach like one-off field survey or Snap shop which were being conducted at present for the continued improvement of safety culture. This study introduces an analytical methodology which approaches the generic form of the safety both consciously and unconsciously expressed with behavior, thoughts, and attitude etc. This study was implemented only for open materials such as Inspection report, incidents and accidents reports, QA documents because of the limitation in accessibility to data. More effective use with securing operational data will be possible in future.

  5. Microbial ecology of artisanal italian cheese: Molecular microbial characterization by culture-independent method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, E.; Scarpellini, M.; Franzatti, L.; Dioguardi, L.

    2009-07-01

    Present study will treat the next topics: ecology of the natural and man made environments and functional diversity of bacteria. The microbial communities in artisanal goat cheeses produced in mountain pastures (typical farms) in Piemonte mountain (North of Italy) change a lot during precessing and ripening time. Moreover cheese microbial ecosystems are different in each small dairy because adventitious microflora can come from the environment and contamination the milk before the cheese making process and the product during manufacture and ripening. (Author)

  6. Functional implications of the microbial community structure of undefined mesophilic starter cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, E.J.; Erkus, O.; Spus, M.; Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the recent advances made in the studies of the microbial community of complex and undefined cheese starter cultures. We report on work related to the composition of the cultures at the level of genetic lineages, on the presence and activity of bacteriophages and on the populati

  7. Microbial contamination of embryo cultures in an ART laboratory : sources and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastrop, Peter M. M.; de Graaf-Miltenburg, Lia A. M.; Gutknecht, Dagmar R.; Weima, Sjerp M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although rare, microbial contamination of culture dishes occasionally occurs in our IVF/ICSI programme. Despite stringent culture conditions and the use of medium containing penicillin and streptomycin, an increasing number of infections was observed once they were routinely recorded. In

  8. Microbial contamination of embryo cultures in an ART laboratory : sources and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastrop, Peter M. M.; de Graaf-Miltenburg, Lia A. M.; Gutknecht, Dagmar R.; Weima, Sjerp M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although rare, microbial contamination of culture dishes occasionally occurs in our IVF/ICSI programme. Despite stringent culture conditions and the use of medium containing penicillin and streptomycin, an increasing number of infections was observed once they were routinely recorded. In

  9. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials.

  10. Assessment of microbial diversity under arid plants by culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. R. K. Jain

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... Both culture- dependent and culture-independent methods indicated that in arid crops, ... on analysis of DNA allow investigation of this potential. .... Addition of anionic detergent, SDS along with CTAB yielded maximum DNA.

  11. Parameters of rumen fermentation in a continuously fed sheep: evidence of a microbial rumination pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, R E; Reichl, J; Prins, R

    1971-12-01

    The feed and feces of a continuously fed sheep were analyzed for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen, with oxygen as the remainder. The daily feed-feces weight difference was used as the reactant in an equation representing the rumen fermentation. The measured products were the daily production of volatile fatty acids (VFA), CH(4), CO(2), and ammonia. The carbon unaccounted for was assumed to be in the microbial cell material produced in the rumen and absorbed before reaching the feces. The ratio of C to H, O, and N in bacteria was used to represent the elemental composition of the microbes formed in the rumen fermentation, completing the following equation:C(20.03)H(36.99)O(17.406)N(1.345) + 5.65 H(2)O --> C(12)H(24)O(10.1) + 0.83 CH(4) VFA + 2.76 CO(2) + 0.50 NH(3) + C(4.44)H(8.88)O(2.35)N(0.785) microbial cells absorbed With C arbitrarily balanced and O balanced by appropriate addition of water, any error is reflected in the H. The H recovery was 98.5%. The turnover rate constant for rumen liquid equilibrating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) was 2.27 per day. Direct counts and volume measurements of the individual types of bacteria and protozoa in the rumen were used to calculate the total microbial cell volume in the rumen, not equilibrating with it. The dry matter in the rumen (582 g) and the nitrogen content (12.05) of the microbes in the rumen were estimated, the latter constituting 85% of the measured N in the rumen. Calculations for rumen dry matter and nitrogen turning over at the PEG rate introduce big discrepancies with other parameters; a rumination pool must be postulated. Its size and composition are estimated. Arguments are presented to support the view that dry matter and some of the microbes, chiefly the protozoa, do not leave the rumen at the PEG rate. One experiment with the same sheep fed twice daily showed significantly less production of microbial cells than did the continuous (each 2 hr) feeding. Analysis of the microbial cell yield suggests that

  12. Effects of Continuous Tomato Monoculture on Soil Microbial Properties and Enzyme Activities in a Solar Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdan Fu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil-related obstacles resulting from continuous monoculture have limited the sustainable development of the tomato industry in China. An experiment on tomatoes with seven continuous monoculture treatments (the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, and 13th crops, respectively was conducted in a solar greenhouse, to investigate the influence of monoculture on soil quality. Most soil quality indicators first increased and then decreased with increasing continuous monoculture crops, and significant differences among crops were observed. Indicators at the 13th crop were significantly lower than those at the other crops in terms of average well color development (AWCD, substrate richness (S, the Shannon diversity index (H, and the McIntosh index (U of the soil microbial community (SMC, soil urease (UR, and neutral phosphatase (N-PHO activities, and available nitrogen (AN and potassium (AK. However, fungal abundance (FUN at the 13th crop was significantly higher than that at the other crops. As principal component analysis (PCA revealed, SMC functional diversity at the 1st, 11th, and 13th crops were similar, and were obviously distinguished from those at the other crops. Moreover, the tomato yield was significantly and positively correlated with soil-available potassium and SMC functional diversity indexes. Our findings indicated that short-term continuous monoculture, e.g., for fewer than seven or nine crops, was beneficial for soil quality improvement. However, continuous monoculture for greater than 11 crops had adverse effects on soil enzyme activities, soil microbial abundances, soil chemical properties, soil SMC functional diversity, and the tomato yield, particularly at the 13th crop.

  13. Engineering Complex Microbial Phenotypes with Continuous Genetic Integration and Plasmid Based Multi-Gene Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    the chromosome. Repeat this step for continu ous integration. 4’h Round: Oisru1Hing the Sp gene to insert he te ro logous DNA with Tet rn...provide a selective advantage. Briefly, the collection of cells will be stressed until the stationary phase of cultures, and will then be transferred into

  14. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  15. [Seasonal variation of functional diversity of aquatic microbial community in Apostichopus japonicus cultural pond].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fa-Jun; Tian, Xiang-Li; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Yang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    The functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) cultural ponds was examined in this paper. The Biolog plate technique and redundancy analysis (RDA) method were used to evaluate seasonal changes and their relationships with environmental factors. The results showed that both total amount and types of carbon sources utilized by microbes in the sea cucumber cultural ponds varied seasonally, and were the highest in summer and lowest in winter, with polymers being the main type of carbon sources. Principal component analysis revealed that the carbon utilization diversity of the microbial communities varied significantly over the seasonal courses. A total of 10 categories of carbon sources were significantly related to the principal component 1, among which were polymers, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids, and amines. Significant seasonal changes were detected for all carbon utilization diversity indices of the microbial communities, including Shannon, McIntosh, Simpson, and S-E. However, seasonal variations were different among the microbial diversity indices. RDA analysis revealed that TP, NO(3-)-N, TN, and PO4(3-)-P were the critical environmental factors influencing the seasonal changes in functional diversity of aquatic microbial community in sea cucumber cultural ponds.

  16. The Continuity and Discontinuity of the Chinese Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Xiaohang[1

    2016-01-01

    Chinese culture has been disrupted and distorted for several times during its history. Two cases are introduced todiscuss how the Chinese culture was affected by the various factors. Some cultural legacies of China may be lost, and the wayfor remedy is to keep Chinese culture open up and in a competitive environment.

  17. Harnessing the landscape of microbial culture media to predict new organism–media pairings

    OpenAIRE

    Oberhardt, Matthew A.; Zarecki, Raphy; Gronow, Sabine; Lang, Elke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Culturing microorganisms is a critical step in understanding and utilizing microbial life. Here we map the landscape of existing culture media by extracting natural-language media recipes into a Known Media Database (KOMODO), which includes >18,000 strain–media combinations, >3300 media variants and compound concentrations (the entire collection of the Leibniz Institute DSMZ repository). Using KOMODO, we show that although media are usually tuned for individual strains using biologically comm...

  18. Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kyle S; Drew, David M; He, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) hold great promise for drinking water production because of potential energy savings during the desalination process. In this study, we developed a continuously operated MDC--upflow microbial desalination cell (UMDC) for the purpose of salt removal. During the 4-month operation, the UMDC constantly removed salts and generated bio-electricity. At a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days (salt solution) and current production of ∼62 mA, the UMDC was able to remove more than 99% of NaCl from the salt solution that had an initial salt concentration of 30 g total dissolved solids (TDS)/L. In addition, the TDS removal rate was 7.50 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (salt solution volume) or 5.25 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (wastewater volume), and the desalinated water met the drinking water standard, in terms of TDS concentration. A high charge transfer efficiency of 98.6% or 81% was achieved at HRT 1 or 4d. The UMDC produced a maximum power density of 30.8 W/m(3). The phenomena of bipolar electrodialysis and proton transport in the UMDC were discussed. These results demonstrated the potential of the UMDC as either a sole desalination process or a pre-desalination reactor for downstream desalination processes.

  19. Intracellular carbon isotope distributions of continuous-culture Allochromatium vinosum grown on acetate vs. CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T.; Mohr, W.; Sattin, S.; Rogers, D.; Girguis, P. R.; Pearson, A.

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur oxidizing bacteria are commonly observed in various aquatic environments, which use reduced sulfur compounds as electron donors to complete the carbon metabolism. Their carbon isotope fractionations during biosynthesis can be preserved in the fossil records. Here we grew a model sulfur oxidizing bacterium, Allochromatium vinosum, in two mode of continuous culture. One of the A. vinosum culture was grown autotrophically with CO2 as the carbon source; while the other one was grown heterotrophically on acetate. A novel protein isotope fingerprinting analysis was applied combining proteomics and protein isotope analysis together, which indicates no isotope fractionation among individual proteins, whereas the bulk protein d13C relative to bulk biomass were substantially different between autotrophic and heterotrophic cells. The same trend was also observed in d13C values of bulk amino acids, fatty acids and nucleic acids. The observed difference in major classes of organic compounds may result from the difference in biosynthetic pathways of autotrophic and heterotrophic cells. A closer look into d13C value of individual amino acids and fatty acids provides us further evidence to identify isotopic response to key reactions of central carbon metabolism as revealed by proteomic analysis. Our work suggests that we can decipher diverse microbial carbon metabolisms by combining proteomics with compound specific analysis of major classes of organic compounds.

  20. Formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium of microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Huzairy; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng; Ngau, Cornelius

    2016-11-01

    The formation of microbial biofilm while maintaining the electricity output is a challenging topic in microbial fuel cell (MFC) studies. This MFC critical factor becomes more significant when handling with industrial wastewater which normally contains refractory and toxic compounds. This study explores the formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium through observing and characterizing microscopically its establishment on MFC anode surface. The mixed culture was found to develop its biofilm on the anode surface in the chlorophenol environment and established its maturity and dispersal stages with concurrent electricity generation and phenolic degradation. The mixed culture biofilm engaged the electron transfer roles in MFC by generating current density of 1.4 mA/m2 and removing 53 % of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The results support further research especially on hazardous wastewater treatment using a benign and sustainable method.

  1. Influence of combined pollution of antimony and arsenic on culturable soil microbial populations and enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongshan; He, Mengchang; Wang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The effects of both combined and single pollution of antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) in different concentrations on culturable soil microbial populations and enzyme activities were studied under laboratory conditions. Joint effects of both Sb and As were different from that of Sb or As alone. The inhibition rate of culturable soil microbial populations under Sb and As pollution followed the order: bacterial > fungi > actinomycetes. There existed antagonistic inhibiting effect on urease and acid phophatase and synergistic inhibiting effect on protease under the combined pollution of Sb (III) and As (III). Only urease appeared to be the most sensitive indicator under Sb (V) and As (V) pollution, and there existed antagonistic inhibiting effect on acid phophatase and synergistic inhibiting effect on urease and protease under Sb (V) and As (V) combined pollution at most time. In this study, we also confirmed that the trivalent states of Sb and As were more toxic to all the microbes tested and more inhibitory on microbial enzyme activities then their pentavalent counterparts. The results also suggest that not only the application rate of the two metalloids but also the chemical form of metalloids should be considered while assessing the effect of metalloid on culturable microbial populations and enzyme activities. Urease and acid phosphatase can be used as potential biomarkers to evaluate the intensity of Sb (III) and As (III) stress.

  2. 复合生防菌群对连作大豆根际土壤可培养微生物区系的影响%Effects of combined biocontrol agents on soybean rhizosphere culturable microbial flora from continuous soybean cropping soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文艳; 陈瑾; 姜述君; 于涵; 张国庆; 刘朝

    2012-01-01

    Pot experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of combined biocontrol agents on rhizosphere microbial flora of soybean (Glycine max) in continuous cropping soil. Results showed thai combined biocontrol agents could effectively change soil microbial flora in soybean rhizosphere. Among different growth stages of soybean, the quantities of bacteria, fungi and actinomyces had changed evidently under combined biocontrol agents treatment. In euphylla period and compound leaf period, rhizosphere bacteria increased 71. 8% and 114. 3% , while fungus decreased 12.9% and 22. 3% respectively. Actinomyces decreased 9.9% in euphylla period, but increased 27.4% in compound leaf period. The results showed that combined biocontrol agents significantly reduced the proportions of soilborne pathogene of Fusarium and Rhizoctonia in soybean rhizosphere, and enhanced the proportions of beneficial microbes including Rhizobium, Azotobacter, Trichoderma, Pseudomonas and Bacillus.%采用盆栽试验,研究了复合生防菌群对大豆根际土壤可培养微生物区系的调节作用.结果表明,复合生防菌群可以明显改变大豆根际微生物区系组成.在大豆不同时期,复合生防菌群处理的大豆根际细菌、真菌和放线菌在数量上发生了较大改变.在大豆真叶期和复时期,复合生防菌群接种处理大豆根际细菌较对照增幅分别达到71.8%和114.3%,而根际真菌较对照减少12.9%和22.3%.在大豆真叶期,复合生防菌群接种处理大豆根际放线菌数量较对照减少9.9%,而在复叶期,根际放线菌数量较对照增加27.4%.此外,施用复合生防菌群可有效降低土传病原菌镰孢菌属(Fusarium)和丝核菌属(Rhizoctonia)的比例,并且提高根瘤菌(Rhtizobium)、固氮菌(Azotobacter)、木霉属(Trichoderma)、假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas)和芽孢杆菌属(Bacillus)等有益菌的比例.

  3. Culture-dependent and -independent investigations of microbial diversity on urinary catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Moser, Claus Ernst; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed;

    2012-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is caused by bacteria, which ascend the catheter along its external or internal surface to the bladder and subsequently develop into biofilms on the catheter and uroepithelium. Antibiotic-treated bacteria and bacteria residing in biofilm can be difficul...... to culture. In this study we used culture-based and 16S rRNA gene-based culture-independent methods (fingerprinting, cloning, and pyrosequencing) to determine the microbial diversity of biofilms on 24 urinary catheters. Most of the patients were catheterized for...

  4. An action research study; cultural differences impact how manufacturing organizations receive continuous improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattman, Braden R.

    National culture and organizational culture impact how continuous improvement methods are received, implemented and deployed by suppliers. Previous research emphasized the dominance of national culture over organizational culture. The countries studied included Poland, Mexico, China, Taiwan, South Korea, Estonia, India, Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. The research found that Canada was most receptive to continuous improvement, with China being the least receptive. The study found that organizational culture was more influential than national culture. Isomorphism and benchmarking is driving continuous-improvement language and methods to be more universally known within business. Business and management practices are taking precedence in driving change within organizations.

  5. Culture-dependent and -independent approaches establish the complexity of a PAH-degrading microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinas, M.; Sabate, J.; Solanas, A.M. [Barcelona Univ., Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology; Guasp, C.; Lalucat, J. [Illes Balears Univ., Palma de Mallorca (Spain). Dept. of Biology

    2005-11-15

    Microbial consortia are used in the decontamination of polluted environmental sites. A microbial consortium obtained by batch enrichment culture is a closed system with controlled conditions in which micro-organisms with a potentially high growth rate are selected and become dominant. The aim of this study was to identify the members of consortium AM, in which earlier batch enrichment work had shown high biodegradation rates of the aromatic fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The AM consortium was obtained by sequential enrichment in liquid culture with a PAH mixture of 3- and 4- ringed PAHs as the sole source of carbon and energy. The consortium was examined using a triple approach method based on various cultivation strategies, denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) and the screening of 16S and 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. Eleven different sequences by culture-dependent techniques and 7 by both DGGE and clone libraries were obtained, yielding 19 different microbial components. Proteobacteria were the dominant group, representing 83 per cent of the total, while the Cytophaga-Flexibactor-Bacteroides group (CFB) was 11 per cent, and Ascomycota fungi were 6 per cent. It was determined that {beta}-Proteobacteria were predominant in the DGGE and clone library methods, whereas they were a minority in culturable strains. The highest diversity and number of noncoincident sequences was achieved by the cultivation method that showed members of the {alpha},{beta}, and {gamma}-Proteobacteria, CFB bacterial group, and Ascomycota fungi. Only 6 of the 11 strains isolated showed PAH-degrading capability. The bacterial strain (AMS7) and the fungal strain (AMF1) achieved the greatest PAH depletion. Results indicated that polyphasic assessment is necessary for a proper understanding of the composition of a microbial consortium. It was concluded that microbial consortia are more complex than previously realized. 54 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  6. Scalable microbial fuel cell (MFC) stack for continuous real wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Li; Zheng, Yu; Zhou, Shungui; Yuan, Yong; Yuan, Haoran; Chen, Yong

    2012-02-01

    A tubular air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) stack with high scalability and low material cost was constructed and the ability of simultaneous real wastewater treatment and bioelectricity generation was investigated under continuous flow mode. At the two organic loading rates (ORLs) tested (1.2 and 4.9kg COD/m(3)d), five non-Pt MFCs connected in series and parallel circuit modes treating swine wastewater can enable an increase of the voltage and the current. The parallel stack retained high power output and the series connection underwent energy loss due to the substrate cross-conduction effect. With continuous electricity production, the parallel stack achieved 83.8% of COD removal and 90.8% of NH(4)(+)-N removal at 1.2kg COD/m(3)d, and 77.1% COD removal and 80.7% NH(4)(+)-N removal at 4.9kg COD/m(3)d. The MFC stack system in this study was demonstrated to be able to treat real wastewater with the added benefit of harvesting electricity energy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbial transformation and sorption of anthracene in liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadibarata, Tony; Zubir, Meor Mohd Fikri Ahmad; Rubiyatno; Chuang, Teh Zee

    2013-09-01

    Armillaria sp. F022, a white-rot fungus isolated from decayed wood in tropical rain forest was used to biodegrade anthracene in cultured medium. The percentage of anthracene removal by Armillaria sp. F022 reached 13 % after 7 days and at the end of the experiment, anthracene removal level was at 87 %. The anthracene removal through sorption and transformation was investigated. 69 % of eliminated anthracene was transformed by Armillaria sp. F022 to form other organic structure, while only 18 % was absorbed in the mycelia. In the kinetic experiment, anthracene dissipation will not stop even though the biomass had stopped growing. Anthracene removal by Armillaria sp. F022 was correlated with protein concentration (whole biomass) in the culture. The production of enzyme was affected by biomass production. Anthracene was transformed to two stable metabolic products. The metabolites were extracted in ethyl-acetate, isolated by column chromatography, and then identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

  8. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for Microbial Growth Kinetics of Mixed Culture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto, Ada; Looper, Jessica K; Mota, Linda C; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-11-01

    Microbial growth kinetics is often used to optimize environmental processes owing to its relation to the breakdown of substrate (contaminants). However, the quantification of bacterial populations in the environment is difficult owing to the challenges of monitoring a specific bacterial population within a diverse microbial community. Conventional methods are unable to detect and quantify the growth of individual strains separately in the mixed culture reactor. This work describes a novel quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based genomic approach to quantify each species in mixed culture and interpret its growth kinetics in the mixed system. Batch experiments were performed for both single and dual cultures of Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli K12 to obtain Monod kinetic parameters (μmax and Ks). The growth curves and kinetics obtained by conventional methods (i.e., dry weight measurement and absorbance reading) were compared with that obtained by qPCR assay. We anticipate that the adoption of this qPCR-based genomic assay can contribute significantly to traditional microbial kinetics, modeling practice, and the operation of bioreactors, where handling of complex mixed cultures is required.

  9. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Bell, Terrence H.; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E.; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  10. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck O P Stefani

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods.

  11. Unraveling microbial ecology of industrial-scale Kombucha fermentations by metabarcoding and culture-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coton, Monika; Pawtowski, Audrey; Taminiau, Bernard; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Deniel, Franck; Coulloumme-Labarthe, Laurent; Fall, Abdoulaye; Daube, Georges; Coton, Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    Kombucha, historically an Asian tea-based fermented drink, has recently become trendy in Western countries. Producers claim it bears health-enhancing properties that may come from the tea or metabolites produced by its microbiome. Despite its long history of production, microbial richness and dynamics have not been fully unraveled, especially at an industrial scale. Moreover, the impact of tea type (green or black) on microbial ecology was not studied. Here, we compared microbial communities from industrial-scale black and green tea fermentations, still traditionally carried out by a microbial biofilm, using culture-dependent and metabarcoding approaches. Dominant bacterial species belonged to Acetobacteraceae and to a lesser extent Lactobacteriaceae, while the main identified yeasts corresponded to Dekkera, Hanseniaspora and Zygosaccharomyces during all fermentations. Species richness decreased over the 8-day fermentation. Among acetic acid bacteria, Gluconacetobacter europaeus, Gluconobacter oxydans, G. saccharivorans and Acetobacter peroxydans emerged as dominant species. The main lactic acid bacteria, Oenococcus oeni, was strongly associated with green tea fermentations. Tea type did not influence yeast community, with Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Hanseniaspora valbyensis as most dominant. This study unraveled a distinctive core microbial community which is essential for fermentation control and could lead to Kombucha quality standardization. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effects of phosphate limitation on soluble microbial products and microbial community structure in semi-continuous Synechocystis-based photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Alexander S; Nam, Taekgul; Rittmann, Bruce; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    All bacteria release organic compounds called soluble microbial products (SMP) as a part of their normal metabolism. In photobioreactor (PBR) settings, SMP produced by cyanobacteria represent a major pool of carbon and electrons available to heterotrophic bacteria. Thus, SMP in PBRs are a major driver for the growth of heterotrophic bacteria, and understanding the distribution of SMP in PBRs is an important step toward proper management of PBR microbial communities. Here, we analyzed the SMP and microbial communities in two Synechocystis sp. PCC6803-based PBRs. The first PBR (PBRP0) became phosphate limited after several days of operation, while the second PBR (PBRP+) did not have phosphate limitation. Heterotrophic bacteria were detected in both PBRs, but PBRP0 had a much higher proportion of heterotrophic bacteria than PBRP+. Furthermore, PBRP+ had greater biomass production and lower SMP production per unit biomass than PBRP0. Carbohydrates that were most likely derived from hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) dominated the SMP in PBRP0, while products resulting from cell lysis or decay dominated the SMP in PBRP+. Together, our data support that maintaining phosphate availability in Synechocystis-based PBRs is important for managing SMP and, thus, the heterotrophic community.

  13. The Legal Status of Microbial Food Cultures in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herody, Caroline; Soyeux, Y; Hansen, Egon Bech

    2010-01-01

    The production of fermented foods is one of the oldest food processing technologies known to man. Since the dawn of civilisation, methods for the fermentation of milks, meats, fish and vegetables have been used to produce safe foods with distinctive organoleptic properties. Microbial food cultures...... (MFC) with a technological impact on food are called “starter cultures”. They may be present as natural microflora in the food, or as a result of the intentional addition of the microorganisms in an industrial food fermentation process. MFC that are used for their beneficial effect on consumers’ health...... an overview of the European regulatory framework which governs the use and labelling of commercial microbial food cultures intentionally added in a food manufacturing process....

  14. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  15. Analysis of culturable and unculturable microbial community in bensulfuron-methyl contaminated paddy soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xiaoyan; ZHAO Yuhua; FU Qinglin; M. L. Umashankara; FENG Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) on culturable microbial quantities and unculturable microbial community structures, conventional and molecular biological methods were employed in five BSM treated soils with three replications, respectively. The results obtained with traditional culture-dependent methods showed that a low-level of BSM had slight and transient effects on culturable microorganisms; nevertheless, high concentration of BSM resulted in a dramatic decrease in bacterial colony forming units (cfus). The result obtained using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that more than 17 bands were observed in low BSM contaminated soil samples and only 10 bands were detected in samples with high BSM contamination. In other words, the diversity of soil community structure is related to the concentration of BSM. Cluster analysis showed that the community structure under low level of contamination was more similar to that of the control, while heavy contaminated amendments were far away from the above group. In a sense, the cooperation of the traditional method and the molecular biological method is more powerful to study the soil microbial information in contaminated ecosystem.

  16. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05m3/m3-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02m3/m3-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38mV, 1.0V; -0.426±4mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium.

  17. Salt removal using multiple microbial desalination cells under continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Youpeng

    2013-05-01

    Four microbial desalination cells (MDCs) were hydraulically connected and operated under continuous flow conditions. The anode solution from the first MDC flowed into the cathode, and then on to the anode of the next reactor, which avoided pH imbalances that inhibit bacterial metabolism. The salt solution also moved through each desalination chamber in series. Increasing the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of the salt solution from 1 to 2. days increased total NaCl removal from 76 ± 1% to 97 ± 1%, but coulombic efficiencies decreased from 49 ± 4% to 35 ± 1%. Total COD removals were similar at both HRTs (60 ± 2%, 2. days; 59 ± 2%, 1. day). Community analysis of the anode biofilms showed that bacteria most similar to the xylose fermenting bacterium Klebsiella ornithinolytica predominated in the anode communities, and sequences most similar to Geobacter metallireducens were identified in all MDCs except the first one. These results demonstrated successful operation of a series of hydraulically connected MDCs and good desalination rates. © 2013 Elsevier B.V..

  18. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Yates, Matthew D; Zaybak, Zehra; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05 m(3)/m(3)-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02 m(3)/m(3)-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9 V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2 V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38 mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38 mV, 1.0 V; -0.426±4 mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell fed winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Bryan, Bill; Parker, Denny S; Merrill, Matthew D; Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D; Liu, Guangli; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    A pilot-scale (1,000 L) continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell was constructed and tested for current generation and COD removal with winery wastewater. The reactor contained 144 electrode pairs in 24 modules. Enrichment of an exoelectrogenic biofilm required ~60 days, which is longer than typically needed for laboratory reactors. Current generation was enhanced by ensuring adequate organic volatile fatty acid content (VFA/SCOD ≥ 0.5) and by raising the wastewater temperature (31 ± 1°C). Once enriched, SCOD removal (62 ± 20%) was consistent at a hydraulic retention time of 1 day (applied voltage of 0.9 V). Current generation reached a maximum of 7.4 A/m(3) by the planned end of the test (after 100 days). Gas production reached a maximum of 0.19 ± 0.04 L/L/day, although most of the product gas was converted to methane (86 ± 6%). In order to increase hydrogen recovery in future tests, better methods will be needed to isolate hydrogen gas produced at the cathode. These results show that inoculation and enrichment procedures are critical to the initial success of larger-scale systems. Acetate amendments, warmer temperatures, and pH control during startup were found to be critical for proper enrichment of exoelectrogenic biofilms and improved reactor performance.

  20. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Rader, Geoffrey K.

    2010-09-01

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m2/m3). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m2, cathode surface area; 74 A/m 3) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of ηE = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H2 gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Significance of biological hydrogen oxidation in a continuous single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Sool; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2010-02-01

    A single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) that used a high density of nonmetal-catalyst carbon fibers as the anode achieved high volumetric current densities from 1470 +/- 60 to 1630 +/- 50 A/m(3) for a hydraulic retention time of 1.6-6.5 h. The high current density was driven by a large anode surface area and corresponded to a volumetric chemical oxygen demand (COD)-removal rate of 27-49 kg COD/m(3).d. Observed H(2) harvesting rates were from 2.6 +/- 0.10 to 4.3 +/- 0.46 m(3) H(2)/m(3).d, but the H(2) production rates computed from the current densities were 16.3-18.2 m(3) H(2)/m(3).d. Tracking all significant electron sinks (residual acetate, H(2), CH(4), biomass, and soluble microbial products (SMP)) in the single-chamber MEC showed that H(2) reoxidation by anode-respiring bacteria recycled H(2) between the cathode and the anode, and this caused the large discrepancy in H(2) production and harvest rates. H(2) recycle accounted for 62-76% of observed current density, and this made the observed Coulombic efficiency 190-310% at steady state. Consequently, the cathodic conversion efficiency was only 16-24%. The current density added by H(2) recycle also increased the applied voltage from approximately 0.6 V to approximately 1.5 V for the highest H(2) harvest rate (4.3 m(3) H(2)/m(3).d). CH(4) generation consistently occurred in the continuous single-chamber MEC, and its electron fraction of consumed acetate was 7-25%. Because of methane formation and biomass/SMP accumulation, the overall H(2) recovery was moderate at 1.8-2.0 mol of H(2)/mol of acetate in the MEC. Thus, this study illustrates that a single-chamber MEC with a high anode surface area can generate high volumetric rates for COD removal and H(2) generation, but H(2) recycle and methanogenesis present significant challenges for practical application.

  2. Effects of Cotton Straw Incorporation on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Long-Term Continuous Cropping Cotton Field

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Cheng-zang; LI Lu-hua; Huang, Jin-Hua; LIU Jun; YANG Zhi-lan; Wei, Fei; Liu, Jian-guo

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the effect of straw incorporation on the content of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN) and microbial biomass phosphorus(SMBP) in the continuous cropping cotton field. Results showed that cotton straw incorporation could increase the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP significantly in different soil layers. Besides, with the time of continuous cropping increasing, the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP were all remarkably raised in the straw inc...

  3. Microbial biofilm community in a thermophilic trickling bio filter used for continuous biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Y.; Park, E.-J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Oh, Y.-K. [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Park, S. [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of). Inst. for Environmental Technology and Industry

    2004-07-01

    The microbial community in a thermophilic trickling biofilter reactor (TBR) that produces biohydrogen was examined. In particular, nonculture-based molecular methods were used to characterize the microbial community in the biofilm formed on the matrixes that were packed in the reactor. The operation of the bioreactor was described. TBR demonstrated long term stability to produce hydrogen. Biomass volatile suspended solids (VSS) in the TBR decreased gradually as bed height increased from the bottom of the bed. Epifluorescence microscopy of 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cells and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis both indicate that microbial composition changes in the TBR according to bed height. The dominant phylogenetic groups in the system were identified along with the comparative analysis of morphology of microbial community and the DGGE profiles of the microbial community in terms of total genomic DNA extracted from biofilm cells. 10 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  4. Microbial pollution indicators and culturable heterotrophic bacteria in a Mediterranean area (Southern Adriatic Sea Italian coasts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabili, L.; Cavallo, R. A.

    2011-05-01

    In the present study we evaluated the degree of microbial water pollution along the coast line between Brindisi and Santa Maria di Leuca (Southern Adriatic Sea) as well as the culturable heterotrophic bacteria abundances and biodiversity in relation to the microbiological quality of the water. A total of 3773 colonies were isolated, subcultured and identified by several morphological, cultural and biochemical methods including the standardized API 20 E and API 20 NE tests. Along the examined coastal tract the microbial pollution indicators were always below the tolerance limits for bathing waters defined by the CEE directive, suggesting a good sanitary quality. Concerning culturable heterotrophic bacteria, different temporal density trends were observed in the four sites in relation to their geographical position. A positive relationship between the bacterial abundances and the temperature was observed in S. Cataldo and Otranto. The culturable bacterial community was mainly composed of the genera Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Photobacterium and Flavobacterium. The Enterobacteriaceae family represented a conspicuous component of the bacterial community too. Bacilli were predominant among the Gram-positive bacteria. Of interest is the isolation of yeasts (2% at the surface and 1% at the bottom) taking into account their capability of biodegradation of various materials. Because of the low level of microbial pollution recorded, our results are indicative of the natural variation and diversity of the culturable bacterial community in such an oligotrophic ecosystem and could represent a good point of comparison with other ecosystems as well as a baseline for long term studies aimed to evaluate the effects of environmental fluctuations and human impacts on this aspect of biodiversity in coastal areas.

  5. Microchemostat array with small-volume fraction replenishment for steady-state microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaewon; Wu, Jianzhang; Polymenis, Michael; Han, Arum

    2013-11-07

    A chemostat is a bioreactor in which microorganisms can be cultured at steady-state by controlling the rate of culture medium inflow and waste outflow, thus maintaining media composition over time. Even though many microbial studies could greatly benefit from studying microbes in steady-state conditions, high instrument cost, complexity, and large reagent consumption hamper the routine use of chemostats. Microfluidic-based chemostats (i.e. microchemostats) can operate with significantly smaller reagent consumption while providing accurate chemostatic conditions at orders of magnitude lower cost compared to conventional chemostats. Also, microchemostats have the potential to significantly increase the throughput by integrating arrays of microchemostats. We present a microchemostat array with a unique two-depth culture chamber design that enables small-volume fraction replenishment of culture medium as low as 1% per replenishment cycle in a 250 nl volume. A system having an array of 8 microchemostats on a 40 × 60 mm(2) footprint could be automatically operated in parallel by a single controller unit as a demonstration for potential high throughput microbial studies. The model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, successfully reached a stable steady-state of different cell densities as a demonstration of the chemostatic functionality by programming the dilution rates. Chemostatic functionality of the system was further confirmed by quantifying the budding index as a function of dilution rate, a strong indicator of growth-dependent cell division. In addition, the small-volume fraction replenishment feature minimized the cell density fluctuation during the culture. The developed system provides a robust, low-cost, and higher throughput solution to furthering studies in microbial physiology.

  6. Cultural continuity, traditional Indigenous language, and diabetes in Alberta First Nations: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Richard T; Grier, Angela; Lightning, Rick; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L

    2014-10-19

    We used an exploratory sequential mixed methods approach to study the association between cultural continuity, self-determination, and diabetes prevalence in First Nations in Alberta, Canada. We conducted a qualitative description where we interviewed 10 Cree and Blackfoot leaders (members of Chief and Council) from across the province to understand cultural continuity, self-determination, and their relationship to health and diabetes, in the Alberta First Nations context. Based on the qualitative findings, we then conducted a cross-sectional analysis using provincial administrative data and publically available data for 31 First Nations communities to quantitatively examine any relationship between cultural continuity and diabetes prevalence. Cultural continuity, or "being who we are", is foundational to health in successful First Nations. Self-determination, or "being a self-sufficient Nation", stems from cultural continuity and is seriously compromised in today's Alberta Cree and Blackfoot Nations. Unfortunately, First Nations are in a continuous struggle with government policy. The intergenerational effects of colonization continue to impact the culture, which undermines the sense of self-determination, and contributes to diabetes and ill health. Crude diabetes prevalence varied dramatically among First Nations with values as low as 1.2% and as high as 18.3%. Those First Nations that appeared to have more cultural continuity (measured by traditional Indigenous language knowledge) had significantly lower diabetes prevalence after adjustment for socio-economic factors (p =0.007). First Nations that have been better able to preserve their culture may be relatively protected from diabetes.

  7. Shake it easy: a gently mixed continuous culture system for dinoflagellates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; Eberlein, T.; Bublitz, Y.; John, U.; Rost, B.

    2014-01-01

    An important requirement for continuous cultures is a homogeneous distribution of resources and microorganisms, often achieved by rigorous mixing. Many dinoflagellate species are known to be vulnerable to turbulence. Here, we present a newly developed continuous culture system based on gentle mixing

  8. A Simple Laser-Based Device for Simultaneous Microbial Culture and Absorbance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Abrevaya, X C; Areso, O; Mauas, P J D

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a device specifically designed to study microbial growth with several applications related to environmental microbiology and other areas of research as astrobiology. The Automated Measuring and Cultivation device (AMC-d) enables semi-continuous absorbance measurements directly during cultivation. It can measure simultaneously up to 16 samples. Growth curves using low and fast growing microorganism were plotted, including: Escherichia coli, and Haloferax volcanii, an halophilic archaeon.

  9. From cultured to uncultured genome sequences: metagenomics and modeling microbial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Daniel R; Dutilh, Bas E

    2015-11-01

    Microorganisms and the viruses that infect them are the most numerous biological entities on Earth and enclose its greatest biodiversity and genetic reservoir. With strength in their numbers, these microscopic organisms are major players in the cycles of energy and matter that sustain all life. Scientists have only scratched the surface of this vast microbial world through culture-dependent methods. Recent developments in generating metagenomes, large random samples of nucleic acid sequences isolated directly from the environment, are providing comprehensive portraits of the composition, structure, and functioning of microbial communities. Moreover, advances in metagenomic analysis have created the possibility of obtaining complete or nearly complete genome sequences from uncultured microorganisms, providing important means to study their biology, ecology, and evolution. Here we review some of the recent developments in the field of metagenomics, focusing on the discovery of genetic novelty and on methods for obtaining uncultured genome sequences, including through the recycling of previously published datasets. Moreover we discuss how metagenomics has become a core scientific tool to characterize eco-evolutionary patterns of microbial ecosystems, thus allowing us to simultaneously discover new microbes and study their natural communities. We conclude by discussing general guidelines and challenges for modeling the interactions between uncultured microorganisms and viruses based on the information contained in their genome sequences. These models will significantly advance our understanding of the functioning of microbial ecosystems and the roles of microbes in the environment.

  10. Continuous electricity generation from domestic wastewater and organic substrates in a flat plate microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-11-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a device that converts organic matter to electricity using microorganisms as the biocatalyst. Most MFCs contain two electrodes separated into one or two chambers that are operated as a completely mixed reactor. In this study, a flat plate MFC (FPMFC) was designed to operate as a plug flow reactor (no mixing) using a combined electrode/proton exchange membrane (PEM) system. The reactor consisted of a single channel formed between two nonconductive plates that were separated into two halves by the electrode/PEM assembly. Each electrode was placed on an opposite side of the PEM, with the anode facing the chamber containing the liquid phase and the cathode facing a chamber containing only air. Electricity generation using the FPMFC was examined by continuously feeding a solution containing wastewater, or a specific substrate, into the anode chamber. The system was initially acclimated for 1 month using domestic wastewater orwastewater enriched with a specific substrate such as acetate. Average power density using only domestic wastewater was 72+/-1 mW/m2 at a liquid flow rate of 0.39 mL/min [42% COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal, 1.1 h HRT (hydraulic retention time)]. At a longer HRT = 4.0 h, there was 79% COD removal and an average power density of 43+/-1 mW/m2. Power output was found to be a function of wastewater strength according to a Monod-type relationship, with a half-saturation constant of Ks = 461 or 719 mg COD/L. Power generation was sustained at high rates with several organic substrates (all at approximately 1000 mg COD/L), including glucose (212+/-2 mW/ m2), acetate (286+/-3 mW/m2), butyrate (220+/-1 mW/ m2), dextran (150+/-1 mW/m2), and starch (242+/-3 mW/ m2). These results demonstrate the versatility of power generation in a MFC with a variety of organic substrates and show that power can be generated at a high rate in a continuous flow reactor system.

  11. Starter Culture Selection for Making Chinese Sesame-Flavored Liquor Based on Microbial Metabolic Activity in Mixed-Culture Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Ling, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a starter culture with excellent viability and metabolic activity is important for inoculated fermentation of traditional food. To obtain a suitable starter culture for making Chinese sesame-flavored liquor, the yeast and bacterium community structures were investigated during spontaneous and solid-state fermentations of this type of liquor. Five dominant species in spontaneous fermentation were identified: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranaefaciens, Issatchenkia orientalis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The metabolic activity of each species in mixed and inoculated fermentations of liquor was investigated in 14 different cocultures that used different combinations of these species. The relationships between the microbial species and volatile metabolites were analyzed by partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. We found that S. cerevisiae was positively correlated to nonanal, and B. licheniformis was positively associated with 2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, guaiacol, and 4-vinyl guaiacol, while I. orientalis was positively correlated to butyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, and 2,3-butanediol. These three species are excellent flavor producers for Chinese liquor. Although P. membranaefaciens and B. amyloliquefaciens were not efficient flavor producers, the addition of them alleviated competition among the other three species and altered their growth rates and flavor production. As a result, the coculture of all five dominant species produced the largest amount of flavor compounds. The result indicates that flavor producers and microbial interaction regulators are important for inoculated fermentation of Chinese sesame-flavored liquor. PMID:24814798

  12. Continuous exposure of pesticides in an aquifer changes microbial biomass, diversity and degradation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J. R.; Johnsen, K.; Aamand, J.;

    2000-01-01

    We studied in situ effects of pesticide exposure on microbial degradation potential and community structure of aquifer sediments. Sediment samples pre-exposed to pesticides were significantly different to non-exposed control samples. Pre-exposed sediment showed an increased degradation potential...... towards phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicides as well as impact on microbial diversity was observed. Furthermore, bacterial biomass was changed, e.g. increased numbers of phenoxyalcanoic acid degraders in pesticide exposed sediment....

  13. A flexible microbial co-culture platform for simultaneous utilization of methane and carbon dioxide from gas feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Eric A.; Chrisler, William B.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Bernstein, Hans C.

    2017-03-01

    A new co-cultivation technology is presented that converts greenhouse gasses, CH4 and CO2, into microbial biomass. The methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20z, was coupled to a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC 7002 via oxygenic photosynthesis. The system exhibited robust growth on diverse gas mixtures ranging from biogas to those representative of a natural gas feedstock. A continuous processes was developed on a synthetic natural gas feed that achieved steady-state by imposing coupled light and O2 limitations on the cyanobacterium and methanotroph, respectively. Continuous co-cultivation resulted in an O2 depleted reactor and does not require CH4/O2 mixtures to be fed into the system, thereby enhancing process safety considerations over traditional methanotroph mono-culture platforms. This co-culture technology is scalable with respect to its ability to utilize different gas streams and its biological components constructed from model bacteria that can be metabolically customized to produce a range of biofuels and bioproducts.

  14. Stock culture heterogeneity rather than new mutational variation complicates short-term cell physiology studies of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahku, Ranno; Peebo, Karl; Valgepea, Kaspar; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2011-09-01

    Nutrient-limited continuous cultures in chemostats have been used to study microbial cell physiology for over 60 years. Genome instability and genetic heterogeneity are possible uncontrolled factors in continuous cultivation experiments. We investigated these issues by using high-throughput (HT) DNA sequencing to characterize samples from different phases of a glucose-limited accelerostat (A-stat) experiment with Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and a duration regularly used in cell physiology studies (20 generations of continuous cultivation). Seven consensus mutations from the reference sequence and five subpopulations characterized by different mutations were detected in the HT-sequenced samples. This genetic heterogeneity was confirmed to result from the stock culture by Sanger sequencing. All the subpopulations in which allele frequencies increased (betA, cspG/cspH, glyA) during the experiment were also present at the end of replicate A-stats, indicating that no new subpopulations emerged during our experiments. The fact that ~31 % of the cells in our initial cultures obtained directly from a culture stock centre were mutants raises concerns that even if cultivations are started from single colonies, there is a significant chance of picking a mutant clone with an altered phenotype. Our results show that current HT DNA sequencing technology allows accurate subpopulation analysis and demonstrates that a glucose-limited E. coli K-12 MG1655 A-stat experiment with a duration of tens of generations is suitable for studying cell physiology and collecting quantitative data for metabolic modelling without interference from new mutations.

  15. Tradition and Agency. Tracing cultural continuity and invention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    start. Yet - to update the old quip about nostalgia - tradition is not what it used to be. Twenty years ago, Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger showed in The Invention of Tradition how now governments acquire legitimacy and status by creating 'traditional' ceremonies and identities. Their work helped...... revolutionize the understanding of tradition in anthropology, history and sociology, stimulating an enormous amount of research on invented and imagined traditions. However, most of this research has focussed on the cultural dynamics of specific local innovations and reactions to global developments....... The present anthology seeks to hightlight instead just how widespread the invention and revival of traditions is. The individual chapters feature a fascinating series of case studies from Africa, Asia, the Pacific, Australia, and Europe, while the editors provide and overview of how the various discussions...

  16. Tradition and Agency. Tracing cultural continuity and invention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    start. Yet - to update the old quip about nostalgia - tradition is not what it used to be. Twenty years ago, Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger showed in The Invention of Tradition how now governments acquire legitimacy and status by creating 'traditional' ceremonies and identities. Their work helped...... revolutionize the understanding of tradition in anthropology, history and sociology, stimulating an enormous amount of research on invented and imagined traditions. However, most of this research has focussed on the cultural dynamics of specific local innovations and reactions to global developments....... The present anthology seeks to hightlight instead just how widespread the invention and revival of traditions is. The individual chapters feature a fascinating series of case studies from Africa, Asia, the Pacific, Australia, and Europe, while the editors provide and overview of how the various discussions...

  17. Modeling microbial ethanol production by E. coli under aerobic/anaerobic conditions: applicability to real postmortem cases and to postmortem blood derived microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2013-10-10

    The mathematical modeling of the microbial ethanol production under strict anaerobic experimental conditions for some bacterial species has been proposed by our research group as the first approximation to the quantification of the microbial ethanol production in cases where other alcohols were produced simultaneously with ethanol. The present study aims to: (i) study the microbial ethanol production by Escherichia coli under controlled aerobic/anaerobic conditions; (ii) model the correlation between the microbial produced ethanol and the other higher alcohols; and (iii) test their applicability in: (a) real postmortem cases that had positive BACs (>0.10 g/L) and co-detection of higher alcohols and 1-butanol during the original ethanol analysis and (b) postmortem blood derived microbial cultures under aerobic/anaerobic controlled experimental conditions. The statistical evaluation of the results revealed that the formulated models were presumably correlated to 1-propanol and 1-butanol which were recognized as the most significant descriptors of the modeling process. The significance of 1-propanol and 1-butanol as descriptors was so powerful that they could be used as the only independent variables to create a simple and satisfactory model. The current models showed a potential for application to estimate microbial ethanol - within an acceptable standard error - in various tested cases where ethanol and other alcohols have been produced from different microbes.

  18. Co-culture engineering for microbial biosynthesis of 3-amino-benzoic acid in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoran; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    3-amino-benzoic acid (3AB) is an important building block molecule for production of a wide range of important compounds such as natural products with various biological activities. In the present study, we established a microbial biosynthetic system for de novo 3AB production from the simple substrate glucose. First, the active 3AB biosynthetic pathway was reconstituted in the bacterium Escherichia coli, which resulted in the production of 1.5 mg/L 3AB. In an effort to improve the production, an E. coli-E. coli co-culture system was engineered to modularize the biosynthetic pathway between an upstream strain and an downstream strain. Specifically, the upstream biosynthetic module was contained in a fixed E. coli strain, whereas a series of E. coli strains were engineered to accommodate the downstream biosynthetic module and screened for optimal production performance. The best co-culture system was found to improve 3AB production by 15 fold, compared to the mono-culture approach. Further engineering of the co-culture system resulted in biosynthesis of 48 mg/L 3AB. Our results demonstrate co-culture engineering can be a powerful new approach in the broad field of metabolic engineering.

  19. Microbial diversity of a Camembert-type cheese using freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture as starter culture by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese.

  20. Microbial diversity of a Camembert-type cheese using freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture as starter culture by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Mei

    Full Text Available The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates. Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates. However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese.

  1. Microbial Diversity of a Camembert-Type Cheese Using Freeze-Dried Tibetan Kefir Coculture as Starter Culture by Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese. PMID:25360757

  2. Metabolism of lactose by Clostridium thermolacticum growing in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Christophe; Girbal, Laurence; Péringer, Paul; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul; Soucaille, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the metabolism of Clostridium thermolacticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, growing continuously on lactose (10 g l(-1)) and to determine the enzymes involved in the pathways leading to the formation of the fermentation products. Biomass and metabolites concentration were measured at steady-state for different dilution rates, from 0.013 to 0.19 h(-1). Acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were produced at all dilution rates, whereas lactate was detected only for dilution rates below 0.06 h(-1). The presence of several key enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, including beta-galactosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, ethanol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. Finally, the intracellular level of NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP was also measured for different dilution rates. The production of ethanol and lactate appeared to be linked with the re-oxidation of NADH produced during glycolysis, whereas hydrogen produced should come from reduced ferredoxin generated during pyruvate decarboxylation. To produce more hydrogen or more acetate from lactose, it thus appears that an efficient H2 removal system should be used, based on a physical (membrane) or a biological approach, respectively, by cultivating C. thermolacticum with efficient H2 scavenging and acetate producing microorganisms.

  3. Clarivate Analytics: Continued Omnia vanitas Impact Factor Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Bernès, Sylvain

    2017-02-23

    This opinion paper takes aim at an error made recently by Clarivate Analytics in which it sent out an email that congratulated academics for becoming exclusive members of academia's most cited elite, the Highly Cited Researchers (HCRs). However, that email was sent out to an undisclosed number of non-HCRs, who were offered an apology shortly after, through a bulk mail, which tried to down-play the importance of the error, all the while praising the true HCRs. When Clarivate Analytics senior management was contacted, the company declined to offer an indication of the number of academics who had been contacted and erroneously awarded the HCR status. We believe that this regrettable blunder, together with the opacity offered by the company, fortify the corporate attitude about the value of the journal impact factor (JIF), and what it represents, namely a marketing tool that is falsely used to equate citations with quality, worth, or influence. The continued commercialization of metrics such as the JIF is at the heart of their use to assess the "quality" of a researcher, their work, or a journal, and contributes to a great extent to driving scientific activities towards a futile endeavor.

  4. Dark fermentative hydrogen production by defined mixed microbial cultures immobilized on ligno-cellulosic waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sanjay K.S. [Microbial Biotechnology and Genomics, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), CSIR, Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Purohit, Hemant J. [Environmental Genomics Unit, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), CSIR, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440020 (India); Kalia, Vipin C. [Microbial Biotechnology and Genomics, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), CSIR, Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) based on 11 isolates belonging to Bacillus spp. (Firmicutes), Bordetella avium, Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis (Proteobacteria) were employed to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) under dark fermentative conditions. Under daily fed culture conditions (hydraulic retention time of 2 days), MMC6 and MMC4, immobilized on ligno-cellulosic wastes - banana leaves and coconut coir evolved 300-330 mL H{sub 2}/day. Here, H{sub 2} constituted 58-62% of the total biogas evolved. It amounted to a H{sub 2} yield of 1.54-1.65 mol/mol glucose utilized over a period of 60 days of fermentation. The involvement of various Bacillus spp. -Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus thuringiensis as components of the defined MMCs for H{sub 2} production has been reported here for the first time. (author)

  5. Biotransformation of oral contraceptive ethynodiol diacetate with microbial and plant cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Salman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biotransformation by using microbial and plant cell cultures has been applied effectively for the production of fine chemicals on large scale. Inspired by the wealth of literature available on the biotransformation of steroids, we decided to investigate the biotransformation of ethynodiol diacetate (1 by using plant and microbial cultures. Results The biotransformation of ethynodiol diacetate (1 with Cunninghamella elegans and plant cell suspension cultures of Ocimum basilicum and Azadirachta indica is being reported here for the first time. Biotransformation of 1 with Cunninghamella elegans yielded three new hydroxylated compounds, characterized as 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-6α-ol (2, 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-6β-ol (3, and 17α-ethynylestr-4-en-3β,17β-diacetoxy-10β-ol (4 and a known metabolite, 17α-ethynyl-17β-acetoxyestr-4-en-3-one (5. The biotransformation of 1 with Ocimum basilicum included hydrolysis of the ester group, oxidation of alcohol into ketone, and rearrangement of the hydroxyl group. Thus four major known metabolites were characterized as 17α-ethynyl-17β-acetoxyestr-4-en-3-one (5, 17α-ethynyl-17β-hydroxyestr-4-en-3-one (6, 17α-ethynyl-3 β-hydroxy-17β-acetoxyestr-4-ene (7 and 17α-ethynyl-5α,17β-dihydroxyestr-3-ene (8. Biotransformation of 1 with Azadirachta indica culture yielded compounds 5 and 6. Spectroscopic data of compound 8 is being reported for the first time. Structure of compound 6 was unambiguously deduced through single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies. Conclusion Biotransformation of an oral contraceptive, ethynodiol diacetate (1, by using microbial and plant cell cultures provides an efficient route to the synthesis of a library of new steroids with potential contraceptive properties. These methods can be employed in the production of such compounds with high stereoselectivity.

  6. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Edward A; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies.

  7. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  8. Microbial Fuel Cell Operation with Continuous Biological Ferrous Iron Oxidation of the Catholyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne, ter A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen reduction rate at the cathode is a limiting factor in microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. In our previous study, we showed the performance of an MFC with ferric iron (Fe3+) reduction at the cathode. Instead of oxygen, ferric iron was reduced to ferrous iron (Fe2+) at the cathode with a

  9. Ecosystem and physiological scales of microbial responses to nutrients in a detritus-based stream: results of a 5-year continuous enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller Suberkropp; Vladislav Gulis; Amy D. Rosemond; Jonathan Benstead

    2010-01-01

    Our study examined the response of leaf detritus–associated microorganisms (both bacteria and fungi) to a 5-yr continuous nutrient enrichment of a forested headwater stream. Leaf litter dominates detritus inputs to such streams and, on a system wide scale, serves as the key substrate for microbial colonization. We determined physiological responses as microbial biomass...

  10. Microbial culture dynamics and chromium (VI) removal in packed-column microcosm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokwane, Pulane E; Nkhalambayausi-Chirwa, Evans M

    2009-01-01

    Microbial Cr(VI) reduction in groundwater aquifer media was investigated in microcosm reactors extracted from Cr(VI) contaminated sites in South Africa. The reactors were operated under an influent Cr(VI) concentration of 40 mg/L to simulate the current Cr(VI) level at the contaminated site. Near complete Cr(VI) removal was observed in microcosm reactors inoculated with Cr(VI) reducing bacteria from dried activated sludge collected from a treatment plant receiving periodic loadings of Cr(VI). The best performance was observed under low hydraulic loading (flow rate, Q=0.310 cm(3)/hr). Microbial culture characterisation results showed a change in culture composition after 17 days of reactor operation, indicating Bacillus and Lysinibacillus species as the most dominant organisms in reactors that reduced Cr(VI). The predominance of Bacillus and Lysinibacillus species was either due to resilience against toxicity or adaptation to the changing conditions in the reactor. This research was the initial step towards the development of an in situ bioremediation process to contain the spread of a Cr(VI) plume in a groundwater aquifer at contaminated site in Brits, South Africa. South Africa holds about 72% percent of the world's chromium resources, the majority of which is mined in the North Eastern region of the country formally known as Transvaal.

  11. Feasibility of utilizing bioindicators for testing microbial inactivation in sweetpotato purees processed with a continuous-flow microwave system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley, T A; Dock, C N; Truong, V-D; Coronel, P; Kumar, P; Simunovic, J; Sandeep, K P; Cartwright, G D; Swartzel, K R; Jaykus, L-A

    2007-06-01

    Continuous-flow microwave heating has potential in aseptic processing of various food products, including purees from sweetpotatoes and other vegetables. Establishing the feasibility of a new processing technology for achieving commercial sterility requires evaluating microbial inactivation. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using commercially available plastic pouches of bioindicators containing spores of Geobacillius stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 35021 for evaluating the degree of microbial inactivation achieved in vegetable purees processed in a continuous-flow microwave heating unit. Sweetpotato puree seeded with the bioindicators was subjected to 3 levels of processing based on the fastest particles: undertarget process (F(0) approximately 0.65), target process (F(0) approximately 2.8), and overtarget process (F(0) approximately 10.10). After initial experiments, we found it was necessary to engineer a setup with 2 removable tubes connected to the continuous-flow microwave system to facilitate the injection of indicators into the unit without interrupting the puree flow. Using this approach, 60% of the indicators injected into the system could be recovered postprocess. Spore survival after processing, as evaluated by use of growth indicator dyes and standard plating methods, verified inactivation of the spores in sweetpotato puree. The log reduction results for B. subtilis were equivalent to the predesigned degrees of sterilization (F(0)). This study presents the first report suggesting that bioindicators such as the flexible, food-grade plastic pouches can be used for microbial validation of commercial sterilization in aseptic processing of foods using a continuous-flow microwave system.

  12. Cross-Cultural Communication and the Continuity of Cultures: The Role of Intercultural Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    cultural contexts influence interpersonal communication. We need to know how intercultural communication affects the mobility and permanency of cultures. We need to know what sustains our core values and what might be harmful to them. We need a clear definition of what intercultural communication is about...

  13. Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Munakata, Kanako; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition.

  14. Response of the rumen archaeal and bacterial populations to anti-methanogenic organosulphur compounds in continuous-culture fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Gonzalo; Abecia, Leticia; Martín-García, A Ignacio; Ramos-Morales, Eva; Denman, Stuart E; Newbold, Charles J; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R

    2015-08-01

    Study of the efficacy of methanogenesis inhibitors in the rumen has given inconsistent results, mainly due to poorly understood effects on the key microbial groups involved in pathways for methane (CH4) synthesis. The experiment described in this report was designed to assess the effect of propyl propane thiosulfinate (PTS), diallyl disulfide (DDS) and bromochloromethane (BCM) on rumen fermentation, methane production and microbial populations in continuous culture fermenters. No effects on total volatile fatty acids (VFA) were observed with PTS or DDS, but VFA were decreased with BCM. Amylase activity increased with BCM as compared with the other treatments. A decrease in methane production was observed with PTS (48%) and BCM (94%) as compared with control values. The concentration of methanogenic archaea decreased with BCM from day 4 onward and with PTS on days 4 and 8. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that PTS and BCM decreased the relative abundance of Methanomicrobiales and increased that of Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. The total concentration of bacteria was not modified by any treatment, although treatment with BCM increased the relative abundance of Prevotella and decreased that of Ruminococcus. These results suggest that the inhibition of methane production in the rumen by PTS and BCM is associated with a shift in archaeal biodiversity and changes in the bacterial community with BCM.

  15. Intermittent vs continuous operation of upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors for dairy wastewater and related microbial changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadais, H; Capela, I; Arroja, L

    2006-01-01

    This work compares continuous vs intermittent UASB reactors inoculated with flocculent sludge for the treatment of dairy effluents. The effects of effluent recirculation on the performance of intermittent reactors were assessed as well as the differences in specific methanogenic activity (SMA) with different substrates for the biomass from continuous and intermittent UASB reactors. Compared to the continuous operation the intermittent operation resulted in higher methanization of the removed COD (64-78% and 65-88%, respectively) whilst the effluent recirculation presented beneficial effects when applied during the stabilization period and was clearly detrimental when applied during the feed period of the intermittent operation. The SMA tests showed that the intermittent operation causes a shift in the microbial populations towards a better adaptation for the degradation of complex substrates confirmed by the meaningfull contribution of methane production through a pathway other than acetoclastic methanogenesis observed in the biomass taken from intermittent UASB reactors.

  16. Biodegradation Of Thiocyanate Using Microbial Consortia Cultured From Gold Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J. W.; Watts, M. P.; Spurr, L. P.; Vu, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Some bacteria possess the capability to degrade SCN-; therefore, harnessing this metabolic trait offers a biotechnological remediation strategy for SCN- produced in gold ore processing. A tailings storage facility (TSF) at a gold mine in Victoria, Australia holds large quantities of thiocyanate (SCN-) contaminated mine waste. The surface water in the TSF typically contains SCN- concentrations of >800 mg L-1, and seepage from the facility has contaminated the groundwater at the site. This study aimed to culture SCN-degrading microbes from the TSF, characterize the microbial consortia and test its operational parameters for use in a thiocyanate-degrading bioreactor. Surface samples were obtained from several locations around the TSF facility and used to inoculate medium reflective of the moderately saline and alkaline tailings water at the TSF, in the absence of organic carbon but subject to additions of phosphate and trace metals. Four microbial consortia capable of rapid SCN- degradation were successfully cultured. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes found that the consortia were dominated by Thiobacillus species, a genus of known SCN- degraders. Lower abundances of other SCN- degraders; Sphingopyxis and Rhodobacter, were also identified. The impact of a number of geochemical conditions, including pH, temperature and SCN- concentration, upon the growth and SCN- degrading capacity of these consortia was determined. These results informed the optimization of a lab-scale thiocyanate degrading bioreactor. In summary, the cultured bacterial consortia proved effective towards SCN- degradation at the prevailing geochemical conditions of the TSF, requiring minimal nutrient additions. These consortia were dominated by genera of known autotrophic SCN- degraders. The comprehensive characterisation of these SCN- degrading consortia will provide the fundamental operational parameters required for deployment of this technique at the field scale.

  17. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells.

  18. Analysis of microbial community variation during the mixed culture fermentation of agricultural peel wastes to produce lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Gerritsen, Alida T; McDonald, Armando G

    2016-05-01

    Mixed cultures fermentation can be used to convert organic wastes into various chemicals and fuels. This study examined the fermentation performance of four batch reactors fed with different agricultural (orange, banana, and potato (mechanical and steam)) peel wastes using mixed cultures, and monitored the interval variation of reactor microbial communities with 16S rRNA genes using Illumina sequencing. All four reactors produced similar chemical profile with lactic acid (LA) as dominant compound. Acetic acid and ethanol were also observed with small fractions. The Illumina sequencing results revealed the diversity of microbial community decreased during fermentation and a community of largely lactic acid producing bacteria dominated by species of Lactobacillus developed.

  19. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that inc...

  20. Screening of static culture and comparison of batch and continuous culture for the textile dye biological decolorization by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Urra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of manganese dependent peroxidase (MnP by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the level of decolorization of 13 dyes were evaluated using static and agitated batch cultures and continuous cultures. A screening carried out under static conditions showed that the oxidative system has a certain affinity for azoic structures. For concentrations of 100 mg l-1 of Acid Black 1, Reactive Black 5, Reactive Orange 16 and Acid Red 27, decolorization percentages higher than 90% were obtained. In batch cultures with Acid Black 1 and Reactive Black 5 a significant increment in primary post-metabolism biomass was observed. For these last two dyes, it was possible to explore the response of the continuous system during 32 to 47 days, with concentrations between 25 to 400 mg l-1, obtaining decolorization percentages greater than 70% for 400 mg l-1.

  1. [Effects of cotton stalk biochar on microbial community structure and function of continuous cropping cotton rhizosphere soil in Xinjiang, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mei-ying; Tang, Guang-mu; Liu, Hong-liang; Li, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Xiao-wei; Xu, Wan-li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, field trials were conducted to examine the effects of cotton stalk biochar on microbial population, function and structural diversity of microorganisms in rhizosphere soil of continuous cotton cropping field in Xinjiang by plate count, Biolog and DGGE methods. The experiment was a factorial design with four treatments: 1) normal fertilization with cotton stalk removed (NPK); 2) normal fertilization with cotton stalk powdered and returned to field (NPKS); 3) normal fertilization plus cotton stalk biochar at 22.50 t · hm⁻² (NPKB₁); and 4) normal fertilization plus cotton stalk biochar at 45.00 t · hm⁻² (NPKB₂). The results showed that cotton stalk biochar application obviously increased the numbers of bacteria and actinomycetes in the rhizospheric soil. Compared with NPK treatment, the number of fungi was significantly increased in the NPKB₁treatment, but not in the NPKB₂ treatment. However, the number of fungi was generally lower in the biochar amended (NPKB₁, NPKB₂) than in the cotton stalk applied plots (NPKS). Application of cotton stalk biochar increased values of AWCD, and significantly improved microbial richness index, suggesting that the microbial ability of utilizing carbohydrates, amino acids and carboxylic acids, especially phenolic acids was enhanced. The number of DGGE bands of NPKB₂ treatment was the greatest, with some species of Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria being enriched. UPGMC Cluster analysis pointed out that bacterial communities in the rhizospheric soil of NPKB₂ treatment were different from those in the NPK, NPKS and NPKB₁treatments, which belonged to the same cluster. These results indicated that application of cotton stalk biochar could significantly increase microbial diversity and change soil bacterial community structure in the cotton rhizosphere soil, thus improving the health of soil ecosystem.

  2. Continuous cultures of spirulina platensis under photoautotrophic conditions with change in light intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, S. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)532600; Taya, M.; Tone, S. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    In continuous cultures of Spirulina platensis under photoautotrophic conditions, the operation mode to maintain constant cell concentration is examined using culture apparatuses with light path lengths of 0.02 and 0.156 m. The values of dilution rates in the continuous cultures are determined by employing specific growth rates of the cells corresponding to light intensity distribution in liquid medium. When incident light intensity is fixed at 25, 50 or 400 W m{sup minus2}, it is found that the cell concentration in the continuous culture is kept almost constant, and agrees fairly well with the prescribed value of the cell concentration in the range of 0.09 to 2.43 kg m{sup minus3}. It is also demonstrated that the operation mode is valid to obtain stable cell concentrations in the continuous cultures associated with the change in incident light intensity ranging from 25 to 400 W m{sup minus2} during the cultures. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  3. Thionine increases electricity generation from microbial fuel cell using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and exoelectrogenic mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Najafpour, Ghasem Darzi; Ghoreyshi, Ali Asghar; Talebnia, Farid; Premier, Giuliano C; Bakeri, Gholamreza; Kim, Jung Rae; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been shown to be capable of clean energy production through the oxidation of biodegradable organic waste using various bacterial species as biocatalysts. In this study we found Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previously known electrochemcially inactive or less active species, can be acclimated with an electron mediator thionine for electrogenic biofilm formation in MFC, and electricity production is improved with facilitation of electron transfer. Power generation of MFC was also significantly increased by thionine with both aerated and non-aerated cathode. With electrochemically active biofilm enriched with swine wastewater, MFC power increased more significantly by addition of thionine. The optimum mediator concentration was 500 mM of thionine with S. cerevisae in MFC with the maximum voltage and current generation in the microbial fuel cell were 420 mV and 700 mA/m(2), respectively. Cyclic voltametry shows that thionine improves oxidizing and reducing capability in both pure culture and acclimated biofilm as compared to non-mediated cell. The results obtained indicated that thionine has great potential to enhance power generation from unmediated yeast or electrochemically active biofilm in MFC.

  4. A defined co-culture of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Escherichia coli in a membrane-less microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdakos, Nicholas; Marsili, Enrico; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Wastewater-fed microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology to treat low-organic carbon wastewater and recover part of the chemical energy in wastewater as electrical power. However, the interactions between electrochemically active and fermentative microorganisms cannot be easily studied in wastewater-fed MFCs because of their complex microbial communities. Defined co-culture MFCs provide a detailed understanding of such interactions. In this study, we characterize the extracellular metabolites in laboratory-scale membrane-less MFCs inoculated with Geobacter sulfurreducens and Escherichia coli co-culture and compare them with pure culture MFCs. G. sulfurreducens MFCs are sparged to maintain anaerobic conditions, while co-culture MFCs rely on E. coli for oxygen removal. G. sulfurreducens MFCs have a power output of 128 mW m(-2) , compared to 63 mW m(-2) from the co-culture MFCs. Analysis of metabolites shows that succinate production in co-culture MFCs decreases current production by G. sulfurreducens and that the removal of succinate is responsible for the increased current density in the late co-culture MFCs. Interestingly, pH adjustment is not required for co-culture MFCs but a base addition is necessary for E. coli MFCs and cultures in vials. Our results show that defined co-culture MFCs provide clear insights into metabolic interactions among bacteria while maintaining a low operational complexity.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus in continuous culture: a tool for the rational design of antibiotic treatment protocols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas I Udekwu

    Full Text Available In vitro measures of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics that account for the factors anticipated for bacteria in infected patients are central to the rational design of antibiotic treatment protocols. We consider whether or not continuous culture devices are a way to obtain these measures. Staphylococcus aureus PS80 in high-density continuous cultures were exposed to oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, gentamicin, daptomycin and linezolid. Contrary to results from low density retentostats as well as to predictions of traditional PK/MIC ratios, daily dosing with up to 100× MIC did not clear these cultures. The densities of S. aureus in these cultures oscillated with constant amplitude and never fell below 10(5 CFU per ml. Save for daptomycin "treated" populations, the densities of bacteria in these cultures remained significantly below that of similar antibiotic-free cultures. Although these antibiotics varied in their pharmacodynamic properties there were only modest differences in their mean densities. Mathematical models and experiments suggest that the dominant factor preventing clearance was wall-adhering subpopulations reseeding the planktonic population which can be estimated and corrected for. Continuous cultures provide a way to evaluate the potential efficacy of antibiotic treatment regimes in vitro under conditions that are more clinically realistic and comprehensive than traditional in vitro PK/PD indices.

  6. The U.S. Culture Collection Network Lays the Foundation for Progress in Preservation of Valuable Microbial Resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCluskey, Kevin; Alvarez, Anne; Bennett, Rick; Bokati, Deepak; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Brown, Daniel; Bull, Carolee T; Coffey, Michael; Dreaden, Tyler; Duke, Clifford; Dye, Greg; Ehmke, Erin; Eversole, Kellye; Fenstermacher, Kristi; Geiser, David; Glaeser, Jessie A; Greene, Stephanie; Gribble, Lisa; Griffith, M Patrick; Hanser, Kathryn; Humber, Richard; Johnson, Barbara W; Kermode, Anthony; Krichevsky, Micah; Laudon, Matt; Leach, Jan; Leslie, John; May, Meghan; Melcher, Ulrich; Nobles, David; Fonseca, Natalia Risso; Robinson, Sara; Ryan, Matthew; Scott, James; Silflow, Carolyn; Vidaver, Anne; Webb, Kimberly M; Wertz, John E; Yentsch, Sara; Zehr, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Culture Collection Network was formed in 2012 by a group of culture collection scientists and stakeholders in order to continue the progress established previously through efforts of an ad hoc group...

  7. The Legal Status of Microbial Food Cultures in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herody, Caroline; Soyeux, Y; Hansen, Egon Bech;

    2010-01-01

    The production of fermented foods is one of the oldest food processing technologies known to man. Since the dawn of civilisation, methods for the fermentation of milks, meats, fish and vegetables have been used to produce safe foods with distinctive organoleptic properties. Microbial food cultures...... (MFC) with a technological impact on food are called “starter cultures”. They may be present as natural microflora in the food, or as a result of the intentional addition of the microorganisms in an industrial food fermentation process. MFC that are used for their beneficial effect on consumers’ health...... are called probiotics. Probiotics are always intentionally added to the food as they have been carefully selected and studied to guarantee that they provide a proven beneficial effect to consumers. They may be used in both fermented and non-fermented foods such as food supplements. This paper aims to provide...

  8. Extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoates from mixed microbial cultures: Impact on polymer quality and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorì, Chiara; Abbondanzi, Federica; Galletti, Paola; Giorgini, Loris; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Torri, Cristian; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) can be extracted from mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) by means of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) or combination of DMC and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). The protocol based on DMC, a green solvent never used before for the extraction of PHAs from MMC, allows an overall polymer recovery of 63%; also the purity and the molecular weight of the recovered polymers are good (98% and 1.2 MDa, respectively). The use of NaClO pretreatment before DMC extraction increases the overall PHA recovery (82%) but lowers the mean molecular weight to 0.6-0.2 MDa. A double extraction with DMC results to be the method of choice for the recovery of high quality PHAs from attractive but challenging MMCs.

  9. Kinetic analysis of high-concentration isopropanol biodegradation by a solvent-tolerant mixed microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustard, Mark T; Meeyoo, Vissanu; Wright, Phillip C

    2002-06-20

    The ability of a previously enriched microbial population to utilize isopropanol (IPA) as the sole carbon source within a minimal salts medium is studied. The advantage of prior enrichment procedures for the improvement of IPA biodegradation performance is demonstrated for an IPA concentration of up to 24 g L(-1). Results showing the interrelationship between temperature and substrate utilization and inhibition levels at temperatures of between 2 degrees C and 45 degrees C are examined. Models of inhibition based on enzyme kinetics are assessed via nonlinear analysis, in order to accurately represent the growth kinetics of this solvent-tolerant mixed culture. The model that best describes the data is the Levenspiel substrate inhibition model, which can predict the maximum substrate level above which growth is completely limited. This is the first report of IPA treatment of up to 24 g L(-1) by an aerobic solvent-tolerant population.

  10. Homogeneous matrix deposition on dried agar for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  12. Assessment of the microbial diversity at the surface of Livarot cheese using culture-dependent and independent approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Mounier, Jérôme; Monnet, Christophe; Jacques, Noémie; Antoinette, A.; Irlinger, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The microbial diversity of the surface of a commercial red-smear cheese, Livarot cheese, sold on the retail market was studied using culture-dependent and independent approaches. Forty yeasts and 40 bacteria from the cheese surface were collected, dereplicated using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and identified using rRNA gene sequencing for the culture-dependent approach. The cultureindependent approach involved cloning and sequencing of the 1...

  13. Model for the feedback control system of bacterial growth. II. Growth in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleecken, S

    1989-12-07

    A mathematical model is developed that describes substrate limited bacterial growth in a continuous culture and that is based upon the conceptual framework elaborated in a previous paper for describing the feedback control system of cell growth [S. Bleecken, (1988). J. theor. Biol. 133, 37.] Central to the theory are the ideas that the limiting substrate is converted into low molecular weight building blocks of macromolecular synthesis which again are converted into biomass (RNA and protein) and that the rates of RNA and protein synthesis are controlled by the intracellular concentration of building blocks. It is shown that a continuous culture can be simulated by two interconnected feedback control systems the actuating signals of which are limiting substrate concentration and the intracellular concentration of building blocks, respectively. Three types of steady-states are found to appear in a continuous culture, besides the well-known stable steady-state of the whole culture there exist two batchlike steady-states of the biotic part of the culture which are metastable. The model is used to analyse the steady-states and their stability properties as well as the dynamic responses of biomass, RNA, protein, building block and substrate concentrations to changes in environmental conditions. Especially the inoculation of a continuous culture and the effects of step changes in dilution rate, inlet substrate concentration and growth temperature are studied in detail. Relations between the growth behaviour of a single cell and that of a continuous culture are derived. The RNA to protein ratio is introduced as a rough measure of the physiological state of cells and it is shown that a cell reacts to environmental changes with a simple pattern of basic responses in growth rate and physiological state. There are reasons to assume that the model presented is the minimal version of a structured model of bacterial growth and represents an optimum compromise between biological

  14. Impact of microbial cultures on proteolysis and release of bioactive peptides in fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-López, Clemencia; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Martuscelli, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating co-cultures of selected microorganisms for their proteolytic activity and capability to produce fermented milk enriched with ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) peptides. Selected yeasts (Torulaspora delbruekii KL66A, Galactomyces geotrichum KL20B, Pichia kudriavzevii KL84A and Kluyveromyces marxianus KL26A) and lactic acid bacteria strains (Lactobacillus plantarum LAT03, Lb. plantarum KLAT01 and the not virulent Enterococcus faecalis KE06) were screened as single cultures for their capacity of releasing ACEI peptides without producing bitter taste. Three strains cultures (yeast, Lb. plantarum and E. faecalis) were performed to evaluate the combined impact on microbial growth, lactic acid production, citric acid consumption, proteolysis, ACEI activity, and bitter taste after 36 h of fermentation at 28 °C. While G. geotrichum KL20B showed a strong stimulating effect on Lb. plantarum strains and the production of peptides with ACEI activity, the presence of T. delbruekii KL26A in the cultures was deleterious both to ACEI activity and product taste. The most effective combination was P. kudriavzevii KL84A, Lb. plantarum LAT3, E. faecalis KL06, which showed the highest ACEI activity (IC50 = 30.63 ± 1.11 μg ml(-1)) and gave no bitter taste for 7 days at 6 °C. Our results highlight the importance of choosing the strains combination carefully, to obtain a high yield of ACEI activity without bitter taste.

  15. Effects of Partial Replacement of Corn with Glycerin on Ruminal Fermentation in a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bianco Benedeti, Pedro; Galoro da Silva, Lorrayny; Marostegan de Paula, Eduardo; Shenkoru, Teshome; Marcondes, Marcos Inácio; Monteiro, Hugo Fernando; Amorati, Brad; Yeh, Yenling; Poulson, Simon Roger; Faciola, Antonio Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of partially replacing dry ground corn with glycerin on ruminal fermentation using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Six fermenters (1,223 ± 21 ml) were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square arrangement with three periods of 10 d each, with 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collections. All diets contained 75% concentrate and three dietary glycerin levels (0, 15, and 30% on dry matter basis), totaling six replicates per treatment. Fermenters were fed 72 g of dry matter/d equally divided in two meals/d, at 0800 and 2000 h. Solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted daily to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. On d 8, 9, and 10, samples of 500 ml of solid and liquid digesta effluent were mixed, homogenized, and stored at -20°C. Subsamples of 10 ml were collected and preserved with 0.2 mL of a 50% H2SO4 solution for later determination of NH3-N and volatile fatty acids. Microbial biomass was isolated from fermenters for chemical analysis at the end of each experimental period. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Glycerin levels did not affect apparent digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.13; PQuad. = 0.40), OM (PLin. = 0.72; PQuad. = 0.15), NDF (PLin. = 0.38; PQuad. = 0.50) and ADF (PLin. = 0.91; PQuad. = 0.18). Also, glycerin inclusion did not affect true digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.35; PQuad. = 0.48), and OM (PLin. = 0.08; PQuad. = 0.19). Concentrations of propionate (P glycerin inclusion. Linear increases on NH3-N concentration in digesta effluent (P glycerin inclusion in the diets. Crude protein digestibility (P = 0.04) and microbial N flow (P = 0.04) were greater in the control treatment compared with the other treatments and responded quadratically with glycerin inclusion. Furthermore, the inclusion of glycerin linearly decreased (P = 0.02) non-ammonia N flow. Glycerin levels did not affect the flows of total N (PLin. = 0.79; PQuad. = 0.35), and dietary N (PLin. = 0

  16. Microbial community and function of enrichment cultures with methane and toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yao; Xia, Fang-Fang; Tian, Bao-Hu; Li, Wei; He, Ruo

    2014-04-01

    The interaction effect of co-existence of toluene and CH4 on community and activity of methanotrophs and toluene-degrading bacteria was characterized in three consortia enriched with CH4 and toluene (MT), toluene (T), and CH4 (M), respectively, in this study. The CH4 oxidation activity in the enrichment culture of MT was significantly lower than that of M at the end of the experiment (P = 0.001). The toluene degradation rate could be enhanced by continuous addition of CH4 and toluene in the initial days, but it was inhibited in the later days. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were dominant in the three enriched consortia, but the community of methanotrophs and toluene-degrading bacteria was significantly affected by the co-existence of CH4 and toluene. Both Methylosinus (91.8 %) and Methylocystis (8.2 %) were detected in the enrichment culture of MT, while only Methylocystis species were detected in M. The toluene-degrading bacteria including Burkholderia, Flavobacteria, Microbacterium, and Azoarcus were all detected in the enrichment culture of T. However, only Azoarcus was found in the enrichment culture of MT. Significantly higher contents of extracellular polymeric substances polysaccharose and protein in the enrichment culture of MT than that of T and M suggested that a higher environmental stress occurred in the enrichment culture of MT.

  17. Hydrogen production from continuous flow, microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Valerie J; Hatzell, Marta; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-11-01

    A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) was used to produce hydrogen gas from fermentation wastewater without the need for additional electrical energy. Increasing the number of cell pairs in the reverse electrodialysis stack from 5 to 10 doubled the maximum current produced from 60 A/m(3) to 120 A/m(3) using acetate. However, more rapid COD removal required a decrease in the anolyte hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 24 to 12 h to stabilize anode potentials. Hydrogen production using a fermentation wastewater (10 cell pairs, HRT=8 h) reached 0.9±0.1 L H2/Lreactor/d (1.1±0.1 L H2/g-COD), with 58±5% COD removal and a coulombic efficiency of 74±5%. These results demonstrated that consistent rates of hydrogen gas production could be achieved using an MREC if effluent anolyte COD concentrations are sufficient to produce stable anode potentials.

  18. Self-sustaining, solar-driven bioelectricity generation in micro-sized microbial fuel cell using co-culture of heterotrophic and photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Choi, Seokheun

    2017-04-01

    Among many energy harvesting techniques with great potential, microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is arguably the most underdeveloped. Even so, excitement is building, as microorganisms can harvest electrical power from any biodegradable organic source (e.g. wastewater) that is readily available in resource-limited settings. Nevertheless, the requirement for endless introduction of organic matter imposes a limiting factor to this technology, demanding an active feeding system and additional power. Here, we demonstrated self-sustaining bioelectricity generation from a microliter-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) by using the syntrophic interaction between heterotrophic exoelectrogenic bacteria and phototrophs. The MFC continuously generated light-responsive electricity from the heterotrophic bacterial metabolic respiration with the organic substrates produced by photosynthetic bacteria. Without additional organic fuel, the mixed culture in a 90-μL-chamber MFC generated self-sustained current for more than 13 days, while the heterotrophic culture produced current that decreased dramatically within a few hours. The current from the mixed culture was about 70 times greater than that of the device with only photosynthetic bacteria. The miniaturization provided a short start-up time, a well-controlled environment, and small internal resistance. Those advantages will become the general design platform for micropower generation.

  19. Impact of a Microbial Cocktail Used as a Starter Culture on Cocoa Fermentation and Chocolate Flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Magalhães da Veiga Moreira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chocolate production suffered a vast impact with the emergence of the “witches’ broom” disease in cocoa plants. To recover cocoa production, many disease-resistant hybrid plants have been developed. However, some different cocoa hybrids produce cocoa beans that generate chocolate with variable quality. Fermentation of cocoa beans is a microbiological process that can be applied for the production of chocolate flavor precursors, leading to overcoming the problem of variable chocolate quality. The aim of this work was to use a cocktail of microorganisms as a starter culture on the fermentation of the ripe cocoa pods from PH15 cocoa hybrid, and evaluate its influence on the microbial communities present on the fermentative process on the compounds involved during the fermentation, and to perform the chocolate sensorial characterization. According to the results obtained, different volatile compounds were identified in fermented beans and in the chocolate produced. Bitterness was the dominant taste found in non-inoculated chocolate, while chocolate made with inoculated beans showed bitter, sweet, and cocoa tastes. 2,3-Butanediol and 2,3-dimethylpyrazine were considered as volatile compounds making the difference on the flavor of both chocolates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA CCMA 0200, Lactobacillus plantarum CCMA 0238, and Acetobacter pasteurianus CCMA 0241 are proposed as starter cultures for cocoa fermentation.

  20. Impact of a Microbial Cocktail Used as a Starter Culture on Cocoa Fermentation and Chocolate Flavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães da Veiga Moreira, Igor; de Figueiredo Vilela, Leonardo; da Cruz Pedroso Miguel, Maria Gabriela; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Freitas Schwan, Rosane

    2017-05-09

    Chocolate production suffered a vast impact with the emergence of the "witches' broom" disease in cocoa plants. To recover cocoa production, many disease-resistant hybrid plants have been developed. However, some different cocoa hybrids produce cocoa beans that generate chocolate with variable quality. Fermentation of cocoa beans is a microbiological process that can be applied for the production of chocolate flavor precursors, leading to overcoming the problem of variable chocolate quality. The aim of this work was to use a cocktail of microorganisms as a starter culture on the fermentation of the ripe cocoa pods from PH15 cocoa hybrid, and evaluate its influence on the microbial communities present on the fermentative process on the compounds involved during the fermentation, and to perform the chocolate sensorial characterization. According to the results obtained, different volatile compounds were identified in fermented beans and in the chocolate produced. Bitterness was the dominant taste found in non-inoculated chocolate, while chocolate made with inoculated beans showed bitter, sweet, and cocoa tastes. 2,3-Butanediol and 2,3-dimethylpyrazine were considered as volatile compounds making the difference on the flavor of both chocolates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA CCMA 0200, Lactobacillus plantarum CCMA 0238, and Acetobacter pasteurianus CCMA 0241 are proposed as starter cultures for cocoa fermentation.

  1. Harnessing the landscape of microbial culture media to predict new organism–media pairings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhardt, Matthew A.; Zarecki, Raphy; Gronow, Sabine; Lang, Elke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Culturing microorganisms is a critical step in understanding and utilizing microbial life. Here we map the landscape of existing culture media by extracting natural-language media recipes into a Known Media Database (KOMODO), which includes >18,000 strain–media combinations, >3300 media variants and compound concentrations (the entire collection of the Leibniz Institute DSMZ repository). Using KOMODO, we show that although media are usually tuned for individual strains using biologically common salts, trace metals and vitamins/cofactors are the most differentiating components between defined media of strains within a genus. We leverage KOMODO to predict new organism–media pairings using a transitivity property (74% growth in new in vitro experiments) and a phylogeny-based collaborative filtering tool (83% growth in new in vitro experiments and stronger growth on predicted well-scored versus poorly scored media). These resources are integrated into a web-based platform that predicts media given an organism's 16S rDNA sequence, facilitating future cultivation efforts. PMID:26460590

  2. Rapid culture-independent microbial analysis aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Monaco, Lisa; Morris, Heather; Gunter, Daniel; Damon, Michael; Wells, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A new culture-independent system for microbial monitoring, called the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). LOCAD-PTS was launched to the ISS aboard Space Shuttle STS-116 on December 9, 2006, and has since been used by ISS crews to monitor endotoxin on cabin surfaces. Quantitative analysis was performed within 15 minutes, and sample return to Earth was not required. Endotoxin (a marker of Gram-negative bacteria) was distributed throughout the ISS, despite previous indications that mostbacteria on ISS surfaces were Gram-positive [corrected].Endotoxin was detected at 24 out of 42 surface areas tested and at every surface site where colony-forming units (cfu) were observed, even at levels of 4-120 bacterial cfu per 100 cm(2), which is below NASA in-flight requirements (3.78 EU per 100 cm(2)). Based upon data collected from the ISS so far, new culture-independent requirements (defined in EU) are suggested, which are verifiable in flight with LOCAD-PTS yet high enough to avoid false alarms. The suggested requirements are intended to supplement current ISS requirements (defined in cfu) and would serve a dual purpose of safeguarding crew health (internal spacecraft surfaces <20 EU per 100 cm(2)) and monitoring forward contamination during Constellation missions (surfaces periodically exposed to the external environment, including the airlock and space suits, <0.24 EU per 100 cm(2)).

  3. Microbial degradation of the herbicide molinate by defined cultures and in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Olga C; Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M

    2013-12-01

    Molinate is a thiocarbamate herbicide used worldwide in rice crop protection. As with other pesticides, molinate is a recognized environmental pollutant, detected in soils, irrigation water, or rivers and bio-accumulated by some wildlife forms. For this reason, and in spite of its low toxicity to humans, environmental protection measures, which include reduction of use and/or remediation processes, are recommended. Due to its physic-chemical properties, molinate can easily disperse and react in the environment, originating diverse transformation products, some with increased toxicity. In spite of being a xenobiotic compound, molinate can also suffer microbial transformation by bacteria or fungi, sometimes serving as nutrient and energy source. In an attempt to isolate microorganisms to be used in the bioremediation of molinate-contaminated sites, a mixed culture, dominated by the actinobacterium Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4(T), was recovered from the runoff of a molinate-producing plant. Beyond a promising tool to decontaminate molinate-polluted sites, this culture also brought interesting insights into the biology of the degradation of this herbicide. In this review, an overview of the distribution and properties of molinate as environmental contaminant, the capability of microorganisms to transform this herbicide, and some reflections about possible bioremediation approaches are made.

  4. Skew-Laplace and Cell-Size Distribution in Microbial Axenic Cultures: Statistical Assessment and Biological Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Julià

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a skew-Laplace statistical analysis of both flow cytometry scatters and cell size from microbial strains primarily grown in batch cultures, others in chemostat cultures and bacterial aquatic populations. Cytometry scatters best fit the skew-Laplace distribution while cell size as assessed by an electronic particle analyzer exhibited a moderate fitting. Unlike the cultures, the aquatic bacterial communities clearly do not fit to a skew-Laplace distribution. Due to its versatile nature, the skew-Laplace distribution approach offers an easy, efficient, and powerful tool for distribution of frequency analysis in tandem with the flow cytometric cell sorting.

  5. Continuous flow membrane-less air cathode microbial fuel cell with spunbonded olefin diffusion layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugtas, Adile Evren; Cavdar, Pelin; Calli, Baris

    2011-11-01

    The power production performance of a membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cell was evaluated for 53 days. Anode and cathode electrodes and the micro-fiber cloth separator were configured by sandwiching the separator between two electrodes. In addition, the air-facing side of the cathode was covered with a spunbonded olefin sheet instead of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating to control oxygen diffusion and water loss. The configuration resulted in a low resistance of about 4Ω and a maximum power density of 750 mW/m2. However, as a result of a gradual decrease in the cathode potential, maximum power density decreased to 280 mW/m2. The declining power output was attributed to loss of platinum catalyst (8.26%) and biomass growth (38.44%) on the cathode. Coulombic efficiencies over 55% and no water leakage showed that the spunbonded olefin sheet covering the air-facing side of the cathode can be a cost-effective alternative to PTFE coating.

  6. Evaluation of guar gum derivatives as gelling agents for microbial culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangotri, Waikhom; Jain-Raina, Ruchi; Babbar, Shashi B

    2012-05-01

    Guar gum, a galactomannan, has been reported to be an inexpensive substitute of agar for microbial culture media. However, its use is restricted probably because of (1) its highly viscous nature even at high temperatures, making dispensing of the media to Petri plates difficult and (2) lesser clarity of the guar gum gelled media than agar media due to impurities present in guar gum. To overcome these problems, three guar gum derivatives, carboxymethyl guar, carboxymethyl hydroxypropyl guar and hydroxypropyl guar, were tested as gelling agents for microbial growth and differentiation. These were also evaluated for their suitability for other routine microbiological methods, such as, enumeration, use of selective and differential media, and antibiotic sensitivity test. For evaluation purpose, growth and differentiation of eight fungi and eight bacteria grown on the media gelled with agar (1.5%), guar gum (4%) or one of the guar gum derivatives (4%), were compared. All fungi and bacteria exhibited normal growth and differentiation on all these media. Generally, growth of most of the fungi was better on guar gum derivatives gelled medium than on agar medium. The enumeration carried out for Serratia sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by serial dilution and pour plate method yielded similar counts in all the treatments. Likewise, the selective succinate medium, specific for P. aeruginosa, did not allow growth of co-inoculated Bacillus sp. even if gelled with guar gum derivatives. The differential medium, Congo red mannitol agar could not differentiate between Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti on color basis, if gelled with guar gum or any of its derivatives However, for antibiotic sensitivity tests for both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, guar gum and its derivatives were as effective as agar.

  7. Selection of an Asporogenous Strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum in Continuous Culture Under Phosphate Limitation

    OpenAIRE

    Meinecke, Beatrix; Bahl, Hubert; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1984-01-01

    Based on the observation that cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum unable to store granulose do not initiate sporulation, a staining procedure was developed for the detection of asporogenous mutants. By application of this procedure it was shown that an asporogenous strain of C. acetobutylicum was selected in continuous culture under phosphate limitation.

  8. High cell density cultures produced by internal retention: application in continuous ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Carola Pérez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol has provoked great interest due to its potential as an alternative fuel. Nevertheless, fermentation processes must be developed by increasing the low volumetric productivity achieved in conventional cultures (batch or continuous to make this product become economically competitive. This can be achieved by using techniques leading to high cell concentration and reducing inhibition by the end-product. One of the frequently employed methods involves cell recycling. This work thus developed a membrane reactor incorporating a filtration module with 5 u,m stainless steel tubular units inside a 3L stirred jar fermenter for investigating its application in continuous ethanol production. The effects of cell concentration and transmembrane pressure difference on permeate flux were evaluated for testing the filtration module's performance. The internal cell retention system was operated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae continuous culture derived from sucrose, once fermentation conditions had been selected (30 °C, 1.25 -1.75 vvm, pH 4.5. Filter unit permeability was maintained by applying pulses of air. More than 97% of the grown cells were retained in the fermenter, reaching 51 g/L cell concentration and 8.51 g/L.h average ethanol productivity in culture with internal cell retention; this was twice that obtained in a conventional continuous culture. Key words: Membrane reactor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alcoholic fermentation, cell recycling.

  9. Enteric methane production and ruminal fermentation from forage brassica diets fed in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassicas provide forage for livestock during the late fall when traditional perennial cool-season forages are not productive. However, little research exists on ruminal fermentation and methane(CH4) production of brassicas fed as forage. A continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutr...

  10. The Role of Cultural Context in Continuing Vocational Training: A Study on Auto Repairmen in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Oktay

    2011-01-01

    This study analysed how auto repairmen working in micro-enterprises undertake continuing vocational training in relation to cultural context. The study was conducted in Kirikkale, a city in central Anatolia in Turkey. To this end, the descriptive research technique of structured interview was used. Interviews with 33 auto repairmen were recorded…

  11. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  12. Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Raish; Alice M. McSweeney

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted among ranchers on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests in the Southwestern United States, examines the role of ranching in maintaining traditional heritage and cultural continuity. The mainly Hispanic ranching families of northern New Mexico first came into the region in 1598 with Spanish colonization. Many of the villages received community...

  13. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  14. Impact of a continuing professional development intervention on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Tania; Creedy, Debra K; West, Roianne

    2017-06-01

    Cultural safety in higher education learning and teaching environments is paramount to positive educational outcomes for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (hereafter called First Peoples) students. There is a lack of research evaluating the impact of continuing professional development on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety. To implement and evaluate a continuing professional development intervention to improve midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety in supporting First Peoples midwifery students success. A pre-post intervention mixed methods design was used. Academics (n=13) teaching into a Bachelor of Midwifery program agreed to participate. The intervention consisted of two workshops and five yarning circles across a semester. Data included the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale, self-assessment on cultural safety and perceptions of racism, evaluation of the intervention, participants' journal entries, and researcher's reflections. Responses on the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale revealed significant improvement in participants' awareness of cultural safety. There was an upward trend in self-assessment ratings. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention or workshops and yarning circles. Participants' journal entries revealed themes willingness to participate and learn, confidence as well as anger and distress. Increased awareness of cultural safety can be transformative for midwifery academics. Workshops and yarning circles can support academics in moving beyond a 'sense of paralysis' and engage in challenging conversations to transform their learning and teaching and in turn foster a culturally safe learning and teaching environment for First Peoples midwifery students towards success. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    tolerant methanogenic culture as potential bioaugmentation inoculum in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operating under “inhibited steady-state”, triggered by high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). The results of the current study established for the first time that bioaugmentation of an enriched...... ammonia tolerant methanogen in a CSTR reactor could completely alleviate the ammonia inhibitory effect. Furthermore, it was found that bioaugmentation with the enriched culture resulted in 25% higher methane production compared to when the bioaugmentation was achieved with pure methanogenic strains....... The bioaugmentation was performed without pausing the continuous operation of the CSTR reactor and without excluding the ammonia-rich substrate from the feedstock. Thus, bioaugmentation with mixed methanogenic cultures could potentially support the development of an efficient and cost-effective biomethanation process...

  16. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-05

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Glucose metabolism in batch and continuous cultures of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, María F; Bernardelli, Cecilia E; Galar, María L; Boiardi, José L

    2006-03-01

    Periplasmic glucose oxidation (by way of a pyrrolo-quinoline-quinone [PQQ]-linked glucose dehydrogenase [GDH]) was observed in continuous cultures of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus regardless of the carbon source (glucose or gluconate) and the nitrogen source (N(2) or NH(3)). Its synthesis was stimulated by conditions of high energetic demand (i.e., N(2)-fixation) and/or C-limitation. Under C-excess conditions, PQQ-GDH synthesis increased with the glucose concentration in the culture medium. In batch cultures, PQQ-GDH was actively expressed in very early stages with higher activities under conditions of N(2)-fixation. Hexokinase activity was almost absent under any culture condition. Cytoplasmic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-linked glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was expressed in continuous cultures under all tested conditions, and its synthesis increased with the glucose concentration. In contrast, low activities of this enzyme were detected in batch cultures. Periplasmic oxidation, by way of PQQ-GDH, seems to be the principal pathway for metabolism of glucose in G. Diazotrophicus, and NAD-GDH is an alternative route under certain environmental conditions.

  18. Continuing Education Effects on Cultural Competence Knowledge and Skills Building among Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla B. Hall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Racial and ethnic minority health data from a national perspective indicates there is much to learn in the public health workforce about the ongoing health disparities crisis. This suggests a level of urgency to assist our public health professionals in obtaining specific skills sets that will assist them in working better with vulnerable populations. The purpose of this research is to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets, utilizing an explorational case study, of individuals employed within an urban public health department. In order to effectively evaluate these constructs, a quantitative research approach was employed to examine participants’ knowledge and competencies of the subject matter. This data was further analyzed to determine if continuing education participation and training was correlated to the levels of culturally competent practice engagement and self-reported confidence. In addition, researchers obtained data on the availability of employer sponsored training opportunities. The data suggested when health professionals engage in cultural competence education, their level of awareness of unique characteristics between ethnic and racial minorities increased. Those who exhibited the healthiest behaviors, as it relates to effectively working with diverse populations, had a heightened sense of knowledge related to culture and healthcare services. Continuing education in cultural competence is an essential strategy for improving public health employees’ effectiveness in working with diverse clients and reducing racial and ethnic health disparities. As the finding illustrated, training programs must incorporate educational components which foster skill building to enable subsequent culturally appropriate clinical interactions.

  19. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, S M; Rostagno, M H; Patterson, J A; Yoon, I; Fitzner, G; Eicher, S D

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on innate immunity and intestinal microbial ecology after weaning and transport stress. In a randomized complete block design, before weaning and in a split-plot analysis of a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of yeast culture (YY) and transport (TT) after weaning, 3-d-old pigs (n = 108) were randomly assigned within litter (block) to either a control (NY, milk only) or yeast culture diet (YY; delivered in milk to provide 0.1 g of yeast culture product/kg of BW) from d 4 to 21. At weaning (d 21), randomly, one-half of the NY and YY pigs were assigned to a 6-h transport (NY-TT and YY-TT) before being moved to nursery housing, and the other one-half were moved directly to nursery housing (NY-NT and YY-NT, where NT is no transport). The yeast treatment was a 0.2% S. cerevisiae fermentation product and the control treatment was a 0.2% grain blank in feed for 2 wk. On d 1 before transport and on d 1, 4, 7, and 14 after transport, blood was collected for leukocyte assays, and mesenteric lymph node, jejunal, and ileal tissue, and jejunal, ileal, and cecal contents were collected for Toll-like receptor expression (TLR); enumeration of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, and lactobacilli; detection of Salmonella; and microbial analysis. After weaning, a yeast × transport interaction for ADG was seen (P = 0.05). Transport affected (P = 0.09) ADFI after weaning. Yeast treatment decreased hematocrit (P = 0.04). A yeast × transport interaction was found for counts of white blood cells (P = 0.01) and neutrophils (P = 0.02) and for the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.02). Monocyte counts revealed a transport (P = 0.01) effect. Interactions of yeast × transport (P = 0.001) and yeast × transport × day (P = 0.09) for TLR2 and yeast × transport (P = 0.08) for TLR4 expression in the mesenteric lymph node were detected. Day affected lactobacilli, total coliform, and E

  20. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  1. Effects of carbon brush anode size and loading on microbial fuel cell performance in batch and continuous mode

    KAUST Repository

    Lanas, Vanessa

    2014-02-01

    Larger scale microbial fuel cells (MFCs) require compact architectures to efficiently treat wastewater. We examined how anode-brush diameter, number of anodes, and electrode spacing affected the performance of the MFCs operated in fed-batch and continuous flow mode. All anodes were initially tested with the brush core set at the same distance from the cathode. In fed-batch mode, the configuration with three larger brushes (25 mm diameter) produced 80% more power (1240 mW m-2) than reactors with eight smaller brushes (8 mm) (690 mW m-2). The higher power production by the larger brushes was due to more negative and stable anode potentials than the smaller brushes. The same general result was obtained in continuous flow operation, although power densities were reduced. However, by moving the center of the smaller brushes closer to the cathode (from 16.5 to 8 mm), power substantially increased from 690 to 1030 mW m-2 in fed batch mode. In continuous flow mode, power increased from 280 to 1020 mW m-2, resulting in more power production from the smaller brushes than the larger brushes (540 mW m-2). These results show that multi-electrode MFCs can be optimized by selecting smaller anodes, placed as close as possible to the cathode. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cultural Continuity as a Determinant of Indigenous Peoples’ Health: A Metasynthesis of Qualitative Research in Canada and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D. Auger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As a strengths-based alternative to Western notions of enculturation and acculturation theory, cultural continuity describes the integration of people within their culture and the methods through which traditional knowledge is maintained and transmitted. Through reviewing relevant, original research with Indigenous Peoples in Canada and the United States, the purpose of this metasynthesis is to describe and interpret qualitative research relating to cultural continuity for Indigenous Peoples in North America. This metasynthesis was conducted through the selection, appraisal, and synthesis of 11 qualitative studies. Across the selected studies, five key themes arose: the connection between cultural continuity and health and well-being, conceptualizations of cultural continuity and connectedness, the role of knowledge transmission, journeys of cultural (discontinuity, and barriers to cultural continuity.

  3. Microbial community analysis of food-spoilage bacteria in commercial custard creams using culture-dependent and independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Kawai, Y; Iioka, H; Tanioka, M; Nishimura, J; Kitazawa, H; Tsurumi, K; Saito, T

    2008-08-01

    Custard cream is made from highly nutritive raw materials such as milk and sugar and is easily spoiled by the multiplication of specific microbial contaminants or residents. However, this spoilage microbial community has not been studied. We determined the spoilage microbiota in commercial custard creams using culture-dependent and independent methods. Using the culture-dependent analysis with various agar media, 185 bacterial colonies and 43 eukaryal colonies were isolated from 7 commercial custard cream products. All bacterial isolates were morphologically, physiologically, and genetically identified as bacilli, staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, and psychrotrophic gram-negative rods. Using culture-independent molecular analysis, the PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique, spoilage of the commercial custard creams was found to be caused by bacilli, staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, psychrotrophic gram-negative rods, Anoxybacillus sp., Caurobacter sp., and Streptococcus sp. bacteria. The detected spoilage bacteria were the same species as previously detected in spoiled milk products and shown in other reports, suggesting that spoilage bacteria in a raw material easily grow in processed foods made from milk. We determined the spoilage microbial communities in commercial custard creams, and these are the first data concerning spoilage microbiota in nonfermented processed foods using a culture-independent analysis. Our study will be useful for the manufacture and safe preservation of dairy products because the first step toward safe food preservation by food manufacturers is to understand the spoilage microbiota in a target food to select optimal preservatives and to reduce the use of food additives.

  4. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  5. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  6. Optimization of culture medium for the continuous cultivation of the microalga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábregas, J; Domínguez, A; Regueiro, M; Maseda, A; Otero, A

    2000-05-01

    The freshwater microalga Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the best microbial sources of the carotenoid astaxanthin, but this microalga shows low growth rates and low final cell densities when cultured with traditional media. A single-variable optimization strategy was applied to 18 components of the culture media in order to maximize the productivity of vegetative cells of H. pluvialis in semicontinuous culture. The steady-state cell density obtained with the optimized culture medium at a daily volume exchange of 20% was 3.77 x 10(5) cells ml(-1), three times higher than the cell density obtained with Bold basal medium and with the initial formulation. The formulation of the optimal Haematococcus medium (OHM) is (in g l(-1)) KNO3 0.41, Na2HPO4 0.03, MgSO4 x 7H2O 0.246, CaCl2 x 2H2O 0.11, (in mg l(-1)) Fe(III)citrate x H2O 2.62, CoCl2 x 6H2O 0.011, CuSO4 x 5H2O 0.012, Cr2O3 0.075, MnCl2 x 4H2O 0.98, Na2MoO4 x 2H2O 0.12, SeO2 0.005 and (in microg l(-1)]) biotin 25, thiamine 17.5 and B12 15. Vanadium, iodine, boron and zinc were demonstrated to be non-essential for the growth of H. pluvialis. Higher steady-state cell densities were obtained by a three-fold increase of all nutrient concentrations but a high nitrate concentration remained in the culture medium under such conditions. The high cell productivities obtained with the new optimized medium can serve as a basis for the development of a two-stage technology for the production of astaxanthin from H. pluvialis.

  7. Use of the isolator 1.5 microbial tube for culture of synovial fluid from patients with septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagupsky, P; Press, J

    1997-09-01

    Synovial fluid specimens obtained from patients with arthritis were plated onto solid media (conventional cultures) or inoculated into an Isolator 1.5 microbial tube (Isolator cultures), and the yield and time to detection of organisms were compared. Overall, 144 specimens obtained from 137 patients were processed, and 31 (21.5%) cultures obtained from 29 patients were positive by at least one method. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 12 patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Kingella kingae were isolated from 4 patients each, group G streptococci were isolated from 3 patients, Staphylococcus epidermidis and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were isolated from 2 patients each, and Streptococcus mitis and Peptostreptococcus prevotii were isolated from 1 patient each. Overall, the causative organism was detected in 31 of 31 (100.0%) Isolator cultures and 24 of 31 (77.4%) conventional cultures (P septic arthritis.

  8. Rapid Culture-Independent Microbial Analysis Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Monaco, Lisa; Morris, Heather; Gunter, Daniel; Damon, Michael; Wells, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A new culture-independent system for microbial monitoring, called the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). LOCAD-PTS was launched to the ISS aboard Space Shuttle STS-116 on December 9, 2006, and has since been used by ISS crews to monitor endotoxin on cabin surfaces. Quantitative analysis was performed within 15 minutes, and sample return to Earth was not required. Endotoxin (a marker of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi) was distributed throughout the ISS, despite previous indications that most bacteria on ISS surfaces were Gram-positive. Endotoxin was detected at 24 out of 42 surface areas tested and at every surface site where colony-forming units (cfu) were observed, even at levels of 4-120 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2, which is below NASA in-flight requirements (dining facilities. Endotoxin was absent from airlock surfaces, except the Extravehicular Hatch Handle (>3.78 EU per 100 cm2). Based upon data collected from the ISS so far, new culture-independent requirements (defined in EU) are suggested, which are verifiable in flight with LOCAD-PTS yet high enough to avoid false alarms. The suggested requirements are intended to supplement current ISS requirements (defined in cfu) and would serve a dual purpose of safeguarding crew health (internal spacecraft surfaces <20 EU per 100 cm2) and monitoring forward contamination during Constellation missions (surfaces periodically exposed to the external environment, including the airlock and space suits, <0.24 EU per 100 cm2).

  9. Microbial Stereoselective One-Step Conversion of Diols to Chiral Lactones in Yeast Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Boratyński

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that whole cells of different strains of yeast catalyze stereoselective oxidation of meso diols to the corresponding chiral lactones. Among screening-scale experiments, Candida pelliculosa ZP22 was selected as the most effective biocatalyst for the oxidation of monocyclic diols 3a–b with respect to the ratio of high conversion to stereoselectivity. This strain was used in the preparative oxidation, affording enantiomerically-enriched isomers of lactones: (+-(3aR,7aS-cis-hexahydro-1(3H -isobenzofuranone (2a and (+-(3aS,4,7,7aR-cis-tetrahydro-1(3H-isobenzofuranone (2b. Scaling up the culture growth, as well as biotransformation conditions has been successfully accomplished. Among more bulky substrates, bicyclic diol 3d was totally converted into enantiomerically-pure exo-bridged (+-(3aR,4S,7R,7aS-cis-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran -1(3H-one (2d by Yarrovia lipolytica AR71. Microbial oxidation of diol 3f by Candida sake AM908 and Rhodotorula rubra AM4 afforded optically-pure cis-3-butylhexahydro-1(3H -isobenzofuranone (2f, however with low conversion.

  10. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from fermented cheese whey by using a mixed microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bianca; Pepè Sciarria, Tommy; Reis, Maria; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Two fermented cheese wheys (FCW), FCW1 composed of lactic, acetic and butyric acids in the proportion of 58/16/26 (% CODOrganic Acid (OA)) and FCW2 composed of acetic, propionic, butyric, lactic and valeric acids in the proportion of 58/19/13/6/4 (% CODOA) were used to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by using a pre-selected mixed microbial culture (MMC). PHA accumulation gave for fermented FCW1 a PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.24±0.02mgCODPHAmgCODSolubleSubstrate(SS)(-1) and a total PHA production, referred to the substrate used, of 60gPHAkgcheesewheyTotalSolids(TS)(-1). For fermented FCW2 results were: PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.42±0.03mgCODPHAmgCODSS(-1) and PHA from a substrate of 70gPHAkgcheesewheyTS(-1). Qualitatively, PHAs from FCW1 was made up exclusively of 3-hydroxybutyrate (HB), while those obtained from FCW2 were composed of 40% of 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV) and 60% of HB.

  11. Comparative analysis and culturing of the microbial community of Aiptasia pallida, A Sea Anemone Model for Coral Biology

    KAUST Repository

    Binsarhan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Recent works has highlighted the contribution of microbes to animal function. In this regard, the microbial community associated with corals has become a growing field of research in order to understand how microbes contribute to the host organisms’ response to environmental changes. It has been shown that microbes associated with corals have important functions in the coral holobiont such as immunity and nutrient assimilation. However, corals are notoriously difficult to work with. To this end, the sea anemone Aiptasia is becoming a model organism for coral symbiosis. Given the importance of host-­microbiome interactions, the topic of this thesis is to assess microbial structure of Aiptasia, culture prominent bacterial members, and compare bacterial community structure to corals. Different molecular methods have been applied using 16S rRNA bacterial gene fragments to characterize the microbial composition of Aiptasia. 16S rRNA gene sequence derived from cultured bacteria was compared to 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from native Red Sea Aiptasia. Inter-­individual as well as methodological differences were found to account for variance in microbiome composition. However, all approaches showed a highly abundant microbial taxon belonging to the genus Alteromonas in all samples. The Alteromonas species was successfully isolated for further research targeting microbiome selection mechanisms in Aiptasia. Future investigations by using different molecular tools will help to define the functions and relationship between the Aiptasia and its complex microbiome.

  12. Computer graphics and cultural heritage, part 2: continuing inspiration for future tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, David

    2014-01-01

    The availability of large quantities of cultural-heritage data will enable new, previously inconceivable, types of analysis and new applications. Currently, most emerging analysis methods are experimental research. It's likely to take many years before the research matures and provides cultural-heritage professionals with novel research methods that they use routinely. Indeed, we can expect further disruptive technologies to emerge in the foreseeable future and a "steady state" of continuing rapid change. Part 1 can be found at 10.1109/MCG.2014.47.

  13. Effect of Fed-Batch vs. Continuous Mode of Operation on Microbial Fuel Cell Performance Treating Biorefinery Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannell, Tyler C.; Goud, R. Kannaiah; Schell, Daniel J.; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2016-12-15

    Bioelectrochemical systems have been shown to treat low-value biorefinery streams while recovering energy, however, low current densities and anode conversion efficiencies (ACE) limit their application. A bioanode was developed via enrichment of electroactive biofilm under fed-batch and continuous feeding conditions using corn stover-derived waste stream. The continuously-fed MFC exhibited a current density of 5.8 +/- 0.06 A/m2 and an ACE of 39% +/- 4. The fed-batch MFC achieved a similar current density and an ACE of 19.2%, however, its performance dropped after 36 days of operation to 1.1 A/m2 and 0.5%, respectively. In comparison, the ACE of the continuously-fed MFC remained stable achieving an ACE of 30% +/- 3 after 48 days of operation. An MFC treating a biorefinery stream post fuel separation achieved a current density of 10.7 +/- 0.1 A/m2 and an ACE of 57% +/- 9 at an organic loading of 12.5 g COD/L-day. Characterization of the microbial communities indicate higher abundance of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and lower abundance of Bacteriodetes and a higher level of Geobacter spp. (1.4% vs. 0.2%) in continuously-fed MFC vs. fed-batch MFC. The results demonstrate that limiting substrate to the equivalent maximum current that the anode can generate, maintains MFC performance over a long term for high strength wastewaters, such as those generated in the biorefinery.

  14. Acclimation to extremely high ammonia levels in continuous biomethanation process and the associated microbial community dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Acclimatized anaerobic communities to high ammonia levels can offer a solution to the ammonia toxicity problem in biogas reactors. In the current study, a stepwise acclimation strategy up to 10 g NH4+-N L−1, was performed in mesophilic (37 ± 1 °C) continuously stirred tank reactors. The reactors...... were co-digesting (20/80 based on volatile solid) cattle slurry and microalgae, a protein-rich, 3rd generation biomass. Throughout the acclimation period, methane production was stable with more than 95% of the uninhibited yield. Next generation 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a dramatic microbiome...... change throughout the ammonia acclimation process. Clostridium ultunense, a syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria, increased significantly alongside with hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanoculleus spp., indicating strong hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity at extreme ammonia levels (>7 g NH4+-N L−1...

  15. Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2014-07-01

    Power production of four hydraulically connected microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was compared with the reactors operated using individual electrical circuits (individual), and when four anodes were wired together and connected to four cathodes all wired together (combined), in fed-batch or continuous flow conditions. Power production under these different conditions could not be made based on a single resistance, but instead required polarization tests to assess individual performance relative to the combined MFCs. Based on the power curves, power produced by the combined MFCs (2.12 ± 0.03 mW, 200 ω) was the same as the summed power (2.13 mW, 50 ω) produced by the four individual reactors in fed-batch mode. With continuous flow through the four MFCs, the maximum power (0.59 ± 0.01 mW) produced by the combined MFCs was slightly lower than the summed maximum power of the four individual reactors (0.68 ± 0.02 mW). There was a small parasitic current flow from adjacent anodes and cathodes, but overall performance was relatively unaffected. These findings demonstrate that optimal power production by reactors hydraulically and electrically connected can be predicted from performance by individual reactors. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Trypanosoma acomys (Wenyon, 1909): continuous culturing with a mouse fibroblast cell-line (A9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, M A; Abdel-Hafez, S K; al-Yaman, F M

    1990-01-01

    The continuous culturing of Trypanosoma acomys in the presence of a murine areolar-adipose cell line (A9) was possible for the 1st time. The trypanosomes were cultured at 37 degrees C with A9 in DMEM supplemented with 20% heat inactivated fetal bovine serum, using an initial inoculum from primary cultures of lung or blood clots from infected spiny mice. The cultures were maintained for 115 days and underwent 15 passages before termination and cryopreservation. Using this culture system T. acomys subcultures were initiated from 3 different initial inocula (3 x 10(4), 1.5 x 10(5) and 7.4 x 10(5) parasites/ml) and growth curves revealed that the lowest inoculum gave the best growth pattern. This inoculum yielded a population doubling time of less than 12 h for 4 days, a high peak density of 7 x 10(6) parasites/ml and the most gradual decline compared to the other 2 inocula. Rosetting epimastigotes and nests of amastigotes were observed in close association with the feeder layer cells. Epimastigotes were the most predominant form in culture supernatants but other morphological forms observed included trypomastigotes and sphaeromastigotes.

  17. High-Throughput Sequencing and Metagenomics: Moving Forward in the Culture-Independent Analysis of Food Microbial Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Following recent trends in environmental microbiology, food microbiology has benefited from the advances in molecular biology and adopted novel strategies to detect, identify, and monitor microbes in food. An in-depth study of the microbial diversity in food can now be achieved by using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) approaches after direct nucleic acid extraction from the sample to be studied. In this review, the workflow of applying culture-independent HTS to food matrices is described. T...

  18. Aeration remediation of a polluted waterway increases near-surface coarse and culturable microbial aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M Elias; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2014-04-15

    Aeration remediation is currently used in polluted urban waterways to increase oxygen levels in the water column. Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that the bursting of bubbles at water surfaces introduced by aeration, or other surface disturbances, can transfer viable bacteria to the air. In heavily sewage-polluted waterways these water-originated bacterial aerosols may pose as a health risk to recreators in small boats or residents inhabiting the shoreline. Nonetheless, few studies have explored aerosols above active aeration remediation projects in waterways or investigated how bacterial aerosols change with vertical distance from aeration activities. This study, conducted at the Newtown Creek superfund site in Brooklyn, NY, USA, measured coarse aerosol particles and culturable bacteria in near-surface air above waters undergoing aeration remediation. Regardless of aeration operation culturable bacterial fallout was greater near-surface (0.6m above water) than previously-reported measurements made at 2.5m. Molecular analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolated bacteria demonstrates that water and air shared a large number of bacterial genera and that the genera present in the near-surface aerosols (0.6m) contained water-associated Vibrio and Caulobacter, which were not present at 2.5m, despite the smaller sequence library size from the near-surface. Also, the near-surface microbial assemblage had significantly greater association with sequences detected previously in aquatic environments compared to the 2.5m library. We found compelling evidence that aeration activity contributed to this vertical gradient in bacterial aerosol concentrations and identity. Similar to results from 2.5m, concentrations of near-surface respirable coarse aerosols (aeration was occurring. Culturable bacterial aerosol fallout was also greater near-surface when the aerator was on compared to simultaneous measurements made at 2.5m. Furthermore, when the aerator was

  19. Analysis of CHO cells metabolic redistribution in a glutamate-based defined medium in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, C; Illanes, A; Casablancas, A; Gámez, X; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, C

    2001-01-01

    The effect of glutamine replacement by glutamate and the balance between glutamate and glucose metabolism on the redistribution of t-PA-producing recombinant CHO cells metabolism is studied in a series of glucose shift down and shift up experiments in continuous culture. These experiments reveal the existence of multiple steady states, and experimental data are used to perform metabolic flux analysis to gain a better insight into cellular metabolism and its redistribution. Regulation of glucose feed rate promotes a higher efficiency of glucose and nitrogen source utilization, with lower production of metabolic byproducts, but this reduces t-PA specific production rate. This reduction under glucose limitation can be attributed to the fact that the cells are forced to efficiently utilize the carbon and energy source for growth, impairing the production of dispensable metabolites. It is, therefore, the combination of growth rate and carbon and energy source availability that determines the level of t-PA production in continuous culture.

  20. Toxoplasma gondii from liquid nitrogen for continuous cell culture: methods to maximise efficient retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavin, S; Evans, R; Chatterton, J M W; Ashburn, D; Joss, A W L; Ho-Yen, D O

    2003-01-01

    This study aims to increase the efficiency of continuous growth of Toxoplasma gondii in HeLa cells from tachyzoite stocks frozen in liquid nitrogen. Freezing and retrieval of tachyzoites for continuous cell culture requires more stringent protocols than those published for animal culture. The freezing and retrieval conditions are optimised so that a quality harvest (> or = 1 x 10(6) tachyzoites/mL, > or = 90% viability) can be produced using T. gondii recovered from liquid nitrogen as fast and reliably as possible. Retrieval success rate increased from 36% to 100%. An improved freezing procedure using chilled reagents and freshly harvested parasites, and adoption of an effective recovery protocol with retrieval of 3 x 10(7) tachyzoites into 75 cm2 flasks, change of maintenance media after six hours and subsequent blind passage all contributed to this success. The result is faster and more dependable production of T. gondii for diagnostic and experimental use.

  1. Assessment of the microbial diversity at the surface of Livarot cheese using culture-dependent and independent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, J; Monnet, C; Jacques, N; Antoinette, A; Irlinger, F

    2009-07-31

    The microbial diversity of the surface of a commercial red-smear cheese, Livarot cheese, sold on the retail market was studied using culture-dependent and independent approaches. Forty yeasts and 40 bacteria from the cheese surface were collected, dereplicated using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and identified using rRNA gene sequencing for the culture-dependent approach. The culture-independent approach involved cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and SSCP analysis from total DNA extracted from the cheese. The most dominant bacteria were Microbacterium gubbeenense, Leucobacter komagatae and Gram-negative bacteria from the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was also used to study the cheese microbial diversity with class-level and specific rRNA-targeted probes for bacteria and yeasts, respectively. FISH analysis confirmed that Gamma-Proteobacteria were important microorganisms in this cheese. Four specific FISH probes targeting the dominant yeasts present in the cheese, Candida catenulata, Candida intermedia, Geotrichum spp. and Yarrowia lipolytica, were also designed and evaluated. These probes allowed the detection of these yeasts directly in cheese. The use of the rRNA gene-based approach combined with FISH analysis was useful to investigate the diversity of a surface microbial consortium from cheese.

  2. PHOSPHATE-LIMITED GROWTH OF CHROMATIUM-VINOSUM IN CONTINUOUS CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAS, J; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1992-01-01

    Chromatium vinosum DSM 185 was grown in continuous culture at a constant dilution rate of 0.071 h-1 with sulfide as the only electron donor. The organism was subjected to conditions ranging from phosphate limitation (S(R-phosphate) = 2.7-mu-M and S(R-sulfide) = 1.8 mM) to sulfide limitation (S(R-pho

  3. Continuous plant cell perfusion culture: bioreactor characterization and secreted enzyme production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei Wen; Arias, Renee

    2003-01-01

    Culture perfusion is widely practiced in mammalian cell processes to enhance secreted antibody production. Here, we report the development of an efficient continuous perfusion process for the cultivation of plant cell suspensions. The key to this process is a perfusion bioreactor that incorporates an annular settling zone into a stirred-tank bioreactor to achieve continuous cell/medium separation via gravitational sedimentation. From washout experiments, we found that under typical operating conditions (e.g., 200 rpm and 0.3 vvm) the liquid phase in the entire perfusion bioreactor was homogeneous despite the presence of the cylindrical baffle. Using secreted acid phosphatase (APase) produced in Anchusa officinalis cell culture as a model we have studied the perfusion cultures under complete or partial cell retention. The perfusion culture was operated under phosphate limitation to stimulate APase production. Successful operation of the perfusion process over four weeks has been achieved in this work. When A. officinalis cells were grown in the perfusion reactor and perfused at up to 0.4 vvd with complete cell retention, a cell dry weight exceeding 20 g/l could be achieved while secreted APase productivity leveled off at approximately 300 units/l/d. The culture became extremely dense with the maximum packed cell volume (PCV) surpassing 70%. In comparison, the maximum cell dry weight and overall secreted APase productivity in a typical batch culture were 10-12 g/l and 100-150 units/l/d, respectively. Operation of the perfusion culture under extremely high PCV for a prolonged period, however, led to declined oxygen uptake and reduced viability. Subsequently, cell removal via a bleed stream at up to 0.11 vvd was tested and shown to stabilize the culture at a PCV below 60%. With culture bleeding, both specific oxygen uptake rate and viability were shown to increase. This also led to a higher cell dry weight exceeding 25 g/l, and further improvement of secreted APase

  4. Performance of the FilmArray® blood culture identification panel utilized by non-expert staff compared with conventional microbial identification and antimicrobial resistance gene detection from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Morgan H; Relich, Ryan F; Davis, Thomas E; Schmitt, Bryan H

    2016-07-01

    Utilization of commercially available rapid platforms for microbial identification from positive blood cultures is useful during periods of, or in laboratories with, limited expert staffing. We compared the results of the FilmArray® BCID Panel performed by non-expert technologists to those of conventional methods for organism identification performed by skilled microbiologists. Within 8 h of signalling positive by a continuous monitoring blood culture system, positive bottles were analysed by the FilmArray BCID Panel. Data from these analyses were compared to standard-of-care testing, which included conventional and automated methods. To gauge the ease of use of the BCID Panel by non-expert staff, technologists unfamiliar with diagnostic bacteriology performed the testing without prior knowledge of the Gram stain results, or even whether organisms were detected. Identifications of 172/200 (86 %) positive blood cultures using the BCID Panel were consistent with identifications provided by standard-of-care methods. Standard-of-care testing identified organisms in 20 positive blood cultures, which were not represented on the BCID Panel. Seven (3.5 %) blood cultures demonstrated a discrepancy between the methods, which could not be attributed to either a lack of representation on the panel or unclear separate detection of organisms in a mixed blood culture of a shared genus or grouping of organisms, e.g. Staphylococcus or Enterobacteriaceae . One (0.5 %) blood culture yielded invalid results on two separate panels, so it was eliminated from the study. The easy-to-use FilmArray® technology shows good correlation with blood culture identification and antibiotic resistance detection performed by conventional methods. This technology may be particularly useful in laboratories with limited staffing or limited technical expertise.

  5. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to…

  6. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  7. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N, Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio García-Moyano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae. These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting

  8. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-10-13

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  9. Building a Culture of Continuous Quality Improvement in an Academic Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Gregory L; Paushter, David M

    2016-04-01

    As we enter a new era of health care in the United States, radiologists must be adequately prepared to prove, and continually improve, our value to our customers. This goal can be achieved in large part by providing high-quality services. Although quality efforts on the national and international levels provide a framework for improving radiologic quality, some of the greatest opportunities for quality improvement can be found at the departmental level, through the implementation of total quality management programs. Establishing such a program requires not only strong leadership and employee engagement, but also a firm understanding of the multiple total quality management tools and continuous quality improvement strategies available. In this article, we discuss key tools and strategies required to build a culture of continuous quality improvement in an academic department, based on our experience. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple steady states with distinct cellular metabolism in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Europa, A F; Gambhir, A; Fu, P C; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to proliferate under different nutrient environments by utilizing different combinations of the nutrients, especially glucose and the amino acids. Under the conditions often used in in vitro cultivation, the cells consume glucose and amino acids in great excess of what is needed for making up biomass and products. They also produce large amounts of metabolites with lactate, ammonia, and some non-essential amino acids such as alanine as the most dominant ones. By controlling glucose and glutamine at low levels, cellular metabolism can be altered and can result in reduced glucose and glutamine consumption as well as in reduced metabolite formation. Using a fed-batch reactor to manipulate glucose at a low level (as compared to a typical batch culture), cell metabolism was altered to a state with substantially reduced lactate production. The culture was then switched to a continuous mode and allowed to reach a steady-state. At this steady-state, the concentrations of cells and antibody were substantially higher than a control culture that was initiated from a batch culture without first altering cellular metabolism. The lactate and other metabolite concentrations were also substantially reduced as compared to the control culture. This newly observed steady-state was achieved at the same dilution rate and feed medium as the control culture. The paths leading to the two steady-states, however, were different. These results demonstrate steady-state multiplicity. At this new steady-state, not only was glucose metabolism altered, but the metabolism of amino acids was altered as well. The amino acid metabolism in the new steady-state was more balanced, and the excretion of non-essential amino acids and ammonia was substantially lower. This approach of reaching a more desirable steady-state with higher concentrations of cells and product opens a new avenue for high-density- and high-productivity-cell culture.

  11. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varrone, Cristiano; Heggeset, T. M. B.; Le, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable...... and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic...... Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h) and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending...

  12. Enhancement of microbial density and methane production in advanced anaerobic digestion of secondary sewage sludge by continuous removal of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bing; Donnelly, Joanne; Oliveira, Ivo; Anthony, Ruth; Wilson, Victoria; Esteves, Sandra R

    2017-05-01

    Ammonia inhibition mitigation in anaerobic digestion of high solids content of thermally hydrolysed secondary sewage sludge by the NH4(+) affinitive clinoptilolite and a strong acid type ion-exchange resin S957 was investigated. Continuous NH4(+)-N removal was achieved through ion-exchanging at both temperatures with average removals of 50 and 70% for the clinoptilolite and resin dosed reactors, respectively. Approximate 0.2-0.5unit of pH reduction was also observed in the dosed reactors. The synergy of NH4(+)-N removal and pH reduction exponentially decreased free NH3 concentration, from 600 to 90mg/L at 43°C, which mitigated ammonia inhibition and improved methane yields by approximately 54%. Microbial community profiling suggested that facilitated by ammonia removal, the improvement in methane production was mainly achieved through the doubling in bacterial density and a 6-fold increase in population of the Methanosarcinaceae family, which in turn improved the degradation of residual volatile fatty acids, proteins and carbohydrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of pH and ORP on microbial ecology and kinetics for hydrogen production in continuously dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiaxiu; An, Dong; Ren, Nanqi; Zhang, Yongming; Chen, Ying

    2011-12-01

    The microbial structure and kinetic characteristics of the hydrogen producing strains in two fermentative continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) were studied by controlling pH and oxidation and reduction potential (ORP). The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests were conducted to investigate the fermentative performance of Clostridium histolyticum (C. histolyticum), Clostridium lituseburense (C. lituseburense) and Enterobacteriaceae. The experimental results showed that in ethanol-type reactor 1#, the relative abundance of the strains was 48%, 30% and 22%. Comparatively, the relative abundance in butyric acid-type reactor 2# was 24%, 55% and 19% with butyric acids and hydrogen as the main products. The kinetic results indicated that the hydrogen yield coefficients YP/X in both reactors were 8.357 and 5.951 l-H2/g, while the coefficients of the cellular yield were 0.0268 and 0.0350 g-Cell/g, respectively. At the same biomass, the hydrogen yield in ethanol-type reactors was more than that in butyric acid reactors. However, the cellular synthesis rate in ethanol-type reactors was low when the same carbon source was used.

  14. Batch growth kinetics of an indigenous mixed microbial culture utilizing m-cresol as the sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Pichiah; Pakshirajan, K; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2009-02-15

    An indigenous mixed microbial culture, isolated from a sewage treatment plant located in Guwahati was used to study biodegradation of m-cresol in batch shake flasks. m-Cresol concentration in the growth media was varied from 100mg/L to 900mg/L. The degradation kinetics was found to follow a three-half-order model at all initial m-cresol concentrations with regression values greater than 0.97. A maximum observed specific degradation rate of 0.585h(-1) was observed at 200mg/L m-cresol concentration in the medium. In the range of m-cresol concentrations used in the study, specific growth rate of the culture and specific degradation rates were observed to follow substrate inhibition kinetics. These two rates were fitted to kinetic models of Edward, Haldane, Luong, Han-Levenspiel, and Yano-Koga that are used to explain substrate inhibition on growth of microbial culture. Out of these models Luong and Han-Levenspiel models fitted the experimental data best with lowest root mean square error values. Biokinetic constants estimated from these two models showed good potential of the indigenous mixed culture in degrading m-cresol in wastewaters.

  15. Effect of changing temperature on anaerobic hydrogen production and microbial community composition in an open-mixed culture bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Dogan; Puhakka, Jaakko A. [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2010-10-15

    The temperature effect (37-65 C) on H{sub 2} production from glucose in an open-mixed culture bioreactor using an enrichment culture from a hot spring was studied. The dynamics of microbial communities was investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). At 45 and 60 C the H{sub 2} production was the highest i.e. 1.71 and 0.85 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose, respectively. No H{sub 2} was produced at temperatures 50 and 55 C. At 37-45 C, H{sub 2} production was produced by butyrate type fermentation while fermentation mechanism changed to ethanol type at 60 C. Clostridium species were dominant at 37-45 C while at 50-55 C and 60 C the culture was dominated by Bacillus coagulans and Thermoanaerobacterium, respectively. In the presence of B. Coagulans the metabolism was directed to lactate production. The results show that the mixed culture had two optima for H{sub 2} production and that the microbial communities and metabolic patterns promptly changed according to changing temperatures. (author)

  16. Effects of Partial Replacement of Corn with Glycerin on Ruminal Fermentation in a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Del Bianco Benedeti

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of partially replacing dry ground corn with glycerin on ruminal fermentation using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Six fermenters (1,223 ± 21 ml were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square arrangement with three periods of 10 d each, with 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collections. All diets contained 75% concentrate and three dietary glycerin levels (0, 15, and 30% on dry matter basis, totaling six replicates per treatment. Fermenters were fed 72 g of dry matter/d equally divided in two meals/d, at 0800 and 2000 h. Solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted daily to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. On d 8, 9, and 10, samples of 500 ml of solid and liquid digesta effluent were mixed, homogenized, and stored at -20°C. Subsamples of 10 ml were collected and preserved with 0.2 mL of a 50% H2SO4 solution for later determination of NH3-N and volatile fatty acids. Microbial biomass was isolated from fermenters for chemical analysis at the end of each experimental period. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Glycerin levels did not affect apparent digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.13; PQuad. = 0.40, OM (PLin. = 0.72; PQuad. = 0.15, NDF (PLin. = 0.38; PQuad. = 0.50 and ADF (PLin. = 0.91; PQuad. = 0.18. Also, glycerin inclusion did not affect true digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.35; PQuad. = 0.48, and OM (PLin. = 0.08; PQuad. = 0.19. Concentrations of propionate (P < 0.01 and total volatile fatty acids (P < 0.01 increased linearly and concentrations of acetate (P < 0.01, butyrate (P = 0.01, iso-valerate (P < 0.01, and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids, as well as the acetate: propionate ratio (P < 0.01 decreased with glycerin inclusion. Linear increases on NH3-N concentration in digesta effluent (P < 0.01 and on NH3-N flow (P < 0.01 were observed due to glycerin inclusion in the diets. Crude protein digestibility (P = 0.04 and microbial N flow (P

  17. Evaluation of microbial diversity in the pilot-scale beer brewing process by culture-dependent and culture-independent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Kita, Y; Kusaka, K; Mizuno, A; Goto-Yamamoto, N

    2015-02-01

    In the brewing industry, microbial management is very important for stabilizing the quality of the product. We investigated the detailed microbial community of beer during fermentation and maturation, to manage beer microbiology in more detail. We brewed a beer (all-malt) and two beerlike beverages (half- and low-malt) in pilot-scale fermentation and investigated the microbial community of them using a next-generation sequencer (454 GS FLX titanium), quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and a culture-dependent method. From 28 to 88 genera of bacteria and from 9 to 38 genera of eukaryotic micro-organisms were detected in each sample. Almost all micro-organisms died out during the boiling process. However, bacteria belonging to the genera Acidovorax, Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Methylobacterium, Paenibacillus, Polaromonas, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Sphingomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Tepidimonas and Tissierella were detected at the early and middle stage of fermentation, even though their cell densities were low (below approx. 10(3) cells ml(-1) ) and they were not almost detected at the end of fermentation. We revealed that the microbial community of beer during fermentation and maturation is very diverse and several bacteria possibly survive during fermentation. In this study, we revealed the detailed microbial communities of beer using next-generation sequencing. Some of the micro-organisms detected in this study were found in beer brewing process for the first time. Additionally, the possibility of growth of several bacteria at the early and middle stage of fermentation was suggested. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Microbial succession in response to pollutants in batch-enrichment culture

    OpenAIRE

    Shuo Jiao; Weimin Chen; Entao Wang; Junman Wang; Zhenshan Liu; Yining Li; Gehong Wei

    2016-01-01

    As a global problem, environmental pollution is an important factor to shape the microbial communities. The elucidation of the succession of microbial communities in response to pollutants is essential for developing bioremediation procedures. In the present study, ten batches of soil-enrichment subcultures were subjected to four treatments: phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane, or phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2. Forty pollutant-degrading consortia, corresponding to ea...

  19. Effects of Cotton Straw Incorporation on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Long-Term Continuous Cropping Cotton Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Cheng-zang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effect of straw incorporation on the content of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC, microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN and microbial biomass phosphorus(SMBP in the continuous cropping cotton field. Results showed that cotton straw incorporation could increase the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP significantly in different soil layers. Besides, with the time of continuous cropping increasing, the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP were all remarkably raised in the straw incorporation treatment. However, with the time of continuous cropping increasing, the content of SMBC, SMBN and SMBP were all remarkably declined in the straw removal treatment. In 0~20 cm soil layer, compared with the straw removal, both SMBC content and SMBN content with 5, 10, 15 years continuous cropping treatments in the straw incorporation treatment were increased by 20.8%, 67.2%, 70.4% and 22.2%, 81.2%, 85.4%, respectively, and the SMBP content in the straw incorporation treatment was increased by 22.3%, 81.2%, 85.3%, respectively. Under the cotton straw incorporation, in 0~20 cm soil layer, compared with the 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 years continuous cropping, both SMBC content and SMBN content in 30 years were increased by 116.6%, 86.2%, 101.6%, 28.9%, 8.99% and 114.1%, 82.1%, 99.65%, 27.8%, 7.15%, respectively, and the SMBP content in 30 years was increased by 65.7%, 6.9%, 34.2%, 1.4%, 2.2%, respectively. The content of SMBC, SMBN, SMBP in different soil layers decreased in the order as 0~20 cm> 20~40 cm> 40~60 cm. Consequently, cotton straw incorporation could significantly increase the the content of soil microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen and microbial biomass phosphorus in the long-term continuous cropping cotton field, besides it could alleviate the negative impact of cotton continuous cropping, so that it would be beneficial to improve the soil quality and soil fertility.

  20. Marketing to increase participation in a Web-based continuing medical education cultural competence curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Carlos A; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J; Allison, Jeroan J; Houston, Thomas K

    2011-01-01

    CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of 2 marketing strategies in the context of an online CME cultural competence curriculum (www.c-comp.org). In an interrupted time-series quasi-experimental design, 2 marketing strategies were tested: (1) wide dissemination to relevant organizations over a period of approximately 4 months, and (2) Internet paid search using Google Ads (5 consecutive 8-week periods--control 1, cultural/CME advertisement, control 2, hypertension/ content advertisement, control 3). Outcome measures were CME credit requests, Web traffic (visits per day, page views, pages viewed per visit), and cost. Overall, the site was visited 19,156 times and 78,160 pages were viewed. During the wide dissemination phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit decreased between the first (5.3%) and second (3.3%) halves of this phase (p = .04). During the Internet paid search phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit was highest during the cultural/CME advertisement period (control 1, 1.4%; cultural/CME ad, 4.3%; control 2, 1.5%; hypertension/content ad, 0.6%; control 3, 0.8%; p Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  1. The association between event learning and continuous quality improvement programs and culture of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Lukasz; Chera, Bhishamjit; Mosaly, Prithima; Taylor, Kinley; Tracton, Gregg; Johnson, Kendra; Comitz, Elizabeth; Adams, Robert; Pooya, Pegah; Ivy, Julie; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    To present our approach and results from our quality and safety program and to report their possible impact on our culture of patient safety. We created an event learning system (termed a "good catch" program) and encouraged staff to report any quality or safety concerns in real time. Events were analyzed to assess the utility of safety barriers. A formal continuous quality improvement program was created to address these reported events and make improvements. Data on perceptions of the culture of patient safety were collected using the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality survey administered before, during, and after the initiatives. Of 560 good catches reported, 367 could be ascribed to a specific step on our process map. The calculated utility of safety barriers was highest for those embedded into the pretreatment quality assurance checks performed by physicists and dosimetrists (utility score 0.53; 93 of 174) and routine checks done by therapists on the initial day of therapy. Therapists and physicists reported the highest number of good catches (24% each). Sixty-four percent of events were caused by performance issues (eg, not following standardized processes, including suboptimal communications). Of 31 initiated formal improvement events, 26 were successfully implemented and sustained, 4 were discontinued, and 1 was not implemented. Most of the continuous quality improvement program was conducted by nurses (14) and therapists (7). Percentages of positive responses in the patient safety culture survey appear to have increased on all dimensions (p quality improvement programs can be successfully implemented and that there are contemporaneous improvements in the culture of safety. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Continual electric field stimulation preserves contractile function of adult ventricular myocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, H J; Prasad, S K; Davidoff, A J; Pimental, D; Ellingsen, O; Marsh, J D; Smith, T W; Kelly, R A

    1994-01-01

    To model with greater fidelity the electromechanical function of freshly isolated heart muscle cells in primary culture, we describe a technique for the continual electrical stimulation of adult myocytes at physiological frequencies for several days. A reusable plastic cover was constructed to fit standard, disposable 175-cm2 tissue culture flasks and to hold parallel graphite electrodes along the long axis of each flask, which treated a uniform electric field that resulted in a capture efficiency of ventricular myocytes of 75-80%. Computer-controlled amplifiers were designed to be capable of driving a number of flasks concurrently, each containing up to 4 x 10(6) myocytes, over a range of stimulation frequencies (from 0.1 to 7.0 Hz) with reversal of electrode polarity after each stimulus to prevent the development of pH gradients around each electrode. Unlike quiescent, unstimulated myocytes, the amplitude of contraction, and velocities of shortening and relaxation did not change in myocytes paced at 3-5 Hz for up to 72 h. The maintenance of normal contractile function in paced myocytes required mechanical contraction per se, since paced myocytes that remained quiescent due to the inclusion of 2.5 microM verapamil in the culture medium for 48 h also exhibited a decline in contractility when paced after verapamil removal. Similarly, pacing increased peak calcium current compared with quiescent cells that had not been paced. Thus myocyte contraction at physiological frequencies induced by continual uniform electric field stimulation in short-term primary culture in defining medium maintains some biophysical parameters of myocyte phenotype that are similar to those observed in freshly isolated adult ventricular myocytes.

  3. Microbial succession in response to pollutants in batch-enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shuo; Chen, Weimin; Wang, Entao; Wang, Junman; Liu, Zhenshan; Li, Yining; Wei, Gehong

    2016-02-24

    As a global problem, environmental pollution is an important factor to shape the microbial communities. The elucidation of the succession of microbial communities in response to pollutants is essential for developing bioremediation procedures. In the present study, ten batches of soil-enrichment subcultures were subjected to four treatments: phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane, or phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2. Forty pollutant-degrading consortia, corresponding to each batch of the four treatments were obtained. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the diversity, richness and evenness of the consortia decreased throughout the subculturing procedure. The well-known hydrocarbon degraders Acinetobacter, Gordonia, Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis, and Castellaniella and several other genera, including Niabella and Naxibacter, were detected in the enriched consortia. The predominant microbes varied and the microbial community in the consortia gradually changed during the successive subculturing depending on the treatment, indicating that the pollutants influenced the microbial successions. Comparison of the networks in the treatments indicated that organic pollutants and CdCl2 affected the co-occurrence patterns in enriched consortia. In conclusion, single environmental factors, such as the addition of nutrients or selection pressure, can shape microbial communities and partially explain the extensive differences in microbial community structures among diverse environments.

  4. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Varrone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs, able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending on the selection strategy (mainly 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, or butyrate. On the other hand, anaerobic sludge exhibited inactivation after a few transfers. To circumvent this problem, fed-batch mode was used as an alternative adaptation strategy, which led to effective substrate degradation and high 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production. Changes in microbial composition were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing, revealing a dominance of glycerol consuming species, such as Clostridium, Klebsiella, and Escherichia.

  5. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrone, C.; Heggeset, T. M. B.; Le, S. B.; Haugen, T.; Markussen, S.; Skiadas, I. V.; Gavala, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h) and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending on the selection strategy (mainly 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, or butyrate). On the other hand, anaerobic sludge exhibited inactivation after a few transfers. To circumvent this problem, fed-batch mode was used as an alternative adaptation strategy, which led to effective substrate degradation and high 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production. Changes in microbial composition were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing, revealing a dominance of glycerol consuming species, such as Clostridium, Klebsiella, and Escherichia. PMID:26509171

  6. The microbial spectrum of neonatal sepsis in Uganda: recovery of culturable bacteria in mother-infant pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwanuka, Julius; Bazira, Joel; Mwanga, Juliet; Tumusiime, Dickson; Nyesigire, Eunice; Lwanga, Nkangi; Warf, Benjamin C; Kapur, Vivek; Poss, Mary; Schiff, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis in the developing world is incompletely characterized. We seek to characterize the microbial spectrum involved in sepsis and determine the role of maternal transmission by comparing organisms that can be cultured from septic newborn infants and their mothers. From 80 consecutive mother-infant pairs meeting clinical criteria for neonatal sepsis, we collected infant blood and spinal fluid, and maternal blood and vaginal specimens. Identifiable bacteria were recovered from the blood in 32.5% of infants, and from 2.5% of cerebrospinal fluid cultures, for a total of 35% recoverable putative causative agents. Bacteria recovered from vaginal specimens were not concordant with those recovered from infants. Similarly there was no concordance of bacteria recovered from blood and cerebrospinal fluid. We conclude that relying on traditional bacterial culture techniques does not adequately delineate the role of maternal versus environmental sources of neonatal sepsis in this setting. More sensitive molecular approaches will be needed to properly characterize the maternal and environmental microbial community involved in neonatal sepsis in such developing countries.

  7. Effect of starter culture and inulin addition on microbial viability, texture, and chemical characteristics of whole or skim milk Kefir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Daiana Montanuci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of inulin addition and starters (Kefir grains or commercial starter culture on the microbial viability, texture, and chemical characteristics of Kefir beverages prepared with whole or skim milk was evaluated during refrigerated storage. The type of starter did not influence microbial viability during the storage of the beverages, but the chemical and textural changes (decreases in pH, lactose concentration, and inulin and increased acidity, firmness, and syneresis were more pronounced in the formulations fermented with grains than those fermented with the starter culture. The addition of inulin did not influence acidity or viability of lactic acid bacteria, but in general, its effect on the survival of acetic acid bacteria, Lactococcus and yeasts, firmness, and syneresis depended on the type of milk and starter culture used. Generally, the yeast, acetic acid bacteria, and Leuconostoc counts increased or remained unchanged, while the total population of lactic acid bacteria and Lactococcus were either reduced by 1 to 2 logs or remained unchanged during storage.

  8. Experiments on continuous microbial hydrolysis and acidification of pressed beetroot chips. Untersuchungen zur kontinuierlichen mikrobiellen Hydrolyse und Versaeuerung von Ruebenpressschnitzeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrolysis is the factor which determines the rate of biogas production in anaerobic processes. This fact, first established in discontinuous experiments, was also true for continuous, industrial-scale experiments. The author investigated the hydrolysis rate of the main cell wall constituents of beetroots in an anaerobic degradation process using mixed cultures of bacteria. Different methods of analysis were applied. The optimum times of residue of the liquid phase were determined for given loads. The reaction rate is highest at a burden (CSB) of 9 g/l x d, without solids retention or circulation. Pectine and arabane are decomposed at a liquid phase residue time of 12 h with an efficiency of 90 or 80%; galactane and glucane are decomposed with an efficiency of 85 resp. 60% at a time of residue of 144 h. The hydrolysis of pectine and arabane assures a satisfactory degree of macerisation of the cell structure, so that mechanical comminution will be unnecessary.

  9. A comparative study on the effect of subtherapeutic tylosin administration on select feral or domestic porcine gut microflora grown in continuous-flow culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes,...

  10. Microbial community analysis in sludge of anaerobic wastewater treatment systems : integrated culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Roest, C.

    2007-01-01

    The need for clean water is increasing and anaerobic wastewater treatment can be used as a cost-effective solution for purification of organically polluted industrial waste streams. This thesis presents results from microbiological investigations of several full-scale and lab-scale anaerobic wastewater treatments systems. Anaerobic wastewater treatment has gained popularity and is now one of the key technologies in environmental biotechnology. However, knowledge of the microbial community str...

  11. A novel approach to recycle bacterial culture waste for fermentation reuse via a microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhu, Yuan; Zhuang, Liangpeng; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Goodell, Barry; Sonoki, Tomonori; He, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Biochemical production processes require water and nutrient resources for culture media preparation, but aqueous waste is generated after the target products are extracted. In this study, culture waste (including cells) produced from a lab-scale fermenter was fed into a microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system. Electrical energy was generated via the interaction between the microbial consortia and the solid electrode in the MFC. The treated wastewater was reclaimed in this process which was reused as a solvent and a nutrient source in subsequent fermentation. Polarization testing showed that the MFC produced a maximum current density of 37.53 A m(-3) with a maximum power density of 5.49 W m(-3). The MFC was able to generate 0.04 kWh of energy per cubic meter of culture waste treated. The lab-scale fermenters containing pure cultures of an engineered Pseudomonas spp. were used to generate 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDC), a high value platform chemical. When the MFC-MBR-treated wastewater was used for the fermenter culture medium, a specific bacterial growth rate of 1.00 ± 0.05 h(-1) was obtained with a PDC production rate of 708.11 ± 64.70 mg PDC L(-1) h(-1). Comparable values for controls using pure water were 0.95 ± 0.06 h(-1) and 621.01 ± 22.09 mg PDC L(-1) h(-1) (P > 0.05), respectively. The results provide insight on a new approach for more sustainable bio-material production while at the same time generating energy, and suggest that the treated wastewater can be used as a solvent and a nutrient source for the fermentation production of high value platform chemicals.

  12. Development of a Continuous Phytoplankton Culture System for Ocean Acidification Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathryn Wynn-Edwards

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Around one third of all anthropogenic CO2 emissions have been absorbed by the oceans, causing changes in seawater pH and carbonate chemistry. These changes have the potential to affect phytoplankton, which are critically important for marine food webs and the global carbon cycle. However, our current knowledge of how phytoplankton will respond to these changes is limited to a few laboratory and mesocosm experiments. Long-term experiments are needed to determine the vulnerability of phytoplankton to enhanced pCO2. Maintaining phytoplankton cultures in exponential growth for extended periods of time is logistically difficult and labour intensive. Here we describe a continuous culture system that greatly reduces the time required to maintain phytoplankton cultures, and minimises variation in experimental pCO2 treatments over time. This system is simple, relatively cheap, flexible, and allows long-term experiments to be performed to further our understanding of chronic responses and adaptation by phytoplankton species to future ocean acidification.

  13. Adaptation of the genetically tractable malaria pathogen Plasmodium knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert

    2012-12-24

    Research into the aetiological agent of the most widespread form of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, has benefitted enormously from the ability to culture and genetically manipulate blood-stage forms of the parasite in vitro. However, most malaria outside Africa is caused by a distinct Plasmodium species, Plasmodium vivax, and it has become increasingly apparent that zoonotic infection by the closely related simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a frequent cause of life-threatening malaria in regions of southeast Asia. Neither of these important malarial species can be cultured in human cells in vitro, requiring access to primates with the associated ethical and practical constraints. We report the successful adaptation of P. knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes. Human-adapted P. knowlesi clones maintain their capacity to replicate in monkey erythrocytes and can be genetically modified with unprecedented efficiency, providing an important and unique model for studying conserved aspects of malarial biology as well as species-specific features of an emerging pathogen.

  14. Purification of cell culture-derived influenza A virus via continuous anion exchange chromatography on monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Laura M; Wolff, Michael W; Reichl, Udo

    2017-07-17

    The continuously increasing demand for potent and safe vaccines and the intensifying economic pressure on health care systems underlines the need for further optimization of vaccine manufacturing. Here, we focus on downstream processing of human influenza vaccines, investigating the purification of serum-free cell culture-derived influenza virus (A/PR/8/34 H1N1) using continuous chromatography. Therefore, quaternary amine anion exchange monoliths (CIM® QA) were characterized for their capacity to capture virus particles from animal cells cultivated in different media and their ability to separate virions from contaminating host cell proteins and DNA. The continuous chromatography was implemented as simulated moving bed chromatography (SMB) in a three zone open loop configuration with a detached high salt zone for regeneration. SMBs exploiting 10% and 50% of the monoliths' dynamic binding capacity, respectively, allowed the depletion of >98% of the DNA and >52% of the total protein. Based on the hemagglutination assay (HA assay), the virus yield was higher at 10% capacity use (89% vs. 45%). Both SMB separations resulted in a ratio of total protein to hemagglutinin antigen (based on single radial diffusion assay, SRID assay) below the required levels for manufacturing of human vaccines (less than 100µg of protein per virus strain per dose). The level of contaminating DNA was five-times lower for the 10% loading, but still exceeded the required limit for human vaccines. A subsequent Benzonase® treatment step, however, reduced the DNA contamination below 10ng per dose. Coupled to continuous cultivations for virus propagation, the establishment of integrated processes for fully continuous production of vaccines seems to be feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflight Microbial Monitoring- An Alternative Method to Culture Based Detection Currently Used on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Roman, Monsi; Hummerick, Mary E.; Smith, David J.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that potentially destructive microorganisms and human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). The likelihood of introducing new microorganisms occurs with every exchange of crew or addition of equipment or supplies. Microorganisms introduced to the ISS are readily transferred between crew and subsystems (i.e. ECLSS, environmental control and life support systems). Current microbial characterization methods require enrichment of microorganisms and at least a 48-hour incubation time. This increases the microbial load while detecting only a limited number of the total microorganisms. The culture based method detects approximately 1-10% of the total organisms present and provides no identification. To identify and enumerate ISS microbes requires that samples be returned to Earth for complete analysis. Therefore, a more expedient, low-cost, in-flight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is warranted. The RAZOR EX, a ruggedized, commercial off the shelf, real-time PCR field instrument was tested for its ability to detect microorganisms at low concentrations within one hour. Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected at low levels using real-time DNA amplification. Total heterotrophic counts could also be detected using a 16S gene marker that can identify up to 98% of all bacteria. To reflect viable cells found in the samples, RNA was also detectable using a modified, single-step reverse transcription reaction.

  16. Inflight Microbial Monitoring-An Alternative Method to Culture Based Detection Currently Used on International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Roman, Monsi; Hummerick, Mary E.; Smith, David J.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that microorganisms and potential human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). The potential to introduce new microorganisms occurs with every exchange of crew or addition of equipment or supplies. Previous research has shown that microorganisms introduced to the ISS are readily transferred between crew and subsystems and back (i.e. ECLSS, environmental control and life support systems). Current microbial characterization methods require enrichment of microorganisms and a 48-hour incubation time. This increases the microbial load while detecting a limited number of microorganisms. The culture based method detects approximately 1-10% of the total organisms present and provides no identification, To identify and enumerate ISS samples requires that samples to be returned to Earth for complete analysis. Therefore, a more expedient, low-cost, in-flight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is warranted. The RAZOR EX, a ruggedized, commercial off the shelf, real-time PCR field instrument was tested for its ability to detect microorganism at low concentrations within one hour. Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected at low levels using real-time DNA amplification. Total heterotrophic counts could also be detected using a 16S gene marker that can identify up to 98% of all bacteria. To reflect viable cells found in the samples, RNA was also detectable using a modified, single-step reverse transcription reaction.

  17. Evaluation of a Multi-Parameter Sensor for Automated, Continuous Cell Culture Monitoring in Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, D.; Jeevarajan, A.; Anderson, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    offer automated, continuous monitoring of cell cultures with a temporal resolution of 1 minute, which is not attainable by sampling via handheld blood analyzer (i-STAT). Conclusion: The resulting bias and precision found in these cell culture-based studies is comparable to Paratrend sensor clinical results. Although the large error in p02 measurements (+/-18 mm Hg) may be acceptable for clinical applications, where Paratrend values are periodically adjusted to a BGA measurement, the O2 sensor in this bundle may not be reliable enough for the single-calibration requirement of sensors used in NASA's bioreactors. The pH and pC02 sensors in the bundle are reliable and stable over the measurement period, and can be used without recalibration to measure cell cultures in rn.jcrogravity biotechnology experiments. Future work will test additional Paratrend sensors to provide statistical assessment of sensor performance.

  18. The potential of autochthonous microbial culture encapsulation in a confined environment for phenol biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaizeh, Hassan; Kurzbaum, Eyal; Said, Ons; Jaradat, Husain; Menashe, Ofir

    2015-10-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMWW) is claimed to be one of the most polluting effluents produced by agro-food industries, providing high contaminants load that encase cytotoxic agents such as phenolic and polyphenolic compounds. Therefore, a significant and continuous stress episode is induced once the mixed liquor of the wastewater treatment plants (WWTP's) is being exposed to OMWW. The use of bio-augmentation treatment procedures can be useful to eliminate or reduce such stress episodes. In this study, we have estimated the use of autochthonous biomass implementation within small bioreactor platform (SBP) particles as a bio-augmentation method to challenge against WWTPs stress episodes. Our results showed that SBP particles significantly reduced the presence of various phenolics: tannic, gallic and caffeic acid in a synthetic medium and in crude OMWW matrix. Moreover, the SBP particles succeeded to biodegrade a very high concentration of phenol blend (3000 mg L(-1)). Our findings indicated that the presence of the SBP microfiltration membrane has reduced the phenol biodegradation rate by 50 % compared to the same suspended culture. Despite the observed reduction in biodegradation rate, encapsulation in a confined environment can offer significant values such as overcoming the grazing forcers and dilution, thus achieving a long-term sufficient biomass. The potential for reducing stress episodes caused by cytotoxic agents through bio-augmentation treatment procedure using the SBP technology is discussed.

  19. Optimal Control for Multistage Nonlinear Dynamic System of Microbial Bioconversion in Batch Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In batch culture of glycerol biodissimilation to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD, the aim of adding glycerol is to obtain as much 1,3-PD as possible. Taking the yield intensity of 1,3-PD as the performance index and the initial concentration of biomass, glycerol, and terminal time as the control vector, we propose an optimal control model subject to a multistage nonlinear dynamical system and constraints of continuous state. A computational approach is constructed to seek the solution of the above model. Firstly, we transform the optimal control problem into the one with fixed terminal time. Secondly, we transcribe the optimal control model into an unconstrained one based on the penalty functions and an extension of the state space. Finally, by approximating the control function with simple functions, we transform the unconstrained optimal control problem into a sequence of nonlinear programming problems, which can be solved using gradient-based optimization techniques. The convergence analysis and optimality function of the algorithm are also investigated. Numerical results show that, by employing the optimal control, the concentration of 1,3-PD at the terminal time can be increased, compared with the previous results.

  20. Optimal control for nonlinear dynamical system of microbial fed-batch culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chongyang

    2009-10-01

    In fed-batch culture of glycerol bio-dissimilation to 1, 3-propanediol (1, 3-PD), the aim of adding glycerol is to obtain as much 1, 3-PD as possible. So a proper feeding rate is required during the process. Taking the concentration of 1, 3-PD at the terminal time as the performance index and the feeding rate of glycerol as the control function, we propose an optimal control model subject to a nonlinear dynamical system and constraints of continuous state and non-stationary control. A computational approach is constructed to seek the solution of the above model in two aspects. On the one hand we transcribe the optimal control model into an unconstrained one based on the penalty functions and an extension of the state space; on the other hand, by approximating the control function with simple functions, we transform the unconstrained optimal control problem into a sequence of nonlinear programming problems, which can be solved using gradient-based optimization techniques. The convergence analysis of this approximation is also investigated. Numerical results show that, by employing the optimal control policy, the concentration of 1, 3-PD at the terminal time can be increased considerably.

  1. [Effects of continuous application of bio-organic fertilizer on banana production and cultural microflora of bulk soil in orchard with serious disease incidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shu-tang; Shen, Zong-zhuan; Sun, Yi-fei; Lyu, Na-na; Ruan, Yun-ze; Li, Rong; Shen, Qi-rong

    2015-02-01

    A field experiment was conducted for two years to investigate the effects of different fertilization applications on the suppression of banana fusarium wilt disease, crop yield, fruit quality and culturable microflora in a banana orchard which has been monocultured with banana for 12 years and suffered serious banana fusarium wilt disease. The fertilizers included chemical fertilizer (CF), cow manure compost (CM), pig manure compost (PM) and bio-organic fertilizer (BIO). The banana soil microflora was invested using plate-counting method and culture-dependent polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis method (CD PCR-DGGE). Results showed that, compared with the other treatments, 2-year consecutive application of BIO significantly reduced the banana fusarium wilt disease incidence, and improved the banana mass per tree, crop yield, total soluble sugar content and the ratio of total soluble sugar to titratable acidity of fruits (sugar/acid ratio). Moreover, the analysis of culturable microflora showed that BIO application significantly increased the soil microbial biomass, soil culturable bacteria, bacillus and actinomycetes, and the ratio of bacteria to fungi (B/F) , while decreased the Fusarium oxysporum. Based on the CD PCR-DGGE results, the BIO application significantly altered the soil culturable bacterial structure and showed highest richness and diversity after 2 years of BIO application. The phylogenetic analysis of the selected bands showed that BIO application enriched the soil with the species of Paenibacillus sp., Burkholderia sp., uncultured Verrucomicrobia sp. and Bacillus aryabhattai, and depressed the species of Ralstonia sp., Chryseobacterium gleum, Fluviicola taffensis, Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus megaterium. These results confirmed that the continuous application of BIO effectively controlled the fusarium wilt disease, improved the crop yield and fruit quality, and modulated the soil culturable microflora under field

  2. Comparative genome analysis of a thermotolerant Escherichia coli obtained by Genome Replication Engineering Assisted Continuous Evolution (GREACE) and its parent strain provides new understanding of microbial heat tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Guodong; Bao, Guanhui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yang; Chen, Zugen; Li, Yin; Cai, Zhen

    2015-12-25

    Heat tolerance of microbes is of great importance for efficient biorefinery and bioconversion. However, engineering and understanding of microbial heat tolerance are difficult and insufficient because it is a complex physiological trait which probably correlates with all gene functions, genetic regulations, and cellular metabolisms and activities. In this work, a novel strain engineering approach named Genome Replication Engineering Assisted Continuous Evolution (GREACE) was employed to improve the heat tolerance of Escherichia coli. When the E. coli strain carrying a mutator was cultivated under gradually increasing temperature, genome-wide mutations were continuously generated during genome replication and the mutated strains with improved thermotolerance were autonomously selected. A thermotolerant strain HR50 capable of growing at 50°C on LB agar plate was obtained within two months, demonstrating the efficiency of GREACE in improving such a complex physiological trait. To understand the improved heat tolerance, genomes of HR50 and its wildtype strain DH5α were sequenced. Evenly distributed 361 mutations covering all mutation types were found in HR50. Closed material transportations, loose genome conformation, and possibly altered cell wall structure and transcription pattern were the main differences of HR50 compared with DH5α, which were speculated to be responsible for the improved heat tolerance. This work not only expanding our understanding of microbial heat tolerance, but also emphasizing that the in vivo continuous genome mutagenesis method, GREACE, is efficient in improving microbial complex physiological trait.

  3. Transfer of tylosin resistance between Enterococcus spp. during continuous-flow culture of feral or domestic porcine gut microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed populations of domesticated and feral pig gut microbes (RPCF and FC, respectively) were grown in continuous culture to investigate the effects of tylosin on antimicrobial resistance. Cultures established in steady state were inoculated with 9.7 log10 colony forming units (CFU) of a tylosin-re...

  4. Influences of religion and culture on continuing bonds in a sample of British Muslims of Pakistani origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hanan; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-11-01

    This study considered the nature of continuing bonds with deceased relatives in a sample of Pakistani Muslims living in the United Kingdom. Ten participants were interviewed following a cultural psychology approach and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Dreaming, talking with others about the deceased, following the deceased's example, keeping memories and mementos, and doing actions thought to help the deceased were forms of continued relationship found. These were intertwined with the process of grieving and were influenced by the family, culture, and religion. Religion was a strong influence on the prominence given by participants to finishing well and on the notion of doing actions thought to help the deceased. Cultural mores, such as the community, and collectivist ethos and the expectation that emotion would be expressed around the time of death, were found to be supportive for some but sources of tension for other participants. Expressing a continuing bond through following the deceased's example so as to make them proud or happy seemed to be reinforced by cultural roots in respect for elders. Participants gave instances of tensions in areas such as expression of emotion and communality versus individualism that arose as a result of their position between two cultural frameworks, some illustrating how assimilation into the host culture set up conflict with the expected norms of their family/ancestral culture. The study highlights how understanding different cultural and religious influences may enrich the concept of continuing bonds.

  5. Prescreening bacterial colonies for bioactive molecules with Janus plates, a SBS standard double-faced microbial culturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Pascual, Javier; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Kath, Gary S; Sigmund, Janet M; Masurekar, Prakash; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the availability of many culture-based antibiotic screening methods, the lack of sensitive automated methods to identify functional molecules directly from microbial cells still limits the search for new biologically active compounds. The effectiveness of antibiotic detection is influenced by the solubility of the assayed compounds, indicator strain sensitivity, culture media and assay configuration. We describe a qualitative high throughput screening system for detecting cell-perturbing molecules from bacterial colonies employing two opposed agar layers sequentially formed in prototype Society for Biomolecular Screening (SBS) plates, named Janus plates. Direct assay of microbial colonies against target organisms in opposed agar layers overcomes some of the limitations of agar overlay methods. The system enables the rapid detection of extracellular cell-perturbing molecules, e.g., antibiotics, excreted directly from environmental isolates. The source bacterial colonies remain separate from the target organism. The growth layer is prepared and grown independently, so environmental strains can be grown for longer intervals, at temperatures and in media that favor their growth and metabolite expression, while the assay layer with pathogens, usually requiring nutrient-rich medium and elevated temperatures, are added later. Colonies to be tested can be precisely arrayed on the first agar surface, thus avoiding dispersion and disturbance of potential antibiotic-producing colonies by overlaying agar with the target strain. The rectangular SBS configuration facilitates factorial replication of dense microbial colony arrays for testing with multiple assays and assay conditions employing robotic colony pickers and pin tools. Opposed agar layers only slightly reduced the effectiveness for detecting growth inhibition from pure antibiotics compared to single-layer agar diffusion assays. The Janus plate enabled an automation-assisted workflow where a lone operator can

  6. Utilizing a Robotic Sprayer for High Lateral and Mass Resolution MALDI FT-ICR MSI of Microbial Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderton, Christopher R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolic, Nikola; Creissen, Alain V.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-07

    The ability to visualize biochemical interactions between microbial communities using MALDI MSI has provided tremendous insights into a variety of biological fields. Matrix application using a sieve proved to be incredibly useful, but it had many limitations that include uneven matrix coverage and limitation in the types of matrices one could employ in their studies. Recently, there has been a concerted effort to improve matrix application for studying agar plated microbial cultures, many of which utilized automated matrix sprayers. Here, we describe the usefulness of using a robotic sprayer for matrix application. The robotic sprayer has two-dimensional control over where matrix is applied and a heated capillary that allows for rapid drying of the applied matrix. This method provided a significant increase in MALDI sensitivity over the sieve method, as demonstrated by FT-ICR MS analysis, facilitating the ability to gain higher lateral resolution MS images of Bacillus Subtilis than previously reported. This method also allowed for the use of different matrices to be applied to the culture surfaces.

  7. Automated analysis of food-borne pathogens using a novel microbial cell culture, sensing and classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Kun; Li, Yinglei; Ford, William; Land, Walker; Schaffer, J David; Congdon, Robert; Zhang, Jing; Sadik, Omowunmi

    2016-02-21

    We hereby report the design and implementation of an Autonomous Microbial Cell Culture and Classification (AMC(3)) system for rapid detection of food pathogens. Traditional food testing methods require multistep procedures and long incubation period, and are thus prone to human error. AMC(3) introduces a "one click approach" to the detection and classification of pathogenic bacteria. Once the cultured materials are prepared, all operations are automatic. AMC(3) is an integrated sensor array platform in a microbial fuel cell system composed of a multi-potentiostat, an automated data collection system (Python program, Yocto Maxi-coupler electromechanical relay module) and a powerful classification program. The classification scheme consists of Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and General Regression Neural Network (GRNN) oracle-based system. Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) is performed on standard samples or unknown samples. Then, using preset feature extractions and quality control, accepted data are analyzed by the intelligent classification system. In a typical use, thirty-two extracted features were analyzed to correctly classify the following pathogens: Escherichia coli ATCC#25922, Escherichia coli ATCC#11775, and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC#12228. 85.4% accuracy range was recorded for unknown samples, and within a shorter time period than the industry standard of 24 hours.

  8. mRNA differential display in a microbial enrichment culture: simultaneous identification of three cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C; Walters, Dana M; Thomas, Stuart M; Nagarajan, Vasantha; Rouvière, Pierre E

    2003-01-01

    mRNA differential display has been used to identify cyclohexanone oxidation genes in a mixed microbial community derived from a wastewater bioreactor. Thirteen DNA fragments randomly amplified from the total RNA of an enrichment subculture exposed to cyclohexanone corresponded to genes predicted to be involved in the degradation of cyclohexanone. Nine of these DNA fragments are part of genes encoding three distinct Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three different bacterial species present in the enrichment culture. In Arthrobacter sp. strain BP2 and Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi2, the monooxygenase is part of a gene cluster that includes all the genes required for the degradation of cyclohexanone, while in Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi1 the genes surrounding the monooxygenase are not predicted to be involved in this degradation pathway but rather seem to belong to a biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, in the case of Arthrobacter strain BP2, three other genes flanking the monooxygenase were identified by differential display, demonstrating that the repeated sampling of bacterial operons shown earlier for a pure culture (D. M. Walters, R. Russ, H. Knackmuss, and P. E. Rouvière, Gene 273:305-315, 2001) is also possible for microbial communities. The activity of the three cyclohexanone monooxygenases was confirmed and characterized following their expression in Escherichia coli.

  9. ITEM - agro-food microbial culture collection: The importance of toxigenic fungi in the fight against mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanelli Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal culture collections are important to biologists, microbiologists, epidemiologists and others involved in health and natural sciences. The improvement of techniques and methods for fungal isolation and preservation has contributed to maintain large microbial collections, which represent a rich source of biological sciences research, especially taxonomic, pathological and biodiversity studies as well as industrial applications. The collection centers are responsible for repository reference strains and for the maintenance of these microorganisms. The ITEM Microbial Culture Collection of ISPA (Institute of Sciences and of Food Production includes more than 10,000 strains belonging to various agro-food microorganisms with phytopathological and toxicological significance. These microorganisms are mainly fungal pathogens belonging to toxigenic genera of Fusarium, Aspergillus, Alternaria, and Penicillium. This collection is a remarkable resource in the fight against mycotoxins: the increasing number of toxigenic fungi included in this collection ensures an original genetic source for biotechnological applications in several fields of research, contributing to knowledge improvement about fungal biology and strategies development for reducing mycotoxin contamination.

  10. Utilizing a Robotic Sprayer for High Lateral and Mass Resolution MALDI FT-ICR MSI of Microbial Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Christopher R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolić, Nikola; Creissen, Alain; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-01

    The ability to visualize biochemical interactions between microbial communities using MALDI MSI has provided tremendous insights into a variety of biological fields. Matrix application using a sieve proved to be incredibly useful, but it has many limitations that include uneven matrix coverage and limitation in the types of matrices that could be employed in studies. Recently, there has been a concerted effort to improve matrix application for studying agar plated microbial cultures, many of which utilized automated matrix sprayers. Here, we describe the usefulness of using a robotic sprayer for matrix application. The robotic sprayer has two-dimensional control over where matrix is applied, and a heated capillary that allows for rapid drying of the applied matrix. This method provided a significant increase in MALDI sensitivity over the sieve method, as demonstrated by FT-ICR MS analysis, facilitating the ability to gain higher lateral resolution MS images of Bacillus subtilis than previously reported. This method also allowed for the use of different matrices to be applied to the culture surfaces.

  11. 微生物限度培养器在微生物限度检查中的适用性研究%Applicability of microbial limit culture in microbial limit test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任嘉; 柳海霞

    2015-01-01

    目的:微生物限度培养器在微生物限度检查中的适用性。方法:借助微生物限度培养器检验5种标准菌株及其回收率,并对屈臣氏水、含抑菌成分的药品进行相应的微生物限度检验。结果:用《微生物限度培养器》与用《药典》规定的薄膜过滤法的检验结果相比,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:在微生物限度检查中,微生物限度培养器适用于日常的微生物检验,比药典规定的过滤方法操作更便捷,且增大了滤膜面积,提高过滤效果。%Objective:Applicability of microbial limit culture in microbial limit test.Methods:Testing of 5 standard strains and their recovery rate by microbial limit,the microbial limit test of Watsons water and drug containing antimicrobial components. Results:Comparison of membrane filtration method with microbial limit culture for membrane filtration,there was no statistical significance(P>0.05).Conclusion:In microbial limit test,microbial limit culture device is suitable for routine microbiological examination,and it is more convenient to operate and increase the size of the filter, and improve the filtering effect.

  12. Diversity and Distribution of Culturable Microbial Communities of Semiarid Desert Steppe and Cultivated Land in Northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yan-lin CHEN Ji-xiang

    2016-05-01

    microbial diversities of the desert steppe and cultivated land were abundant and different. The microbial numbers and community distributions changed at different depths in the same area. The culturable microbial communities of the cultivated land were more abundant than those of the desert steppe soils.

  13. Egypt’s Red Sea Coast: Phylogenetic analysis of cultured microbial consortia in industrialized sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada A. Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Red Sea has a unique geography and ecosystem and its shores are very rich in mangrove, macro-algae and coral reefs. Different sources of pollution are affecting the Red Sea shores and waters which impacts biological life including microbial life. We assessed the effects of industrialization, along the Egyptian Red Sea coast in eight coastal sites and two lakes, on microbial life. The bacterial community in sediment samples was analyzed using bacterial 16S rDNApyrosequencing of V6-V4 hypervariable regions. Taxonomical assignment of 131,402 significant reads to major bacterial taxa revealed five main bacterial phyla dominating the sampled Red Sea sites. This includes Proteobacteria (68%, Firmicutes (13%, Fusobacteria (12%, Bacteriodetes (6% and Spirochetes (0.03%. Further analysis revealed distinct bacterial consortium formed mainly of: 1 marine Vibrio’s- suggesting a Marine Vibrio phenomenon 2 potential human pathogens and 3 oil-degrading bacteria. We discuss a distinct microbial consortium in Solar Lake West near Taba/Eilat and Saline Lake in Ras Muhammad; revealing the highest abundance of human pathogens versus no pathogens, respectively. Our results draw attention to the affects of industrialization on the Red Sea, and suggest further analysis to overcome hazardous affects on the impacted sites.

  14. Characteristics of the microbial community in rhizosphere of Camptotheca acuminata cultured with exotic invasive plant Eupatorium adenophorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZU YuanGang; GAO ChongYang; WANG WenJie; YANG FengJian; LIU Ying; WANG Min; ZHAO YangGuo

    2007-01-01

    The traditional culture-dependent plate counting and culture-independent small-subunit-ribosomal RNA gene-targeted molecular techniques, Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) and terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (tRFLP) combined with 16S rDNA clone library were adopted to investigate the impacts of secretion from Camptotheca acuminata (abbreviated to Ca) roots on the quantities and structure of eukaryotic microbes and bacteria in the rhizosphere, and the possibility that Ca controls exotic invasive plant Eupatorium adenophorum (Ea). The counting results indicated that the number of bacteria increased in turn in rhizospheres of Ea, Ca-Ea mixed culture and Ca, while that of eukaryotic microbes decreased. PCR-SSCP profiles showed eukaryotic microbial bands (corresponding to biodiversity) in rhizosphere of Ea were more complex than those of Ca and CE. Meristolohmannia sp., Termitomyces sp. And Rhodophyllus sp. Were the dominant populations in the rhizosphere of Ca. Bacterial terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) profiles showed no difference among three kinds of rhizospheres, and the sequences of the 16S rDNA clone library from Ca rhizospheres were distributed in 10 known phyla, in which phylum Proteobacteria were the absolute dominant group and accounted for 24.71% of the cloned sequences (δ-Proteobacteria accounted for up to 17.65%), and phyla Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes accounted for 16.47% and 10.59% of the cloned sequences, respectively. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography detected a trace amount of camptothecin and hydroxycamptothecin in the rhizospheric soil of Ca and CE, but examined neither camptothecin nor hydroxycamptothecin in rhizospheric soil of Ea. Therefore, invasion and diffusion of Ea evidently depended on distinguishing the eukaryotic community structure, but not on that of the bacterial pattern. Ca was able to alter the eukaryotic community structure of invasive Ea by secreting camptothecin and

  15. Microbial dynamics and biodiversity of table olives fermentations: the different culture-dependent and –independent approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian eBotta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The microbial ecology of the table olive fermentation process is a complex set of dynamics in which the roles of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB and yeast populations are closely related, and this synergism is of fundamental importance to obtain high quality products. Several studies on the ecology of table olives, both in spontaneous fermentations and in inoculated ones, have focused on the identification and characterization of yeasts, as they play a key role in the definition of the final organoleptic profiles through the production of volatile compounds. Moreover, these are able to promote the growth of LAB, which is responsible for the stabilization of the final product through the acidification activity and the inhibition of the growth of pathogenic bacteria. The current empirical production process of table olives could be improved through the development of mixed starter cultures. These can only be developed after a deep study of the population dynamics of yeasts and LAB by means of molecular methods. Until now, most studies have exploited culture-dependent approaches to define the natural microbiota of brine and olives. These approaches have identified two main species of LAB, namely Lactobacillus plantarum and L. pentosus, while, as far as yeasts are concerned, the most frequently isolated genera are Candida, Pichia and Saccharomyces. However, there are a few studies in literature in which a culture-independent approach has been employed. This review summarizes the state of the art of the microbial ecology of table olive fermentations and it focuses on the different approaches and molecular methods that have been applied.

  16. Digestion during continuous culture fermentation when replacing perennial ryegrass with barley and steam-flaked corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, W J; Kolver, E S; Egan, A R

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the optimal inclusion rate of grain required to maximize nutrient digestion of a diet based on highly digestible pasture. It was hypothesized that maximum digestion would occur at a rate of grain inclusion that resulted in a culture pH of 6.0, reflecting the pH below which fiber digestion would be expected to be compromised. Four dual-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to establish the effects on digestion of replacing freeze-dried, highly digestible ryegrass with 0, 15, 30, and 45% of dry matter as 60% barley, 35% steam-flaked corn, and 5% molasses mix. The respective composite diets were fed twice daily to mimic intake patterns observed in dairy cows offered supplements during milking and offered half their daily allowance of pasture after each milking. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of four 9-d experimental periods. Average daily culture pH decreased linearly as proportion of cereal grain in the diet increased, with average daily pH ranging from 6.29 to 5.74. Concentrations of neutral detergent fiber and total fatty acids decreased linearly with increasing proportion of cereal grain in the diet. Digestion of organic matter (OM) was maximized at an interpolated value of 24% grain inclusion and culture pH of 6.0, but the difference in the OM digestibility over the range of grain treatments from 0 to 45% was small (3 percentage units) despite pH changes over a range of 6.3 to 5.7. The relatively small change in OM digestibility was explained by reduced fiber and crude protein digestibilities being balanced by an increased digestion of nonstructural carbohydrate. Although different relationships between ruminal pH and digestibility appear to exist when cows are fed pasture alone compared with a total mixed ration, when starch supplements are included in pasture diets, the relationships associated with feeding a total mixed ration may then be more likely to apply.

  17. Microbial diversity of bacteria, archaea, and fungi communities in a continuous flow constructed wetland for the treatment of swine waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminant removal in constructed wetlands may largely be a function of many microbial processes. However, information about bacterial, archaea, and fungi communities in constructed wetlands for the removal of swine waste is limited. In this study, we used 454/GS-FLX pyrosequencing to assess bacter...

  18. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

  19. The Continuing Importance of the "Cultural" in the Study of Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The academic study of youth culture has changed markedly in the past two decades. The early 1990s saw a "cultural turn" as the sociological focus moved from "institutional and structural features of society to the study of culture". Andy Bennett begins this article with a critical evaluation of the "cultural turn" and its impact on the field of…

  20. Microbial identification and automated antibiotic susceptibility testing directly from positive blood cultures using MALDI-TOF MS and VITEK 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattal, C; Oberoi, J K

    2016-01-01

    The study addresses the utility of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using VITEK MS and the VITEK 2 antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) system for direct identification (ID) and timely AST from positive blood culture bottles using a lysis-filtration method (LFM). Between July and December 2014, a total of 140 non-duplicate mono-microbial blood cultures were processed. An aliquot of positive blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer before the bacteria were filtered and washed. Micro-organisms recovered from the filter were first identified using VITEK MS and its suspension was used for direct AST by VITEK 2 once the ID was known. Direct ID and AST results were compared with classical methods using solid growth. Out of the 140 bottles tested, VITEK MS resulted in 70.7 % correct identification to the genus and/ or species level. For the 103 bottles where identification was possible, there was agreement in 97 samples (94.17 %) with classical culture. Compared to the routine method, the direct AST resulted in category agreement in 860 (96.5 %) of 891 bacteria-antimicrobial agent combinations tested. The results of direct ID and AST were available 16.1 hours before those of the standard approach on average. The combined use of VITEK MS and VITEK 2 directly on samples from positive blood culture bottles using a LFM technique can result in rapid and reliable ID and AST results in blood stream infections to result in early institution of targeted treatment. The combination of LFM and AST using VITEK 2 was found to expedite AST more reliably.

  1. Microbial community composition of the ileum and cecum of broiler chickens as revealed by molecular and culture-based techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Engberg, R.M.; Leser, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    The microbial communities of the ileum and cecum of broiler chickens from a conventional and an organic farm were investigated using conventional culture techniques as well as cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Eighty-five percent of the 557 cloned sequences were ...% of the cecal clones belonged to this cluster in conventional and organic broiler chickens, respectively. We were, however, able to recover a number of these phylotypes by cultivation, and the isolates were shown to be butyric acid producers. The investigation was a descriptive rather than a comparative study...... of 2 different rearing systems; however, several differences were observed. For instance, Clostridium perfringens was found in significantly higher numbers in the birds from the organic farm compared with the conventional broilers, probably due to the addition of salinomycin to the conventional feed...

  2. High-throughput sequencing and metagenomics: moving forward in the culture-independent analysis of food microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-05-01

    Following recent trends in environmental microbiology, food microbiology has benefited from the advances in molecular biology and adopted novel strategies to detect, identify, and monitor microbes in food. An in-depth study of the microbial diversity in food can now be achieved by using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) approaches after direct nucleic acid extraction from the sample to be studied. In this review, the workflow of applying culture-independent HTS to food matrices is described. The current scenario and future perspectives of HTS uses to study food microbiota are presented, and the decision-making process leading to the best choice of working conditions to fulfill the specific needs of food research is described.

  3. Microbial culture selection for bio-hydrogen production from waste ground wheat by dark fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argun, Hidayet; Kargi, Fikret; Kapdan, Ilgi K. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    Hydrogen formation performances of different anaerobic bacteria were investigated in batch dark fermentation of waste wheat powder solution (WPS). Serum bottles containing wheat powder were inoculated with pure cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum (CAB), Clostridium butyricum (CB), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA), heat-treated anaerobic sludge (ANS) and a mixture of those cultures (MIX). Cumulative hydrogen formation (CHF), hydrogen yield (HY) and specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) were determined for every culture. The heat-treated anaerobic sludge was found to be the most effective culture with a cumulative hydrogen formation of 560 ml, hydrogen yield of 223 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} starch and a specific hydrogen production rate of 32.1 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} h{sup -1}. (author)

  4. Kinetics of nitrate and sulfate removal using a mixed microbial culture with or without limited-oxygen fed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-Jun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Ai-Jie; Guo, Hong-Liang; Yuan, Ye; Lee, Duu-Jong; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2014-07-01

    The biological degradation of nitrate and sulfate was investigated using a mixed microbial culture and lactate as the carbon source, with or without limited-oxygen fed. It was found that sulfate reduction was slightly inhibited by nitrate, since after nitrate depletion the sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.37 mg SO4 (2-)/mg VSS d to 0.71 mg SO4 (2-)/mg VSS d, and the maximum rate of sulfate reduction in the presence of nitrate corresponded to 56 % of the non-inhibited sulfate reduction rate determined after nitrate depleted. However, simultaneous but not sequential reduction of both oxy-anions was observed in this study, unlike some literature reports in which sulfate reduction starts only after depletion of nitrate, and this case might be due to the fact that lactate was always kept above the limiting conditions. At limited oxygen, the inhibited effect on sulfate reduction by nitrate was relieved, and the sulfate reduction rate seemed relatively higher than that obtained without limited-oxygen fed, whereas kept almost constant (0.86-0.89 mg SO4 (2-)/mg VSS d) cross the six ROS states. In contrast, nitrate reduction rates decreased substantially with the increase in the initial limited-oxygen fed, showing an inhibited effect on nitrate reduction by oxygen. Kinetic parameters determined for the mixed microbial culture showed that the maximum specific sulfate utilization rate obtained (0.098 ± 0.022 mg SO4 (2-)/(mg VSS h)) was similar to the reported typical value (0.1 mg SO4 (2-)/(mg VSS h)), also indicating a moderate inhibited effect by nitrate.

  5. Effects of cyanamide fertilizer on microbial community structure of continuous cropping soil%氰胺类肥料对连作土壤微生物种群结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马军伟; 孙万春; 胡庆发; 俞巧钢; 王强; 符建荣

    2013-01-01

    structure and increasing bio‐diversity , was an effective method to overcome continuous cropping obstacles . Calcium cyanamide and dicyandiamide ( DCD) were cyanamide fertilizers , which had significant inhibition effect on harmful organisms , especially on pathogenic fungi in soil . However , effects of cyanamide fertilizers on microbial community structure and bio‐diversity of continuous cropping soil were unclear . The aim of this research was to study the effects of calcium cyanamide and dicyandiamide application on microbial community structure in continuous vegetable cropping soil . Results of the study might reveal the soil micro‐ecological mechanism of calcium cyanamide and dicyandiamide to control eggplant verticillium wilt , and provide theoretical foundation and technical guidance for cyanamide fertilizers application in agricultural production . The experimental soil was silt paddy soil and was collected from farmland in Quzhou , Zhejiang Province . In the farmland , the planting years of eggplant were more than four years , and verticillium wilt of eggplant was severe and out of control in the last year . Six treatments were designed in experiments: 1) control , 2) dicyandiamide , 3) calcium cyanamide (lime nitrogen) , 4) straw , 5) dicyandiamide + straw , 6) calcium cyanamide + straw . Soils of different treatments were incubated at 25 ℃ . Through conventional artificial culture method , quantities of bacteria , fungi and actinomycetes were recorded . Community structure and bio‐diversity of bacteria and fungi were analyzed by PCR‐DGGE . Results showed that , calcium cyanamide application effectively increased the number of bacteria , decreased the amount of fungi , improved the ratio of bacteria to fungi and actinomycetes to fungi in the continuous cropping soil . But dicyandiamide showed no distinct influence on the number of bacteria . Dicyandiamide and dicyandiamide plus rice straw application increased the ratio of bacteria to fungi with the

  6. Nitrogen-regulated transcription and enzyme activities in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Raeven, L J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T

    1995-05-01

    Variations in the transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes and in the activities of nitrogen-regulated enzymes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by changing the carbon and nitrogen fluxes. S. cerevisiae was grown in continuous culture at various dilution rates (D) under nitrogen limitation with NH4Cl as sole nitrogen source. With an increase in D from 0.05 to 0.29 h-1, both the glucose and the ammonia flux increased sixfold. The activities of the two ammonia-incorporating enzymes, NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS), encoded by GDH1 and GLN1, respectively, increased with increasing D, while the activity of the glutamate-degrading enzyme, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), decreased. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the transcription of GDH1 and GLN1; however increased D was accompanied by an increase in GAP1 transcription. At the metabolite level, the increase in the glucose and nitrogen flux did not result in changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate or glutamine concentrations. It is shown that growth on ammonia alone is not sufficient to cause repression of GAP1 and GLN1 transcription and that the regulation of GAP1 transcription and both NADPH-GDH and GS activity is not an on/off switch, but is gradually modulated in correlation with the ammonia concentration.

  7. Stability and Sensitivity Analysis of a Plant Disease Model with Continuous Cultural Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a plant disease model with continuous cultural control strategy and time delay is formulated. Then, how the time delay affects the overall disease progression and, mathematically, how the delay affects the dynamics of the model are investigated. By analyzing the transendental characteristic equation, stability conditions related to the time delay are derived for the disease-free equilibrium. Specially, when R0=1, the Jacobi matrix of the model at the disease-free equilibrium always has a simple zero eigenvalue for all τ≥0. The center manifold reduction and the normal form theory are used to discuss the stability and the steady-state bifurcations of the model near the nonhyperbolic disease-free equilibrium. Then, the sensitivity analysis of the threshold parameter R0 and the positive equilibrium E* is carried out in order to determine the relative importance of different factors responsible for disease transmission. Finally, numerical simulations are employed to support the qualitative results.

  8. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  9. Microbial prevalence, diversity and abundance in amniotic fluid during preterm labor: a molecular and culture-based investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B DiGiulio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm delivery causes substantial neonatal mortality and morbidity. Unrecognized intra-amniotic infections caused by cultivation-resistant microbes may play a role. Molecular methods can detect, characterize and quantify microbes independently of traditional culture techniques. However, molecular studies that define the diversity and abundance of microbes invading the amniotic cavity, and evaluate their clinical significance within a causal framework, are lacking. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In parallel with culture, we used broad-range end-point and real-time PCR assays to amplify, identify and quantify ribosomal DNA (rDNA of bacteria, fungi and archaea from amniotic fluid of 166 women in preterm labor with intact membranes. We sequenced up to 24 rRNA clones per positive specimen and assigned taxonomic designations to approximately the species level. Microbial prevalence, diversity and abundance were correlated with host inflammation and with gestational and neonatal outcomes. Study subjects who delivered at term served as controls. The combined use of molecular and culture methods revealed a greater prevalence (15% of subjects and diversity (18 taxa of microbes in amniotic fluid than did culture alone (9.6% of subjects; 11 taxa. The taxa detected only by PCR included a related group of fastidious bacteria, comprised of Sneathia sanguinegens, Leptotrichia amnionii and an unassigned, uncultivated, and previously-uncharacterized bacterium; one or more members of this group were detected in 25% of positive specimens. A positive PCR was associated with histologic chorioamnionitis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 20; 95% CI, 2.4 to 172, and funisitis (adjusted OR 18; 95% CI, 3.1 to 99. The positive predictive value of PCR for preterm delivery was 100 percent. A temporal association between a positive PCR and delivery was supported by a shortened amniocentesis-to-delivery interval (adjusted hazard ratio 4.6; 95% CI, 2.2 to 9.5. A dose

  10. Microbial diversity and dynamics throughout manufacturing and ripening of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses investigated by culture-independent techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryssel, Mia; Johansen, Pernille; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Microbial successions on the surface and in the interior of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses were investigated by culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Culture-independent detection of microorganisms was obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyroseq.......9%±7.8% of the OTUs throughout the cheese processing. The microbial dynamics described at genus level in this study add to a comprehensive understanding of the complex microbiota existing especially on surface ripened semi-hard cheeses.......Microbial successions on the surface and in the interior of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses were investigated by culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Culture-independent detection of microorganisms was obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE....... As expected, microbial profiles of the surface and the interior of the cheeses diverged. During cheese production pyrosequencing determined Lactococcus as the dominating genus on cheese surfaces, representing on average 94.7%±2.1% of the OTUs. At day 6 Lactococcus spp. declined to 10.0% of the OTUs, whereas...

  11. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varrone, Cristiano; Heggeset, T. M. B.; Le, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable...

  12. Effects of organic loading rate on hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production and microbial community during acidogenic hydrogenesis in a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, J; Cho, K-S

    2016-12-01

    Microbial community associated with hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation was characterized in acidogenic hydrogenesis using molasses wastewater as a feedstock. Hydrogen and VFAs production were measured under an organic loading rate (OLR) from 19 to 35 g-COD l(-1)  day(-1) . The active microbial community was analysed using RNA-based massively parallel sequencing technique, and their correlation patterns were analysed using networking analysis. The continuous stirred tank reactor achieved stable hydrogen production at different OLR conditions, and the maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) was 1·02 L-H2  l(-1)  day(-1) at 31·0 g-COD l(-1)  day(-1) . Butyrate (50%) and acetate (38%) positively increased with increase in OLR. Total VFA production stayed around 7135 mg l(-1) during the operation period. Although Clostridiales and Lactobacillales were relatively abundant, the HPR was positively associated with Pseudomonadaceae and Micrococcineae. Total VFA and acetate, butyrate and propionate concentrations were positively correlated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Bacillales, Sporolactobacillus and Lactobacillus. The close relationship between Pseudomonadaceae and Micrococcineae, and LAB play important roles for stable hydrogen and VFA production from molasses wastewater. Microbial information on hydrogen and VFA production can be useful to design and operate for acidogenic hydrogenesis using high strength molasses wastewater. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Impact of continuous and intermittent supply of electric assistance on high-strength 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) degradation in electro-microbial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhanping; Zhang, Minghui; Zhang, Jingli; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-07-01

    The high-strength 2,4-DCP, which exists in two states: dissolved and colloidal, was studied by a continuously electro-microbial system (CEMS) and an intermittently electro-microbial system (IEMS). The hydrolysis rate of colloidal 2,4-DCP in the IEMS without electric assistance was much higher than that in the CEMS. However, the degradation rate of the dissolved 2,4-DCP and the dissolved intermediates (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol) in the IEMS without electric assistance were much lower than that in the CEMS. By adjusting the intermittent operation mode, the degradation time of 2,4-DCP was shortened greatly. Microbial characteristics in the CEMS and the IEMS were different. The correlation analysis for the main factors affecting the hydrolysis was performed by SPSS, and it was found that the correlation coefficient (rp) was -0.912 for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content, 0.823 for zeta potential and 0.632 for relative hydrophobicity, respectively.

  14. Batch fermentative hydrogen production by enriched mixed culture: Combination strategy and their microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Sen, Biswarup; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2014-02-01

    The effect of individual and combined mixed culture on dark fermentative hydrogen production performance was investigated. Mixed cultures from cow dung (C1), sewage sludge (C2), and pig slurry (C3) were enriched under strict anaerobic conditions at 37°C with glucose as the sole carbon source. Biochemical hydrogen production test in peptone-yeast-glucose (PYG) and basal medium was performed for individual mixed cultures (C1, C2 and C3) and their combinations (C1-C2, C2-C3, C1-C3 and C1-C2-C3) at a glucose concentration of 10 g/L, 37°C and initial pH 7. Maximum hydrogen yields (HY) of 2.0 and 1.86 [Formula: see text] by C2, and 1.98 and 1.95 mol(H2)/mol(glucose) by C2-C3 were obtained in PYG and basal medium, respectively. Butyrate and acetate were the major soluble metabolites produced by all the cultures, and the ratio of butyrate to acetate was ∼2 fold higher in basal medium than PYG medium, indicating strong influence of media formulation on glucose catabolism. The major hydrogen-producing bacterial strains, observed in all mixed cultures, belonged to Clostridium butyricum, C. saccharobutylicum, C. tertium and C. perfringens. The hydrogen production performance of the combined mixed culture (C2-C3) was further evaluated on beverage wastewater (10 g/L) at pH 7 and 37°C. The results showed an HY of 1.92 mol(H2)/mol(glucose-equivalent). Experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen fermentation by mixed culture combination could be a novel strategy to improve the HY from industrial wastewater.

  15. Enriched ammonia-tolerant methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula in continuous biomethanation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Treu, Laura; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    application of bioaugmentation could improve up to 36% the methane production, the greenhouse gas reduction efficiency and the gross revenue of ammonia inhibited full scale biogas reactors. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that bioaugmentation changed the microbial composition of the reactors resulting...

  16. Kinetics of phenol and m-cresol biodegradation by an indigenous mixed microbial culture isolated from a sewage treatment plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pichiah Saravanan; Kannan Pakshirajan; Prabirkumar Saha

    2008-01-01

    An acclimatized mixed microbial culture, predominantly Pseudomonas sp., was enriched from a sewage treatment plant, and its potential to simultaneously degrade mixtures of phenol and m-cresol was investigated during its growth in batch shake flasks. A 22 full factorial design with the two substrates at two different levels and different initial concentration ranges (low and high), was employed to carry out the biodegradation experiments. The substrates phenol and m-cresol were completely utilized within 21 h when present at low concentrations of 100 mg/L for each, and at high concentration of 600 mg/L for each, a maximum time of 187 h was observed for their removal. The biodegradation results also showed that the presence of phenol in low concentration range (100-300 mg/L) did not inhibit m-cresol biodegradation. Whereas the presence of m-cresol inhibited phenol biodegradation by the culture. Moreover, irrespective of the concentrations used, phenol was degraded preferentially and earlier than m-cresol. A sum kinetics model was used to describe the variation in the substrate specific degradation rates, which gave a high coefficient of determination value (R2 0.98) at the low concentration range of the substrates. From the estimated interaction parameter values obtained from this model, the inhibitory effect of phenol on m-cresol degradation by the culture was found to be more pronounced compared to that of m-cresol on phenol. This study showed a good potential of the indigenous mixed culture in degrading mixed substrate of phenolics.

  17. Evaluation of microbial diversity in sulfite-added and sulfite-free wine by culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohta, Tami; Masaki, Kazuo; Mizuno, Akihiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami

    2014-05-01

    The difference in microbiota including non-lactic acid bacteria, non-acetic acid bacteria, and wild yeast during winemaking and in the end-products between sulfite-added and sulfite-free wine, was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and a culture-dependent method. There were differences between the microorganisms detected by PCR-DGGE and those detected by the culture-dependent method, probably because of the selectivity of culture medium and the characteristics of PCR-based method. In both the red wine and white wine, the microbial diversity of the sulfite-added wine was lower than that of the sulfite-free wine during fermentation. Tatumella terrea was detected from the fermenting must by PCR-DGGE and by the culture-dependent method, even though sulfite inhibited its growth to some extent. We confirmed that the addition of sulfite plays an important role in winemaking by inhibiting the growth of unexpected microorganisms, but on the other hand, it was revealed that some microorganisms can survive and grow in sulfite-added fermenting must. We also analyzed 15 samples of commercial wines by the PCR-DGGE method and detected various microorganisms. Among them, Sphingomonas sp., Pseudozyma sp., Ochromonas sp. and Methylophilus sp. were found for the first time in wine as far as we know. We did not identify a specific microorganism that was detected only from wines without sulfite addition. Thus, the microbiota of end-products seemed to be influenced by other factors, such as filtration before bottling, the production equipment and the storage environment. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries.

  19. A method for microbial decontamination ofAcanthamoeba cultures using the peritoneal cavity of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonalves; Patrcia Albuquerque; Csar Augusto Cuba-Cuba

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate whether the inoculation of contaminated cultures in the peritoneal cavity of mice could implement decontamination ofAcanthamoeba cultures. Methods: Suspensions ofAcanthamoeba,Acanthamoeba polyphagaATCC30461, or Acanthamoeba spp. isolated from soil (UnB13 strain) were inoculated in the peritoneal cavity of Swiss mice (n = 24). After 1, 6, 12, or 24 h of exposure the peritoneal cavity was washed and assessed for the presence of bacteria, fungi, andAcanthamoeba. Results: After 1 h of intraperitoneal inoculation at least 97% of the bacteria and 96% of the fungi (P Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that this technique has great potential for decontamination ofAcanthamoeba cultures in a short period of time.

  20. A method for microbial decontamination of Acanthamoeba cultures using the peritoneal cavity of mice简

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniella; de; Sousa; Mendes; Moreira; Alves; Rodrigo; Gurgel-Gon?alves; Patrícia; Albuquerque; César; Augusto; Cuba-Cuba; Maria; Imaculada; Muniz-Junqueira; Selma; Aparecida; Souza; Kückelhaus

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the inoculation of contaminated cultures in the peritoneal cavity of mice could implement decontamination of Acanthamoeba cultures.Methods: Suspensions of Acanthamoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga ATCC 30461, or Acanthamoeba spp. isolated from soil(Un B13 strain) were inoculated in the peritoneal cavity of Swiss mice(n = 24). After 1, 6, 12, or 24 h of exposure the peritoneal cavity was washed and assessed for the presence of bacteria, fungi, and Acanthamoeba.Results: After 1 h of intraperitoneal inoculation at least 97% of the bacteria and 96% of the fungi(P < 0.05) and 99% of the bacteria(P < 0.05) were successfully eliminated from the ATCC 30461 strain and from the soil isolate Un B13 strain, respectively. This method also allowed the recovery of most trophozoites and cysts from both Acanthamoeba cultures at the end of 24 h.Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that this technique has great potential for decontamination of Acanthamoeba cultures in a short period of time.

  1. Characteristics of the microbial community in rhizosphere of Camptotheca acuminata cultured with exotic invasive plant Eupatorium adenophorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The traditional culture-dependent plate counting and culture-independent small-subunit-ribosomal RNA gene-targeted molecular techniques, Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) and ter-minal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (tRFLP) combined with 16S rDNA clone library were adopted to investigate the impacts of secretion from Camptotheca acuminata (abbreviated to Ca) roots on the quantities and structure of eukaryotic microbes and bacteria in the rhizosphere, and the possi-bility that Ca controls exotic invasive plant Eupatorium adenophorum (Ea). The counting results indi-cated that the number of bacteria increased in turn in rhizospheres of Ea, Ca-Ea mixed culture and Ca, while that of eukaryotic microbes decreased. PCR-SSCP profiles showed eukaryotic microbial bands (corresponding to biodiversity) in rhizosphere of Ea were more complex than those of Ca and CE. Meristolohmannia sp., Termitomyces sp. and Rhodophyllus sp. were the dominant populations in the rhizosphere of Ca. Bacterial terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) profiles showed no difference among three kinds of rhizospheres, and the sequences of the 16S rDNA clone library from Ca rhizospheres were distributed in 10 known phyla, in which phylum Proteobacteria were the absolute dominant group and accounted for 24.71% of the cloned sequences (δ-Proteobacteria accounted for up to 17.65%), and phyla Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes accounted for 16.47% and 10.59% of the cloned sequences, respectively. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography detected a trace amount of camp-tothecin and hydroxycamptothecin in the rhizospheric soil of Ca and CE, but examined neither camp-tothecin nor hydroxycamptothecin in rhizospheric soil of Ea. Therefore, invasion and diffusion of Ea evidently depended on distinguishing the eukaryotic community structure, but not on that of the bac-terial pattern. Ca was able to alter the eukaryotic community structure of invasive Ea by secreting camptothecin and

  2. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  3. Climate proxies from Sr/Ca of coccolith calcite: calibrations from continuous culture of Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Rosenthal, Yair; Falkowski, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Continuous culture of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi reveals that coccolith Sr/Ca ratios depend on temperature and growth rate. At a constant temperature of 18°C, coccolith Sr/Ca ratios increased nearly 15% as growth rate increased from 0.1 to 1.5 divisions per day and calcification rate increased from 1.5 to 50 pg calcite per cell per day. When temperature increased from 7 to 26°C, Sr/Ca ratios increased by more than 25% (i.e., 1%/1°C), although the range in growth and calcification rates was the same as for experiments at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera and abiogenic calcites, suggesting that it is controlled by thermodynamic processes. However, the positive correlation of coccolith Sr/Ca with temperature contrasts with field studies in the equatorial Pacific, where Sr/Ca ratios are highest at the locus of maximum upwelling and productivity despite depressed temperatures. This paradox may reflect different calcification rate effects between E. huxleyi and the other species dominating assemblages in the equatorial Pacific sediments, which may be resolved by new techniques for separation of monospecific coccolith samples from sediments. Models of crystal growth indicate that kinetic effects on Sr partitioning in calcite due to surface enrichment could explain the Sr/Ca variations observed in constant temperature experiments but not the larger amplitude calcification rate effects observed in equatorial Pacific sediments. Despite the dual influence of temperature and growth rate on coccolith Sr/Ca, coccolith Sr/Ca correlates with "b," the slope of the dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in biomarkers (ɛ p) on CO 2(aq) at a range of growth rates and temperatures. Consequently, using coccolith Sr/Ca in combination with alkenone ɛ p may improve paleo-CO 2 determinations.

  4. Synergistic action of gentamicin and bacteriophage in a continuous culture population of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Kirby

    Full Text Available With the increasing frequency of antibiotic resistance and the decreasing frequency of new antibiotics entering the market, interest has returned to developing bacteriophage as a therapeutic agent. Acceptance of phage therapy, however, is limited by the unknown pharmacodynamics of a replicating agent, as well as the potential for the evolution of resistant bacteria. One way to overcome some of these limitations is to incorporate phage and antibiotics into a dual therapy regimen; however, this increases the complexity of the pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to develop an experimental system to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of dual phage-drug therapy. A continuous culture system for Staphylococcus aureus is used to simulate the pharmacokinetics of periodic antibiotic dosing alone and in combination with lytic phage. A computer model representation of the system allows further evaluation of the conditions governing the observed pharmacodynamics. The results of this experimental/modeling approach suggest that dual therapy can be more efficacious than single therapies, particularly if there is an overlap in the physiological pathways targeted by the individual agents. In this case, treatment with gentamicin induces a population of cells with a strong aggregation phenotype. These aggregators also have an increased ability to form biofilm, which is a well-known, non-genetic mechanism of drug resistance. However, the aggregators are also more susceptible than the parental strain to the action of the phage. Thus, dual treatment with gentamicin and phage resulted in lower final cell densities than either treatment alone. Unlike in the phage-only treatment, phage-resistant isolates were not detected in the dual treatment.

  5. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen.

  6. Effect of feeding warm-season annuals with orchardgrass on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 4-unit, dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutrient digestibility, volatile fatty acids (VFA) production, bacterial protein synthesis and CH4 output of warm-season summer annual grasses. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 × 4 Latin square design us...

  7. Influence of Dilution Rate on Enzymes of Intermediary Metabolism in Two Freshwater Bacteria Grown in Continuous Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matin, A.; Grootjans, A.; Hogenhuis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Two freshwater bacteria, a Pseudomonas sp. and a Spirillum sp., were grown in continuous culture under steady-state conditions in L-lactate-, succinate-, ammonium- or phosphate-limited media. In Pseudomonas sp., NAD-independent and NAD-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenases, aconitase, isocitrate dehydr

  8. More than a Food Fight: Intellectual Traditions and Cultural Continuity in Chilocco's "Indian School Journal, 1902-1918"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Through his many works calling for the evolution of indigenous theory, Duane Champagne has emphasized the importance of recovering indigenous voices such as Chilocco Indian Industrial School graduate Mack Setima's and documenting forms of cultural continuity. According to Champagne, case studies such as K. Tsianina Lomawaima's scholarship on…

  9. Effect of incremental flaxseed supplementation of an herbage diet on methane output and ruminal fermentation in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of increasing flax supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, bacterial N synthesis and methane output. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 7 ...

  10. Microbial profile of the vitreous aspirates in culture proven exogenous endophthalmitis: A 10-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bhattacharjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the microbiological profile and clinical outcome in the eyes with culture-proven exogenous endophthalmitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 495 eyes diagnosed as exogenous endophthalmitis was performed over a period of 10 years. In all, aseptically collected aqueous and vitreous aspirates were cultured for bacteria and fungus using standard microbiological techniques. Gram-stain and KOH preparation of the specimens were also performed. The antibiotic susceptibility testing for bacterial isolates was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The treatment was modified according to the antibiotic sensitivity profile. The final clinical ocular condition was divided into improved, stable or deteriorated. Results: Of 148 culture-proven endophthalmitis eyes, 137 (92.57% were referred from elsewhere, and 11 (7.43% belonged to our institute. Aetiologically, 76 (51.35% eyes were post-cataract surgery, 61 (41.22% were post-traumatic, 5 (3.38% eyes post-intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injection, 5 associated with corneal diseases and 1 bleb-related endophthalmitis. In 31 (20.95% eyes, primary intravitreal antibiotics were given outside. The cultures revealed monomicrobial growth in 92.57% (n = 137 and polymicrobial growth in 7.43% (n = 11. Among the bacteria (n = 121, 81.76%, Pseudomonas species dominated overall (n = 32, 27.11% and post-operative (n = 26, 38.23% endophthalmitis group. Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 14, 28% was prominent in post-traumatic endophthalmitis group. Ninety-two percent (n = 108 isolates of bacteria were sensitive to vancomycin. In 78 (52.7% eyes, the clinical ocular condition improved or remained stable while deteriorated in 51 (34.46%. Conclusion: A bacterial predominance was observed among causative organisms of exogenous endophthalmitis with Pseudomonas species being the most common. The appropriate surgical intervention improved or stabilised the visual acuity in nearly

  11. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meile Leo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. Results At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 1013 CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2 after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Conclusions Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  12. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  13. Persistence of pentolite (PETN and TNT) in soil microcosms and microbial enrichment cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeli, Ziv; Garcia-Bonilla, Erika; Pardo, Cindy; Hidalgo, Kelly; Velásquez, Trigal; Peña, Luis; C, Eliana Ramos; Avila-Arias, Helena; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolás; Brandão, Pedro F B; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Pentolite is a mixture (1:1) of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and little is known about its fate in the environment. This study was aimed to determine the dissipation of pentolite in soils under laboratory conditions. Microcosm experiments conducted with two soils demonstrated that dissipation rate of PETN was significantly slower than that of TNT. Interestingly, the dissipation of PETN was enhanced by the presence of TNT, while PETN did not enhanced the dissipation of TNT. Pentolite dissipation rate was significantly faster under biostimulation treatment (addition of carbon source) in soil from the artificial wetland, while no such stimulation was observed in soil from detonation field. In addition, the dissipation rate of TNT and PETN in soil from artificial wetland under biostimulation was significantly faster than the equivalent abiotic control, although it seems that non-biological processes might also be important for the dissipation of TNT and PETN. Transformation of PETN was also slower during establishment of enrichment culture using pentolite as the sole nitrogen source. In addition, transformation of these explosives was gradually reduced and practically stopped after the forth cultures transfer (80 days). DGGE analysis of bacterial communities from these cultures indicates that all consortia were dominated by bacteria from the order Burkholderiales and Rhodanobacter. In conclusion, our results suggest that PETN might be more persistent than TNT.

  14. Microbial deterioration of cultural heritage and works of art--tilting at windmills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2013-11-01

    Microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi), in addition to lichens and insect pests, cause problems in the conservation of cultural heritage because of their biodeteriorative potential. This holds true for all types of historic artefacts, and even for art made of modern materials, in public buildings, museums and private art collections. The variety of biodeterioration phenomena observed on materials of cultural heritage is determined by several factors, such as the chemical composition and nature of the material itself, the climate and exposure of the object, in addition to the manner and frequency of surface cleaning and housekeeping in museums. This study offers a review of a variety of well-known biodeterioration phenomena observed on different materials, such as stone and building materials, objects exhibited in museums and libraries, as well as human remains and burial-related materials. The decontamination of infected artefacts, exhibition rooms and depots incurs high expenditure for museums. Nevertheless, the question has to be raised: whether the process of biodeterioration of cultural heritage can or should be stopped under all circumstances, or whether we have to accept it as a natural and an implicit consecution of its creation. This study also highlights critically the pros and cons of biocide treatments and gives some prominent examples of successful and unsuccessful conservation treatments. Furthermore, an outlook on the future research needs and developments in this highly interesting field is given.

  15. THE USE OF CONTINUOUS, TEMPORARY IMMERSION BIOREACTOR SYSTEM AND SEMISOLID CULTURE MEDIUM FOR THE PRODUCTION OF Eucalyptus camaldulensis CLONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evânia Galvão Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant micro-propagation in bioreactor systems is regarded as one way to reduce cost by automation and production scheduling. This research was carried out in order to obtain an efficient procedure for clone production of Eucalyptus camaldulensis on different types of bioreactor including continuous and temporary immersion bioreactor. To do so, the apical meristems (1 mm and the apical meristems with adjacent tissue (2,5 mm were used as initial explants. These tissues were cultured, for 60 days, in semisolid culture medium supplemented with 1 mg L -1 indole acetic acid (IAA and 0.32 mg L -1 benzylaminopurine (BA. After 60 days, the meristems with adjacent tissue were transferred to a continuous immersion bioreactor and maintained in dark or light conditions. In order to verify the effect of the explant source on bioreactor multiplication, the explants subcultured from meristems multiplied in semisolid culture medium and the meristems multiplied in continuous immersion bioreactor were tested and maintained in dark conditions. After establishing this parameters, the multiplication experiments were carried out in continuous and temporary immersion and the multiplied explants were then rooted in MS medium supplemented with 0, 2, 4, 8 and 20 mg L -1 indole butyric acid (IBA and kept in the dark or under controlled lighting conditions. After that, the rooting the plants were acclimatized in mist chamber. The meristem with adjacent tissue favored a greater number of buds/explants. The continuous immersion bioreactor in the dark provided higher shoots number and multiplication rate. The rooting was better on culture medium without auxin and kept in the dark for 15 days or the culture medium supplemented with auxin and maintained under light with 100% plantlet rooting. The Eucalyptus camaldulensis acclimatization was efficient, with high survival rate (76%. It was possible to establish the procedure for bioreactor micro-propagation of Eucalyptus

  16. Forum: Cultural Identity and (Dis)Continuities of Children of Immigrant Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obsiye, Mohamed; Cook, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Susan Harper's study centres on "funds of knowledge" as a pedagogical resource for the development of a science curriculum, drawing on Karen refugee parents' cultural knowledge and identity. She argues that engagement in this process helps the parent generation of this community to "rebuild their cultural resilience" and cope…

  17. [Investigation and culture of microbial contaminants of Caulerpa lentillifera (Sea Grape)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudaka, Jun; Itokazu, Kiyomasa; Taira, Katsuya; Nidaira, Minoru; Okano, Sho; Nakamura, Masaji; Iwanaga, Setsuko; Tominaga, Masaya; Ohno, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Caulerpa lentillifera is a kind of edible seaweed, known as 'sea grape' or 'green caviar'. It is used in fresh salads. However, it is sensitive to low temperature and osmotic pressure, and is easily spoilt by storage in a refrigerator or washing with tap water. That is the reason why it is difficult to prevent food poisoning, especially due to Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In this study we investigated of marine bacteria and V. parahaemolyticus in C. lentillifera and cultured them in order to develop effective control of bacteria in commercial farms. The sixteen farms in the Okinawa Islands were investigated from August to September in 2006. A total of 176 samples were collected from eleven points during the cultivation processes and from the products. About 10(3) cfu/mL of marine bacteria were detected in the seawater used in the tank culture, but after cultivation of C. lentillifera the number had increased to about 10(6) cfu/mL. The number of marine bacteria in C. lentillifera did not change significantly through the process of planting to the final product (about 10(7) cfu/g). V. parahaemolyticus was detected in seawater from all processes and C. lentillifera was isolated from 56% of seawater, 25% of seed-stocks, and 18.8% of product samples, though but thermostable direct hemolysin gene was not detected from enrichment cultures or isolated V. parahaemolyticus strains. These results indicate that for prevention of food poisoning by V. parahaemolyticus in C. lentillifera, it is important to establish a suitable sterilization procedure for each process.

  18. Environmental Remediation Full-Scale Implementation: Back to Simple Microbial Massive Culture Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Syakti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Using bioaugmentation and biostimulation approach for contaminated soil bioremediation were investigated and implemented on field scale. We combine those approaches by culturing massively the petrophilic indigenous microorganisms from chronically contaminated soil enriched by mixed manure. Through these methods, bioremediation performance revealed promising results in removing the petroleum hydrocarbons comparatively using metabolite by product such as biosurfactant, specific enzymes and other extra-cellular product which are considered as a difficult task and will impact on cost increase.

  19. Continuous precipitation of process related impurities from clarified cell culture supernatant using a novel coiled flow inversion reactor (CFIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateja, Nikhil; Agarwal, Harshit; Saraswat, Aditya; Bhat, Manish; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-10-01

    Coiled Flow Inverter Reactor (CFIR) has recently been explored for facilitating continuous operation of several unit operations involved in downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals such as viral inactivation and protein refolding. The application of CFIR for continuous precipitation of clarified cell culture supernatant has been explored. The pH based precipitation is optimized in the batch mode and then in the continuous mode in CFIR using a design of experiments (DOE) study. Improved clearance of host cell DNA (52× vs. 39× in batch), improved clearance of host cell proteins (HCP) (7× vs. 6× in batch) and comparable recovery (90 vs. 91.5 % in batch) are observed along with six times higher productivity. To further demonstrate wider applicability of CFIR in performing continuous precipitation, two more case studies involving use of two different precipitation protocols (CaCl2 based and caprylic acid based) are also performed. In both cases, clearance of host cell DNA, HCP, and product recovery are found to be comparable or better in CFIR than in batch operations. Moreover, increase in productivity of 16 times (CaCl2 based) and eight times (caprylic acid based) is obtained for the two precipitation protocols, respectively. The data clearly demonstrate that CFIR can be seamlessly integrated into a continuous bioprocess train for performing continuous precipitation of clarified cell culture supernatant. To our knowledge this is the first report of such use. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Metabolism of cellulose by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in continuously agitated culture is associated with enhanced production of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchi, L; Burla, G; Zuolong, D; Harvey, P J

    2000-03-10

    Production of the extracellular heme protein lignin peroxidase (LiP) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium is currently associated with a number of requirements, namely exposure of the cultures to oxygen; limiting nutrient nitrogen or carbon and static or semi-static culture conditions. To obtain LiP activity in continuously agitated liquid culture requires the inclusion of a surfactant. However, using cellulose as the carbon source, we obtained high titres (0.2-0.4 U ml(-1)) of LiP in submerged liquid cultures under conditions of continuous agitation, without substrate limitation or the need to add oxygen or surfactant. Comparison of the morphological and physiological traits of hyphae maintained on either cellulose or free glucose supports observations that the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide in the cultures grown on glucose, restricts oxygen diffusion into the hyphae, which is necessary for LiP induction. They also suggest that isozymes of LiP synthesised under these conditions may be triggered in response to oxidant stress.

  1. Performance and microbial communities of a continuous stirred tank anaerobic reactor treating two-phases olive mill solid wastes at low organic loading rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, B; Raposo, F; Borja, R; Gonzalez, J M; Portillo, M C; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2006-02-24

    A study of the performance and microbial communities of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) treating two-phases olive mill solid wastes (OMSW) was carried out at laboratory-scale. The reactor operated at a mesophilic temperature (35 degrees C) and an influent substrate concentration of 162 g total chemical oxygen demand (COD)L(-1) and 126 g volatile solids (VS)L(-1). The data analyzed in this work corresponded to a range of organic loading rates (OLR) of between 0.75 and 3.00 g CODL(-1)d(-1), getting removal efficiencies in the range of 97.0-95.6%. Methane production rate increased from 0.164 to 0.659 L CH(4)L(reactor)(-1)d(-1) when the OLR increased within the tested range. Methane yield coefficients were 0.225 L CH(4)g(-1) COD removed and 0.290 L CH(4)g(-1) VS removed and were virtually independent of the OLR applied. A molecular characterization of the microbial communities involved in the process was also accomplished. Molecular identification of microbial species was performed by PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA genes, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), cloning and sequencing. Among the predominant microorganisms in the bioreactor, the Firmicutes (mainly represented by Clostridiales) were the most abundant group, followed by the Chloroflexi and the Gamma-Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas species as the major representative). Other bacterial groups detected in the bioreactor were the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Deferribacteres. Among the Archaea, the methanogen Methanosaeta concilii was the most representative species.

  2. Application of culture-dependent and culture-independent methods for the identification of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens in microbial consortia present in kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, Maria Fernanda; Londero, Alejandra; Medrano, Micaela; Vercammen, Elisabeth; Van Hoorde, Koenraad; Garrote, Graciela L; Huys, Geert; Vandamme, Peter; Abraham, Analía G

    2013-12-01

    The biological and technological characteristics of kefiran as well as its importance in grain integrity led us to analyze the microbial kefir grain consortium with focus on Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The presence of L. kefiranofaciens in the nine kefir grains studied was demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. By culture dependent methods applying a methodology focused on the search of this species, 22 isolates with typical morphology were obtained and identified applying a combination of SDS-PAGE of whole cell proteins, (GTG)5-PCR and sequence analysis of the housekeeping gene encoding the α-subunit of bacterial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS). This polyphasic approach allowed the reliable identification of 11 L. kefiranofaciens, 5 Lactobacillus paracasei, 4 Lactobacillus kefiri and 2 Lactobacillus parakefiri isolates. Isolated L. kefiranofaciens strains produced polysaccharide in strain-dependent concentrations and EPS produced by them also differed in the degree of polymerization. The isolation and accurate identification of L. kefiranofaciens is relevant taking into account the important role of this microorganism in the grain ecosystem as well as its potential application as starter in food fermentations.

  3. Batch and continuous culture-based selection strategies for acetic acid tolerance in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeremiah; Bellissimi, Eleonora; de Hulster, Erik; Wagner, Andreas; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2011-05-01

    Acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is crucial for the production of bioethanol and other bulk chemicals from lignocellulosic plant-biomass hydrolysates, especially at a low pH. This study explores two evolutionary engineering strategies for the improvement of acetic acid tolerance of the xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae RWB218, whose anaerobic growth on xylose at pH 4 is inhibited at acetic acid concentrations >1 g L(-1) : (1) sequential anaerobic, batch cultivation (pH 4) at increasing acetic acid concentrations and (2) prolonged anaerobic continuous cultivation without pH control, in which acidification by ammonium assimilation generates selective pressure for acetic acid tolerance. After c. 400 generations, the sequential-batch and continuous selection cultures grew on xylose at pH≤4 with 6 and 5 g L(-1) acetic acid, respectively. In the continuous cultures, the specific xylose-consumption rate had increased by 75% to 1.7 g xylose g(-1) biomass h(-1) . After storage of samples from both selection experiments at -80 °C and cultivation without acetic acid, they failed to grow on xylose at pH 4 in the presence of 5 g L(-1) acetic acid. Characterization in chemostat cultures with linear acetic acid gradients demonstrated an acetate-inducible acetic acid tolerance in samples from the continuous selection protocol.

  4. Forum: cultural identity and (dis)continuities of children of immigrant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obsiye, Mohamed; Cook, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    Susan Harper's study centres on `funds of knowledge' as a pedagogical resource for the development of a science curriculum, drawing on Karen refugee parents' cultural knowledge and identity. She argues that engagement in this process helps the parent generation of this community to `rebuild their cultural resilience' and cope with the resettlement process (p. 43). Drawing on our own research with Somali, Sierra Leonean and Nigerian diaspora communities in London, the following article extends this discussion with a particular focus on the intricate intergenerational dynamics between children and their parents' generation in relation to cultural identity development though engagement with education.

  5. Influence of discrete and continuous culture conditions on human mesenchymal stem cell lineage choice in RGD concentration gradient hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Callahan, Laura A; Policastro, Gina M; Bernard, Sharon L; Childers, Erin P; Boettcher, Ronna; Becker, Matthew L

    2013-09-09

    Stem cells have shown lineage-specific differentiation when cultured on substrates possessing signaling groups derived from the native tissue. A distinct determinant in this process is the concentration of the signaling motif. While several groups have been working actively to determine the specific factors, concentrations, and mechanisms governing the differentiation process, many have been turning to combinatorial and gradient approaches in attempts to optimize the multiple chemical and physical parameters needed for the next advance. However, there has not been a direct comparison between the cellular behavior and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in gradient and discrete substrates, which quantitates the effect of differences caused by cell-produced, soluble factors due to design differences between the culture systems. In this study, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in continuous and discrete polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEGDM) hydrogels containing an RGD concentration gradient from 0 to 14 mM were examined to study the effects of the different culture conditions on stem-cell behavior. Culture condition was found to affect every osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase, Runx 2, type 1 collagen, bone sailoprotein, and calcium content) and adipogenic marker (oil red and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) examined regardless of RGD concentration. Only in the continuous gradient culture did RGD concentration affect human mesenchymal stem-cell lineage commitment with low RGD concentrations expressing higher osteogenic differentiation than high RGD concentrations. Conversely, high RGD concentrations expressed higher adipogenic differentiation than low RGD concentrations. Cytoskeletal actin organization was only affected by culture condition at low RGD concentrations, indicating that it played a limited role in the differences in lineage commitment observed. Therefore, the role of discrete versus gradient

  6. Continuing Education Effects on Cultural Competence Knowledge and Skills Building among Health Professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marla B. Hall; Jeffrey J. Guidry; E. Lisako J. McKyer; Corliss Outley; Danny Ballard

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research is to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets, utilizing an explorational case study, of individuals employed within an urban public health department...

  7. Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms for continuous power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2014-09-01

    Current generation in a microbial fuel cell can be limited by the amount of anode surface area available for biofilm formation, and slow substrate degradation kinetics. Increasing the anode surface area can increase the amount of biofilm, but performance will improve only if the anode material is located near the cathode to minimize solution internal resistance. Here we demonstrate that biofilms do not have to be in constant contact with the anode to produce current in an MFC. Granular activated carbon particles enriched with exoelectrogenic biofilm are fluidized (by stirring) in the anode chamber of the MFC, resulting in only intermittent contact between the particles and the anode current collector. The maximum power density generated is 951 ± 10 mW m-2, compared to 813 ± 2 mW m-2 for the control without stirring (packed bed), and 525 ± 1 mW m-2 in the absence of GAC particles and without stirring. GAC-biofilm particles demonstrate capacitor-like behavior, but achieve nearly constant discharge conditions due to the large number of particles that contact the current collector. These results provide proof of concept for the development of flowable electrode reactors, where anode biofilms can be electrically charged in a separate storage tank and then rapidly discharged in compact anode chambers. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term performance of a 20-L continuous flow microbial fuel cell for treatment of brewery wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mengqian; Chen, Shing; Babanova, Sofia; Phadke, Sujal; Salvacion, Michael; Mirhosseini, Auvid; Chan, Shirley; Carpenter, Kayla; Cortese, Rachel; Bretschger, Orianna

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been shown as a promising technology for wastewater treatment. Integration of MFCs into current wastewater treatment plant have potential to reduce the operational cost and improve the treatment performance, and scaling up MFCs will be essential. However, only a few studies have reported successful scale up attempts. Fabrication cost, treatment performance and operational lifetime are critical factors to optimize before commercialization of MFCs. To test these factors, we constructed a 20 L MFC system containing two 10 L MFC reactors and operated the system with brewery wastewater for nearly one year. Several operational conditions were tested, including different flowrates, applied external resistors, and poised anodic potentials. The condition resulting in the highest chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency (94.6 ± 1.0%) was a flow rate of 1 mL min-1 (HRT = 313 h) and an applied resistor of 10 Ω across each MFC circuit. Results from each of the eight stages of operation (325 days total) indicate that MFCs can sustain treatment rates over a long-term period and are robust enough to sustain performance even after system perturbations. possible ways to improve MFC performance were discussed for future studies.

  9. Electrochemical and impedance characterization of Microbial Fuel Cells based on 2D and 3D anodic electrodes working with seawater microorganisms under continuous operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, D; Sacco, A; Hernández, S; Tommasi, T

    2015-11-01

    A mixed microbial population naturally presents in seawater was used as active anodic biofilm of two Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs), employing either a 2D commercial carbon felt or 3D carbon-coated Berl saddles as anode electrodes, with the aim to compare their electrochemical behavior under continuous operation. After an initial increase of the maximum power density, the felt-based cell reduced its performance at 5 months (from 7 to 4 μW cm(-2)), while the saddle-based MFC exceeds 9 μW cm(-2) (after 2 months) and maintained such performance for all the tests. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to identify the MFCs controlling losses and indicates that the mass-transport limitations at the biofilm-electrolyte interface have the main contribution (>95%) to their internal resistance. The activation resistance was one order of magnitude lower with the Berl saddles than with carbon felt, suggesting an enhanced charge-transfer in the high surface-area 3D electrode, due to an increase in bacteria population growth.

  10. A culture-independent approach to unravel uncultured bacteria and functional genes in a complex microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms in nature are uncultured with unknown functionality. Sequence-based metagenomics alone answers 'who/what are there?' but not 'what are they doing and who is doing it and how?'. Function-based metagenomics reveals gene function but is usually limited by the specificity and sensitivity of screening strategies, especially the identification of clones whose functional gene expression has no distinguishable activity or phenotypes. A 'biosensor-based genetic transducer' (BGT technique, which employs a whole-cell biosensor to quantitatively detect expression of inserted genes encoding designated functions, is able to screen for functionality of unknown genes from uncultured microorganisms. In this study, BGT was integrated with Stable isotope probing (SIP-enabled Metagenomics to form a culture-independent SMB toolbox. The utility of this approach was demonstrated in the discovery of a novel functional gene cluster in naphthalene contaminated groundwater. Specifically, metagenomic sequencing of the (13C-DNA fraction obtained by SIP indicated that an uncultured Acidovorax sp. was the dominant key naphthalene degrader in-situ, although three culturable Pseudomonas sp. degraders were also present in the same groundwater. BGT verified the functionality of a new nag2 operon which co-existed with two other nag and two nah operons for naphthalene biodegradation in the same microbial community. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that the nag2 operon was the key functional operon in naphthalene degradation in-situ, and shared homology with both nag operons in Ralstonia sp. U2 and Polaromonas naphthalenivorans CJ2. The SMB toolbox will be useful in providing deep insights into uncultured microorganisms and unravelling their ecological roles in natural environments.

  11. 益生菌发酵剂发酵特性研究%Fermentation Property of Probiotics Microbial Culture Starters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路守栋; 刘玺; 马瑞芬

    2012-01-01

    Three strains(Lactobacillu casei,Lactobacillus bulgaricus,Lactobacillus acdophilus) of common probiotics bacteria were selected,and fermentation property of probiotics microbial culture starters were studied.The three strains performed stronger resistant capabilities of NaNO2,stronger resistant capabilities of NaCl,and lacked in the abilities of lipolysis and proteolysis.They had strong acid—producing capability and could effectively inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria.They were suitable for fermented meat products.%选择干酪乳杆菌(Lactobacillu casei,Lc),嗜酸乳杆菌(Lactobacillus acdophilus,La),保加利亚乳杆菌(Lactobacillus bulgaricus,Lb)三种益生菌作为发酵肉发酵剂,对其发酵特性进行研究。结果表明:三种菌均有较强的耐亚硝酸盐、食盐能力,能够耐受150 mg/kg亚硝酸盐和6%食盐。所选菌种无蛋白和脂肪分解能力,能够有效降低pH,抑制致病菌的生长,适合发酵肉制品的生产。

  12. Numerical Modeling Analysis of Hydrodynamic and Microbial Controls on DNAPL Pool Dissolution and Detoxification: Dehalorespirers in Co-culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesseldyke, Eric S.; Becker, Jennifer G.; Seagren, Eric A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Zhang, Changyong

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants like tetrachloroethene (PCE) can be “bioenhanced” via biodegradation, which increases the concentration gradient at the DNAPL–water interface. Model simulations were used to evaluate the impact of ecological interactions between different dehalorespiring strains and hydrodynamics on the bioenhancement effect and the extent of PCE dechlorination. Simulations were performed using a two-dimensional coupled flow-transport model, with a DNAPL pool source and two microbial species, Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195 and Desulfuromonas michiganensis, which compete for electron acceptors (e.g., PCE), but not for their electron donors. Under biostimulation, low vx conditions, D. michiganensis alone significantly enhanced dissolution by rapidly utilizing aqueous-phase PCE. In co-culture under these conditions, D. mccartyi 195 increased this bioenhancement modestly and greatly increased the extent of PCE transformation. Although D. michiganensis was the dominant population under low velocity conditions, D. mccartyi 195 dominated under high velocity conditions due to bioclogging effects.

  13. Integrative modelling of pH-dependent enzyme activity and transcriptomic regulation of the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    In a continuous culture under phosphate limitation the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum depends on the external pH level. By comparing seven steady-state conditions between pH 5.7 and pH 4.5 we show that the switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis occurs between pH 5.3 and pH 5.0 with an intermediate state at pH 5.1. Here, an integrative study is presented investigating how a changing external pH level affects the clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation pathway. This is of particular interest as the biotechnological production of n-butanol as biofuel has recently returned into the focus of industrial applications. One prerequisite is the furthering of the knowledge of the factors determining the solvent production and their integrative regulations. We have mathematically analysed the influence of pH-dependent specific enzyme activities of branch points of the metabolism on the product formation. This kinetic regulation was compared with transcriptomic regulation regarding gene transcription and the proteomic profile. Furthermore, both regulatory mechanisms were combined yielding a detailed projection of their individual and joint effects on the product formation. The resulting model represents an important platform for future developments of industrial butanol production based on C. acetobutylicum. © 2013 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Fermentation and growth response of a primary poultry isolate of Salmonella typhimurium grown under strict anaerobic conditions in continuous culture and amino acid-limited batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorowski, K G; Nisbet, D J; Ha, S D; Corrier, D E; DeLoach, J R; Ricke, S C

    1997-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a significant hazard to consumer health that is carried asymptomatically in poultry gastrointestinal tracts. Nurmi cultures may prevent Salmonella colonization in young chicks, but the mechanism of competitive exclusion is unclear. Modeling Salmonella's metabolism in pure culture may allow for greater definition in choosing strains for Nurmi cultures. The growth rates and affinity constants of S. typhimurium growing in amino acid-limited conditions were determined in batch culture and compared to primary poultry isolates of cecal strains. Serine and NH4Cl were the best N sources for growth of all organisms tested in this study. The fermentation response of S. typhimurium was also monitored in continuous culture at a slow dilution rate of 0.021 h-1. S. typhimurium was found to adapt to VL media, with trends in protein disappearance, Yglucose, and Yprotein. This may show that amino acid or protein concentrations may be an integral component of the initial establishment of S. typhimurium in the cecum.

  15. Growth and nutrient removal in free and immobilized green algae in batch and semi-continuous cultures treating real wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Marin, Alejandro; Mendoza-Espinosa, Leopoldo G; Stephenson, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Two species of microalgae growing as immobilized and free-cells were compared to test its ability to remove N and P in batch cultures of urban wastewater. The best microalgae-cell growth configuration was selected to be tested in bioreactor operated in semi-continuous mode. Scenedesmus obliquus showed a higher N and P uptake rate in urban wastewater than Chlorella vulgaris. When tested in semi-continuous mode and with the re-calcification of beads, S. obliquus was more effective in removing N and P for longer periods (181 h) than batch cultures; fecal coliforms removal was good (95%) although the final concentration was still unsuitable for discharge to natural water bodies. Protein and lipids content analysis suggest that, from a practical point of view, immobilized systems could facilitate the separation of the biomass from the treated wastewater although in terms of nutritional value of the biomass, immobilized systems do not represent an advantage over free-cell systems.

  16. Simple generic model for dynamic experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous culture. Decoupling between anabolism and catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duboc, Philippe Jean; von Stockar, U.; Villadsen, John

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a sudden increase in the dilution rate has been successfully modelled for anaerobic growth on glucose, and for aerobic growth on acetate, on ethanol, and on glucose. The catabolism responded by an immediate jump...... whereas biosynthesis did not. Thus catabolism was in excess to anabolism. The model considers the decoupling between biosynthesis and catabolism, both types of reactions being modelled by first-order kinetic expressions evolving towards maximal values. Yield parameters and maximal reaction rates were...... identified in steady state continuous cultures or during batch experiments. Only the time constant of biosynthesis regeneration, tau(x), and the time constant of catabolic capacity regeneration, tau(cat), had to be identified during transient experiments. In most experiments 7, was around 3 h, and tau...

  17. Change of lactose content after milk fermentation using various microbial cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Vinko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine lactose and lactic acid content and acidity changes in typified milk prior to fermentation and in dairy products on 1st and 28th day of their storage at 8 °C in cold environment. In this study 5 different dairy products were observed: yogurt, extra lactose yogurt, bifido milk, sour cream and sour milk. The enzymatic method for determination of lactose has been used. The biggest change in lactose and lactic acid content, according to study results, has happened in the process of fermentation, as expected. About 16-20 % of lactose has been converted by mesophilus, while significantly bigger part (round 30 % of lactose to lactic acid has been converted by thermophilus. The smallest part of lactose conversion was performed by Bifidobacterium therapy culture (just 15 % after the first day and 19 % on 28th day of cold storage which is due to the greater adjustment period of Bifidobacterium in milk for lactose fermentation.

  18. Bioelectricity production from microbial fuel cell using mixed bacterial culture isolated from distillery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudeen, N; Radhakrishnan, T K; Matheswaran, Manickam

    2015-11-01

    The effect of various system parameters such as wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) concentration, pH, conductivity, membrane size and thickness on efficient energy production using mixed isolated culture from the distillery wastewater in the MFC was studied. The power density increased with increase in the anolyte pH from 6 to 8. The peak power density and COD removal efficiency was observed as 63.8±0.65 mW/m(2) and 63.5±1.5% at pH 8, respectively. The MFC performance increased with increasing COD concentration (800-3200 mg/l), conductivity (1.1-9.7 mS/cm) and membrane area (8-24 cm(2)). The MFC operating with wastewater COD concentration of 3200 mg/l and its conductivity of 9.7 mS/cm produced the highest power density of 202±6 mW/m(2) with a corresponding current density of 412±12 mA/m(2). The results showed that the efficient electricity generation and simultaneous treatment of distillery wastewater can be attained in the MFC.

  19. Inflight Microbial Monitoring - An Alternative Method to Culture Based Detection Currently Used on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Christina L.; Birmele, Michele N.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Roman, Monsi; Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms including potential human pathogens have been detected on the International Space Station (ISS). The potential to introduce new microorganisms occurs with every exchange of crew or addition of equipment or supplies. Current microbial monitoring methods require enrichment of microorganisms and a 48-hour incubation time resulting in an increase in microbial load, detecting a limited number of unidentified microorganisms. An expedient, low-cost, in-flight method of microbial detection, identification, and enumeration is warranted.

  20. Culturable microbial diversity and the impact of tourism in Kartchner Caverns, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikner, Luisa A; Toomey, Rickard S; Nolan, Ginger; Neilson, Julia W; Pryor, Barry M; Maier, Raina M

    2007-01-01

    Kartchner Caverns in Benson, AZ, was opened for tourism in 1999 after a careful development protocol that was designed to maintain predevelopment conditions. As a part of an ongoing effort to determine the impact of humans on this limestone cave, samples were collected from cave rock surfaces along the cave trail traveled daily by tour groups (200,000 visitors year-1) and compared to samples taken from areas designated as having medium (30-40 visitors year-1) and low (2-3 visitors year-1) levels of human exposure. Samples were also taken from fiberglass moldings installed during cave development. Culturable bacteria were recovered from these samples and 90 unique isolates were identified by using 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Diversity generally decreased as human impact increased leading to the isolation of 32, 27, and 22 strains from the low, medium, and high impact areas, respectively. The degree of human impact was also reflected in the phylogeny of the isolates recovered. Although most isolates fell into one of three phyla: Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, or Proteobacteria, the Proteobacteria were most abundant along the cave trail (77% of the isolates), while Firmicutes predominated in the low (66%) and medium (52%) impact areas. Although the abundance of Proteobacteria along the cave trail seems to include microbes of environmental rather than of anthropogenic origin, it is likely that their presence is a consequence of increased organic matter availability due to lint and other organics brought in by cave visitors. Monitoring of the cave is still in progress to determine whether these bacterial community changes may impact the future development of cave formations.

  1. TOURISM IMPACTS ON LOCAL LIFE: SOCIO-CULTURAL CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN CRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Terkenli, Theano; BELLAS, Marcia L.; JENKINS, Laura Dudley

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to address the ongoing need to assess the impact of tourism on local societies, in the context of contemporary tourism studies and social sciences. It seeks to contribute to an understanding of local perceptions of socio-spatial transformation through processes of a “new cultural economy of space”—in cases where tourism constitutes the major agent of change. The case study in Crete explores the imprint of this new cultural economy of space on local societies, ...

  2. Dynamics of the Content of Lactobacilli, Microbial Metabolites and Antimicrobial Activity of Growing Culture of Lactobacillus Plantarum 8P-A3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Chicherin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the content of lactobacilli, microbial metabolites and antimicrobial activity of growing cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum 8Р-А3 was studied. Lactobacilli L. plantarum 8Р-А3 and test microorganisms isolated from the intestinal contents of patients with dysbacteriosis were used in experiments. Study of the component composition of growing culture supernatant of lactobacilli was carried out by gas liquid chromatography with mass selective detection. By 54 h of cultivation the content of viable microbial cells in the native culture of Lactobacillus achieves 3,0·109 in 1 mL without further increase during the cultivation. The principal component of lactobacilli culture medium possessing antibacterial activity is lactic acid. In addition to lactic acid, which accounts for 70% of the total metabolites, the culture medium and the supernatant contain salts of phosphoric acid (14% as well as amino acids, carboxylic acids, fatty acids, sugars and polyhydric alcohol constituting of up to 16% of the total metabolites. It is found that during the cultivation in liquid medium lactobacilli produce metabolites which possess antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria that cause intestinal infections.

  3. Oxygen uptake kinetics of Pseudomonas chlororaphis grown in glucose- or glutamate-limited continuous cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen uptake and glucose and glutamate oxidation kinetics of the heterotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis grown in glucose- or glutamate-limited cultures under oxygen-saturating or oxygen-limiting conditions were determined. Km values for oxygen were 1.4– 5.6 UM. Only in the case of glucose

  4. Elements of cultural continuity in modern German literature : a study of Goethe, Nietzsche and Mann

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simuţ, R.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation renders in a thematic and chronological line the argument o a Goethean influence concerning the way Nietzsche and Mann understood their position within German culture and reacted to the social and political perspective of their contemporaries. It outlines specific concepts and

  5. Feeder-independent continuous culture of the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line is a bipotent cell line, i.e., capable of forming either bile ductules or hepatocyte monolayers in vitro, that was derived from the primary culture of pig embryonic stem cells. The cell line has been strictly feeder-dependent in that cell replication morphology,...

  6. Elements of cultural continuity in modern German literature : a study of Goethe, Nietzsche and Mann

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simuţ, R.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation renders in a thematic and chronological line the argument o a Goethean influence concerning the way Nietzsche and Mann understood their position within German culture and reacted to the social and political perspective of their contemporaries. It outlines specific concepts and them

  7. Simultaneous production and separation of biohydrogen in mixed culture systems by continuous dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Morales, Juan E; Tapia-Venegas, Estela; Toledo-Alarcón, Javiera; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production by dark fermentation is one promising technology. However, there are challenges in improving the performance and efficiency of the process. The important factors that must be considered to obtain a suitable process are the source of the inoculum and its pre-treatment, types of substrates, the reactor configurations and the hydrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, to obtain high-quality hydrogen, it is necessary to integrate an effective separation procedure that is compatible with the intrinsic characteristics of a biological process. Recent studies have suggested that a stable and robust process could be established if there was an effective selection of a mixed microbial consortium with metabolic pathways directly targeted to high hydrogen yields. Additionally, the integration of membrane technology for the extraction and separation of the hydrogen produced has advantages for the upgrading step, because this technology could play an important role in reducing the negative effect of the hydrogen partial pressure. Using this technology, it has been possible to implement a production-purification system, the 'hydrogen-extractive membrane bioreactor'. This configuration has great potential for direct applications, such as fuel cells, but studies of new membrane materials, module designs and reactor configurations are required to achieve higher separation efficiencies.

  8. Study of microbial diversity in raw milk and fresh curd used for Fontina cheese production by culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannino, Maria Laura; Marzotto, Marta; Dellaglio, Franco; Feligini, Maria

    2009-04-15

    The bacterial populations of raw milk employed for the production of Fontina cheese in alpine farms located in different valleys and altitudes (from 700 to 2246 m above sea level) were investigated by culture independent techniques. Total microbial DNA was isolated from milk and curd samples and used as template in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to study the hypervariable V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and analyzed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Representative bands of DGGE patterns were sequenced for identification purposes. The use of universal primer for PCR-DGGE allowed the description of the bacterial community, not only for the presence of lactic acid bacteria, but also for other adventitious species. DGGE profiles obtained from milk and fresh curd samples were generally different and typical for each farm, although some recurrent bands were observed. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles did not show high similarity among samples and it was probably dependent on the different geographical areas of pastures. Some Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) recurred in many samples (Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc lactis) indicating that alpine milk is a preferential niche for their colonization. The microbiota included not only mesophilic and thermoresistant LAB but also adventitious bacteria (Macrococcus caseolyticus, Rothia spp.) and psychrotrophic bacteria (Chryseobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp.), that were found in almost all samples, but disappeared after the warming up at 47-48 degrees C of coagulated milk. Pantoea spp. was primarily found in curds and only with a low incidence in milk samples, indicating the environmental origin. Finally the sequencing data confirmed the presence of E. faecium, E. faecalis and S. thermophilus as major species present in the curd. These species were found also in raw milk, proving its importance as source of the typical fermenting

  9. Production, Distribution, and Kinetic Properties of Inulinase in Continuous Cultures of Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouwenhorst, Robert J.; Visser, Leo E.; Van Der Baan, Adriaan A.; Scheffers, W. Alexander; Van Dijken, Johannes P.

    1988-01-01

    From a screening of several Kluyveromyces strains, the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was selected for a study of the parameters relevant to the commercial production of inulinase (EC 3.2.1.7). This yeast exhibited superior properties with respect to growth at elevated temperatures (40 to 45°C), substrate specificity, and inulinase production. In sucrose-limited chemostat cultures growing on mineral medium, the amount of enzyme decreased from 52 U mg of cell dry weight−1 at D = 0.1 h−1 to 2 U mg of cell dry weight−1 at D = 0.8 h−1. Experiments with nitrogen-limited cultures further confirmed that synthesis of the enzyme is negatively controlled by the residual sugar concentration in the culture. High enzyme activities were observed during growth on nonsugar substrates, indicating that synthesis of the enzyme is a result of a derepression/repression mechanism. A substantial part of the inulinase produced by K. marxianus was associated with the cell wall. The enzyme could be released from the cell wall via a simple chemical treatment of cells. Results are presented on the effect of cultivation conditions on the distribution of the enzyme. Inulinase was active with sucrose, raffinose, stachyose, and inulin as substrates and exhibited an S/I ratio (relative activities with sucrose and inulin) of 15 under standard assay conditions. The enzyme activity decreased with increasing chain length of the substrate. PMID:16347626

  10. Hydraulic continuity and biological effects of low strength very low frequency electromagnetic waves: Case of microbial biofilm growth in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Merlin; Noamen, Omri; Evelyne, Gonze; Eric, Valette; Gilles, Cauffet; Marc, Henry

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to elucidate the interactions between water, subjected to electromagnetic waves of very low frequency (VLF) (kHz) with low strength electromagnetic fields (3.5 mT inside the coils), and the development of microbial biofilms in this exposed water. Experimental results demonstrate that in water exposed to VLF electromagnetic waves, the biomass of biofilm is limited if hydraulic continuity is achieved between the electromagnetic generator and the biofilm media. The measured amount of the biofilm's biomass is approximately a factor two lower for exposed biofilm than the non-exposed biofilm. Measurements of electromagnetic fields in the air and simulations exhibit very low intensities of fields (electromagnetic generator. Exposure to electric and magnetic fields of the quoted intensities cannot explain thermal and ionizing effects on the biofilm. A variable electrical potential with a magnitude close to 20 mV was detected in the tank in hydraulic continuity with the electromagnetic generator. The application of quantum field theory may help to explain the observed effects in this case.

  11. Establishment of microbial eukaryotic enrichment cultures from a chemically stratified antarctic lake and assessment of carbon fixation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Ketchum, Nicholas; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2012-04-20

    Lake Bonney is one of numerous permanently ice-covered lakes located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The perennial ice cover maintains a chemically stratified water column and unlike other inland bodies of water, largely prevents external input of carbon and nutrients from streams. Biota are exposed to numerous environmental stresses, including year-round severe nutrient deficiency, low temperatures, extreme shade, hypersalinity, and 24-hour darkness during the winter (1). These extreme environmental conditions limit the biota in Lake Bonney almost exclusively to microorganisms (2). Single-celled microbial eukaryotes (called "protists") are important players in global biogeochemical cycling (3) and play important ecological roles in the cycling of carbon in the dry valley lakes, occupying both primary and tertiary roles in the aquatic food web. In the dry valley aquatic food web, protists that fix inorganic carbon (autotrophy) are the major producers of organic carbon for organotrophic organisms (4, 2). Phagotrophic or heterotrophic protists capable of ingesting bacteria and smaller protists act as the top predators in the food web (5). Last, an unknown proportion of the protist population is capable of combined mixotrophic metabolism (6, 7). Mixotrophy in protists involves the ability to combine photosynthetic capability with phagotrophic ingestion of prey microorganisms. This form of mixotrophy differs from mixotrophic metabolism in bacterial species, which generally involves uptake dissolved carbon molecules. There are currently very few protist isolates from permanently ice-capped polar lakes, and studies of protist diversity and ecology in this extreme environment have been limited (8, 4, 9, 10, 5). A better understanding of protist metabolic versatility in the simple dry valley lake food web will aid in the development of models for the role of protists in the global carbon cycle. We employed an enrichment culture approach to isolate potentially

  12. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  13. Continuity and Change: Building a Quality Culture in the Romanian Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunda, Nicoleta Ramona; Baciu, Livia Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Educational objectives, like educational quality, are contextual and evolving--they may exhibit both continuity and change. This paper capitalizes on the role of neo-institutionalism and on the contribution of Douglass North (one major representative of the neo-institutionalism trend) in identifying the institutional impact upon cognitive…

  14. Bacterial Concentration and Diversity within Repetitive Aliquots Collected from Replicate Continuous-Flow Bioreactor Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Tawni L; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Andrews, Kathleen; Bongaerts, Roy; Nisbet, David J

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility of small volume repeat sampling from replicate bioreactors with stabilized continuous-flow chicken cecal bacterial communities. Bacterial concentration and diversity were analyzed by phenotypic, biochemical and ribotype analysis. Significant differences in concentrations and variations in diversity were found in replicate bioreactors.

  15. The detection of microbial DNA but not cultured bacteria is associated with increased mortality in patients with suspected sepsis-a prospective multi-centre European observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, M J; Starczewska, M H; Schrenzel, J; Zacharowski, K; Ecker, D J; Sampath, R; Brealey, D; Singer, M; Libert, N; Wilks, M; Vincent, J-L

    2017-03-01

    Blood culture results inadequately stratify the mortality risk in critically ill patients with sepsis. We sought to establish the prognostic significance of the presence of microbial DNA in the bloodstream of patients hospitalized with suspected sepsis. We analysed the data collected during the Rapid Diagnosis of Infections in the Critically Ill (RADICAL) study, which compared a novel culture-independent PCR/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay with standard microbiological testing. Patients were eligible for the study if they had suspected sepsis and were either hospitalized or were referred to one of nine intensive care units from six European countries. The blood specimen for PCR/ESI-MS assay was taken along with initial blood culture taken for clinical indications. Of the 616 patients recruited to the RADICAL study, 439 patients had data on outcome, results of the blood culture and PCR/ESI-MS assay available for analysis. Positive blood culture and PCR/ESI-MSI result was found in 13% (56/439) and 40% (177/439) of patients, respectively. Either a positive blood culture (p 0.01) or a positive PCR/ESI-MS (p 0.005) was associated with higher SOFA scores on enrolment to the study. There was no difference in 28-day mortality observed in patients who had either positive or negative blood cultures (35% versus 32%, p 0.74). However, in patients with a positive PCR/ESI-MS assay, mortality was significantly higher in comparison to those with a negative result (42% versus 26%, p 0.001). Presence of microbial DNA in patients with suspected sepsis might define a patient group at higher risk of death. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting volatile compounds from Kraft lignin degradation in the headspace of microbial cultures by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andrew; Malek, Lada; Dekker, Robert F H; Ross, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) was used to quantify methanol and other volatile compounds in the headspace of one bacterial and 12 fungal lignin-degrading microbial cultures. Cultures were grown in 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks capped with aluminum foil containing 40 mL of nutrient media using Kraft lignin (0.3% w/v) as the sole carbon source. Analysis was done using SIFT-MS with H3O(+) and NO(+) precursors. Product ions were identified with multiple ion mode (MIM). Full scan (FS) mode was used to identify other compounds of interest. Absidia cylindrospora, Ischnoderma resinosum and Pholiota aurivella increased headspace methanol concentration by 136 ppb, 1196 ppb and 278 ppb, respectively, while Flammulina velutipes and Laetiporus sulphureus decreased concentration below ambient levels. F. velutipes and L. sulphureus were found to produce products of methanol oxidation (formaldehyde and formic acid) and were likely metabolizing methanol. Some additional unidentified compounds generated by the fungal cultures are intriguing and will require further study. SIFT-MS can be used to quantify methanol and other volatile compounds in the headspace of microbial cultures and has the potential to be a rapid, sensitive, non-invasive tool useful in elucidating the mechanisms of lignin degradative pathways.

  17. Batch and continuous culture kinetics for production of carotenoids by beta-ionone-resistant mutant of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Moon; Song, Min-Woo; Kang, Seog-Jin; Lee, Jae-Heung

    2007-07-01

    A beta-ionone-resistant mutant strain isolated from the red yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous KCTC 7704 was used for batch and continuous fermentation kinetic studies with glucose media in a 2.5-1 jar fermentor at 22 degrees C and pH 4.5. The kinetic pattern of growth and carotenoid concentration in the batch fermentations exhibited a so-called mixed-growth-associated product formation, possibly due to the fact that the content of intracellular carotenoids depends on the degree of physical maturation toward adulthood. To determine the maximum specific growth rate constant (microm) and Monod constant (k(s)) for the mutant, glucose-limited continuous culture studies were performed at different dilution rates within a range of 0.02-0.10 h(-1). A reciprocal plot of the steady-state data (viz., reciprocal of glucose concentration versus residence time) obtained from continuous culture experiments was used to estimate a microm of 0.15 h(-1) and k(s) of 1.19 g/l. The carotenoid content related to the residence time appeared to assume a typical form of saturation kinetics. The maximum carotenoid content (Xm) for the mutant was estimated to be 1.04 microg/mg dry cell weight, and the Lee constant (k(m)), which was tentatively defined in this work, was found to be 3.0 h.

  18. Growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens under nutrient-limiting conditions in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Rothermich, Mary; Sharma, Manju; Lovley, Derek

    2005-05-01

    A system for growing Geobacter sulfurreducens under anaerobic conditions in chemostats was developed in order to study the physiology of this organism under conditions that might more closely approximate those found in the subsurface than batch cultures. Geobacter sulfurreducens could be cultured under acetate-limiting conditions with fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor at growth rates between 0.04 and 0.09 h(-1). The molar growth yield was threefold higher with fumarate as the electron acceptor than with Fe(III), despite the lower mid-point potential of the fumarate/succinate redox couple. When growth was limited by availability of fumarate, high steady-state concentrations were detected, suggesting that fumarate is unlikely to be an important electron acceptor in sedimentary environments. The half-saturation constant, Ks, for acetate in Fe(III)-grown cultures (10 microM) suggested that the growth of Geobacter species is likely to be acetate limited in most subsurface sediments, but that when millimolar quantities of acetate are added to the subsurface in order to promote the growth of Geobacter for bioremediation applications, this should be enough to overcome any acetate limitations. When the availability of electron acceptors, rather than acetate, limited growth, G. sulfurreducens was less efficient in incorporating acetate into biomass but had higher respiration rates, a desirable physiological characteristic when adding acetate to stimulate the activity of Geobacter species during in situ uranium bioremediation. These results demonstrate that the ability to study the growth of G. sulfurreducens under steady-state conditions can provide insights into its physiological characteristics that have relevance for its activity in a diversity of sedimentary environments.

  19. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaro, Amy A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Konopka, Allan; Callister, Stephen J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated ‘omics have been used on pure cultures and co-cultures, yet they have not been applied to complex microbial communities to examine questions of perturbation response. In this study, we used integrated ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH decrease by addition of a pulse of acid would reduce microbial community diversity and temporarily reduce reactor function such as cellulose degradation. However, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing results revealed increased alpha diversity in the microbial community after the perturbation, and a persistence of the dominant community members over the duration of the experiment. Proteomics results showed a decrease in activity of proteins associated with Fibrobacter succinogenes two days after the perturbation followed by increased protein abundances six days after the perturbation. The decrease in cellulolytic activity suggested by the proteomics was confirmed by the accumulation of Avicel in the reactor. Metabolomics showed a pattern similar to that of the proteome, with amino acid production decreasing two days after the perturbation and increasing after six days. This study demonstrated that community ‘omics data provides valuable information about the interactions and function of anaerobic cellulolytic community members after a perturbation.

  20. Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid in fed-batch and continuous cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Stephan; Mottet, Alexis; Grousseau, Estelle; Plassmeier, Jens K; Popović, Milan K; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie; Guillouet, Stéphane E; Sinskey, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid, acting as both carbon and energy source, is a safe alternative to a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and dioxygen mix for studying the conversion of carbon through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle into value-added chemical compounds by non-photosynthetic microorganisms. In this work, organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid was studied using an approach combining stoichiometric modeling and controlled cultures in bioreactors. A strain deleted of its polyhydroxyalkanoate production pathway was used in order to carry out a physiological characterization. The maximal growth yield was determined at 0.16 Cmole Cmole(-1) in a formate-limited continuous culture. The measured yield corresponded to 76% to 85% of the theoretical yield (later confirmed in pH-controlled fed-batch cultures). The stoichiometric study highlighted the imbalance between carbon and energy provided by formic acid and explained the low growth yields measured. Fed-batch cultures were also used to determine the maximum specific growth rate (μmax  = 0.18 h(-1) ) and to study the impact of increasing formic acid concentrations on growth yields. High formic acid sensitivity was found in R eutropha since a linear decrease in the biomass yield with increasing residual formic acid concentrations was observed between 0 and 1.5 g l(-1) .

  1. Evidence of biogenic corrosion of titanium after exposure to a continuous culture of thiobacillus ferrooxidans grown in thiosulfate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J M; Martin, S I; Masterson, B

    2000-12-07

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate extreme conditions under which candidate materials intended for use in a proposed nuclear waste repository might be susceptible to corrosion by endogenous microorganisms. Thiobucillus ferrooxidans, a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, was grown in continuous culture using thiosulfate as an energy source; thiosulfate is oxidized to sulfate as a metabolic endproduct by this organism. Culture conditions were optimized to produce a high-density, metabolically active culture throughout a period of long term incubation in the presence of Alloy 22 (a high nickel-based alloy) and Titanium grade 7 (Tigr7) material coupons. After seven months incubation under these conditions, material coupons were withdrawn and analyzed by high resolution microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses. Alloy 22 coupons showed no detectable signs of corrosion. Tigr7, however, demonstrated distinct roughening of the coupon surface, and [presumably solubilized and precipitated] titanium was detected on Alloy 22 coupons incubated in the same T. ferrooxiduns culture vessel. Control coupons of these materials incubated in sterile thiosulfate medium did not demonstrate any signs of corrosion, thus showing that observed corrosive effects were due to the T. ferrooxidans metabolic activities. T. ferrooxidans intermediates of thiosulfate oxidation or sulfate may have caused the corrosive effects observed on Tigr7.

  2. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... of ammonia-rich organic waste in full-scale continuous reactors.......Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...

  3. English Language Teaching in Indonesia: A Continuous Challenge in Education and Cultural Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcellino

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The linguistic situations and conditions in Indonesia are quite complex by their own natures as more than seven hundred vernaculars with their various dialects from a great number of ethnic groups have been used as media of communication in the country. Accordingly, the success of English teaching in Indonesia cannot be freed from the students’ cultural backgrounds, values, customs, and beliefs as well as the political standpoint of the government regarding this foreign language. English language teaching has then undergone more than four changes in its curriculum since the country’s independence and brought no significant impact upon the learning outcomes. This study reveals the substantial unconstructive influence of the students’ cultures and the non-conducive language environment affecting their language acquisition. Other aspects related to the teachers’ performance and class preparations equally contribute to the ineffective classroom interactions. This study offers some practical suggestions to cope with those problems.

  4. Physiology of Aspergillus niger in Oxygen-Limited Continuous Cultures: Influence of Aeration, Carbon Source Concentration and Dilution Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Peeters, J.; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    In industrial production of enzymes using the filamentous fungus Aspergilhis niger supply of sufficient oxygen is often a limitation, resulting in the formation of by-products such as polyols. In order to identify the mechanisms behind formation of the different by-products we studied the effect...... of low oxygen availability, at different carbon source concentrations and at different specific growth rates, on the metabolism of A. niger, using continuous cultures. The results show that there is an increase in the production of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates at low oxygen concentrations...

  5. Interactions entre les bacteries et les algues dans une culture continue de phytoplancton naturel soumise aux conditions exterieures

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, M; Martin, Y; Lelong, P; Breittmayer, V

    1984-01-01

    Au cours d'une expérience de culture continue de phytoplancton marin en grand volume soumise aux conditions extérieures, des tests microbiologiques et biochimiques ont été effectués pour mettre en évidence la production de substances antibactériennes et antialgales par les algues unicellulaires. De nombreux paramètres ont été mesurés pour caractériser la croissance de ces algues (qualitativement et quantitativement) et des bassin expérimental et dans la biomasse à différents stades de la cult...

  6. Some observations on oscillatory changes in the growth rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic continuous undisturbed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzani, W; Gregori, R E; Vairo, M L

    1977-09-01

    Oscillatory changes in the growth rate were observed in undisturbed continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on sugar-cane molasses media when nitrogen sources (2.56 to 6.17 g/liter of ammonium sulfate or 1.22 g/liter of urea) were added to the feeding mash and when the air rate was 1.3 to 1.6 v/v/m. The oscillations were not affected by the addition of yeast extract. The suppression of the nitrogen source during the continous test leads to a nonoscillatory transient state. No oscillations occured at all when no nitrogen source was added to the medium and/or the air rate was equal to zero or equal to about 3.3 v/v/m. The oscillatory responses of the system were affected by a previous anaerobic continuous cultivation of the yeast.

  7. Continuing the dialogue: postcolonial feminist scholarship and Bourdieu - discourses of culture and points of connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J M; Reimer Kirkham, S; Browne, A J; Lynam, M J

    2007-09-01

    Postcolonial feminist theories provide the analytic tools to address issues of structural inequities in groups that historically have been socially and economically disadvantaged. In this paper we question what value might be added to postcolonial feminist theories on culture by drawing on Bourdieu. Are there points of connection? Like postcolonial feminists, he puts forward a position that aims to unmask oppressive structures. We argue that, while there are points of connection, there are also epistemologic and methodologic differences between postcolonial feminist perspectives and Bourdieu's work. Nonetheless, engagement with different theoretical perspectives carries the promise of new insights - new ways of 'seeing' and 'understanding' that might enhance a praxis-oriented theoretical perspective in healthcare delivery.

  8. Culture and subjectivity – areas of continuity and rupture: the history of Mukhtar Mai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Perroni

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2002 a Pakistani woman named Mukhtar Mai was sentenced to collective rape for a crime committed by her brother. Unfortunately, situations like these cannot be considered rare in Pakistan, where rape as a way of resolving conflicts between families is a common practice. Consequently, the most remarkable aspect of this story may have been the reaction of this woman, who instead of resigning herself to silence or committing suicide, which is common in these cases, initiated a campaign of protest and struggle in favor of women’s rights in her country. Through this story we can perceive how tradition and culture permeate the actions and representations of a people in which the femail body still represents an object that can be used for the honor or shame of the clan. But this system of values also makes possible the rise of indivuduals who are able to break with a pattern of subordination.

  9. The Continuity and the Culture Change of Pesantren in South Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Munir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article entitled culture of pesantren (madrasah boarding schools in South Sumatra. This article is the result of research in Pesantren Nurul Islam Ogan Ilir South Sumatra. It is based on the fact that many pesantren graduation create academicians from the Kiayi or Ulama. Therefore, this paper describe the characteristics of the culture of madrasah schools from anthropology-sociology aspects of education, with a phenomenological approach to research subjects are madrasah chairman, board of teachers, students and community supporters. The data collection techniques used documentation study, observation and in-depth interviews, and analysis of data using qualitative descriptive, with triangulation and contrasting techniques. Applying local knowledge systems in boarding school curriculum and integrated with Madrasah boarding school curriculum. Orientation discipline tends towards positive law than the laws of Personality Syara’. Clothing the students follow a uniform generally used in madrasah. For students wear clothes instead of the veil of windings. Artistic activities undertaken include: litany, muhad Barzanji, Tilawah al-Qur’an, calligraphy, and drum band.   Artikel berjudul budaya pesantren (sekolah berasrama madrasah di Sumatera Selatan. Artikel ini merupakan hasil penelitian di Pesantren Nurul Islam Ogan Ilir Sumatera Selatan. Hal ini didasarkan pada kenyataan bahwa banyak lulusan pesantren melahirkan akademisi dari kiayi atau Ulama. Oleh karena itu, makalah ini menggambarkan karakteristik budaya dari sekolah madrasah dari aspek antropologi-sosiologi pendidikan, dengan pendekatan fenomenologis dengan subyek penelitian kepala madrasah, dewan guru, siswa dan masyarakat sekitar. Teknik pengumpulan data yang digunakan studi dokumentasi, observasi dan wawancara mendalam, dan analisis data menggunakan deskriptif kualitatif, dengan triangulasi dan teknik kontras. Menerapkan sistem pengetahuan lokal dalam kurikulum pesantren dan

  10. A comparative study on the effects of tylosin on select bacteria during continuous-flow culture of mixed populations of gut microflora derived from a feral and a domestic pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes, ...

  11. Effect of formation of biofilms and chemical scale on the cathode electrode on the performance of a continuous two-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Fujiki, Itto; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    A two-chamber MFC system was operated continuously for more than 500 days to evaluate effects of biofilm and chemical scale formation on the cathode electrode on power generation. A stable power density of 0.57 W/m(2) was attained after 200 days operation. However, the power density decreased drastically to 0.2 W/m(2) after the cathodic biofilm and chemical scale were removed. As the cathodic biofilm and chemical scale partially accumulated on the cathode, the power density gradually recovered with time. Microbial community structure of the cathodic biofilm was analyzed based on 16S rRNA clone libraries. The clones closely related to Xanthomonadaceae bacterium and Xanthomonas sp. in the Gammaproteobacteria subdivision were most frequently retrieved from the cathodic biofilm. Results of the SEM-EDX analysis revealed that the cation species (Na(+) and Ca(2+)) were main constituents of chemical scale, indicating that these cations diffused from the anode chamber through the Nafion membrane. However, an excess accumulation of the biofilm and chemical scale on the cathode exhibited adverse effects on the power generation due to a decrease in the active cathode surface area and an increase in diffusion resistance for oxygen. Thus, it is important to properly control the formation of chemical scale and biofilm on the cathode during long-term operation.

  12. A Long-Term Cultivation of an Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Microbial Community from Deep-Sea Methane-Seep Sediment Using a Continuous-Flow Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masataka; Ehara, Masayuki; Saito, Yumi; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Saito, Yayoi; Miyashita, Ai; Kawakami, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments is an important global methane sink, but the physiological characteristics of AOM-associated microorganisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the cultivation of an AOM microbial community from deep-sea methane-seep sediment using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called the down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) bioreactor. We anaerobically incubated deep-sea methane-seep sediment collected from the Nankai Trough, Japan, for 2,013 days in the bioreactor at 10°C. Following incubation, an active AOM activity was confirmed by a tracer experiment using 13C-labeled methane. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that phylogenetically diverse Archaea and Bacteria grew in the bioreactor. After 2,013 days of incubation, the predominant archaeal components were anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-2a, Deep-Sea Archaeal Group, and Marine Benthic Group-D, and Gammaproteobacteria was the dominant bacterial lineage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ANME-1 and -2a, and most ANME-2c cells occurred without close physical interaction with potential bacterial partners. Our data demonstrate that the DHS bioreactor system is a useful system for cultivating fastidious methane-seep-associated sedimentary microorganisms. PMID:25141130

  13. Building enterprise-wide resilience by integrating business continuity capability into day-to-day business culture and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesi, Patrick

    2008-04-01

    This paper follows the development of the business continuity planning (BCP) programme at Lehman Brothers following the events of September 11th. Previous attempts to implement a `traditional' form of BCP had been ineffective, but following the events, the firm began to look at BCP in a new light. This paper deals with three main themes: creating a culture of resiliency, leveraging technology, and building flexible plans. Distributing accountability for BCP to business line managers, integrating BCP change management into the normal course of business, and providing every employee with personalised BCP information breeds a culture of resiliency where people are empowered to react to events without burdensome, hierarchical response and recovery procedures. Building a strong relationship with one's application development community can result in novel, customised BCP solutions; existing systems and data structures can be used to enhance an existing BCP. Even the best plans are often challenged by events; understanding that flexibility is essential to effective incident response is a critical element in the development of a proper business continuity plan.

  14. Coupling a continuous watershed-scale microbial fate and transport model with a stochastic dose-response model to estimate risk of illness in an urban watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hehuan; Krometis, Leigh-Anne H; Kline, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Within the United States, elevated levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) remain the leading cause of surface water-quality impairments requiring formal remediation plans under the federal Clean Water Act's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The sufficiency of compliance with numerical FIB criteria as the targeted endpoint of TMDL remediation plans may be questionable given poor correlations between FIB and pathogenic microorganisms and varying degrees of risk associated with exposure to different fecal pollution sources (e.g. human vs animal). The present study linked a watershed-scale FIB fate and transport model with a dose-response model to continuously predict human health risks via quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), for comparison to regulatory benchmarks. This process permitted comparison of risks associated with different fecal pollution sources in an impaired urban watershed in order to identify remediation priorities. Results indicate that total human illness risks were consistently higher than the regulatory benchmark of 36 illnesses/1000 people for the study watershed, even when the predicted FIB levels were in compliance with the Escherichia coli geometric mean standard of 126CFU/100mL. Sanitary sewer overflows were associated with the greatest risk of illness. This is of particular concern, given increasing indications that sewer leakage is ubiquitous in urban areas, yet not typically fully accounted for during TMDL development. Uncertainty analysis suggested the accuracy of risk estimates would be improved by more detailed knowledge of site-specific pathogen presence and densities. While previous applications of the QMRA process to impaired waterways have mostly focused on single storm events or hypothetical situations, the continuous modeling framework presented in this study could be integrated into long-term water quality management planning, especially the United States' TMDL program, providing greater clarity to watershed

  15. Alginate production and alg8 gene expression by Azotobacter vinelandii in continuous cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barrera, Alvaro; Soto, Erik; Altamirano, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Alginates are polysaccharides that are used as thickening agents, stabilizers, and emulsifiers in various industries. These biopolymers are produced by fermentation with a limited understanding of the processes occurring at the cellular level. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of agitation rate and inlet sucrose concentrations (ISC) on alginate production and the expression of the genes encoding for alginate-lyases (algL) and the catalytic subunit of the alginate polymerase complex (alg8) in chemostat cultures of Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC 9046. Increased alginate production (2.4 g l⁻¹) and a higher specific alginate production rate (0.1 g g⁻¹ h⁻¹) were obtained at an ISC of 15 g l⁻¹. Carbon recovery of about 100% was obtained at an ISC of 10 g l⁻¹, whereas it was close to 50% at higher ISCs, suggesting that cells growing at lower sucrose feed rates utilize the carbon source more efficiently. In each of the steady states evaluated, an increase in algL gene expression was not related to a decrease in alginate molecular weight, whereas an increase in the molecular weight of alginate was linked to higher alg8 gene expression, demonstrating a relationship between the alg8 gene and alginate polymerization in A. vinelandii for the first time. The results obtained provide a possible explanation for changes observed in the molecular weight of alginate synthesized and this knowledge can be used to build a recombinant strain able to overexpress alg8 in order to produce alginates with higher molecular weights.

  16. Microbial diversity and dynamics throughout manufacturing and ripening of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses investigated by culture-independent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryssel, Mia; Johansen, Pernille; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Sørensen, Søren; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-12-23

    Microbial successions on the surface and in the interior of surface ripened semi-hard Danish Danbo cheeses were investigated by culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Culture-independent detection of microorganisms was obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing, using amplicons of 16S and 26S rRNA genes for prokaryotes and eukaryotes, respectively. With minor exceptions, the results from the culture-independent analyses correlated to the culture-dependent plating results. Even though the predominant microorganisms detected with the two culture-independent techniques correlated, a higher number of genera were detected by pyrosequencing compared to DGGE. Additionally, minor parts of the microbiota, i.e. comprising cheeses diverged. During cheese production pyrosequencing determined Lactococcus as the dominating genus on cheese surfaces, representing on average 94.7%±2.1% of the OTUs. At day 6 Lactococcus spp. declined to 10.0% of the OTUs, whereas Staphylococcus spp. went from 0.0% during cheese production to 75.5% of the OTUs at smearing. During ripening, i.e. from 4 to 18 weeks, Corynebacterium was the dominant genus on the cheese surface (55.1%±9.8% of the OTUs), with Staphylococcus (17.9%±11.2% of the OTUs) and Brevibacterium (10.4%±8.3% of the OTUs) being the second and third most abundant genera. Other detected bacterial genera included Clostridiisalibacter (5.0%±4.0% of the OTUs), as well as Pseudoclavibacter, Alkalibacterium and Marinilactibacillus, which represented cheeses was dominated by Lactococcus spp. comprising on average 93.9%±7.8% of the OTUs throughout the cheese processing. The microbial dynamics described at genus level in this study add to a comprehensive understanding of the complex microbiota existing especially on surface ripened semi-hard cheeses.

  17. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sequential culture in a continuous flow reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia M. Elía

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum in a continuous-flow, high-solids reactor. Liquid medium was continuously flowed through switchgrass (2 mm particle size at one of three flow rates: 83.33 mL h−1 (2 L d−1, 41.66 mL h−1 (1 L d−1, and 20.833 mL h−1 (0.5 L d−1. The cellulolytic phase was initiated by culturing C. thermocellum (63 °C, 24 h. The temperature was decreased (35 and C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum was inoculated. When metabolism decreased (96 h, the temperature was increased (63 °C; 24 h to permit cellulosome production by C. thermocellum. The C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum was re-inoculated and the temperature returned to 35°C. The average gross production over 9 d was 1480 mg total acids (formic, acetic lactic butyric, 207 mg total solvents (acetone, butanol, ethanol, and average dry matter disappearance was 2.8 g from 25 g non-pretreated switchgrass. There was no effect of flow rate on the product formation. These results indicate that C. thermocellum can survive and produce cellulases with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicumin a continuous-flow, high-solids reactor temperature with temperature cycling.

  18. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types.

  19. Production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inhibited by H2S but resumes in a co-culture with P. stutzeri: applications for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Ma, Fang; Shi, Rongjiu; Zhang, Jie; Han, Siqin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria and H2S exist widely in oil production systems, and in situ production of rhamnolipids is promising for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, information of the effect of S(2-) on rhamnolipids production is scarce. Two facultative anaerobic rhamnolipids-producing bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and WJ-1, were used. Above 10 mg S(2-)/l, both cell growth and rhamnolipids production were inhibited. A large inoculum (9%, v/v) failed to completely relieve the inhibitory effect of 10 mg S(2-)/l. Below 30 mg S(2-)/l, both strains resumed rhamnolipid production through co-culturing with the denitrifying and sulphide-removing strain Pseudomonas stutzeri DQ1. H2S has a direct but reversible inhibitory effect on rhamnolipids production. Control of H2S in oilfields is indispensable to MEOR, and the co-culture method is effective in restoring rhamnolipid production in presence of S(2-).

  20. Effect of sodium arsenate on microbial growth in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatpanahi, M; Anderson, A C

    1981-01-01

    Microbial transformation of sodium arsenate, the wood preservative and insecticide, is important in assessing the environmental impact of this pesticide. Recent studies using batch culture techniques have shown that arsenate is metabolized to more toxic end products. This study investigated the effect of the chemical on the microbial cells themselves using continuous flow cultures to examine the effect of arsenate on the growth and maintenance requirements of the microbes. Cell yield was lower and maintenance requirements higher at 100 micrograms/ml arsenate than at 10 micrograms/ml indicating a greater expenditure of energy by the cells to maintain homeostasis.

  1. Optimising enzyme production by bakers yeast in continuous culture: physiological knowledge useful for process design and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, M.E. [Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Bulmer, M. [Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, University Coll., London (United Kingdom); Bogle, I.D.L. [Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, University Coll., London (United Kingdom); Titchener-Hooker, N. [Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, University Coll., London (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in aerobic continuous culture on a defined minimal medium, with glucose (40 g.l{sup -1}) as the growth-limiting carbon source, to acquire knowledge useful in process design and for model-based control. Steady-state concentrations of biomass, glucose, ethanol and activities of model products alcohol dehydrogenase, hexokinase, malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and iso-citrate dehydrogenase were determined at dilution rates (D) between 0.06 h{sup -1} and 0.323 h{sup -1} (close to {mu}{sub max}). Enzyme activities showed productivity trends related to the transition from oxidative to oxido-reductive growth. Conclusions are drawn from the data with regard to designing a new process for production of intracellular enzymes. Issues of process stability as well as productivity are discussed. (orig.). With 5 figs.

  2. Continuous-culture study of the regulation of glucose and fructose transport in Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, E; Van den Broek, P J

    1990-01-01

    Regulation of transport of D-glucose and D-fructose was studied in Kluyveromyces marxianus grown in continuous culture. Both substrates could be transported by at least two different transport systems, low-affinity transport and high-affinity proton-sugar symport. The low-affinity transporter, specific for both glucose and fructose, was constitutively present and was apparently not regulated by carbon catabolite repression. Regulation of the activity of the glucose- and fructose-specific proton symport systems appeared to proceed mainly through catabolite repression. Activation of symport did not need the presence of specific inductor molecules in the medium. Nevertheless, the capacities of the proton-sugar symporters varied in cells grown on a wide variety of carbon sources. The possibility that the control of proton symport activity is related to the presence of specific intracellular metabolites is discussed. PMID:2160928

  3. Production of extracellular protease and glucose uptake in Bacillus clausii in steady-state and transient continuous cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    for product formation. The dynamics of the production of Savinuse(R) were studied during step changes in the dilution rate. During a step down in the dilution rate the specific production rate decreased immediately until it reached a new steady value. During a step-up an initial cease in the production rate...... was observed, but when glucose stopped to accumulate the production rate was regained. The glucose uptake was further investigated when chemostat cultures growing at different dilution rates were exposed to glucose pulses. The maximal glucose uptake capacity was found to be dependent on the initial specific......The production of the extracellular alkaline protease Savinase(R) (EC 3.4.21.62) and glucose uptake in a non-sporulating strain of Bacillus clausii were investigated by analysing steady-state and transients during continuous cultivations. The specific production rate was found to have an optimum...

  4. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaro, Amy A. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States). Bioproducts, Sciences and Engineering Lab.; Kim, Young-Mo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Biological Sciences Division; Konopka, Allan E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Biological Sciences Division; Callister, Stephen J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Biological Sciences Division; Ahring, Birgitte K. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States). Bioproducts, Sciences and Engineering Lab.

    2015-01-05

    Propionate accumulation is a common indicator of process imbalances in anaerobic bioreactor systems. The accumulation of propionate can occur due to low retention rates, hydrogen accumulation, or mechanical changes affecting the proximity between propionate oxidizers and partner species, thereby preventing necessary electron transfer. Few studies, however, have observed the changes in microbial community structure during propionate accumulation. We used 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA to evaluate the community membership during propionate accumulations in replicate bioreactors with rumen based cultures. Half of the culture volume from a parent reactor was transferred to a sterile “daughter” reactor, and both systems were run identically. Both reactors experienced a propionate accumulation after roughly 10 days, with the propionate accumulation being less pronounced in the parent reactor as compared to the daughter reactor. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) was used to determine clustering patterns of the samples, and correlative methods were used to determine which OTUs were significantly associated with the movements of samples along the NMDS axes. The presence of Saccharofermentans characterized the position of early samples, whereas the presence of Ruminococcus and Succiniclasticum were more indicative of the positions of later samples. Hydrogen accumulation and low sequence counts indicated low methanogen activity. Although both reactor systems were closed to microbial inputs due to the sterilization of influent media, we recorded significant increases in reactor diversity over time. This suggests that changes in the abundances of dominant community members may affect the sequencing of rare taxa within samples.

  5. Treatment and electricity harvesting from sulfate/sulfide-containing wastewaters using microbial fuel cell with enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: cedean@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chin-Yu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We started up microbial fuel cell (MFC) using enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulfate-reducing bacteria and anode-respiring bacteria were enriched in anodic biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MFC effectively remove sulfate to elementary sulfur in the presence of lactate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present device can treat sulfate laden wastewaters with electricity harvesting. - Abstract: Anaerobic treatment of sulfate-laden wastewaters can produce excess sulfide, which is corrosive to pipelines and is toxic to incorporated microorganisms. This work started up microbial fuel cell (MFC) using enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture as anodic biofilms and applied the so yielded MFC for treating sulfate or sulfide-laden wastewaters. The sulfate-reducing bacteria in anodic biofilm effectively reduced sulfate to sulfide, which was then used by neighboring anode respiring bacteria (ARB) as electron donor for electricity production. The presence of organic carbons enhanced MFC performance since the biofilm ARB were mixotrophs that need organic carbon to grow. The present device introduces a route for treating sulfate laden wastewaters with electricity harvesting.

  6. Effect of light on 2H/1H fractionation in lipids from continuous cultures of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Julian P.; Maloney, Ashley E.; Gregersen, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Continuous cultures of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana were grown at irradiances between 6 and 47 μmol m-2 s-1 in order to evaluate the effect of light on hydrogen isotope fractionation in lipids. δ2H values increased with irradiance in phytol by 1.1‰ (μmol m-2 s-1)-1 and by 0.3‰ (μmol m-2 s-1)-1 in the C14:0 fatty acid, but decreased by 0.8‰ (μmol m-2 s-1)-1 in the sterol 24-methyl-cholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3β-ol (C28Δ5,24(28)). The anticorrelation between δ2H values in C28Δ5,24(28) and irradiance is attributed to enhanced sterol precursor synthesis via the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway at high irradiance, relative to the cytosolic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway, and the supposition that MEP precursors are 2H-depleted compared to MVA precursors because they incorporate a greater proportion of hydrogen from photosynthetically produced NADPH. Increasing δ2H values of phytol and C14:0 with irradiance is attributed to a greater proportion of pyruvate, the last common precursor to both lipids, being sourced from glycolysis in the mitochondria and cytosol, where enhanced incorporation of metabolic NADPH and further hydrogen exchange with cell water can enrich pyruvate with 2H relative to pyruvate from the chloroplast. Irrespective of the biosynthetic mechanisms responsible for the 2H/1H fractionation response to light, the high sensitivity of lipid δ2H values in T. pseudonana continuous cultures would result in -30‰ to +40‰ variations in δ2H over a 40 μmol m-2 s-1 range in sub-saturating irradiance if expressed in the environment, depending on the lipid.

  7. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: Parameter estimation and sporulation modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Graeme J.; King, John R.; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The acetone–butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. PMID:23201580

  8. Evaluation of gene expression and alginate production in response to oxygen transfer in continuous culture of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Díaz-Barrera

    Full Text Available Alginates are polysaccharides used as food additives and encapsulation agents in biotechnology, and their functional properties depend on its molecular weight. In this study, different steady-states in continuous cultures of A. vinelandii were established to determine the effect of the dilution rate (D and the agitation rate on alginate production and expression of genes involved in alginate polymerization and depolymerization. Both, the agitation and dilution rates, determined the partitioning of the carbon utilization from sucrose into alginate and CO2 under oxygen-limiting conditions. A low D (0.07 h(-1 and 500 rpm resulted in the highest carbon utilization into alginate (25%. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the transcription level of six genes involved in alginate polymerization and depolymerization. In chemostat cultures at 0.07 h(-1, the gene expression was affected by changes in the agitation rate. By increasing the agitation rate from 400 to 600 rpm, the algE7 gene expression decreased tenfold, whereas alyA1, algL and alyA2 gene expression increased between 1.5 and 2.8 times under similar conditions evaluated. Chemostat at 0.07 h(-1 showed a highest alginate molecular weight (580 kDa at 500 rpm whereas similar molecular weights (480 kDa were obtained at 400 and 600 rpm. The highest molecular weight was not explained by changes in the expression of alg8 and alg44 (genes involved in alginate polymerization. Nonetheless, a different expression pattern observed for lyases could explain the highest alginate molecular weight obtained. Overall, the results suggest that the control of alginate molecular weight in A. vinelandii cells growing in continuous mode is determined by a balance between the gene expression of intracellular and extracellular lyases in response to oxygen availability. These findings better our understanding of the biosynthesis of bacterial alginate and help us progress toward obtain

  9. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: parameter estimation and sporulation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-02-01

    The acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. Copyright © 2012

  10. Evaluation of Gene Expression and Alginate Production in Response to Oxygen Transfer in Continuous Culture of Azotobacter vinelandii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barrera, Alvaro; Martínez, Fabiola; Guevara Pezoa, Felipe; Acevedo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Alginates are polysaccharides used as food additives and encapsulation agents in biotechnology, and their functional properties depend on its molecular weight. In this study, different steady-states in continuous cultures of A. vinelandii were established to determine the effect of the dilution rate (D) and the agitation rate on alginate production and expression of genes involved in alginate polymerization and depolymerization. Both, the agitation and dilution rates, determined the partitioning of the carbon utilization from sucrose into alginate and CO2 under oxygen-limiting conditions. A low D (0.07 h−1) and 500 rpm resulted in the highest carbon utilization into alginate (25%). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the transcription level of six genes involved in alginate polymerization and depolymerization. In chemostat cultures at 0.07 h−1, the gene expression was affected by changes in the agitation rate. By increasing the agitation rate from 400 to 600 rpm, the algE7 gene expression decreased tenfold, whereas alyA1, algL and alyA2 gene expression increased between 1.5 and 2.8 times under similar conditions evaluated. Chemostat at 0.07 h−1 showed a highest alginate molecular weight (580 kDa) at 500 rpm whereas similar molecular weights (480 kDa) were obtained at 400 and 600 rpm. The highest molecular weight was not explained by changes in the expression of alg8 and alg44 (genes involved in alginate polymerization). Nonetheless, a different expression pattern observed for lyases could explain the highest alginate molecular weight obtained. Overall, the results suggest that the control of alginate molecular weight in A. vinelandii cells growing in continuous mode is determined by a balance between the gene expression of intracellular and extracellular lyases in response to oxygen availability. These findings better our understanding of the biosynthesis of bacterial alginate and help us progress toward obtain tailor

  11. The effect of growth-mimicking continuous strain on the early stages of skeletal development in micromass culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpers, Darinka D; Smit, Theo H; Mooney, David J

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic skeletogenesis involves proliferation, condensation and subsequent chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal precursor cells, and the strains and stresses inherent to these processes have been hypothesized to influence skeletal development. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of growth-mimicking strain on the process of early skeletal development in vitro. To this end, we applied continuous uniaxial strain to embryonic skeletal precursor cells in micromass culture. Strain was applied at different times of culture to specifically address the effect of mechanical loading on the sequential stages of cellular proliferation, condensation and differentiation. We found that growth-mimicking strain at all three times did not affect proliferation or chondrogenic differentiation under the tested conditions. However, the timing of the applied strain did play a role in the density of mesenchymal condensations. This finding suggests that a mechanically dynamic environment, and specifically strain, can influence skeletal patterning. The growth-mimicking micromass model presented here may be a useful tool for further studies into the role of mechanical loading in early skeletal development.

  12. Effect of low pH start-up on continuous mixed-culture lactic acid fermentation of dairy effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyucheol; Kim, Jaai; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-12-01

    Mixed-culture fermentation that does not require an energy-intensive sterilization process is a viable approach for the economically feasible production of lactic acid (LA) due to the potential use of organic waste as feedstock. This study investigated mixed-culture LA fermentation of whey, a high-strength organic wastewater, in continuous mode. Variations in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 120 to 8 h under different pH regimes in two thermophilic reactors (55 °C) were compared for their fermentation performance. One reactor was maintained at a low pH (pH 3.0) during operation at HRTs of 120 to 24 h and then adjusted to pH 5.5 in the later phases of fermentation at HRTs of 24 to 8 h (R1), while the second reactor was maintained at pH 5.5 throughout the experiment (R2). Although the LA production in R1 was negligible at low pH, it increased dramatically after the pH was raised to 5.5 and exceeded that in R2 when stabilized at HRTs of 8 and 12 h. The maximum yield (0.62 g LA/g substrate fed as the chemical oxygen demand (COD) equivalent), the production rate (11.5 g/L day), and the selectivity (95 %) of LA were all determined at a 12-h HRT in R1. Additionally, molecular and statistical analyses revealed that changes in the HRT and the pH significantly affected the bacterial community structure and thus the fermentation characteristics of the experimental reactors. Bacillus coagulans was likely the predominant LA producer in both reactors. The overall results suggest that low pH start-up has a positive effect on yield and selectivity in mixed-culture LA fermentation.

  13. Coupling a continuous watershed-scale microbial fate and transport model with a stochastic dose-response model to estimate risk of illness in an urban watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Hehuan, E-mail: hehuan86@vt.edu [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 155 Ag Quad Lane, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Krometis, Leigh-Anne H. [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 155 Ag Quad Lane, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Kline, Karen [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, 155 Ag Quad Lane, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Center for Watershed Studies, Virginia Tech, 155 Ag Quad Lane, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Within the United States, elevated levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) remain the leading cause of surface water-quality impairments requiring formal remediation plans under the federal Clean Water Act's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The sufficiency of compliance with numerical FIB criteria as the targeted endpoint of TMDL remediation plans may be questionable given poor correlations between FIB and pathogenic microorganisms and varying degrees of risk associated with exposure to different fecal pollution sources (e.g. human vs animal). The present study linked a watershed-scale FIB fate and transport model with a dose-response model to continuously predict human health risks via quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), for comparison to regulatory benchmarks. This process permitted comparison of risks associated with different fecal pollution sources in an impaired urban watershed in order to identify remediation priorities. Results indicate that total human illness risks were consistently higher than the regulatory benchmark of 36 illnesses/1000 people for the study watershed, even when the predicted FIB levels were in compliance with the Escherichia coli geometric mean standard of 126 CFU/100 mL. Sanitary sewer overflows were associated with the greatest risk of illness. This is of particular concern, given increasing indications that sewer leakage is ubiquitous in urban areas, yet not typically fully accounted for during TMDL development. Uncertainty analysis suggested the accuracy of risk estimates would be improved by more detailed knowledge of site-specific pathogen presence and densities. While previous applications of the QMRA process to impaired waterways have mostly focused on single storm events or hypothetical situations, the continuous modeling framework presented in this study could be integrated into long-term water quality management planning, especially the United States' TMDL program, providing greater clarity to

  14. Purification of monoclonal antibodies from clarified cell culture fluid using Protein A capture continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Amit K; Tran, Travis; Napadensky, Boris; Teella, Achyuta; Brookhart, Gary; Ropp, Philip A; Zhang, Ada W; Tustian, Andrew D; Zydney, Andrew L; Shinkazh, Oleg

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies using simple model systems have demonstrated that continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography (CCTC) has the potential to overcome many of the limitations of conventional Protein A chromatography using packed columns. The objective of this work was to optimize and implement a CCTC system for monoclonal antibody purification from clarified Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture fluid using a commercial Protein A resin. Several improvements were introduced to the previous CCTC system including the use of retentate pumps to maintain stable resin concentrations in the flowing slurry, the elimination of a slurry holding tank to improve productivity, and the introduction of an "after binder" to the binding step to increase antibody recovery. A kinetic binding model was developed to estimate the required residence times in the multi-stage binding step to optimize yield and productivity. Data were obtained by purifying two commercial antibodies from two different manufactures, one with low titer (∼ 0.67 g/L) and one with high titer (∼ 6.9 g/L), demonstrating the versatility of the CCTC system. Host cell protein removal, antibody yields and purities were similar to those obtained with conventional column chromatography; however, the CCTC system showed much higher productivity. These results clearly demonstrate the capabilities of continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography for the commercial purification of monoclonal antibody products.

  15. Long-term operation of microbial electrosynthesis cell reducing CO2 to multi-carbon chemicals with a mixed culture avoiding methanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Suman; Yuliasni, Rustiana; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Buisman, Cees J N; Strik, David P B T B; Pant, Deepak

    2017-02-01

    In microbial electrosynthesis (MES), CO2 can be reduced preferably to multi-carbon chemicals by a biocathode-based process which uses electrochemically active bacteria as catalysts. A mixed anaerobic consortium from biological origin typically produces methane from CO2 reduction which circumvents production of multi-carbon compounds. This study aimed to develop a stable and robust CO2 reducing biocathode from a mixed culture inoculum avoiding the methane generation. An effective approach was demonstrated based on (i) an enrichment procedure involving inoculum pre-treatment and several culture transfers in H2:CO2 media, (ii) a transfer from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth and (iii) a sequential batch operation. Biomass growth and gradual acclimation to CO2 electro-reduction accomplished a maximum acetate production rate of 400mgLcatholyte(-1)d(-1) at -1V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Methane was never detected in more than 300days of operation. Accumulation of acetate up to 7-10gL(-1) was repeatedly attained by supplying (80:20) CO2:N2 mixture at -0.9 to -1V (vs. Ag/AgCl). In addition, ethanol and butyrate were also produced from CO2 reduction. Thus, a robust CO2 reducing biocathode can be developed from a mixed culture avoiding methane generation by adopting the specific culture enrichment and operation procedures without the direct addition of chemical inhibitor.

  16. Accelerated microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation in a defined co-culture of ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, D.; Tsesarsky, M.; Shamir, D.; Ronen, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) is an innovative technique that harnesses bacterial activity for the modification of the physical properties of soils. Since stimulation of MICP by urea hydrolysis in natural soils is likely to be affected by interactions between ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria, we designed an experiment to examine the interactions between ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria and the effect of these interactions on MICP. An artificial groundwater-based rich medium was inoculated with two model species of bacteria, the ureolytic species Sporosarcina pasteurii and the non-ureolytic species Bacillus subtilis. The control treatment was inoculated with a pure culture of S. pasteurii. The following parameters were monitored during the course of the experiment: optical density, pH, and the evolution of ammonium, dissolved calcium, and dissolved inorganic carbon. The results showed that dissolved calcium was precipitated as CaCO3 faster in the mixed culture than in the control, despite less favorable chemical conditions in the mixed culture, i.e., lower pH and lower CO32- concentration. B. subtilis exhibited a considerably higher growth rate than S. pasteurii, resulting in higher density of bacterial cells in the mixed culture. We suggest that the presence of the non-ureolytic bacterial species, B. subtilis, accelerated the MICP process, via the supply of nucleation sites in the form of non-ureolytic bacterial cells.

  17. Political and cultural factors in achieving continuity with a primary health care provider at an Indian Health Service hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, A J; Olson, A L

    1981-01-01

    A primary care system was established at Zuni-Ramah Indian Health Service Hospital and clinic in New Mexico. Continuity and coordination of care were added to a health care system that was already accountable, accessible, and comprehensive. The new system offered each patient a personal health care provider who worked as a member of a multidisciplinary team. In changing the health care system, special attention was given to its cultural and political setting, the village of Zuni. After thorough discussion with community and staff, community members' concerns about patients' privacy and free choice were better understood, and special efforts were made to safeguard them. Ongoing evaluation is essential to maintain continuity. Eight months after the primary care system was begun, 64 percent of patients who came for care had established a personal relationship with a health care provider. For 59 percent of the visits during the 1-month evaluation period, patients saw their regular provider and, for 82 percent, patients saw their provider or one of his or her team colleagues. These percentages include night and walk-in visits. The system required no extra funding or staff. The political process of planning and consultation helped anticipate and alleviate the community's concerns, but resistance from physician's assistants and some physicians was unexpected. A flexible approach has led to a gradual acceptance of this voluntary system. This experience with the people of Zuni village shows that a primary care system can be started in a rural Indian Health Service facility with minimal outside help. Apparent improvements in quality of care make the continuity of primary care worthy of further consideration in the IHS and similar health services systems.

  18. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio García-Moyano; Andreas Erling Austnes; Anders Lanzén; Elena González-Toril; Ángeles Aguilera; Lise Øvreås

    2015-01-01

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharact...

  19. Electroactive mixed culture biofilms in microbial bioelectrochemical systems: the role of temperature for biofilm formation and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil A; Harnisch, Falk; Kapadnis, Balasaheb; Schröder, Uwe

    2010-10-15

    In this paper we investigate the temperature dependence and temperature limits of waste water derived anodic microbial biofilms. We demonstrate that these biofilms are active in a temperature range between 5°C and 45°C. Elevated temperatures during initial biofilm growth not only accelerate the biofilm formation process, they also influence the bioelectrocatalytic performance of these biofilms when measured at identical operation temperatures. For example, the time required for biofilm formation decreases from above 40 days at 15°C to 3.5 days at 35°C. Biofilms grown at elevated temperatures are more electrochemically active at these temperatures than those grown at lower incubation temperature. Thus, at 30°C current densities of 520 μA cm(-2) and 881 μA cm(-2) are achieved by biofilms grown at 22°C and 35°C, respectively. Vice versa, and of great practical relevance for waste water treatment plants in areas of moderate climate, at low operation temperatures, biofilms grown at lower temperatures outperform those grown at higher temperatures. We further demonstrate that all biofilms possess similar lower (0°C) and upper (50°C) temperature limits--defining the operational limits of a respective microbial fuel cell or microbial biosensor--as well as similar electrochemical electron transfer characteristics.

  20. Biofilms: A microbial home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  1. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  2. Effect of pH and level of concentrate in the diet on the production of biohydrogenation intermediates in a dual-flow continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M C; Calsamiglia, S; Cardozo, P W; Vlaeminck, B

    2009-09-01

    Milk fat depression in cows fed high-grain diets has been related to an increase in the concentration of trans-10 C(18:1) and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in milk. These fatty acids (FA) are produced as a result of the alteration in rumen biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated FA. Because a reduction in ruminal pH is usually observed when high-concentrate diets are fed, the main cause that determines the alteration in the biohydrogenation pathways is not clear. The effect of pH (6.4 vs. 5.6) and dietary forage to concentrate ratios (F:C; 70:30 F:C vs. 30:70 F:C) on rumen microbial fermentation, effluent FA profile, and DNA concentration of bacteria involved in lipolysis and biohydrogenation processes were investigated in a continuous culture trial. The dual-flow continuous culture consisted of 2 periods of 8 d (5 d for adaptation and 3 d for sampling), with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Samples from solid and liquid mixed effluents were taken for determination of total N, ammonia-N, and volatile fatty acid concentrations, and the remainder of the sample was lyophilized. Dry samples were analyzed for dry matter, ash, neutral and acid detergent fiber, FA, and purine contents. The pH 5.6 reduced organic matter and fiber digestibility, ammonia-N concentration and flow, and crude protein degradation, and increased nonammonia and dietary N flows. The pH 5.6 decreased the flow of C(18:0), trans-11 C(18:1) and cis-9, trans-11 CLA, and increased the flow of trans-10 C(18:1), C(18:2n-6), C(18:3n-3), trans-11,cis-15 C(18:2) and trans-10,cis-12 CLA in the 1 h after feeding effluent. The pH 5.6 reduced Anaerovibrio lipolytica (32.7 vs. 72.1 pg/10 ng of total DNA) and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens vaccenic acid subgroup (588 vs. 1,394 pg/10 ng of total DNA) DNA concentrations. The high-concentrate diet increased organic matter and fiber digestibility, nonammonia and bacterial N flows, and reduced ammonia-N concentration and flow. The high

  3. Artisanal and experimental Pecorino Siciliano cheese: Microbial dynamics during manufacture assessed by culturing and PCR-DGGE analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randazzo, C.L.; Vaughan, E.E.; Caggia, C.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional artisanal Pecorino Siciliano (PS) cheeses, and two experimental PS cheeses were manufactured using either raw or pasteurised ewes' milk with the addition of starter cultures. The bacterial diversity and dynamics of the different cheese types were evaluated both by culturing and character

  4. 复合微生物肥料功能菌的筛选与培养%Screening and Culturing of Bacteria for Compound Microbial Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朔; 严如玉; 张鹏; 易欣欣

    2012-01-01

    [目的]筛选出分别可固氮、解磷、解钾的菌株,对其进行鉴定,并利用它们生产微生物肥料。[方法]从供试土壤中分离出目的菌,测定其代谢能力,分别进行16S rDNA测序菌种鉴定,并进行液体培养正交试验,以及尝试固体培养生存复合微生物有机肥。[结果]分离得到代谢能力较强的固氮、解磷、解钾菌N2、P1、K5;鉴定分别为Klebsiella oxytoca、Bacillus cereus和Bacillus mucilaginous;培养条件对有效活菌数的影响大小程度为温度〉C/N〉pH〉转速,最佳培养条件温度32℃,C/N比30,pH 7.0,转速140 r/min,在最佳条件下48 h达到1.78×1010CFU/mL;尝试利用该复合微生物进行固体发酵生产复合微生物有机肥,96h得到有效活菌数2.23×109CFU/g。[结论]筛选出了固氮、解磷及解钾菌株,并对其培养条件进行了优化,为进行生物有机肥生产奠定了基础。%[Objective]The research aims to screen and identify the strains which have the ability of fixing nitrogen,dissolving phosphorus and releasing potassium,and use these bacteria to produce the microbial fertilizer.[Method]The bacteria were separated from soil,then their related metabolism ability was determined,and their specific 16s rDNA was sequenced.Meanwhile,liquid culture of orthogonal test was carried out and solid culture was used to culture compound microbial fertilizer.[Result] The purpose bacteria N2,P1,K5 with strong metabolism ability were identified to be Klebsiella oxytoca,Bacillus cereus and B.mucilaginous.The effects of culture conditions on effective active bacteria number successively were temperatureC/NpHspeed.The best culture conditions were as follows: temperature 32 ℃,C/N=30,pH=7.0,speed 140 rpm(up to 1.78×1010 CFU/mL after 48 hours under the best condition).The compound microorganism was carried out solid culture to produce compound microbial fertilizer,and the effective active bacteria number was up to 2.23×109 CFU /g after 96 h

  5. Microbial community structure and dynamics during co-digestion of whey permeate and cow manure in continuous stirred tank reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Live Heldal; Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Linjordet, Roar; Pope, Phillip B; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2014-11-01

    Microbial community profiles in two parallel CSTR biogas reactors fed with whey permeate and cow manure were investigated. The operating conditions for these two reactors were identical, yet only one of them (R1) showed stable performance, whereas the other (R2) showed a decrease in methane production accompanied by accumulation of propionic acid and, later, acetic acid. This gave a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of the microbial communities in two biogas reactors apparently operating close to the edge of stability. The microbial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and the methanogens Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales in both reactors, but with larger fluctuations in R2. Correlation analyses showed that the depletion of propionic acid in R1 and the late increase of acetic acid in R2 was related to several bacterial groups. The biogas production in R1 shows that stable co-digestion of manure and whey can be achieved with reasonable yields.

  6. The effect of storage conditions on microbial community composition and biomethane potential in a biogas starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Live Heldal; Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Pope, Phillip B; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2015-07-01

    A new biogas process is initiated by adding a microbial community, typically in the form of a sample collected from a functional biogas plant. This inoculum has considerable impact on the initial performance of a biogas reactor, affecting parameters such as stability, biogas production yields and the overall efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, we have analyzed changes in the microbial composition and performance of an inoculum during storage using barcoded pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and determination of the biomethane potential, respectively. The inoculum was stored at room temperature, 4 and -20 °C for up to 11 months and cellulose was used as a standard substrate to test the biomethane potential. Storage up to 1 month resulted in similar final methane yields, but the rate of methane production was reduced by storage at -20 °C. Longer storage times resulted in reduced methane yields and slower production kinetics for all storage conditions, with room temperature and frozen samples consistently giving the best and worst performance, respectively. Both storage time and temperature affected the microbial community composition and methanogenic activity. In particular, fluctuations in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes were observed. Interestingly, a shift from hydrogenotrophic methanogens to methanogens with the capacity to perform acetoclastic methanogensis was observed upon prolonged storage. In conclusion, this study suggests that biogas inocula may be stored up to 1 month with low loss of methanogenic activity, and identifies bacterial and archaeal species that are affected by the storage.

  7. Studies on pigments of the myxomycete Physarum nudum. I. Absorption spectra of the crude extracts of pigments from plasmodia cultured in continuous light and in darkness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rakoczy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 1. Method for extraction and crude separation of the plasmodial pigments of the myxomycete Physarum nudum cultured in light and in darkness were elaborated. 2.\tBy the use of various solvents in the procedure of extraction three pigment fractions were obtained from plasmodia cultured in the dark and four fractions from those grown under continuous light. 3. The absorption spectra of the particular fractions within the UV and visible range were determined.

  8. Effect of nitrogen and phosphate on the levels of intermediates in bakers' yeast grown in continuous culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, C.M.M.; Smith, J.E.; Berry, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was grown in continuous culture using a control medium and media which contained low levels of NH4 and phosphate. The effects of medium composition and growth rate on the levels of intermediates of the glycolytic pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the glyoxylate cycle were investigated. The energy charge varied only between 0.7 and 0.9 over the range of dilution rates studied; however, the level of ATP decreased by 50% at higher aerobic growth rates. Intermediates of the Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas pathway were higher at the low aerobic growth rates and decreased as the dilution rate was increased. However, higher levels of these intermediates were also observed at even higher dilution rates at which EtOH formation and fermentative metabolism occurred. Significant differences in levels of intermediates were observed between control experiments and fermentations using the low N and phosphate media. The greatest differences were observed in the levels of glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconate, pyruvate, citrate and glyoxlate. Twenty-one different steady states were investigated and each had a unique composition.

  9. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-05-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia into glutamine. Glutamine-limited continuous cultures were used to completely derepress the expression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1. Following an ammonia pulse, the expression of GAP1, PUT4 and GDH1 decreased while the intracellular glutamine concentration remained constant, both in the cytoplasm and in the vacuole. Therefore, it was concluded that ammonia causes gene repression independent of the intracellular glutamine concentration. The expression of GLN1 was not decreased by an ammonia pulse but solely by a glutamine pulse. Analysis of the mRNA levels of ILV5 and HIS4 showed that the response of the two biosynthetic genes, GDH1 and GLN1, to ammonia and glutamine in the wild-type and gln1-37 was not due to changes in general transcription of biosynthetic genes. Ure2p has been shown to be an essential element for nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Deletion of URE2 in the gln1-37 background prevented repression of gene expression by ammonia, showing that the ammonia-induced repression is not caused by a general stress response but represents a specific signal for nitrogen catabolite regulation.

  10. A continuous-exchange cell-free protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlitt Stech

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a novel technique for the synthesis of complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins by using a continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells. Our approach consists of two basic elements: First, protein synthesis is performed in insect cell lysates which harbor endogenous microsomal vesicles, enabling a translocation of de novo synthesized target proteins into the lumen of the insect vesicles or, in the case of membrane proteins, their embedding into a natural membrane scaffold. Second, cell-free reactions are performed in a two chamber dialysis device for 48 h. The combination of the eukaryotic cell-free translation system based on insect cell extracts and the CECF translation system results in significantly prolonged reaction life times and increased protein yields compared to conventional batch reactions. In this context, we demonstrate the synthesis of various representative model proteins, among them cytosolic proteins, pharmacological relevant membrane proteins and glycosylated proteins in an endotoxin-free environment. Furthermore, the cell-free system used in this study is well-suited for the synthesis of biologically active tissue-type-plasminogen activator, a complex eukaryotic protein harboring multiple disulfide bonds.

  11. Innovative use of Mucuna monosperma (Wight) callus cultures for continuous production of melanin by using statistically optimized biotransformation medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shrirang; Joshi, Swati; Bapat, Vishwas; Jadhav, Jyoti

    2014-01-20

    Melanins are predominantly indolic polymers which are having extensive applications in cosmetics, agriculture and medicine. In the present study, optimization of nutritional parameters influencing melanin production by Mucuna monosperma callus cultures was attempted using the response surface methodology (RSM). Standardization of four factors was carried out using the Box-Behnken design. The optimized levels of factors predicted by the model include tyrosine 0.978gL(-1), pH 5.85, SDS 34.55mgL(-1)and copper sulphate 21.14mgL(-1) tyrosine, which resulted in highest melanin yield of 0.887gL(-1). The optimization of medium using RSM resulted in a 3.06-fold increase in the yield of melanin. The ANOVA analysis showed a significant R(2)-value (0.9995), model F-value (1917.72) and probability (0.0001), with insignificant lack of fit. Optimized medium was used in the laboratory scale column reactor for the continuous production of melanin. Uninterrupted flow column exhibited maximum melanin production rate of 250mgL(-1)h(-1) which is the highest value ever reported using plant as a biotransformation source. Melanin production was confirmed by spectrophotometric and chemical analysis. Thus, this study demonstrates the production of melanin by M. monosperma callus, using a laboratory scale column reactor.

  12. Electron Microscopy Studies, Surface Analysis and Microbial Culturing Experiments on a Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, J. K. W.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Griffin, C.; Whitby, C.; Avci, R.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Combined electron microscopy studies and culturing experiments have shown that Nakhla became contaminated with recent terrestrial microorganisms. Additional surface analysis detected an as yet unknown organic species which may represent a biomarker.

  13. Determination of free amino acids in whole-fat Turkish White Brined Cheese produced by animal and microbial milk-clotting enzymes with and without the addition of starter culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ufuk Eren-Vapur; Tulay Ozcan

    2012-01-01

    Coagulating enzymes are essential ingredients for the production of different cheese varieties. The objective of this research was to summarize the effect of rennet type (calf rennet and microbial rennet from Rhizomucor miehei) and starter culture on the sensory properties and free amino acids (FAA) release during the ripening of Turkish White brined cheese. The concentrations of FAA and sensory properties were similar for cheeses made with both types of coagulant and starter culture. Aminoac...

  14. 微生物连续培养过程平衡点的稳定分析%STABILITY ANALYSIS OF EQUILIBRIUM FOR MICROORGANISMS IN CONTINUOUS CULTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 冯恩民; 修志龙

    2005-01-01

    The problem of equilibrium of non-linear dynamic system for microorganism in continuous culture is considered in this paper.The existence of equilibrium point is proved.The conclusion that the equilibrium is the continuous function of the dilution rate and substrate concentration in medium in a certain range is concluded.And the stability criterion of equilibrium is obtained.In theory,it explains the multiplicity shown in laboratory.

  15. Microbially enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination of PCE by a mixed culture: Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingjie; Abriola, Linda M.; Amos, Benjamin K.; Suchomel, Eric J.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Löffler, Frank E.; Christ, John A.

    2013-08-01

    Reductive dechlorination catalyzed by organohalide-respiring bacteria is often considered for remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones due to cost savings, ease of implementation, regulatory acceptance, and sustainability. Despite knowledge of the key dechlorinators, an understanding of the processes and factors that control NAPL dissolution rates and detoxification (i.e., ethene formation) is lacking. A recent column study demonstrated a 5-fold cumulative enhancement in tetrachloroethene (PCE) dissolution and ethene formation (Amos et al., 2009). Spatial and temporal monitoring of key geochemical and microbial (i.e., Geobacter lovleyi and Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains) parameters in the column generated a data set used herein as the basis for refinement and testing of a multiphase, compositional transport model. The refined model is capable of simulating the reactive transport of multiple chemical constituents produced and consumed by organohalide-respiring bacteria and accounts for substrate limitations and competitive inhibition. Parameter estimation techniques were used to optimize the values of sensitive microbial kinetic parameters, including maximum utilization rates, biomass yield coefficients, and endogenous decay rates. Comparison and calibration of model simulations with the experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to accurately reproduce measured effluent concentrations, while delineating trends in dechlorinator growth and reductive dechlorination kinetics along the column. Sensitivity analyses performed on the optimized model parameters indicate that the rates of PCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) transformation and Dehalococcoides growth govern bioenhanced dissolution, as long as electron donor (i.e., hydrogen flux) is not limiting. Dissolution enhancements were shown to be independent of cis-DCE accumulation; however, accumulation of cis-DCE, as well as column length and flow rate (i.e., column residence time

  16. Influence of substrate and microbial interaction on efficiency of rumen microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeyer, D; Van Nevel, C

    1986-01-01

    Microbial N produced in the rumen and flowing to the duodenum (Ni) is related to the total amount of OM fermented or apparently digested in the rumen (OMf). This relationship, best expressed as microbial N yield (gNi/kgOMf), is affected mainly by the physical and chemical properties of feed carbohydrates and the amounts ingested. These factors influence yields at three levels of increasing complexity: Bacterial fermentation within one compartment following the continuous culture model. Fermentation pattern as such does not seem to affect yields. High fermentation rates are associated with lactate production, low methane production and transient polysaccharide synthesis. These effects induce acidification and lower yields, partly compensated by faster growth. Protozoal action, determined by the presence of sequestration spaces provided mainly by roughage diets. The presence of protozoa depresses microbial N yield but allows more complete fibre digestion. Compartmentation and differential passage. With roughage diets, optimal microbial N yield seems to require well developed microbial compartmentation, involving a large proportion of microbes in a large-particle pool with a slow turnover, balanced by a small proportion in liquid, small-particle pools with a fast turnover. Such a situation is associated with long roughage feeding. It is hypothesized that microbial N yields in the rumen may vary between two extremes which are associated with the feeding of long roughage on the one hand or with concentrate (starch) feeding on the other.

  17. Investment into the future of microbial resources: culture collection funding models and BRC business plans for biological resource centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; McCluskey, Kevin; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2014-01-01

    Through their long history of public service, diverse microbial Biological Resource Centres (mBRCs) have made myriad contributions to society and science. They have enabled the maintenance of specimens isolated before antibiotics, made available strains showing the development and change of pathogenicity toward animals, humans and plants, and have maintained and provided reference strains to ensure quality and reproducibility of science. However, this has not been achieved without considerable financial commitment. Different collections have unique histories and their support is often tied to their origins. However many collections have grown to serve large constituencies and need to develop novel funding mechanisms. Moreover, several international initiatives have described mBRCs as a factor in economic development and have led to the increased professionalism among mBRCs.

  18. Modelling the role of CtfA/B in reverse shift continuous culture experiments of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R

    2016-06-01

    In continuous phosphate-limited conditions, under pH control from high pH (pH ≳ 5.2) to low pH (pH ≲ 5.2), the metabolism of the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum,switches from acid to solvent production. Three main enzymes are responsible for the shift, acetoacetate decarboxylase (Adc), alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE1/2) and a CoA-transferase (CtfA/B), which are produced in increased quantities during solventogenesis. A two-population model, Millat et al. (2013) and fitted to such 'forward'-shift data, can explain this, as well as observed changes in optical density immediately following the shift: an acidogenic subpopulation is washed out and a solventogenic subpopulation grows in its place, each with distinct physiologies and proteomes. We fit this model to a 'reverse'-shift experiment, where the pH is increased from solventogenic to acidogenic conditions. We find corresponding changes in reaction rates, with AdhE1 and Adc production falling, as in the 'forward' experiments; however, for CtfA/B, the best fit surprisingly arises from the same level of production in both conditions. We propose experiments that would test whether this is a model artefact or accurately reflects cultures shifted in this reverse direction, and, if true, may suggest that over-expressing CtfA/B in both solventogenic and acidogenic conditions could improve the efficiency of fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  20. Effects of octane on the fatty acid composition and transition temperature of Pseudomonas oleovorans membrane lipids during growth in two-liquid-phase continuous cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Qi; Nijenhuis, Atze; Preusting, Hans; Dolfing, Jan; Janssen, Dick B.; Witholt, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Growth of Pseudomonas oleovorans GPol in continuous culture containing a bulk n-octane phase resulted in changes of the fatty acid composition of the membrane lipids. Compared to citrate-grown cells, the ratio of C-18 to C-16 fatty acids and the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids increase

  1. Effects of octane on the fatty acid composition and transition temperature of Pseudomonas oleovorans membrane lipids during growth in two-liquid-phase continuous cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Qi; Nijenhuis, Atze; Preusting, Hans; Dolfing, Jan; Janssen, Dick B.; Witholt, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Growth of Pseudomonas oleovorans GPol in continuous culture containing a bulk n-octane phase resulted in changes of the fatty acid composition of the membrane lipids. Compared to citrate-grown cells, the ratio of C18 to C16 fatty acids and the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids increased

  2. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  3. A LITHOTROPHIC CLOSTRIDIUM STRAIN WITH EXTREMELY THERMORESISTANT SPORES ISOLATED FROM A PECTIN-LIMITED CONTINUOUS CULTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM-THERMOSACCHAROLYTICUM STRAIN HAREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANRIJSSEL, M; VANDERVEEN, [No Value; HANSEN, TA

    1992-01-01

    A thermophilic Clostridium sp. with extremely thermoresistant spores was isolated from a pectin-limited continuous culture of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. The decimal reduction time of the spores was 70 min at 121-degrees-C. Because of the ability of the bacterium to grow both heterotrophicall

  4. Effect of Feeding a Mixed Microbial Culture Fortified with Trace Minerals on the Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Late-fattening Hanwoo Steers: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, W S; Kim, Y I; Lee, S M; Lee, Y H; Choi, D Y

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding a trace minerals-fortified microbial culture (TMC) on the performance and carcass characteristics of late-fattening Hanwoo steers. A mixture of microbes (0.6% [v/w] of Enterobacter sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Saccharomyces sp.) was cultured with 99% feedstuff for ensiling and 0.4% trace minerals (zinc, selenium, copper, and cobalt). Sixteen late-fattening steers (mean age, 21.8 months) were allocated to two diets: a control diet (concentrate mix and rice straw) and a treated diet (control diet+3.3% TMC). At a mean age of 31.1 months, all the steers were slaughtered. The addition of TMC to the diet did not affect the average daily weight gain of the late fattening steers, compared with that of control steers. Moreover, consuming the TMC-supplemented diet did not affect cold carcass weight, yield traits such as back fat thickness, longissimus muscle area, yield index or yield grade, or quality traits such as meat color, fat color, texture, maturity, marbling score, or quality grade. However, consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet increased the concentrations of zinc, selenium, and sulfur (panimals consuming TMC showed increased (pminerals and essential amino acids in the longissimus muscle, without any deleterious effects on performance and other carcass characteristics of Hanwoo steers.

  5. Continuously microscopically observed and process-controlled cell culture within the SlideReactor: proof of a new concept for cell characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartlander, Ruth; Schmid, Jochen; Brandenburg, Börries; Katenz, Ekaterina; Vondran, Florian Wolfgang Rudolf; Pless, Gesine; Cheng, Xiangdong; Pascher, Andreas; Neuhaus, Peter; Sauer, Igor Maximilian

    2007-01-01

    Certain cell types, especially primary human cells, favor a well-defined culture environment offering continuous supply of nutrients and oxygen and waste product removal. Several bioreactors based on special matrices or hollow fibers have been developed that provide such conditions. However, characterization of matrix re-organization or growth of tissue within these systems is possible only after culture termination. Evaluation of the influence of certain medium additives or culture conditions (e.g., temperature, oxygenation) on cell viability, expansion, and differentiation within these systems remains a challenging task. The SlideReactor, a miniaturized hollow fiber-based bioreactor, was developed to enable the observation of cells during culture. An operation concept offering predefined conditions for various cell types has been designed. For proof of concept, primary human cells (hepatocytes, fibroblasts, keratinocytes) and cell lines (HepG2, HuH7, C3A, WiDr, SkHep1) were cultured and observed. A series of experiments (n=40) showed the feasibility of the set-up; determination of process parameters and continuous observation is possible. The SlideReactor may serve as a simple and cost-efficient tool for cell characterization and optimization of cell-culture conditions.

  6. Plus Ça Change: Change and Continuity in French and American Gender Culture, 1952-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Moodie, Benjamin Aldrich

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation traces the transformation of gender cultures in the U.S. and France from the 1950s to the present. Using mainstream as well as avowedly feminist women's magazines as a primary source of evidence, I find deep and lasting cultural contrasts that were crucial for determining both the character and the impact of American and French second-wave feminism. Finding fertile ground in an institutional structure and a cultural ideology that dramatizes universal individual choice and ...

  7. Study on the Effect of Microbial Inoculants with Humic Acid on Continuous Cropping Potato%腐植酸微生物菌剂在连作马铃薯上的应用效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高觅; 周涛; 郭永青; 章学梅; 仝宝生

    2014-01-01

    Cropping potato, furrow and seed dressing were used to study on the effect of microbial inoculants with hu-mic acid on continuous disease-resistant and growth of continuous cropping potato. The results showed that microbial inoculants with humic acid could improve the soil condition of continuous cropping potato. It could promote the growth and development of potato, by improving seeding survival rate of potato and enhancing disease resistance. Moreover, treatment 1 and treatment 2 with humic acid microbial inoculants fertilizer increased the yield of potato by 13.54%and 17.00%compared with CK, respectively. While there were no signiifcant differences between treatment 1 and treatment 2.%为了研究腐植酸微生物菌剂在连作马铃薯上的应用效果,本研究采用沟施(处理1)及拌种(处理2)两种方法,研究了腐植酸微生物菌剂对连作马铃薯的抗病促生作用。试验结果表明:施用腐植酸微生物菌剂改善了马铃薯连作土壤的基本性状;施用腐植酸微生物菌剂与对照(处理3)相比,有效促进了连作马铃薯的生长发育,提高了马铃薯的保苗率,增强了马铃薯的抗病性;处理1与处理2与对照相比,增产效果显著,分别增产13.54%和17.00%;处理1和处理2间差异不显著。

  8. The Research of Growth Capability Intensification and Lipolytic Activity of Fat Splitting Microbial Cultures by Influence of Natural Mineral Components

    OpenAIRE

    Olga V. Kolotova; Irina V. Vladimtseva; Svetlana N. Orlova; Sokolova, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    23 bacterial strains with lipase activity were separated from the waste water of the meat-processing enterprises and Volgograd water-handling facilities aeration tank. There were studied their morphological, cultural and biochemical properties and their animal and vegetable fat splitting ability. Comparative analysis of fat splitting ability has been carried out for searched strains and devices of enzyme activity increasing and growing process intensity of searched microorganisms were investi...

  9. Quantitative comparisons of select cultured and uncultured microbial populations in the rumen of cattle fed different diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Minseok

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number and diversity of uncultured ruminal bacterial and archaeal species revealed by 16S rRNA gene (rrs sequences greatly exceeds that of cultured bacteria and archaea. However, the significance of uncultured microbes remains undetermined. The objective of this study was to assess the numeric importance of select uncultured bacteria and cultured bacteria and the impact of diets and microenvironments within cow rumen in a comparative manner. Results Liquid and adherent fractions were obtained from the rumen of Jersey cattle fed hay alone and Holstein cattle fed hay plus grain. The populations of cultured and uncultured bacteria present in each fraction were quantified using specific real-time PCR assays. The population of total bacteria was similar between fractions or diets, while total archaea was numerically higher in the hay-fed Jersey cattle than in the hay-grain-fed Holstein cattle. The population of the genus Prevotella was about one log smaller than that of total bacteria. The populations of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, the genus Butyrivibrio, and R. albus was at least one log smaller than that of genus Prevotella. Four of the six uncultured bacteria quantified were as abundant as F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens and the genus Butyrivibrio. In addition, the populations of several uncultured bacteria were significantly higher in the adherent fractions than in the liquid fractions. These uncultured bacteria may be associated with fiber degradation. Conclusions Some uncultured bacteria are as abundant as those of major cultured bacteria in the rumen. Uncultured bacteria may have important contribution to ruminal fermentation. Population dynamic studies of uncultured bacteria in a comparative manner can help reveal their ecological features and importance to rumen functions.

  10. The Research of Growth Capability Intensification and Lipolytic Activity of Fat Splitting Microbial Cultures by Influence of Natural Mineral Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Kolotova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available 23 bacterial strains with lipase activity were separated from the waste water of the meat-processing enterprises and Volgograd water-handling facilities aeration tank. There were studied their morphological, cultural and biochemical properties and their animal and vegetable fat splitting ability. Comparative analysis of fat splitting ability has been carried out for searched strains and devices of enzyme activity increasing and growing process intensity of searched microorganisms were investigated. Mineral nature ingredients – the lake Elton brine, the bischofite, the Dead Sea salt – were added in the culture mediums for increasing of biomass accumulation. It has been investigated that addition of the brine into the culture medium in 5 % concentration increases the growth rate of producer lipase on 293 % in comparison with growth of the control medium without the brine. Addition of 0,25 % the Dead Sea salt concentration intensifies the growth on 317 % in comparison with the control medium. Laboratory simulation of fat waste water purification process has been realized with one of separated activity bacterial strains and it has been showed that addition of the 0,5 % bishofite into the fermenter stimulates lipase activity of the searched microorganisms.

  11. Microbial activity in soils following steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ruth E; James, C Andrew; Bhupathiraju, Vishvesh K; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Steam enhanced extraction (SEE) is an aquifer remediation technique that can be effective at removing the bulk of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination from the subsurface, particularly highly volatile contaminants. However, low volatility compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are less efficiently removed by this process. This research evaluated the effects of steam injection on soil microbial activity, community structure, and the potential for biodegradation of contaminants following steam treatment. Three different soils were evaluated: a laboratory-prepared microbially-enriched soil, soil from a creosote contaminated field site, and soil from a chlorinated solvent and waste oil contaminated field site. Results from field-scale steaming are also presented. Microbial activity before and after steam treatment was evaluated using direct epifluorescent microscopy (DEM) using the respiratory activity dye 5-cyano-2,3, ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) in conjunction with the fluorochrome 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (DTAF) to yield a quantitative assessment of active and total microbial numbers. DEM results indicate that steamed soils that were analyzed while still hot exhibited microbial activity levels that were below detection. However, soil samples that were slowly cooled, more closely reflecting the conditions of applied SEE, exhibited microbial activity levels that were comparable to presteamed soils. Samples from a field-site where steam was applied continuously for 6 weeks also showed high levels of microbial activity following cooling. The metabolic capabilities of the steamed communities were investigated by measuring cell growth in enrichment cultures on various substrates. These studies provided evidence that organisms capable of biodegradation were among the mesophilic populations that survived steam treatment. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the soils with domain-level rRNA probes suggest

  12. Novel experimental design for steady-state processes: a systematic Bayesian approach for enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, continuous culture and cell transport kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, M James C; Murphy, Emma F; Gilmour, Steven G

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Bayesian approach (the use of prior knowledge) to the design of steady-state experiments can produce major gains quantifiable in terms of information, productivity and accuracy of each experiment. Developing the use of Bayesian utility functions, we have used a systematic method to identify the optimum experimental designs for a number of kinetic model data sets. This has enabled the identification of trends between kinetic model types, sets of design rules and the key conclusion that such designs should be based on some prior knowledge of the kinetic model. We suggest an optimal and iterative method for selecting features of the design such as the substrate range, number of measurements and choice of intermediate points. The final design collects data suitable for accurate modelling and analysis and minimises the error in the parameters estimated. It is equally applicable to enzymes, drug transport, receptor binding, microbial culture and cell transport kinetics.

  13. Biodegradation of Phenolic Compounds in Creosote Treated Wood Waste by a Composting Microbial Culture Augmented with the Fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Creosote is used as a wood preservative and water proof agent in railway sleepers, utility poles, buildings foundations and fences and garden furniture. It is a mixture of over 300 hydrocarbons which include 75% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 2-17% phenolic compounds and 10-18% heterocyclic organic compounds. Exposure to creosote may result in several health problems including damage to kidney, liver, eyes and skin. Potential contamination of soil and water exist from creosote treated wood from construction and demolition sites. Approach: The possibility of using an invessel composting process augmented with the ascomycetous fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus as a mesophilic/thermophilic bioremediation option for the degradation of phenolic compounds in creosote treated wood waste was evaluated. Results: The temperatures of bioremediation process reached thermophilic phase and the mesophilic and thermophilic lag phases were clearly identified. The moisture content decreased significantly indicating that the water produced by microbial respiration did not compensate for the water lost as vapor with the exhaust gases. Initial increases in pH due to the breakdown of organic nitrogen to ammonium and final drop in pH due to the formation of organic acids and the loss of ammonium with the exhaust gases in the latter stage were observed. Different degradation rates were observed in the mesophilic and thermophilic stages of composting. The control experiment achieved higher reductions of volatile solids, total carbon and TKN and higher degradation of phenolic compounds, cellulose and lignin, indicating a higher level of activity of microorganisms during the composting process compared with the inoculated experimental trial. The stability and maturity of the product of the control experiment were also better than those of the product from the inoculated experimental trial. Conclusion: The inoculation of the cellulolyticthermophilic

  14. Effects of added chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract in horses. Part I: Blood nutrient concentration and digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, M E; Edwards, M S; Sweeney, C R; Jerina, M L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that feed additives such as chelated minerals, organic Se, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract would improve nutrient digestibility when included in an equine diet. Horses (Quarter Horse geldings 4.5 to 16 yr of age; mean BW 522 kg ± 46 kg) were acclimated to 100% pelleted diets formulated with (ADD) and without (CTRL) commercially available sources of the aforementioned additives followed by a 14-d collection period of feces and urine. Chelated sources of Cu, Zn, Mn and Co were utilized versus sulfated forms, at a 100% replacement rate. No significant differences among apparent the digestibility of DM, ADF, or NDF (P= 0.665, P = 0.866, P = 0.747, respectively) were detected between dietary treatments. Likewise, no differences in apparent digestibility of Cu (P = 0.724), Zn (P = 0.256), Mn (P = 0.888), Co (P = 0.71), or Se (P = 0.588) were observed. No differences were observed in serum Cu, Mn, or Co concentrations between ADD and CTRL at acclimation or collection time points (P > 0.05). While no difference in serum Zn concentrations were observed between ADD and CTRL groups at acclimation (P > 0.05), they were statistically higher at the collection time period for horses consuming CTRL (P 0.05). Serum Zn concentrations of horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.021) and CTRL (P 0.05) were observed in serum Mn concentrations. Serum Co concentrations increased over time in horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.001) and CTRL (P = 0.021). From acclimation to collection, whole blood Se concentration increased for horses consuming CTRL (P = 0.01) but not for ADD (P > 0.05). The results of this study indicate no effect on nutrient digestibility due to the inclusion of chelated minerals, organic Se, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract for horses at maintenance.

  15. Characterization of Endolithic Culturable Microbial Communities in Carbonate Rocks from a Typical Karst Canyon in Guizhou (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuan; Cheng, Jian-Zhong; Lian, Bin

    2017-01-02

    The endolithic environment is a ubiquitous habitat for microorganisms and a critical interface between biology and geology. In this study, a culture-based method and the phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were used to investigate the diversity of endolithic bacteria and fungi in two main types of carbonate rocks (namely dolomite and limestone) from Nanjiang Canyon in Guizhou karst area, China. The results of bacterial diversity indicated that all bacteria isolated from dolomite and limestone rocks were divided into 4 bacterial groups, including Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. For these two kinds of rocks, Proteobacteria was the first dominant group, and Gammaproteobacteria occupied the greatest proportion which might be closely related to Pseudomonas in phylogeny to be the most dominant genera after isolation. Actinobacteria and Bacillus bacteria were also widespread in these two kinds of rock environments. There were only 9 and 8 strains of fungi isolated from dolomite and limestone respectively, which all belonged to Ascomycota. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on diversity of endolithic culturable bacteria and fungi in carbonate rocks in Guizhou karst region. These microorganisms may play an important and unprecedented role in the carbonate rock weathering during the long history of geological evolution.

  16. Removal of the pharmaceuticals ibuprofen and iohexol by four wetland plant species in hydroponic culture: plant uptake and microbial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Lv, Tao; Carvalho, Pedro N; Arias, Carlos A; Chen, Zhanghe; Brix, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We aimed at assessing the effects of four wetland plant species commonly used in constructed wetland systems: Typha, Phragmites, Iris and Juncus for removing ibuprofen (IBU) and iohexol (IOH) from spiked culture solution and exploring the mechanisms responsible for the removal. IBU was nearly completely removed by all plant species during the 24-day experiment, whereas the IOH removal varied between 13 and 80 %. Typha and Phragmites were the most efficient in removing IBU and IOH, respectively, with first-order removal rate constants of 0.38 and 0.06 day(-1), respectively. The pharmaceuticals were taken up by the roots and translocated to the aerial tissues. However, at the end of the experiment, plant accumulation constituted only up to 1.1 and 5.7 % of the amount of IBU and IOH spiked initially. The data suggest that the plants mainly function by facilitating pharmaceutical degradation in the rhizosphere through release of root exudates.

  17. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sequential culture in a continuous flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study was conducted to evaluate fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum in a continuous-flow, high-solids reactor. Liquid medium was continuously flowed through switchgrass (2 mm particle size) at one of three flow rates: 83.33 mL h-1 (2 L d-1), 41.66 mL h-1(1 ...

  18. Microbial resistance and frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL in isolated from blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Carlos Gomes da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The emergence and spread of isolated carriers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL have complicated the treatment of nosocomial infections, since its production is not easily identified by the sensitivity tests, routinely performed in clinical laboratories, leading to difficulties in the hospital control of resistant microorganisms and antibiotics misuse.Objective:The objective of this study was to analyze the resistance profile and the frequency of ESBL in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from blood cultures. A hundred bacterial samples from blood cultures of adult patients were analyzed, which were phenotypically identified by biochemical tests of carbohydrates fermentation and submitted to determination of the resistance profile by disc diffusion test and ESBL screening by disc approximation and disc replacement methods.Results:Among the bacterial samples tested, 30 were identified as Gram-negative bacteria, predominantly by Proteus mirabilis, Pantoea agglomerans, and Escherichia coli. Of these, 73.33% were positive for the detection of ESBL by phenotypic tests, and was found mainly in Pantoea agglomerans, Proteus mirabilis, and Enterobacter cloacae.Conclusion:The increase in the occurrence of ESBL in different Enterobacteriaceae shows the importance of the amplification of detection in other species than Escherichia coli or Klebsiella sp., so that the assistance to the patient is not restrained, since these resistant bacteria cannot be detected by the laboratories. Considering the frequency of ESBL in this study, we highlight the importance of its detection, aiming to its contribution to the development of improvements in the health care policies of hospitals.

  19. Continuity of Political Culture: The Case of Military Culture in East and West Germany in the Post-World War Two Military Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    SED und Ministers fur Verteidigung der DDR, Armmeegeneral H. Hoffmann, an der Parteihochschule ’ Karl Marx ’ beim ZK der SED, 20 Januar 1969." in Die...Row, Peterson and Company, 1957. Verba, Sidney, Political Development. "Chapter 12: Comparative Political Culture." Weber, Hermann. Grundriss der

  20. SULFIDE OXIDATION UNDER OXYGEN LIMITATION BY A THIOBACILLUS-THIOPARUS ISOLATED FROM A MARINE MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENENDE, FP; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1993-01-01

    The colorless sulfur bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus T5, isolated from a marine microbial mat, was grown in continuous culture under conditions ranging from sulfide limitation to oxygen limitation. Under sulfide-limiting conditions, sulfide was virtually completely oxidized to sulfate. Under oxygen

  1. Analysis of microbial spectrum and antibiotic resistance in patients of peritoneal dialysis related peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹周兵

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the microbial spectrum and antibiotic resistance of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)related peritonitis and guide the clinical rational use of antimicrobial agents.Methods A retrospective analysis was made of CAPD related peritonitis in236 cases with peritoneal dialysate culture results in the

  2. Effect of Feeding a Mixed Microbial Culture Fortified with Trace Minerals on the Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Late-fattening Hanwoo Steers: A Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Kwak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding a trace minerals-fortified microbial culture (TMC on the performance and carcass characteristics of late-fattening Hanwoo steers. A mixture of microbes (0.6% [v/w] of Enterobacter sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Saccharomyces sp. was cultured with 99% feedstuff for ensiling and 0.4% trace minerals (zinc, selenium, copper, and cobalt. Sixteen late-fattening steers (mean age, 21.8 months were allocated to two diets: a control diet (concentrate mix and rice straw and a treated diet (control diet+3.3% TMC. At a mean age of 31.1 months, all the steers were slaughtered. The addition of TMC to the diet did not affect the average daily weight gain of the late fattening steers, compared with that of control steers. Moreover, consuming the TMC-supplemented diet did not affect cold carcass weight, yield traits such as back fat thickness, longissimus muscle area, yield index or yield grade, or quality traits such as meat color, fat color, texture, maturity, marbling score, or quality grade. However, consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet increased the concentrations of zinc, selenium, and sulfur (p<0.05 in the longissimus muscle. With respect to amino acids, animals consuming TMC showed increased (p<0.05 concentrations of lysine, leucine, and valine among essential amino acids and a decreased (p<0.05 concentration of proline among non-essential amino acids. In conclusion, the consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet during the late-fattening period elevated the concentrations of certain trace minerals and essential amino acids in the longissimus muscle, without any deleterious effects on performance and other carcass characteristics of Hanwoo steers.

  3. Effects of Fertilization on Strawberry Fusarium Wilt and Soil Microbial Communities Under Continuous Mono-cropping%施肥模式对连作草莓枯萎病控制效果及土壤微生物群落特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈义群; 董元华; 王辉; 黄冠燚; 霍恒志

    2012-01-01

    通过营养调控防治连作病害是近年来的发展方向之一.本研究通过不同施肥处理的田间小区试验,采用微生物培养方法和Biolog微生物自动分析系统分析了不同施肥模式下草莓抗病能力、连作土壤微生物群落特征.研究结果表明:与当地习惯施肥相比,优化施肥模式Ⅰ和Ⅱ可以促进草莓生长,并有效地控制草莓枯萎病;优化施肥模式Ⅰ提高了草莓连作土壤细菌/真菌和放线菌/真菌比例;Biolog结果显示在短期内不同施肥模式对土壤微生物群落碳源利用能力和Shannon指数、Simpson指数、Mcintosh指数的影响有限;PCA分析表明,优化施肥模式Ⅰ的土壤微生物群落碳源利用特征与当地习惯施肥模式明显不同.综合考虑控病效果及施肥量,优化施肥模式Ⅰ是更为经济有效的施肥模式.%Soil nutrient management is recently an attractive method to control soil-borne plant disease. A field plot experiment with different fertilization treatments was carried out to evaluate the effects of fertilization on disease resistance of strawberry and soil microbial communities in continuous mono-cropping field of strawberry, by using microbial cultivation and Biolog analysis. The results showed that strawberry plant growth could be improved and strawberry rosarium wilt was controlled effectively under optimized fertilization treatments. In addition, the proportion of culturable bacterium and actinomycctes to fungus under optimized fertilization 1 were increased when compared with conventional fertilization treatment The Biolog analyses indicated that optimized fertilization treatments had less affects on the carbon utilization ability and Shannon, Simpson, Mcintosh indexes of soil microbial communities in a short term. PCA analyses suggested that carbon utilization of soil microbial communities under optimized fertilization I was obviously different from that of conventional fertilization treatment

  4. Effect of starter culture and fermentation temperature on water mobility and distribution in fermented sausages and correlation to microbial safety studied by nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Sandie M; Gunvig, Annemarie; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2010-10-01

    Water mobility and distribution in fermented sausages produced with differences in pH development as a result of the use of three different starter cultures (T-SPX, F-1, or F-SC-111) and two fermentation temperatures (24 degrees C, or 32 degrees C) were studied using low-field proton NMR relaxometry. Changes in the distribution and mobility of water in fermented sausages upon fermentation and drying were detectable by NMR T(2) relaxation, and the progress in the drying process could be followed as a shift towards faster relaxation times. In addition, the distribution of water in the sausages was significantly affected by the pH decline. The sausages were spiked with Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli VTEC, and partial least squares regressions revealed that 90% of the variation in reduction of Salmonella and VTEC could be explained by the NMR T(2) relaxation decay. Consequently, the study demonstrated that NMR relaxometry is a promising technique for elucidating process parameters and microbial safety in the production of fermented meat products.

  5. Characterization of the Microbial Diversity and Chemical Composition of Gouda Cheese Made by Potential Probiotic Strains as an Adjunct Starter Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Nam Su; Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sae Hun; Kim, Younghoon

    2016-10-05

    This study characterized the microbial diversity and chemical properties of Gouda cheese made by probiotics during ripening periods. Lactobacillus plantarum H4 (H4) and Lactobacillus fermentum H9 (H9), which demonstrate probiotic properties and bioactivity, were used as adjunct starter cultures. Gouda cheese made with H4 (GCP1) and H9 (GCP2) demonstrated the highest production of formic acid and propionic acid, respectively. Moreover, the bacterial diversity, including richness and evenness of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), increased in probiotic cheeses. Specifically, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, and Streptococcaceae were present at higher concentrations in probiotic cheeses than in control Gouda cheese (GCC). The proportion of H4 in GCP1 increased and culminated at 1.76%, whereas H9 in GCP2 decreased during ripening. Peptide profiles were altered by the addition of probiotics and included various bioactive peptides. In particular, three peptide fragments are newly detected. Therefore, Gouda cheese could be used as an effective probiotic carrier for H4 and H9.

  6. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Sylvia; Jabbari, Sara; Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; King, John R; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2011-01-19

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7) acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5) this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required.

  7. Acid protease and formation of multiple forms of glycoamylase in batch and continuous cultures of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk, Thomas; Reeslev, Morten; Jensen, Bo

    2002-01-01

    In order to identify factors responsible for production of multiple forms of glucoamylase (GA) by Aspergillus niger Bo-1, the fungus was cultured in both complex and defined media in pH-controlled batch fermenters and chemostats. At all culture conditions three forms of GA were produced...... degradation of the GA forms at low pH. It was concluded that the observed modifications of the extracellular profile of GA isoforms in A. niger Bo-1 are due to changes in pH and medium composition....

  8. Civilization, Culture, and Race in John Crawfurd’s Discourses on Southeast Asia: Continuities and Changes, c.1814-c.1868

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation I examine the uses of the notions of civilization, race, and culture within a set of British 19th century discourses on especially Southeast Asian societies, their present state and history. Taking the point of departure in John Crawfurd’s (1783-1868) publications, it contains...... to be primarily descriptive, they nonetheless were normatively cogent in their inherent hierarchal and classificatory structures, as well as in providing a theoretical template delineating the naturalized historical trajectories. Arguing that the notions of civilization, race and culture were pivotal key concepts...

  9. Microbial community analysis of a coastal hot spring in Kagoshima, Japan, using molecular- and culture-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Minako; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Kurosawa, Norio

    2013-08-01

    Ibusuki hot spring is located on the coastline of Kagoshima Bay, Japan. The hot spring water is characterized by high salinity, high temperature, and neutral pH. The hot spring is covered by the sea during high tide, which leads to severe fluctuations in several environmental variables. A combination of molecular- and culture-based techniques was used to determine the bacterial and archaeal diversity of the hot spring. A total of 48 thermophilic bacterial strains were isolated from two sites (Site 1: 55.6°C; Site 2: 83.1°C) and they were categorized into six groups based on their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Two groups (including 32 isolates) demonstrated low sequence similarity with published species, suggesting that they might represent novel taxa. The 148 clones from the Site 1 bacterial library included 76 operational taxonomy units (OTUs; 97% threshold), while 132 clones from the Site 2 bacterial library included 31 OTUs. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were frequently detected in both clone libraries. The clones were related to thermophilic, mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria. Approximately half of the sequences in bacterial clone libraries shared <92% sequence similarity with their closest sequences in a public database, suggesting that the Ibusuki hot spring may harbor a unique and novel bacterial community. By contrast, 77 clones from the Site 2 archaeal library contained only three OTUs, most of which were affiliated with Thaumarchaeota.

  10. Regulation of methanol oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in Xanthobacter strain 25a grown in continuous culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, L.M.; Meijer, Wilhelmus; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of C1-metabolism in Xanthobacter strain 25a was studied during growth of the organism on acetate, formate and methanol in chemostat cultures. No activity of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH), formate dehydrogenase (FDS) or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O) could be

  11. Regulation of methanol oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in Xanthobacter strain 25a grown in continuous culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, L.M.; Meijer, Wilhelmus; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of C1-metabolism in Xanthobacter strain 25a was studied during growth of the organism on acetate, formate and methanol in chemostat cultures. No activity of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH), formate dehydrogenase (FDS) or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O) could be

  12. Determining the role of a probiotic in the restoration of intestinal microbial balance by molecular and cultural techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Affhan; Dachang, W; Xin, Y

    2015-02-20

    The human intestine has a vast variety of microorganisms, and their balance is dependent on several factors. Antibiotics affect microfloral balance and allow naturally opportunistic organisms to multiply. Azithromycin is the most widely used macrolide antibiotic, active against a wide number of pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. It is currently used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients. The use of probiotics has advantages in gastrointestinal conditions, including infectious diarrhea and imbalance due to antibiotic use. In this research, the effect of azithromycin on the intestinal microbiota of Sprague Dawley rats and the role of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the restoration of the balance by employing molecular and cultural techniques was investigated. PCR with universal primers targeting the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE was used to characterize the overall intestinal microbiota composition. Cultivable fecal bacteria count using microbiological media and semi-quantitative PCR with group-specific primers were also utilized to analyze the effects of antibiotic and probiotic on microflora. We found that the total amount of 16S rRNA gene and fecal aerobic bacterial count was reduced following azithromycin administration along with elimination of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, but it was restored by the use of the probiotic. The results from PCR with group-specific primers showed that Bacteroides sp was present in the control and probiotic groups, but it was nearly eliminated in the antibiotic group. Moreover, semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the numbers of Enterobacteriaceae were nearly the same in the probiotic group and decreased in the antibiotic group, while Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in the probiotic group and decreased in the antibiotic group (P < 0.05) as compared with that in the control group. Azithromycin-induced dysbiosis can result in prolonged deleterious effects on the

  13. Determination of free amino acids in whole-fat Turkish White Brined Cheese produced by animal and microbial milk-clotting enzymes with and without the addition of starter culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Eren-Vapur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coagulating enzymes are essential ingredients for the production of different cheese varieties. The objective of this research was to summarize the effect of rennet type (calf rennet and microbial rennet from Rhizomucor miehei and starter culture on the sensory properties and free amino acids (FAA release during the ripening of Turkish White brined cheese. The concentrations of FAA and sensory properties were similar for cheeses made with both types of coagulant and starter culture. Aminoacids Phe, Leu - Ile, Gln, Val, Pro and Ala were the principal FAAs in the White brined cheeses at all stages of ripening.

  14. Bacteriocin production by strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus BB18 during continuous prefermentation of yogurt starter culture and subsequent batch coagulation of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simova, E D; Beshkova, D M; Angelov, M P; Dimitrov, Zh P

    2008-06-01

    By screening for bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria of 1,428 strains isolated from authentic Bulgarian dairy products, Lb. bulgaricus BB18 strain obtained from kefir grain was selected. Out of 11 yogurt starters containing Lb. bulgaricus BB18 and S. thermophilus strains resistant to bacteriocin secreted by Lb. bulgaricus BB18 a yogurt culture (S. thermophilus 11A+Lb. bulgaricus BB18) with high growth and bacteriocinogenic activity in milk was selected. Continuous (pH-stat 5.7) prefermentation processes were carried out in milk at 37 degrees C in a 2l MBR bioreactor (MBR AG, Zurich, Switzerland) with an IMCS controller for agitation speed, temperature, dissolved oxygen, CO2 and pH. Prefermented milk with pH 5.7 coagulated in a thermostat at 37 degrees C until pH 4.8-4.9. S. thermophilus 11A and Lb. bulgaricus BB18 grew independently in a continuous mode at similar and sufficiently high-dilution rates (D=1.83 h(-1)-S. thermophilus 11A; D=1.80 h(-1)-Lb. bulgaricus BB18). The yogurt cultures developed in a stream at a high-dilution rate (D=2.03-2.28 h(-1)). The progress of both processes (growth and bacteriocin production) depended on the initial ratio between the two microorganisms. The continuous prefermentation process promoted conditions for efficient fermentation and bacteriocinogenesis of the starter culture during the batch process: strong reduction of the times for bacteriocin production and coagulation of milk (to 4.5-5.0 h); high cell productivity (lactobacilli-4x10(12) CFU ml(-1), streptococci-6x10(12) CFU ml(-1)); high productivity of bacteriocins (4,500 BU ml(-1))-1.7 times higher than the bacteriocinogenic activity of the batch starter culture.

  15. Application of PCR-denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to examine microbial community structure in asparagus fields with growth inhibition due to continuous cropping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urashima, Yasufumi; Sonoda, Takahiro; Fujita, Yuko; Uragami, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    Growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus is a major problem; the yield of asparagus in replanted fields is low compared to that in new fields, and missing plants occur among young seedlings. Although soil-borne disease and allelochemicals are considered to be involved in this effect, this is still controversial. We aimed to develop a technique for the biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping. Therefore, in this study, fungal community structure and Fusarium community structure in continuously cropped fields of asparagus were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction/denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Soil samples were collected from the Aizu region of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Soil samples were taken from both continuously cropped fields of asparagus with growth inhibition and healthy neighboring fields of asparagus. The soil samples were collected from the fields of 5 sets in 2008 and 4 sets in 2009. We were able to distinguish between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium by using Alfie1 and Alfie2GC as the second PCR primers and PCR-DGGE. Fungal community structure was not greatly involved in the growth inhibition of asparagus due to continuous cropping. By contrast, the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi in growth-inhibited fields were higher than those in neighboring healthy fields. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi and the ratios of missing asparagus plants. We showed the potential of biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus using PCR-DGGE.

  16. Novel device for continuous spatial control and temporal delivery of nitric oxide for in vitro cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve E. Romanowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an ubiquitous signaling molecule of intense interest in many physiological processes. Nitric oxide is a highly reactive free radical gas that is difficult to deliver with precise control over the level and timing that cells actually experience. We describe and characterize a device that allows tunable fluxes and patterns of NO to be generated across the surface upon which cells are cultured. The system is based on a quartz microscope slide that allows for controlled light levels to be applied to a previously described photosensitive NO-releasing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. Cells are cultured in separate wells that are either NO-releasing or a chemically similar PDMS that does not release NO. Both wells are then top coated with DowCorning RTV-3140 PDMS and a polydopamine/gelatin layer to allow cells to grow in the culture wells. When the waveguide is illuminated, the surface of the quartz slide propagates light such that the photosensitive polymer is evenly irradiated and generates NO across the surface of the cell culture well and no light penetrates into the volume of the wells where cells are growing. Mouse smooth muscle cells (MOVAS were grown in the system in a proof of principle experiment, whereby 60% of the cells were present in the NO-releasing well compared to control wells after 17 h. The compelling advantage of illuminating the NO-releasing polymers with the waveguide system is that light can be used to tunably control NO release while avoiding exposing cells to optical radiation. This device provides means to quantitatively control the surface flux, timing and duration of NO cells experience and allows for systematic study of cellular response to NO generated at the cell/surface interface in a wide variety of studies.

  17. Growth and enzyme production during continuous cultures of a high amylase-producing variant of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangirolami, Teresa; Carlsen, M.; Nielsen, J.;

    2002-01-01

    Growth and product formation by a selected variant of Aspergillus oryzae showing high alpha-amylase production was studied in continuous cultivations carried out at six different specific growth rates, using glucose as the growth-limiting nutrient. The analysis of the steady-state data revealed t...

  18. Growth and genetic responses of Salmonella Typhimurium to pH-shifts in an anaerobic continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella infection of chickens that leads to potential human foodborne salmonellosis continues to be a concern. Changes in the pH of poultry gastrointestinal tract could influence Salmonella growth and virulence response. In the current study, growth responses of a chicken isolate Salmonella ent...

  19. Production of a highly potent epoxide through the microbial metabolism of 3β-acetoxyurs-11-en-13β,28-olide by Aspergillus niger culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Nisar, Muhammad; Gulab, Hussain

    2016-09-01

    Context 3β-Acetoxyurs-11-en-13β,28-olide (I), a triterpenoid, is found in most plant species. Pharmacologically triterpenes are very effective compounds with potent anticancer, anti-HIV and antimicrobial activities. Objectives Microbial transformation of 3β-acetoxyurs-11-en-13β,28-olide (I) was performed in order to obtain derivatives with improved pharmacological potential. Materials and methods Compound (I, 100 mg) was incubated with Aspergillus niger culture for 12 d. The metabolite formed was purified through column chromatography. Structure elucidation was performed through extensive spectroscopy (IR, MS and NMR). In vitro α- and β-glucosidase inhibitory, and antiglycation potentials of both substrate and metabolite were evaluated. Results Structure of metabolite II was characterized as 3β-acetoxyurs-11,12-epoxy-13β,28-olide (II). Metabolite II was found to be an oxidized product of compound I. In vitro α- and β-glucosidases revealed that metabolite II was a potent and selective inhibitor of α-glucosidase (IC50 value = 3.56 ± 0.38 μM), showing that the inhibitory effect of metabolite II was far better than compound I (IC50 value = 14.7 ± 1.3 μM) as well as acarbose (IC50 value = 545 ± 7.9 μM). Antiglycation potential of compound II was also high with 82.51 ± 1.2% inhibition. Thus, through oxidation, the biological potential of the substrate molecule can be enhanced. Conclusion Biotransformation can be used as a potential tool for the production of biologically potent molecules.

  20. Effects of added chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract in horses: II. Nutrient excretion and potential environmental impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, M E; Edwards, M S; Sweeney, C R; Jerina, M L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an equine diet formulated with chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials (DFM) and Yucca schidigera extract would decrease excretion of nutrients that have potential for environmental impact. Horses were acclimated to 100% pelleted diets formulated with (ADD) and without (CTRL) the aforementioned additives. Chelated sources of Cu, Zn, Mn, and Co were included in the ADD diet at a 100% replacement rate of sulfate forms used in the CTRL diet. Additionally, the ADD diet included organic selenium yeast, DFM, and Yucca schidigera extract. Ten horses were fed the 2 experimental diets during two 42-d periods in a crossover design. Total fecal and urine collection occurred during the last 14 d of each period. Results indicate no significant differences between Cu, Zn, Mn, and Co concentrations excreted via urine (P > 0.05) due to dietary treatment. There was no difference between fecal Cu and Mn concentrations (P > 0.05) based on diet consumed. Mean fecal Zn and Co concentrations excreted by horses consuming ADD were greater than CTRL (P 0.05). In feces stockpiled to simulate a crude composting method, no differences (P > 0.05) due to diet were detected for particle size, temperature, moisture, OM, total N, P, phosphate, K, moisture, potash, or ammonia N (P > 0.05). Although no difference (P = 0.2737) in feces stockpile temperature due to diet was found, temperature differences over time were documented (P Yucca schidigera extract did not decrease most nutrient concentrations excreted. Horses consuming organic selenium as part of the additive diet had lower fecal and urine Se concentrations, as well as greater fecal K concentrations.

  1. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  2. Comparison of Difco ESP and Organon Teknika BacT/Alert continuous-monitoring blood culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwadyk, P; Pierson, C L; Young, C

    1994-05-01

    The Difco ESP and Organon Teknika BacT/Alert (BTA) systems were evaluated in a clinical study of 5,421 aerobic and 5,035 anaerobic blood cultures. Of 405 clinically significant positive cultures evaluated, 272 grew in both systems, 86 grew in ESP only, and 47 grew in BTA only (P < 0.005). Of 320 organisms detected in aerobic bottles, 208 grew in both systems, 68 grew in ESP only and 45 grew in BTA only (P < 0.05), with Staphylococcus aureus the only organism showing a statistically significant difference. The ESP anaerobic bottle also detected more anaerobes (16 of 17 versus 4 of 17, P < 0.005) and more organisms overall (57 versus 34, P < 0.05). However, with the exception of patients with anaerobic bacteremia (12 of 13 for ESP and 4 of 13 for BTA, P < 0.05), there was no statistical difference in the detection of patient episodes. Average detection time of matched aerobic bottles was 18.3 h for ESP and 22.0 h for BTA (P < 0.001). For matched pairs of anaerobic bottles, the average detection time was faster in the BTA bottles (P < 0.001), because of the growth of facultative organisms. To explore the differences in anaerobic detection more fully, 20 sets of anaerobic bottles were seeded with 12 anaerobic species mixed with human blood. ESP grew more organisms (17 of 20 versus 10 of 20, P < 0.025), and the average time to detection for the 10 paired positive cultures was 21.6 h for ESP and 50.8 h for BTA (P < 0.05). Times for loading and unloading bottles were similar for both systems.

  3. Continuous cultivation and thermodynamic aspects of niche definition in the nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stefanie; Strous, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The study of model organisms in pure culture has provided detailed information about the physiology and biochemistry of nitrification and related processes. Metagenomic sequencing of environmental samples is providing information to what extent this understanding also applies to natural microbial communities. Here, we outline a conceptual and experimental strategy that links these two approaches. It consists of the mathematical modeling of nitrification and related processes. The model predictions are subsequently validated experimentally by the study of natural microbial communities in continuous cultures under precisely defined environmental conditions. Combined with calorimetry and metagenomic monitoring this form of "experimental metagenomics" enables the answering of current questions in the ecology of the nitrogen cycle.

  4. Establishment of a continuous culture system for Entamoeba muris and analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi S.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We established a culture system for Entamoeba muris (MG-EM-01 strain isolated from a Mongolian gerbil using a modified Balamuth’s egg yolk infusion medium supplemented with 4% adult bovine serum and Bacteroides fragilis cocultured with Escherichia coli. Further, encystation was observed in the culture medium. The morphological characteristics of E. muris are similar to those of Entamoeba coli (E. coli; moreover, the malic isoenzyme electrophoretic band, which shows species-specific electrophoretic mobility, of E. muris had almost the same mobility as that observed with the malic isoenzyme electrophorectic band of E. coli (UZG-EC-01 strain isolated from a gorilla. We determined the small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA gene sequence of the MG-EM-01 strain, and this sequence was observed to show 82.7% homology with that of the UZG-EC-01 strain. Further, the resultant phylogenetic tree for molecular taxonomy based on the SSU-rRNA genes of the 21 strains of the intestinal parasitic amoeba species indicated that the MG-EM-01 strain was most closely related to E. coli.

  5. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. Results We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7) acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5) this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Conclusions Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required. PMID:21247470

  6. Sporulation of Clostridium cellulolyticum while grown in cellulose-batch and cellulose-fed continuous cultures on a mineral-salt based medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvaux, M; Petitdemange, H

    2002-03-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum sporulation was investigated during growth on cellulose fibers in a mineral-salt based medium which corresponds to conditions linked to its natural ecological niche. At steady state of the continuous cultures under limitation and with an excess of cellulose and/or ammonium, bacterial cells mainly sporulated at low dilution rates (D), at least 10% sporulation being observed at the lowest D tested. Increasing the cellulose concentration in the feed-medium reservoir increased the percentage of spores in the bioreactor. It appeared that the remaining undigested cellulose could serve as an exogenous carbon source supply at a continuous but limited rate throughout the sporulation process. In addition to the proportion of carbon and nitrogen, the influence of the environmental pH on spore formation was studied. In cellulose-fed continuous cultures at a constant D and a pH decreasing from 7.2 to 6.4, the percentage of spores increased to 14% at the lowest pH tested. When C. cellulolyticum was grown in batch culture, the level of sporulation was dramatically higher in unregulated-pH fermentation compared to pH-controlled growth conditions at pH 7.2 since in the former it reached 45% within 5 days of cultivation. It then appeared that a low specific growth rate and a low environmental pH in the presence of an insoluble carbon substrate were the major factors inducing sporulation in C. cellulolyticum. Furthermore, since the spores adhere to the carbon substrate (the cellulose) the bacteria gain advantages when the environment allows germination thanks to the recovery of suitable growth conditions. By allowing the maintenance and the integrity of the bacteria in the microbiota, spore formation could then explain the successful survival of C. cellulolyticum in cellulosic anaerobic habitats where low environmental pH conditions are often found.

  7. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. Results We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7 acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5 this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Conclusions Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required.

  8. Changes in fermentation and biohydrogenation intermediates in continuous cultures fed low and high levels of fat with increasing rates of starch degradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascano, G J; Alende, M; Koch, L E; Jenkins, T C

    2016-08-01

    Excessive levels of starch in diets for lactating dairy cattle is a known risk factor for milk fat depression, but little is known about how this risk is affected by differences in rates of starch degradability (Kd) in the rumen. The objective of this study was to compare accumulation of biohydrogenation intermediates causing milk fat depression, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), when corn with low or high Kd were fed to continuous cultures. Diets contained (dry matter basis) 50% forage (alfalfa pellets and grass hay) and 50% concentrate, with either no added fat (LF) or 3.3% added soybean oil (HF). Within both the LF and HF diets, 3 starch degradability treatments were obtained by varying the ratio of processed (heat and pressure treatments) and unprocessed corn sources, giving a total of 6 dietary treatments. Each diet was fed to dual-flow continuous fermenters 3 times a day at 0800, 1600, and 2400h. Diets were fed for four 10-d periods, with 7d for adaptation and 3d for sample collection. Orthogonal contrasts were used in the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS to test the effects of fat, starch degradability, and their interaction. Acetate and acetate:propionate were lower for HF than for LF but daily production of trans-10 18:1 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA were higher for HF than for LF. Increasing starch Kd from low to high increased culture pH, acetate, and valerate but decreased butyrate and isobutyrate. Changes in biohydrogenation intermediates (expressed as % of total isomers) from low to high starch Kd included reductions in trans-11 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 CLA but increases in trans-10 18:1 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA. The results show that increasing the starch Kd in continuous cultures while holding starch level constant causes elevation of biohydrogenation intermediates linked to milk fat depression.

  9. [Effects of snow pack removal on soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and the number of soil culturable microorganisms during wintertime in alpine Abies faxoniana forest of western Sichuan, Southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Lian; Wu, Fu-Zhong; He, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Zhen-Feng; Liu, Yang; Yang, Wan-Qin; Tan, Bo

    2012-07-01

    To understand the effects of the lack of snow pack under global warming on the characteristics of soil microorganisms during wintertime, a snow-shading experiment was conducted in a primary fir (Abies faxoniana) forest after snow pack removal, with the soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) and soil culturable microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) at the stages of snow forming, snow covering, and snow melting investigated. Snow pack removal had significant effects on the soil MBC and MBN and the number of soil culturable bacteria and fungi, but the responses of the culturable microorganisms differed with the stages of snow-shading. Under the condition of snow pack removal, the MBC and MBN in soil organic layer decreased significantly at the early stages of snow forming and snow melting but increased significantly at snow covering stage and at the later stage of snow melting, and the number of culturable bacteria decreased significantly from the early stage of snow forming to the stage of snow covering while that of culturable fungi had a significant increase from the early stage of snow forming to the stage of snow melting. After snow melting, the MBC and the number of culturable fungi in soil organic layer had a significant decrease, the number of cultural bacteria was in adverse, but the MBN had less change. The MBC and MBN and the number of culturable microorganisms in soil mineral layer had the similar variation trends as those in soil organic layer, but the fluctuations were smaller. It was suggested that snow pack removal changed the ratio of culturable bacteria to culturable fungi, showing positive effects on the number of soil culturable fungi during wintertime in alpine Abies faxoniana forest of western Sichuan.

  10. Effect of salinity on 2H/1H fractionation in lipids from continuous cultures of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Julian P.; Maloney, Ashley E.; Gregersen, Josh; Paschall, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Salinity and temperature dictate the buoyancy of seawater, and by extension, ocean circulation and heat transport. Yet there remain few widely applicable proxies for salinity with the precision necessary to infer all but the largest hydrographic variations in the past. In the last decade the hydrogen isotope composition (2H/1H or δ2H) of microalgal lipids has been shown to increase systematically with salinity, providing a foundation for its use as a paleosalinity proxy. Culture and field studies have indicated a wide range of sensitivities for this response, ranging from about 0.6-3.3‰ ppt-1 depending on the lipid, location and/or culturing conditions. Lacking in these studies has been the controlled conditions necessary to isolate the response to salinity while keeping all other growth parameters constant. Here we show that the hydrogen isotope composition of lipids in the marine coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi grown in chemostats increased by 1.6 ± 0.3‰ ppt-1 (p < 0.05) in eight individual alkenones and by 2.0 ± 0.1‰ ppt-1 (p < 0.05) in three individual fatty acids over the salinity range 20-42 ppt. Hydrogen isotope ratios of phytol and the sterol 24-methyl-cholest-5,22-dien-3β-ol (brassicasterol) also increased with salinity but correlations were weaker than for the acetogenic lipids. For eight individual alkenones, linear regression analyses of the fractionation factors on salinity yielded slopes of 1.2-2.2‰ ppt-1. This sensitivity of δ2Halkenone to salinity is 45-71% of that previously reported for E. huxleyi, which can be attributed to the fact that previous experiments were performed with batch cultures in which growth rates and other parameters differed between salinity treatments. The underlying cause of this response to salinity remains unknown, but may result from changes in (1) the proportion of lipid hydrogen derived from NADPH versus water, (2) the proportion of lipid hydrogen derived from NADPH from Photosystem I versus the oxidative

  11. The influence of nitrogen sources on the alpha-amylase productivity of Aspergillus oryzae in continuous cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    was shown to be inferior to ammonia as a nitrogen source. A mixture of ammonia and complex nitrogen sources, such as yeast extract or casein hydrolysate, was better than with ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Even a low concentration of casein hydrolysate (0.05 g l(-1)) resulted in a 35% increase......The influence of the nitrogen source on the cc-amylase productivity of Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in continuous cultivations. Both inorganic and complex nitrogen sources were investigated and glucose was used as the carbon and energy sources. For production of alpha-amylase, nitrate...

  12. Direct blood culturing on solid medium outperforms an automated continuously monitored broth-based blood culture system in terms of time to identification and susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, E A; Grünastel, B; Peters, G; Becker, K

    2016-03-01

    Pathogen identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) should be available as soon as possible for patients with bloodstream infections. We investigated whether a lysis-centrifugation (LC) blood culture (BC) method, combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification and Vitek 2 AST, provides a time advantage in comparison with the currently used automated broth-based BC system. Seven bacterial reference strains were added each to 10 mL human blood in final concentrations of 100, 10 and 1 CFU/mL. Inoculated blood was added to the Isolator 10 tube and centrifuged at 3000 g for 30 min, then 1.5 mL sediment was distributed onto five 150-mm agar plates. Growth was observed hourly and microcolonies were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 as soon as possible. For comparison, seeded blood was introduced into an aerobic BC bottle and incubated in the BACTEC 9240 automated BC system. For all species/concentration combinations except one, successful identification and Vitek 2 inoculation were achieved even before growth detection by BACTEC. The fastest identification and inoculation for AST were achieved with Escherichia coli in concentrations of 100 CFU/mL and 10 CFU/mL (after 7 h each, while BACTEC flagged respective samples positive after 9.5 h and 10 h). Use of the LC-BC method allows skipping of incubation in automated BC systems and, used in combination with rapid diagnostics from microcolonies, provides a considerable advantage in time to result. This suggests that the usefulness of direct BC on solid medium should be re-evaluated in the era of rapid microbiology.

  13. 烟草连作对土壤微生物多样性及酶活性的影响%Effects of Continuous Tobacco on Soil Microbial Diversity and Enzyme Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦永吉; 程功; 马永健; 王伟超; 李建华; 乔保明; 蒋士君

    2014-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from continuous cropping 1a-8a(except 7 year) tobacco fields in Xiangcheng county ,and the a-mount of soil microbial,bacteria diversity,activities of sucrase,amylase,pectase cellulase were determined.Results showed that with the increasing of continuous cropping year ,the number of soil bacteria and actinomycetes was going down ,while the number of soil fungus kept the trend of “up-down-up-down”.The bacterial diversity index as estimated by DGGE banding patterns ,e.g.Shannon ,Simp-son and McIntosh index had the same trend of falling down ,but had a slight rise in the fifth continuous cropping year that consistenting with the results of soil bacteria isolation.The changes of invertase and amylase activity revealed increased at the begaining and reached a peak in second continuous cropping year and then decreased.When the continuous cropping year is greater than 3 years,the invertase and amylase activities changed a little and then kept at a lower level.Meanwhile,the cellulase activity declined violently within 1-3 continuous cropping years ,and kept at a lower levels when the continuous cropping term more than 2 years.The impact of tobacco con-tinuous cropping on soil microbial diversity and soil enzyme activities csused the disadvantage of healthy soil ecosystem development .%对采自襄城县连作1a-8a的烟田土壤的微生物数量、细菌多样性和土壤中的蔗糖酶、淀粉酶、纤维素酶和进行了测定。结果表明:随着连作年限的增加,土壤细菌和放线菌数量呈明显下降趋势,而真菌数量变化表现出一定的滞后性,呈现升高-降低-升高-降低的波动;土壤细菌的Shannon指数、 Simpson指数和McIntosh多样性指数整体呈下降趋势,仅在连作5a时出现一定的上升波动,与土壤细菌的分离培养结果相吻合;土壤蔗糖酶和淀粉酶活性先升高后降低,连作2a时达到最大值,当连作年限﹥3a时,酶活性变化不大

  14. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  15. Profiling the hydA gene and hydA gene transcript levels of Clostridium butyricum during continuous, mixed-culture hydrogen fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolvanen, Katariina E.S.; Koskinen, Perttu E.P.; Santala, Ville P.; Karp, Matti T. [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Raussi, Hanna-Mari; Ylikoski, Alice I.; Hemmilae, Ilkka A. [PerkinElmer Life Sciences, Wallac Oy, P.O. Box 10, FI-20101 Turku (Finland)

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of the research was to investigate the hydrogenase (hydA) gene and the corresponding transcript levels of Clostridium butyricum during continuous hydrogen fermentation. A quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) method was developed to specifically target the C. butyricum hydrogenase gene and mRNA in samples collected from a continuous, mixed-culture bioreactor over a period of 30 days (operation days 114-144). The detection limit of the qrt-PCR was 3.9 x 10{sup 2}hydA copies and the linear range 3.9 x 10{sup 2}-3.9 x 10{sup 7}hydA copies. The results showed that after a re-inoculation of the bioreactor on day 120 the hydA copy numbers started to rise and stabilized after day 127. The number of hydA transcript continued to rise until day 142. The results demonstrate that this method is suitable for detecting the hydA gene and gene transcript levels of C. butyricum from bioreactor samples. The expression level of hydA gene changed during continuous operation and can, therefore, be a useful target for process performance monitoring. (author)

  16. Does the 14C method estimate net photosynthesis? Implications from batch and continuous culture studies of marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward A.

    2013-12-01

    We carried out batch culture studies with seven species of marine phytoplankton and chemostat studies with two of the seven species to determine whether and to what extent 14C uptake approximated net photosynthesis. In two of seven cases, Isochrysis galbana and Dunaliella tertiolecta, cells uniformly labeled with 14C lost no activity when they were transferred to a 14C-free medium and allowed to grow in the light. In similar experiments with four other species, uniformly labeled cells lost activity when incubated in the light, but the loss rates were only a few percent per day. Thus these six species appear to respire primarily recently fixed carbon. In the case of the remaining species, Chlorella kessleri, loss rates of 14C in the light from uniformly labeled cells were about 29% per day, the apparent ratio of respiration to net photosynthesis being 0.4. Follow-up chemostat studies with I. galbana and C. kessleri grown under both light- and nitrate-limited conditions produced results consistent with the implications of the batch culture work: uptake of 14C by I. galbana after incubations of 24 h yielded estimates of photosynthetic carbon fixation equal to the product of the chemostat dilution rate and the concentration of organic carbon in the growth chamber. Similar experiments with C. kessleri produced 14C-based estimates of photosynthetic carbon fixation that exceeded the net rates of organic carbon production in the growth chamber by roughly 55%. Time-course studies with both species indicated that at high growth rates recently fixed carbon began to enter the respiratory substrate pool after a time lag of several hours, a result consistent with previous work with D. tertiolecta. The lag time appeared to be much shorter at low growth rates. The results with C. kessleri are similar to results previously reported for Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Amphidium carteri. Collectively these results suggest that 14C uptake by species with relatively high ratios of

  17. A method for assessing the disinfection response of microbial bioaerosols retained in antimicrobial filter materials and textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Kevin M; Turner, Jane; Hernandez, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of applications utilizing antimicrobial laden textiles continues to grow, yet testing methods based on the liquid loading of cultures to challenge textiles remain unchanged. For bioaerosol applications, liquid challenge methods are unsuitable. We present a method of aerosol based loading and microbial recovery for contextual testing antimicrobial textiles.

  18. Mechanistic investigation of doxycycline photosensitization by picosecond-pulsed and continuous wave laser irradiation of cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, C.R.; Hefetz, Y.; Gillies, R.; Wimberly, J.; Dalickas, G.; Hasan, T. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-04-15

    In order to elucidate the photophysical mechanisms of cellular phototoxicity sensitized by doxycycline, MGH-U1 human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro were treated with 20.7 microM doxycycline and irradiated with either a pulsed (lambda = 355 nm, pulse duration = 24 ps) or a continuous wave (lambda = 351 nm) laser. Cumulative radiant exposure and irradiance were systematically varied in experiments with both lasers. Phototoxicity was assessed by epifluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells using rhodamine 123 labeling of mitochondria. With the continuous wave source, the cumulative radiant exposure required for induction of phototoxic injury was independent of irradiance. With the 24-ps-pulsed source, a significantly lower cumulative radiant exposure was required to induce the phototoxicity when the peak irradiance was 5.8 x 10(7) or 1.3 x 10(8) watts cm-2 compared with when peak irradiance was either lower (6.0 x 10(6) watts cm-2) or higher (7.6 x 10(8) watts cm-2). The measured fluorescence lifetimes of doxycycline in buffered saline solution were longer than the laser pulse duration of 24 ps. The increased efficiency of photosensitization at the optimal peak irradiance in the ps domain appears to result from sequential multiphoton absorption involving higher excited states of the singlet manifold. At the highest irradiance studied, on the other hand, reduced efficiency of photosensitization is attributed to increased photodegradation of doxycycline from higher excited states by processes such as photoionization. A model consistent with these observations is presented along with calculations, based on simple rate equations, that fit the essentials of the proposed model.

  19. Development of a continuous process for microbial elimination of 1,2 dichloropropane in contaminated water; Entwicklung eines kontinuierlichen Verfahrens zur mikrobiellen Elimination von 1,2-Dichlorpropan in kontaminierten Waessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, R.

    2000-07-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of 1,2-dichloropropane with mixed cultures in batch- and continuous experiments were investigated. An aerobic mixed culture was enriched from a contaminated groundwater and batch-experiments with differently enriched inocula and various co-substrates were carried out. It was not possible to achieve a repeated DCP-degradation and the observed chloride release could not be correlated with DCP decrease. Simultaneously, the mixed culture was immobilized on siran glass and transferred to a continuous fixed bed reactor. During operation with groundwater a 90% elimination with influent concentrations of up to 35 mg/l could be achieved. After the groundwater was replaced by a completely synthesized medium a bold decrease in elimination was observed. Establishment of a hydrogenperoxide-supply as oxygen source could be carried out with slight decrease in elimination. For investigations of the anaerobic DCP degradation a mixed culture from sediments of the river Salle was enriched. In batch experiments with the sediment containing culture quantitative formation of propene was determined, whereby also small amounts of 1- and 2-monochloropropane were found. The anaerobic mixed culture was immobilized on polyurethane foam cubes and established in continuous fluidized bed reactors. In batch- and continuous experiments various electron donors were investigated. With methanol as single substrate the highest DCP elimination rate of 65 mg/(l x d) were reached. In continuous experiments a maximum elimination rate of 90 mg/(l x d) at a hydraulic retention time of 24 h and influent concentrations of 100 mg/l with a combination of acetate and methanol as electron donors were achieved. For the maintenance of an elimination of 90% the minimum hydraulic retention time amounted to about 20 h. The molecular characterization of the reactor population showed that a species with high 16S rRNA-homology to Dehalobacter restrictus was enriched. Inhibition of

  20. A microfluidic device for the continuous culture and analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans in a toxic aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Nakajima, Masahiro; Tajima, Hirotaka; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) receives attention as a bioindicator, and the C. elegans condition has been recently analyzed using microfluidic devices equipped with an imaging system. To establish a method without an imaging system, we have proposed a novel microfluidic device with which to analyze the condition of C. elegans from the capacitance change using a pair of micro-electrodes. The device was designed to culture C. elegans, to expose C. elegans to an external stimulus, such as a chemical or toxicant, and to measure the capacitance change which indicates the condition of C. elegans. In this study, to demonstrate the capability of our device in a toxic aqueous environment, the device was applied to examine the effect of cadmium on C. elegans. Thirty L4 larval stage C. elegans were divided into three groups. One group was a control group and the other groups were exposed to cadmium solutions with concentrations of 5% and 10% LC50 for 24 h. The capacitance change and the body volume of C. elegans as a reference were measured four times and we confirmed the correlation between them. It shows that our device can analyze the condition of C. elegans without an imaging system.

  1. The influence of six pharmaceuticals on freshwater sediment microbial growth incubated at different temperatures and UV exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Allison; Bernot, Melody J; Mitchell, James K

    2012-07-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected in freshwater for several decades. Once they enter the aquatic ecosystem, they may be transformed abiotically (i.e., photolysis) or biotically (i.e., microbial activity). To assess the influence of pharmaceuticals on microbial growth, basal salt media amended with seven pharmaceutical treatments (acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, cotinine, ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole, and a no pharmaceutical control) were inoculated with stream sediment. The seven pharmaceutical treatments were then placed in five different culture environments that included both temperature treatments of 4, 25, 37°C and light treatments of continuous UV-A or UV-B exposure. Microbial growth in the basal salt media was quantified as absorbance (OD(550)) at 7, 14, 21, 31, and 48d following inoculation. Microbial growth was significantly influenced by pharmaceutical treatments (P microbial communities post-incubation identified selection of microbial and fungal species with exposure to caffeine, cotinine, and ibuprofen at 37°C; acetaminophen, caffeine, and cotinine at 25°C; and carbamazepine exposed to continuous UV-A. Bacillus and coccus cellular arrangements (1000X magnification) were consistently observed across incubation treatments for each pharmaceutical treatment although carbamazepine and ibuprofen exposures incubated at 25°C also selected spiral-shaped bacteria. These data indicate stream sediment microbial communities are influenced by pharmaceuticals though physiochemical characteristics of the environment may dictate microbial response.

  2. Microbial degradation of chloro- and methylphenol mixtures under aerobic and denitrifying conditions. Regulation and interaction in a mixed culture; Mikrobieller Abbau von Chlor- und Methylphenolen im Gemisch unter aeroben und denitrifizierenden Bedingungen. Regulation und Interaktion in einer Mischkultur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollender, J.

    1994-12-31

    The mechanism and the regulation of the microbial aerobic degradation of chloro- and methylphenol mixtures were investigated by comparing the mixed culture enriched of these phenolic compounds with the isolated pure cultures. The degradation assays and the characterization of the central degrading enzymes involved show that the degradation potential of the mixed culture was essentially determined by the additive abilities of the three pure cultures Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subspecies denitrificans JH1, Pseudomonas stutzeri JH3 and Comamonas testosteroni JH5. Degradation of some substrate mixtures and avoidance of enrichment of metabolites can only be explained by the interaction of the pure cultures or the participation of other organisms in the mixed culture which were not further investigated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei den Untersuchungen zum Mechanismus und der Regulation des aeroben Abbaus von Chlor- und Methylphenolen im Gemisch stand der Vergleich zwischen der auf diesen Phenolen angereicherten Mischkultur und den daraus isolierten Reinkulturen im Vordergrund. Die Abbauversuche und die Charakterisierung der am Metabolismus beteiligten zentralen Enzyme zeigen, dass fuer das Abbaupotential der Mischkultur im wesentlichen die additiven Abbauleistungen der drei Reinkulturen Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subspecies dentrificans JH1, Pseudomonas stutzeri JH3 und Comamonas testosteroni JH5 verantwortlich sind. Der Abbau einiger Substratmischungen und die Vermeidung einer Anreicherung von Metaboliten in der Mischkultur sind jedoch nur durch eine Interaktion der Reinkulturen oder durch eine Beteiligung anderer nicht naeher untersuchter Organismen in der Mischkultur zu erklaeren. (orig.)

  3. Monitoring the impact of the indoor air quality on silver cultural heritage objects using passive and continuous corrosion rate assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    `t Hart, Lucy; Storme, Patrick; Anaf, Willemien; Nuyts, Gert; Vanmeert, Frederik; Dorriné, Walter; Janssens, Koen; de Wael, Karolien; Schalm, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    There is a long tradition in evaluating industrial atmospheres by measuring the corrosion rate of exposed metal coupons. The heritage community also uses this method, but the interpretation of the corrosion rate often lacks clarity due to the low corrosivity in indoor museum environments. This investigation explores the possibilities and drawbacks of different silver corrosion rate assessments. The corrosion rate is determined by three approaches: (1) chemical characterization of metal coupons using analytical techniques such as electrochemical measurements, SEM-EDX, XRD, and µ-Raman spectroscopy, (2) continuous corrosion monitoring methods based on electrical resistivity loss of a corroding nm-sized metal wire and weight gain of a corroding silver coated quartz crystal, and (3) characterization of the visual degradation of the metal coupons. This study confirms that subtle differences in corrosivity between locations inside a museum can be determined on condition that the same corrosion rate assessment is used. However, the impact of the coupon orientation with respect to the prevailing direction of air circulation can be substantially larger than the impact of the coupon location.

  4. GROWTH AND ENZYME PRODUCTION DURING CONTINUOUS CULTURES OF A HIGH AMYLASE-PRODUCING VARIANT OF Aspergillus Oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.C. Zangirolami

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth and product formation by a selected variant of Aspergillus oryzae showing high alpha-amylase production was studied in continuous cultivations carried out at six different specific growth rates, using glucose as the growth-limiting nutrient. The analysis of the steady-state data revealed that the variant and wild-type strains were similar with respect to glucose uptake system and stoichiometric coefficients. However, the variant was capable of maintaining an enzyme production as high as 40 FAUgDW-1h-1 at a dilution rate of 0.2 h-1, while the wild-type strain reached a maximum specific alpha-amylase production rate of 17 FAUgDW-1h-1 at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. Using a morphologically structured model originally proposed for the wild-type strain, it was possible to describe enzyme production, biomass formation and glucose consumption after modification of a few parameters to adjust the model to the characteristics of the selected variant.

  5. Microbial bio-based plastics from olive-mill wastewater: Generation and properties of polyhydroxyalkanoates from mixed cultures in a two-stage pilot scale system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaikou, I; Valencia Peroni, C; Kourmentza, C; Ilieva, V I; Morelli, A; Chiellini, E; Lyberatos, G

    2014-10-20

    The operational efficiency of a two stage pilot scale system for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from three phase olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) was investigated in this study. A mixed anaerobic, acidogenic culture derived from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, was used in the first stage, aiming to the acidification of OMW. The effluent of the first bioreactor that was operated in continuous mode, was collected in a sedimentation tank in which partial removal of the suspended solids was taking place, and was then forwarded to an aerobic reactor, operated in sequential batch mode under nutrient limitation. In the second stage an enriched culture of Pseudomonas sp. was used as initial inoculum for the production of PHAs from the acidified waste. Clarification of the acidified waste, using aluminium sulphate which causes flocculation and precipitation of solids, was also performed, and its effect on the composition of the acidified waste as well as on the yields and properties of PHAs was investigated. It was shown that clarification had no significant qualitative or quantitative effect on the primary carbon sources, i.e. short chain fatty acids and residual sugars, but only on the values of total suspended solids and total chemical oxygen demand of the acidified waste. The type and thermal characteristics of the produced PHAs were also similar for both types of feed. However the clarification of the waste seemed to have a positive impact on final PHAs yield, measured as gPHAs/100g of VSS, which reached up to 25%. Analysis of the final products via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed the existence of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and 3-hydroxyoctanoate (HO) units, leading to the conclusion that the polymer could be either a blend of P3HB and P3HO homopolymers or/and the 3HB-co-3HO co-polymer, an unusual polymer occurring in nature with advanced properties.

  6. 微生物燃料电池耦合连续搅拌反应系统(CSTR)低温下处理“糖蜜-电镀”废水%Microbial fuel cell with continuous stirred reactor system (CSTR) for continuous flow Processing of “Molasses-Electroplating”wastewater at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢静怡; 李永峰; 孙彩玉; 秦必达

    2015-01-01

    为提高传统微生物燃料电池( MFC)在低温条件下的效率,实现实验装置放大化.本实验将连续搅拌反应系统( CSTR)与双极室微生物燃料电池系统相结合,连续流处理糖蜜废水,并间接回收金属单质,处理模拟电镀废水,考察系统的产电性能和废水处理效果.结果表明,当系统稳定运行后,最高电压及功率密度分别可达到340 mV和58.65 mW·m-2.20 d后,系统COD去除率明显增加,最高COD去除率可达到81%.实验运行10 d后,银离子开始析出,最高去除率可达到90%左右.%In order to improve the efficiency of traditional microbial fuel cells ( MFC ) at low temperatures, and scale up the experimental device amplification, this experiment combined a continuous stirred reactor with a two chamber microbial fuel cell to continuously process molasses wastewater and simulated electroplating wastewater, indirectly recovered metals, and investigated electricity production and wastewater treatment effect. The results from the experiment showed that the highest voltage output of 340 mV and the maximum power density of 58. 65 mW·m-2 were obtained under a stable operating condition. In addition,COD removal rate reached its highest value (81%)after 20 d, and the maximum removal rate(90%) for Ag+ was recorded after 10 d.

  7. Continuous Production of Thermostable beta-Amylase with Clostridium thermosulfurogenes: Effect of Culture Conditions and Metabolite Levels on Enzyme Synthesis and Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipkow, A; Shen, G J; Zeikus, J G

    1989-03-01

    A beta-amylase-overproducing mutant of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes was grown in continuous culture on soluble starch to produce thermostable beta-amylase. Enzyme productivity was reasonably stable over periods of weeks to months. The pH and temperature optima for beta-amylase production were pH 6.0 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Enzyme concentration was maximized by increasing biomass concentration by using high substrate concentrations and by maintaining a low growth rate. beta-Amylase concentration reached 90 U ml at a dilution rate of 0.07 h in a 3% starch medium. A further increase in enzyme activity levels was limited by acetic acid inhibition of growth and low beta-amylase productivity at low growth rates.

  8. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  9. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time. PMID:21529093

  10. Novel chemometric strategy based on the application of artificial neural networks to crossed mixture design for the improvement of recombinant protein production in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Caroline; Forno, Guillermina; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Goicoechea, Héctor

    2009-09-21

    The optimal blends of six compounds that should be present in culture media used in recombinant protein production were determined by means of artificial neural networks (ANN) coupled with crossed mixture experimental design. This combination constitutes a novel approach to develop a medium for cultivating genetically engineered mammalian cells. The compounds were collected in two mixtures of three elements each, and the experimental space was determined by a crossed mixture design. Empirical data from 51 experimental units were used in a multiresponse analysis to train artificial neural networks which satisfy different requirements, in order to define two new culture media (Medium 1 and Medium 2) to be used in a continuous biopharmaceutical production process. These media were tested in a bioreactor to produce a recombinant protein in CHO cells. Remarkably, for both predicted media all responses satisfied the predefined goals pursued during the analysis, except in the case of the specific growth rate (mu) observed for Medium 1. ANN analysis proved to be a suitable methodology to be used when dealing with complex experimental designs, as frequently occurs in the optimization of production processes in the biotechnology area. The present work is a new example of the use of ANN for the resolution of a complex, real life system, successfully employed in the context of a biopharmaceutical production process.

  11. A comparative study on the effects of tylosin on select bacteria during continuous flow culture of mixed populations of gut microflora derived from a feral and a domestic pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlachan, Nicole; Anderson, Robin C; Andrews, Kathleen; Harvey, Roger B; Nisbet, David J

    2008-02-01

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures were continuously infused with 25 or 100 microg tylosin/mL and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes, Bacteroides and Enterococcus via plating to agar supplemented without or with 100 microg tylosin/mL, the latter to assess bacterial sensitivity to tylosin. Endogenous tylosin-insensitive anaerobes within the cultures, while similar prior to tylosin administration, responded differently during tylosin administration, with concentrations in RPCF cultures becoming enriched more than in FC cultures. Tylosin-insensitive anaerobes in RPCF cultures persisted at increased concentrations after cessation of tylosin administration whereas concentrations in FC cultures decreased slightly. Concentrations of Bacteroides and endogenous Enterococcus recovered on medium without tylosin decreased to near or below detectable levels in FC cultures administered 25 or 100 microg tylosin/mL. Tylosin-insensitive Bacteroides were enriched to >5 log10 CFU/mL in RPCF cultures after 25 microg tylosin/mL but not at 100 microg tylosin/mL. Populations of endogenous tylosin-insensitive Enterococcus were enriched in RPCF but not FC cultures administered 25 or 100 microg tylosin/mL. In cultures administered 100 microg tylosin/mL, an exogenous-sourced E. faecium possessing tylosin resistance maintained itself only in the presence of tylosin. These results indicate that under the conditions of these tests, antibiotic exposure may enrich for antibiotic-insensitive bacteria populations of endogenous or exogenous origin but that the ability of an exogenous tylosin-resistant E. faecium to persist is reduced in the absence of the antibiotic, likely due to exclusion by native flora.

  12. Microbial source tracking of private well water samples across at-risk regions in southern Ontario and analysis of traditional fecal indicator bacteria assays including culture and qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolik, Julia; Maier, Allison; Thompson, Shawna; Majury, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Many people living in rural areas rely on privately owned wells as their primary source of drinking water. These water sources are at risk for fecal contamination of human, wildlife, and livestock origin. While traditional bacteriological testing involves culture-based methods, microbial source tracking (MST) assays present an opportunity to additionally determine the source of fecal contamination. This study investigated the main host sources of contamination in private well water samples with high levels of Escherichia coli (E. coli), using MST with human and multi-species specific markers. Fecal contamination of human origin was detected in approximately 50% of samples, indicating that current contamination prevention strategies require reconsideration. The relationship between cattle density and fecal contamination of bovine origin was investigated using a Bovine Bacteroidales specific MST assay. Regional variations of microbial sources were examined, and may inform local primary prevention strategies. Additionally, in order to assess MST and E. coli quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays as indicators of fecal contamination, these were compared to E. coli culture methods. Variation in results was observed across all assay methods investigated, suggesting the most appropriate routine bacteriological testing methodology cannot be determined without comparison to a method that directly detects the presence of fecal contamination.

  13. 微生物分子生态学技术在文物保护中应用的进展%Application of microbial molecular ecology in conservation of cultural heritage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚丽

    2012-01-01

    微生物分子生态学技术近年来在文物保护研究中得到了广泛的应用,已经成为控制文物被微生物侵害的一个不可或缺的工具。本研究较系统地总结了国内外利用微生物分子生态学技术进行文物保护研究的进展,为更有效防治微生物危害侵蚀文物,进而长久的保存文物提供理论支持。%In recent years, microbial molecular ecology has been widely applied in the field of conservation. This article reviews the domestic and international application of microbial ecology technology for conservation of cultural heritage objects, so as to effectively prevent microbiological damage to them. This review provides theoretical foun- dations for long - term conservation of cultural heritage objects.

  14. Continuation Of Cultural Environment In Historic Renewal%历史地段更新中人文环境的延续

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱李亚

    2016-01-01

    In the social background of rapid change, historic area is facing double pressure of natural fade and commercial development, the lack of understanding of the historical cultural environment, the lack of the continuation of the human environment is the major dilemma in the protection. To solve this dilemma, this paper analyzes the characteristics and evolution mechanism of the humanistic environment connotation in the historical area, through the analysis of cases at home and abroad, discusses the measures to realize the continuation of human environment in the Historical Areas Renewal.%在社会快速变革背景下,历史地段面临自然消逝与商业开发的双重压力,对历史地段人文环境认识不足,缺乏延续人文环境的方法是保护工作需要面对的困境。针对这一困境,文章浅析了历史地段中人文环境的内涵、特点与演变机制,通过借助国内外相应案例的分析,探讨了历史地段更新中实现人文环境延续的措施。

  15. Bioreactors for high cell density and continuous multi-stage cultivations: options for process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2016-03-01

    With an increasing demand for efficacious, safe, and affordable vaccines for human and animal use, process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production demands advanced process strategies to overcome the limitations of conventional batch cultivations. However, the use of fed-batch, perfusion, or continuous modes to drive processes at high cell density (HCD) and overextended operating times has so far been little explored in large-scale viral vaccine manufacturing. Also, possible reductions in cell-specific virus yields for HCD cultivations have been reported frequently. Taking into account that vaccine production is one of the most heavily regulated industries in the pharmaceutical sector with tough margins to meet, it is understandable that process intensification is being considered by both academia and industry as a next step toward more efficient viral vaccine production processes only recently. Compared to conventional batch processes, fed-batch and perfusion strategies could result in ten to a hundred times higher product yields. Both cultivation strategies can be implemented to achieve cell concentrations exceeding 10(7) cells/mL or even 10(8) cells/mL, while keeping low levels of metabolites that potentially inhibit cell growth and virus replication. The trend towards HCD processes is supported by development of GMP-compliant cultivation platforms, i.e., acoustic settlers, hollow fiber bioreactors, and hollow fiber-based perfusion systems including tangential flow filtration (TFF) or alternating tangential flow (ATF) technologies. In this review, these process modes are discussed in detail and compared with conventional batch processes based on productivity indicators such as space-time yield, cell concentration, and product titers. In addition, options for the production of viral vaccines in continuous multi-stage bioreactors such as two- and three-stage systems are addressed. While such systems have shown similar virus titers compared to

  16. Culture-Independent Identification of Manganese-Oxidizing Genes from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Chemoautotrophic Ferromanganese Microbial Communities Using a Metagenomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity has long been recognized as being important to the fate of manganese (Mn) in hydrothermal systems, yet we know very little about the organisms that catalyze Mn oxidation, the mechanisms by which Mn is oxidized or the physiological function that Mn oxidation serves in these hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal vents with thick ferromanganese microbial mats and Mn oxide-coated rocks observed throughout the Pacific Ring of Fire are ideal models to study the mechanisms of microbial Mn oxidation, as well as primary productivity in these metal-cycling ecosystems. We sampled ferromanganese microbial mats from Vai Lili Vent Field (Tmax=43°C) located on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mn oxide-encrusted rhyolytic pumice (4°C) from Niua South Seamount on the Tonga Volcanic Arc. Metagenomic libraries were constructed and assembled from these samples and key genes known to be involved in Mn oxidation and carbon fixation pathways were identified in the reconstructed genomes. The Vai Lili metagenome assembled to form 121,157 contiguous sequences (contigs) greater than 1000bp in length, with an N50 of 8,261bp and a total metagenome size of 593 Mbp. Contigs were binned using an emergent self-organizing map of tetranucleotide frequencies. Putative homologs of the multicopper Mn-oxidase MnxG were found in the metagenome that were related to both the Pseudomonas-like and Bacillus-like forms of the enzyme. The bins containing the Pseudomonas-like mnxG genes are most closely related to uncultured Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi. The Deltaproteobacteria bin appears to be an obligate anaerobe with possible chemoautotrophic metabolisms, while the Chloroflexi appears to be a heterotrophic organism. The metagenome from the Mn-stained pumice was assembled into 122,092 contigs greater than 1000bp in length with an N50 of 7635 and a metagenome size of 385 Mbp. Both forms of mnxG genes are present in this metagenome as well as the genes encoding the putative Mn

  17. Prediction of Competitive Microbial Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

     Prediction of competitive microbial growth is becoming important for microbial food safety. There would be two approaches to predict competitive microbial growth with mathematical models. The first approach is the development of a growth model for competitive microbes. Among several candidates for the competition model considered, the combination of the primary growth model of the new logistic (NL) model and the competition model of the Lotka-Vorttera (LV) model showed the best performance in predicting microbial competitive growth in the mixed culture of two species. This system further successfully predicted the growth of three competitive species in mixed culture. The second approach is the application of the secondary model especially for the parameter of the maximum cell population in the primary growth model. The combination of the NL model and a polynomial model for the maximum population successfully predicted Salmonella growth in raw ground beef. This system further successfully predicted Salmonella growth in beef at various initial concentrations and temperatures. The first approach requires microbial growth data in monoculture for analysis. The second approach to the prediction of competitive growth from the viewpoint of microbial food safety would be more suitable for practical application.

  18. La reforma agraria en Campeche, ¿permanencia de una cultura indí­gena? The Agrarian Reform in Campeche, Continuation of an Indigenous Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Cantún Caamal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo mostraremos el proceso histórico de la reforma agraria mexicana del siglo XX y cómo se dio en el estado de Campeche. Veremos cómo un intento de los gobiernos posrevolucionarios por restituir y dorar de tierras a las comunidades se convirtió en la oportunidad de rescatar y consolidar la tenencia comunal. También cómo las omisiones e inconsistencias de las leyes durante el proceso dio lugar a errores como no contemplar que las comunidades tuvieran aún tierras y no saber cómo clasificarlas. En la mayoría de las veces estos desaciertos permitieron que los campesinos obtuvieran grandes extensiones de tierra. Finalmente discutiremos cómo la reforma agraria permitió la permanencia de un elemento cultural como lo es posesión en común, el cual ha formado parte de la identidad de los grupos mayas del estado de Campeche.This paper shows the historical process of the Mexican agrarian reform in the 20th century and explains how ¡t took place in the state of Campeche. It demonstrates how an attempt by post-revolutionary governments to return and provide land for communities became an opportunity to restore and consolidate communal ownership. It also reveals how the omissions and inconsistencies of the laws during the process gave rise to errors such as not imagining that communities still had land and not knowing how to classify them. Nevertheless, most of the time, these mistakes enabled peasants to obtain large expanses of land. Lastly, it discusses the way the agrarian reform permitted the continuation of a cultural feature, common ownership, which has formed part of the identity of Maya groups in the state of Campeche.

  19. Dynamics of bacterial populations during bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil bioaugmented with coastal microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nidaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Sorkhoh, Naser; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Radwan, Samir

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a bench-scale attempt to bioremediate Kuwaiti, oily water and soil samples through bioaugmentation with coastal microbial mats rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacterioflora. Seawater and desert soil samples were artificially polluted with 1% weathered oil, and bioaugmented with microbial mat suspensions. Oil removal and microbial community dynamics were monitored. In batch cultures, oil removal was more effective in soil than in seawater. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria associated with mat samples colonized soil more readily than seawater. The predominant oil degrading bacterium in seawater batches was the autochthonous seawater species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. The main oil degraders in the inoculated soil samples, on the other hand, were a mixture of the autochthonous mat and desert soil bacteria; Xanthobacter tagetidis, Pseudomonas geniculata, Olivibacter ginsengisoli and others. More bacterial diversity prevailed in seawater during continuous than batch bioremediation. Out of seven hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species isolated from those cultures, only one, Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum, was of mat origin. This result too confirms that most of the autochthonous mat bacteria failed to colonize seawater. Also culture-independent analysis of seawater from continuous cultures revealed high-bacterial diversity. Many of the bacteria belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and were hydrocarbonoclastic. Optimal biostimulation practices for continuous culture bioremediation of seawater via mat bioaugmentation were adding the highest possible oil concentration as one lot in the beginning of bioremediation, addition of vitamins, and slowing down the seawater flow rate.

  20. Application of Culture-independent Methods for Analyzing Microbial Communities in Cheese: A Review%非培养技术在干酪微生物群落分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫蓓红; 孙立国

    2012-01-01

    The application of culture-independent methods in food industry is still in the preliminary stage. In this paper, the application of the most common culture-independent approaches for describing both bacterial and fungal communities in cheese and for monitoring microbial community in cheese manufacturing and ripening process has been reviewed. The most commonly used DNA fingerprinting techniques for investigating microbial communities in cheese are introduced, which include PCR- DGGE, PCR-TTGE, SSCP-PCR, DHPLC and other techniques. Furthermore, the benefits, pitfalls and perspectives of cultureindependent methods in cheese are discussed. Based on the discussion, a polyphasic approach with the combination of culturedependent and culture-independent methods may be the best strategy to achieve more accurate structures of microbial communities.%非培养方法在食品行业中的应用还处于起步阶段。本文综述非培养方法在分析干酪中微生物群落结构以及监测微生物群落结构在干酪生产和成熟过程中演替的应用现状。主要介绍已被广泛用于分析干酪中微生物群落结构的DNA指纹图谱技术,包括PCR.变性梯度凝胶电泳(PCR-DGGE)技术、PCR.时间温度梯度凝胶电泳(PCR-TTGE)技术、单链构象多态性PCR(SSCP-PCR)技术以及变性高效液相色谱(DHPLC)技术等。此外,本文还对非培养技术的优点和局限性进行分析,展望非培养方法在干酪行业的应用前景,认为将非培养方法和传统培养方法结合使用才是研究微生物生态的最好途径。

  1. Integrative modelling of pH-dependent enzyme activity and transcriptomic regulation of the acetone–butanol–ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a continuous culture under phosphate limitation the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum depends on the external pH level. By comparing seven steady-state conditions between pH 5.7 and pH 4.5 we show that the switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis occurs between pH 5.3 and pH 5.0 with an intermediate state at pH 5.1. Here, an integrative study is presented investigating how a changing external pH level affects the clostridial acetone–butanol–ethanol (ABE) fermentation pathway. This is of particular interest as the biotechnological production of n-butanol as biofuel has recently returned into the focus of industrial applications. One prerequisite is the furthering of the knowledge of the factors determining the solvent production and their integrative regulations. We have mathematically analysed the influence of pH-dependent specific enzyme activities of branch points of the metabolism on the product formation. This kinetic regulation was compared with transcriptomic regulation regarding gene transcription and the proteomic profile. Furthermore, both regulatory mechanisms were combined yielding a detailed projection of their individual and joint effects on the product formation. The resulting model represents an important platform for future developments of industrial butanol production based on C. acetobutylicum. PMID:23332010

  2. Microbial keratitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, D Y; Sharma, S; Reddy, M K; Gopinathan, U; Jyothi, J; Miller, D; Rao, G N

    1998-02-01

    Microbial keratitis is a major cause of corneal blindness worldwide. This problem is particularly relevant to children, because most of their visual life is ahead of them, and they are uniquely at risk for irreversible ocular deficits, such as those resulting from amblyopia. The objective of this study was to determine the etiologic agents and predisposing factors in childhood infectious keratitis and to examine the outcome of treatment in terms of structure and visual acuity. The study design was a retrospective cases series. The authors studied 113 eyes in 107 children 16 years of age and younger who were treated for (nonviral) microbial keratitis at the LV Prasad Eye Institute in Hyderabad, India, during the 4.5-year period between February 1, 1991, and June 30, 1995. The patients who met the following criteria were included in the study: (1) corneal stromal infiltrate was present on slit-lamp examination; and (2) a corneal scraping was taken at the time of examination for suspected microbial keratitis. Etiologic micro-organisms, predisposing factors, treatment method, structural treatment outcome, and visual acuity treatment outcome of the infectious keratitis episode were measured. The principal predisposing factors identified in this study were trauma (21.2%), ocular disease (17.7%), systemic disease (15.9%), and prior penetrating keratoplasty in the same eye (8.8%). Vitamin A deficiency was an important factor within the category of severe systemic disease, and contact lens wear was not involved in any of the cases. A total of 85 organisms were isolated in cultures of corneal scrapings from 64 (56.6%) of the 113 cases. Staphylococcus species (43.7%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), and fungi (17.2%) were the most common isolates. Eighteen eyes (15.9%) required surgery, and 28 (36.4%) of the 77 patients on whom visual acuity was assessed at last follow-up achieved an unaided visual acuity of 20/60 or better at last follow-up. This work represents the

  3. Long-term effect of mineral fertilizers and amendments on microbial dynamics in an alfisol of Western Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, S; Kanwar, S S; Sharma, S P

    2007-03-01

    The microbial dynamics expressed in terms of culturable microbial populations i.e. bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes and Azotobacter were measured after 33 years of continuous application of mineral fertilizers and amendments to an acid alfisol. The bacterial, fungal and Azotobacter populations were maximum in plots treated with mineral fertilizers and FYM (100%NPK+FYM) while actinomycetes population was maximum in mineral fertilizes and lime treated plots (100%NPK+Lime). The bacterial population decreased and fungal population increased with increasing levels of NPK i.e. from 50% to 150%NPK. Bacillus species of bacteria and Gliocladium, Aspergillus and Rhizopus species of fungi were the main dominating culturable microorganisms in all the treatments. The FYM and lime amended plots sustained crop productivity and microbial populations at higher levels than rest of the mineral fertilizer treatments. The nitrogenous fertilizers alone had the most deleterious effect on crop productivity and the biological soil environment.

  4. A simulation of microbial competition in the human colonic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M E; Dreesen, D W; Wiegert, R G

    1996-10-01

    Many investigations of the interactions of microbial competitors in the gastrointestinal tract used continuous-flow anaerobic cultures. The simulation reported here was a deterministic 11-compartment model coded by using the C programming language and based on parameters from published in vitro studies and assumptions were data were unavailable. The resource compartments were glucose, lactose and sucrose, starch, sorbose, and serine. Six microbial competitors included indigenous nonpathogenic colonizers of the human gastrointestinal tract (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroids ovatus, Fusobacterium varium, and Enterococcus faecalis) and the potential human enteropathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Flows of carbon from the resources to the microbes were modified by resource and space controls. Partitioning of resources to the competitors that could utilize them was calculated at each iteration on the basis of availability of all resources by feeding preference functions. Resources did not accumulate during iterations of the model. The results of the computer simulation of microbial competition model and for various modifications of the model. The results were based on few measured parameters but may be useful in the design of user-friendly software to aid researchers in defining and manipulating the microbial ecology of colonic ecosystems as relates to food-borne disease.

  5. Microbial flocculant and its application in environmental protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The microbial flocculant is a kind of natural bio- polymer and has promising future to be used in the fermentation industry and wastewater treatment. It has been studied in details in many countries, such as U.S.A, Japan. This paper reviewed the development on microbial flocculant basic studies and applications, including flocculant-production microorganisms, chemical and components of microbial flocculants, flocculation mechanism of microbial flocculants, capability of microbial flocculants and influence factors, and culture conditions for flocculant production. The application cases of microbial flocculants were also discussed.

  6. Microbial stability and safety of traditional Greek Graviera cheese: characterization of the lactic acid bacterial flora and culture-independent detection of bacteriocin genes in the ripened cheeses and their microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelis, John; Kakouri, Athanasia; Pappa, Eleni C; Matijasić, Bojana Bogovic; Georgalaki, Marina D; Tsakalidou, Effie; Rogelj, Andirena

    2010-07-01

    The microflora of four batches of traditional Greek Graviera cheese was studied at 5 weeks of ripening, and 200 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates were phenotypically characterized and screened for antilisterial bacteriocins. The cheeses were also analyzed for organic acids by high-performance liquid chromatography and for the potential presence of 25 known LAB bacteriocin genes directly in cheese and their microbial consortia by PCR. All batches were safe according to the European Union regulatory criteria for Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, enterobacteria, and coagulase-positive staphylococci. The cheese flora was dominated by nonstarter Lactobacillus casei/paracasei (67.5%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (16.3%) strains, whereas few Streptococcus thermophilus (3.8%), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (0.6%), and Leuconostoc (1.9%) organisms were present. Enterococcus faecium (9.4%) and Enterococcus durans (0.6%) were isolated among the dominant LAB from two batches; however, enterococci were present in all batches at 10- to 100-fold lower populations than mesophilic lactobacilli. Sixteen E. faecium isolates produced antilisterial enterocins. In accordance, enterocin B gene was detectable in all cheeses and enterocin P gene was present in one cheese, whereas the consortia of all cheeses contained at least two of the enterocin A, B, P, 31, L50A, and L50B genes. Plantaricin A gene was also amplified from all cheeses. Mean concentrations of lactic, acetic, citric, and propionic acids in the ripened cheeses exceeded 1.5% in total, of which approximately 0.9% was lactate. Thus, organic acid contents constitute an important hurdle factor for inhibiting growth of pathogens in traditional Graviera cheese products, with LAB bacteriocins, mainly enterocins, potentially contributing to increased cheese safety.

  7. Microbial xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids abundant in the human food supply. Lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin are major xanthophyll carotenoids in human plasma. The consumption of these xanthophylls is directly associated with reduction in the risk of cancers, cardiovascular disease, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract formation. Canthaxanthin and astaxanthin also have considerable importance in aquaculture for salmonid and crustacean pigmentation, and are of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. Chemical synthesis is a major source for the heavy demand of xanthophylls in the consumer market; however, microbial producers also have potential as commercial sources. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis, commercial utility, and major microbial sources of xanthophylls. We also present a critical review of current research and technologies involved in promoting microbes as potential commercial sources for mass production.

  8. Selection and evaluation of reference genes for expression studies with quantitative PCR in the model fungus Neurospora crassa under different environmental conditions in continuous culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen D Cusick

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa has served as a model organism for studying circadian pathways and more recently has gained attention in the biofuel industry due to its enhanced capacity for cellulase production. However, in order to optimize N. crassa for biotechnological applications, metabolic pathways during growth under different environmental conditions must be addressed. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR is a technique that provides a high-throughput platform from which to measure the expression of a larg