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Sample records for continuous density profile

  1. Density profiles of the exclusive queueing process

    OpenAIRE

    Arita, Chikashi; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The exclusive queueing process (EQP) incorporates the exclusion principle into classic queueing models. It can be interpreted as an exclusion process of variable system length. Here we extend previous studies of its phase diagram by identifying subphases which can be distinguished by the number of plateaus in the density profiles. Furthermore the influence of different update procedures (parallel, backward-ordered, continuous time) is determined.

  2. Continuous profiling of magnetotelluric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, Carlos Torres [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method of mapping ground electrical conductivity is traditionally based on measurement of the surface impedance at widely spaced stations to infer models of the subsurface through a suitable pseudo 1-D inverse or with linearized least-squares inversion for 2- or 3-D geoelectric media. It is well known that small near-surface inhomogeneities can produce spatial discontinuities in the measured electric fields over a wide frequency range and may consequently bias the impedance on a very local scale. Inadequate station spacing effectively aliases the electric field measurements and results in distortions that cannot be removed in subsequent processing or modelling. In order to fully exploit the benefits of magnetotellurics in complex geological environments, closely spaced measurements must be used routinely. This thesis entertains an analysis of MT data taken along continuous profiles and is a first step that will allow more encompassing 2-D sampling techniques to become viable in the years to come. The developments presented here are to a large extent motivated by the physical insight gained from low-contrast solutions to the forward MT problem. These solutions describe the relationship between a perturbation in the electrical conductivity of the subsurface and the ensuing perturbation of the MT response as the output of a linear system. Albeit strictly accurate in a limited subset of practical exploration problems, the linearized solutions allow one to pursue a model independent study of the response characteristics of MT data. In fact, these solutions yield simple expressions for 1-,2-, and 3-D resistivity models which are here examined in progressive sequence.

  3. Continuous antiretroviral therapy decreases bone mineral density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grund, Birgit; Peng, Grace; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Isaksson, Rachel L.; Shlay, Judith C.; Martinez, Esteban; Reiss, Peter; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Carr, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of anti retroviral therapy (ART) on bone mineral density (BMD) Design: Randomized comparison of continuous ART (viral suppression group; VS) with intermittent ART (drug conservation group; DC) Setting: Outpatient clinics in the United States, Australia, and Spain.

  4. A Survey of Coronal Cavity Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height—indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions—except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  5. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popolo, A. Del, E-mail: adelpopolo@oact.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, University Of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, Catania, 95125 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The present paper is an extension and continuation of Del Popolo (2012a) which studied the role of baryon physics on clusters of galaxies formation. In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. As already found in Del Popolo 2012a, the density profiles depend on baryonic fraction, angular momentum, and the angular momentum transferred from baryons to DM through dynamical friction. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003–0.03r{sub 200}, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, α, has a maximum value (including errors) of α = −0.88 in the case of A2390, and minimum value α = −0.14 for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii < 5–10 kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, R{sub e}, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius r{sub core}, and R{sub e}. Moreover, the mass in 100 kpc (mainly dark matter) is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons). The behavior of the total mass density profile, the DM density profile, and the quoted correlations can be understood in a double phase scenario. In the first dissipative phase the proto-BCG forms, and in the second dissipationless phase, dynamical friction between baryonic clumps (collapsing to the center) and the DM halo flattens the inner slope of the density profile. In simple terms, the large scatter in the inner slope from cluster to cluster, and the anti-correlation among the slope, α and R{sub e} is due to the fact that in order to have a total

  6. Effective Density Queries of Continuously Moving Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Lin, D.; Ooi, B.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study a newly emerging type of queries on moving objects - the density query. Basically, this query locates regions in the data space where the density of the objects is high. This type of queries is especially useful in Location Based Services (LBS). For example, in a traffic...

  7. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  8. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P., E-mail: dstotler@pppl.gov; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3}; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%.

  9. Amplitude modulation reflectometry for density profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, V.; Sanchez, J.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Branas, B.; Frances, M. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Hartfuss, H.J. [Max Plank Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom-Ass, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hanson, G.R.; Wilgen, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8072 (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) reflectometry is a technique for density profile measurements in magnetic fusion plasmas based on the measurement of the phase delay of the modulation in the amplitude of a microwave beam launched and reflected at the plasma. Results from AM experiments in the PBX-M tokamak and the W7-AS stellarator are presented. A general analysis of the capabilities of the technique is performed, particularly centered in the effects of spatial turbulence. Simulations of the effects of two-dimensional turbulence have been performed for medium size (W7-AS) and large devices (LHD stellarator, ITER), showing the capability of the AM technique to operate in turbulent plasmas. Finally, possible solutions to the problem of parasitic reflections in AM systems are presented as development options. (orig.) 4 refs.

  10. Abel inversion of asymmetric plasma density profile at Aditya tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, N. Y.; Atrey, P. K.; Pathak, S. K.

    2010-02-01

    In Aditya tokamak, at Institute for Plasma Research, till now, multi-channel microwave interferometer system is used to measure the cord averaged plasma density at predefined radial position. An inversion code is developed to determine the local density profile from the chord average density measurement of radially asymmetric plasma. The radial density profile is interpolated using Spline interpolation analytical technique for symmetric plasma density profile. Code implements the Slice and Stack method to determine localized density from asymmetric averaged plasma density measurement from interferometer. Inverted results are tested with various monotonically varying asymmetric radial density profiles of the plasma shots. It also provides the poloidal picture of plasma density distribution with circular constant density surfaces. Localized density measurements, which is very important for successful operation of tokamak, is in agreement with observation of other diagnostics.

  11. Nonparametric density estimation of continuous part of a mixed measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Sabre

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider a pair of random variables(X,Y whose probability measure is the sum of an absolutely continuous measure, a discrete measure and a finite number of absolutely continuous measures on several lines(1. An asymptotically unbiased and consistent estimate, at all points, of the density of the continuous part is given as well as its rate of convergence. We also estimate the amplitude of the discrete measure and the densities on several lines.

  12. Scattering length density profile of Ni film under controlled corrosion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report the density depth profile of an as-deposited Ni film and density profile for the same film after controlled electrochemical corrosion by chloride ions, mea- sured by unpolarized neutron reflectometry. The neutron reflectometry measurement of the film after corrosion shows density degradation along the ...

  13. Scattering length density profile of Ni film under controlled corrosion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the density depth profile of an as-deposited Ni film and density profile for the same film after controlled electrochemical corrosion by chloride ions, measured by unpolarized neutron reflectometry. The neutron reflectometry measurement of the film after corrosion shows density degradation along the thickness of ...

  14. MGS RS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 5600 ionospheric electron density profiles (EDS files) derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data. The profiles were...

  15. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  16. Continuity of integrated density of states–independent randomness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we discuss the continuity properties of the integrated density of states for random models based on that of the single site distribution. Our results are valid for models with independent randomness with arbitrary free parts. In particular in the case of the Anderson type models (with stationary, growing, decaying ...

  17. Core fueling to produce peaked density profiles in large tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; McGuire, K.M.; Schmidt, G.L.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Peaking the density profile increases the usable bootstrap current and the average fusion power density; this could reduce the current drive power and increase the net output of power producing tokamaks. The use of neutral beams and pellet injection to produce peaked density profiles is assessed. We show that with radially ``hollow`` diffusivity profiles (and no particle pinch) moderately peaked density profiles can be produced by particle source profiles which are peaked off-axis. The fueling penetration requirements can therefore be relaxed and this greatly improves the feasibility of generating peaked density profiles in large tokamaks. In particular, neutral beam fueling does not require MeV particle energy. Even with beam voltages of {approximately}200 keV, however, exceptionally good particle confinement, {tau}{sub p} {much_gt} {tau}{sub E} is required to achieve net electrical power generation. In system with no power production requirement (e.g., neutron sources) neutral beam fueling should be capable of producing peaked density profiles in devices as large as ITER. Fueling systems with low energy cost per particle (such as cryogenic pellet injection) must be used in power producing tokamaks when {tau}{sub p} {approximately} {tau}{sub E}. Simulations with pellet injection speeds of 7 km/sec show the peaking factor, n{sub eo}/{l_angle}n{sub e}{r_angle}, approaching 2.

  18. Exact analytical density profiles and surface tension

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to nonideality, which distinguish electrolyte from nonelectrolyte solutions. An example is provided by the excess surface tension for an air–water interface, which is determined by the excess particle density, and which was first calculated by Onsager and Samaras. Because of the discrepancy between the dielectric constants ...

  19. Electron Density Profile Data Contains Virtual Height/Frequency Pairs from a Profile or Profiles (Composite Months) of Ionograms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Electron Density Profile, N(h), data set contains both individual profiles and composite months. The data consist of virtual height/frequency pairs from a...

  20. A representative density profile of the North Greenland snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Schaller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Along a traverse through North Greenland in May 2015 we collected snow cores up to 2 m depth and analyzed their density and water isotopic composition. A new sampling technique and an adapted algorithm for comparing data sets from different sites and aligning stratigraphic features are presented. We find good agreement of the density layering in the snowpack over hundreds of kilometers, which allows the construction of a representative density profile. The results are supported by an empirical statistical density model, which is used to generate sets of random profiles and validate the applied methods. Furthermore we are able to calculate annual accumulation rates, align melt layers and observe isotopic temperatures in the area back to 2010. Distinct relations of δ18O with both accumulation rate and density are deduced. Inter alia the depths of the 2012 melt layers and high-resolution densities are provided for applications in remote sensing.

  1. Measurement of electron density profile by microwave reflectometry on tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonet, F.

    1985-05-01

    A new method for measuring the electron density spatial profile has been successfully tested on the tokamak of Fontenay aux Roses (TFR). This method is based on the total reflection experienced by a wave of frequency F on the layer where F = F/sub p/e(r). The experimental results show that the maximum electron density in the discharge is also easily measured and that accurate determination of a density profile can be obtained with a time resolution of 5 ms. This diagnostic is well adapted to all fusion devices where access to the total plasma cross section is limited, particularly for large tokamaks.

  2. New density profile reconstruction methods in X-mode reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, R. B.; Hacquin, S.; Heuraux, S.; Sabot, R.

    2017-04-01

    The reconstruction method published by Bottollier-Curtet and Ichtchenko in 1987 has been the standard method of density profile reconstruction for X-mode reflectometry ever since, with only minor revision. Envisaging improved accuracy and stability of the reconstruction method, functions more complex than the linear are evaluated here to describe the refractive index shape in each integration step. The stability and accuracy obtained when using parabolic and fixed or adaptative fractional power functions are compared to the previous method and tested against spurious events and phase noise. The developed relation from the plasma parameters to the best integration shapes allows for the optimization of the reconstruction for any profile shape. In addition, the density profiles can be reconstructed using less probing frequencies without accuracy loss, which speed up the reconstruction algorithm and enable real-time monitoring of faster density profile evolution.

  3. The virialization density of peaks with general density profiles under spherical collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Douglas [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: dsrubin@physics.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We calculate the non-linear virialization density, Δ{sub c}, of halos under spherical collapse from peaks with an arbitrary initial and final density profile. This is in contrast to the standard calculation of Δ{sub c} which assumes top-hat profiles. Given our formalism, the non-linear halo density can be calculated once the shape of the initial peak's density profile and the shape of the virialized halo's profile are provided. We solve for Δ{sub c} for halos in an Einstein de-Sitter and a ΛCDM universe. As examples, we consider power-law initial profiles as well as spherically averaged peak profiles calculated from the statistics of a Gaussian random field. We find that, depending on the profiles used, Δ{sub c} is smaller by a factor of a few to as much as a factor of 10 as compared to the density given by the standard calculation ( ≈ 200). Using our results, we show that, for halo finding algorithms that identify halos through an over-density threshold, the halo mass function measured from cosmological simulations can be enhanced at all halo masses by a factor of a few. This difference could be important when using numerical simulations to assess the validity of analytic models of the halo mass function.

  4. Evaluation of solid–liquid interface profile during continuous casting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 4. Evaluation of solid–liquid interface profile during continuous casting by a spline based formalism. S K Das. Metals and Alloys Volume ... Keywords. Continuous casting; solidification; solid–liquid interface; front tracking algorithm; phase change; heat transfer.

  5. Continuation of probability density functions using a generalized Lyapunov approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baars, S., E-mail: s.baars@rug.nl [Johann Bernoulli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 407, 9700 AK Groningen (Netherlands); Viebahn, J.P., E-mail: viebahn@cwi.nl [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), P.O. Box 94079, 1090 GB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mulder, T.E., E-mail: t.e.mulder@uu.nl [Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Kuehn, C., E-mail: ckuehn@ma.tum.de [Technical University of Munich, Faculty of Mathematics, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Wubs, F.W., E-mail: f.w.wubs@rug.nl [Johann Bernoulli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 407, 9700 AK Groningen (Netherlands); Dijkstra, H.A., E-mail: h.a.dijkstra@uu.nl [Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Techniques from numerical bifurcation theory are very useful to study transitions between steady fluid flow patterns and the instabilities involved. Here, we provide computational methodology to use parameter continuation in determining probability density functions of systems of stochastic partial differential equations near fixed points, under a small noise approximation. Key innovation is the efficient solution of a generalized Lyapunov equation using an iterative method involving low-rank approximations. We apply and illustrate the capabilities of the method using a problem in physical oceanography, i.e. the occurrence of multiple steady states of the Atlantic Ocean circulation.

  6. ON THE DENSITY PROFILE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cecco, A.; Buonanno, R. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana Science Data Center (ASDC), c/o ESRIN, via G. Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Zocchi, A.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Monelli, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF)-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00044 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Nonino, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Kunder, A.; Walker, A. R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-04-15

    We present new number density and surface brightness profiles for the globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). These profiles are calculated from optical images collected with the CCD mosaic camera MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ground-based data were supplemented with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalog. Special care was taken to discriminate candidate cluster stars from field stars and to subtract the background contamination from both profiles. By examining the contour levels of the number density, we found that the stellar distribution becomes clumpy at radial distances larger than {approx}13', and there is no preferred orientation of contours in space. We performed detailed fits of King and Wilson models to the observed profiles. The best-fit models underestimate the number density inside the core radius. Wilson models better represent the observations, in particular in the outermost cluster regions: the good global agreement of these models with the observations suggests that there is no need to introduce an extra-tidal halo to explain the radial distribution of stars at large radial distances. The best-fit models for the number density and the surface brightness profiles are different, even though they are based on the same observations. Additional tests support the evidence that this fact reflects the difference in the radial distribution of the stellar tracers that determine the observed profiles (main-sequence stars for the number density, bright evolved stars for the surface brightness).

  7. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laviron, C.; Donne, A. J. H.; Manso, M. E.; Sanchez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance,

  8. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  9. Density Profile Control in a Large Diameter, Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluggish, B. P.

    2004-11-01

    Large diameter plasmas are desirable in many applications, including semiconductor processing, surface treatment, and space propulsion. The Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter^1 is a new addition to this list. Whereas the Filter is intended for nuclear waste separation, current experiments on the Archimedes Demonstration Unit use noble gases as the feed material. Plasmas of density 2 x 10^19 m-3 can be created in axial magnetic fields up to 0.16 T by using 1.6 MW of RF power at 5-7 MHz. Creating uniform density profiles in this large (0.75 m diameter, 4 m long) device requires controlling the phase relationships between RF currents in an array of 8 antenna straps, each encircling the plasma column. When the currents in adjacent straps are in phase (i.e. in the same direction), the radial density profile is hollow with a density peak at the plasma edge. Reversing the phase on half of the straps causes the density profile to fill in and become flat. This behavior is consistent with the dispersion relation for helicon modes.^2 Alternating the phase from strap to strap reduces the axial wavelengths of the dominant RF fields, which generates helicon modes with longer radial wavelengths that are absorbed deeper in the plasma. Comparisons of the density profiles to the spectra of antenna currents will be presented, along with observations of the dependence of the plasma parameters on magnetic field, RF power, and gas pressure. Experimental results will be compared to helicon theory and computer models. ^1T. Ohkawa, "Plasma Mass Filter", U.S. Patent 6 096 220, August 1, 2000. ^2F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 3, 1783, (1996)

  10. Computational lipidology: predicting lipoprotein density profiles in human blood plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hübner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring cholesterol levels is strongly recommended to identify patients at risk for myocardial infarction. However, clinical markers beyond "bad" and "good" cholesterol are needed to precisely predict individual lipid disorders. Our work contributes to this aim by bringing together experiment and theory. We developed a novel computer-based model of the human plasma lipoprotein metabolism in order to simulate the blood lipid levels in high resolution. Instead of focusing on a few conventionally used predefined lipoprotein density classes (LDL, HDL, we consider the entire protein and lipid composition spectrum of individual lipoprotein complexes. Subsequently, their distribution over density (which equals the lipoprotein profile is calculated. As our main results, we (i successfully reproduced clinically measured lipoprotein profiles of healthy subjects; (ii assigned lipoproteins to narrow density classes, named high-resolution density sub-fractions (hrDS, revealing heterogeneous lipoprotein distributions within the major lipoprotein classes; and (iii present model-based predictions of changes in the lipoprotein distribution elicited by disorders in underlying molecular processes. In its present state, the model offers a platform for many future applications aimed at understanding the reasons for inter-individual variability, identifying new sub-fractions of potential clinical relevance and a patient-oriented diagnosis of the potential molecular causes for individual dyslipidemia.

  11. Proton Stopping Power of Different Density Profile Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Andreev, Alexander A; Schnürer, Matthias; Morales, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first one, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of an ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  12. Element-specific density profiles in interacting biomembrane models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Bertinetti, Luca; Marin, Egor; Novikov, Dmitri; Konovalov, Oleg; Gochev, Georgi

    2017-03-01

    Surface interactions involving biomembranes, such as cell-cell interactions or membrane contacts inside cells play important roles in numerous biological processes. Structural insight into the interacting surfaces is a prerequisite to understand the interaction characteristics as well as the underlying physical mechanisms. Here, we work with simplified planar experimental models of membrane surfaces, composed of lipids and lipopolymers. Their interaction is quantified in terms of pressure-distance curves using ellipsometry at controlled dehydrating (interaction) pressures. For selected pressures, their internal structure is investigated by standing-wave x-ray fluorescence (SWXF). This technique yields specific density profiles of the chemical elements P and S belonging to lipid headgroups and polymer chains, as well as counter-ion profiles for charged surfaces.

  13. Isotope and density profile effects on pedestal neoclassical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, S.; Pusztai, I.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-field neoclassical transport of heat, particles and momentum is studied in sharp density pedestals, with a focus on isotope and profile effects, using a radially global approach. Global effects—which tend to reduce the peak ion heat flux, and shift it outward—increase with isotope mass for fixed profiles. The heat flux reduction exhibits a saturation with a favorable isotopic trend. A significant part of the heat flux can be convective even in pure plasmas, unlike in the plasma core, and it is sensitive to how momentum sources are distributed between the various species. In particular, if only ion momentum sources are allowed, in global simulations of pure plasmas the ion particle flux remains close to its local value, while this may not be the case for simulations with isotope mixtures or electron momentum sources. The radial angular momentum transport that is a finite orbit width effect, is found to be strongly correlated with heat sources.

  14. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  15. Formation of current density profile in tilted current sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Petrukovich

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate Cluster observations of strongly tilted sheets (flapping events in the magnetotail. In accordance with the simple model of slip deformation (vertical differential displacement of neighboring flux tubes, the Jy current density component in the tilted sheet remains constant and equal to that in the horizontal undisturbed sheet. However, a substantial Jz component appears proportional to the local sheet tilt. Slip-type variations, having smaller scale than the full crossing, locally change the tilt and Jz and may thus create a variety of non-classical (bifurcated, asymmetric etc current density profiles.

  16. Implementation of the new multichannel X-mode edge density profile reflectometer for the ICRF antenna on ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiam, D. E., E-mail: daguiam@ipfn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt; Silva, A.; Carvalho, P. J.; Carvalho, P. F.; Fernandes, A.; Gonçalves, B.; Guimarais, L.; Meneses, L.; Pereira, R. C.; Santos, J. M. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bobkov, V.; Conway, G. D.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Universitá di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); D’Arcangelo, O.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A. [ENEA, Dipartimento FSN, C. R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); and others

    2016-11-15

    A new multichannel frequency modulated continuous-wave reflectometry diagnostic has been successfully installed and commissioned on ASDEX Upgrade to measure the plasma edge electron density profile evolution in front of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna. The design of the new three-strap ICRF antenna integrates ten pairs (sending and receiving) of microwave reflectometry antennas. The multichannel reflectometer can use three of these to measure the edge electron density profiles up to 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, at different poloidal locations, allowing the direct study of the local plasma layers in front of the ICRF antenna. ICRF power coupling, operational effects, and poloidal variations of the plasma density profile can be consistently studied for the first time. In this work the diagnostic hardware architecture is described and the obtained density profile measurements were used to track outer radial plasma position and plasma shape.

  17. Continuity of integrated density of states – independent randomness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider a direct proof without going through the approximation process and this requires us to declare some average total spectral measure as the density of states and we will choose a definition as in Krishna [12] that agrees with the standard one in the case of the Anderson model. To this end, let H be a ...

  18. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shume, E. B.; Vergados, P.; Komjathy, A.

    2017-01-01

    good agreement with density profiles estimated from ionosonde data, measured over nearby stations to the latitude and longitude of the RO tangent points, (2) in good agreement with density profiles inferred from GPS RO measured by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere...... number density profiles retrieved over landmasses and oceans. The density profiles over oceans exhibit wide-spread values and scale heights compared to density profiles over landmasses. We provide an explanation for the ocean-landmass discrepancy in terms of the unique wave coupling mechanisms operating...

  19. Real-time feedback control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Giannone, L.; Treutterer, W.; Behler, K.; Blank, H.; Buhler, A.; Cole, R.; Eixenberger, H.; Fischer, R.; Lohs, A.; Lüddecke, K.; Merkel, R.; Neu, G.; Ryter, F.; Zasche, D.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-04-01

    The spatial distribution of density in a fusion experiment is of significant importance as it enters in numerous analyses and contributes to the fusion performance. The reconstruction of the density profile is therefore commonly done in offline data analysis. In this paper, we present an algorithm which allows for density profile reconstruction from the data of the submillimetre interferometer and the magnetic equilibrium in real-time. We compare the obtained results to the profiles yielded by a numerically more complex offline algorithm. Furthermore, we present recent ASDEX Upgrade experiments in which we used the real-time density profile for active feedback control of the shape of the density profile.

  20. Enabling Continuous Descent Operations in High-Density Traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Leege, A.M.P.

    2013-01-01

    The Air Traffic Management (ATM) community strives to reduce the environmental impact per flight. Continuous Descent Operation (CDO) has been identified by the ATM community as one of the operational improvements that could reduce aviation’s environmental impact, both in terms of aircraft noise and

  1. Effects of density profile of MDF on stiffness and strength of nailed joints

    OpenAIRE

    Sawata, Kei; Shibusawa, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Kazuo; Sotomayor Castellanos, Javier Ramon; Hatano, Yasunori

    2008-01-01

    Nail-head pull-through, lateral nail resistance, and single shear nailed joint tests were conducted on medium density fiberboard (MDF) with different density profiles, and the relations between the results of these tests and the density profiles of MDF were investigated. The maximum load of nail-head pull-through and the maximum load of nailed joints were little affected by the density profile. However, the ultimate strength of lateral nail resistance, the stiffness, and the yield strength of...

  2. Estimating a continuous p-wave velocity profile with constant squared-slowness gradient models from seismic field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We inverted seismic field data for a continuous, laterally invariant P-wave velocity profile. Instead of the usual approach that involves horizontal layers with piecewise constant densities and velocities, we consider models of one or two layers with a constant gradient of the squared slowness above

  3. Hölder continuity property of the densities of SDEs with singular drift coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Masafumi; Kohatsu, Arturo; Yuki, Go

    2014-01-01

    We prove that the solution of stochastic differential equations with deterministic diffusion coefficient admits a Hölder continuous density via a condition on the integrability of the Fourier transform of the drift coefficient. In our result, the integrability is an important factor to determine the order of Hölder continuity of the density. Explicit examples and some applications are given.

  4. Immersible probe for continual monitoring of the population density of microorganisms grown in liquid media.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, G. M.; Allen, E R; Freese, E

    1987-01-01

    A common technique of measuring population density of microorganisms grown in liquid media is to withdraw a sample of the suspension and measure its apparent optical density with a spectrophotometer. The device we describe is capable of continually and automatically monitoring the population density of microorganisms grown in suspension.

  5. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  6. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shume, Esayas B.; Vergados, Panagiotis; Komjathy, Attila; Langley, Richard B.; Durgonics, Tibor

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents electron number density profiles derived from high-resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations performed using the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe payload on the high inclination CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE) spacecraft. We have developed and applied a novel inverse Abel transform algorithm on high rate RO total electron content measurements performed along GPS to CASSIOPE radio links to recover electron density profiles. The high-resolution density profiles inferred from the CASSIOPE RO are (1) in very good agreement with density profiles estimated from ionosonde data, measured over stations nearby to the latitude and longitude of the RO tangent points; (2) in good agreement with density profiles inferred from GPS RO measured by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC); and (3) in general agreement with density profiles estimated using the International Reference Ionosphere climatological model. Using both CASSIOPE and COSMIC RO observations, we identify, for the first time, that there exist differences in the characteristics of the electron number density profiles retrieved over landmasses and oceans. The density profiles over oceans exhibit widespread values and scale heights compared to density profiles over landmasses. We provide an explanation for the ocean-landmass discrepancy in terms of the unique wave coupling mechanisms operating over oceans and landmasses.

  7. Density profiles of granular gases studied by molecular dynamics and Brownian bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuñuri, F.; Montoya, J. A.; Carvente, O.

    2018-02-01

    Despite the inherent frictional forces and dissipative collisions, confined granular matter can be regarded as a system in a stationary state if we inject energy continuously. Under these conditions, both the density and the granular temperature are, in general, non-monotonic variables along the height of the container. In consequence, an analytical description of a granular system is hard to conceive. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we measure the packing fraction profiles for a vertically vibrating three-dimensional granular system in several gaseous-like stationary states. We show that by using the Brownian bridge concept, the determined packing fraction profiles can be reproduced accurately and give a complete description of the distribution of the particles inside the simulation box.

  8. Effects of pressing schedule on formation of vertical density profile for MDF panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyong Cai; James H. Muehl; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of mat consolidation during hot pressing will help to optimize the medium-density fiberboard (MDF) manufacturing process by increasing productivity, improving product quality, and enhancing durability. Effects of panel density, fiber moisture content (MC), and pressing schedule on formation of vertical density profile (VDP) during hot...

  9. Aluminum integral foams with tailored density profile by adapted blowing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Johannes; Fiegl, Tobias; Körner, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    The goal of the present work is the variation of the structure of aluminum integral foams regarding the thickness of the integral solid skin as well as the density profile. A modified die casting process, namely integral foam molding, is used in which an aluminum melt and blowing agent particles (magnesium hydride MgH2) are injected in a permanent steel mold. The high solidification rates at the cooled walls of the mold lead to the formation of a solid skin. In the inner region, hydrogen is released by thermal decomposition of MgH2 particles. Thus, the pore formation takes place parallel to the continuing solidification of the melt. The thickness of the solid skin and the density profile of the core strongly depend on the interplay between solidification velocity and kinetics of hydrogen release. By varying the melt and blowing agent properties, the structure of integral foams can be systematically changed to meet the requirements of the desired field of application of the produced component.

  10. Spectra of random operators with absolutely continuous integrated density of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio, Rafael del, E-mail: delrio@iimas.unam.mx, E-mail: delriomagia@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica Matematica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 04510, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-04-15

    The structure of the spectrum of random operators is studied. It is shown that if the density of states measure of some subsets of the spectrum is zero, then these subsets are empty. In particular follows that absolute continuity of the integrated density of states implies singular spectra of ergodic operators is either empty or of positive measure. Our results apply to Anderson and alloy type models, perturbed Landau Hamiltonians, almost periodic potentials, and models which are not ergodic.

  11. Density profiles of different negative ion mass groups at Titan as observed by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of heavy negative ions by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer (ELS) in Titan's ionosphere (Coates et al., 2007, Waite et al., 2007) suggests that complex hydrocarbon and nitrile processes occur in Titan's upper atmosphere which are also linked to haze formation. Negative ions are observed during Titan encounters at altitudes different mass groups as reported by Coates et al. (2007). These have been updated by Wellbrock et al. (2013) who performed a study investigating trends of mass groups with altitude using data from 34 negative ion encounters. We continue this work here by studying individual flybys in more detail. We investigate density profiles for different mass groups and total densities.

  12. Density functional theory for molecular and periodic systems using density fitting and continuous fast multipole method: Analytical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łazarski, Roman; Burow, Asbjörn Manfred; Grajciar, Lukáš; Sierka, Marek

    2016-10-30

    A full implementation of analytical energy gradients for molecular and periodic systems is reported in the TURBOMOLE program package within the framework of Kohn-Sham density functional theory using Gaussian-type orbitals as basis functions. Its key component is a combination of density fitting (DF) approximation and continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) that allows for an efficient calculation of the Coulomb energy gradient. For exchange-correlation part the hierarchical numerical integration scheme (Burow and Sierka, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation 2011, 7, 3097) is extended to energy gradients. Computational efficiency and asymptotic O(N) scaling behavior of the implementation is demonstrated for various molecular and periodic model systems, with the largest unit cell of hematite containing 640 atoms and 19,072 basis functions. The overall computational effort of energy gradient is comparable to that of the Kohn-Sham matrix formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. CASSINI RSS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES EDP1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the complete collection of the published Cassini radio occultation electron density profiles of the Titan ionosphere as of September 2008.

  14. Temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric electron density profiles over South Africa during strong magnetic storms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yao, Y. B; Chen, P; Zhang, S; Chen, J. J

    2013-01-01

    ...) and vertical total electron content (VTEC) data from the Jason-1 satellite were used to analyze the variations in ionospheric electron density profiles over South Africa before and after the severe geomagnetic storms on 15 May 2005...

  15. Estimating and Testing Continuous-Time Models in Finance: The Role of Transition Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Yacine Aït-Sahalia

    2009-01-01

    This article surveys recent developments to estimate and test continuous-time models in finance using discrete observations on the underlying asset price or derivative securities' prices. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are described. All these methods share a common focus on the transition density as the central object for inference and testing of the model.

  16. Comparison of neutral density profiles measured using Dα and C5+ in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Scotti, F.; Diallo, A.; Leblanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Edge neutral density profiles determined from two different measurements are compared on NSTX-U plasmas. Neutral density measurements were not typical on NSTX plasmas. An array of fibers dedicated to the measurement of passive emission of C5+, used to subtract background emission for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS), can be used to infer deuterium neutral density near the plasma edge. The line emission from C5+ is dominated by charge exchange with neutral deuterium near the plasma edge. An edge neutral density diagnostic consisting of a camera with a Dα filter was installed on NSTX-U. The line-integrated measurements from both diagnostics are inverted to obtain local emissivity profiles. Neutral density is then inferred using atomics rates from ADAS and profile measurements from Thomson scattering and CHERS. Comparing neutral density profiles from the two diagnostic measurements helps determine the utility of using the more routinely available C5+ measurements for neutral density profiles. Initial comparisons show good agreement between the two measurements inside the separatrix. Supported by US DoE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Vertical density profile and internal bond strength of wet-formed particleboard bonded with cellulose nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Hunt; Weiqi Leng; Mehdi Tajvidi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) ratio, press program, particle size, and density on the vertical density profile (VDP) and internal bond (IB) strength of the wet-formed particleboard were investigated. Results revealed that the VDP was significantly influenced by the press program. Pressing using a constant pressure (CP) press program...

  18. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 19, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  19. Raw Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 17, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  20. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 19, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  1. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 20, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  2. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 17, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  3. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 17, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  4. Raw Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 19, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  5. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, Feb. 28, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  6. Raw Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, Feb. 28, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  7. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 20, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  8. Raw Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 20, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  9. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profiles from Cape Cod National Seashore, Feb. 28, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  10. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the

  11. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the plasmapause can expand anti-earthward at the same speed. For the trough region, it is found

  12. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  13. Density profile measurements by amplitude modulation reflectometry on the TJ-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, E. de la; Zhuravlev, V.; Branas, B.; Sanchez, J.; Estrada, T. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-31

    Amplitude Modulation (AM) reflectometry has been proposed as an alternative method to the more traditional swept frequency reflectometry systems which can be strongly affected by the presence of plasma density fluctuations. Compared to the time domain systems, the time measurements are replaced in AM reflectometry by much simpler phase delay measurements. In AM reflectometry, the time delay of the microwave beam propagating to the reflecting layer and back is directly obtained through the phase delay of the modulating envelope, which is directly measured in a linear (0-2{pi}) phase meter. This method avoids operation with multifringe counters and is a very attractive alternative for real time determination of the plasma position and density profile. In order to achieve real time density profile monitoring, fast analysis methods are necessary, first results of Neural Networks application to the problem of fast inversion of the density profile are shown. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs.

  14. The continuous high-precision measurement of the density of flowing blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, T; Leopold, H; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H

    1977-07-29

    The "mechanical oscillator" technique for the measurement of the density of fluids is based on the influence of mass on the natural frequency of a mechanical oscillator. The practical application of this principle was worked out by Kratky et al. (1969) and Leopold (1970). It is demonstrated in this study that the method permits the continuous high-precision measurement of the density of flowing blood in anesthetized animals. The accuracy is 10(5) g/ml, the maximum sampling rate 20/min. As found in rabbits and cats during the control state, physiological blood density changes related to spontaneous blood pressure variations are up to 2-10(4) g/ml. The method can be combined with i.v. injections of isotonic and iso-oncotic solutions to determine cardiac output and blood volume on the basis of a "density dilution" principle. Since the density of the interstitial fluid is lower than that of blood, fluid shifts through the capillary walls can be detected. The effects of hypertonic glucose and of hyperoncotic dextran have been examined. Changes in the density of the arterial blood appear within 10 s after i.v. injection of these fluids. Similarly, density changes result from hemorrhage and reinfusion. During and after i.v. administration of vasoactive drugs (noradrenaline, angiotensin II, acetylcholine), marked transient changes in blood density are seen which obviously reflect the effects of fluid shifts through the capillary walls. During hemorrhagic hypotension we found periodic variations in the blood density synchronous with spontaneously occurring Mayer waves. The new method seems to be a promising tool for investigations physiological and pathological capillary fluid dynamics.

  15. Earth-mass haloes and the emergence of NFW density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Raul E.; Hahn, Oliver; Ludlow, Aaron D.; Bonoli, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    We simulate neutralino dark matter (χDM) haloes from their initial collapse, at ˜ earth mass, up to a few percent solar. Our results confirm that the density profiles of the first haloes are described by a ˜r-1.5 power law. As haloes grow in mass, their density profiles evolve significantly. In the central regions, they become shallower and reach on average ˜r-1, the asymptotic form of an NFW profile. Using non-cosmological controlled simulations, we observe that temporal variations in the gravitational potential caused by major mergers lead to a shallowing of the inner profile. This transformation is more significant for shallower initial profiles and for a higher number of merging systems. Depending on the merger details, the resulting profiles can be shallower or steeper than NFW in their inner regions. Interestingly, mergers have a much weaker effect when the profile is given by a broken power law with an inner slope of -1 (such as NFW or Hernquist profiles). This offers an explanation for the emergence of NFW-like profiles: after their initial collapse, r-1.5 χDM haloes suffer copious major mergers, which progressively shallows the profile. Once an NFW-like profile is established, subsequent merging does not change the profile anymore. This suggests that halo profiles are not universal but rather a combination of (1) the physics of the formation of the microhaloes and (2) their early merger history - both set by the properties of the dark matter particle - as well as (3) the resilience of NFW-like profiles to perturbations.

  16. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Congsen [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Janssen, Maurice H. M. [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  17. Synthesis of high-density nickel cobalt aluminum hydroxide by continuous coprecipitation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongseon; Kim, Doyu

    2012-02-01

    Spherical nickel cobalt aluminum hydroxide (Ni(0.80)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)-hydroxide, NCA) was prepared by a continuous coprecipitation method. A new design of the Al solution and the feeding method was applied, which enabled to prevent rapid precipitation of Al(OH)(3) and to obtain spherical NCA with large enough particle size and high density. The active material (LiNi(0.80)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)O(2) or LNCA) prepared from it showed higher tap-density than that made from NCA prepared by general processes, and homogeneity of Al-distribution was also improved. It is expected that the electrode density of lithium ion batteries adopting LNCA could be improved with the new process proposed in this study.

  18. Determination of the vertical electron-density profile in ionospheric tomography: experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the vertical electron-density profile is a fundamental problem in ionospheric tomography. Lack of near-horizontal ray paths limits the information available on the vertical profile, so that the resultant image of electron density is biased in a horizontal sense. The vertical profile is of great importance as it affects the authenticity of the entire tomographic image. A new method is described whereby the vertical profile is selected using relative total-electron-content measurements. The new reconstruction process has been developed from modelling studies. A range of background ionospheres, representing many possible peak heights, scale heights and electron densities are formed from a Chapman profile on the bottomside with a range of topside profiles. The iterative reconstruction process is performed on all of these background ionospheres and a numerical selection criterion employed to select the final image. The resulting tomographic images show excellent agreement in electron density when compared with independent verification provided by the EISCAT radar.

  19. Novel method for continuous cell separation by density gradient centrifugation: evaluation of a miniature separation column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoichiro

    2003-05-01

    A compact bench-top model of the centrifuge enables continuous cell separation based on density differences. The apparatus holds a small separation disk equipped with a circular channel (8 mL capacity) separated by a septum. A set of isotonic Percoll media with different densities is continuously introduced at one terminal and collected from the other. Under a centrifugal force field, cell suspension introduced into the proximal portion of the channel results in continuous separation of cells according to their densities. The performance of the apparatus was demonstrated with the separation of human buffy coat containing nucleated cells (>10(8)) among a large population (10(10)) of RBC. The results indicated that the method is capable of separating a large number of nucleated cells, with minimum damage, for a few hours of operation wherein neutrophils are well resolved from lymphocytes. The method may be applied to other types of samples including cord blood, blood from small animals, cultured cells, pancreatic beta cell islets, malaria parasites, sperm cells, etc.

  20. The professional profile of trainers working in continuous training in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamaqi, Xhevrie

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze and describe the professional profile of trainers working in continuous training in Spain. For this purpose we have developed a structured questionnaire was applied in person to a sample of 606 instructors nationwide. The questionnaire has provided information on aspects such as the socio-occupational status of instructors, their degree of professionalism, and the importance of professional skills. The information gathered has been analyzed by multivariate methods to determine the dominant professional profiles. The quantitative analysis includes the Categorical of Principal Components Analysis (CATPCA to analyze the skills and capabilities of the trainer and cluster analysis in two stages to get the profiles. Four dominant profiles have been deduced by the cluster analysis. The occupational variables, professional experience profiles and competences/skills produce the major discrepancies between the four profiles.

  1. Avalanche consumption and the stationary regions of the density profile around the droplets in the theory of condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurasov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The contradiction between the stationary aproach to the density profile and the avalanche character of the metastable phase consumption is investigated. The exact solution for the metastable phase profile is obtained. The reconsidered value for the special parameter responsible for the hierarchy in the structure of the density profile around the droplet is presented.

  2. 3-Dimensional density profiles in edge plasma simulations for ICRF heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tierens Wouter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss improvements made to two codes for the simulation of ICRF waves in edge plasmas: SSWICH-SW, which self-consistently models the interplay between sheath physics and radiofrequency waves (the slow wave, and RAPLICASOL, a Finite Element solver for Maxwell's equations in the cold plasma approximation. We have extended both to be able to handle 3D plasma density profiles. A comparison between a 1D and a 3D simulation reveals that the density profile dimensionality has a relatively small effect on E|| at the aperture, but a large effect on the sheath potential at the antenna limiters

  3. Neutrals density profiles in EXTRAP-T2R based on Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M

    2002-07-01

    The role of neutral particles in fusion plasmas is very important affecting several aspects of the discharge properties. In particular the neutrals affect the particle and energy balance, the plasma confinement properties, the density profile, the particle and energy fluxes at the wall and the wall erosion. In addition, highly energetic neutrals are used as a diagnostic of the plasma ion temperature. This report describes MCNC a Monte Carlo code used in EXTRAP T2R for the calculation of the neutrals density profile of hydrogen plasma.

  4. The diverse density profiles of galaxy clusters with self-interacting dark matter plus baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew; Massey, Richard; Eke, Vincent; Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Bahé, Yannick; Barnes, David J.; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Kay, Scott T.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2018-02-01

    We present the first simulated galaxy clusters (M200 > 1014 M⊙) with both self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) and baryonic physics. They exhibit a greater diversity in both dark matter and stellar density profiles than their counterparts in simulations with collisionless dark matter (CDM), which is generated by the complex interplay between dark matter self-interactions and baryonic physics. Despite variations in formation history, we demonstrate that analytical Jeans modelling predicts the SIDM density profiles remarkably well, and the diverse properties of the haloes can be understood in terms of their different final baryon distributions.

  5. Influence of an axial magnetic field on the density profile of capillary plasma channels

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, V V; Toma, E S; Bijkerk, F

    2003-01-01

    A narrow capillary plasma channel, with a sizeable depletion of the electron density on the channel axis, has been proposed to guide a laser pulse over a length of several to several tens of centimetres. We discuss the possibility to significantly improve the wave-guiding properties of such a channel by applying an axial magnetic field. Our analytical and numerical studies show that a pulsed axial magnetic field of 10 T in a hydrogen capillary plasma at a pressure of 50 Torr will reduce the on-axis plasma density by a factor of three, and the full width at half maximum of the density profile by a factor of two. The resulting parabolic plasma density profile is expected to be more efficient in guiding laser pulses.

  6. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium—tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekynia, B.; S. Razavipour, S.

    2012-12-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x = 0 qualitatively. A high threshold energy flux density, i.e., E* = 4.3 × 1012 J/m2, has been reached. Recently, fast ignition by employing clean petawatt—picosecond laser pulses was performed. The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses. The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium—tritium fuel at solid-state density. The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated. Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition. In this paper, the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks, thermonuclear reaction, heat transfer, electron—ion equilibration, stopping power of alpha particles, bremsstrahlung, expansion, density dependence, and fluid dynamics. New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations, including the density profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity. The density is only a function of x and independent of time. The ignition energy flux density, E*t, for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 1012 J/m2. Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x = 0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent.

  7. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanikova, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Peterka, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); MFF Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Bohm, P., E-mail: bohm@ipp.cas.cz; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Sos, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  8. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  9. The effect of transient density profile shaping on transport in large stellarators and heliotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinklage, A.; Sakamoto, R.; Yokoyama, M.; Ida, K.; Baldzuhn, J.; Beidler, C. D.; Cats, S.; McCarthy, K. J.; Geiger, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Maaßberg, H.; Morita, S.; Motojima, G.; Nakata, M.; Nunami, M.; Pablant, N.; Ogawa, K.; Proll, J. H. E.; Satake, S.; Tanaka, K.; Warmer, F.; Wolf, R. C.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Yamada, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Yoshinuma, M.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2017-06-01

    Transport studies of pellet fuelling experiments on LHD are reported. Spatio-temporal evolutions after pellet injection into LHD discharges show cases where central density increases on the time scale of particle transport processes. Both the temperature gradient and the density gradient change during the density relaxation, the latter even in sign. The resulting thermodynamic forces influence radial electric fields—both as a driving term but also by, e.g. affecting the E r dependence of ion transport. Magnetic fluctuations have been found to be induced by pellet injection but die out with the relaxation of the pressure profile.

  10. An apparatus to control and automate the formation of continuous density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammons, David; Manrrique, Joel; Rampersad, Joanne

    2012-08-15

    A common problem associated with making a continuous density gradient is the unwanted mixing of liquids as the gradient solution is being delivered from the gradient mixer to the centrifuge tube. We show that by using a Styrofoam float on a thin drawn-out glass pipette, liquids from the gradient mixer will flow down the outside surface of the glass fiber and contact the float, after which the liquid spreads across the gradient surface without unwanted mixing. As the liquid in the tube rises, the float rises up the glass fiber, thereby allowing the creation of gradients without the need to monitor the process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Affinity proteomic profiling of plasma for proteins associated to area-based mammographic breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byström, Sanna; Eklund, Martin; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Fredolini, Claudia; Eriksson, Mikael; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Schwenk, Jochen M; Gabrielson, Marike

    2018-02-14

    Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but molecular understanding of how breast density relates to cancer risk is less complete. Studies of proteins in blood plasma, possibly associated with mammographic density, are well-suited as these allow large-scale analyses and might shed light on the association between breast cancer and breast density. Plasma samples from 1329 women in the Swedish KARMA project, without prior history of breast cancer, were profiled with antibody suspension bead array (SBA) assays. Two sample sets comprising 729 and 600 women were screened by two different SBAs targeting a total number of 357 proteins. Protein targets were selected through searching the literature, for either being related to breast cancer or for being linked to the extracellular matrix. Association between proteins and absolute area-based breast density (AD) was assessed by quantile regression, adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). Plasma profiling revealed linear association between 20 proteins and AD, concordant in the two sets of samples (p density and processes of tissue homeostasis, DNA repair, cancer development and/or progression in breast cancer. Further validation and follow-up studies of the shortlisted protein candidates in independent cohorts will be needed to infer their role in breast density and its progression in premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  12. Low-latitude Model Electron Density Profiles using the IRI and CCIR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... electron density profiles under different solar-geophysical conditions are highlighted. The need for additional ionosonde stations in the African sector in order to incorporate the results of studies on equatorial anomaly into the models is emphasized. Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics VOLUME 1, AUGUST 2000, ...

  13. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, C.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the

  14. Model Predictive Control with Integral Action for Current Density Profile Tracking in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Z. O.; Wehner, W. P.; Schuster, E.; Boyer, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Active control of the toroidal current density profile may play a critical role in non-inductively sustained long-pulse, high-beta scenarios in a spherical torus (ST) configuration, which is among the missions of the NSTX-U facility. In this work, a previously developed physics-based control-oriented model is embedded in a feedback control scheme based on a model predictive control (MPC) strategy to track a desired current density profile evolution specified indirectly by a desired rotational transform profile. An integrator is embedded into the standard MPC formulation to reject various modeling uncertainties and external disturbances. Neutral beam powers, electron density, and total plasma current are used as actuators. The proposed MPC strategy incorporates various state and actuator constraints directly into the control design process by solving a constrained optimization problem in real-time to determine the optimal actuator requests. The effectiveness of the proposed controller in regulating the current density profile in NSTX-U is demonstrated in closed-loop nonlinear simulations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson’s equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  16. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Boudou, L; Makasheva, K; Teyssedre, G

    2017-12-15

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson's equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  17. Recovering galaxy cluster gas density profiles with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalucci, I.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pointecouteau, E.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Mazzotta, P.; Andrade-Santos, F.

    2017-12-01

    We examined the reconstruction of galaxy cluster radial density profiles obtained from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations, using high quality data for a sample of twelve objects covering a range of morphologies and redshifts. By comparing the results obtained from the two observatories and by varying key aspects of the analysis procedure, we examined the impact of instrumental effects and of differences in the methodology used in the recovery of the density profiles. We find that the final density profile shape is particularly robust. We adapted the photon weighting vignetting correction method developed for XMM-Newton for use with Chandra data, and confirm that the resulting Chandra profiles are consistent with those corrected a posteriori for vignetting effects. Profiles obtained from direct deprojection and those derived using parametric models are consistent at the 1% level. At radii larger than 6″, the agreement between Chandra and XMM-Newton is better than 1%, confirming an excellent understanding of the XMM-Newton PSF. Furthermore, we find no significant energy dependence. The impact of the well-known offset between Chandra and XMM-Newton gas temperature determinations on the density profiles is found to be negligible. However, we find an overall normalisation offset in density profiles of the order of 2.5%, which is linked to absolute flux cross-calibration issues. As a final result, the weighted ratios of Chandra to XMM-Newton gas masses computed at R2500 and R500 are r = 1.03 ± 0.01 and r = 1.03 ± 0.03, respectively. Our study confirms that the radial density profiles are robustly recovered, and that any differences between Chandra and XMM-Newton can be constrained to the 2.5% level, regardless of the exact data analysis details. These encouraging results open the way for the true combination of X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, fully leveraging the high resolution of Chandra and the high throughput of XMM-Newton.

  18. Measurements of density profile evolution during the stably-stratified filling of an open enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarawneh, Constantine M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539-2999 (United States); Homan, K.O. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, formerly University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409-0050 (United States)], E-mail: khoman@umr.edu

    2008-08-15

    The stably-stratified filling of an open enclosure produces an interfacial gradient layer which is transported through the enclosure with the bulk flow. The evolution of this interfacial layer is strongly time-dependent and is driven by the nature of the interaction between the internal gravity waves and the inlet-driven interfacial shear. Measurements of density profile evolution have been completed for a rectangular enclosure with a single corner inlet and density variation produced by saline concentration. This system serves as a mass transfer analog to large-scale, thermally-stratified energy storage devices, preserving dynamic similitude in a laboratory-scale system. The experiments covered jet Reynolds numbers of 200-2200 and Froude numbers of 0.06-0.6 in an enclosure with a width 23 times the jet inlet height. The density profiles are seen to be strongly asymmetric and exhibit growth rates significantly different than due to simple one-dimensional molecular diffusion. In addition, shadowgraph and hydrogen bubble visualizations of the density and velocity fields in the gradient layer show the persistence of complex multi-dimensional flow structure even at relatively late stages of the filling process when the gradient layer has been transported well away from the enclosure inlet. The evolution of the vertical density profile has been compared quantitatively to a quasi one-dimensional model based upon empirical diffusivity coefficients.

  19. Density profile control using compact toroid injection in STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; Liu, Dazhi; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Asai, Tomohiko; Wolfe, Sean

    2011-10-01

    The Saskatchewan TORus Modified (STOR-M) tokamak has a Compact Torus (CT) injector which allows tangential injection of high density plasmoid. The objectives of CT injection (CTI) into the core of plasma are to fuel tokamaks and also optimize the bootstrap current in the future reactors by control of the plasma pressure gradient. Measurement of soft X-ray bremsstrahlung emission profile have verified that CT particles are deposited in the core region from outside and steeper density gradient is generated via a balancing process after the asymmetric density profile is formed in STOR-M. The major radius of the core plasma is shifted outward and stays in equilibrium until the end of discharge. H alpha line-emission considerably decreases in the core region and the high emitting area with low temperature plasma exists in the edge region. A few milliseconds seconds after these altered profiles of the density and the emission by CTI are generated, stronger edge radial electric field as well as H-mode appears and the average electron density peaks. This work has been sponsored by the CRC program and NSERC of Canada.

  20. Continuous measurements of discharge from a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler in a tidal river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Buschman, F.A.; Vermeulen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be mounted horizontally at a river bank, yielding single-depth horizontal array observations of velocity across the river. This paper presents a semideterministic, semistochastic method to obtain continuous measurements of discharge from horizontal ADCP

  1. On the use of horizontal acoustic doppler profilers for continuous bed shear stress monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of bed shear stress in large river systems may serve to better estimate alluvial sediment transport to the coastal ocean. Here we explore the possibility of using a horizontally deployed acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to monitor bed shear stress, applying a prescribed

  2. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, A. R.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach. Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis, and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results. Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance. Most published BMI studies that use electrocorticographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  3. TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES: ENHANCED TRANSFORMATION INTO DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lokas, Ewa L. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Mayer, Lucio, E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.edu [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-02-20

    According to the tidal stirring model, late type, rotationally supported dwarfs resembling present day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) via interactions with Milky-Way-sized hosts. We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes {gamma} of the dwarf DM density profiles ({rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}). For a given orbit inside the primary galaxy, rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like distributions ({gamma} = 0.2) and mild density cusps ({gamma} = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles ({gamma} = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dIrrs highlighting tidal stirring as a plausible model for the Local Group (LG) morphology-density relation. When {gamma} < 1, a single pericentric passage can induce dSph formation and disky dwarfs on low-eccentricity or large-pericenter orbits are able to transform; these new results allow tidal stirring to explain virtually all known dSphs across a wide range of distances from their hosts. A subset of disky dwarfs initially embedded in DM halos with shallow density profiles are eventually disrupted by the primary; those that survive as dSphs are generally on orbits with lower eccentricities and/or larger pericenters compared to those of typical cold dark matter satellites. The latter could explain the peculiar orbits of several LG dSphs such as Fornax, Leo I, Tucana, and Cetus.

  4. Aphid aerial density profiles are consistent with turbulent advection amplifying flight behaviours: abandoning the epithet 'passive'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andy M; Reynolds, Don R

    2009-01-07

    Seminal field studies led by C. G. Johnson in the 1940s and 1950s showed that aphid aerial density diminishes with height above the ground such that the linear regression coefficient, b, of log density on log height provides a single-parameter characterization of the vertical density profile. This coefficient decreases with increasing atmospheric stability, ranging from -0.27 for a fully convective boundary layer to -2.01 for a stable boundary layer. We combined a well-established Lagrangian stochastic model of atmospheric dispersal with simple models of aphid behaviour in order to account for the range of aerial density profiles. We show that these density distributions are consistent with the aphids producing just enough lift to become neutrally buoyant when they are in updraughts and ceasing to produce lift when they are in downdraughts. This active flight behaviour in a weak flier is thus distinctly different from the aerial dispersal of seeds and wingless arthropods, which is passive once these organisms have launched into the air. The novel findings from the model indicate that the epithet 'passive' often applied to the windborne migration of small winged insects is misleading and should be abandoned. The implications for the distances traversed by migrating aphids under various boundary-layer conditions are outlined.

  5. Continuous-time random walk: exact solutions for the probability density function and first two moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok Sau Fa [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa-PR (Brazil); Joni Fat, E-mail: kwok@dfi.uem.br [Jurusan Teknik Elektro-Fakultas Teknik, Universitas Tarumanagara, Jl. Let. Jend. S. Parman 1, Blok L, Lantai 3 Grogol, Jakarta 11440 (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    We consider the decoupled continuous-time random walk model with a finite characteristic waiting time and approximate jump length variance. We take the waiting time probability density function (PDF) given by a combination of the exponential and the Mittag-Leffler function. Using this waiting time PDF, we investigate the diffusion behavior for all times. We obtain exact solutions for the first two moments and the PDF for the force-free and linear force cases. Due to the finite characteristic waiting time and jump length variance, the model presents, for the force-free case, normal diffusive behavior in the long-time limit. Further, the model can describe anomalous behavior at intermediate times.

  6. TOLNET – A Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Profiling Network for Satellite Continuity and Process Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newchurch Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone lidars measure continuous, high-resolution ozone profiles critical for process studies and for satellite validation in the lower troposphere. However, the effectiveness of lidar validation by using single-station data is limited. Recently, NASA initiated an interagency ozone lidar observation network under the name TOLNet to promote cooperative multiple-station ozone-lidar observations to provide highly timeresolved (few minutes tropospheric-ozone vertical profiles useful for air-quality studies, model evaluation, and satellite validation. This article briefly describes the concept, stations, major specifications of the TOLNet instruments, and data archiving.

  7. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles based on solar magnetic field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The density and temperature profiles in the solar corona are complex to describe, the observational diagnostics is not easy. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the electron density and temperature in the solar corona based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated from Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) based on magnetic field from both observational synoptic charts and a magnetic flux transport model. We use an emission model based on the ionization equilibrium and coronal abundances from CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The preliminary results are discussed in details.

  8. An efficient algorithm for numerical computations of continuous densities of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfeld, K.; Lucini, B.; Pellegrini, R.; Rago, A.

    2016-06-01

    In Wang-Landau type algorithms, Monte-Carlo updates are performed with respect to the density of states, which is iteratively refined during simulations. The partition function and thermodynamic observables are then obtained by standard integration. In this work, our recently introduced method in this class (the LLR approach) is analysed and further developed. Our approach is a histogram free method particularly suited for systems with continuous degrees of freedom giving rise to a continuum density of states, as it is commonly found in lattice gauge theories and in some statistical mechanics systems. We show that the method possesses an exponential error suppression that allows us to estimate the density of states over several orders of magnitude with nearly constant relative precision. We explain how ergodicity issues can be avoided and how expectation values of arbitrary observables can be obtained within this framework. We then demonstrate the method using compact U(1) lattice gauge theory as a show case. A thorough study of the algorithm parameter dependence of the results is performed and compared with the analytically expected behaviour. We obtain high precision values for the critical coupling for the phase transition and for the peak value of the specific heat for lattice sizes ranging from 8^4 to 20^4. Our results perfectly agree with the reference values reported in the literature, which covers lattice sizes up to 18^4. Robust results for the 20^4 volume are obtained for the first time. This latter investigation, which, due to strong metastabilities developed at the pseudo-critical coupling of the system, so far has been out of reach even on supercomputers with importance sampling approaches, has been performed to high accuracy with modest computational resources. This shows the potential of the method for studies of first order phase transitions. Other situations where the method is expected to be superior to importance sampling techniques are pointed

  9. Effect of instantaneous and continuous quenches on the density of vibrational modes in model glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Edan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-08-01

    Computational studies of supercooled liquids often focus on various analyses of their "underlying inherent states"—the glassy configurations at zero temperature obtained by an infinitely fast (instantaneous) quench from equilibrium supercooled states. Similar protocols are also regularly employed in investigations of the unjamming transition at which the rigidity of decompressed soft-sphere packings is lost. Here we investigate the statistics and localization properties of low-frequency vibrational modes of glassy configurations obtained by such instantaneous quenches. We show that the density of vibrational modes grows as ωβ with β depending on the parent temperature T0 from which the glassy configurations were instantaneously quenched. For quenches from high temperature liquid states we find β ≈3 , whereas β appears to approach the previously observed value β =4 as T0 approaches the glass transition temperature. We discuss the consistency of our findings with the theoretical framework of the soft potential model, and contrast them with similar measurements performed on configurations obtained by continuous quenches at finite cooling rates. Our results suggest that any physical quench at rates sufficiently slower than the inverse vibrational time scale—including all physically realistic quenching rates of molecular or atomistic glasses—would result in a glass whose density of vibrational modes is universally characterized by β =4 .

  10. Reconstruction of NSTX midplane neutral density profiles from visible imaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D.P., E-mail: dstotler@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bell, R.E.; LeBlanc, B.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The experimental determination of neutral densities in tokamak plasmas from line radiation is only accurate in the narrow region in which both the excitation rate and neutral density are significant. We describe an alternative procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code to invert light emission data obtained from a tangentially viewing camera, yielding absolute radial profiles of deuterium atoms and molecules at midplane. That the neutral source in these simulations can be adequately characterized as a uniform flux at the vacuum vessel wall is demonstrated by the similarity of the shapes of the simulated and observed brightness profiles. A second test is obtained by comparing the resulting neutral pressures at the vessel walls with data from midplane micro-ion gauges. We also show that the simulated camera image is insensitive to variations in the spatial distribution of the neutral source.

  11. Understanding how Supernova Light Curves are Affected by the Density Profiles of Extended Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühleisen, Marc; Piro, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The light curve of a supernova can provide important clues about the structure of the exploding progenitor. When extended material is present, shock cooling of this material can lead to a prominent early peak distinct from the main radioactive nickel peak, as seen in some Type IIb supernovae. We explore whether the density profile of the extended material plays a role in shaping these light curves. We perform a series of numerical supernova simulations with a range of extended mass configurations. We find that steeper density profiles for the extended material shrink the width and decrease the luminosity of the early peak of the light curve. We conclude that light curves with a distinct, early peak do not imply a particular structure, but rather may arise from several distinct mass configurations. This places limits on how much can be inferred about the progenitor's structure from its light curve.

  12. The Splashback Feature around DES Galaxy Clusters: Galaxy Density and Weak Lensing Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chihway; et al.

    2017-10-18

    Splashback refers to the process of matter that is accreting onto a dark matter halo reaching its first orbital apocenter and turning around in its orbit. The cluster-centric radius at which this process occurs, r_sp, defines a halo boundary that is connected to the dynamics of the cluster, in contrast with other common halo boundary definitions such as R_200. A rapid decline in the matter density profile of the halo is expected near r_sp. We measure the galaxy number density and weak lensing mass profiles around RedMapper galaxy clusters in the first year Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. For a cluster sample with mean mass ~2.5 x 10^14 solar masses, we find strong evidence of a splashback-like steepening of the galaxy density profile and measure r_sp=1.16 +/- 0.08 Mpc/h, consistent with earlier SDSS measurements of More et al. (2016) and Baxter et al. (2017). Moreover, our weak lensing measurement demonstrates for the first time the existence of a splashback-like steepening of the matter profile of galaxy clusters. We measure r_sp=1.28 +/- 0.18 Mpc/h from the weak lensing data, in good agreement with our galaxy density measurements. Applying our analysis to different cluster and galaxy samples, we find that consistent with LambdaCDM simulations, r_sp scales with R_200m and does not evolve with redshift over the redshift range of 0.3--0.6. We also find that potential systematic effects associated with the RedMapper algorithm may impact the location of r_sp, in particular the choice of scale used to estimate cluster richness. We discuss progress needed to understand the systematic uncertainties and fully exploit forthcoming data from DES and future surveys, emphasizing the importance of more realistic mock catalogs and independent cluster samples.

  13. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have numerical appreciation of the results the propagation equation for plasma is solved using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the initial plane wave front of the beam, using boundary conditions. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma and significantly adds self-focusing in plasma. This causes the laser beam to become more focused by reduction of diffraction effect, which is an important phenomenon in inertial confinement fusion and also for the understanding of self-focusing of laser pulses. Numerical computations are presented and discussed in the form of graphs for typical parameters of laser-plasma interaction.

  14. Retrieval of stratospheric ozone density profiles from OSIRIS scattered sunlight observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Savigny, C. H. A.

    2002-07-01

    A new satellite instrument has been developed in Canada to monitor stratospheric ozone concentrations. The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) has played a major contribution to global change research. The OSIRIS measures ozone densities with a powerful new method based on measurements of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere. This thesis reports the first global distribution ozone measurements made during the first months of OSIRIS operation. Ozone densities were obtained through a method based on the analysis of normalized limb radiance profiles measured at wavelengths of the Chappuis-Wulf absorption bands of ozone. The OSIRIS limb radiance measurements were analyzed by recounting the non-linear Newtonian version of the Optimal Estimation coupled with the LIMBTRAN multiple scattering radiative transfer model. In August 2001, several sets of OSIRIS limb observations were acquired for the northern hemisphere. Limb scans of stratospheric ozone density profiles were shown to correlate well with current knowledge of the global morphology of ozone. Tropospheric ozone column densities were inferred from OSIRIS stratospheric ozone densities using a residual approach and the total ozone columns measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer on the Earth Probe satellite. Tropospheric estimates were shown to correlate reasonably well with those by Fishman. Observations in the southern hemisphere were made in October 2001 in the Antarctic ozone hole region. The data showed that the OSIRIS is capable of accurately monitoring the evolution of the 3-dimensional structure of the Antarctic ozone hole. It was concluded that OSIRIS can obtain global ozone profiles with high accuracy and high vertical resolution.

  15. Variations in a Universal Density Profile for the Milky Way's Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardel, John; Gebhardt, K.

    2014-01-01

    On the largest scales, the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm for structure formation has enjoyed remarkable success in describing the universe we live in. The current frontier in our knowledge of galaxy formation is at the low-mass level. Here we find disagreement between theory and observations in a number of interesting cases. One such problem that has received considerable attention is the debate over the shape of the dark matter density profiles in the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, known as the core/cusp problem. CDM simulations predict every halo should have a cuspy profile with an inner logarithmic slope of -1, but some observers have found that profiles with constant density inner cores are preferred. However, a major weakness of this previous work is that the dynamical models constructed to measure the mass distribution have had to assume a parameterization for the dark matter profile--exactly the thing one wishes to measure. For my thesis I introduced a new modeling technique, based on Schwarzschild's method, that instead calculates the dark matter profile non-parametrically. Applying these models to five of the Milky Way's dSphs I found a variety of profile shapes including cores, cusps, and other completely unexpected shapes. When scaled to a common normalization, however, I found the combined profile appears to follow an approximate power law with slope -1. The results of this averaging suggest that the individual formation histories of each galaxy produce differing dark matter profiles, but with a net result that is similar to CDM predictions. To better understand the role baryons play in this process, I compare my results to recent hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of dwarf galaxies. Together, my results and the simulations suggest a trend of flatter profiles in galaxies where more stars have formed. This implies that star formation and dark matter halos are linked through the effects of supernova-induced outflows which are

  16. Comparison of current density profiles based on particle orbit-driven current in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Md Mahbub, E-mail: m.alam@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Kazuo [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Xia, Fan [CFS, SWIP, P.O. Box 432, 610041 Chengdu (China); Mitarai, Osamu [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Araki, Kuniaki; Zushi, Hideki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Fujisawa, Akihide; Idei, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki; Nagata, Takahiro [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of QUEST. • Particle guiding center orbit calculation. • Orbit-driven current density profile. • Hollow current density. • Equilibrium condition for steady-state operation of QUEST. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven divertor plasma of QUEST, it has been observed that orbit-driven current flows in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces. To observe this phenomenon and the characteristics of the orbit-driven current, current density profiles have been calculated on two different equilibrium conditions. We calculated current density profiles from particle guiding center orbits both for the fundamental and the second harmonic resonances for the 8.2 GHz electron cyclotron current drive. From this calculation, hollow current density profiles have been obtained with significant characteristics on both conditions. Only positive current distribution has been observed in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces.

  17. Revisiting internal gravity waves analysis using GPS RO density profiles: comparison with temperature profiles and application for wave field stability study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pisoft

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We revise selected findings regarding the utilization of Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS RO density profiles for the analysis of internal gravity waves (IGW, introduced by Sacha et al. (2014. Using various GPS RO datasets, we show that the differences in the IGW spectra between the dry-temperature and dry-density profiles that were described in the previous study as a general issue are in fact present in one specific data version only. The differences between perturbations in the temperature and density GPS RO profiles do not have any physical origin, and there is not the information loss of IGW activity that was suggested in Sacha et al. (2014. We investigate the previously discussed question of the temperature perturbations character when utilizing GPS RO dry-temperature profiles, derived by integration of the hydrostatic balance. Using radiosonde profiles as a proxy for GPS RO, we provide strong evidence that the differences in IGW perturbations between the real and retrieved temperature profiles (which are based on the assumption of hydrostatic balance include a significant nonhydrostatic component that is present sporadically and might be either positive or negative. The detected differences in related spectra of IGW temperature perturbations are found to be mostly about ±10 %. The paper also presents a detailed study on the utilization of GPS RO density profiles for the characterization of the wave field stability. We have analyzed selected stability parameters derived from the density profiles together with a study of the vertical rotation of the wind direction. Regarding the Northern Hemisphere the results point to the western border of the Aleutian high, where potential IGW breaking is detected. These findings are also supported by an analysis of temperature and wind velocity profiles. Our results confirm advantages of the utilization of the density profiles for IGW analysis.

  18. Topside ionospheric vertical electron density profile reconstruction using GPS and ionosonde data: possibilities for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sibanda

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful empirical modeling of the topside ionosphere relies on the availability of good quality measured data. The Alouette, ISIS and Intercosmos-19 satellite missions provided large amounts of topside sounder data, but with limited coverage of relevant geophysical conditions (e.g., geographic location, diurnal, seasonal and solar activity by each individual mission. Recently, methods for inferring the electron density distribution in the topside ionosphere from Global Positioning System (GPS-based total electron content (TEC measurements have been developed. This study is focused on the modeling efforts in South Africa and presents the implementation of a technique for reconstructing the topside ionospheric electron density (Ne using a combination of GPS-TEC and ionosonde measurements and empirically obtained Upper Transition Height (UTH. The technique produces reasonable profiles as determined by the global models already in operation. With the added advantage that the constructed profiles are tied to reliable measured GPS-TEC and the empirically determined upper transition height, the technique offers a higher level of confidence in the resulting Ne profiles.

  19. Relativistic self-focusing of intense laser beam in thermal collisionless quantum plasma with ramped density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of a Gaussian x-ray laser beam has been analyzed in collisionless thermal quantum plasma with considering a ramped density profile. In this density profile due to the increase in the plasma density, an earlier and stronger self-focusing effect is noticed where the beam width oscillates with higher frequency and less amplitude. Moreover, the effect of the density profile slope and the initial plasma density on the laser propagation has been studied. It is found that, by increasing the initial density and the ramp slope, the laser beam focuses faster with less oscillation amplitude, smaller laser spot size and more oscillations. Furthermore, a comparison is made among the laser self-focusing in thermal quantum plasma, cold quantum plasma and classical plasma. It is realized that the laser self-focusing in the quantum plasma becomes stronger in comparison with the classical regime.

  20. Standard Test Method for Obtaining Char Density Profile of Ablative Materials by Machining and Weighing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the char density profile of a charred ablator that can be used with the following limitations: 1.1.1 The local surface imperfections must be removed, and the char must be able to be machined off in a plane parallel to the char-virgin material interface before the density profiles can be determined. 1.1.2 The char must be strong enough to withstand the machining and handling techniques employed. 1.1.3 The material should have orderly density variations. The total thickness of the char and degradation zone must be larger than the machining thicknesses required. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.2.1 Exception—Certain inch-pound equivalent units are included in parentheses for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establis...

  1. Density profile of water confined in cylindrical pores in MCM-41 silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Alan K

    2012-02-15

    Recently, water absorbed in the porous silica material MCM-41-S15 has been used to demonstrate an apparent fragile to strong dynamical crossover on cooling below ∼220 K, and also to claim that the density of confined water reaches a minimum at a temperature around 200 K. Both of these behaviours are purported to arise from the crossing of a Widom line above a conjectured liquid-liquid critical point in bulk water. Here it is shown that traditional estimates of the pore diameter in this porous silica material (of order 15 Å) are too small to allow the amount of water that is observed to be absorbed by these materials (around 0.5 g H(2)O/g substrate) to be absorbed only inside the pore. Either the additional water is absorbed on the surface of the silica particles and outside the pores, or else the pores are larger than the traditional estimates. In addition the low Q Bragg intensities from a sample of MCM-41-S15 porous silica under different dry and wet conditions and with different hydrogen isotopes are simulated using a simple model of the water and silica density profile across the pore. It is found the best agreement of these intensities with experimental data is shown by assuming the much larger pore diameter of 25 Å (radius 12.5 Å). Qualitative agreement is found between these simulated density profiles and those found in recent empirical potential structure refinement simulations of the same data, even though the latter data did not specifically include the Bragg peaks in the structure refinement. It is shown that the change in the (100) peak intensity on cooling from 300 to 210 K, which previously has been ascribed to a change in density of the confined water on cooling, can equally be ascribed to a change in density profile at constant average density. It is further pointed out that, independent of whether the pore diameter really is as large as 25 Å or whether a significant amount of water is absorbed outside the pore, the earlier reports of a

  2. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherford, Brandon R., E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Barnat, E. V., E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1423 (United States); Xiong, Zhongmin, E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122, USA. (United States)

    2014-09-14

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3×10⁹cm s⁻¹, depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  3. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.es [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vega, J., E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, M., E-mail: msantos@ucm.es [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I., E-mail: ignacio.pastor@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fingerhuth, S., E-mail: sebastian.fingerhuth@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Ascencio, J., E-mail: j_ascencio21@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2014-05-15

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process.

  4. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  5. O2 density and temperature profiles retrieving from direct solar Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guineva, V.; Witt, G.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.; Werner, R.; Hedin, J.; Neichev, S.; Kirov, B.; Bankov, L.; Gramatikov, P.; Tashev, V.; Popov, M.; Hauglund, K.; Hansen, G.; Ilstad, J.; Wold, H.

    2009-12-01

    The resonance transition 2P-2S of the atomic hydrogen (Lyman-alpha emission) is the strongest and most conspicuous feature in the solar EUV spectrum. The Lyman-alpha radiation transfer depends on the resonance scattering from the hydrogen atoms in the atmosphere and on the O2 absorption. Since the Lyman-alpha extinction in the atmosphere is a measure for the column density of the oxygen molecules, the atmospheric O2 density and temperature profiles can be calculated thereof. A detector of solar Lyman-alpha radiation was manufactured in the Stara Zagora Department of the Solar-Terrestrial Influences Laboratory (STIL). Its basic part is an ionization camera, filled in with NO. A 60 V power supply is applied to the chamber. The produced photoelectric current from the sensor is fed to a two-channel amplifier, providing analog signal. The characteristics of the Lyman-alpha detector were studied. It passed successfully all tests and the results showed that the so-designed instrument could be used in rocket experiments to measure the Lymanalpha flux. From the measurements of the detector, the Lyman-alpha vertical profile can be obtained. Programs are created to compute the O2 density, atmospheric power and temperature profiles based on Lymanalpha data. The detector design appertained to ASLAF project (Attenuation of the Solar Lyman-Alpha Flux), a scientific cooperation between STIL—Bul.Acad.Sci., Stara Zagora Department and the Atmospheric Physics Group at the Department of Meteorology (MISU), Stockholm University, Sweden. The joint project was part of the rocket experiment HotPay I, in the ALOMAR eARI Project, EU’s 6th Framework Programme, Andøya Rocket Range, Andenes, Norway. The project is partly financed by the Bulgarian Ministry of Science and Education.

  6. Force-free collisionless current sheet models with non-uniform temperature and density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Allanson, O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a class of one-dimensional, strictly neutral, Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium distribution functions for force-free current sheets, with magnetic fields defined in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions, extending the results of Abraham-Shrauner [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102117 (2013)] to allow for non-uniform density and temperature profiles. To achieve this, we use an approach previously applied to the force-free Harris sheet by Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)]. In one limit of the parameters, we recover the model of Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)], while another limit gives a linear force-free field. We discuss conditions on the parameters such that the distribution functions are always positive and give expressions for the pressure, density, temperature, and bulk-flow velocities of the equilibrium, discussing the differences from previous models. We also present some illustrative plots of the distribution function in velocity space.

  7. A New Inversion Routine to Produce Vertical Electron-Density Profiles from Ionospheric Topside-Sounder Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Benson, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Two software applications have been produced specifically for the analysis of some million digital topside ionograms produced by a recent analog-to-digital conversion effort of selected analog telemetry tapes from the Alouette-2, ISIS-1 and ISIS-2 satellites. One, TOPIST (TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height algorithm) from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, is designed for the automatic identification of the topside-ionogram ionospheric-reflection traces and their inversion into vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). TOPIST also has the capability of manual intervention. The other application, from the Goddard Space Flight Center based on the FORTRAN code of John E. Jackson from the 1960s, is designed as an IDL-based interactive program for the scaling of selected digital topside-sounder ionograms. The Jackson code has also been modified, with some effort, so as to run on modern computers. This modification was motivated by the need to scale selected ionograms from the millions of Alouette/ISIS topside-sounder ionograms that only exist on 35-mm film. During this modification, it became evident that it would be more efficient to design a new code, based on the capabilities of present-day computers, than to continue to modify the old code. Such a new code has been produced and here we will describe its capabilities and compare Ne(h) profiles produced from it with those produced by the Jackson code. The concept of the new code is to assume an initial Ne(h) and derive a final Ne(h) through an iteration process that makes the resulting apparent-height profile fir the scaled values within a certain error range. The new code can be used on the X-, O-, and Z-mode traces. It does not assume any predefined profile shape between two contiguous points, like the exponential rule used in Jackson s program. Instead, Monotone Piecewise Cubic Interpolation is applied in the global profile to keep the monotone nature of the profile, which also ensures better smoothness

  8. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E. F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Malofeev, V. M.; Sobey, C.; Breton, R. P.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Karastergiou, A.; Michilli, D.; Osłowski, S.; Sanidas, S.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zarka, P.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Serylak, M.; Bell, M. E.; Broderick, J. W.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec > 8° and Galactic latitudes |Gb| > 3°, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed for ≥20 min in the contiguous frequency range of 110-188 MHz. Full-Stokes data were recorded. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures (1.5 × 10-3 pc cm-3) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, thechoice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral break, were highly influenced by the spectral coverage of the available flux density measurements. In particular, the inclusion of measurements below 100 MHz appears essential for investigating the low-frequency turnover in the spectra for most of the census pulsars. For several pulsars, we compared the spectral indices from different works and found the typical spread of values to be within 0.5-1.5, suggesting a prevailing underestimation of spectral index errors in the literature. The census observations yielded some unexpected individual source results, as we describe in the paper. Lastly, we will provide this unique sample of wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles via the European Pulsar Network Database. Tables B.1-B.4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A134

  9. Neutral-depletion-induced asymmetric plasma density profile and momentum transport in a helicon thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takao, Yoshinori; Chiba, Aiki; Ando, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Axial momentum lost to a lateral wall of a helicon source is directly measured by using a pendulum force balance, where only the lateral wall is attached to the balance immersed in 60-cm-diam and 1.4-m-long vacuum tank (pumping speed of 300-400 L/s). When operating the source with highly ionized krypton and xenon, the strong density decay along the axis is observed inside the source tube, which seems to be due to the neutral depletion. Under such a condition, a non-negligible loss of the axial momentum to the lateral wall is detected. The presently detected loss of the axial momentum indicates the presence of the ions which are axially accelerated by the electric field in the plasma core and then lost to the lateral wall. Furthermore, the helicon thruster immersed in 1-m-diam and 2-m-long vacuum tank (pumping speed of 4000-5000 L/s) is operated at high rf power up to 5 kW in argon, to demonstrate the neutral-depletion-induced axially asymmetric density profile. Combination between the Langmuir probe and the optical diagnosis indicates that the neutral density at the axial center of the source is reduced to 20% of the initial neutral density. This work is partially supported by grant-in-aid for scientific research (16H04084 and 26247096) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  10. Plasma Shape and Current Density Profile Control in Advanced Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenyu

    The need for new sources of energy is expected to become a critical problem within the next few decades. Nuclear fusion has sufficient energy density to potentially supply the world population with its increasing energy demands. The tokamak is a magnetic confinement device used to achieve controlled fusion reactions. Experimental fusion technology has now reached a level where tokamaks are able to produce about as much energy as is expended in heating the fusion fuel. The next step towards the realization of a nuclear fusion tokamak power plant is ITER, which will be capable of exploring advanced tokamak (AT) modes, characterized by a high fusion gain and plasma stability. The extreme requirements of the advanced modes motivates researchers to improve the modeling of the plasma response as well as the design of feedback controllers. This dissertation focuses on several magnetic and kinetic control problems, including the plasma current, position and shape control, and data-driven and first-principles-driven modeling and control of plasma current density profile and the normalized plasma pressure ratio betaN. The plasma is confined within the vacuum vessel by an external electromagnetic field, produced primarily by toroidal and poloidal field coils. The outermost closed plasma surface or plasma boundary is referred to as the shape of the plasma. A central characteristic of AT plasma regimes is an extreme elongated shape. The equilibrium among the electromagnetic forces acting on an elongated plasma is unstable. Moreover, the tokamak performance is improved if the plasma is located in close proximity to the torus wall, which guarantees an efficient use of available volume. As a consequence, feedback control of the plasma position and shape is necessary. In this dissertation, an Hinfinity-based, multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) controller for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is developed, which is used to control the plasma position, shape, and X

  11. Assimilation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC electron density profiles into a coupled Thermosphere/Ionosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Te; Matsuo, Tomoko; Richmond, Arthur D.; Tiger Liu, Jann-Yeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents our effort to assimilate FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) GPS Occultation Experiment observations into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) by means of ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF). The F3/C EDP are combined with the TIE-GCM simulations by EnKF algorithms implemented in the NCAR Data Assimilation Research Testbed open-source community facility to compute the expected value of electron density, which is 'the best' estimate of the current ionospheric state. Assimilation analyses obtained with real F3/C electron density profiles during geomagnetic quiet time and disturbed period are further compared with independent ground-based observations and global ionospheric map as well as the F3/C profiles themselves. The comparison shows the improvement of the primary ionospheric parameters such as NmF2 and hmF2 and further display some small scale physical meaning structures which might either generally ionospheric features or storm effects. Nevertheless some unrealistic signatures appearing in the results and high rejection rates of observations due to the applied outlier threshold and quality control are also found in the assimilation experiments. These features are additionally analyzed to identify and correct the model biases in the future.

  12. X-ray reflectivity theory for determining the density profile of a liquid under nanometre confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Edith; Nygård, Kim; Satapathy, Dillip K; Balmer, Tobias E; Bunk, Oliver; Heuberger, Manfred; van der Veen, J Friso

    2010-07-01

    An X-ray reflectivity theory on the determination of the density profile of a molecular liquid under nanometre confinement is presented. The confinement geometry acts like an X-ray interferometer, which consists of two opposing atomically flat single-crystal mica membranes with an intervening thin liquid film of variable thickness. The X-rays reflected from the parallel crystal planes (of known structure) and the layered liquid in between them (of unknown structure) interfere with one another, making X-ray reflectivity highly sensitive to the liquid's density profile along the confinement direction. An expression for the reflected intensity as a function of momentum transfer is given. The total structure factor intensity for the liquid-filled confinement device is derived as a sum of contributions from the inner and outer crystal terminations. The method presented readily distinguishes the confined liquid from the liquid adsorbed on the outer mica surfaces. It is illustrated for the molecular liquid tetrakis(trimethyl)siloxysilane, confined by two mica surfaces at a distance of 8.6 nm.

  13. Development of Continuous Speed Profile Using GPS at Johor Federal Roads F0050

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetijo Joewono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Road accidents are one of the most relevant issues in today’s society. It causes hundreds of accidents every year from over the world. Every year 1.2 million of people are killed and between 20 and 50 million people are offended due to the road accidents. Three main types of accidents in Malaysia is collision with passenger cars, collisions with other motorcycles and single-motorcycle accidents. F0050 is ranked the district with the highest road fatalities in Johor for five consecutive years. Motorcyclists and their pillion riders were the highest contributors – 60% or 648 fatalities, followed by car drivers and passengers numbering 266 fatalities. One reason of accident occurrence can be lack of road design consistency which most drivers make fewer errors in the vicinity of geometric features. Geometric design consistency is emerging as an important component in highway design relate to the safety performance. The result shows the continuous speed profiles along F0050. Since motorcyclist have a higher fatality per distance traveled, this study will develop the potential relationship between design consistency which is represented by continuous speed profiles by using Global Positioning System (GPS.

  14. Continuous resistivity profiling data from Great South Bay, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Kroeger, K.D.; Crusius, John; Worley, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of submarine aquifers adjacent to the Fire Island National Seashore and Long Island, New York was conducted to assess the importance of submarine groundwater discharge as a potential nonpoint source of nitrogen delivery to Great South Bay. Over 200 kilometers of continuous resistivity profiling data were collected to image the fresh-saline groundwater interface in sediments beneath the bay. In addition, groundwater sampling was performed at sites (1) along the north shore of Great South Bay, particularly in Patchogue Bay, that were representative of the developed Long Island shoreline, and (2) at sites on and adjacent to Fire Island, a 50-kilometer-long barrier island on the south side of Great South Bay. Other field activities included sediment coring, stationary electrical resistivity profiling, and surveys of in situ pore water conductivity. Results of continuous resistivity profiling surveys are described in this report. The onshore and offshore shallow hydrostratigraphy of the Great South Bay shorelines, particularly the presence and nature of submarine confining units, appears to exert primary control on the dimensions and chemistry of the submarine groundwater flow and discharge zones. Sediment coring has shown that the confining units commonly consist of drowned and buried peat layers likely deposited in salt marshes. Low-salinity groundwater extends from 10 to 100 meters offshore along much of the north and south shores of Great South Bay based on continuous resistivity profiling data, especially off the mouths of tidal creeks and beneath shallow flats to the north of Fire Island adjacent to modern salt marshes. Human modifications of much of the shoreline and nearshore areas along the north shore of the bay, including filling of salt marshes, construction of bulkheads and piers, and dredging of navigation channels, has substantially altered the natural hydrogeology of the bay's shorelines by truncating confining units and increasing

  15. Effects of volcano profile on dilute pyroclastic density currents: Numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronzo, D. M.; Valentine, G. A.; Dellino, P.; de Tullio, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Explosive activity and lava dome collapse at stratovolcanoes can lead to pyroclastic density currents (PDCs; mixtures of volcanic gas, air, and volcanic particles) that produce complex deposits and pose a hazard to surrounding populations. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of dilute PDCs (characterized by a turbulent suspended load and deposition through a bed load) are carried out with the Euler-Lagrange approach of multiphase physics. The fluid phase is modeled as a dusty gas (1.88 kg/m3 dense), and the solid phase is modeled as discrete particles (1 mm, 5 mm, and 10 mm; 1500 kg/m3 dense and irregularly-shaped), which are two-way coupled to the gas, i.e. they affect the fluid turbulence. The initial PDC, which enters a volcano domain 5 km long and 1.9 km high, has the following characteristics: thickness of 200 m, velocity of 20 m/s, temperature of 573 K, turbulence of 5 %, and sediment concentration of 3 % by volume. The actual physics of flow boundary zone is simulated at the PDC base, by monitoring the sediment flux toward the substrate, which acts through the flow boundary zone, and the grain-size distribution. Also, the PDC velocity and dynamic pressure are calculated. The simulations show that PDC transport, deposition, and hazard potential are sensitive to the shape of the volcano slope (profile) down which they flow. In particular, three generic volcano profiles, straight, concave-upward, and convex-upward are focused on. Dilute PDCs that flow down a constant slope gradually decelerate over the simulated run-out distance (5 km in the horizontal direction) due to a combination of sedimentation, which reduces the density of the PDC, and mixing with the atmosphere. However, dilute PDCs down a concave-upward slope accelerate high on the volcano flanks and have less sedimentation until they begin to decelerate over the shallow lower slopes. A convex-upward slope causes dilute PDCs to lose relatively more of their pyroclast load on the upper slopes of a

  16. Lipid profile, obesity and bone mineral density: the Hertfordshire Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, E M; Syddall, H E; Aihie Sayer, A; Martin, H J; Cooper, C

    2007-05-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) are positively correlated in several studies, but few data relate bone density, lipid profile and anthropometric measures. To investigate these relationships in a large, well-characterized cohort of men and women (The Hertfordshire Cohort Study). Men (n = 465) and women (n = 448) from Hertfordshire, UK were recruited. Information was available on demographic and lifestyle factors, anthropometric measurements, body fat percentage, fasting triglycerides, cholesterol (total, HDL, LDL), apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein (b); bone mineral density (BMD) was recorded at the lumbar spine and total femur. BMD at the lumbar spine (males r = 0.15, p = 0.001; females r = 0.14, p = 0.003) and total femoral region (males r = 0.18, p = 0.0001; females r = 0.16, p = 0.0008) was related to serum triglyceride level, even after adjustment for waist-hip ratio, age, social class and lifestyle factors, but not if body fat percentage was substituted for waist-hip ratio in the regression model. Fasting HDL cholesterol level was related to lumbar spine BMD in women (r = -0.15, p = 0.001) and total femoral BMD in both sexes (males r = -0.15, p = 0.002; females r = -0.23, p BMD. In this cohort, relationships between lipid profile and BMD were robust to adjustment for one measure of central obesity (waist-hip ratio), but not total body fat. This broadly supports the idea that adiposity may confound the relationship between lipids and bone mass.

  17. Impact of a hollow density profile on turbulent particle fluxes: Gyrokinetic and fluid simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Strand, P.; Nordman, H.

    2017-07-01

    Hollow density profiles may occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the pellet fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by Ion Temperature Gradient/Trapped Electron (ITG/TE) mode turbulence in hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT, and magnetic shear are investigated. In addition, the effects of a fast species are studied and global ITG simulations in a simplified physics description are performed in order to investigate nonlocal effects. It is found that β in particular, has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region. Both nonlinear GENE and EDWM simulations show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change in the direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln. Moreover, the addition of fast particles was shown to decrease the inward main ion particle flux in the positive gradient region further. This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas. Additionally, the heat flux in global ITG turbulence simulations indicates that nonlocal effects can play a different role from usual in connection with pellet fuelling.

  18. Continuous BP Decoding Algorithm for a Low-Density Parity-Check Coded Hybrid ARQ System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangjoon; Choi, Sooyong; Hwang, Seung-Hoon

    A continuous belief propagation (BP) decoding algorithm for a hybrid automatic repeat request (ARQ) system is proposed in this paper. The proposed continuous BP decoding algorithm utilizes the extrinsic information generated in the last iteration of the previous transmission for a continuous progression of the decoding through retransmissions. This allows the continuous BP decoding algorithm to accelerate the decoding convergence for codeword determination, especially when the number of retransmissions is large or a currently combined packet has punctured nodes. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed continuous BP decoding algorithm.

  19. Simulating the Effects of the Airborne Lidar Scanning Angle, Flying Altitude, and Pulse Density for Forest Foliage Profile Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Qin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Foliage profile is a key biophysical parameter for forests. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging is an effective tool for vegetation parameter retrieval. Data acquisition conditions influence the estimation of biophysical parameters. To acquire accurate foliage profiles at the lowest cost, we used simulations to explore the effects of data acquisition conditions on forest foliage profile retrieval. First, a 3-D forest scene and the airborne small-footprint full-waveform LiDAR data were simulated by the DART model. Second, the foliage profile was estimated from LiDAR data based on a Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer model. Lastly, the effects of the airborne LiDAR scanning angle, flying altitude, and pulse density on foliage profile retrieval were explored. The results indicated that the scanning angle was an important factor in the foliage profile retrieval, and the optimal scanning angle was 20°. The optimal scanning angle was independent of flying altitude and pulse density, and combinations of multiple scanning angles could improve the accuracy of the foliage profile estimation. The flying altitude and pulse density had little influence on foliage profile retrieval at plot level and could be ignored. In general, our study provides reliable information for selecting the optimal instrument operational parameters to acquire more accurate foliage profiles and minimize data acquisition costs.

  20. Constraining the interior density profile of a Jovian planet from precision gravity field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, Naor; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Helled, Ravit; Hubbard, William B.; Thorngren, Daniel; Mankovich, Chris; Wahl, Sean; Militzer, Burkhard; Durante, Daniele

    2017-10-01

    The external gravity field of a planetary body is determined by the distribution of mass in its interior. Therefore, a measurement of the external field, properly interpreted, tells us about the interior density profile, ρ(r), which in turn can be used to constrain the composition in the interior and thereby learn about the formation mechanism of the planet. Planetary gravity fields are usually described by the coefficients in an expansion of the gravitational potential. Recently, high precision measurements of these coefficients for Jupiter and Saturn have been made by the radio science instruments on the Juno and Cassini spacecraft, respectively.The resulting coefficients come with an associated uncertainty. And while the task of matching a given density profile with a given set of gravity coefficients is relatively straightforward, the question of how best to account for the uncertainty is not. In essentially all prior work on matching models to gravity field data, inferences about planetary structure have rested on imperfect knowledge of the H/He equation of state and on the assumption of an adiabatic interior. Here we wish to vastly expand the phase space of such calculations. We present a framework for describing all the possible interior density structures of a Jovian planet, constrained only by a given set of gravity coefficients and their associated uncertainties. Our approach is statistical. We produce a random sample of ρ(a) curves drawn from the underlying (and unknown) probability distribution of all curves, where ρ is the density on an interior level surface with equatorial radius a. Since the resulting set of density curves is a random sample, that is, curves appear with frequency proportional to the likelihood of their being consistent with the measured gravity, we can compute probability distributions for any quantity that is a function of ρ, such as central pressure, oblateness, core mass and radius, etc. Our approach is also bayesian, in that

  1. Simultaneous Conduction and Valence Band Quantization in Ultrashallow High-Density Doping Profiles in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, F.; Wells, J. W.; Pakpour-Tabrizi, A. C.; Jackman, R. B.; Thiagarajan, B.; Hofmann, Ph.; Miwa, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous quantization of conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB) states in silicon using ultrashallow, high-density, phosphorus doping profiles (so-called Si:P δ layers). We show that, in addition to the well-known quantization of CB states within the dopant plane, the confinement of VB-derived states between the subsurface P dopant layer and the Si surface gives rise to a simultaneous quantization of VB states in this narrow region. We also show that the VB quantization can be explained using a simple particle-in-a-box model, and that the number and energy separation of the quantized VB states depend on the depth of the P dopant layer beneath the Si surface. Since the quantized CB states do not show a strong dependence on the dopant depth (but rather on the dopant density), it is straightforward to exhibit control over the properties of the quantized CB and VB states independently of each other by choosing the dopant density and depth accordingly, thus offering new possibilities for engineering quantum matter.

  2. Retrieval of Electron Density Profile for KOMPSAT-5 GPS Radio Occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Kyoung Lee

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The AOPOD (Atmosphere Occultation and Precision Orbit Determination system, the secondary payload of KOMPSAT (KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite-5 scheduled to be launched in 2010, shall provide GPS radio occultation data. In this paper, we simulated the GPS radio occultation characteristic of KOMPSAT-5 and retrieved electron density profiles using KROPS (KASI Radio Occultation Processing Software. The electron density retrieved from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload GPS radio occultation data on June 20, 2004 was compared with IRI (International Reference Ionosphere - 2001, PLP (Planar Langmuir Probe, and ionosonde measurements. When the result was compared with ionosonde measurements, the discrepancies were 5 km on the F_2 peak height (hmF_2 and 3×10^{10} el/m^3 on the electron density of the F_2 peak height (NmF_2. By comparing with the Langmuir Probe measurements of CHAMP satellite (PLP, both agrees with 1.6×10^{11} el/m^3 at the height of 365.6 km.

  3. Continuous Resistivity Profile Tracklines of Data Collected from Cape Cod National Seashore, May 17-20, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys were conducted at Cape Cod National Seashore in 2004 and 2006 in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under...

  4. Experimental evaluation of the Continuous Risk Profile (CRP) approach to the current Caltrans methodology for high collision concentration location identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report evaluates the performance of Continuous Risk Profile (CRP) compared with the : Sliding Window Method (SWM) and Peak Searching (PS) methods. These three network : screening methods all require the same inputs: traffic collision data and Sa...

  5. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  6. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Bauk, Sabar [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, Rokiah [School of Industrial Technologies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  7. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi, E-mail: hiratsuka.junichi@jaea.go.jp; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Miyamoto, Kenji [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  8. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  9. Modification of SOL profiles and fluctuations with line-average density and divertor flux expansion in TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Tsui, C.; Theiler, C.; Allan, S.; Boedo, J.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Verhaegh, K.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Walkden, N.; Costea, S.; Kovacic, J.; Ionita, C.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Schneider, B.; Schrittwieser, R.; Spolaore, M.; Carralero, D.; Madsen, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Militello, F.; The TCV Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-11-01

    A set of Ohmic density ramp experiments addressing the role of parallel connection length in modifying scrape off layer (SOL) properties has been performed on the TCV tokamak. The parallel connection length has been modified by varying the poloidal flux expansion f x . It will be shown that this modification does not influence neither the detachment density threshold, nor the development of a flat SOL density profile which instead depends strongly on the increase of the core line average density. The modification of the SOL upstream profile, with the appearance of what is generally called a density shoulder, has been related to the properties of filamentary blobs. Blob size increases with density, without any dependence on the parallel connection length both in the near and far SOL. The increase of the density decay length, corresponding to a profile flattening, has been related to the variation of the divertor normalized collisionality Λ_div (Myra et al 2006 Phys. Plasmas 13 112502, Carralero et al, ASDEX Upgrade Team, JET Contributors and EUROfusion MST1 Team 2015 Phys. Rev. Let. 115 215002), showing that in TCV the increase of Λ_div is not sufficient to guarantee the SOL upstream profile flattening.

  10. Circadian plasma level profile of lisuride in rats and mice after continuous administration via the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, W; Reissmann, F; Kühne, G; Schöbel, C

    1995-01-01

    Lisuride (Dopergin, CAS 18016-80-3), a dopamine D2 agonist, was administered to male and female rats and mice continuously via the diet for 14 days. The doses were 0.2 mg/kg/d in mice and 1 mg/kg/d in mice and rats. Plasma level profiles (0-22 or 24 h) were determined by measuring lisuride concentrations by radioimmunoassay. At all doses a plateau-like plasma level of lisuride was observed. A clear circadian rhythm of lisuride concentrations (highs during night, low levels during day) was found for male rats (1 mg/kg/d) and for male mice (0.2 mg/kg/d). Female animals did not show this phenomenon as pronounced. At the same dose of 1 mg/kg/d rats showed higher plasma levels than mice. For males the ratio of total AUCs was 1.9 and for female animals 8.6.

  11. Profile and evaluation of participants in distance learning continuing education courses about inclusive practices in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Messias Fialho Capellini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses aspects related to a continuing education course about Inclusive and Special Education in the area of Mental Disabilities offered to 20 (twenty groups of teachers by the Ministry of Education. The Distance Course was offered in different regions of Brazil with a 180 (a hundred and eighty hours workload. The research included the profile of the participants, an evaluation of the course by the participants and the analysis of the dropout causes. The aspects of the course under evaluation received a positive evaluation by most of the participants. The most frequent reason for the dropout rates include participants’ limitations in terms of meeting deadlines, personal reasons and difficulties in using computers. It was concluded that Distance Education seems to be a relevant tool for the acquisition of knowledge about inclusive practice.

  12. Diffuse scattering provides material parameters and electron density profiles of biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yufeng; Nagle, John F

    2004-04-01

    Fully hydrated stacks of DOPC lipid bilayer membranes generate large diffuse x-ray scattering that corrupts the Bragg peak intensities that are used in conventional biophysical structural analysis, but the diffuse scattering actually contains more information. Using an efficient algorithm for fitting extensive regions of diffuse data to classical smectic liquid crystalline theory we first obtain the compressional modulus B= 10(13) erg/ cm(4), which involves interactions between membranes, and the bending modulus K(c) =8x 10(-13) erg of the membranes. The membrane form factor F ( q(z) ) is then obtained for most values of q(z) up to 0.8 A(-1). The electron density profile rho(z) is obtained by fitting models to F( q(z) ). Constraining the models to conform to other measurements provides structural quantities such as area A=72.1+/-0.5 A(2) per lipid at the interface.

  13. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation systems (often referred to as casks) and spent fuel pools (SFPs). This work is divided into two main phases. The first phase investigated the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in SFPs to transportation and storage casks and the validation of reactivity calculations and spent fuel compositions within these methods. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the analysis of the effects of control blade insertion history, and moderator density and burnup axial profiles for extended BWR BUC.

  14. Size distribution and radial density profile of synaptic vesicles by SAXS and light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorph, Simon; Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-ray Physics, Goettingen (Germany); Holt, Matthew; Jahn, Reinhard [Max Plank Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Sztucki, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-01

    Synaptic vesicles are small membraneous organelles within the nerve terminal, encapsulating neurotransmitters by a lipid bilayer. The transport of the neurotransmitter, the fusion at the plasma membrane, and the release of the stored neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft are since long know as essential step in nerve conduction of the chemical synapse. A detailed structural view of these molecular mechanisms is still lacking, not withstanding the enormous progress in the field during recent years. From measurements and quantitative fitting of small angle X-ray scattering curves and dynamic light scattering the averaged structural properties of synaptic vesicles can be determined. We present SAXS measurements and fits revealing the width of the size distribution function and details of the radial scattering length profile of synaptic vesicles from rat brain. Representative values for the inner and outer radius and the size polydispersity as well as the density and width of the outer protein layer are obtained.

  15. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E, we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  16. Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heftberger, Peter [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Kollmitzer, Benjamin [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Rappolt, Michael [University of Leeds, UK; Amenitsch, Heinz [Graz University of Technology; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Pabst, georg [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria

    2014-01-01

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  17. Influence of dialysis on the glucose profile in patients with diabetes: usefulness of continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrel, F; Sissoko, H; Képénékian, L; Smagala, A; Meyer, L; Imhoff, O; Serb, L; Fleury, D; Dorey, F; Krummel, T; Le Floch, J P; Kessler, L

    2014-10-01

    We sought to investigate the impact of dialysis on glucose profiles of diabetic patients using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The study included 33 hemodialyzed patients with diabetes (14 females and 19 males; mean age: 66±8 years; patients with type 2 diabetes: 30; mean duration of dialysis: 3.8±2.6 years) who were under insulin treatment. After a run-in period, CGM was performed for 48 h, including a dialysis session. Three CGM sessions were proposed for each patient over a 3-month period. CGM results were analyzed during and after dialysis at 6 different time points. Moreover, data were analyzed in 7 different day periods according to meals. Of the 99 CGM available, 21 were excluded because of technical issues or patient refusal. The CGM results indicated that mean glucose values (7.5±2.5 mmol/l vs. 9.4±1.9 mmol/l; phemodialysis sessions. Significant differences were observed in glucose values only before and 2 h after breakfast (pprofile in hemodialyzed diabetic patients. CGM seems feasible and clinically useful for the analysis of glucose profiles in this group of patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Modification of SOL profiles and fluctuations with line-average density and divertor flux expansion in TCV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, N.; Tsui, C.; Theiler, C.

    2017-01-01

    A set of Ohmic density ramp experiments addressing the role of parallel connection length in modifying scrape off layer (SOL) properties has been performed on the TCV tokamak. The parallel connection length has been modified by varying the poloidal flux expansion fx. It will be shown that this mo......A set of Ohmic density ramp experiments addressing the role of parallel connection length in modifying scrape off layer (SOL) properties has been performed on the TCV tokamak. The parallel connection length has been modified by varying the poloidal flux expansion fx. It will be shown...... that this modification does not influence neither the detachment density threshold, nor the development of a flat SOL density profile which instead depends strongly on the increase of the core line average density. The modification of the SOL upstream profile, with the appearance of what is generally called a density...... shoulder, has been related to the properties of filamentary blobs. Blob size increases with density, without any dependence on the parallel connection length both in the near and far SOL. The increase of the density decay length, corresponding to a profile flattening, has been related to the variation...

  19. Tidal Disruption of Milky Way Satellites with Shallow Dark Matter Density Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa L. Łokas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dwarf galaxies of the Local Group provide unique possibilities to test current theories of structure formation. Their number and properties have put the broadly accepted cold dark matter model into question, posing a few problems. These problems now seem close to resolution due to the improved treatment of baryonic processes in dwarf galaxy simulations which now predict cored rather than cuspy dark matter profiles in isolated dwarfs with important consequences for their subsequent environmental evolution. Using N-body simulations, we study the evolution of a disky dwarf galaxy with such a shallow dark matter profile on a typical orbit around the Milky Way. The dwarf survives the first pericenter passage but is disrupted after the second due to tidal forces from the host. We discuss the evolution of the dwarf’s properties in time prior to and at the time of disruption. We demonstrate that the dissolution occurs on a rather short timescale as the dwarf expands from a spheroid into a stream with non-zero mean radial velocity. We point out that the properties of the dwarf at the time of disruption may be difficult to distinguish from bound configurations, such as tidally induced bars, both in terms of surface density and line-of-sight kinematics.

  20. Continuous versus cyclic progesterone exposure differentially regulates hippocampal gene expression and functional profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Zhao

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of chronic exposure to continuous (CoP4 versus cyclic progesterone (CyP4 alone or in combination with 17β-estradiol (E2 on gene expression profiles targeting bioenergetics, metabolism and inflammation in the adult female rat hippocampus. High-throughput qRT-PCR analyses revealed that ovarian hormonal depletion induced by ovariectomy (OVX led to multiple significant gene expression alterations, which were to a great extent reversed by co-administration of E2 and CyP4. In contrast, co-administration of E2 and CoP4 induced a pattern highly resembling OVX. Bioinformatics analyses further revealed clear disparities in functional profiles associated with E2+CoP4 and E2+CyP4. Genes involved in mitochondrial energy (ATP synthase α subunit; Atp5a1, redox homeostasis (peroxiredoxin 5; Prdx5, insulin signaling (insulin-like growth factor I; Igf1, and cholesterol trafficking (liver X receptor α subtype; Nr1h3, differed in direction of regulation by E2+CoP4 (down-regulation relative to OVX and E2+CyP4 (up-regulation relative to OVX. In contrast, genes involved in amyloid metabolism (β-secretase; Bace1 differed only in degree of regulation, as both E2+CoP4 and E2+CyP4 induced down-regulation at different efficacy. E2+CyP4-induced changes could be associated with regulation of progesterone receptor membrane component 1(Pgrmc1. In summary, results from this study provide evidence at the molecular level that differing regimens of hormone therapy (HT can induce disparate gene expression profiles in brain. From a translational perspective, confirmation of these results in a model of natural menopause, would imply that the common regimen of continuous combined HT may have adverse consequences whereas a cyclic combined regimen, which is more physiological, could be an effective strategy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging.

  1. Aspergillus niger β-galactosidase production by yeast in a continuous high cell density reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, Lucília; Lima, Nelson; Teixeira, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    The continuous production of extracellular heterologous beta-galactosidase by a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing the lacA gene (coding for beta-galactosidase) of Aspergillus niger was investigated. A continuous operation was run in a 6.51 airlift bioreactor with a concentric draft tube using lactose as substrate. Data on the operation with semi-synthetic medium with 50 and 100 g/l initial lactose concentrations are presented. The best result for beta-galactosidase...

  2. Effects of ICRF and/or LHCD on SOL density profiles and fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cornwall; Hanson, Greg; Lin, Yijun; Wukitch, Steve; Faust, Ian; Hughes, Jerry; Labombard, Brian; Ma, Yunxing; Meneghini, Orso; Parker, Ron; Shiraiwa, Syun'ichi; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Wilgen, John

    2011-10-01

    Antenna operation and antenna-plasma interactions during RF heating and current drive are greatly influenced by the scrape-off-layer (SOL) densities. A swept-frequency X-mode reflectometer installed on Alcator C-Mod measures the SOL density profiles and fluctuations at three poloidal locations adjacent to the Lower Hybrid (LH) launcher. The application of LH power consistently decreases the density in front of the LH launcher, consistent with a ponderomotive force; the application of ICRF power also decreases the density in front of the LH launcher, which may be consistent with ICRF sheath induced convective cells. LH power also seems to strongly modify the density profile shape in the near and far SOL, especially at high line averaged densities. The reflectometer measured density profiles and preliminary results on phase fluctuation behavior will be presented and compared with measurements from other diagnostics, such as Thomson scattering and gas puff imaging diagnostic. This work is supported by U.S. DoE under awards DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. A computer program for estimating the power-density spectrum of advanced continuous simulation language generated time histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program for performing frequency analysis of time history data is presented. The program uses circular convolution and the fast Fourier transform to calculate power density spectrum (PDS) of time history data. The program interfaces with the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL) so that a frequency analysis may be performed on ACSL generated simulation variables. An example of the calculation of the PDS of a Van de Pol oscillator is presented.

  4. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hochegger, G P

    2000-01-01

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was '...

  5. Relationship between habitat, densities and metabolic profile in brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bagliacca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some habitat traits and haematic parameters were studied to understand the relationships between the hare densities, habitat characteristics and physiological and nutritional condition of the animals. A total of 33 protected areas, reserved for wild game reproduction, located in the Province of Florence (Central Italy, were monitored during a 2-year period. In each protected area the hares were submitted to census. The habitat features of the protected areas were studied and the following parameters were categorised: altitude; cleared-land/total-land ratio; main exposure; main ground composition; water availability; main slope; anthropogenic presence; predator presence; wooded borders; presence of trees and shrubs; surveillance against hunting; demographic predator control; kind of cultivation; unharvested crops for game. After the census the hares were captured for translocation outside in “free” hunting areas. During capture the hares were put in darkened, wooden capture-boxes and remained inside for a variable period of time (10min to 3h. A sample of 3 to 7 hares, captured per year and per each protected area, were removed from the boxes (physically restrained, with covered eyes for blood sample collection, sex, age and live weight determination. The following analyses were performed on frozen plasma samples: ALanine aminoTransferase (ALT, ASpartate aminoTransferase (AST, glucose, cholesterol, Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN, Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, and Cl concentrations. The relationship between hare density and habitat characteristics was analysed by single regressions analysis. Then the habitat characteristics were subjected to multivariate analysis in relationship to hare body condition. The haematic parameters were analysed by least square means considering habitat traits, animal density, age and sex, as main categorical factors, interaction sex*age, and “pregnant and non-reproducing” nested within sex. Results showed that the highest density

  6. Analysis of plasma equilibrium based on orbit-driven current density profile in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K., E-mail: nakamura@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Alam, M.M. [IGSES, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Jiang, Y.Z. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Kurihara, K.; Kawamata, Y.; Sueoka, M.; Takechi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Hasegawa, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Araki, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nagata, T. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • High energy particle guiding center orbit is calculated as a contour plot of conserved variable. • Current density profile is analyzed based on the orbit-driven current. • Plasma equilibrium is reconstructed by considering the hollow current profile. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven (ECCD) steady-state plasma on QUEST (B{sub t} = 0.25 T, R = 0.68 m, a = 0.40 m), plasma current seems to flow in the open magnetic surface outside of the closed magnetic surface in the low-field region according to plasma current fitting (PCF) method. We consider that the current in the open magnetic surface is due to orbit-driven current by high-energy particles in RF-driven plasma. So based on the analysis of current density profile based on the orbit-driven current, plasma equilibrium is to be calculated. We calculated high energy particles guiding center orbits as a contour plot of conserved variable in Hamiltonian formulation and considered particles initial position with different levels of energy and pitch angles that satisfy resonance condition. Then the profile of orbit-driven current is estimated by multiplying the particle density on the resonance surface and the velocity on the orbits. This analysis shows negative current near the magnetic axis and hollow current profile is expected even if pressure driven current is considered. Considering the hollow current profile shifted toward the low-field region, the equilibrium is fitted by J-EFIT coded by MATLAB.

  7. Time course-changes in phosphatidylcholine profile during oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidized phosphatidylcholines (oxPC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) generated during the formation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) are involved in atherosclerotic lesion development. We investigated the time course-changes in phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species during oxidation of LDL to determine how those atherogenic PCs are produced. Methods Human and rabbit LDLs were pretreated with or without a selective platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) inhibitor. LDL was oxidized by incubation with copper sulfate, and PC profiles were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results When human LDL was oxidized, the peak areas for polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-containing PC species dramatically decreased after a short lag period, concomitantly lysoPC species increased sharply. Although a variety of oxPC species containing oxidized fatty acyl groups or cleaved acyl chains are formed during LDL oxidation, only a few oxPC products accumulated in oxLDL: 1-palmitoyl-2-(9-oxo-nonanoyl) PC and long-chain oxPC with two double bonds. Pretreatment of LDL with the PAF-AH inhibitor greatly reduced lysoPC production while it had no effect on lipid peroxidation reactions and oxPC profiles. Rabbit LDL, which has a different composition of PC molecular species and needs a longer time to reach achieve full oxidation than human LDL, also accumulated lysoPC during oxidation. The increase in lysoPC in rabbit oxLDL was suppressed by pretreatment with the PAF-AH inhibitor. The major oxPC species formed in rabbit oxLDL were almost the same as human oxLDL. Conclusions These results suggest that lysoPC species are the major products and PAF-AH activity is crucial for lysoPC generation during oxidation of LDL. The oxPC species accumulated are limited when LDL is oxidized with copper ion in vitro. PMID:24625108

  8. Benchmark dose profiles for joint-action continuous data in quantitative risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Roland C; Piegorsch, Walter W

    2013-09-01

    Benchmark analysis is a widely used tool in biomedical and environmental risk assessment. Therein, estimation of minimum exposure levels, called benchmark doses (BMDs), that induce a prespecified benchmark response (BMR) is well understood for the case of an adverse response to a single stimulus. For cases where two agents are studied in tandem, however, the benchmark approach is far less developed. This paper demonstrates how the benchmark modeling paradigm can be expanded from the single-agent setting to joint-action, two-agent studies. Focus is on continuous response outcomes. Extending the single-exposure setting, representations of risk are based on a joint-action dose-response model involving both agents. Based on such a model, the concept of a benchmark profile-a two-dimensional analog of the single-dose BMD at which both agents achieve the specified BMR-is defined for use in quantitative risk characterization and assessment. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. PollyNET: a global network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, H.; Kanitz, T.; Engelmann, R.; Althausen, D.; Heese, B.; Komppula, M.; Preißler, J.; Tesche, M.; Ansmann, A.; Wandinger, U.; Lim, J.-H.; Ahn, J. Y.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Seifert, P.; Hofer, J.; Skupin, A.; Schneider, F.; Bohlmann, S.; Foth, A.; Bley, S.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Viisanen, Y.; Hooda, R. K.; Pereira, S.; Bortoli, D.; Wagner, F.; Mattis, I.; Janicka, L.; Markowicz, K. M.; Achtert, P.; Artaxo, P.; Pauliquevis, T.; Souza, R. A. F.; Sharma, V. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Beukes, J. P.; Sun, J. Y.; Rohwer, E. G.; Deng, R.; Mamouri, R. E.; Zamorano, F.

    2015-10-01

    A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly) for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design and apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at http://polly.tropos.de. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash) are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  10. Density profile of dark matter haloes and galaxies in the horizon-agn simulation: the impact of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirani, Sébastien; Dubois, Yohan; Volonteri, Marta; Devriendt, Julien; Bundy, Kevin; Silk, Joe; Pichon, Christophe; Kaviraj, Sugata; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Habouzit, Mélanie

    2017-12-01

    Using a suite of three large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, horizon-AGN, horizon-noagn (no AGN feedback) and horizon-dm (no baryons), we investigate how a typical sub-grid model for AGN feedback affects the evolution of the inner density profiles of massive dark matter haloes and galaxies. Based on direct object-to-object comparisons, we find that the integrated inner mass and density slope differences between objects formed in these three simulations (hereafter, HAGN, HnoAGN and HDM) significantly evolve with time. More specifically, at high redshift (z ˜ 5), the mean central density profiles of HAGN and HnoAGN dark matter haloes tend to be much steeper than their HDM counterparts owing to the rapidly growing baryonic component and ensuing adiabatic contraction. By z ˜ 1.5, these mean halo density profiles in HAGN have flattened, pummelled by powerful AGN activity (`quasar mode'): the integrated inner mass difference gaps with HnoAGN haloes have widened, and those with HDM haloes have narrowed. Fast forward 9.5 billion years, down to z = 0, and the trend reverses: HAGN halo mean density profiles drift back to a more cusped shape as AGN feedback efficiency dwindles (`radio mode'), and the gaps in integrated central mass difference with HnoAGN and HDM close and broaden, respectively. On the galaxy side, the story differs noticeably. Averaged stellar profile central densities and inner slopes are monotonically reduced by AGN activity as a function of cosmic time, resulting in better agreement with local observations.

  11. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Density profile and cholesterol concentration of serum lipoproteins in experimental animals and human subjects on hypercholesterolaemic diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Terpstra, A.H.M.

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The density profile of Sudan black stained serum lipoproteins was studied in human subjects and various animal species on diets supplemented with cholesterol. 2. 2. In the animals studied (rabbits, calves, mice, chickens, rats and guinea-pigs), the feeding of cholesterol resulted in an

  13. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettenis, M.M.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  14. Direct and quantitative comparison of pixelated density profiles with high-resolution X-ray reflectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenter, P; Lee, S S; Skelton, A A; Cummings, P T

    2011-03-01

    A method for comparing pixelated density profiles (e.g. obtained from molecular dynamics or other computational techniques) with experimental X-ray reflectivity data both directly and quantitatively is described. The conditions under which such a comparison can be made quantitatively (e.g. with errors X-ray reflectivity calculations for binned density profiles is defined in terms of the inter-relationships between resolution of the X-ray reflectivity data (i.e. its range in momentum transfer), the chosen bin size and the width of the intrinsic density profile. These factors play a similar role in the application of any structure-factor calculations that involve the use of pixelated density profiles, such as those obtained from iterative phasing algorithms for inverting structures from X-ray reflectivity and coherent diffraction imaging data. Finally, it is shown how simulations of a quartz-water interface can be embedded into an exact description of the `bulk' phases (including the substrate crystal and the fluid water, below and above the actual interface) to quantitatively reproduce the experimental reflectivity data of a solid-liquid interface.

  15. Planetary Accretion in the Inner Solar System: Dependence on Nebula Surface Density Profile and Giant Planet Eccentricities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Cassen, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present 32 N-body simulations of planetary accretion in the inner Solar System, examining the effect of nebula surface density profile and initial eccentricities of Jupiter and Saturn on the compositions and orbits of the inner planets. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Continuous Learning Graphical Knowledge Unit for Cluster Identification in High Density Data Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K.L.B. Adikaram

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Big data are visually cluttered by overlapping data points. Rather than removing, reducing or reformulating overlap, we propose a simple, effective and powerful technique for density cluster generation and visualization, where point marker (graphical symbol of a data point overlap is exploited in an additive fashion in order to obtain bitmap data summaries in which clusters can be identified visually, aided by automatically generated contour lines. In the proposed method, the plotting area is a bitmap and the marker is a shape of more than one pixel. As the markers overlap, the red, green and blue (RGB colour values of pixels in the shared region are added. Thus, a pixel of a 24-bit RGB bitmap can code up to 224 (over 1.6 million overlaps. A higher number of overlaps at the same location makes the colour of this area identical, which can be identified by the naked eye. A bitmap is a matrix of colour values that can be represented as integers. The proposed method updates this matrix while adding new points. Thus, this matrix can be considered as an up-to-time knowledge unit of processed data. Results show cluster generation, cluster identification, missing and out-of-range data visualization, and outlier detection capability of the newly proposed method.

  17. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, M., E-mail: mbeall@trialphaenergy.com; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  18. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.

    2016-11-01

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO2/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 1016 m-2 at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  19. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M; Deng, B H; Gota, H

    2016-11-01

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO2/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 1016 m-2 at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  20. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  1. On the apparent power law in CDM halo pseudo-phase space density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Ethan O.; Oh, S. Peng; Ji, Suoqing

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the apparent power-law scaling of the pseudo-phase space density (PPSD) in cold dark matter (CDM) haloes. We study fluid collapse, using the close analogy between the gas entropy and the PPSD in the fluid approximation. Our hydrodynamic calculations allow for a precise evaluation of logarithmic derivatives. For scale-free initial conditions, entropy is a power law in Lagrangian (mass) coordinates, but not in Eulerian (radial) coordinates. The deviation from a radial power law arises from incomplete hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE), linked to bulk inflow and mass accretion, and the convergence to the asymptotic central power-law slope is very slow. For more realistic collapse, entropy is not a power law with either radius or mass due to deviations from HSE and scale-dependent initial conditions. Instead, it is a slowly rolling power law that appears approximately linear on a log-log plot. Our fluid calculations recover PPSD power-law slopes and residual amplitudes similar to N-body simulations, indicating that deviations from a power law are not numerical artefacts. In addition, we find that realistic collapse is not self-similar; scalelengths such as the shock radius and the turnaround radius are not power-law functions of time. We therefore argue that the apparent power-law PPSD cannot be used to make detailed dynamical inferences or extrapolate halo profiles inwards, and that it does not indicate any hidden integrals of motion. We also suggest that the apparent agreement between the PPSD and the asymptotic Bertschinger slope is purely coincidental.

  2. Spinal coronal profiles and proximal femur bone mineral density in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Qiang; Watanabe, Kota; Hosogane, Naobumi; Hikata, Tomohiro; Iwanami, Akio; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2013-11-01

    Although the occurrence and progression of AIS has been linked to low bone mineral density (BMD), the relationships between spinal curvature and bilateral differences in proximal femur BMD are controversial. Few correlation studies have stratified patients by curve type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between spinal coronal profile and bilateral differences in proximal femur BMD in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). This study included 67 patients with AIS who underwent posterior correction and fusion surgery between January 2009 and October 2011. The mean age at the time of surgery was 17.4 ± 4.1 years. Bilateral proximal femur BMD was measured before surgery by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We compared the proximal femur BMDs by determining the bilateral BMD ratio (left proximal femur BMD divided by that of the right). We evaluated correlations between coronal parameters, obtained from preoperative radiographs, and the BMD ratio using Pearson's correlation analysis. Patients with Lenke type 1 curve (48; all with a right convex curve) had a mean bilateral proximal femur BMD ratio of 1.00 ± 0.04. Patients with Lenke type 5 curve (19; all with a left convex curve) had a mean bilateral proximal femur BMD ratio of 0.94 ± 0.04, indicating that the BMD in the proximal femur on the right side (concave) was greater than that in the left (convex). Coronal balance was significantly correlated with the BMD ratio in both the Lenke type 1 and type 5 groups, with a correlation coefficient of 0.46 and 0.50, respectively. The bilateral proximal femur BMD ratio was significantly correlated with the coronal balance in AIS patients. When the C7 plumb line was shifted toward one side, the BMD was greater in the contralateral proximal femur.

  3. Improved Minimum Entropy Filtering for Continuous Nonlinear Non-Gaussian Systems Using a Generalized Density Evolution Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinliang Xu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the filtering problem for multivariate continuous nonlinear non-Gaussian systems based on an improved minimum error entropy (MEE criterion. The system is described by a set of nonlinear continuous equations with non-Gaussian system noises and measurement noises. The recently developed generalized density evolution equation is utilized to formulate the joint probability density function (PDF of the estimation errors. Combining the entropy of the estimation error with the mean squared error, a novel performance index is constructed to ensure the estimation error not only has small uncertainty but also approaches to zero. According to the conjugate gradient method, the optimal filter gain matrix is then obtained by minimizing the improved minimum error entropy criterion. In addition, the condition is proposed to guarantee that the estimation error dynamics is exponentially bounded in the mean square sense. Finally, the comparative simulation results are presented to show that the proposed MEE filter is superior to nonlinear unscented Kalman filter (UKF.

  4. [A Modified Procedure to Isolate Synchronous Cells from Yeasts with Continuous Percoll Density Gradient and Their Raman Discrimination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-shi; Lai, Jun-zhuo; Lu, Ming-qian; Cheng, Qin; Liao, Wei; Chen, Li-mei

    2015-08-01

    A modified procedure of Percoll density gradient centrifugation was developed to isolate and fractionate synchronous cells from stationary phase (sp) cultures of different yeast strains, as well as Raman spectra discrimination of single yeast cells was reported. About 1.75 mL Percoll solution in 2 mL polypropylene centrifugal tube was centrifuged at 19,320 g, 20 °C with an angle rotor for 15 min to form continuous densities gradient (1.00~1.31 g · mL(-1)), approximately 100 μL sample was overlaid onto the preformed continuous density gradient carefully, subsequently, centrifuged at 400 g for 60 min in a tabletop centrifuge equipped with a angle rotor at 25 °C. Yeast samples could be observed that the suspensions were separated into two cell fractions obviously. Both fractions of different yeast strains were respectively determined by differential interference contrast (DIC), phase contrast microscope and synchronous culture to distinguish their morphological and growth trait. The results showed that the lower fraction cells were unbudded, mostly unicellular, highly refractive, homogeneous and uniform in size, and represented growth characteristic synchronously; Their protoplasm had relatively high density, and contained significant concentrations of glycogen; all of which were accordant with description of quiescent yeast cells and G0 cells in previously published paper. It was shown that lower fraction was quiescent cells, synchronous G0 cells as well. A Raman tweezers setup was used to investigate the differences between two fractions, G0 cells and non G0 cells, at a single cell level. The result showed that both G0 cells and the non G0 cells had the same characteristic peaks corresponding biological macromolecules including proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, but all characteristic peak intensities of G0 cells were higher than that of non G0 cells, implied that the macromolecular substance content of G0 cells was more higher. Principal component

  5. Continuous gravity measurements reveal a low-density lava lake at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    On 5 March 2011, the lava lake within the summit eruptive vent at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, began to drain as magma withdrew to feed a dike intrusion and fissure eruption on the volcanoʼs east rift zone. The draining was monitored by a variety of continuous geological and geophysical measurements, including deformation, thermal and visual imagery, and gravity. Over the first ∼14 hours of the draining, the ground near the eruptive vent subsided by about 0.15 m, gravity dropped by more than 100 μGal, and the lava lake retreated by over 120 m. We used GPS data to correct the gravity signal for the effects of subsurface mass loss and vertical deformation in order to isolate the change in gravity due to draining of the lava lake alone. Using a model of the eruptive vent geometry based on visual observations and the lava level over time determined from thermal camera data, we calculated the best-fit lava density to the observed gravity decrease — to our knowledge, the first geophysical determination of the density of a lava lake anywhere in the world. Our result, 950 +/- 300 kg m-3, suggests a lava density less than that of water and indicates that Kīlaueaʼs lava lake is gas-rich, which can explain why rockfalls that impact the lake trigger small explosions. Knowledge of such a fundamental material property as density is also critical to investigations of lava-lake convection and degassing and can inform calculations of pressure change in the subsurface magma plumbing system.

  6. Aphid aerial density profiles are consistent with turbulent advection amplifying flight behaviours: abandoning the epithet ‘passive’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andy M; Reynolds, Don R

    2008-01-01

    Seminal field studies led by C. G. Johnson in the 1940s and 1950s showed that aphid aerial density diminishes with height above the ground such that the linear regression coefficient, b, of log density on log height provides a single-parameter characterization of the vertical density profile. This coefficient decreases with increasing atmospheric stability, ranging from −0.27 for a fully convective boundary layer to −2.01 for a stable boundary layer. We combined a well-established Lagrangian stochastic model of atmospheric dispersal with simple models of aphid behaviour in order to account for the range of aerial density profiles. We show that these density distributions are consistent with the aphids producing just enough lift to become neutrally buoyant when they are in updraughts and ceasing to produce lift when they are in downdraughts. This active flight behaviour in a weak flier is thus distinctly different from the aerial dispersal of seeds and wingless arthropods, which is passive once these organisms have launched into the air. The novel findings from the model indicate that the epithet ‘passive’ often applied to the windborne migration of small winged insects is misleading and should be abandoned. The implications for the distances traversed by migrating aphids under various boundary-layer conditions are outlined. PMID:18782743

  7. Unraveling Motivational Profiles of Health Care Professionals for Continuing Education: The Example of Pharmacists in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) can support health care professionals in maintaining and developing their knowledge and competencies. Although lack of motivation is one of the most important barriers of pharmacists' participation in CE, we know little about the quality or the quantity of motivation. We used the self-determination theory, which describes autonomous motivation (AM) as originating from within an individual and controlled motivation (CM) as originating from external factors, as a framework for this study. Our aim was to obtain insight into the quality and quantity of pharmacists' motivation for CE. The scores of 425 pharmacists on Academic Motivation Scale were subjected to K-means cluster analysis to generate motivational profiles. We unraveled four motivational profiles: (1) good quality with high AM/low CM, (2) high quantity with high AM/high CM, (3) poor quality with low AM/high CM, and (4) low quantity with low AM/low CM. Female pharmacists, pharmacists working in a hospital pharmacy, pharmacists working for more than 10 years, and pharmacists not in training were highly represented in the good-quality profile. Pharmacists working in a community pharmacy, pharmacists working for less than 10 years, and pharmacists in training were highly represented in the high-quantity profile. Male pharmacists were more or less equally distributed over the four profiles. The highest percentage of pharmacy owners was shown in the low-quantity profile, and the highest percentage of the nonowners was shown in the good-quality profile. Pharmacists exhibit different motivational profiles, which are associated with their background characteristics, such as gender, ownership of business, practice setting, and current training. Motivational profiles could be used to tailor CE courses for pharmacists.

  8. Tokamak plasma self-organization and the possibility to have the peaked density profile in ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Kislov, A. Y.; Kirneva, N. A.; Lysenko, S. E.; Pavlov, Y. D.; Shafranov, T. V.; Donne, A. J. H.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Spakman, G. W.; R. Jaspers,; Kantor, M.; Walsh, M.

    2009-01-01

    The self-organization of a tokamak plasma is a fundamental turbulent plasma phenomenon, which leads to the formation of a self-consistent pressure profile. This phenomenon has been investigated in several tokamaks with different methods of heating. It is shown that the normalized pressure profile

  9. Construction of concentration density profile across the interface in SAN/EVA immiscible blend from positron lifetime parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, P.; Meghala, D.; Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-01

    The interface width determination through the construction of composition density profile across the interface in an immiscible binary polymer blend using ortho-positronium lifetime parameters is described in this paper. The distribution of free volume and hence the hydrodynamic interaction parameter has been evaluated for this purpose making use of the CONTIN routine analysis of the lifetime spectra. The results showed the broad free volume distribution and narrow interface width were reminiscent of lack of interaction between SAN and EVA the constituents.

  10. Forming disc galaxies in major mergers - III. The effect of angular momentum on the radial density profiles of disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschken, N.; Athanassoula, E.; Rodionov, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    We study the effect of angular momentum on the surface density profiles of disc galaxies, using high-resolution simulations of major mergers whose remnants have downbending radial density profiles (type II). As described in the previous papers of this series, in this scenario, most of the disc mass is acquired after the collision via accretion from a hot gaseous halo. We find that the inner and outer disc scalelengths, as well as the break radius, correlate with the total angular momentum of the initial merging system, and are larger for high-angular momentum systems. We follow the angular momentum redistribution in our simulated galaxies, and find that like the mass, the disc angular momentum is acquired via accretion, I.e. to the detriment of the gaseous halo. Furthermore, high-angular momentum systems give more angular momentum to their discs, which directly affects their radial density profile. Adding simulations of isolated galaxies to our sample, we find that the correlations are valid also for disc galaxies evolved in isolation. We show that the outer part of the disc at the end of the simulation is populated mainly by inside-out stellar migration, and that in galaxies with higher angular momentum, stars travel radially further out. This, however, does not mean that outer disc stars (in type II discs) were mostly born in the inner disc. Indeed, generally the break radius increases over time, and not taking this into account leads to overestimating the number of stars born in the inner disc.

  11. Secret information reconciliation based on punctured low-density parity-check codes for continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue-Qin; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2017-02-01

    Achieving information theoretic security with practical complexity is of great interest to continuous-variable quantum key distribution in the postprocessing procedure. In this paper, we propose a reconciliation scheme based on the punctured low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Compared to the well-known multidimensional reconciliation scheme, the present scheme has lower time complexity. Especially when the chosen punctured LDPC code achieves the Shannon capacity, the proposed reconciliation scheme can remove the information that has been leaked to an eavesdropper in the quantum transmission phase. Therefore, there is no information leaked to the eavesdropper after the reconciliation stage. This indicates that the privacy amplification algorithm of the postprocessing procedure is no more needed after the reconciliation process. These features lead to a higher secret key rate, optimal performance, and availability for the involved quantum key distribution scheme.

  12. [A rapid method for continuous flow measurement of cholesterol contained in high density lipoproteins (HDL) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsot, P; Yvert, J P; Chevrier, M; Bon, R

    1981-01-01

    The authors utilized a reagent containing concanavalin A, a vegetal lecithin, to selectively precipitate lipoproteins containing apoprotein B, a component of VLDL, LDL, and Lp (a) which are well known for their atherogenic risk. During this precipitation "true" high density lipoproteins remain in solution. HDL cholesterol determination which constitutes an indirect indication of HDL activity or concentrations is performed by an enzymatic method using an automated continuous flow technique carried out on an Auto Analyzer II (Technicon Corp.). This rapid, easy determination obtains results comparable to other methods, particularly those chosen by the Société Française de Biologie Clinique (French Society of Clinical Biology). This technique should permit all laboratories to confirm an atherogenic index.

  13. Cross-correlation Weak Lensing of SDSS galaxy Clusters II: Cluster Density Profiles and the Mass--Richness Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rozo, Eduardo; Koester, Benjamin P.; Frieman, Joshua A.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; Becker, Matthew; Annis, James

    2007-09-28

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  14. On the density profile in Fourier space of harmonically confined ideal quantum gases in d dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Nieto, L. M.

    2007-11-01

    Closed-form analytical expressions and asymptotic results are obtained for the density distribution in Fourier space of harmonically trapped fermion gases at zero and nonzero temperatures in d dimensions. The result is applied to weakly interacting Fermi gases and to the elastic scattering from atomic nuclei. The Fourier transform of the momentum density for a d-dimensional harmonic confinement is also found.

  15. Wood density-moisture profiles in old-growth Douglas-fir and western hemlock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.Y. Pong; Dale R. Waddell; Lambert Michael B.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the weight of each load of logs is necessary for safe and efficient aerial logging operations. The prediction of green density (lb/ft3) as a function of height is a critical element in the accurate estimation of tree bole and log weights. Two sampling methods, disk and increment core (Bergstrom xylodensimeter), were used to measure the density-...

  16. Development of a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) for continuous temperature profiling upto lower stratospheric altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2012-07-01

    The Gadanki (13.46°N, 79.17°E) MST radar is a high power VHF pulsed coherent Doppler radar established for remote probing of atmospheric phenomena in the Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere regions. Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) was developed using this radar to obtain height profiles of atmospheric temperature up to lower stratospheric altitudes. RASS uses the effect of temperature on the speed of sound in air as a means to sense the atmospheric temperature. It is the combination of a Doppler radar and acoustic exciters. The radar was augmented with acoustic exciters that were designed and constructed for this purpose. The Doppler radar profiles the speed of refractive index perturbations induced by the acoustic source. RASS has been demonstrated to be a reliable ground-based remote profiling technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature, Tv over the past two decades. This work describes the design of the system and its application to the observation of height profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature up to and beyond tropical tropopause altitudes. Observations were made during 2007, 2008 and 2009 over periods extending up to 72 hours. These observations demonstrate temperature profiling capability up to about 18 km in altitude, though on an occasion height coverage upto 22.8km was obtained briefly; lowest height covered is from about 1.5km onwards. During the period of the RASS observations simultaneous data from radiosonde was used to validate the temperature measurements. Simultaneous satellite-based measurement of outgoing long wave radiation (OLR) and precipitation from ground-based instruments was used to study the atmospheric phenomena of gravity waves and atmospheric stability during a convection event.

  17. A continuous OSL scanning method for analysis of radiation depth-dose profiles in bricks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the development of a method for directly measuring radiation depth-dose profiles from brick, tile and porcelain cores, without the need for sample separation techniques. For the brick cores, examples are shown of the profiles generated by artificial irradiation using...... the different photon energies from Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma sources; comparison is drawn with both the theoretical calculations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, as well as experimental measurements made using more conventional optically stimulated luminescence methods of analysis....

  18. Density of muscle spindle profiles in the intrinsic forelimb muscles of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, D F; Peck, D

    1990-03-01

    The concept of parallel muscle combinations, in which spindle density is significantly higher in small muscles compared to their larger counterparts in large-small muscle combinations acting across a joint, is supported by the results of this study regardless of the joint. Analysis of the canine data as well as previously published guinea pig forelimb and human pelvic limb data revealed no significant difference in spindle density between antigravity and non-antigravity muscles. Furthermore, a gradual increase in spindle density from proximal to distal on the limb was not found, although spindle density was significantly higher in the intrinsic manus or pes muscles compared to more proximal limb muscles in all three species. The significant differences in spindle densities in parallel muscle combinations and in manus/pes versus proximal muscles are discussed relative to their possible role in the control of locomotion.

  19. Radio science electron density profiles of lunar ionosphere based on the service module of circumlunar return and reentry spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Han, S.; Ping, J.; Tang, G.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-09-01

    The existence of lunar ionosphere has been under debate for a long time. Radio occultation experiments had been performed by both Luna 19/22 and SELENE missions and electron column density of lunar ionosphere was provided. The Apollo 14 mission also acquired the electron density with in situ measurements. But the results of these missions don't well-matched. In order to explore the lunar ionosphere, radio occultation with the service module of Chinese circumlunar return and reentry spacecraft has been performing. One coherent S-band and X-band radio signals were recorded by China deep space stations, and local correlation was adopted to compute carrier phases of both signals. Based on the above work, the electron density profiles of lunar ionosphere was obtained and analyzed.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations on the density profile of CO2 laser-produced Sn plasma for an EUVL source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Ueno, Y.; Yuspeh, S.; Burdt, R. A.; Amin, N.; Shaikh, N. M.; Tillack, M. S.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-04-01

    Experimentally observed density profile of CO2 laser-produced Sn plasma was compared with that predicted by one dimensional hydrodynamic radiation numerical code. Experimental data showed a much smaller corona and a much shorter shift distance of the critical density from the initial target surface as compared with those predicted by an isothermal model and the numerical simulation. The possible reason may come from thin localized laser deposition region, less energy transport into the corona and into the dense region beyond the critical density. This research suggests that more efforts to understand the fundamental dominating the interaction of CO2 laser with high Z plasma are necessary to form a more solid foundation for the application of numerical method to the development of the EUVL source.

  1. The dynamics of straight vortex filaments in a Bose-Einstein condensate with a Gaussian density profile

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, V P

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of interacting quantized vortex filaments in a rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate, which is in the Thomas-Fermi regime at zero temperature and described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, is considered in the hydrodynamical "anelastic" approximation. In the presence of a smoothly inhomogeneous array of filaments (vortex lattice), a non-canonical Hamiltonian equation of motion is derived for the macroscopically averaged vorticity, with taking into account the spatial non-uniformity of the equilibrium condensate density determined by the trap potential. A minimum of the corresponding Hamiltonian describes a static configuration of deformed vortex lattice against a given density background. The minimum condition is reduced to a vector nonlinear partial differential equation of the second order, for which some approximate and exact solutions are found. It is shown that if the condensate density has an anisotropic Gaussian profile then equation of motion for the averaged vorticity admits solutio...

  2. Interval and Continuous Exercise Training Produce Similar Increases in Skeletal Muscle and Left Ventricle Microvascular Density in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interval training (IT, consisting of alternated periods of high and low intensity exercise, has been proposed as a strategy to induce more marked biological adaptations than continuous exercise training (CT. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of IT and CT with equivalent total energy expenditure on capillary skeletal and cardiac muscles in rats. Wistar rats ran on a treadmill for 30 min per day with no slope (0%, 4 times/week for 13 weeks. CT has constant load of 70% max; IT has cycles of 90% max for 1 min followed by 1 min at 50% max. CT and IT increased endurance and muscle oxidative capacity and attenuated body weight gain to a similar extent (P>0.05. In addition, CT and IT similarly increased functional capillary density of skeletal muscle (CT: 30.6±11.7%; IT: 28.7±11.9% and the capillary-to-fiber ratio in skeletal muscle (CT: 28.7±14.4%; IT: 40.1±17.2% and in the left ventricle (CT: 57.3±53.1%; IT: 54.3±40.5%. In conclusion, at equivalent total work volumes, interval exercise training induced similar functional and structural alterations in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle and myocardium in healthy rats compared to continuous exercise training.

  3. Continuous representation of tumor microvessel density and detection of angiogenic hotspots in histological whole-slide images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Marx, Alexander; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels in solid tumors are not randomly distributed, but are clustered in angiogenic hotspots. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) within these hotspots correlates with patient survival and is widely used both in diagnostic routine and in clinical trials. Still, these hotspots are usually subjectively defined. There is no unbiased, continuous and explicit representation of tumor vessel distribution in histological whole slide images. This shortcoming distorts angiogenesis measurements and may account for ambiguous results in the literature. In the present study, we describe and evaluate a new method that eliminates this bias and makes angiogenesis quantification more objective and more efficient. Our approach involves automatic slide scanning, automatic image analysis and spatial statistical analysis. By comparing a continuous MVD function of the actual sample to random point patterns, we introduce an objective criterion for hotspot detection: An angiogenic hotspot is defined as a clustering of blood vessels that is very unlikely to occur randomly. We evaluate the proposed method in N=11 images of human colorectal carcinoma samples and compare the results to a blinded human observer. For the first time, we demonstrate the existence of statistically significant hotspots in tumor images and provide a tool to accurately detect these hotspots. PMID:26061817

  4. Profiling teachers' continuing professional development and the relation with their beliefs about learning and teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Siebrich; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; de Grift, Wim J. C. M. van

    This exploratory study investigates the relationship between teachers' continuing professional development (CPD) and their beliefs about learning and teaching, in a Dutch secondary education context. Two hundred sixty teachers participated in a survey focused on teachers' updating, reflective, and

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ANATOMICAL FEATURES AND INTRA-RING WOOD DENSITY PROFILES IN Gmelina arborea APPLYING X-RAY DENSITOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tomazelo-Filho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Four annual tree-rings (2 of juvenile wood and 2 of mature wood were sampled from fast-growth plantations ofGmelina arborea in two climatic conditions (dry and wet tropical in Costa Rica. Each annual tree-ring was divided in equal parts ina radial direction. For each part, X-ray density as well as vessel percentage, length and width fiber, cell wall thickness and lumendiameter were measured. Wood density and profile patterns of cell dimension demonstrated inconsistency between juvenile andmature wood and climatic conditions. The Pearson correlation matrix showed that intra-ring wood density was positively correlatedwith the cell wall thickness and negatively correlated with vessel percentage, fiber length, lumen diameter and width. The forwardstepwise regressions determined that: (i intra-ring wood density variation could be predicted from 76 to 96% for anatomicalvariation; (ii cell wall thickness was the most important anatomical feature to produce intra-ring wood density variation and (iii thevessel percentage, fiber length, lumen diameter and width were the second most statically significant characteristics to intra-ring wooddensity, however, with low participation of the determination coefficient of stepwise regressions.

  6. Metal sheet thickness profile measurement method based on two-side line triangulation and continuous vibration compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Petri; Miettinen, Jari; Keränen, Heimo; Vaarala, Tapio

    2008-04-01

    Dimension measurements in metal production are getting increasingly important to improve quality and yield. One important measurement is thickness profile, in this case of copper strip. Knowing the strip profile in entrance and exit side of milling line helps optimizing the milling depth and give information about tool wearing. In this study a comparative measurement method was traversing point measurement system. It gives profile as a series of points which take a relatively long time to measure. Now presented method is based on two-side optical triangulation formed by line illuminators and CMOS-cameras and enables instantaneous thickness profile measurement. Results from both sides are fixed together using reference plates on both ends of the measurement area. From 1.3 m stand-off distance, 1.4 m wide measurement area is achieved. This paper presents the measurement method and results of laboratory and on-line tests. Using laser line illumination the accuracy of thickness was 150 μm when measuring 9 mm thick test plate. Accuracy was limited by laser speckle during static calibration. Other illumination method based on white light was therefore tested and the accuracy was 12 μm correspondingly. Measurement time for one profile was 1 second and resolution in cross machine direction 50 mm after averaging. Now presented method enables thickness profile measurement of copper and other metal sheets. Using white light the accuracy is at same level as the present traversing point measurement. Method has also continuous reference measurement to compensate errors caused by vibration; therefore the system can be realized at reasonable cost.

  7. Improved fluid mixing and power density in reverse electrodialysis stacks with chevron-profiled membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowski, Sylwin; Rijnaarts, Timon; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Crespo, João G.; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2017-01-01

    Spacer-less RED stacks using membranes with integrated spacer profiles have been investigated during the last years to eliminate the spacer shadow effect. The presence of spacers partially blocks the membrane surface and creates a tortuous and thus longer path for ions in the channel, meaning higher

  8. Density profile evolution and nonequilibrium effects in partial and full spreading measurements of surface diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikunen, P.; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2001-01-01

    (theta) to determine the locations of phase boundaries and find such data to be clearly time dependent during full spreading. We conclude that nonequilibrium effects seem to be an inherent feature in profile evolution studies of surface diffusion in all cases where ordering plays a prominent role. This warrants...

  9. Instrumental broadening of spectral line profiles due to discrete representation of a continuous physical quantity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulov, E.N. [Department of Physics, Kazan State University, 420008, Kremlevskaya st. 18, Kazan (Russian Federation)], E-mail: fe57@rambler.ru; Khripunov, D.M. [Department of Physics, Kazan State University, 420008, Kremlevskaya st. 18, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15

    It is the usual situation in spectroscopy that a continuous physical quantity, which plays the role of a spectral function argument (i.e. the abscissa of a spectrum), is sampled electronically as discrete point clouds or channels. Each channel corresponds to the midpoint of a small interval of the continuous argument. The experimentally registered value of intensity in the channel describes the averaged spectral intensity in this interval. However, an approximation of spectra by a continuous theoretical model function often assumes that the interval is small enough, and tabulation of the theoretical model function may be used without appreciable disadvantages for the fitting results. At this point, a new type of approximation error appears, such as the error of midpoint approximation to a definite integral in the rectangle method of numeric integration. This paper aims at quantitative estimation of this error in the cases of a pure Lorentz lineshape and a generalized Voigt contour. It is shown that discrete representation of continuous spectral data leads to some non-physical broadening in comparison with the tabulated model function. As a first approximation it is normal broadening. We show that even in the case of a Lorentz true lineshape we must use the tabulated Voigt function measured in channels fixed Gauss linewidth rather than a tabulated Lorentzian. Application of the results of this paper is demonstrated on Moessbauer spectra.

  10. Tractable flux-driven temperature, density, and rotation profile evolution with the quasilinear gyrokinetic transport model QuaLiKiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Casson, F. J.; Angioni, C.; Bonanomi, N.; Camenen, Y.; Garbet, X.; Garzotti, L.; Görler, T.; Gürcan, O.; Koechl, F.; Imbeaux, F.; Linder, O.; van de Plassche, K.; Strand, P.; Szepesi, G.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Quasilinear turbulent transport models are a successful tool for prediction of core tokamak plasma profiles in many regimes. Their success hinges on the reproduction of local nonlinear gyrokinetic fluxes. We focus on significant progress in the quasilinear gyrokinetic transport model QuaLiKiz (Bourdelle et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 014036), which employs an approximated solution of the mode structures to significantly speed up computation time compared to full linear gyrokinetic solvers. Optimisation of the dispersion relation solution algorithm within integrated modelling applications leads to flux calculations × {10}6-7 faster than local nonlinear simulations. This allows tractable simulation of flux-driven dynamic profile evolution including all transport channels: ion and electron heat, main particles, impurities, and momentum. Furthermore, QuaLiKiz now includes the impact of rotation and temperature anisotropy induced poloidal asymmetry on heavy impurity transport, important for W-transport applications. Application within the JETTO integrated modelling code results in 1 s of JET plasma simulation within 10 h using 10 CPUs. Simultaneous predictions of core density, temperature, and toroidal rotation profiles for both JET hybrid and baseline experiments are presented, covering both ion and electron turbulence scales. The simulations are successfully compared to measured profiles, with agreement mostly in the 5%–25% range according to standard figures of merit. QuaLiKiz is now open source and available at www.qualikiz.com.

  11. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1...

  12. Kernel density estimation and K-means clustering to profile road accident hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tessa K

    2009-05-01

    Identifying road accident hotspots is a key role in determining effective strategies for the reduction of high density areas of accidents. This paper presents (1) a methodology using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Kernel Density Estimation to study the spatial patterns of injury related road accidents in London, UK and (2) a clustering methodology using environmental data and results from the first section in order to create a classification of road accident hotspots. The use of this methodology will be illustrated using the London area in the UK. Road accident data collected by the Metropolitan Police from 1999 to 2003 was used. A kernel density estimation map was created and subsequently disaggregated by cell density to create a basic spatial unit of an accident hotspot. Appended environmental data was then added to the hotspot cells and using K-means clustering, an outcome of similar hotspots was deciphered. Five groups and 15 clusters were created based on collision and attribute data. These clusters are discussed and evaluated according to their robustness and potential uses in road safety campaigning.

  13. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  14. Assessing the potential of passive microwave radiometers for continuous temperature profile retrieval using a three year data set from Payerne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhnert, U.; Maier, O.

    2011-12-01

    The motivation of this study is to verify theoretical expectations placed on ground-based radiometer techniques and to confirm whether they are suitable for supporting key missions of national weather services, such as timely and accurate weather advisories and warnings. We evaluate reliability and accuracy of atmospheric temperature profiles retrieved continuously by a HATPRO (Humidity And Temperature PROfiler) system operated at the aerological station of Payerne (MeteoSwiss) in the time period August 2006-December 2009. Assessment is performed by comparing temperatures from the radiometer against temperature measurements from a radiosonde accounting for a total of 2088 quality-controlled all-season cases. In the evaluated time period, HATPRO delivered reliable temperature profiles in 88% of all-weather conditions with a temporal resolution of 15 min. Random differences between HATPRO and radiosonde are down to 0.5 K in the lower boundary layer and rise up to 1.7 K at 4 km height. The differences observed between HATPRO and radiosonde in the lower boundary layer are similar to the differences observed between the radiosonde and another in-situ sensor located on a close-by 30 m tower. Temperature retrievals from above 4 km contain less than 5% of the total information content of the measurements, which makes clear that this technique is mainly suited for continuous observations in the boundary layer. Systematic temperature differences are also observed throughout the retrieved profile and can account for up to ±0.5 K. These errors are due to offsets in the measurements of the microwave radiances that have been corrected for in data post-processing and lead to nearly bias-free overall temperature retrievals. Different reasons for the radiance offsets are discussed, but cannot be unambiguously determined retrospectively. Monitoring and, if necessary, corrections for radiance offsets as well as a real-time rigorous automated data quality control are mandatory for

  15. Exact and Asymptotic Features of the Edge Density Profile for the One Component Plasma in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T.; Forrester, P. J.; Téllez, G.; Wiegmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    There is a well known analogy between the Laughlin trial wave function for the fractional quantum Hall effect, and the Boltzmann factor for the two-dimensional one-component plasma. The latter requires continuation beyond the finite geometry used in its derivation. We consider both disk and cylinder geometry, and focus attention on the exact and asymptotic features of the edge density. At the special coupling the system is exactly solvable. In particular the -point correlation can be written as a determinant, allowing the edge density to be computed to first order in . A double layer structure is found, which in turn implies an overshoot of the density as the edge of the leading support is approached from the interior. Asymptotic analysis shows that the deviation from the leading order (step function) value is different for the interior and exterior directions. For general , a Gaussian fluctuation formula is used to study the large deviation form of the density for large but finite. This asymptotic form involves thermodynamic quantities which we independently study, and moreover an appropriate scaling gives the asymptotic decay of the limiting edge density outside of the plasma.

  16. Effect of the deviation of the current density profile center on the three-dimensional non-transferred arc plasma torch

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Z; Yin, S; Qian, Z; Liao, H; Gu, S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the three-dimensional steady-state non-transferred plasma arc was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with user defined functions (UDFs). A two-equation current density profile was developed to simulate the complex plasma flow inside the torch. The effect of the deviation distance (distance between the cathode tip center and the current density profile center) on the plasma flow features was systematically investigated for the first time. It is found that the ...

  17. Recreational football improves bone mineral density and bone turnover marker profile in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Eva Wulff; Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Schmidt, Jakob Friis

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of recreational football and resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTMs) in elderly men. Twenty-six healthy sedentary men (age 68.2 ± 3.2 years) were randomized into three groups: football (F; n = 9) and resistance training (R; n...... training had no effect. The anabolic response may be due to increased bone turnover, especially improved bone formation....

  18. Correlated magnetic impurities in a superconductor: electron density profiles and robustness of superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, P D; Dugaev, V K; Vieira, V R; Araújo, M A N

    2010-01-20

    The insertion of magnetic impurities in a conventional superconductor leads to various effects. In this work we show that the electron density is affected by the spins (considered as classical) both locally and globally. The charge accumulation is solved self-consistently. This affects the transport properties along magnetic domain walls. Also, we show that superconductivity is more robust if the spin locations are not random but correlated. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  19. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  20. Preschool language profiles of children at family risk of dyslexia: continuities with specific language impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Hannah M.; Hulme, Charles; Gooch, Debbie; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children at family risk of dyslexia have been reported to show phonological deficits as well as broader language delays in the preschool years. Method The preschool language skills of 112 children at family risk of dyslexia (FR) at ages 3½ and 4½ were compared with those of children with SLI and typically developing (TD) controls. Results Children at FR showed two different profiles: one third of the group resembled the children with SLI and scored poorly across multiple domains of language including phonology. As a group, the remaining children had difficulties on tasks tapping phonological skills at T1 and T2. At the individual level, we confirmed that some FR children had both phonological and broader oral language difficulties (compared with TD controls), some had only phonological difficulties and some appeared to be developing typically. Conclusions We have highlighted the early overlap between family risk of dyslexia and SLI. A family history of dyslexia carries an increased risk for SLI and the two disorders both show an increased incidence of phonological deficits which appear to a proximal risk factor for developing a reading impairment. PMID:23772651

  1. Cross-linked gelatin microspheres with continuously tunable degradation profiles for renal tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Monica A; Knight, Toyin; Payne, Richard G; Basu, Joydeep; Rivera, Elias A; Robbins, Neil; McCoy, Darell; Halberstadt, Craig; Jain, Deepak; Bertram, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin-based biomaterials are widely used in tissue engineering applications. Various methods have been reported for the cross-linking of these macromolecules for the purpose of delaying their biodegradation to prolong their in vivo residence (in tissue engineering applications) or tailoring their drug releasing capacity (when used as drug carriers). In this study, a carbodiimide-based cross-linking method, also used in the production of United States Food and Drug Administration-approved products, was employed to obtain differentially cross-linked gelatin beads. The colorimetric determination of the in vitro enzymatic susceptibility of the beads indicated that the resistance to degradation linearly correlated with the concentration of carbodiimide used for the cross-linking reaction. This result was also confirmed in vivo by the histological evaluation of the residence time of orthotopically injected cell-seeded beads. These data would indicate that the production of gelatin-based microbeads with tunable degradation profiles might be applicable toward the development of products that catalyze regeneration of kidney and other solid organs. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. "The relationship between pharmacokinetic variables and pharmacodynamic profiles of bolus versus continuous infusion of furosemide in critically ill patients"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the pharmacokinetic variables of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus injection of furosemide and the possible relationship between its pharmacokinetic characteristics and pharmacodynamic profile among intensive care unit (ICU patients were studied. In this prospective, randomized, clinical trial, twelve patients received IV bolus of 20 mg of the drug during 3 hours period and, the drug dose was doubled, when the urine output was less than 1 ml/kg/h (group 1. The other nine patients received a continuous intravenous furosemide infusion at the rate of 0.1 mg/kg/h (group 2. The amount of furosemide in serum was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results showed a positive correlation between plasma clearance of furosemide and its diuretic activity (P=0.01. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vd (l, CL (ml/min, Ke (min-1 and t½ (min in continuous infusion patients were not significantly differed from the bolus patients (P-values 0.5, 0.9, 0.9,0.9, respectively. Nevertheless the observed plasma clearance of drug in the continuous infusion group was clinically higher than bolus injection group and as a result the cumulative urine output per hour per mg of furosemide in a continuous infusion was observed to be higher than bolus(P=0.2. Changes in serum sodium and potassium were similar for both groups, but bolus injection patients were associated with higher potassium depletion (P=0.001. Therefore, continuous infusion seems to be better means of diuretic therapy in critically ill patients.

  3. Density and current profiles in Uq (A2(1)) zero range process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniba, A.; Mangazeev, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The stochastic R matrix for Uq (An(1)) introduced recently gives rise to an integrable zero range process of n classes of particles in one dimension. For n = 2 we investigate how finitely many first class particles fixed as defects influence the grand canonical ensemble of the second class particles. By using the matrix product stationary probabilities involving infinite products of q-bosons, exact formulas are derived for the local density and current of the second class particles in the large volume limit.

  4. Density profile in shock wave fronts of partially ionized xenon plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Reinholz, H; Morozov, I; Mintsev, V; Zaparoghets, Y; Fortov, V; Wierling, A

    2003-01-01

    Results for the reflection coefficient of shock-compressed dense xenon plasmas at pressures of 1.6-20 GPa and temperatures around 30 000 K are interpreted. In addition to former experiments using laser beams with lambda = 1.06 mu m, measurements at lambda = 0.694 mu m have been performed recently. Reflectivities typical for metallic systems are found at high densities. Besides free carriers, the theoretical description also takes into account the influence of the neutral component of the plasma on the reflectivity. A consistent description of the measured reflectivities is achieved only if a finite width of the shock wave front is considered.

  5. Profile of cortisol, glycaemia, and blood parameters of American Bullfrog tadpoles Lithobates catesbeianus exposed to density and hypoxia stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C. Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations to the physiological profile (cortisol, glycaemia, and blood parameters of Lithobates catesbeianus caused by the stressors density and hypoxia. The organisms were in the prometamorphosis stage and exposed to different tadpole densities: 1 tadpole/L (T1, 5 tadpoles/L (T2, and 10 tadpoles/L (T3 for 12 days. The blood was collected through the rupture of the caudal blood vessel and collected under normoxia (immediate collection and hypoxia (after 15 minutes of air exposure conditions. Cortisol levels rose on the fourth and eighth days of treatment and returned to basal levels by the end of the experiment. The stressor mechanisms tested did not affect glycaemia. White blood cells (total number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils showed a significant difference at the twelfth day of the experiment when compared with the start of the experiment. We concluded that, under controlled conditions, a density of up to 10 tadpoles/L and air exposure for 15 minutes did not cause harmful physiological alterations during the experimental period. The answer to these stressors maybe was in another hormonal level (corticosterone.

  6. Improving the Automatic Inversion of Digital Alouette/ISIS Ionogram Reflection Traces into Topside Electron Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Huang, Xueqin; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The topside sounders of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program were designed as analog systems. The resulting ionograms were displayed on 35 mm film for analysis by visual inspection. Each of these satellites, launched between 1962 and 1971, produced data for 10 to 20 years. A number of the original telemetry tapes from this large data set have been converted directly into digital records. Software, known as the Topside Ionogram Scalar With True-Height (TOPIST) algorithm, has been produced and used for the automatic inversion of the ionogram reflection traces on more than 100,000 ISIS-2 digital topside ionograms into topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h). Here we present some topside ionospheric solar cycle variations deduced from the TOPIST database to illustrate the scientific benefit of improving and expanding the topside ionospheric Ne(h) database. The profile improvements will be based on improvements in the TOPIST software motivated by direct comparisons between TOPIST profiles and profiles produced by manual scaling in the early days of the ISIS program. The database expansion will be based on new software designed to overcome limitations in the original digital topside ionogram database caused by difficulties encountered during the analog-to-digital conversion process in the detection of the ionogram frame sync pulse and/or the frequency markers. This improved and expanded TOPIST topside Ne(h) database will greatly enhance investigations into both short- and long-term ionospheric changes, e.g., the observed topside ionospheric responses to magnetic storms, induced by interplanetary magnetic clouds, and solar cycle variations, respectively.

  7. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles of the Active Region NOAA 11855

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The magnetic flux emergence can help understand the physical mechanism responsible for solar atmospheric phenomena. Emerging magnetic flux is frequently related to eruptive events, because when emerging they can reconnected with the ambient field and release magnetic energy. We will use a physic-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the solar emission based on the configuration of the photospheric magnetic field. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated by employing force-free extrapolation NLFFF based on vector magnetic field products (SHARPS) observed by HMI instrument aboard SDO spacecraft from Sept. 29 (2013) to Oct. 07 (2013). The coronal plasma temperature and density are described and the emission is estimated using the CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The performance of the our model is compared to the integrated emission from the AIA instrument aboard SDO spacecraft in the specific wavelengths 171Å and 304Å.

  8. Determination of density profiles of unevenly compressed wood of Po­pu­lus tremula using the X – RAY DENSE – LAB laboratory device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Dejmal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the measuring of the density profile of unevenly pressed wood of European aspen (Populus tremula L.. The main aim of the work is to examine in an experimental way the possibilities of using the X – RAY DENSE – LAB laboratory equipment designed for the determination of density profiles of agglomerated and plied large-area materials. The work uses the X – RAY DENSE – LAB equipment to determine the density profile of the cross-section of unevenly pressed aspen wood, plasticized hydrothermically, without the presence of chemical substances. The work also presents calculations of the level of compression/densification in dependence on the density and it describes the factors that can influence the density profile of compressed/densified wood; at the same time, it presents the possible ways to determine the density profile in the cross-section. Further, it includes the creation of the methodology for sample preparation so that the results do not get distorted during measuring. It describes the preparation of sample pieces, the orientation of the anatomic structure, the methodology of pressing, air conditioning, sample preparation, their measuring and analysis. The paper also describes the theory and the principles of measuring with use of X – RAY DENSE – LAB and its calibration. The paper analyses the obtained results of density profiles and searches for and describes the causes of the uneven distribution of the density in the cross-section. It concludes by summarizing the results and recommending the procedure for future measuring.

  9. Systemic and intraperitoneal proinflammatory cytokine profiles in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksic, Doko; Vasilijic, Saga; Colic, Miodrag; Stankovic-Popovic, Verica; Bokonjic, Dubravko

    2009-01-01

    Our cross-sectional study included 44 patients (27 men, 17 women; mean age: 57.12 +/- 16.66 years; mean dialysis treatment period: 3.59 +/- 2.67 years) on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Of the 44 patients, 21 were using standard solutions (Stay*Safe, ANDY-disc: Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany), and 23 were using biocompatible solutions (Gambrosol Trio: Gambro Lundia AB, Lund, Sweden; Stay*Safe Balance: Fresenius Medical Care). In all CAPD patients dialyzed longer than 6 months, we analyzed levels of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in serum and dialysis effluent when patients were free of acute infection-related (CAPD peritonitis, exit-site infection, other acute infections) complications. In a control group of 20 patients with chronic renal failure [CRF (stages IV and V)], we also determined serum levels of the same cytokines. Levels of the inflammatory cytokines were measured using specific commercial ELISA kits (BioSource, Camarillo, CA, U.S.A.). Statistical analysis of the results was performed using commercial statistics software for the PC (Statistica for Windows, rev. 4.5: StatSoft, Tulsa, OK, U.S.A.). Serum levels of LL-1beta and IL-6 were not statistically significantly different between the patients on CAPD, regardless of the type of dialysis the used, and between the patients and the control group with CRF. Serum levels of TNFalpha, unlike those for IL-1beta and IL-6, were statistically significantly higher in patients on CAPD than in the control group with CRF (13.20 +/- 3.23 pg/mL vs. 5.59 +/- 4.54 pg/mL, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney test). Serum and effluent IL-1beta levels in patients on CAPD for less than 1 year and more than 1 year did not significantly differ, but effluent IL-6 levels were significantly higher than serum IL-6 levels in both groups of patients, and effluent IL-6 levels were significantly higher in CAPD patients dialyzed for more than 1 year

  10. Molecular weight​/branching distribution modeling of low-​density-​polyethylene accounting for topological scission and combination termination in continuous stirred tank reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaghini, N.; Iedema, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model to predict the molecular weight distribution (MWD),(1) and branching distribution of low-density polyethylene (IdPE),(2) for free radical polymerization system in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR).(3) The model accounts for branching, by branching moment or

  11. CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF POLY(3-HYDROXYALKANOATES) BY PSEUDOMONAS-OLEOVORANS IN A HIGH-CELL-DENSITY, 2-LIQUID-PHASE CHEMOSTAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preusting, H.; HAZENBERG, W; Witholt, B.

    When Pseudomonas oleovorans is continuously cultured on a two-phase medium consisting of an aqueous minimal salts medium phase with growth-limiting amounts of ammonium (16.7 mM) and an n-octane phase as carbon and energy source, the cells reach a steady-state density of about 2-3 g l-1 and

  12. Storage affects the phenolic profiles and antioxidant activities of cherries (Prunus avium L) on human low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goncalves, B.; Landbo, Anne-Katrine Regel; Let, Mette Bruni

    2004-01-01

    levels in the cvs Burlat and Saco. Phenolic cherry extracts inhibited low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Extracts of freshly harvested cherries exhibited significantly higher antioxidant activities than extracts of stored samples. The cv Summit samples had the highest...... antioxidant activity. Differences in the antioxidant effects of the cherry samples were positively correlated with their levels of p-coumaroylquinic acid (p ...Four sweet cherry cultivars (cvs), Burlat, Saco, Summit and Van, were analysed at harvest and after storage at 2 and 15degreesC for 30 and 6 days respectively. Phenolic profiles in methanolic extracts of freeze-dried samples of the fresh and differently stored cherries were quantified by high...

  13. Identifying the 630 nm auroral arc emission height: A comparison of the triangulation, FAC profile, and electron density methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megan Gillies, D.; Knudsen, D.; Donovan, E.; Jackel, B.; Gillies, R.; Spanswick, E.

    2017-08-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of 630 nm (red-line) emission discrete auroral arcs using the newly deployed Redline Emission Geospace Observatory. In this study we discuss the need for observations of 630 nm aurora and issues with the large-altitude range of the red-line aurora. We compare field-aligned currents (FACs) measured by the Swarm constellation of satellites with the location of 10 red-line (630 nm) auroral arcs observed by all-sky imagers (ASIs) and find that a characteristic emission height of 200 km applied to the ASI maps gives optimal agreement between the two observations. We also compare the new FAC method against the traditional triangulation method using pairs of all-sky imagers (ASIs), and against electron density profiles obtained from the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar-Canadian radar, both of which are consistent with a characteristic emission height of 200 km.

  14. Defining the bone morphometry, micro-architecture and volumetric density profile in osteopenic vs non-osteopenic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Lee, Wayne Yuk-Wai; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Yip, Benjamin Hon-Kei; Yu, Fiona Wai-Ping; Yu, Wing-Sze; Zhu, Feng; Ng, Bobby Kin-Wah; Qiu, Yong; Cheng, Jack Chun-Yiu

    2017-06-01

    Osteopenia has been widely reported in about 30 % of girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). However, the bone quality profile of the 70 % non-osteopenic AIS defined by areal bone mineral density (BMD) with conventional dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has not been adequately studied. Our purpose was to verify whether abnormal volumetric BMD (vBMD) and bone structure (morphometry and micro-architecture) also existed in the non-osteopenic AIS when compared with matched controls using both DXA and high-resolution peripheral computed tomography (HR-pQCT). This was a case-control cross-sectional study. 257 AIS girls with a mean age of 12.7 (SD = 0.8) years old and 187 age- and gender-matched normal controls with an average age of 12.9 (SD = 0.5) years old were included. Areal BMD (aBMD) and bone quality were measured with standard DXA and HR-pQCT, respectively. The parameters of HR-pQCT could be categorized as bone morphometry, vBMD and bone micro-architecture. The results were compared between the osteopenic AIS and osteopenic control, and between the non-osteopenic AIS and non-osteopenic control. In addition to the lower aBMD and vBMD, osteopenic AIS showed significantly greater cortical perimeter and trabecular area than the osteopenic control even after adjustments of age (P architecture and volumetric density profile compared with their normal matched controls. The observed abnormalities were suggestive of decreased endocortical bone apposition or active endocortical resorption that could affect the mechanical bone strength in AIS. The underlying pathomechanism might be attributed to abnormal bone modeling/remodeling that could be associated with the etiopathogenesis of AIS.

  15. Effects of continuous Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT on FSH, lipid profiles, blood chemistry, and skin thickness in menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to observe the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT of estradiol 2 mg + 1 mg acetate noretisterone administered continuously on FSH hormone, lipid profile, blood chemistry, and skin thickness in menopausal women. The duration of HRT administration was 6 months. The subjects of the study were 35 menopausal women. The study was conducted from January 2001 to June 2001. After HRT administration of 6 months, a significant decrease of FSH was observed. No effect of HRT was found in bilirubin level; however, there was a slight increase of alkali phosphatase enzyme, and a signifcant increase in SGOT and SGPT. HRT caused a decrease of total cholesterol level and triglyceride level. In addition, a slight increase of LDL level and significant decrease of HDL level were observed. HRT administration with progesterone synthetic noretisterone showed an increase of skin collagen synthesis, which was indicated by the significant increase of skin thickness. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 97-103Keywords: HRT, FSH, menopause, lipid profile, blood chemistry, skin thickness

  16. Difference between bulk and thin film densities of metal oxide and fluoride films studied by NRA depth profiling techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Coban, A; Durrani, S A

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear reaction analysis techniques have been used to study the difference between bulk and thin film densities of different dielectric (WO sub 3 , MgF sub 2 , NdF sub 3 , LaF sub 3 and ThF sub 4) thin films. Thicknesses of the films were measured by optical methods. The sup 1 sup 8 O(p,alpha) sup 1 sup 5 N reaction was used at 730 keV to profile WO sub 3 prepared with different thicknesses on a tantalum backing by thermal evaporation of natural WO sub 3. We have also successfully tested the sup 1 sup 8 O(p,alpha) sup 1 sup 5 N reaction at the 629 keV (GAMMA=2.1 keV) resonance for the same purpose. Excitation function measurement of the reaction was performed around the resonant energy at a detection angle of 150 deg. . In order to obtain the oxygen profiles of the thin films non-resonant part of the excitation function was deconvoluted using the known cross-section data of the reaction. Also, we studied different films of MgF sub 2 , NdF sub 3 , LaF sub 3 and ThF sub 4 using the 483.85 keV resonance in the ...

  17. Improving the Automatic Inversion of Digital ISIS-2 Ionogram Reflection Traces into Topside Vertical Electron-Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R. F.; Truhlik, V.; Huang, X.; Wang, Y.; Bilitza, D.

    2011-01-01

    The topside-sounders on the four satellites of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program were designed as analog systems. The resulting ionograms were displayed on 35-mm film for analysis by visual inspection. Each of these satellites, launched between 1962 and 1971, produced data for 10 to 20 years. A number of the original telemetry tapes from this large data set have been converted directly into digital records. Software, known as the TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height (TOPIST) algorithm has been produced that enables the automatic inversion of ISIS-2 ionogram reflection traces into topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). More than million digital Alouette/ISIS topside ionograms have been produced and over 300,000 are from ISIS 2. Many of these ISIS-2 ionograms correspond to a passive mode of operation for the detection of natural radio emissions and thus do not contain ionospheric reflection traces. TOPIST, however, is not able to produce Ne(h) profiles from all of the ISIS-2 ionograms with reflection traces because some of them did not contain frequency information. This information was missing due to difficulties encountered during the analog-to-digital conversion process in the detection of the ionogram frame-sync pulse and/or the frequency markers. Of the many digital topside ionograms that TOPIST was able to process, over 200 were found where direct comparisons could be made with Ne(h) profiles that were produced by manual scaling in the early days of the ISIS program. While many of these comparisons indicated excellent agreement (inversion process: (1) improve the quality of the digital ionogram database by remedying the missing frequency-information problem when possible, and (2) using the above-mentioned comparisons as teaching examples of how to improve the original TOPIST software.

  18. Techniques of Ozone Monitoring in a Mountain Forest Region: Passive and Continuous Sampling, Vertical and Canopy Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is the most harmful air pollutant for plant ecosystems in the Mediterranean and Alpine areas due to its biological and economic damage to crops and forests. In order to evaluate the relation between ozone exposure and vegetation injury under on-field conditions, suitable ozone monitoring techniques were investi-gated. In the framework of a 5-year research project aimed at ozone risk assessment on forests, both continuous analysers and passive samplers were employed during the summer seasons (1994�1998 in different sites of a wide mountain region (80 x 40 km2 on the southern slope of the European Alps. Continuous analysers allowed the recording of ozone hourly concentration means necessary both to calculate specific exposure indexes (such as AOT, SUM, W126 and to record daily time-courses. Passive samplers, even though supplied only weekly mean concentration values, made it possible to estimate the altitude concentration gradient useful to correct the altitude dependence of ozone concentrations to be inserted into exposure indexes. In-canopy ozone profiles were also determined by placing passive samplers at different heights inside the forest canopy. Vertical ozone soundings by means of tethered balloons (kytoons allowed the measurement of the vertical concentration gradient above the forest canopy. They also revealed ozone reservoirs aloft and were useful to explain the ozone advection dynamic in mountain slopes where ground measurement proved to be inadequate. An intercomparison between passive (PASSAM, CH and continuous measurements highlighted the necessity to accurately standardize all the exposure operations, particularly the pre- and postexposure conservation at cold temperature to avoid dye (DPE activity. Advantages and disadvantages from each mentioned technique are discussed.

  19. Continuous plasma density measurement in TJ-II Infrared interferometer - Advanced processor based on FPGA's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, L.; Sanchez, M.; Sanchez, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Lopez, J.A.; Nieto-Taladriz, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    A new electronic density measurement system with online processing capabilities for fusion experiments has been developed. An output density signal at 200 ksps and RMS value correspondent to 1/200 fringe in the first design has been obtained in the simulation. All the channels of the future multi-channel interferometer can be acquired and all the computation made in parallel. In the TJ-2 the immediate applications are going to be the control of the Thomson scattering shot, later the gas valves and the NBI injection. This document is a poster

  20. Origin of a sharp spectral peak near the critical angle in the spectral power density profile of top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyong; Kang, Kyungnam; Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Kim, Jungho

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the origin of the sharp spectral peak near the critical angle in the spectral power density profile of a top-emitting organic light-emitting diode (OLED). On the basis of the point dipole model, spectral power densities of the top-emitting OLED are calculated with respect to the thickness of the capping layer (CPL). Sharp peaks in the spectral power density profile are observed at certain CPL thicknesses near the spectral interface between the radiation- and waveguide-mode regions, which is determined by the critical angle. By calculating the waveguide-mode spatial profile, the sharp peak in the spectral power density profile is identified as the radiation-mode-like waveguide mode, which has a very large evanescent length near the cut-off condition of waveguide modes. By decomposing the total spectral power density into the out-coupled light and absorption loss components, we demonstrate that the sharp spectral peak near the critical angle can enhance the relative power contribution of the absorption loss.

  1. Gemini NIFS survey of feeding and feedback processes in nearby active galaxies - II. The sample and surface mass density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, R. A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Riffel, R.; Davies, R.; Bianchin, M.; Diniz, M. R.; Schönell, A. J.; Burtscher, L.; Crenshaw, M.; Fischer, T. C.; Dahmer-Hahn, L. G.; Dametto, N. Z.; Rosario, D.

    2018-02-01

    We present and characterize a sample of 20 nearby Seyfert galaxies selected for having BAT 14-195 keV luminosities LX ≥ 1041.5 erg s-1, redshift z ≤ 0.015, being accessible for observations with the Gemini Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) and showing extended [O III]λ5007 emission. Our goal is to study Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) feeding and feedback processes from near-infrared integral-field spectra, which include both ionized (H II) and hot molecular (H2) emission. This sample is complemented by other nine Seyfert galaxies previously observed with NIFS. We show that the host galaxy properties (absolute magnitudes MB, MH, central stellar velocity dispersion and axial ratio) show a similar distribution to those of the 69 BAT AGN. For the 20 galaxies already observed, we present surface mass density (Σ) profiles for H II and H2 in their inner ˜500 pc, showing that H II emission presents a steeper radial gradient than H2. This can be attributed to the different excitation mechanisms: ionization by AGN radiation for H II and heating by X-rays for H2. The mean surface mass densities are in the range (0.2 ≤ ΣH II ≤ 35.9) M⊙ pc-2, and (0.2 ≤ ΣH2 ≤ 13.9)× 10-3 M⊙ pc-2, while the ratios between the H II and H2 masses range between ˜200 and 8000. The sample presented here will be used in future papers to map AGN gas excitation and kinematics, providing a census of the mass inflow and outflow rates and power as well as their relation with the AGN luminosity.

  2. Venom Profiling of a Population of the Theraphosid Spider Phlogius crassipes Reveals Continuous Ontogenetic Changes from Juveniles through Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Renan C; Perez, David; Dobson, James; Panagides, Nadya; Raven, Robert J; Nouwens, Amanda; Jones, Alun; King, Glenn F; Fry, Bryan G

    2017-03-25

    Theraphosid spiders (tarantulas) are venomous arthropods found in most tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Tarantula venoms are a complex cocktail of toxins with potential use as pharmacological tools, drugs and bioinsecticides. Although numerous toxins have been isolated from tarantula venoms, little research has been carried out on the venom of Australian tarantulas. We therefore investigated the venom profile of the Australian theraphosid spider Phlogius crassipes and examined whether there are ontogenetic changes in venom composition. Spiders were divided into four ontogenic groups according to cephalothorax length, then the venom composition of each group was examined using gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We found that the venom of P. crassipes changes continuously during development and throughout adulthood. Our data highlight the need to investigate the venom of organisms over the course of their lives to uncover and understand the changing functions of venom and the full range of toxins expressed. This in turn should lead to a deeper understanding of the organism's ecology and enhance the potential for biodiscovery.

  3. LoCuSS: The Mass Density Profile of Massive Galaxy Clusters at z = 0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Nobuhiro; Smith, Graham P.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Takada, Masahiro; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2013-06-01

    We present a stacked weak-lensing analysis of an approximately mass-selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at 0.15 noise ratio of 32.7. The Navarro-Frenk-White model is an excellent fit to the data, yielding sub-10% statistical precision on mass and concentration: {M_vir}=7.19^{+0.53}_{-0.50}\\times 10^{14}\\, {h^{-1}\\,M_\\odot }, {c_vir}=5.41^{+0.49}_{-0.45} (c_{200}=4.22^{+0.40}_{-0.36}). Tests of a range of possible systematic errors, including shear calibration and stacking-related issues, indicate that they are subdominant to the statistical errors. The concentration parameter obtained from stacking our approximately mass-selected cluster sample is broadly in line with theoretical predictions. Moreover, the uncertainty on our measurement is comparable with the differences between the different predictions in the literature. Overall, our results highlight the potential for stacked weak-lensing methods to probe the mean mass density profile of cluster-scale dark matter halos with upcoming surveys, including Hyper-Suprime-Cam, Dark Energy Survey, and KIDS.

  4. Water temperature, salinity, and density profiles collected by CTD from multiple cruises in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, the Bering Sea, and the Gulf of Alaska from 2001-01 to 2001-10 (NCEI Accession 0001112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and density profiles were collected using CTD from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN, NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN, and SIR WILFRED LAURIER in the Northeast...

  5. Several 'problem nutrients' are identified in complementary feeding of Guatemalan infants with continued breastfeeding using the concept of 'critical nutrient density'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenaar, M; Hernández, L; Campos, R; Solomons, N W

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends nutritionally adequate complementary feeding (CF) through the introduction of indigenous foodstuffs and local foods while breastfeeding for at least 2 years. To determine the adequacy of the contribution of CF to the diets of Guatemalan infants at the 7th-12th month of life receiving high-intensity continued breastfeeding. Critical nutrient densities for CF were modelled using age- and sex-specific energy and protein requirements assuming children to be at the 50th weight percentile of local peers and 15th weight percentiles of the 2006 WHO standards. Nutrient requirements for the total diet were determined using the recommended nutrient intakes. Breast milk was assumed to provide 75% of total energy at the 7th-9th month and 50% at the 10th-12th month. Gaps between computed critical nutrient densities and the CF consumption of 128 Guatemalan infants based on data collected by means of three nonconsecutive 24-h quantitative intake recalls were examined. Locally consumed foods with nutrient densities above the modelled critical densities were identified. Observed non-breast milk complementation would result in total diets providing inadequate nutrient density for vitamin A, niacin and vitamin C in some age groups. Major gaps for calcium, iron and zinc were ubiquitous across all groups. Few foods commonly consumed among Guatemalan infants had adequate densities of 'problem nutrients'. The critical nutrient density concept is useful to evaluate the nutrient adequacy of the infant's diet. Fortified foods are essential sources of the main 'problem nutrients', namely calcium, iron and zinc, given that natural sources are scarce.

  6. Calibration of a high spatial resolution laser two-color heterodyne interferometer for density profile measurements in the TJ-II stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, Pablo; Pedreira, P; Criado, A R; Lamela, Horacio; Sánchez, Miguel; Sánchez, Joaquín

    2008-10-01

    A high spatial resolution two-color (CO(2), lambda=10.6 microm, He-Ne, lambda=633 nm) interferometer for density profile measurements in the TJ-II stellarator is under development and installation, based in the currently operational single channel two-color heterodyne interferometer. To achieve the objectives of 32 channels, with 4-5 mm lateral separation between plasma chords, careful design and calibration of the interferometric waveforms for both the measurement and vibration compensation wavelengths are undertaken. The first step has been to set up in our laboratories an expanded-beam heterodyne/homodyne interferometer to evaluate the quality of both interferometric wavefronts, a reported source of poor vibration compensation and thus low resolution in the density profile measurements. This novel interferometric setup has allowed us to calibrate the spatial resolution in the profile measurements resulting in approximately 2 mm lateral resolution in the reconstruction of the interferometric wavefront.

  7. [Usefulness of continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in monitoring glycaemic profile in small children with diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Urban, Mirosława; Peczyńska, Jadwiga; Florys, Bozena; Kowalewski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Improved methods of diabetes therapy result in a near normoglycaemic state in many patients. This leads however unfortunately to more frequent hypoglycaemic incidents. Particularly small children, whose nervous system is not fully mature, are at high risk of central nervous system damage in case of hypoglycaemia. A new method of detail monitoring of glycaemia provides CGMS system. The aim of the study was to compare the glycaemic profile, with high attention to hypoglycaemia in groups of young and older children with diabetes type 1, using CGMS and routine glucose meter. We studied 32 children with diabetes type 1. Children were divided into groups: group I--small children, n=17 (10 years of age), mean age--12 years, with disease duration--3 years, with HbA1c level--7,21%. Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS), by MiniMed, was applied in outpatient or hospital conditions, after short training of patient and parents; together with routine glucose meter measurements, 4-8 times/24 hours. In 9 patients from small children group CGMS was repeated after 2 months. Hypoglycaemic incidents detected with CGMS were similar in both groups: 4,6 in I group vs. 4,2 in II group (ns). Hypoglycaemic incidents found with meter were lower in I group--1,6 vs. 2,3 in II group (ns). Mean hypoglycaemic time/24 hour was longer in small children group: 101 min vs. 74 min in group II (p<00,05). In I group we found higher number of hypoglycaemic incidents during the night compared to group II--1,7 vs. 0,8 (p<00,05) and longer duration of night hypoglycaemia: in I group--56 min vs. 32 min in group II (p<00,05). Repeated CGMS study in 9 children from I group revealed decreased mean time of hypoglycaemia/24 hours from 134 min/24 h to 90 min/24 h (p<00,05) and decreased time of night hypoglycaemia from 65 min to 40 min (p<00,05), with a comparable number of hypoglycaemic incidents. Hypoglycaemic incidents found with routine meter measurements in small children were 1,6 vs. 4,6 hypoglycaemia

  8. Dislocation density and Burgers vector population in fiber-textured Ni thin films determined by high-resolution X-ray line profile analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csiszár, Gábor; Pantleon, Karen; Alimadadi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni thin films have been produced by direct current electrodeposition with different additives and current density in order to obtain 〈100〉, 〈111〉 and 〈211〉 major fiber textures. The dislocation density, the Burgers vector population and the coherently scattering domain size...... distribution are determined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. The substructure parameters are correlated with the strength of the films by using the combined Taylor and Hall-Petch relations. The convolutional multiple whole profile method is used to obtain the substructure parameters...... in the different coexisting texture components. A strong variation of the dislocation density is observed as a function of the deposition conditions....

  9. Asynchrony in respiratory movements between the pulmonary lobes in patients with COPD: continuous measurement of lung density by 4-dimensional dynamic-ventilation CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Moriya, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Shin; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Tsuchiya, Nanae; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2017-01-01

    Four-dimensional dynamic-ventilation CT imaging demonstrates continuous movement of the lung. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between interlobar synchrony in lung density and spirometric values in COPD patients and smokers, by measuring the continuous changes in lung density during respiration on the dynamic-ventilation CT. Thirty-two smokers, including ten with COPD, underwent dynamic-ventilation CT during free breathing. CT data were continuously reconstructed every 0.5 sec. Mean lung density (MLD) of the five lobes (right upper [RU], right middle [RM], right lower [RL], left upper [LU], and left lower [LL]) was continuously measured by commercially available software using a fixed volume of volume of interest which was placed and tracked on a single designated point in each lobe. Concordance between the MLD time curves of six pairs of lung lobes (RU-RL, RU-RM, RM-RL, LU-LL, RU-LU, and RL-LL lobes) was expressed by cross-correlation coefficients. The relationship between these cross-correlation coefficients and the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1.0/FVC) values was assessed by Spearman rank correlation analysis. In all six pairs of the pulmonary lobes, the cross-correlation coefficients of the two MLD curves were significantly positively correlated with FEV1.0/FVC (ρ =0.60-0.73, P<0.001). The mean value of the six coefficients strongly correlated with FEV1.0/FVC (ρ =0.80, P<0.0001). The synchrony of respiratory movements between the pulmonary lobes is limited or lost in patients with more severe airflow limitation.

  10. Examining Submarine Ground-Water Discharge into Florida Bay by using 222Rn and Continuous Resistivity Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter; Reich, Chris; Rudnick, David

    2009-01-01

    Estimates of submarine ground-water discharge (SGD) into Florida Bay remain one of the least understood components of a regional water balance. To quantify the magnitude and seasonality of SGD into upper Florida Bay, research activities included the use of the natural geochemical tracer, 222Rn, to examine potential SGD hotspots (222Rn surveys) and to quantify the total (saline + fresh water component) SGD rates at select sites (222Rn time-series). To obtain a synoptic map of the 222Rn distribution within our study site in Florida Bay, we set up a flow-through system on a small boat that consisted of a Differential Global Positioning System, a calibrated YSI, Inc CTD sensor with a sampling rate of 0.5 min, and a submersible pump (z = 0.5 m) that continuously fed water into an air/water exchanger that was plumbed simultaneously into four RAD7 222Rn air monitors. To obtain local advective ground-water flux estimates, 222Rn time-series experiments were deployed at strategic positions across hydrologic and geologic gradients within our study site. These time-series stations consisted of a submersible pump, a Solinist DIVER (to record continuous CTD parameters) and two RAD7 222Rn air monitors plumbed into an air/water exchanger. Repeat time-series 222Rn measurements were conducted for 3-4 days across several tidal excursions. Radon was also measured in the air during each sampling campaign by a dedicated RAD7. We obtained ground-water discharge information by calculating a 222Rn mass balance that accounted for lateral and horizontal exchange, as well as an appropriate ground-water 222Rn end member activity. Another research component utilized marine continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys to examine the subsurface salinity structure within Florida Bay sediments. This system consisted of an AGI SuperSting 8 channel receiver attached to a streamer cable that had two current (A,B) electrodes and nine potential electrodes that were spaced 10 m apart. A separate DGPS

  11. Classification of X-ray solar flares regarding their effects on the lower ionosphere electron density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grubor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of X-ray solar flares is performed regarding their effects on the Very Low Frequency (VLF wave propagation along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The changes in propagation are detected from an observed VLF signal phase and amplitude perturbations, taking place during X-ray solar flares. All flare effects chosen for the analysis are recorded by the Absolute Phase and Amplitude Logger (AbsPal, during the summer months of 2004–2007, on the single trace, Skelton (54.72 N, 2.88 W to Belgrade (44.85 N, 20.38 E with a distance along the Great Circle Path (GCP D≈2000 km in length. The observed VLF amplitude and phase perturbations are simulated by the computer program Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC, using Wait's model of the lower ionosphere, as determined by two parameters: the sharpness (β in 1/km and reflection height (H' in km. By varying the values of β and H' so as to match the observed amplitude and phase perturbations, the variation of the D-region electron density height profile Ne(z was reconstructed, throughout flare duration. The procedure is illustrated as applied to a series of flares, from class C to M5 (5×10−5 W/m2 at 0.1–0.8 nm, each giving rise to a different time development of signal perturbation. The corresponding change in electron density from the unperturbed value at the unperturbed reflection height, i.e. Ne(74 km=2.16×108 m−3 to the value induced by an M5 class flare, up to Ne(74 km=4×1010 m−3 is obtained. The β parameter is found to range from 0.30–0.49 1/km and the reflection height H' to vary from 74–63 km. The changes in Ne(z during the flares, within height range z=60 to 90 km are determined, as well.

  12. Classification of X-ray solar flares regarding their effects on the lower ionosphere electron density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grubor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of X-ray solar flares is performed regarding their effects on the Very Low Frequency (VLF wave propagation along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The changes in propagation are detected from an observed VLF signal phase and amplitude perturbations, taking place during X-ray solar flares. All flare effects chosen for the analysis are recorded by the Absolute Phase and Amplitude Logger (AbsPal, during the summer months of 2004–2007, on the single trace, Skelton (54.72 N, 2.88 W to Belgrade (44.85 N, 20.38 E with a distance along the Great Circle Path (GCP D≈2000 km in length.

    The observed VLF amplitude and phase perturbations are simulated by the computer program Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC, using Wait's model of the lower ionosphere, as determined by two parameters: the sharpness (β in 1/km and reflection height (H' in km. By varying the values of β and H' so as to match the observed amplitude and phase perturbations, the variation of the D-region electron density height profile Ne(z was reconstructed, throughout flare duration. The procedure is illustrated as applied to a series of flares, from class C to M5 (5×10−5 W/m2 at 0.1–0.8 nm, each giving rise to a different time development of signal perturbation.

    The corresponding change in electron density from the unperturbed value at the unperturbed reflection height, i.e. Ne(74 km=2.16×108 m−3 to the value induced by an M5 class flare, up to Ne(74 km=4×1010 m−3 is obtained. The β parameter is found to range from 0.30–0.49 1/km and the reflection height H' to vary from 74–63 km. The changes in Ne(z during the flares, within height range z=60 to 90 km are determined, as well.

  13. Increased ribosome density associated to positively charged residues is evident in ribosome profiling experiments performed in the absence of translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requião, Rodrigo D; de Souza, Henrique José Araujo; Rossetto, Silvana; Domitrovic, Tatiana; Palhano, Fernando L

    2016-06-02

    It has been proposed that polybasic peptides cause slower movement of ribosomes through an electrostatic interaction with the highly negative ribosome exit tunnel. Ribosome profiling data-the sequencing of short ribosome-bound fragments of mRNA-is a powerful tool for the analysis of mRNA translation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we showed that reduced translation efficiency associated with polybasic protein sequences could be inferred from ribosome profiling. However, an increase in ribosome density at polybasic sequences was evident only when the commonly used translational inhibitors cycloheximide and anisomycin were omitted during mRNA isolation. Since ribosome profiling performed without inhibitors agrees with experimental evidence obtained by other methods, we conclude that cycloheximide and anisomycin must be avoided in ribosome profiling experiments.

  14. A gravity study along a profile across the Sichuan Basin, the Qinling Mountains and the Ordos Basin (central China): Density, isostasy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqian; Teng, Jiwen; Wang, Qianshen; Lü, Qingtian; Si, Xiang; Xu, Tao; Badal, José; Yan, Jiayong; Hao, Zhaobing

    2017-10-01

    In order to investigate the structure of the crust beneath the Middle Qinling Mountains (MQL) and neighboring areas in the North China Block and South China Block, a north-south gravity profile from Yuquan in the Sichuan Basin to Yulin in the Ordos Basin was conducted in 2011. The Bouguer gravity anomaly is determined from a high-quality gravity dataset collected between 31°N and 36°N of latitude, and varies between -200 and -110 mGal in the study region. Using accredited velocity density relationships, an initial crust-mantle density model is constructed for MQL and adjacent areas, which is later refined interactively to simulate the observed gravity anomaly. The present study reveals the features of the density and Bouguer gravity with respect to the tectonic units sampled by the profile. The lithosphere density model shows typical density values that depict a layered structure and allow differentiate the blocks that extend along the reference profile. The gravity field calculated by forward modeling from the final density distribution model correlates well with the measured gravity field within a standard deviation of 1.26 mGal. The density in the crystalline crust increases with depth from 2.65 g/cm3 up to the highest value of 2.95 g/cm3 near the bottom of the crust. The Conrad interface is identified as a density jump of about 0.05 g/cm3. The average density of the crust in MQL is clearly lower than the density in the formations on both sides. Starting from a combined Airy-Pratt isostatic compensation model, a partly compensated crust is found below MQL, suggesting future growth of the crust, unlike the Ordos and Sichuan basins that will remain stable. On the basis of the density and isostatic state of the crust and additional seismological research, such as the P-wave velocity model and Poisson's ratio, it is concluded that the lower crust delamination is a reasonable interpretation for the geophysical characteristics below the Qinling Orogen.

  15. Asynchrony in respiratory movements between the pulmonary lobes in patients with COPD: continuous measurement of lung density by 4-dimensional dynamic-ventilation CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashiro T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneo Yamashiro,1 Hiroshi Moriya,2 Shin Matsuoka,3 Yukihiro Nagatani,4 Maho Tsubakimoto,1 Nanae Tsuchiya,1 Sadayuki Murayama1 On behalf of the ACTIve Study Group 1Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa, Japan; 2Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, Fukushima-City, Fukushima, Japan; 3Department of Radiology, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Shiga, Japan Purpose: Four-dimensional dynamic-ventilation CT imaging demonstrates continuous movement of the lung. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between interlobar synchrony in lung density and spirometric values in COPD patients and smokers, by measuring the continuous changes in lung density during respiration on the dynamic-ventilation CT. Materials and methods: Thirty-two smokers, including ten with COPD, underwent dynamic-ventilation CT during free breathing. CT data were continuously reconstructed every 0.5 sec. Mean lung density (MLD of the five lobes (right upper [RU], right middle [RM], right lower [RL], left upper [LU], and left lower [LL] was continuously measured by commercially available software using a fixed volume of volume of interest which was placed and tracked on a single designated point in each lobe. Concordance between the MLD time curves of six pairs of lung lobes (RU-RL, RU-RM, RM-RL, LU-LL, RU-LU, and RL-LL lobes was expressed by cross-correlation coefficients. The relationship between these cross-correlation coefficients and the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1.0/FVC values was assessed by Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: In all six pairs of the pulmonary lobes, the cross-correlation coefficients of the two MLD curves were significantly positively correlated with FEV1.0/FVC (ρ =0.60–0.73, P<0.001. The mean value of the six

  16. Profiles of plasma parameters and density of negative hydrogen ions by laser detachment measurements in RF-driven ion sources; Profile der Plasmaparameter und Dichte negativer Wasserstoffionen mittels Laserdetachmentmessungen in HF-angeregten Ionenquellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ-Koch, Sina

    2007-12-20

    This work shows the application of the Laserdetachment method for spatially resolved measurements of negative Hydrogen/Deuterium ion density. It was applied on a high power low pressure RF-driven ion source. The Laser detachment method is based on the measurement of electron currents on a positively biased Langmuir probe before and during/after a laser pulse. The density ratio of negative ions to electrons can be derived from the ratio of currents to the probe. The absolute density of negative ions can be obtained when the electron density is measured with the standard Langmuir probe setup. Measurements with the Langmuir probe additionally yield information about the floating and plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density of positive ions. The Laser detachment setup had to be adapted to the special conditions of the RF-driven source. In particular the existence of RF fields (1 MHz), high source potential (-20 kV), magnetic fields ({proportional_to} 7 mT) and caesium inside the source had to be considered. The density of negative ions could be identified in the range of n(H{sup -})=1.10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3}, which is in the same order of magnitude as the electron density. Only the application of the Laser detachment method with the Langmuir probe measurements will yield spatially resolved plasma parameters and H- density profiles. The influence of diverse external parameters, such as pressure, RF-power, magnetic fields on the plasma parameters and their profiles were studied and explained. Hence, the measurements lead to a detailed understanding of the processes inside the source. (orig.)

  17. High-density marker profiling confirms ancestral genomes of Avena species and identifies D-genome chromosomes of hexaploid oat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Honghai; Bekele, Wubishet A; Wight, Charlene P; Peng, Yuanying; Langdon, Tim; Latta, Robert G; Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Howarth, Catherine J; Jellen, Eric N; Boyle, Brian; Wei, Yuming; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-11-01

    Genome analysis of 27 oat species identifies ancestral groups, delineates the D genome, and identifies ancestral origin of 21 mapped chromosomes in hexaploid oat. We investigated genomic relationships among 27 species of the genus Avena using high-density genetic markers revealed by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS). Two methods of GBS analysis were used: one based on tag-level haplotypes that were previously mapped in cultivated hexaploid oat (A. sativa), and one intended to sample and enumerate tag-level haplotypes originating from all species under investigation. Qualitatively, both methods gave similar predictions regarding the clustering of species and shared ancestral genomes. Furthermore, results were consistent with previous phylogenies of the genus obtained with conventional approaches, supporting the robustness of whole genome GBS analysis. Evidence is presented to justify the final and definitive classification of the tetraploids A. insularis, A. maroccana (=A. magna), and A. murphyi as containing D-plus-C genomes, and not A-plus-C genomes, as is most often specified in past literature. Through electronic painting of the 21 chromosome representations in the hexaploid oat consensus map, we show how the relative frequency of matches between mapped hexaploid-derived haplotypes and AC (DC)-genome tetraploids vs. A- and C-genome diploids can accurately reveal the genome origin of all hexaploid chromosomes, including the approximate positions of inter-genome translocations. Evidence is provided that supports the continued classification of a diverged B genome in AB tetraploids, and it is confirmed that no extant A-genome diploids, including A. canariensis, are similar enough to the D genome of tetraploid and hexaploid oat to warrant consideration as a D-genome diploid.

  18. Evaluation of the methodologies used to generate random pavement profiles based on the power spectral density: An approach based on the International Roughness Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Jesús Goenaga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pavement roughness is the main variable that produces the vertical excitation in vehicles. Pavement profiles are the main determinant of (i discomfort perception on users and (ii dynamic loads generated at the tire-pavement interface, hence its evaluation constitutes an essential step on a Pavement Management System. The present document evaluates two specific techniques used to simulate pavement profiles; these are the shaping filter and the sinusoidal approach, both based on the Power Spectral Density. Pavement roughness was evaluated using the International Roughness Index (IRI, which represents the most used index to characterize longitudinal road profiles. Appropriate parameters were defined in the simulation process to obtain pavement profiles with specific ranges of IRI values using both simulation techniques. The results suggest that using a sinusoidal approach one can generate random profiles with IRI values that are representative of different road types, therefore, one could generate a profile for a paved or an unpaved road, representing all the proposed categories defined by ISO 8608 standard. On the other hand, to obtain similar results using the shaping filter approximation a modification in the simulation parameters is necessary. The new proposed values allow one to generate pavement profiles with high levels of roughness, covering a wider range of surface types. Finally, the results of the current investigation could be used to further improve our understanding on the effect of pavement roughness on tire pavement interaction. The evaluated methodologies could be used to generate random profiles with specific levels of roughness to assess its effect on dynamic loads generated at the tire-pavement interface and user’s perception of road condition.

  19. Continuous MR bone density measurement using water- and fat-suppressed projection imaging (WASPI) for PET attenuation correction in PET-MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Ouyang, J.; Reese, T. G.; Wu, Y.; El Fakhri, G.; Ackerman, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the lack of signal from solid bone in normal MR sequences for the purpose of MR-based attenuation correction, investigators have proposed using the ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequence, which yields signal from bone. However, the UTE-based segmentation approach might not fully capture the intra- and inter-subject bone density variation, which will inevitably lead to bias in reconstructed PET images. In this work, we investigated using the water- and fat-suppressed proton projection imaging (WASPI) sequence to obtain accurate and continuous attenuation for bones. This approach is capable of accounting for intra- and inter-subject bone attenuation variations. Using data acquired from a phantom, we have found that that attenuation correction based on the WASPI sequence is more accurate and precise when compared to either conventional MR attenuation correction or UTE-based segmentation approaches.

  20. Spatial Configuration of Stars Around Three Metal-poor Globular Clusters in the Galatic Bulge, NGC 6266, NGC 6273, and NGC 6681 : Surface Density Map and Radial Density Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihwa Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present extra-tidal features of spatial configuration of stars around three metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6273, NGC 6681 located in the Galactic bulge. The wide-field photometric data were obtained in BVI bands with the MOSAIC II camera at CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope. The derived color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs contain stars in a total 71´×71´area including a cluster and its surrounding field outside of the tidal radius of the cluster. Applying statistical filtering technique, we minimized the field star contaminations on the obtained cluster CMDs and extracted the cluster members. On the spatial stellar density maps around the target clusters, we found overdensity features beyond the tidal radii of the clusters. We also found that the radial density profiles of the clusters show departures from the best-fit King model for their outer regions which support the overdensity patterns.

  1. Comparative validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and conventional PCR of bovine semen centrifuged in continuous density gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Resende

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the sperm enrichment with X-bearing spermatozoa, after one centrifugation in a Percoll or OptiPrep continuous density gradient, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of sperm DNA and resultant in vitro-produced bovine embryos by PCR. Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients and the tubes were centrifuged. Supernatants were gently aspirated and the sperm recovered from the bottom of the tubes. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were determined through in vitro production of embryos and PCR was performed to identify the embryos' genetic sex. A difference in blastocyst rate was found in the Percoll treatment compared to OptiPrep (P<0.05. The percentage of female embryos in the Percoll and OptiPrep groups was 62.0% and 47.1%, respectively. These results were confirmed by qPCR of spermatozoa DNA and underestimation was seen only in the Percoll group. It was possible to sexing sperm using simple approach.

  2. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  3. Influence of the fluid structure on the binding potential: Comparing liquid drop profiles from density functional theory with results from mesoscopic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam P; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2017-02-14

    For a film of liquid on a solid surface, the binding potential g(h) gives the free energy as a function of the film thickness h and also the closely related (structural) disjoining pressure Π=-∂g/∂h. The wetting behaviour of the liquid is encoded in the binding potential and the equilibrium film thickness corresponds to the value at the minimum of g(h). Here, the method we developed in the work of Hughes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074702 (2015)], and applied with a simple discrete lattice-gas model, is used with continuum density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the binding potential for a Lennard-Jones fluid and other simple liquids. The DFT used is based on fundamental measure theory and so incorporates the influence of the layered packing of molecules at the surface and the corresponding oscillatory density profile. The binding potential is frequently input in mesoscale models from which liquid drop shapes and even dynamics can be calculated. Here we show that the equilibrium droplet profiles calculated using the mesoscale theory are in good agreement with the profiles calculated directly from the microscopic DFT. For liquids composed of particles where the range of the attraction is much less than the diameter of the particles, we find that at low temperatures g(h) decays in an oscillatory fashion with increasing h, leading to highly structured terraced liquid droplets.

  4. Influence of the fluid structure on the binding potential: Comparing liquid drop profiles from density functional theory with results from mesoscopic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam P.; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    For a film of liquid on a solid surface, the binding potential g(h) gives the free energy as a function of the film thickness h and also the closely related (structural) disjoining pressure Π =-∂g /∂h . The wetting behaviour of the liquid is encoded in the binding potential and the equilibrium film thickness corresponds to the value at the minimum of g(h). Here, the method we developed in the work of Hughes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074702 (2015)], and applied with a simple discrete lattice-gas model, is used with continuum density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the binding potential for a Lennard-Jones fluid and other simple liquids. The DFT used is based on fundamental measure theory and so incorporates the influence of the layered packing of molecules at the surface and the corresponding oscillatory density profile. The binding potential is frequently input in mesoscale models from which liquid drop shapes and even dynamics can be calculated. Here we show that the equilibrium droplet profiles calculated using the mesoscale theory are in good agreement with the profiles calculated directly from the microscopic DFT. For liquids composed of particles where the range of the attraction is much less than the diameter of the particles, we find that at low temperatures g(h) decays in an oscillatory fashion with increasing h, leading to highly structured terraced liquid droplets.

  5. Control of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators by adjusting shock density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Swanson, Kelly K.; Lehe, Remi; Barber, Sam K.; Isono, Fumika; Otero, Jorge G.; Liu, Xinyao; Mao, Hann-Shin; Steinke, Sven; Tilborg, Jeroen Van; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    High-level control of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) using a shock injector was demonstrated by systematically varying the shock injector profile, including the shock angle, up-ramp width and shock position. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation explored how variations in the shock profile impacted the injection process and confirmed results obtained through acceleration experiments. These results establish that, by adjusting shock position, up-ramp, and angle, beam energy, energy spread, and pointing can be controlled. As a result, e-beam were highly tunable from 25 to 300 MeV with Security Administration, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D (NA22).

  6. CLASH-VLT: The stellar mass function and stellar mass density profile of the z=0.44 cluster of galaxies MACS J1206.2-0847

    CERN Document Server

    Annunziatella, M; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Presotto, V.; Girardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Grillo, C.; Medezinski, E.; Kelson, D.; Postman, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Brescia, M.; Sartoris, B.; Demarco, R.; Fritz, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Lemze, D.; Lombardi, M.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Donahue, M.; Regös, E.; Umetsu, K.; Vanzella, E.; Infante, L.; Kuchner, U.; Maier, C.; Verdugo, M.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The study of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) in relation to the galaxy environment and the stellar mass density profile, rho(r), is a powerful tool to constrain models of galaxy evolution. Aims. We determine the SMF of the z=0.44 cluster of galaxies MACS J1206.2-0847 separately for passive and star-forming (SF) galaxies, in different regions of the cluster, from the center out to approximately 2 virial radii. We also determine rho(r) to compare it to the number density and total mass density profiles. Methods. We use the dataset from the CLASH-VLT survey. Stellar masses are obtained by SED fitting on 5-band photometric data obtained at the Subaru telescope. We identify 1363 cluster members down to a stellar mass of 10^9.5 Msolar. Results. The whole cluster SMF is well fitted by a double Schechter function. The SMFs of cluster SF and passive galaxies are statistically different. The SMF of the SF cluster galaxies does not depend on the environment. The SMF of the passive population has a signif...

  7. Numerical computation of gravitational field of infinitely thin axisymmetric disc with arbitrary surface mass density profile and its application to preliminary study of rotation curve of M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of an infinitely thin axisymmetric disc with an arbitrary surface mass density profile. We evaluate the gravitational potential by a split quadrature using the double exponential rule and obtain the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the potential by Ridder's algorithm. The new method is of around 12 digit accuracy and sufficiently fast because requiring only one-dimensional integration. By using the new method, we show the rotation curves of some non-trivial discs: (i) truncated power-law discs, (ii) discs with a non-negligible centre hole, (iii) truncated Mestel discs with edge softening, (iv) double power-law discs, (v) exponentially damped power-law discs, and (vi) an exponential disc with a sinusoidal modulation of the density profile. Also, we present a couple of model fittings to the observed rotation curve of M33: (i) the standard deconvolution by assuming a spherical distribution of the dark matter and (ii) a direct fit of infinitely thin disc mass with a double power-law distribution of the surface mass density. Although the number of free parameters is a little larger, the latter model provides a significantly better fit. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method are electronically available.

  8. An Inverse Method for Obtaining the Attenuation Profile and Small Variations in the Sound Speed and Density Profiles of the Ocean Bottom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    L’-(Pl’ Ing k eriiel for pr,,-fdi 7-1J41 .) 1 ~ Figure 7-30: fEC’.NL Ir. k crud L’ fr pr’cifl T-1.4 (c) P-7 Figure 7-31: L-- 1PH I :r,. - I. ’.1 7-14...Further, the data in the low frequency range are spread over a wide range of values of attenuation and there is no consistent pattern to justify a...studying the peak to null difference in the measured interference pattern . 4 3.2 Determination of the attenuation profile from the plane-wave

  9. Healthy Snacks: Using Nutrient Profiling to Evaluate the Nutrient-Density of Common Snacks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Julie M; Slavin, Joanne L

    2017-09-01

    To quantify and compare the nutrient-density of commonly consumed snacks using two nutrient-density measures, Nutrient Rich Foods Indices 9.3 (NRF 9.3) and 15.3 (NRF 15.3). Identify commonly consumed categories of snacks and individual snack foods, calculate NRF 9.3 and 15.3 scores, rank snacks by category and by individual food based on nutrient density, compare and contrast scores generated by the two NRF Indices. NRF 9.3 and 15.3 scores. Averages and standard deviations of nutrient-density scores for each snack category. Vegetables and coffee/tea received the highest category scores on both indices. Cakes/cookies/pastries and sweets had the lowest category scores. NRF 9.3 scores for individual snacks ranged from -46 (soda) to 524 (coffee). NRF 15.3 scores ranged from -45 (soda) to 736 (coffee). If added to food labels, NRF scores could help consumers identify more nutritious choices. The differences between NRF 9.3 and 15.3 scores generated for the same foods and the limitations of these indices highlight the need for careful consideration of which nutrient-density measure to include on food labels as well as consumer education. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. El perfil profesional de los formadores de formación continua en España. [The professional profile of trainers working in continuous training in Spain].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamaqi, Xhevrie

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze and describe the professional profile of trainers working in continuous training in Spain. For this purpose we have developed a structured questionnaire was applied in person to a sample of 606 instructors nationwide. The questionnaire has provided information on aspects such as the socio-occupational status of instructors, their degree of professionalism, and the importance of professional skills. The information gathered has been analyzed by multivariate methods to determine the dominant professional profiles. The quantitative analysis includes the Categorical of Principal Components Analysis (CATPCA to analyze the skills and capabilities of the trainer and cluster analysis in two stages to get the profiles. Four dominant profiles have been deduced by the cluster analysis. The occupational variables, professional experience profiles and competences/skills produce the major discrepancies between the four profiles. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar y describir los perfiles profesionales del formador de formación continua en España. Con este propósito se ha elaborado un cuestionario estructurado que se ha aplicado de forma presencial a una muestra de 606 formadores a nivel nacional. El cuestionario ha proporcionado información sobre aspectos como el estatus socio-laboral del formador, el grado de profesionalización y la importancia de las competencias profesionales de los formadores. La información recabada ha sido analizada mediante métodos multivariantes para determinar los perfiles profesionales dominantes. El análisis cuantitativo incluye el Análisis de Componentes Principales Categóricos (CATPCA para analizar las competencias y capacidades del formador y el análisis Cluster en Dos Fases para obtener los perfiles. De los resultados obtenidos se han deducido cuatro perfiles profesionales dominantes siendo las variables ocupacionales, experiencia profesional y de las capacidades las que mayor

  11. Pesticide Applicator Profiling: Using Polycom[R] Distance Delivery for Continuing Education and Characterizing Florida's Licensed Applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Fred; Langeland, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The University of Florida offers continuing education units (CEUs) via distance technology using Polycom[R] to meet requirements for applicators of pesticides to renew their licenses. A large statewide event conducted in 2010 also included a needs assessment of this group concerning CEUs. Results indicate that these applicators strongly prefer…

  12. Unraveling Motivational Profiles of Health Care Professionals for Continuing Education : The Example of Pharmacists in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Continuing education (CE) can support health care professionals in maintaining and developing their knowledge and competencies. Although lack of motivation is one of the most important barriers of pharmacists' participation in CE, we know little about the quality or the quantity of

  13. Micrometry combined with profile mapping for the absolute measurement of Integrated Column Density (ICD) and for accurate X-ray mass attenuation coefficients using XERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M. Tauhidul; Rae, Nicholas A.; Glover, Jack L.; Barnea, Zwi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Chantler, Christopher T., E-mail: chantler@physics.unimelb.edu.a [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2010-07-21

    Absolute values of the column densities [{rho}t]{sub c} of four gold foils were measured using micrometry combined with the 2D X-ray attenuation profile. The absolute calibration of [{rho}t]{sub c} was made with a reference foil and the [{rho}t]{sub c} of other foils were determined following the thickness transfer method. By this method, we obtain absolute calibration to 0.1% or better which was not possible using only the X-ray map of a single foil over its central region.

  14. Density Profiles, Energy, and Oscillation Strength of a Quantum Dot in Two Dimensions with a Harmonic Oscillator External Potential using an Orbital-free Energy Functional Based on Thomas–Fermi Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhufa Alfarisa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims i to determine the density profile and calculate the ground state energy of a quantum dot in two dimensions (2D with a harmonic oscillator potential using orbital-free density functional theory, and ii to understand the effect of the harmonic oscillator potential strength on the electron density profiles in the quantum dot. This study determines the total energy functional of the quantum dot that is a functional of the density that depends only on spatial variables. The total energy functional consists of three terms. The first term is the kinetic energy functional, which is the Thomas–Fermi approximation in this case. The second term is the external potential. The harmonic oscillator potential is used in this study. The last term is the electron–electron interactions described by the Coulomb interaction. The functional is formally solved to obtain the electron density as a function of spatial variables. This equation cannot be solved analytically, and thus a numerical method is used to determine the profile of the electron density. Using the electron density profiles, the ground state energy of the quantum dot in 2D can be calculated. The ground state energies obtained are 2.464, 22.26, 90.1957, 252.437, and 496.658 au for 2, 6, 12, 20, and 56 electrons, respectively. The highest electron density is localized close to the middle of the quantum dot. The density profiles decrease with the increasing distance, and the lowest density is at the edge of the quantum dot. Generally, increasing the harmonic oscillator potential strength reduces the density profiles around the center of the quantum dot.

  15. Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Subba Rao Atluri

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B, which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2 Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (≥3 fold down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (≥3 fold up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1 was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of

  16. Assessment risk of osteoporosis in Chinese people: relationship among body mass index, serum lipid profiles, blood glucose, and bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui RT

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rongtao Cui,1 Lin Zhou,2 Zuohong Li,2 Qing Li,2 Zhiming Qi,2 Junyong Zhang3 1Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Surgical Research, Duisburg-Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany; 2Department of Orthopedics, Dalian Central Hospital, Dalian, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship among age, sex, body mass index (BMI, serum lipid profiles, blood glucose (BG, and bone mineral density (BMD, making an assessment of the risk of osteoporosis.Materials and methods: A total of 1,035 male and 3,953 female healthy volunteers (aged 41–95 years were recruited by an open invitation. The basic information, including age, sex, height, weight, waistline, hipline, menstrual cycle, and medical history, were collected by a questionnaire survey and physical examination. Serum lipid profiles, BG, postprandial blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin were obtained after 12 hours fasting. BMD in lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning.Results: The age-adjusted BMD in females was significantly lower than in males. With aging, greater differences of BMD distribution exist in elderly females than in males (P<0.001, and the fastigium of bone mass loss was in the age range from 51 to 55 in females and from 61 to 65 years in males. After adjustment for sex, there were significant differences in BMD among BMI-stratified groups in both males and females. The subjects with a BMI of <18.5 had a higher incidence of osteoporosis than BMI ≥18.5 in both sexes. BMD in type 2 diabetes mellitus with a BG of >7.0 mmol/L was lower than in people with BG of ≤7.0 mmol/L (P<0.001. People with serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of ≥1.56 mmol/L had a greater prevalence of osteoporosis compared with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≤1.55 mmol/L. Logistic regression with odds ratios showed that

  17. Effects of atorvastatin and simvastatin on low-density lipoprotein subfraction profile, low-density lipoprotein oxidizability, and antibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in relation to carotid intima media thickness in familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tits, Lambertus J. H.; Smilde, Tineke J.; van Wissen, Sanne; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the effects of statins on the quality of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in relation to atherosclerosis progression. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized trial of 325 patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), we assessed the effects of high-dose

  18. Liquid drops on a surface: using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam P; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2015-02-21

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness h on a solid surface due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, g(h). The precise form of g(h) determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating g(h) gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating g(h), allowing us to relate the form of g(h) to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on g(h) is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on g(h) of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on g(h) and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  19. Determination of the solvent density profiles across mesopores of silica-C18 bonded phases in contact with acetonitrile/water mixtures: A semi-empirical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2015-09-04

    The local volume fractions of water, acetonitrile, and C18-bonded chains across the 96Åmesopores of 5μm Symmetry particles were determined semi-empirically. The semi-empirical approach was based on previous molecular dynamics studies, which provided relevant mathematical expressions for the density profiles of C18 chains and water molecules, and on minor disturbance experiments, which measured the excess amount of acetonitrile adsorbed in the pores of Symmetry-C18 particles. The pore walls of the Symmetry-C18 material were in thermodynamic equilibrium with a series of binary mixtures of water and acetonitrile. The results show that C18 chains are mostly solvated by acetonitrile molecules, water is excluded from the C18-bonded layer, and acetonitrile concentrates across a 15-25Åthick interface region between the C18 layer and the bulk phase. These actual density profiles are expected to have a direct impact on the retention behaviour of charged, polar, and neutral analytes in RPLC. They also provide clues to predict the local mobility of analytes inside the pores and a sound physico-chemical description of the phenomenon of surface diffusion observed in RPLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical efficacy of a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and swim-up techniques for semen processing in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Inoue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a procedure comprising a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and modified swim-up techniques for the removal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 from the semen of HIV-1 infected males, a total of 129 couples with an HIV-1 positive male partner and an HIV-1 negative female partner (serodiscordant couples who were treated at Keio University Hospital between January 2002 and April 2012 were examined. A total of 183 ejaculates from 129 HIV-1 infected males were processed. After swim-up, we successfully collected motile sperms at a recovery rate as high as 100.0% in cases of normozoospermia (126/126 ejaculates, oligozoospermia (6/6, and asthenozoospermia (36/36. The recovery rate of oligoasthenozoospermia was 86.7% (13/15. In processed semen only four ejaculates (4/181:2.2% showed viral nucleotide sequences consistent with those in the blood of the infected males. After using these sperms, no horizontal infections of the female patients and no vertical infections of the newborns were observed. Furthermore, no obvious adverse effects were observed in the offspring. This protocol allowed us to collect HIV-1 negative motile sperms at a high rate, even in male factor cases. We concluded that our protocol is clinically effective both for decreasing HIV-1 infections and for yielding a healthy child.

  1. Bioreactors for high cell density and continuous multi-stage cultivations: options for process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2016-03-01

    With an increasing demand for efficacious, safe, and affordable vaccines for human and animal use, process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production demands advanced process strategies to overcome the limitations of conventional batch cultivations. However, the use of fed-batch, perfusion, or continuous modes to drive processes at high cell density (HCD) and overextended operating times has so far been little explored in large-scale viral vaccine manufacturing. Also, possible reductions in cell-specific virus yields for HCD cultivations have been reported frequently. Taking into account that vaccine production is one of the most heavily regulated industries in the pharmaceutical sector with tough margins to meet, it is understandable that process intensification is being considered by both academia and industry as a next step toward more efficient viral vaccine production processes only recently. Compared to conventional batch processes, fed-batch and perfusion strategies could result in ten to a hundred times higher product yields. Both cultivation strategies can be implemented to achieve cell concentrations exceeding 10(7) cells/mL or even 10(8) cells/mL, while keeping low levels of metabolites that potentially inhibit cell growth and virus replication. The trend towards HCD processes is supported by development of GMP-compliant cultivation platforms, i.e., acoustic settlers, hollow fiber bioreactors, and hollow fiber-based perfusion systems including tangential flow filtration (TFF) or alternating tangential flow (ATF) technologies. In this review, these process modes are discussed in detail and compared with conventional batch processes based on productivity indicators such as space-time yield, cell concentration, and product titers. In addition, options for the production of viral vaccines in continuous multi-stage bioreactors such as two- and three-stage systems are addressed. While such systems have shown similar virus titers compared to

  2. Density and neurochemical profiles of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-expressing interneuron in the mouse basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaona; Liu, Chunhua; Wang, Xiaochen; Gao, Fei; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2017-05-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-expressing interneurons reside in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) of rodents. In the present study, we immunohistochemically analyzed nNOS-positive cells in the mouse BLA by focusing on their density, γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergicity, and co-localization with calcium-binding proteins and neuropeptides. The density of nNOS-containing neurons was analyzed with unbiased stereology. Experiments were conducted in both adult wild-type C57BL/6 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescence protein (GAD67-GFP) knock-in mice, in which GFP is expressed in GABAergic neurons under the control of the endogenous GAD67 gene promoter. In the BLA, the density of nNOS-positive cells was 3.92×103cells/mm3. Immunofluorescence revealed that nNOS-containing neurons constituted almost 26.93±2.36% of the GAD67-GFP neurons. Almost every nNOS-positive cell expressed glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). Proportions of nNOS-positive interneurons that expressed calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were approximately 5.20%, 15.63%, 26.50%, 87.50% and 88.00%, respectively; but exhibited no co-localization with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. By contrast, percentages of calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y-positive cells that expressed nNOS were approximately 1.93%, 7.25%, 25.25%, 80.25% and 87.50%, respectively. Together, these findings suggest that nNOS-expressing cells are a discrete interneuronal subpopulation in the mouse BLA and may play a functional role in the inhibitory circuitry of this brain region. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods.

  4. Study of blind thrust faults underlying Tokyo and Osaka urban areas using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection profiling and continuous coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miura

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We acquired high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and continuously cored boreholes to evaluate active flexures produced by major blind thrust fault systems within two densely populated Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan: the Fukaya Fault System near Tokyo in the Kanto Basin and the Uemachi Fault System in the Osaka Basin. The high-resolution seismic reflection survey made clear the length, geometry and growth history of fault-related folds, or flexures formed above the two blind thrusts. Continuously cored boreholes linked with high-resolution seismic profiles enabled us to estimate the uplift rate as defined by shallow stratigraphic horizons and constrain the age of the most recent growth of the flexures during earthquakes on the Fukaya and Uemachi fault systems. Even with the high quality of the data we collected, it is still not possible to exactly constrain the age of the most recent blind thrust earthquake recorded by flexure of these fault-related folds. Data presented in this paper form the basis for future efforts aimed at mechanical and kinematic models for fault growth to evaluate the activity of blind thrusts underlying urban areas.

  5. Similar Spectral Power Densities Within the Schumann Resonance and a Large Population of Quantitative Electroencephalographic Profiles: Supportive Evidence for Koenig and Pobachenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroka, Kevin S.; Vares, David E.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    In 1954 and 1960 Koenig and his colleagues described the remarkable similarities of spectral power density profiles and patterns between the earth-ionosphere resonance and human brain activity which also share magnitudes for both electric field (mV/m) and magnetic field (pT) components. In 2006 Pobachenko and colleagues reported real time coherence between variations in the Schumann and brain activity spectra within the 6–16 Hz band for a small sample. We examined the ratios of the average potential differences (~3 μV) obtained by whole brain quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) between rostral-caudal and left-right (hemispheric) comparisons of 238 measurements from 184 individuals over a 3.5 year period. Spectral densities for the rostral-caudal axis revealed a powerful peak at 10.25 Hz while the left-right peak was 1.95 Hz with beat-differences of ~7.5 to 8 Hz. When global cerebral measures were employed, the first (7–8 Hz), second (13–14 Hz) and third (19–20 Hz) harmonics of the Schumann resonances were discernable in averaged QEEG profiles in some but not all participants. The intensity of the endogenous Schumann resonance was related to the ‘best-of-fitness’ of the traditional 4-class microstate model. Additional measurements demonstrated real-time coherence for durations approximating microstates in spectral power density variations between Schumann frequencies measured in Sudbury, Canada and Cumiana, Italy with the QEEGs of local subjects. Our results confirm the measurements reported by earlier researchers that demonstrated unexpected similarities in the spectral patterns and strengths of electromagnetic fields generated by the human brain and the earth-ionospheric cavity. PMID:26785376

  6. Similar Spectral Power Densities Within the Schumann Resonance and a Large Population of Quantitative Electroencephalographic Profiles: Supportive Evidence for Koenig and Pobachenko.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S Saroka

    Full Text Available In 1954 and 1960 Koenig and his colleagues described the remarkable similarities of spectral power density profiles and patterns between the earth-ionosphere resonance and human brain activity which also share magnitudes for both electric field (mV/m and magnetic field (pT components. In 2006 Pobachenko and colleagues reported real time coherence between variations in the Schumann and brain activity spectra within the 6-16 Hz band for a small sample. We examined the ratios of the average potential differences (~3 μV obtained by whole brain quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG between rostral-caudal and left-right (hemispheric comparisons of 238 measurements from 184 individuals over a 3.5 year period. Spectral densities for the rostral-caudal axis revealed a powerful peak at 10.25 Hz while the left-right peak was 1.95 Hz with beat-differences of ~7.5 to 8 Hz. When global cerebral measures were employed, the first (7-8 Hz, second (13-14 Hz and third (19-20 Hz harmonics of the Schumann resonances were discernable in averaged QEEG profiles in some but not all participants. The intensity of the endogenous Schumann resonance was related to the 'best-of-fitness' of the traditional 4-class microstate model. Additional measurements demonstrated real-time coherence for durations approximating microstates in spectral power density variations between Schumann frequencies measured in Sudbury, Canada and Cumiana, Italy with the QEEGs of local subjects. Our results confirm the measurements reported by earlier researchers that demonstrated unexpected similarities in the spectral patterns and strengths of electromagnetic fields generated by the human brain and the earth-ionospheric cavity.

  7. Continuous vertical aerosol profiling with a multi-wavelength Raman polarization lidar over the Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, Birgit; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Althausen, Dietrich; Deng, Ruru

    2017-06-01

    A dataset of particle optical properties of the highly polluted atmosphere over the Pearl River Delta (PRD), Guangzhou, China, is presented in this paper. The data were derived from the measurements of a multi-wavelength Raman and depolarization lidar PollyXT and a co-located AERONET sun photometer. The measurement campaign was conducted from November 2011 to mid-June 2012. These are the first Raman lidar measurements in the PRD that lasted for several months. A mean value of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.54 ± 0.33 was observed by the sun photometer at 500 nm in the polluted atmosphere over this megacity for the whole measurement period. The lidar profiles frequently show lofted aerosol layers, which reach altitudes of up to 2 to 3 km and, especially during the spring season, up to 5 km. These layers contain between 12 and 56 % of the total AOD, with the highest values in spring. The aerosol types in these lofted layers are classified by their optical properties. The observed lidar ratio values range from 30 to 80 sr with a mean value of 48.0 ± 10.7 sr at 532 nm. The linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm lies mostly below 5 %, with a mean value of 3.6 ± 3.7 %. The majority of the Ångström exponents lie between 0.5 and 1.5, indicating a mixture of fine- and coarse-mode aerosols. These results reveal that mostly urban pollution particles mixed with particles produced from biomass and industrial burning are present in the atmosphere above the Pearl River Delta. Trajectory analyses show that these pollution mixtures arise mainly from local and regional sources.

  8. 24-hour glucose profiles during continuous or oscillatory insulin infusion. Demonstration of the functional significance of ultradian insulin oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturis, J; Scheen, A J; Leproult, R; Polonsky, K S; van Cauter, E

    1995-01-01

    Under basal and stimulated conditions, normal insulin secretion oscillates with periods in the ultradian 100-150-min range. To test the hypothesis that oscillatory insulin delivery is more efficient in reducing blood glucose levels than continuous administration, nine normal young men were each studied on two occasions during a 28-h period including a period of polygraphically recorded sleep. Endogenous insulin secretion was suppressed by somatostatin, a constant intravenous glucose infusion was administered, and exogenous insulin was infused either at a constant rate or in a sinusoidal pattern with a period of 120 min. The mean glucose level over the 28-h period was 0.72 +/- 0.31 mmol/liter lower when insulin was infused in an oscillatory pattern than when the rate of infusion was constant (P < 0.05). The greater hypoglycemic effect of oscillatory versus constant infusion was particularly marked during the daytime, with the difference averaging 1.04 +/- 0.38 mmol/liter (P < 0.03). Serum insulin levels tended to be lower during oscillatory than constant infusion, although the same amount of exogenous insulin was administered under both conditions. Ultradian insulin oscillations appear to promote more efficient glucose utilization. PMID:7706450

  9. Ion density and temperature profiles along (XGSM) and across (ZGSM) the magnetotail as observed by THEMIS, Geotail, and ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hietala, H.; Runov, A.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristics of the two-dimensional configuration of the magnetotail current sheet are important for modeling magnetotail motion/evolution and charged particle energization. Because of the magnetotail current sheet's dynamical nature, however, simultaneous plasma and magnetic field measurements at different radial distances are required to reveal this configuration. Simultaneous observations of the magnetotail current sheet from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) D (around 10RE downtail), Geotail (around 30RE downtail), and Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moons Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) P1 (around 55RE downtail) are used to study distributions of plasma (ion) density and temperature along (Earth-Sun direction) and across (north-south direction) the magnetotail. Fourteen events (each including several current sheet crossings at different downtail distances) are studied. We demonstrate that the plasma temperature along and across the magnetotail varies more significantly than plasma density does. The temperature decrease from equatorial plane to current sheet boundaries is a major contributor to the cross-tail pressure balance. The Alfven velocity VA,B calculated at the current sheet boundaries increases significantly toward the Earth from 700 km/s at lunar orbit ˜55RE to 2200 km/s around ˜10RE downtail. The corresponding energy EA=mpVA,B2 (mp is the proton mass) is 4 times larger than the plasma temperature T0 in the magnetotail's equatorial plane, whereas the ratio EA/T0 is constant along the magnetotail. The plasma temperature T0 measured around lunar orbit in the magnetotail agrees well with the simultaneously measured energy of solar wind protons mpVSW2/2 (VSW is the solar wind speed).

  10. Improved Glucose Profile in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes With a New, High-Protein, Diabetes-Specific Tube Feed During 4 Hours of Continuous Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, Mirian; Hofman, Zandrie; Genovese, Stefano; Rouws, Carlette H F C; Ceriello, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Hyperglycemia frequently occurs in hospitalized patients receiving nutrition support. In this study, the effects of a new diabetes-specific formula (DSF) on glucose profile during 4 hours of continuous feeding and 4 hours after stopping feeding were compared with a standard formula (SF). In this randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover study, ambulant, nonhospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes received the DSF or an isocaloric, fiber-containing SF via a nasogastric tube. After overnight fasting, the formula was continuously administered to the patients during 4 hours. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were determined during the 4-hour period and in the subsequent 4 hours during which no formula was provided. During the 4-hour feeding period, DSF compared with SF resulted in a lower mean delta glucose concentration in the 3- to 4-hour period (0.3 ± 1.0 and 2.4 ± 1.5 mmol/L; P 10 mmol/L) on DSF compared with SF (2 vs 11, P = .003, respectively). No differences in number of patients with hypoglycemia (<3.9 mmol/L) were observed. No significant differences in tolerance were observed. Administration of a new, high-protein DSF during 4 hours of continuous feeding resulted in lower glucose and insulin levels compared with a fiber-containing SF in ambulant, nonhospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. These data suggest that a DSF may contribute to lower glucose levels in these patients.

  11. Global small-angle X-ray scattering data analysis for multilamellar vesicles: the evolution of the scattering density profile model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heftberger, Peter; Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Kučerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Pabst, Georg

    2014-02-01

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  12. Auroral E-region electron density height profile modificationby electric field driven vertical plasma transport:some evidence in EISCAT CP-1 data statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bösinger

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A model developed several years ago by Huuskonen et al. (1984 predicted that vertical transport of ions in the nocturnal auroral E-region ionosphere can shift the electron density profiles in altitude during times of sufficiently large electric fields. If the vertical plasma transport effect was to operate over a sufficiently long enough time, then the real height of the E-region electron maximum should be shifted some km upwards (downwards in the eastward (westward auroral electrojet, respectively, when the electric field is strong, exceeding, say, 50 mV/m. Motivated by these predictions and the lack of any experimental verification so far, we made use of the large database of the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar to investigate if the anticipated vertical plasma transport is at work in the auroral E-region ionosphere and thus to test the Huuskonen et al. (1984 model. For this purpose a new type of EISCAT data display was developed which enabled us to order a large number of electron density height profiles, collected over 16 years of EISCAT operation, according to the electric field magnitude and direction as measured at the same time at the radar's magnetic field line in the F-region. Our analysis shows some signatures in tune with a vertical plasma transport in the auroral E-region of the type predicted by the Huuskonen et al. model. The evidence brought forward is, however, not unambiguous and requires more rigorous analysis.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma convection; electric fields and currents

  13. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N' Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served

  14. Self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh Gaussian laser beam in a magnetoplasma with ramp density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti; Wani, Manzoor Ahmad [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, Punjab (India)

    2013-11-15

    The early and strong self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in magnetoplasma in the presence of density ramp has been observed. Focusing and de-focusing nature of the Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter and magnetic field has been studied, and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter 'b' plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam and is very sensitive as in case of extraordinary mode. For mode indices, m = 0, 1, 2, and b = 4.00, 3.14, and 2.05, strong self-focusing is observed. Similarly in case of ordinary mode, for m = 0, 1, 2 and b = 4.00, 3.14, 2.049, respectively, strong self-focusing is reported. Further, it is seen that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For mode indices m = 0, 1, and 2, diffraction term becomes more dominant over nonlinear term for decentered parameter b=0. For selective higher values of decentered parameter in case of mode indices m=0, 1, and 2, self-focusing effect becomes strong for extraordinary mode. Also increase in the value of magnetic field enhances the self-focusing ability of the laser beam, which is very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers.

  15. Diurnal variations of the ionospheric electron density height profiles over Irkutsk: Comparison of the incoherent scatter radar measurements, GSM TIP simulations and IRI predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsov, G. A.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Medvedev, A. V.; Alsatkin, S. S.; Oinats, A. V.; Lukianova, R. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The long-duration continuous Irkutsk incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements allowed us to obtain the monthly averaged height-diurnal variations of the electron density in the 180-600 km altitudinal range for 4 four seasons (winter, spring, summer, autumn) and for two solar activity levels (low and moderate). Considering these electron density variations as ;quiet ionosphere patterns; we compared them with the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) simulations and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) predictions. It was found that some observational features revealed from the ISR measurements are reproduced nicely by both the theoretical and empirical models, and some features agree better with the GSM TIP than with IRI. None of the models is able to reproduce a detailed multi-peak behavior of the electron density observed by ISR at ∼300 km and above for the spring and autumn under low solar activity, while for the spring the GSM TIP tends to reproduce the morning and daytime peaks at the same local times as they are seen from the ISR observations.

  16. Molecular structures of fluid phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers obtained from simulation-to-experiment comparisons and experimental scattering density profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučerka, Norbert; van Oosten, Brad; Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2015-02-05

    Following our previous efforts in determining the structures of commonly used PC, PG, and PS bilayers, we continue our studies of fully hydrated, fluid phase PE bilayers. The newly designed parsing scheme for PE bilayers was based on extensive MD simulations, and is utilized in the SDP analysis of both X-ray and neutron (contrast varied) scattering measurements. Obtained experimental scattering form factors are directly compared to our simulation results, and can serve as a benchmark for future developed force fields. Among the evaluated structural parameters, namely, area per lipid A, overall bilayer thickness DB, and hydrocarbon region thickness 2DC, the PE bilayer response to changing temperature is similar to previously studied bilayers with different headgroups. On the other hand, the reduced hydration of PE headgroups, as well as the strong hydrogen bonding between PE headgroups, dramatically affects lateral packing within the bilayer. Despite sharing the same glycerol backbone, a markedly smaller area per lipid distinguishes PE from other bilayers (i.e., PC, PG, and PS) studied to date. Overall, our data are consistent with the notion that lipid headgroups govern bilayer packing, while hydrocarbon chains dominate the bilayer's response to temperature changes.

  17. Quantitative T1 and proton density mapping with direct calculation of radiofrequency coil transmit and receive profiles from two-point variable flip angle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrexel, Simon; Reitz, Sarah C; Hof, Stephanie; Gracien, René-Maxime; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Zimmermann, Hilga; Droby, Amgad; Klein, Johannes C; Deichmann, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative T1 mapping of brain tissue is frequently based on the variable flip angle (VFA) method, acquiring spoiled gradient echo (GE) datasets at different excitation angles. However, accurate T1 calculation requires a knowledge of the sensitivity profile B1 of the radiofrequency (RF) transmit coil. For an additional derivation of proton density (PD) maps, the receive coil sensitivity profile (RP) must also be known. Mapping of B1 and RP increases the experiment duration, which may be critical when investigating patients. In this work, a method is presented for the direct calculation of B1 and RP from VFA data. Thus, quantitative maps of T1 , PD, B1 and RP can be obtained from only two spoiled GE datasets. The method is based on: (1) the exploitation of the linear relationship between 1/PD and 1/T1 in brain tissue and (2) the assumption of smoothly varying B1 and RP, so that a large number of data points can be fitted across small volume elements where B1 and RP are approximately constant. The method is tested and optimized on healthy subjects. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The effects of plant extracts on microbial community structure in a rumen-simulating continuous-culture system as revealed by molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferme, D; Banjac, M; Calsamiglia, S; Busquet, M; Kamel, C; Avgustin, G

    2004-01-01

    An in vitro study in dual-flow continuous-culture fermentors was conducted with two different concentrations of monensin, cinnamaldehyde or garlic extract added to 1:1 forage-to-concentrate diet in order to determine their effects on selected rumen bacterial populations. Samples were subjected to total DNA extraction, restriction analysis of PCR amplified parts of 16S rRNA genes (ARDRA) and subsequent analysis of the restriction profiles by lab-on-chip technology with the Agilent's Bioanalyser 2100. Eub338-BacPre primer pair was used to select for the bacteria from the genera Bacteroides, Porphyromonas and Prevotella, especially the latter representing the dominant Gram-negative bacterial population in the rumen. Preliminary results of HaeIII restriction analysis show that the effects of monensin, cinnamaldehyde and garlic extract on the BacPre targeted ruminal bacteria are somewhat different in regard to targeted populations and to the nature of the effect. Garlic extract was found to trigger the most intensive changes in the structure of the BacPre targeted population. Comparison of the in silico restriction analysis of BacPre sequences deposited in different DNA databanks and of the results of performed amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis showed differences between the predicted and obtained HaeIII restriction profiles, and suggested the presence of novel, still unknown Prevotella populations in studied samples.

  19. The Nutrient Density of Snacks: A Comparison of Nutrient Profiles of Popular Snack Foods Using the Nutrient-Rich Foods Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Julie; Rao, Goutham; Slavin, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although Americans receive almost a quarter of their daily energy from snacks, snacking remains a poorly defined and understood eating occasion. However, there is little dietary guidance about choosing snacks. Families, clinicians, and researchers need a comprehensive approach to assessing their nutritional value. Objective: To quantify and compare the nutrient density of commonly consumed snacks by their overall nutrient profiles using the Nutrient-Rich Foods (NRF) Index 10.3. Methods: NRF Index scores were calculated for the top 3 selling products (based on 2014 market research data) in different snack categories. These NRF scores were averaged to provide an overall nutrient-density score for each category. Results: Based on NRF scores, yogurt (55.3), milk (52.5), and fruit (30.1) emerged as the most nutrient-dense snacks. Ice cream (-4.4), pies and cakes (-11.1), and carbonated soft drinks (-17.2) emerged as the most nutrient-poor snacks. Conclusions: The NRF Index is a useful tool for assessing the overall nutritional value of snacks based on nutrients to limit and nutrients to encourage.

  20. Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Profiles in the Hyporheic Zone Through the Use of a High-Density Fiber Optic Measurement Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, William Jeffrey; Quick, Annika; Farrell, Tiffany B.; Benner, Shawn G.; Feris, Kevin P.; Tonina, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    The majority of chemical reactions in riverine systems occur within the hyporheic zone (HZ). Hyporheic exchange, flow into and out of the hyporheic zone, represents a primary control over those reactions because the flow rate will determine the residence time and amount of chemical constituents in the HZ. Hyporheic flow can be conceptualized as discreet streamlines that collectively represent a broad distribution of residence times. Within this context, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration becomes a primary indicator of the redox and biochemical state of the HZ including, for example, the fate of carbon, contaminant behavior, nutrient cycling, stream DO levels and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. River systems have been identified as a significant source of N2O emissions, contributing an estimated 10% of anthropogenically generated N2O. The primary biochemical transformations that lead to N2O production are nitrification (NH4+ to NO3-) and denitrification (NO3- to N2) reactions that are mediated by microbes living in the HZ. Current theory describes a process in which DO enters the stoss side of the HZ and is consumed by respiration and nitrification in the upstream, oxic portion of the streamlines leading to a progressive partitioning of the HZ from oxic to anoxic. This conceptualization, however, has not been well validated in a physical sense, due to inherent difficulties associated with measuring chemical concentrations in the HZ. To test current theory, we measured HZ DO concentrations, in a large-scale flume experiment, almost continuously for five months using a multiplexed optical network and a precision robotic surface probe system. We were able to measure DO at higher spatial and temporal resolution than has been previously demonstrated. These measurements, coupled with detailed numerical modeling of HZ flowlines, allowed us to map HZ DO concentrations spatially and over time. Our findings validate the models that describe the consumption of DO through

  1. Effects of aerobic interval training versus continuous moderate exercise programme on aerobic and anaerobic capacity, somatic features and blood lipid profile in collegate females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Krzystof; Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Zmijewski, Piotr; Norkowski, Henryk; Czajkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Regular physical activity has many positive health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases and some cancers, as well as improving the quality of life. objectives. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of 8-week aerobic interval cycle exercise training (AIT) compared to continuous cycle exercises of moderate intensity (CME) on the aerobic and anaerobic capacity, somatic features and lipid profile. The research was conducted in 88 volunteers aged 19.5±0.6 years, who were randomized to three groups of organized physical activity (OPA), who exercised 3 times per week in 47 min sessions: (I) AIT (n=24) comprising 2 series of 6x10 s sprinting with maximal pedalling cadence and active rest pedalling with intensity 65%-75% HRmax, (II) CME (n=22) corresponding to 65%-75% HRmax, (III) regular collegiate physical education classes of programmed exercises (CON; n=42). Before and after OPA anthropometrics, aero- and anaerobic capacity and lipid profile indices were measured. In AIT, a significantly greater decrease of waist circumference and WHR was noted when compared to CON, and a significantly greater reduction of sum of skinfolds than in CON and CME. Improvement in relative and absolute VO2max (L/min and ml/kg/min) was significantly higher in AIT than CON. Work output and peak power output in the anaerobic test improved significantly in AIT, CME and CON, but independently of training type. OPA was effective only in reducing triglyceride concentrations in CME and CON groups, without interaction effects in relation to training type. It was found that 8 weeks of OPA was beneficial in improving somatic and aerobic capacity indices, but AIT resulted in the greatest improvement in somatic indices (waist circumference, WHR, sum of skinfolds) and in VO2max, compared to CME and CON programmes.

  2. Effects of aerobic interval training versus continuous moderate exercise programme on aerobic and anaerobic capacity, somatic features and blood lipid profile in collegate females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzystof Mazurek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available introduction. Regular physical activity has many positive health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases and some cancers, as well as improving the quality of life. objectives. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of 8-week aerobic interval cycle exercise training (AIT compared to continuous cycle exercises of moderate intensity (CME on the aerobic and anaerobic capacity, somatic features and lipid profile. material and methods. The research was conducted in 88 volunteers aged 19.5±0.6 years, who were randomized to three groups of organized physical activity (OPA, who exercised 3 times per week in 47 min sessions: (I AIT (n=24 comprising 2 series of 6x10 s sprinting with maximal pedalling cadence and active rest pedalling with intensity 65%–75% HRmax, (II CME (n=22 corresponding to 65%-75% HRmax, (III regular collegiate physical education classes of programmed exercises (CON; n=42. Before and after OPA anthropometrics, aero- and anaerobic capacity and lipid profile indices were measured. results. In AIT, a significantly greater decrease of waist circumference and WHR was noted when compared to CON, and a significantly greater reduction of sum of skinfolds than in CON and CME. Improvement in relative and absolute VO2max (L/min and ml/kg/min was significantly higher in AIT than CON. Work output and peak power output in the anaerobic test improved significantly in AIT, CME and CON, but independently of training type. OPA was effective only in reducing triglyceride concentrations in CME and CON groups, without interaction effects in relation to training type. conclusion. It was found that 8 weeks of OPA was beneficial in improving somatic and aerobic capacity indices, but AIT resulted in the greatest improvement in somatic indices (waist circumference, WHR, sum of skinfolds and in VO[sub]2[/sub]max, compared to CME and CON programmes.

  3. Lipid, fatty acid and energy density profiles of white sharks: insights into the feeding ecology and ecophysiology of a complex top predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethybridge, Heidi R; Parrish, Christopher C; Bruce, Barry D; Young, Jock W; Nichols, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are major sources of metabolic energy in sharks and are closely linked to environmental conditions and biological cycles, such as those related to diet, reproduction and migration. In this study, we report for the first time, the total lipid content, lipid class composition and fatty acid profiles of muscle and liver tissue of white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, of various lengths (1.5-3.9 m), sampled at two geographically separate areas off southern and eastern Australia. Muscle tissue was low in total lipid content (90% of total lipid) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (34±12% of total fatty acids). In contrast, liver was high in total lipid which varied between 51-81% wm and was dominated by triacylglycerols (>93%) and monounsaturated fatty acids (36±12%). With knowledge of total lipid and dry tissue mass, we estimated the energy density of muscle (18.4±0.1 kJ g-1 dm) and liver (34.1±3.2 kJ g-1 dm), demonstrating that white sharks have very high energetic requirements. High among-individual variation in these biochemical parameters and related trophic markers were observed, but were not related to any one biological or environmental factor. Signature fatty acid profiles suggest that white sharks over the size range examined are generalist predators with fish, elasmobranchs and mammalian blubber all contributing to the diet. The ecological applications and physiological influences of lipids in white sharks are discussed along with recommendations for future research, including the use of non-lethal sampling to examine the nutritional condition, energetics and dietary relationships among and between individuals. Such knowledge is fundamental to better understand the implications of environmental perturbations on this iconic and threatened species.

  4. Real time monitoring of powder blend bulk density for coupled feed-forward/feed-back control of a continuous direct compaction tablet manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravendra; Román-Ospino, Andrés D; Romañach, Rodolfo J; Ierapetritou, Marianthi; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2015-11-10

    The pharmaceutical industry is strictly regulated, where precise and accurate control of the end product quality is necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the drug products. For such control, the process and raw materials variability ideally need to be fed-forward in real time into an automatic control system so that a proactive action can be taken before it can affect the end product quality. Variations in raw material properties (e.g., particle size), feeder hopper level, amount of lubrication, milling and blending action, applied shear in different processing stages can affect the blend density significantly and thereby tablet weight, hardness and dissolution. Therefore, real time monitoring of powder bulk density variability and its incorporation into the automatic control system so that its effect can be mitigated proactively and efficiently is highly desired. However, real time monitoring of powder bulk density is still a challenging task because of different level of complexities. In this work, powder bulk density which has a significant effect on the critical quality attributes (CQA's) has been monitored in real time in a pilot-plant facility, using a NIR sensor. The sensitivity of the powder bulk density on critical process parameters (CPP's) and CQA's has been analyzed and thereby feed-forward controller has been designed. The measured signal can be used for feed-forward control so that the corrective actions on the density variations can be taken before they can influence the product quality. The coupled feed-forward/feed-back control system demonstrates improved control performance and improvements in the final product quality in the presence of process and raw material variations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using A Multi-Level B-Spline Model to Analyze and Compare Patient Glucose Profiles Based on Continuous Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, David M.; Schoenfeld, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective We show how continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data can be analyzed using a three-level B-spline model, facilitating the estimation of inter-patient variability, within-patient inter-day variability, and measurement error. We propose methods for statistical comparison of glucose profiles among patient groups. Methods We applied a three-level random effects model using quadratic B-spline functions to analyze inter-patient and within-patient inter-day variations of the glucose trend. The estimated SD values of the glucose curves are time-dependent and were averaged over a 24-h period. We analyzed CGM data from 322 patients with type 1 diabetes, 223 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 86 subjects without diabetes using interstitial glucose levels measured every 5 min, for approximately 8 days per patient. We compared group-wide glucose profiles from the insulin pump–treated (n = 124) and multiple daily injection (MDI)–treated (n = 144) patients with type 1 diabetes. Results The average inter-patient SD values were 49 mg/dL, 43 mg/dL, and 15 mg/dL for type 1 diabetes patients, type 2 diabetes patients, and subjects without diabetes, respectively. The average within-patient, inter-day SD values were 67 mg/dL, 41 mg/dL, and 18 mg/dL, respectively. The residual SD values were 19 mg/dL, 14 mg/dL, and 8 mg/dL, respectively. We identified a statistically significant difference in glucose profiles during the morning between insulin pump–treated and MDI-treated type 1 diabetes patients. Conclusions B-spline models facilitate the analysis of CGM data and show that type 1 diabetes is associated with higher inter-day glucose variation than type 2 diabetes or being without diabetes. Pump therapy and MDI have different effects on glucose control during specific time periods. PMID:21488799

  6. A rumble in the dark: signatures of self-interacting dark matter in supermassive black hole dynamics and galaxy density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cintio, Arianna; Tremmel, Michael; Governato, Fabio; Pontzen, Andrew; Zavala, Jesús; Bastidas Fry, Alexander; Brooks, Alyson; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2017-08-01

    We explore for the first time the effect of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) on the dark matter (DM) and baryonic distribution in massive galaxies formed in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, including explicit baryonic physics treatment. A novel implementation of supermassive black hole (SMBH) formation and evolution is used, as in Tremmel et al., allowing us to explicitly follow the SMBH dynamics at the centre of galaxies. A high SIDM constant cross-section is chosen, σ = 10 cm2gr-1, to amplify differences from CDM models. Milky Way-like galaxies form a shallower DM density profile in SIDM than they do in cold dark matter (CDM), with differences already at 20 kpc scales. This demonstrates that even for the most massive spirals, the effect of SIDM dominates over the adiabatic contraction due to baryons. Strikingly, the dynamics of SMBHs differs in the SIDM and reference CDM case. SMBHs in massive spirals have sunk to the centre of their host galaxy in both the SIDM and CDM run, while in less massive galaxies about 80 per cent of the SMBH population is off-centred in the SIDM case, as opposed to the CDM case in which ˜ 90 per cent of SMBHs have reached their host's centre. SMBHs are found as far as ˜9 kpc away from the centre of their host SIDM galaxy. This difference is due to the increased dynamical friction time-scale caused by the lower DM density in SIDM galaxies compared to CDM, resulting in core stalling. This pilot work highlights the importance of simulating in a full hydrodynamical context different DM models combined to the SMBH physics to study their influence on galaxy formation.

  7. Dingoes (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793) continue to be an important reservoir host of Dirofilaria immitis in low density housing areas in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, Felicity A; Skerratt, Lee F; Butler, James R A; Johnson, Christopher N; Congdon, Bradley C

    2016-01-15

    Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is a parasitic nematode responsible for canine and feline cardiopulmonary dirofilariasis and human zoonotic filariosis in both tropical and temperate regions throughout the world. Importantly, this study in the Wet Tropics of Far North Queensland found D. immitis remains at high prevalence (72.7%) in wild dingoes in low density housing areas in Australia. This prevalence is equivalent to the highest levels seen in wild dogs in Australia and represents an ongoing risk to domestic dogs, cats and humans. In contrast, in higher density residential areas prevalence was significantly lower (16.7%, p=0.001). It is possible that chemotherapeutic heartworm (HW) prevention in domestic dogs in these higher density housing areas is helping to control infection in the resident dingo population. Five dingoes killed in council control operations around Atherton, a non-endemic HW region in the Wet Tropics, were all negative for HW likely due to the colder climate of the region restricting transmission of the disease. This survey highlights the importance of dingoes as reservoir hosts of HW disease and that the subsequent risk of infection to companion animals and humans depends on local factors such as housing density, possibly linked to chemotherapeutic HW control in domestic dogs and climate. Our findings show that veterinary clinicians need to ensure that pet owners are aware of HW disease and do not become complacent about HW chemoprohylaxis in areas which support dingo populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Density Profiles in Sputtered Molybdenum Thin Films and Their Effects on Sodium Diffusion in Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Mansfield, L.; Young, M.; Yan, Y.; Contreras, M.; Noufi, R.; Levi, D.; Terry Jr., F. L.

    2011-07-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) thin films were sputtered onto soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. The main variable in the deposition parameters, the argon (Ar) pressure pAr, was varied in the range of 6 - 20 mTorr. Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was performed to find out that the dielectric functions of the Mo films were strongly dependent on pAr, indicating a consistent and significant decrease in the Mo film density pMo with increasing pAr. This trend was confirmed by high-angle-annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric functions of Mo were then found to be correlated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles of Sodium (Na) in the Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 (CIGS) layer grown on top of Mo/SLG. Therefore, in situ optical diagnostics can be applied for process monitoring and optimization in the deposition of Mo for CIGS solar cells. Such capability is demonstrated with simulated optical transmission and reflectance of variously polarized incident light, using dielectric functions deduced from SE.

  9. Vertical profiles of specific surface area, thermal conductivity and density of mid-latitude, Arctic and Antarctic snow: relationships between snow physics and climat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domine, F.; Arnaud, L.; Bock, J.; Carmagnola, C.; Champollion, N.; Gallet, J.; Lesaffre, B.; Morin, S.; Picard, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have measured vertical profiles of specific surface area (SSA), thermal conductivity (TC) and density in snow from 12 different climatic regions featuring seasonal snowpacks of maritime, Alpine, taiga and tundra types, on Arctic sea ice, and from ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. We attempt to relate snow physical properties to climatic variables including precipitation, temperature and its yearly variation, wind speed and its short scale temporal variations. As expected, temperature is a key variable that determines snow properties, mostly by determining the metamorphic regime (temperature gradient or equi-temperature) in conjunction with precipitation. However, wind speed and wind speed distribution also seem to have an at least as important role. For example high wind speeds determine the formation of windpacks of high SSA and high TC instead of depth hoar with lower values of these variables. The distribution of wind speed also strongly affects properties, as for example frequent moderate winds result in frequent snow remobilization, producing snow with higher SSA and lower TC than regions with the same average wind speeds, but with less frequent and more intense wind episodes. These strong effects of climate on snow properties imply that climate change will greatly modify snow properties, which in turn will affect climate, as for example changes in snow SSA modify albedo and changes in TC affect permafrost and the release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost. Some of these climate-snow feedbacks will be discussed.

  10. Identification and Characterization of 40 Isolated Rehmannia glutinosa MYB Family Genes and Their Expression Profiles in Response to Shading and Continuous Cropping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengqing; Suo, Yanfei; Wei, He; Li, Mingjie; Xie, Caixia; Wang, Lina; Chen, Xinjian; Zhang, Zhongyi

    2015-07-02

    The v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors (TFs) described in plants. To date, little is known about the MYB genes in Rehmannia glutinosa. Forty unique MYB genes with full-length cDNA sequences were isolated. These 40 genes were grouped into five categories, one R1R2R3-MYB, four TRFL MYBs, four SMH MYBs, 25 R2R3-MYBs, and six MYB-related members. The MYB DNA-binding domain (DBD) sequence composition was conserved among proteins of the same subgroup. As expected, most of the closely related members in the phylogenetic tree exhibited common motifs. Additionally, the gene structure and motifs of the R. glutinosa MYB genes were analyzed. MYB gene expression was analyzed in the leaf and the tuberous root under two abiotic stress conditions. Expression profiles showed that most R. glutinosa MYB genes were expressed in the leaf and the tuberous root, suggesting that MYB genes are involved in various physiological and developmental processes in R. glutinosa. Seven MYB genes were up-regulated in response to shading in at least one tissue. Two MYB genes showed increased expression and 13 MYB genes showed decreased expression in the tuberous root under continuous cropping. This investigation is the first comprehensive study of the MYB gene family in R. glutinosa.

  11. Association between the biochemical profiles in blood and bone mineral density in Chinese Han population: findings from a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HX

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hong-Xia Chen,1,2,* Li-Bing Wu,3,* Zhong-Ji Meng1 1Institute of Biomedicine, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Environmental, Agricultural, & Occupational Health, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: This study investigated the possible correlation between blood biochemical profiles and bone mineral density (BMD in the Chinese Han population. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using participants randomly selected from the Health Screening Center of Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, which included a total of 285 individuals, varied in ages from 31 years to 63 years. The height, weight, and body mass index (BMI of each subject were measured, as well as fasting blood glucose (FBG, triglycerides, total cholesterol, blood uric acid (UA, blood urea nitrogen, and blood creatinine. We evaluated BMD at the wrist (grams per centimeter square using a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. The mean ages of female and male groups were 45.32±8.24 years and 46.76±9.01 years, respectively. The mean age of the study population was 46.14±8.79 years, which is similar to the general population. The mean BMI values were 22.08±2.38 kg/m2 and 24.50±2.67 kg/m2 in the female and male population, respectively, representing a statistically significant difference (P<0.05. No significant differences in levels of FBG total cholesterol, or triglycerides were seen among the male and female population. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed using BMD as outcome variables and BMI, blood UA, FBG, total cholesterol, triglycerides, urea nitrogen, and blood creatinine as covariates, and the regression equation was established as Y=0

  12. An overview of the first decade of PollyNET: an emerging network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baars

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design with different capabilities ranging from single wavelength to multiwavelength systems, and now apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at http://polly.tropos.de/. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm as this operating wavelength is available for all Polly lidar systems. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  13. Extended Prandial Glycemic Profiles of Foods as Assessed Using Continuous Glucose Monitoring Enhance the Power of the 120-Minute Glycemic Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlup, Rudolf; Peterson, Karolina; Zapletalová, Jana; Kudlová, Pavla; Sečkař, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Background The glycemic index (GI) is routinely measured 120 minutes after food intake (GI120). The purpose of this prospective open label study was to assess (1) the dynamics of glycemia over the 210 minutes following food consumption and (2) the evolution of GIs based on 120-, 150-, 180-, and 210-minute glycemic profiles. Method Twenty healthy subjects (mean ± SE; 21.9 ± 1.39 years of age; body mass index 23.6 ± 0.63 kg/m2; 7 men and 13 women) completed the study. Each subject consumed 10 different foods with known GI120 on three separate occasions at four different times of day according to a defined meal plan over a 9-day period; 32 meals were evaluated. The GIs for intervals of 120, 150, 180 and 210 minutes after food consumption were determined using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) to measure glycemia. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to compare the GIs. Results Glycemia returned to baseline within 120 minutes for honey and tomato soup; within 210 minutes for white bread, choco-rice cookies, fish and potatoes, wafers, and meat ravioli with cheese; and later for dark chocolate, apricot dumplings, and choco-wheat cookies. The extended GIs were higher than the respective GI120s in eight of the foods. Conclusions The 120-minute glycemic index fails to fully account for changes in glycemia after ingestion of a mixed meal because glycemia remains above baseline for a longer period. The CGMS is a convenient method to determine the glucose response/GIs over intervals extended up to 210 minutes, which is adequate time for the absorption of most foods. PMID:20513328

  14. An overview of the first decade of PollyNET: an emerging network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Holger; Kanitz, Thomas; Engelmann, Ronny; Althausen, Dietrich; Heese, Birgit; Komppula, Mika; Preißler, Jana; Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; Wandinger, Ulla; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Seifert, Patric; Hofer, Julian; Skupin, Annett; Schneider, Florian; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Foth, Andreas; Bley, Sebastian; Pfüller, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Lihavainen, Heikki; Viisanen, Yrjö; Hooda, Rakesh Kumar; Nepomuceno Pereira, Sérgio; Bortoli, Daniele; Wagner, Frank; Mattis, Ina; Janicka, Lucja; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Achtert, Peggy; Artaxo, Paulo; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Prakesh Sharma, Ved; Gideon van Zyl, Pieter; Beukes, Johan Paul; Sun, Junying; Rohwer, Erich G.; Deng, Ruru; Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Zamorano, Felix

    2016-04-01

    A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly) for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design with different capabilities ranging from single wavelength to multiwavelength systems, and now apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at http://polly.tropos.de/. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash) are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm as this operating wavelength is available for all Polly lidar systems. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  15. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06{mu}m as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-04-01

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs.

  16. Defining stem profile model for wood valuation of red pine in Ontario and Michigan with consideration of stand density influence on tree taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. T. Zakrzewski; M. Penner; D. W. MacFarlane

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Canada-United States Great Lakes Stem Profile Modelling Project, established to support the local timber production process and to enable cross-border comparisons of timber volumes, here we present results of fitting Zakrzewski's (1999) stem profile model for red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) growing in Michigan, United States, and...

  17. GLL RPT IONOSPHERE PROFILES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Radio Propagation Team Ionosphere Profile data set is small number of electron density profiles derived from radio occultation data collected while...

  18. Relationship of the triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio to the remainder of the lipid profile: The Very Large Database of Lipids-4 (VLDL-4) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Renato; Manalac, Raoul J; Faridi, Kamil F; Blaha, Michael J; Toth, Peter P; Kulkarni, Krishnaji R; Nasir, Khurram; Virani, Salim S; Banach, Maciej; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth S; Jones, Steven R

    2015-09-01

    High levels of the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio are associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. We evaluated variability in the remaining lipid profile, especially remnant lipoprotein particle cholesterol (RLP-C) and its components (very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol subfraction 3 and intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol), with variability in the TG/HDL-C ratio in a very large study cohort representative of the general U.S. We examined data from 1,350,908 US individuals who were clinically referred for lipoprotein cholesterol ultracentrifugation (Atherotech, Birmingham, AL) from 2009 to 2011. Demographic information other than age and sex was not available. Changes to the remaining lipid profile across percentiles of the TG/HDL-C ratio were quantified, as well as by three TG/HDL-C cut-off points previously proposed in the literature: 2.5 (male) and 2 (female), 3.75 (male) and 3 (female), and 3.5 (male and female). The mean age of our study population was 58.7 years, and 48% were men. The median TG/HDL-C ratio was 2.2. Across increasing TG/HDL-C ratios, we found steadily increasing levels of RLP-C, non-HDL-C and LDL density. Among the lipid parameters studied, RLP-C and LDL density had the highest relative increase when comparing individuals with elevated TG/HDL-C levels to those with lower TG/HDL-C levels using established cut-off points. Approximately 47% of TG/HDL-C ratio variance was attributable to RLP-C. In the present analysis, a higher TG/HDL-C ratio was associated with an increasingly atherogenic lipid phenotype, characterized by higher RLP-C along with higher non-HDL-C and LDL density. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Density profile and turbulence evolution during L-H transition studied with the ultra-fast swept reflectometer on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, A.; Bottereau, C.; Clairet, F.; Hennequin, P.; Stroth, U.; Birkenmeier, G.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Heuraux, S.; Molina, D.; Silva, A.; Willensdorfer, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-12-01

    The ultra-fast swept reflectometer with the sweep time of 1 μs, inferior to the characteristic turbulent time scale, has provided the measurements of the fast density and density fluctuation evolution across major parts of tokamak plasma radius. The L-H transitions in a series of plasma discharges in ASDEX Upgrade have been studied with a high temporal resolution. The comparison of the density fluctuation behaviour in L- and H-mode is presented. The I-phase oscillation dynamics has been described in terms of the density fluctuation level, the radial electric field and the normalised electron pressure gradient. Indications for a phase shift between the turbulence and the radial electric field are observed in the beginning of the I-phase, where the turbulence grows first and the radial electric field increase follows. In the established I-phase the electric field and the turbulence are in phase.

  20. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboards in the 16.59-25.26 keV photon energy range and their density profile using x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashdeh, M W; Bauk, S; Tajuddin, A A; Hashim, R

    2012-04-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboard with four different particle sizes (samples A, B, C and D) and natural raw Rhizophora spp. wood (sample E) were determined using single-beam photon transmission in the energy range between 16.59 and 25.26 keV. This was done by determining the attenuation of K(α1) X-ray fluorescent (XRF) photons from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin targets. The results were compared with theoretical values of young-age breast (Breast 1) and water calculated using a XCOM computer program. It was found that the mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboards to be close to the calculated XCOM values in water than natural Rhizophora spp. wood. Computed tomography (CT) scans were then used to determine the density profile of the samples. The CT scan results showed that the Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboard has uniform density compared to natural Rhizophora spp. wood. In general, the differences in the variability of the profile density decrease as the particle size of the pellet samples decreases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling spatial density using continuous wavelet transforms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K ANILKUMAR3. 1Digital Mapping and Modelling Division, Advanced Data Processing Research .... dow based search for peaks is sensitive to noise and do not differentiate strong and weak peaks. Methods based ... eter space and iteratively searching for optimal parameters by minimizing a criteria (e.x., sum of square ...

  2. Modelling spatial density using continuous wavelet transforms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Space debris; wavelets; Mexican hat; Laplace distribution; random search; parameter estimation. ... Digital Mapping and Modelling Division, Advanced Data Processing Research Institute, Secunderabad 500 009, India; Department of Mathematics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India; Applied Mathematics ...

  3. GADEP Continuous PM2.5 mass concentration data, VIIRS Day Night Band SDR (SVDNB), MODIS Terra Level 2 water vapor profiles (infrared algorithm for atmospheric profiles for both day and night, NWS surface meteorological data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data descriptions are provided at the following urls: GADEP Continuous PM2.5 mass concentration data - https://aqs.epa.gov/aqsweb/documents/data_mart_welcome.html...

  4. Markers of lutein and zeaxanthin status in two age groups of men and women: dietary intake, serum concentrations, lipid profile and macular pigment optical density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Lutein and zeaxanthin accumulate in retina (macular pigment). Their nutritional status can be assessed using dietary or biochemical markers and both have been associated with macular pigment optical density. We proposed to assess dietary and status markers of lutein and zeaxanthin in a group of healthy Spanish volunteers, considering the potential influence of age, gender and serum lipids to investigate the predictors of the macular pigment optical density. Methods Serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, dietary intake and macular pigment optical density were determined in 108 healthy men and women (20–35 and 45–65 years), using high-performance liquid chromatography, 3-day food records and heterochromic flicker photometry, respectively. Mann–Whitney U-test, Spearman correlation coefficient and multivariate regression analysis were used for the statistical study. Results Serum concentrations and dietary intake of lutein plus zeaxanthin (p lutein (ρ = 0.452, p lutein + zeaxanthin (ρ = 0.431, p lutein and zeaxanthin were expressed in relation to serum lipids in older subjects (ρ = 0.262, p = 0.006). Multivariate regression analysis identified age and serum lutein as major predictors of macular pigment optical density (total sample), and a coefficient of determination of 29.7% for the model including lutein + zeaxathin/cholesterol + triglycerides, sex and fruit + vegetables in the older group. Conclusions The establishment of normal/reference ranges for serum lutein and zeaxanthin should consider age ranges and be expressed in relation to lipid concentrations, at least in subjects over 45 years, as this could influence macular pigment optical density. The macular pigment optical density showed age-specific correlations with lutein plus zeaxanthin expressed in relation to serum lipid concentrations as well as with the fruit and vegetable intake. PMID:24889185

  5. Measurements of the Suprathermal Electron Density Profile by Electron Cyclotron Emission at the Upper Cut-Off Layer in Tore Supra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, B. C.; Talvard, M.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Giruzzi, G.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of measuring the radial profile of fast-electron distributions from ECE spectra is discussed. The most usual ECE diagnostic set-up, i.e. the second-harmonic X-mode, observed by low-held side antennae in the equatorial plane, can be used by exploiting the reflection of spontaneously

  6. User's Guide: An Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup for the Profiling of the Power Density Distribution in Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J W; Teruya, A T; Palmer, T A

    2002-06-01

    This handbook describes the assembly and operation of an enhanced Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) diagnostic device for measuring the power density distribution of high power electron beams used for welding. The most recent version of this diagnostic device, [1] Version 2.0, contains modifications to the hardware components of previous MFC designs.[2] These modifications allow for more complete capture of the electrons and better electrical grounding, thus improving the quality of the acquired data and enabling a more accurate computed tomographic (CT) reconstruction [3,4] of the power density distribution of the electron beam to be performed. [ 5-9

  7. High Tap Density Spherical Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 Cathode Material Synthesized via Continuous Hydroxide Coprecipitation Method for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunyi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical [Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2](OH2 precursor with narrow size distribution and high tap density has been successfully synthesized by a continuous hydroxide coprecipitation, and Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 is then prepared by mixing the precursor with 6% excess Li2CO3 followed by calcinations. The tap density of the obtained Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 powder is as high as 2.61 g cm−3. The powders are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscope (SEM, particle size distribution (PSD, and charge/discharge cycling. The XRD studies show that the prepared Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 has a well-ordered layered structure without any impurity phases. Good packing properties of spherical secondary particles (about 12 μm consisted of a large number of tiny-thin plate-shape primary particles (less than 1 μm, which can be identified from the SEM observations. In the voltage range of 3.0–4.3 V and 2.5–4.6 V, Li[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]O2 delivers the initial discharge capacity of approximately 175 and 214 mAh g−1 at a current density of 32 mA g−1, and the capacity retention after 50 cycles reaches 98.8% and 90.2%, respectively. Besides, it displays good high-temperature characteristics and excellent rate capability.

  8. Relationships between seismic wave-Speed, density, and electrical conductivity beneath Australia from seismology, mineralogy, and laboratory-based conductivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, A.; Koch, S.; Shankland, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present maps of the three-dimensional density (ρ), electrical conductivity (σ), and shear-wave speed (VS) structure of the mantle beneath Australia and surrounding ocean in the depth range of 100–800 km. These maps derived from stochastic inversion of seismic surface-wave dispersion data, ther...

  9. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  10. Circulating and intraprostatic sex steroid hormonal profiles in relation to male pattern baldness and chest hair density among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Hafi, Muhannad; Veneroso, Carmela C; Lynch, Barlow; Falk, Roni T; Niwa, Shelley; Emanuel, Eric; Gao, Yu-Tang; Hemstreet, George P; Zolfghari, Ladan; Carroll, Peter R; Manyak, Michael J; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Levine, Paul H; Hsing, Ann W; Cook, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    Prospective cohort studies of circulating sex steroid hormones and prostate cancer risk have not provided a consistent association, despite evidence from animal and clinical studies. However, studies using male pattern baldness as a proxy of early-life or cumulative androgen exposure have reported significant associations with aggressive and fatal prostate cancer risk. Given that androgens underlie the development of patterned hair loss and chest hair, we assessed whether these two dermatological characteristics were associated with circulating and intraprostatic concentrations of sex steroid hormones among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. We included 248 prostate cancer patients from the NCI Prostate Tissue Study, who answered surveys and provided a pre-treatment blood sample as well as fresh frozen adjacent normal prostate tissue. Male pattern baldness and chest hair density were assessed by trained nurses before surgery. General linear models estimated geometric means and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) of each hormone variable by dermatological phenotype with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Subgroup analyses were performed by Gleason score (balding status with serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and a weak association with elevated intraprostatic testosterone. Conversely, neither circulating nor intraprostatic sex hormones were statistically significantly associated with chest hair density. Age-adjusted correlation between binary balding status and three-level chest hair density was weak (r = 0.05). There was little evidence to suggest that Gleason score or race modified these associations. This study provides evidence that balding status assessed at a mean age of 60 years may serve as a clinical marker for circulating sex hormone concentrations. The weak-to-null associations between balding status and intraprostatic sex hormones reaffirm differences in organ

  11. Energy efficiency project: continuous rolling mill profiles plant of Barra Mansa Votorantim Siderurgia; Projeto de eficiencia energetica: laminador continuo de perfis da Usina Barra Mansa Votorantim Siderurgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decnop, Luiz Eduardo Machado [LD Engenharia Ltda, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Franca, Rafael Latini; Silva, Bruno Jose Carvalho; Antunes, Raphael Jose Simoes [Votorantim Siderurgia, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-12-21

    This work shows the development and implementation of a plan to increase energy efficiency and consequent reduction in production costs of profiles. The plant has a varied mix, large differences among products (1 kg/m to 30 kg/m) that resulting in a large gaps between bars and high level of interruption. It was necessary to reduce the impacts of fixed charges that weighed heavily in the cost. The methodology was to identify, among the main elements contributing to the consumption of electricity, what is the real need of each input as the quality, quantity, intensity and permanence, to perform strictly their intended function in the process. Then the comparison of these results with the engineering solutions adopted in the current design of the equipment. Thus was taken to waste all resources available beyond the strict needs. This ranking conducted the study to optimize the delivery of each resource taking into account the difficulty and risk of possible technical solutions, taking as a premise to develop definitive solutions with full automation of security functions to ensure stability and security of gains. The results were the reduction of 147 kWh/t to 105 kWh/t in the LCP (-37%), and a 50% reduction in energy expended in the WTP. (author)

  12. A multichannel 118.8 {mu}m-CH{sub 3}OH laser interferometer for electron density profile measurements in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahata, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ito, Y. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Ejiri, A. [Tokyo Univ., Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Okajima, S. [Chubu Univ., College of Engineering, Kasugai, Aichi (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A 13-channel far infrared laser interferometer has been developed and routinely operated for the measurements of the spatial and temporal behaviours of the electron density in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The optical configuration is of the Michelson interferometer type with a heterodyne detection system. The light source is a highly stable twin 118.8-{mu}m CH{sub 3}OH laser pumped by a cw CO{sub 2} laser, which is developed in NIFS. All the optical components of the interferometer except laser sources are mounted on a massive stainless steel frame, which encircles the plasma vacuum vessel and is placed on three vibration-isolating mounts. The observed fringe shifts caused by the mechanical vibrations of the system is 1/100 fringes for the high frequency components of f > 1 Hz and 1/50 fringes for the low frequency components. The phase-shift measurement is made with an accuracy of 1/100 of a fringe, corresponding to a minimum measurable line-averaged density of 5.6 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} at the central chord. (author)

  13. Péritonites infectieuses en dialyse péritonéale continue ambulatoire au CHU de Rabat: profil bactériologique sur trois ans

    OpenAIRE

    Lioussfi, Zineb; Rhou, Hakima; Ezzaitouni, Fatima; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabea; Benamar, Loubna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La péritonite infectieuse (PI) est une des complications les plus sévères et les plus fréquentes de la dialyse péritonéale (DP). But: Déterminer le taux des PI et les germes en causes, et évaluer l’efficacité des protocoles thérapeutiques entrepris chez les patients traités par DP au CHU de Rabat. Méthodes Etude rétrospective effectuée en Septembre 2009 chez tous les patients traités par DP continue ambulatoire (DPCA) au CHU de Rabat depuis l’ouverture de l’unité de DP en Juillet...

  14. Evaluation of non-ST segment elevation acute chest pain syndromes with a novel low-profile continuous imaging ultrasound transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraratna, P Anthony N; Mohar, Dilbahar S; Sidarous, Peter F; Brar, Prabhjyot; Miller, Jeffrey; Shah, Nissar; Kadis, John; Ali, Ashgar; Mohar, Prabhsimran

    2012-09-01

    This investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that continuous cardiac imaging using an ultrasound transducer developed in our laboratory (ContiScan) is superior to electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with acute non-ST segment elevation chest pain syndromes. Seventy patients with intermediate to high probability of CAD who presented with typical anginal chest pain and no evidence of ST segment elevation on the ECG were studied. The 2.5-MHz transducer is spherical in its distal part mounted in an external housing to permit steering in 360 degrees. The transducer was placed at the left sternal border to image the left ventricular short-axis view and recorded on video tape at baseline, during and after episodes of chest pain. Two ECG leads were continuously monitored. The presence of CAD was confirmed by coronary arteriography or nuclear or echocardiographic stress testing. Twenty-four patients had regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) on their initial echo which were unchanged during the period of monitoring. All had evidence of CAD. Twenty-eight patients had transient RWMA. All had evidence of CAD. Eighteen patients had normal wall motion throughout the monitoring period, 14 of these had no evidence of CAD, and four had evidence of CAD. These four patients did not have chest pain during monitoring. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of echocardiographic monitoring for diagnosing non-ST elevation myocardial infarction was 88%, 100%, and 91% respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the ECG for diagnosis of CAD were 31%, 100%, and 52%, respectively. Echocardiography was superior to ECG (P patients presenting with acute non-ST segment elevation chest pain syndromes. This technique could be a useful adjunct to ECG monitoring for myocardial ischemia in the acute care setting. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The effects of continuous and intermittent aerobic exercise on lipid profile and fasting blood sugar in women with a body mass index more than 25 kg/m2: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Z

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "n 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Background: Obesity is a major health problem all around the world. On the other hand, few people, especially women, are physically active to the levels recommended by Healthy People 2010 web site managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The objective of this study was to compare the potential effects of intermittent and continuous exercise programs combined with concurrent calorie restriction diets on lipid profile and fasting blood sugar in overweight and obese females."n"nMethods : Forty-five women with a sedentary life style and a BMI greater than 25 kg/m2, were randomly assigned to one of the three groups (15 subjects in each group: a 40 minutes of medium-intensity intermittent exercise (64-76% of maximal heart rate, 3 bouts per day for 5 days a week, b a single bout of a 40-minute continuous exercise per day for 5 days a week, C the non-exercising control group. A self-monitored calorie restricted diet was recommended to all participants by a dietitian. The lipid profile, fasting blood sugar and blood pressure of all participants were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks after the intervention period."n"nResults : After the intervention, there were no significant differences among the groups in terms of lipid profile [cholesterol (P=0.94, triglyceride (P=0.62] fasting blood sugar (P=0.054, systolic blood pressure (P=0.84 or diastolic blood pressure (P=0.30."n"nConclusion: There seems to be no significant differences between short term continuous and intermittent aerobic

  16. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  17. Highly Accelerated, Intravascular T1, T2, and Proton Density Mapping with Linear Algebraic Modeling and Sensitivity Profile Correction at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; Zhang, Yi; Hegde, Shashank Sathyanarayana; Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Vessel wall MRI with intravascular (IV) detectors can produce superior local signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and generate high-resolution T1, T2, and proton density (PD) maps that could be used to automatically classify atherosclerotic lesion stage. However, long acquisition times potentially limit multi-parametric mapping. Here, for the first time, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) is applied to yield accurate compartment-average T1, T2 and PD measures at least 10 times faster compared to a standard full k-space reconstructed MIX-TSE sequence at 3T. Simple phase and magnitude sensitivity corrections are incorporated into the SLAM reconstruction to compensate for IV detector non-uniformity.

  18. HOW TO MAKE AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY: TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokas, Ewa L. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Kazantzidis, Stelios [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Mayer, Lucio, E-mail: lokas@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: stelios@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: lucio@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-05-20

    In recent years the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has unraveled a new population of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) whose origin remains a puzzle in the vicinity of the Milky Way (MW). Using a suite of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the formation of UFDs in the context of the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group (LG). Our simulations are designed to reproduce the tidal interactions between MW-sized host galaxies and rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter (DM) halos. We explore a variety of inner density slopes {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -{alpha}} for the dwarf DM halos, ranging from core-like ({alpha} = 0.2) to cuspy ({alpha} = 1), and different dwarf orbital configurations. Our experiments demonstrate that UFDs can be produced via tidal stirring of disky dwarfs on relatively tight orbits, consistent with a redshift of accretion by the host galaxy of z {approx} 1, and with intermediate values for the halo inner density slopes ({rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -0.6}). The inferred slopes are in excellent agreement with those resulting from both the modeling of the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies and recent cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. Comparing the properties of observed UFDs with those of their simulated counterparts, we find remarkable similarities in terms of basic observational parameters. We conclude that tidal stirring of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of UFDs in the LG environment.

  19. An automated system for selective and continuous measurements of vertical thoron profiles for the determination of transport times near the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Plake

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of in-canopy transport times is of major importance for the investigation of sources, sinks and net fluxes of reactive trace gases within plant canopies. The Damköhler number, which compares timescales of chemical reactions with transport times, is a widely applied measure to evaluate flux divergences. In this study we present and evaluate a novel automated measurement system for selective vertical thoron (Tn profiles near the Earth's surface and demonstrate its suitability for the direct and reliable determination of transport times within a natural grassland canopy. For the first time, we perform a rigorous determination of systematic and random uncertainties of Tn (and Rn concentrations under field conditions for this type of measurement system. The obtained median precisions for three concentration classes (> 100 Bq m−3, 100–15 Bq m−3, −3 were 8.8%, 23.2% and 132.1% for Tn (and 16.6%, 25.0%, 99.2% for Rn. We calculate in-canopy transport times (τ and propagate their uncertainty from the individual errors of the Tn concentration measurements. A quality assessment of τ for the field experiment during a period of 51 days revealed good data quality with 44% of the relative uncertainties below 50%. The occurrence of transport time uncertainties higher than 100% was caused by absolute Tn gradients lower than 70 Bq m−3 m−1, which was found for 22% of all determined transport times. In addition, the method was found to be highly sensitive to the Tn concentrations at the upper of the two inlet heights (zu. Low values of CTnzu result in high absolute uncertainties of the transport time. A comparison with empirical parameterizations revealed a much lower scatter for the τ values determined from our measurements. We found an excellent agreement with τ values obtained by the in-canopy resistance approach used, e.g., in the SURFATM model during daytime, while the SURFATM model significantly overestimated transport times

  20. Learning Grasp Affordance Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Kroemer, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    these and records their outcomes. When a satisfactory number of grasp data is available, an importance-sampling algorithm turns these into a grasp density. We evaluate our method in a largely autonomous learning experiment run on three objects of distinct shapes. The experiment shows how learning increases success......We address the issue of learning and representing object grasp affordance models. We model grasp affordances with continuous probability density functions (grasp densities) which link object-relative grasp poses to their success probability. The underlying function representation is nonparametric...... and relies on kernel density estimation to provide a continuous model. Grasp densities are learned and refined from exploration, by letting a robot “play” with an object in a sequence of graspand-drop actions: The robot uses visual cues to generate a set of grasp hypotheses; it then executes...

  1. Continuous auditing & continuous monitoring : Continuous value?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hillo, Rutger; Weigand, Hans; Espana, S; Ralyte, J; Souveyet, C

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in information technology, new laws and regulations and rapidly changing business conditions have led to a need for more timely and ongoing assurance with effectively working controls. Continuous Auditing (CA) and Continuous Monitoring (CM) technologies have made this possible by

  2. The control of plasma density profile in Tore Supra. Comparison of different fueling techniques; Controle du profil de densite dans le plasma de Tore Supra. Comparaison de differentes methodes d'alimentation en particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commaux, N

    2007-09-15

    The behaviour of a reactor-class plasma when fuelled using the existing techniques (gas puffing, supersonic molecular beam injection and pellet injection) is still very difficult to foresee. The present work has been initiated on Tore Supra in order to extrapolate the consequences of the different fuelling systems on ITER. Two main topics have been studied: the comparison of the plasma behaviour when fuelled using the different techniques at high Greenwald density fractions and the study of the homogenization following a pellet injection (main fuelling technique for ITER burning plasmas). The experiments at high Greenwald density fractions performed on Tore Supra showed that the plasma behaviour is very dependent on the fuelling method. The plasma energy confinement is following the scaling laws determined at low density when fuelled using pellet injection. which is better than for gas puffing and SMBI. both inducing a significant confinement loss. This behaviour is nor related to a transport modification: the ratio between effective diffusion and convection is similar to the pellet case. The difference between these shots is related only to the position of the matter source (at the edge for gas and close to the center for pellets). The study concerning the homogenization phenomena following a pellet injection aims mainly to study the {nabla}B-drift effect that expels the mater deposited by a pellet toward the low field side. A new phenomenon. which appears to be particularly important for the {nabla}B-drift during low field side injections. was then discovered: the influence of magnetic surfaces with an integer-valued safety factor (q). When the mater drifting toward low field side crosses an integer q surface. it experiences an important braking effect which stops the drift motion. It implies that the pellet material is mainly deposited on the last integer q surface crossed by the pellet during its injection. This study allows also to determine that the {nabla

  3. High density lipoprotein structural changes and drug response in lipidomic profiles following the long-term fenofibrate therapy in the FIELD substudy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Yetukuri

    Full Text Available In a recent FIELD study the fenofibrate therapy surprisingly failed to achieve significant benefit over placebo in the primary endpoint of coronary heart disease events. Increased levels of atherogenic homocysteine were observed in some patients assigned to fenofibrate therapy but the molecular mechanisms behind this are poorly understood. Herein we investigated HDL lipidomic profiles associated with fenofibrate treatment and the drug-induced Hcy levels in the FIELD substudy. We found that fenofibrate leads to complex HDL compositional changes including increased apoA-II, diminishment of lysophosphatidylcholines and increase of sphingomyelins. Ethanolamine plasmalogens were diminished only in a subgroup of fenofibrate-treated patients with elevated homocysteine levels. Finally we performed molecular dynamics simulations to qualitatively reconstitute HDL particles in silico. We found that increased number of apoA-II excludes neutral lipids from HDL surface and apoA-II is more deeply buried in the lipid matrix than apoA-I. In conclusion, a detailed molecular characterization of HDL may provide surrogates for predictors of drug response and thus help identify the patients who might benefit from fenofibrate treatment.

  4. Péritonites infectieuses en dialyse péritonéale continue ambulatoire au CHU de Rabat: profil bactériologique sur trois ans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioussfi, Zineb; Rhou, Hakima; Ezzaitouni, Fatima; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabea; Benamar, Loubna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La péritonite infectieuse (PI) est une des complications les plus sévères et les plus fréquentes de la dialyse péritonéale (DP). But: Déterminer le taux des PI et les germes en causes, et évaluer l’efficacité des protocoles thérapeutiques entrepris chez les patients traités par DP au CHU de Rabat. Méthodes Etude rétrospective effectuée en Septembre 2009 chez tous les patients traités par DP continue ambulatoire (DPCA) au CHU de Rabat depuis l’ouverture de l’unité de DP en Juillet 2006. Ont été inclus dans cette étude, tous les patients ayant fait une péritonite. Pour tous nos patients, nous avons relevé les données cliniques, biologiques et bactériologiques. Nous avons également recherché les causes des péritonites, le délai de survenue par rapport au début de la dialyse, et la durée moyenne de formation des patients. Résultats Au cours de la période de l’étude, 28 épisodes de PI sont survenus chez 19 patients dont la moyenne d’âge est de 46±16 (19-78) ans, avec une prédominance masculine (12 hommes/ 7 femmes). Le taux des PI dans notre unité de DP est de 21.07 mois-patients calculé par le RDPLF. Leur délai de survenue par rapport au début de la dialyse au centre est de 7.9 ±8 (1-29) mois. Lors de ces PI, les bactéries à Gram négatif (BGN) ont été retrouvées dans 55% des cas, contre uniquement 45% pour les Gram positifs. Conclusion La PI est une complication grave et redoutable de la DP. Le taux de PI dans notre centre de DPCA est de 21m-p ce qui correspond au taux acceptable définie par les sociétés internationales. Les germes les plus responsables des PI dans notre centre sont les BGN et la contamination semble être manu-portée se faisant essentiellement à partir de la flore environnementale et cutanée. PMID:22593777

  5. First continuous time series of tropical, mid-latitudinal and polar middle-atmospheric wind profile measurements with a ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan A.; Kivi, Rigel; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Duflot, Valentin

    2014-05-01

    Wind is one of the key parameters for the characterisation of the atmosphere and the understanding of its dynamics. Despite this, no continuously operating instrument for wind measurements in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere existed so far. Aiming to contribute to the closing of this data gap by exploiting the potential of microwave radiometry the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Bern built a ground-based 142 GHz Doppler-spectro-radiometer with the acronym WIRA (WInd RAdiometer). WIRA is specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind and is sensitive to the altitude range between 35 and 70 km. The architecture of the radiometer is fairly compact what makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance. The operational use of WIRA started in September 2010. Since a technical upgrade in autumn 2012 which drastically increased the signal to noise ratio of the instrument, the meridional component is permanently measured along with the zonal wind to get a full picture of the horizontal wind field. During the last year the wind retrieval algorithm has been entirely rebuilt and tested. It is now based on the optimal estimation technique (OEM) and uses an upgraded version of the ARTS/QPACK radiative transfer and inversion model. Time series of middle-atmospheric wind from measurement campaigns of 7 to 11 months duration at mid and high latitude sites (Bern, 46°57' N, 7°26' E; Sodankylä, 67°22' N, 26°38' E; Observatoire de Haute-Provence, 43°56' N, 5°43' E) have been obtained. In September 2013 WIRA was moved to Observatoire du Maïdo (21°04' S, 55°23' E) to study the dynamics of the tropical middle atmosphere. The measurements have been compared to the data from the ECMWF model. Generally good agreement has been found in the stratosphere, however systematic discrepancies exist in the mesosphere. At the

  6. Does the nutrition profile of vitamins, fatty acids and microelements counteract the negative impact from organohalogen pollutants on bone mineral density in Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Rigét, Frank F; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik; Hyldstrup, Lars; Teilmann, Jenni; Dietz, Rune; Kirkegaard, Maja; Andersen, Steen; Letcher, Robert J; Jakobsen, Jette

    2008-08-01

    There is a great need for understanding the impact from dietary OHCs (organohalogen compounds) on bone mineral composition - and thereby osteoporosis - in especially arctic wildlife such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus) as well as humans. For that purpose, we measured BMD (bone mineral density) by DXA scanning (g/cm(-2)) in 15 age and weight normalized sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches and their 26 pups divided into a control group (n=26) given 50-200 g/day clean pork (Suis scrofa) fat and a treated group (n=15) given 50-200 g/day OHC polluted minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber as main lipid sources. The results showed that BMD increased significantly with age (linear regression: p0.3). No differences in BMD(femur) or BMD(vertebrae) between exposed and control individuals in the bitch generation were found (linear mixed effect model: both p>0.38). Likewise, no difference between exposed and control subadults and juveniles in the F-generation was found (two-way ANOVA: all p>0.33). Correlation analyses between BMD(femur), BMD(vertebrae) and groups of OHCs, respectively, did not show any statistically significant relationships nor a clear or decreasing trend (Pearson's: p: 0.07-0.78; r: -0.2-0.59; n: 10-18). As the groups were similar regarding genetics, age and sex are the only factors that can explain this observation. Either the pollutants did not have an impact on BMD using the present time frame and OHC concentrations (threshold levels not reached), or the difference in food composition (mainly vitamins and n3 fatty acids) conceal the potential OHC impact on BMD. Such information is important when evaluating the positive and negative health consequences from eating polluted marine species.

  7. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  8. The effects of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E co-supplementation on gene expression of lipoprotein(a) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein, lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Elham; Samimi, Mansooreh; Ebrahimi, Faraneh Afshar; Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Shahnaz; Rahimi, Maryam; Jamilian, Mehri; Aghadavod, Esmat; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Memarzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-01-05

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E co-supplementation on gene expression of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was done on 68 women diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria aged 18-40 years old. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups to receive either 1000 mg omega-3 fatty acids from flaxseed oil containing 400 mg α-Linolenic acid plus 400 IU vitamin E supplements (n = 34) or placebo (n = 34) for 12 weeks. Lp(a) and Ox-LDL mRNA levels were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of PCOS women with RT-PCR method. Lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress were quantified at the beginning of the study and after 12-week intervention. Quantitative results of RT-PCR demonstrated that compared with the placebo, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E co-supplementation downregulated expressed levels of Lp(a) mRNA (P omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E co-supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (-22.1 ± 22.3 vs. +7.7 ± 23.6 mg/dL, P omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E intake compared with the placebo group. Overall, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E co-supplementation for 12 weeks in PCOS women significantly improved gene expression of Lp(a) and Ox-LDL, lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulación del vaciado continuo de perfiles de aceros al carbono de baja aleación//Simulation of the continuous casting of low carbon steel profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusdel Díaz-Hernández

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentó un algoritmo para simular el proceso de vaciado continuo a partir de la construcción de un modelo físico matemático utilizando el Método de los Elementos Finitos. Como característica más destacada del algoritmo se encuentra la consideración de los procesos complejos de intercambio de calor, cambio de fase del metal, distribución de temperaturas en el molde, composiciónquímica del metal, flujo de agua en el enfriamiento primario y secundario, y la velocidad de colada. El algoritmo permitió predecir con suficiente pericia el comportamiento de las variables durante el proceso de vaciado continuo de acero según perfil y marca del mismo.Palabras claves: simulación, solidificación, vaciado continuo, modelado._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractIn this paper an algorithm to simulate the process of continuous casting based on a physical – mathematical model using finite element methods was presented. The most outstanding characteristic of the model was the inclusion of complex processes of heat interchange, metal phase changes, distribution of temperatures in the mould, chemical composition of the metal, flow of water in the primary andsecondary cooling system and the casting speed. Moreover, the algorithm permitted to predict the behaviour of the process variables in the continuous casting of steel according to its profile and type.Key words: simulation, solidification, continuous casting, modelling.

  10. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  11. New-Generation NASA Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Volcanic SO2 Dataset: Algorithm Description, Initial Results, and Continuation with the Suomi-NPP Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Carn, Simon; Zhang, Yan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Joiner, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    coarser spatial and spectral resolution of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument, application of the new PCA algorithm to OMPS data produces highly consistent retrievals between OMI and OMPS. The new PCA algorithm is therefore capable of continuing the volcanic SO2 data record well into the future using current and future hyperspectral UV satellite instruments.

  12. New-generation NASA Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) volcanic SO2 dataset: algorithm description, initial results, and continuation with the Suomi-NPP Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Carn, Simon; Zhang, Yan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Joiner, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    spectral resolution of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument, application of the new PCA algorithm to OMPS data produces highly consistent retrievals between OMI and OMPS. The new PCA algorithm is therefore capable of continuing the volcanic SO2 data record well into the future using current and future hyperspectral UV satellite instruments.

  13. Development of a heterodyne micro-wave reflectometer with ultra-fast sweeping. The study of the plasma turbulence influence on the measurements of electron density profile; Developppement d`un reflectometre micro-onde heterodyne a balayage ultra rapide. Etude de l`influence de la turbulence du plasma sur la mesure des profils de densite electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, Philippe [Aix-Marseille-1 Univ., 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-10-17

    The density profile of the fusion plasmas can be investigated by the reflectometry diagnostics. The measurement principle is based on the radar techniques which calculate the phase shift of a millimeter wave propagating into the plasma and reflected at a cut-off layer. However, this propagation is perturbed by the plasma turbulence. These phenomena affect the phase delay measurement by not well understood a process. In this work we have tried to find the mechanisms and origin of the turbulence which is responsible for the phase disturbance. We point out the role of collisionality and plasma radiation in controlling the instability and also, demonstrate that the phase delay of the probing wave is very sensitive to the plasma MHD phenomena and is less affected by the micro-turbulence. The second part of this work is the development and the use of a new heterodyne reflectometer. The principal characteristics are given. Its heterodyne detection allows the separation of phase and amplitude information from the detected signal and then to study their contribution to the mechanism of signal perturbation. The use of this reflectometer allows us to point out the following points: - a high dynamic availability, required by the large amplitude drops, often greater than 30 db; - fast sweep operation requirement to `freeze` the plasma turbulence; - multiple reflection effects which modulate the amplitude and phase of the probing wave if they are not suppressed by filtering the detected signal; - very good localisation of the measurement (of the order of millimeter). The heterodyne reflectometer developed during this work offers several advantages of different distinct reflectometry techniques (fast sweep, absolute and differential phase measurements, heterodyne detection). It could be developed to work over higher frequency range so as to measure density profile over larger radial extension with very high performances. (author) 93 refs., 101 figs., 8 tabs. 3 ills.

  14. Evaluating lake stratification and temporal trends by using near-continuous water-quality data from automated profiling systems for water years 2005-09, Lake Mead, Arizona and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veley, Ronald J.; Moran, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Southern Nevada Water Authority, collected near-continuous depth-dependent water-quality data at Lake Mead, Arizona and Nevada, as part of a multi-agency monitoring network maintained to provide resource managers with basic data and to gain a better understanding of the hydrodynamics of the lake. Water-quality data-collection stations on Lake Mead were located in shallow water (less than 20 meters) at Las Vegas Bay (Site 3) and Overton Arm, and in deep water (greater than 20 meters) near Sentinel Island and at Virgin and Temple Basins. At each station, near-continual depth-dependent water-quality data were collected from October 2004 through September 2009. The data were collected by using automatic profiling systems equipped with multiparameter water-quality sondes. The sondes had sensors for temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and depth. Data were collected every 6 hours at 2-meter depth intervals (for shallow-water stations) or 5-meter depth intervals (for deep-water stations) beginning at 1 meter below water surface. Data were analyzed to determine water-quality conditions related to stratification of the lake and temporal trends in water-quality parameters. Three water-quality parameters were the main focus of these analyses: temperature, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen. Statistical temporal-trend analyses were performed for a single depth at shallow-water stations [Las Vegas Bay (Site 3) and Overton Arm] and for thermally-stratified lake layers at deep-water stations (Sentinel Island and Virgin Basin). The limited period of data collection at the Temple Basin station prevented the application of statistical trend analysis. During the summer months, thermal stratification was not observed at shallow-water stations, nor were major maxima or minima observed for specific-conductance or dissolved-oxygen profiles. A clearly-defined thermocline

  15. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  16. Continuity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nel, Louis

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed, self-contained theory of continuous mappings. It is mainly addressed to students who have already studied these mappings in the setting of metric spaces, as well as multidimensional differential calculus. The needed background facts about sets, metric spaces and linear algebra are developed in detail, so as to provide a seamless transition between students' previous studies and new material. In view of its many novel features, this book will be of interest also to mature readers who have studied continuous mappings from the subject's classical texts and wish to become acquainted with a new approach. The theory of continuous mappings serves as infrastructure for more specialized mathematical theories like differential equations, integral equations, operator theory, dynamical systems, global analysis, topological groups, topological rings and many more. In light of the centrality of the topic, a book of this kind fits a variety of applications, especially those that contribute to ...

  17. Comparative Effects of Injectable and Oral Hormonal Contraceptives on Lipid Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayor Adegoke; Pascal C. Eneh; Roseanne Okafor; Benjamin N. Okolonkwo; Braide, Solomon A.; Chukwubike U.Okeke; Holy Brown; Ngozika B. Okwandu

    2012-01-01

    Background and AimsThe continual use of hormonal contraceptives among women within reproductive age has been on the increase. The effects of these contraceptives on lipid metabolism vary depending on the type of hormonal contraceptive. This study was carried out among Nigerian women, to compare theeffects of injectable hormonal contraceptives to that of combined oral contraceptives on lipid profile (triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and low density lipo-pro...

  18. A frequency-modulated continuous-wave reflectometer for the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S.; Majeski, R.; Peebles, W. A.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Lucia, M.; Merino, E.; Nguyen, X. V.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2017-05-01

    The frequency-modulated continuous-wave reflectometer on LTX (Lithium Tokamak Experiment) and the data analysis methods used for determining electron density profiles are described. The diagnostic uses a frequency range of 13.1-33.5 GHz, for covering a density range of 0.21-1.4 ×1013 cm-3 (in O-mode polarization) with a time resolution down to 8 μs. The design of the diagnostic incorporates the concept of an "optimized" source frequency sweep, which minimizes the large variation in the intermediate frequency signal due to a long dispersive transmission line. The quality of the raw data is dictated by the tuning characteristics of the microwave sources, as well as the group delay ripple in the transmission lines, which can generate higher-order nonlinearities in the frequency sweep. Both effects are evaluated for our diagnostic and best practices are presented for minimizing "artifacts" generated in the signals. The quality of the reconstructed profiles is also improved using two additional data analysis methods. First, the reflectometer data are processed as a radar image, where clutter due to echoes from the wall and backscattering from density fluctuations can be easily identified and removed. Second, a weighed least-squares lamination algorithm POLAN (POLynomial ANalysis) is used to reconstruct the electron density profile. Examples of density profiles in LTX are presented, along with comparisons to measurements from the Thomson scattering and the λ = 1 mm interferometer diagnostics.

  19. Continuation calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Geron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Programs with control are usually modeled using lambda calculus extended with control operators. Instead of modifying lambda calculus, we consider a different model of computation. We introduce continuation calculus, or CC, a deterministic model of computation that is evaluated using only head reduction, and argue that it is suitable for modeling programs with control. It is demonstrated how to define programs, specify them, and prove them correct. This is shown in detail by presenting in CC a list multiplication program that prematurely returns when it encounters a zero. The correctness proof includes termination of the program. In continuation calculus we can model both call-by-name and call-by-value. In addition, call-by-name functions can be applied to call-by-value results, and conversely.

  20. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Darrouzet

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus on the plasmasphere crossing on 11 April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal velocity of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics. These in-situ measurements are compared with global images of the plasmasphere from the EUV imager on board the IMAGE satellite.

  1. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darrouzet, F.; Decreau, P.M.E.; De Keyser, J.

    2004-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus...... on the plasmasphere crossing on I I April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal velocity...... of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics. These in...

  2. Crown management and stand density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Dean; V. Clark Baldwin

    1996-01-01

    Determination of optimal stand-density continues to be a difficult problem. A trial cannot be established on every combination of soils, topography, and climate possible across the range of a widely distributed species such as loblolly pine, and continual advancements in nutrition and vegetation management, breeding, and utilization make established trials obsolete....

  3. Comparison of Insulin Glargine 300 Units/mL and 100 Units/mL in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Continuous Glucose Monitoring Profiles and Variability Using Morning or Evening Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy S; Rodbard, David; Ziemen, Monika; Guo, Hailing; Muehlen-Bartmer, Isabel; Ahmann, Andrew J

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare glucose control in participants with type 1 diabetes receiving insulin glargine 300 units/mL (Gla-300) or glargine 100 units/mL (Gla-100) in the morning or evening, in combination with mealtime insulin. In this 16-week, exploratory, open-label, parallel-group, two-period crossover study (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01658579), 59 adults with type 1 diabetes were randomized (1:1:1:1) to once-daily Gla-300 or Gla-100 given in the morning or evening (with crossover in the injection schedule). The primary efficacy end point was the mean percentage of time in the target glucose range (80-140 mg/dL), as measured using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), during the last 2 weeks of each 8-week period. Additional end points included other CGM glycemic control parameters, hypoglycemia (per self-monitored plasma glucose [SMPG]), and adverse events. The percentage of time within the target glucose range was comparable between the Gla-300 and Gla-100 groups. There was significantly less increase in CGM-based glucose during the last 4 h of the 24-h injection interval for Gla-300 compared with Gla-100 (least squares mean difference -14.7 mg/dL [95% CI -26.9 to -2.5]; P = 0.0192). Mean 24-h glucose curves for the Gla-300 group were smoother (lower glycemic excursions), irrespective of morning or evening injection. Four metrics of intrasubject interstitial glucose variability showed no difference between Gla-300 and Gla-100. Nocturnal confirmed (300 participants than for Gla-100 participants (4.0 vs. 9.0 events per participant-year; rate ratio 0.45 [95% CI 0.24-0.82]). Less increase in CGM-based glucose levels in the last 4 h of the 24-h injection interval, smoother average 24-h glucose profiles irrespective of injection time, and reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia were observed with Gla-300 versus Gla-100. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Vildagliptin has the same safety profile as a sulfonylurea on bone metabolism and bone mineral density in post-menopausal women with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Andre Gustavo Daher; de Lacerda, Claudio Silva; Pechmann, Luciana Muniz; Polesel, Michelle Garcia; Marino, Emerson Cestari; Borba, Victoria Zeghbi Cochenski; Barreto, Fellype de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Several antidiabetic therapies affect bone metabolism. Sulfonylureas have the lowest impact on bone among oral antidiabetics. The objective of this study is to compare the effects of vildagliptin and gliclazide modified release (MR) on bone turnover markers (BTMs) and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2D). Forty-two postmenopausal women with uncontrolled T2D were randomly allocated into vildagliptin or gliclazide MR (control) groups. The primary endpoint was the change in the BTMs in months 6 and 12 compared with the baseline. The secondary endpoint was the variation in the BMD, which was assessed via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and total hip at baseline and month 12. After a 12-month treatment, the BTM serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen increased 0.001 ± 0.153 ng/mL in the vildagliptin group versus 0.008 ± 0.060 ng/mL in the gliclazide MR group (p = 0.858). The serum osteocalcin, serum amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I and urinary amino-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen remained stable in both groups, and there was no statistically significant difference between the effect of vildagliptin and gliclazide MR on these variables. The lumbar spine BMD did not change in the vildagliptin or gliclazide MR groups after a 12-month treatment (0.000 ± 0.025 g/cm2 versus -0.008 ± 0.036, respectively, p = 0.434). Furthermore, there was a similar lack of change in the femoral neck and total hip BMD values in both treatments. Bone turnover markers and BMD remained unchanged after a 12-month treatment in both groups, which suggests that vildagliptin has the same safety profile as gliclazide MR on bone metabolism. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01679899.

  5. Microscopic description of a liquid film on a solid substrate using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Andreas; Pereira, Antonio; Malijewsky, Alexandr; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2010-11-01

    We examine the wetting properties of planar and spherical substrates using a mean-field density functional theory. Equilibrium density profiles of a fluid close to an attractive wall are obtained by solving an integral equation resulting from the minimization of the grand potential. Using a novel pseudo-arc length continuation scheme, we compute the complete bifurcation diagram of the adsorption as a function of the chemical potential. For a spherical substrate we demonstrate a second unstable branch approaching saturation from the right, absent in the planar case. Our numerical results are in excellent agreement with analytical predictions obtained from a piecewise function approximation in which the density profile is assumed to be everywhere constant except near the wall-liquid and the liquid-gas interfaces. We also show that the sharp-interface approximation, used often to predict wetting behavior on planar substrates, is inadequate to describe wetting on a spherical substrate.

  6. Sequential motif profile of natural visibility graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-11-01

    The concept of sequential visibility graph motifs—subgraphs appearing with characteristic frequencies in the visibility graphs associated to time series—has been advanced recently along with a theoretical framework to compute analytically the motif profiles associated to horizontal visibility graphs (HVGs). Here we develop a theory to compute the profile of sequential visibility graph motifs in the context of natural visibility graphs (VGs). This theory gives exact results for deterministic aperiodic processes with a smooth invariant density or stochastic processes that fulfill the Markov property and have a continuous marginal distribution. The framework also allows for a linear time numerical estimation in the case of empirical time series. A comparison between the HVG and the VG case (including evaluation of their robustness for short series polluted with measurement noise) is also presented.

  7. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  8. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  9. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, pressure, and density profiles from CTD casts from chartered fishing boats taken along line off Grays Harbor, WA from 2000-11-15 to 2005-10-20 (NODC Accession 0119769)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CTD profiles are from 10 cruises. These cruises were part of the NOAA sponsored program entitled Olympic Region Harmful Algal Blooms (ORHAB). The aim of...

  10. Density Development During Erosion Experiments of Cohesive Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Claus; Larsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    The density development during erosion experiments was investigated. The calculation of the erosion rate requires the knowledge of the density profile with respect to the consolidation time(Parchure, 1984). At present, the basic assumption in the calculations is that the density profile is achieved...... from consolidation experiments conducted with the same consolidation period (Malta, 1986; Metha and Partheniades, 1979). Furthermore, the density is assumed constant throughout the erosion experiment. Therefore, experiments were conducted in order to investigate this assumption. Kaolinite was used...

  11. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  12. Relationships between electron density, height and sub-peak ionospheric thickness in the night equatorial ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. W. Lynn

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The development and decay of the southern equatorial anomaly night-time peak in electron density as seen at a number of ionosonde reflection points extending from New Guinea and Indonesia into northern Australia was examined in terms of the characteristic rise and fall in height associated with the sunset ionisation-drift vortex at the magnetic equator. The observations relate to measurements made in November 1997. Following sunset, the ionospheric profile was observed to narrow as the maximum electron density increased during a fall in height that took the peak of the layer at Vanimo and Sumedang down to some 240 km. The fall was followed by a strong rise in which the electron density sub-peak profile expanded from a slab width (as given by POLAN of 20 km to over 100km with no corresponding change in peak electron density. The post-sunset equatorial fall in height and associated changes in profile density and thickness continued to be seen with diminishing amplitude and increasing local time delay in moving from the anomaly peak at Vanimo to the southernmost site of observation at Townsville. Secondary events on a lesser scale sometimes occurred later in the night and may provide evidence of the multiple vortices suggested by Kudeki and Bhattacharyya (1999. Doppler measurements of vertical velocity as seen at Sumedang in Java are compared with the observed changes in electron density profile in the post-sunset period. The normal post-sunset variation in ionospheric parameters was disrupted on the night of 7 November, the night before a negative ionospheric storm was observed.

  13. No evidence of persisting unrepaired nuclear DNA single strand breaks in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice after continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field exposure with flux density of 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korr, Hubert; Angstman, Nicholas B; Born, Tatjana B; Bosse, Kerstin; Brauns, Birka; Demmler, Martin; Fueller, Katja; Kántor, Orsolya; Kever, Barbara M; Rahimyar, Navida; Salimi, Sepideh; Silny, Jiri; Schmitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized in the literature that exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (50 or 60 Hz) may lead to human health effects such as childhood leukemia or brain tumors. In a previous study investigating multiple types of cells from brain and kidney of the mouse (Acta Neuropathologica 2004; 107: 257-264), we found increased unrepaired nuclear DNA single strand breaks (nDNA SSB) only in epithelial cells of the choroid plexus in the brain using autoradiographic methods after a continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) exposure of adult mice with flux density of 1.5 mT. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that MF exposure with lower flux densities (0.1 mT, i.e., the actual exposure limit for the population in most European countries, and 1.0 mT) shows similar results to those in the previous study. Experiments and data analysis were carried out in a similar way as in our previous study. Continuous eight-week 50 Hz MF exposure with 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT did not result in increased persisting unrepaired nDNA SSB in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice. MF exposure with 1.0 mT led to reduced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in epithelial cells in the choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle in the brain (EC-CP) and epithelial cells of the cortical collecting duct in the kidney, as well as to reduced mtDNA synthesis in neurons of the caudate nucleus in the brain and in EC-CP. No evidence was found for increased persisting unrepaired nDNA SSB in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice after continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field exposure with flux density of 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT.

  14. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    if the operator ρa of right multiplication by a is compact (weakly compact, respectively). An algebra A is called right completely continuous (right weakly completely continuous) if any element a ∈ A is right completely continuous (right weakly completely con- tinuous, respectively). Left completely continuous (left weakly ...

  15. Continuous direct compression as manufacturing platform for sustained release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Snick, B; Holman, J; Cunningham, C; Kumar, A; Vercruysse, J; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2017-03-15

    This study presents a framework for process and product development on a continuous direct compression manufacturing platform. A challenging sustained release formulation with high content of a poorly flowing low density drug was selected. Two HPMC grades were evaluated as matrix former: standard Methocel CR and directly compressible Methocel DC2. The feeding behavior of each formulation component was investigated by deriving feed factor profiles. The maximum feed factor was used to estimate the drive command and depended strongly upon the density of the material. Furthermore, the shape of the feed factor profile allowed definition of a customized refill regime for each material. Inline NIRs was used to estimate the residence time distribution (RTD) in the mixer and monitor blend uniformity. Tablet content and weight variability were determined as additional measures of mixing performance. For Methocel CR, the best axial mixing (i.e. feeder fluctuation dampening) was achieved when an impeller with high number of radial mixing blades operated at low speed. However, the variability in tablet weight and content uniformity deteriorated under this condition. One can therefore conclude that balancing axial mixing with tablet quality is critical for Methocel CR. However, reformulating with the direct compressible Methocel DC2 as matrix former improved tablet quality vastly. Furthermore, both process and product were significantly more robust to changes in process and design variables. This observation underpins the importance of flowability during continuous blending and die-filling. At the compaction stage, blends with Methocel CR showed better tabletability driven by a higher compressibility as the smaller CR particles have a higher bonding area. However, tablets of similar strength were achieved using Methocel DC2 by targeting equal porosity. Compaction pressure impacted tablet properties and dissolution. Hence controlling thickness during continuous manufacturing of

  16. Continuously adjustable Pulfrich spectacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ken; Karpf, Ron

    2011-03-01

    A number of Pulfrich 3-D movies and TV shows have been produced, but the standard implementation has inherent drawbacks. The movie and TV industries have correctly concluded that the standard Pulfrich 3-D implementation is not a useful 3-D technique. Continuously Adjustable Pulfrich Spectacles (CAPS) is a new implementation of the Pulfrich effect that allows any scene containing movement in a standard 2-D movie, which are most scenes, to be optionally viewed in 3-D using inexpensive viewing specs. Recent scientific results in the fields of human perception, optoelectronics, video compression and video format conversion are translated into a new implementation of Pulfrich 3- D. CAPS uses these results to continuously adjust to the movie so that the viewing spectacles always conform to the optical density that optimizes the Pulfrich stereoscopic illusion. CAPS instantly provides 3-D immersion to any moving scene in any 2-D movie. Without the glasses, the movie will appear as a normal 2-D image. CAPS work on any viewing device, and with any distribution medium. CAPS is appropriate for viewing Internet streamed movies in 3-D.

  17. Composite continuous time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfer, Rudolf

    2017-12-01

    Random walks in composite continuous time are introduced. Composite time flow is the product of translational time flow and fractional time flow [see Chem. Phys. 84, 399 (2002)]. The continuum limit of composite continuous time random walks gives a diffusion equation where the infinitesimal generator of time flow is the sum of a first order and a fractional time derivative. The latter is specified as a generalized Riemann-Liouville derivative. Generalized and binomial Mittag-Leffler functions are found as the exact results for waiting time density and mean square displacement.

  18. Conditional Density Approximations with Mixtures of Polynomials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varando, Gherardo; López-Cruz, Pedro L.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2015-01-01

    Mixtures of polynomials (MoPs) are a non-parametric density estimation technique especially designed for hybrid Bayesian networks with continuous and discrete variables. Algorithms to learn one- and multi-dimensional (marginal) MoPs from data have recently been proposed. In this paper we introduce...... two methods for learning MoP approximations of conditional densities from data. Both approaches are based on learning MoP approximations of the joint density and the marginal density of the conditioning variables, but they differ as to how the MoP approximation of the quotient of the two densities...

  19. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Continuing lessons and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Since June 2011, the ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) is providing 1 kW power, 100 Mbs network communications and PPS timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4728 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated physical and biogeochemical variability of the water column near-monthly since 1988. The abyssal near bottom acoustic Doppler profiler data are showing stronger than expected internal tide flows and turbulence 20-80 m above bottom. In this oligotrophic environment, the video camera has detected significant biological activity. Acoustic data collected on two hydrophones clearly show very high call density of baleen whales during September-May and sperm whale choruses spread throughout the year. Recent Navy exercises provided examples of anthropogenic sounds. We are also monitoring in real time an acoustic "heartbeat" signal from the nearby HOT Profiler mooring (M. Alford et al.). ACO operation over the last year continues to provide valuable lessons. Several failures occurred at or during deployment, including two ground faults that have isolated two CTDs, a fluorometer, and an acoustic modem from the system. Two independent LED light systems failed after 4 and 6 weeks. Most recently, the pressure sensor has failed perhaps due to loss of vacuum in the quartz crystal chamber. The one remaining conductivity/temperature sensor is episodically, but strongly, affected by thermal plume signatures from the nearby power supply. Understanding the reasons for these failures and limitations will be necessary to improve the methodologies for sustained long-term abyssal measurements. This will be well worth the effort, as suggested by the surprisingly rich video, ADCP, and acoustic data sets.

  20. Measurement of vertebral bone marrow lipid profile at 1.5-T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and bone mineral density at dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: correlation in a swine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Fina, Laura [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unita di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unita di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Bone marrow is mainly composed of red (hematopoietic) and yellow (fatty) components. Soon after the birth there is a physiological conversion of the bone marrow from red to yellow, so that the percentage of hematopoietic cells and adipocytes changes with aging. Although bone marrow adipogenesis is a physiologic process involving all mammals, recent studies showed an accelerated marrow adipogenesis associated with several chronic conditions, including osteoporosis [4] and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, this increased marrow fat is accompanied by a decrease in bone density. Marrow fat is therefore increasingly believed to influence the bone microenvironment. Diagnostic tools for quantitative measurement of bone marrow fat and bone mineral density (BMD) include proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and dual-energy Xray absorptiometry (DXA), respectively. Using MRS, an inverse relationship between vertebral bone marrow fat content and lumbar BMD has been demonstrated in patients affected with osteoporosis or with diabetes mellitus. In most studies, a quite standard MRS sequence has been used, with short echo times (TE) for the measurement of the bulk methylene. In this study we sought to optimize the MRS sequence in order to try to measure other fat components of the vertebral bone marrow at 1.5 T. For this purpose, we used an animal model that allowed long acquisition times and repeated measures. Moreover, we aimed at estimating in this model the relationship between vertebral bone marrow fat content at proton MRS and BMD at DXA.

  1. Effects of Three Different Additives and Two Different Bulk Densities on Maize Silage Characteristics, Temperature Profiles, CO2 and O2–Dynamics in Small Scale Silos during Aerobic Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Helena Jungbluth

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Silage quality and aerobic stability are sometimes insufficient. If management requirements are not met, or to improve silage quality, additives are often used. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of different factors on silage during aerobic conditions. Whole-crop forage maize was harvested and 24 buckets (65 L were filled and assigned to one of four treatment groups: (1 control (no treatment; (2 chemical additive (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, sodium acetate; (3 a mixed biological inoculant containing Lactobacillus buchneri, L. plantarum, and Pediococcus acidilacti; and (4 a mixed biological inoculant containing L. buchneri, L. plantarum, and L. rhamnosus. An untreated variation was also ensiled. Two different densities were adjusted during ensiling. After opening, the temperature was measured for seven days and O2 and CO2 concentrations were analysed. The findings show that the chemical additive very effectively prevented silage from reheating and deteriorating. Aerobic reheating of silage was also successfully inhibited through biological additives and high density.

  2. Occupancy in continuous habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efford, Murray G.; Dawson, Deanna K.

    2012-01-01

    The probability that a site has at least one individual of a species ('occupancy') has come to be widely used as a state variable for animal population monitoring. The available statistical theory for estimation when detection is imperfect applies particularly to habitat patches or islands, although it is also used for arbitrary plots in continuous habitat. The probability that such a plot is occupied depends on plot size and home-range characteristics (size, shape and dispersion) as well as population density. Plot size is critical to the definition of occupancy as a state variable, but clear advice on plot size is missing from the literature on the design of occupancy studies. We describe models for the effects of varying plot size and home-range size on expected occupancy. Temporal, spatial, and species variation in average home-range size is to be expected, but information on home ranges is difficult to retrieve from species presence/absence data collected in occupancy studies. The effect of variable home-range size is negligible when plots are very large (>100 x area of home range), but large plots pose practical problems. At the other extreme, sampling of 'point' plots with cameras or other passive detectors allows the true 'proportion of area occupied' to be estimated. However, this measure equally reflects home-range size and density, and is of doubtful value for population monitoring or cross-species comparisons. Plot size is ill-defined and variable in occupancy studies that detect animals at unknown distances, the commonest example being unlimited-radius point counts of song birds. We also find that plot size is ill-defined in recent treatments of "multi-scale" occupancy; the respective scales are better interpreted as temporal (instantaneous and asymptotic) rather than spatial. Occupancy is an inadequate metric for population monitoring when it is confounded with home-range size or detection distance.

  3. Safety factor profile control in a tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Bribiesca Argomedo, Federico; Prieur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak uses Lyapunov techniques to address a challenging problem for which even the simplest physically relevant models are represented by nonlinear, time-dependent, partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because of the  spatiotemporal dynamics of transport phenomena (magnetic flux, heat, densities, etc.) in the anisotropic plasma medium. Robustness considerations are ubiquitous in the analysis and control design since direct measurements on the magnetic flux are impossible (its estimation relies on virtual sensors) and large uncertainties remain in the coupling between the plasma particles and the radio-frequency waves (distributed inputs). The Brief begins with a presentation of the reference dynamical model and continues by developing a Lyapunov function for the discretized system (in a polytopic linear-parameter-varying formulation). The limitations of this finite-dimensional approach motivate new developments in the infinite-dimensional framework. The t...

  4. Continuous generation of delayed light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartsev, Slava; Eger, David; Davidson, Nir; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-11-01

    We use a four-wave mixing process to read-out light from atomic coherence which is continuously written. The light is continuously generated after an effective delay, allowing the atomic coherence to evolve during the process. Contrary to slow-light delay, which depends on the medium optical depth, here the generation delay is determined solely by the intensive properties of the system, approaching the atomic coherence lifetime at the weak driving limit. The atomic evolution during the generation delay is further manifested in the spatial profile of the generated light due to atomic diffusion. Continuous generation of light with a long intrinsic delay can replace discrete write–read procedures when the atomic evolution is the subject of interest.

  5. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  6. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  7. Destructive and non-destructive density determination: method comparison and evaluation from the Laguna Potrok Aike sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    PASADO Science Team Fortin, David; Francus, Pierre; Gebhardt, Andrea Catalina; Hahn, Annette; Kliem, Pierre; Lisé-Pronovost, Agathe; Roychowdhury, Rajarshi; Labrie, Jacques; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2013-07-01

    Density measurements play a central role in the characterization of sediment profiles. When working with long records (>100 m), such as those routinely obtained within the frame of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, several methods can be used, all of them varying in resolution, time-cost efficiency and source of errors within the measurements. This paper compares two relatively new non-destructive densitometric methods, CT-Scanning and the coherent/incoherent ratio from an Itrax XRF core Scanner, to data acquired from a Multi-sensor core logger Gamma Ray Attenuation Porosity Evaluator (MSCL Grape) and discrete measurements of dry bulk density, wet bulk density and water content. Quality assessment of density measurements is performed at low and high resolution along the Laguna Potrok Aike (LPA) composite sequence. Giving its resolution (0.4 mm in our study), its high signal to noise ratio, we conclude that CT-Scan provides a precise, fast and cost-efficient way to determine density variation of long sedimentary record. Although more noisy that the CT-Scan measurements, coherent/incoherent ratio from the XRF core scanner also provides a high-resolution, reliable continuous measure of density variability of the sediment profile. The MSCL Grape density measurements provide actual density data and have the significant advantage to be completely non-destructive since the acquisition is performed on full cores prior to opening. However, the quality MSCL Grape density measurements can potentially be reduced by the presence of voids within the sediment core tubes and the dry and bulk density measurements suffers from sampling challenges and are time-consuming.

  8. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  9. A density gradient theory based method for surface tension calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The density gradient theory has been becoming a widely used framework for calculating surface tension, within which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases, because it is a theoretically sound, consistent and computationally affordable approach. Based on the observation...... that the optimal density path from the geometric mean density gradient theory passes the saddle point of the tangent plane distance to the bulk phases, we propose to estimate surface tension with an approximate density path profile that goes through this saddle point. The linear density gradient theory, which...... assumes linearly distributed densities between the two bulk phases, has also been investigated. Numerical problems do not occur with these density path profiles. These two approximation methods together with the full density gradient theory have been used to calculate the surface tension of various...

  10. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  11. Subsurface plasma in beam of continuous CO2-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danytsikov, Y. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Pismennyy, V. D.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Institute of Atomic Energy established the conditions for formation of subsurface plasma in substances by laser radiation and its characteristics. A quasi-continuous CO2 laser emitting square pulses of 0.1 to 1.0 ms duration and 1 to 10 kW power as well as a continuous CO2 laser served as radiation sources. Radiation was focused on spots 0.1 to 0.5 mm in diameter and maintained at levels ensuring constant power density during the interaction time, while the temperature of the target surface was measured continuously. Metals, graphite and dielectric materials were tested with laser action taking place in air N2 + O2 mixtures, Ar or He atmosphere under pressures of 0.01 to 1.0 atm. Data on radiation intensity thresholds for evaporation and plasma formation were obtained. On the basis of these thresholds, combined with data on energy balance and the temperature profile in plasma layers, a universal state diagram was constructed for subsurface plasma with nonquantified surface temperature and radiation intensity coordinates.

  12. Polar cap electron densities from DE 1 plasma wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Electric-field-spectum measurements from the plasma-wave instrument on the Dynamics Explorer 1 spacecraft are used to study the local electron density at high altitudes in the northern polar-cap region. The electron density is determined from the upper cutoff of whistler-mode radiation at the electron plasma frequency. Median density values over the polar cap at L greater than 10 are found to vary from 35.2 + or - 8.5 cu cm at 2.1 earth radii to 0.99 + or - 0.51 cu cm at 4.66 earth radii. The steady-state radial-outflow model is examined for consistency with the observed density profile. A power-law fit to the radial variation of the electron density yields an exponent of - 3.85 + or - 0.32, which for the radial-outflow model implies a flow velocity increasing nearly linearly with incresing radial distance. Comparison of the observed electron densities with theoretical polar-wind densities yields consistent results up to 2.8 earth radii. A comparison of the observed electron densities with low-altitude density profiles from the Alouette II and ISIS 1 spacecraft illustrates transitions in the slope of the profile at 1.16 earth radii and between 1.55 and 2.0 earth radii. The changes in the density profile suggest that changes occur in the basic radial-transport processes at these altitudes.

  13. Wood density and its radial variation in six canopy tree species differing in shade-tolerance in western Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Charles A.; Geihofer, Daniela; Grabner, Michael; Baker, Patrick J.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Wood density is a key variable for understanding life history strategies in tropical trees. Differences in wood density and its radial variation were related to the shade-tolerance of six canopy tree species in seasonally dry tropical forest in Thailand. In addition, using tree ring measurements, the influence of tree size, age and annual increment on radial density gradients was analysed. Methods Wood density was determined from tree cores using X-ray densitometry. X-ray films were digitized and images were measured, resulting in a continuous density profile for each sample. Mixed models were then developed to analyse differences in average wood density and in radial gradients in density among the six tree species, as well as the effects of tree age, size and annual increment on radial increases in Melia azedarach. Key Results Average wood density generally reflected differences in shade-tolerance, varying by nearly a factor of two. Radial gradients occurred in all species, ranging from an increase of (approx. 70%) in the shade-intolerant Melia azedarach to a decrease of approx. 13% in the shade-tolerant Neolitsea obtusifolia, but the slopes of radial gradients were generally unrelated to shade-tolerance. For Melia azedarach, radial increases were most-parsimoniously explained by log-transformed tree age and annual increment rather than by tree size. Conclusions The results indicate that average wood density generally reflects differences in shade-tolerance in seasonally dry tropical forests; however, inferences based on wood density alone are potentially misleading for species with complex life histories. In addition, the findings suggest that a ‘whole-tree’ view of life history and biomechanics is important for understanding patterns of radial variation in wood density. Finally, accounting for wood density gradients is likely to improve the accuracy of estimates of stem biomass and carbon in tropical trees. PMID:19454592

  14. Providing Continuous Assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, Jonne; Hulstijn, Joris

    2017-01-01

    It has been claimed that continuous assurance can be attained by combining continuous monitoring by management, with continuous auditing of data streams and the effectiveness of internal controls by an external auditor. However, we find that in existing literature the final step to continuous

  15. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Chemistry. Narasimhan, Prof. Palliakaranai Thirumalai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 July 1928. Date of death: 3 May 2013. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Last known address: 1013, Lupine Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. YouTube ...

  16. Future Road Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  17. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  18. Crowding and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Design and Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Three-part report pinpointing problems and uncovering solutions for the dual concepts of density (ratio of people to space) and crowding (psychological response to density). Section one, A Primer on Crowding,'' reviews new psychological and social findings; section two, Density in the Suburbs,'' shows conflict between status quo and increased…

  19. Observing the Unobservable? Modeling Coronal Cavity Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.; de Toma, G.; Fan, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Prominence cavities in coronal helmet streamers are readily detectable in white-light coronagraph images, yet their interpretation may be complicated by projection effects. In order to determine a cavity's density structure, it is essential to quantify the contribution of noncavity features along the line of sight. We model the coronal cavity as an axisymmetric torus that encircles the Sun at constant latitude and fit it to observations of a white-light cavity observed by the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) MK4 coronagraph from 2006 January 25 to 30. We demonstrate that spurious noncavity contributions (including departures from axisymmetry) are minimal enough to be incorporated in a density analysis as conservatively estimated uncertainties in the data. We calculate a radial density profile for cavity material and for the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the "cavity rim") and find that the cavity density is depleted by a maximum of 40% compared to the surrounding helmet streamer at low altitudes (1.18 R⊙) but is consistently higher (double or more) than in coronal holes. We also find that the relative density depletion between cavity and surrounding helmet decreases as a function of height. We show that both increased temperature in the cavity relative to the surrounding helmet streamer and a magnetic flux rope configuration might lead to such a flattened density profile. Finally, our model provides general observational guidelines that can be used to determine when a cavity is sufficiently unobstructed to be a good candidate for plasma diagnostics.

  20. Organocatalysis in continuous flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry is an enabling technique in organic chemistry. Advantages include extremely fast mixing and heat transfer capabilities as well as rapid screening of reaction conditions. Combining continuous flow chemistry with solid-supported organocatalysis presents challenges that have

  1. Evaluation of solid–liquid interface profile during continuous casting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Solidification carried out properly results in solid with particular physical and mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled or misunderstood solidification process can lead to materials with non- uniform or undesirable characteristics. Casting tend, by their very nature, to be less controlled than the products of crystal growth.

  2. Prevalence and strength of density-dependent tree recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai Zhu; Christopher W. Woodall; Joao V.D. Monteiro; James S. Clark

    2015-01-01

    Density dependence could maintain diversity in forests, but studies continue to disagree on its role. Part of the disagreement results from the fact that different studies have evaluated different responses (survival, recruitment, or growth) of different stages (seeds, seedlings, or adults) to different inputs (density of seedlings, density or distance to adults). Most...

  3. 46 CFR 98.25-65 - Filling density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filling density. 98.25-65 Section 98.25-65 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL... § 98.25-65 Filling density. (a) The filling density, or the percent ratio of the liquefied gas that may...

  4. Quark number density and susceptibility calculation under one loop ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Somorendro Singh

    2017-05-30

    May 30, 2017 ... Abstract. We calculate quark number density and susceptibility under one-loop correction in the mean- field potential. The calculation shows continuous increase in the number density and susceptibility up to the temperature T = 0.4 GeV. Then the values of number density and susceptibility approach the ...

  5. Continuity of transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.

    1991-01-01

    Let u be a continuous function from Re to Re. Let f be a transformation (which in our terminology does not have to be bijective) from the range of u to Re. v = f(u(.)) is the composition of f and u. It is well-known that continuity of f implies continuity of v. We consider the reversed question:

  6. Temporal Behavior of the Ionospheric Electron Density at Low Latitudes: First Glimpse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerloev, J. W.; Humberset, B. K.; Gonzalez, S. A.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we address the spatiotemporal characteristics of the electron density at 150 km altitude in the low latitude ionosphere above the Arecibo Observatory. We utilize a new pointing mode that allows us to probe the same volume in the ionosphere for a continuous period of approximately 25 min. or more. The ISR profiles have 150 m range resolution and samples have a 10-second time resolution; we probed 60 individual regions uniformly spaced in local times and covering the full 24 hours. For each time series we determine the total derivative of the electron density using a narrow Hanning bandpass filter that allow us to determine the variability at different frequencies. This is done for each of the 60 local time regions. We further compare to widely used static statistical models and test their underlying assumption: Dynamics can be ignored.

  7. Probability densities and Lévy densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler

    For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated.......For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated....

  8. Sorting cells by their density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Norouzi

    Full Text Available Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth's gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell's density matches the surrounding fluid's density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells. The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip, a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this

  9. Sorting cells by their density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Nazila; Bhakta, Heran C; Grover, William H

    2017-01-01

    Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types) than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth's gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell's density matches the surrounding fluid's density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene) and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells). The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood) to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip), a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this technique make

  10. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  11. Scaling behavior of the Compton profile of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekania, Michael; Appelt, Wilhelm H.; Benea, Diana; Ebert, Hubert; Vollhardt, Dieter; Chioncel, Liviu

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of the valence electrons to the Compton profiles of the crystalline alkali metals is calculated using density functional theory. We show that the Compton profiles can be modeled by a q-Gaussian distribution, which is characterized by an anisotropic, element dependent parameter q. Thereby we derive an unexpected scaling behavior of the Compton profiles of all alkali metals.

  12. Modeling thermospheric neutral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liying

    Satellite drag prediction requires determination of thermospheric neutral density. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the global-mean Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) were used to quantify thermospheric neutral density and its variations, focusing on annual/semiannual variation, the effect of using measured solar irradiance on model calculations of solar-cycle variation, and global change in the thermosphere. Satellite drag data and the MSIS00 empirical model were utilized to compare to the TIEGCM simulations. The TIEGCM simulations indicated that eddy diffusion and its annual/semiannual variation is a mechanism for annual/semiannual density variation in the thermosphere. It was found that eddy diffusion near the turbopause can effectively influence thermospheric neutral density. Eddy diffusion, together with annual insolation variation and large-scale circulation, generated global annual/semiannual density variation observed by satellite drag. Using measured solar irradiance as solar input for the TIEGCM improved the solar-cycle dependency of the density calculation shown in F10.7 -based thermospheric empirical models. It has been found that the empirical models overestimate density at low solar activity. The TIEGCM simulations did not show such solar-cycle dependency. Using historic measurements of CO2 and F 10.7, simulations of the global-mean TIMEGCM showed that thermospheric neutral density at 400 km had an average long-term decrease of 1.7% per decade from 1970 to 2000. A forecast of density decrease for solar cycle 24 suggested that thermospheric density will decrease at 400 km from present to the end of solar cycle 24 at a rate of 2.7% per decade. Reduction in thermospheric density causes less atmospheric drag on earth-orbiting space objects. The implication of this long-term decrease of thermospheric neutral density is that it will increase the

  13. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  14. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The latter situation reminds us of the well-known Moseley's law of. X-ray spectra. References. [1] A Sommerfeld, Atomic structure and spectral lines (Methuen and Co. Ltd., London, 1934). [2] N Schwentnu and M Chergeni, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 3458 (1986). A Bhattacharyya, P K Bera, M M Panja and B Talukdar, Phys. Rev.

  15. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Author Affiliations. Pranab Sarkar1 Anupam Sarkar2 S N Roy2 B Talukdar2. Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235, India; Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235, India ...

  16. Continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and satisfaction of women using an oral contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest versus a progestogen-only pill after switching from an ethinylestradiol-containing pill in a real-life setting: results of the CONTENT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briggs P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paula Briggs,1 Marco Serrani,2 Kai Vogtländer,3 Susanne Parke4 1Sexual and Reproductive Health, Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust, Merseyside, UK; 2Global Medical Affairs Women’s HealthCare, Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, 3Global Integrated Analysis & Life Cycle Management Statistics, Bayer Pharma AG, Wuppertal, 4Global Clinical Development Women’s HealthCare, Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany Background: Oral contraceptives are still associated with high discontinuation rates, despite their efficacy. There is a wide choice of oral contraceptives available, and the aim of this study was to assess continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and the satisfaction of women in the first year of using a contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (E2V/DNG versus a progestogen-only pill (POP in a real-life setting after discontinuing an ethinylestradiol-containing pill.Methods and results: In this prospective, noninterventional, observational study, 3,152 patients were included for the efficacy analyses (n=2,558 women in the E2V/DNG group and n=592 in the POP group (two patients fulfilled the criteria of the efficacy population, but the used product was not known. Women had been taking an ethinylestradiol-containing pill ≥3 months before deciding to switch to the E2V/DNG pill or a POP. Overall, 19.8% (n=506 of E2V/DNG users and 25.8% (n=153 of POP users discontinued their prescribed pill. The median time to discontinuation was 157.0 days and 127.5 days, respectively. Time to discontinuation due to bleeding (P<0.0001 or other reasons (P=0.022 was significantly longer in the E2V/DNG group versus the POP group. The E2V/DNG pill was also associated with shorter (48.7% vs 44.1%, lighter (54% vs 46.1%, and less painful bleeding (91.1% vs 73.7% and greater user satisfaction (80.7% vs 64.6% than POP use, within 3–5 months after switch.Conclusion: The E2V/DNG pill was associated with higher rates of continuation

  17. Cutting Out Continuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Hutton, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In the field of program transformation, one often transforms programs into continuation-passing style to make their flow of control explicit, and then immediately removes the resulting continuations using defunctionalisation to make the programs first-order. In this article, we show how these two...... transformations can be fused together into a single transformation step that cuts out the need to first introduce and then eliminate continuations. Our approach is calculational, uses standard equational reasoning techniques, and is widely applicable....

  18. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  19. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  20. On density forecast evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, C.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, probability integral transforms (PITs) have been popular means for evaluating density forecasts. For an ideal density forecast, the PITs should be uniformly distributed on the unit interval and independent. However, this is only a necessary condition, and not a sufficient one, as

  1. Future Road Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  2. On continued fraction algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ionica

    2010-01-01

    Is there a good continued fraction approximation between every two bad ones? What is the entropy of the natural extension for alpha-Rosen fractions? How do you find multi-dimensional continued fractions with a guaranteed quality in polynomial time? These, and many more, questions are answered in

  3. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 88 ...

  4. Discretization of continuous frame

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which is a positive, self-adjoint, invertible operator on H with A · IdH ≤ SWω ≤ B · IdH. 2. Main result. For establishing a relationship between discrete and continuous frame of subspaces, we generalize the concept of continuous frame and resolution of identity to arbitrary Hilbert space H. For this purpose, we introduce the ...

  5. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    various locations and at varying degrees during BWR operation based on the core loading pattern. When present during depletion, control blades harden the neutron spectrum locally because they displace the moderator and absorb thermal neutrons. The investigation of the effect of control blades on post operational cask reactivity is documented herein, as is the effect of multiple (continuous and intermittent) exposure periods with control blades inserted. The coupled effects of control blade presence on power density, void profile, or burnup profile will be addressed in future work.

  6. The Nutrient Density of Snacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hess BA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although Americans receive almost a quarter of their daily energy from snacks, snacking remains a poorly defined and understood eating occasion. However, there is little dietary guidance about choosing snacks. Families, clinicians, and researchers need a comprehensive approach to assessing their nutritional value. Objective: To quantify and compare the nutrient density of commonly consumed snacks by their overall nutrient profiles using the Nutrient-Rich Foods (NRF Index 10.3. Methods: NRF Index scores were calculated for the top 3 selling products (based on 2014 market research data in different snack categories. These NRF scores were averaged to provide an overall nutrient-density score for each category. Results: Based on NRF scores, yogurt (55.3, milk (52.5, and fruit (30.1 emerged as the most nutrient-dense snacks. Ice cream (−4.4, pies and cakes (−11.1, and carbonated soft drinks (−17.2 emerged as the most nutrient-poor snacks. Conclusions: The NRF Index is a useful tool for assessing the overall nutritional value of snacks based on nutrients to limit and nutrients to encourage.

  7. Reliability and continuous regeneration model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pavlisková

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The failure-free function of an object is very important for the service. This leads to the interest in the determination of the object reliability and failure intensity. The reliability of an element is defined by the theory of probability.The element durability T is a continuous random variate with the probability density f. The failure intensity (tλ is a very important reliability characteristics of the element. Often it is an increasing function, which corresponds to the element ageing. We disposed of the data about a belt conveyor failures recorded during the period of 90 months. The given ses behaves according to the normal distribution. By using a mathematical analysis and matematical statistics, we found the failure intensity function (tλ. The function (tλ increases almost linearly.

  8. Mapping tree density at a global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crowther, T.W.; Glick, H.B.; Covey, K.R.; Bettigole, C.; Maynard, D.S.; Thomas, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Hintler, G.; Duguid, M.C.; Amatulli, G.; Hengeveld, G.M.; Nabuurs, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    The global extent and distribution of forest trees is central to our understanding of the terrestrial biosphere. We provide the first spatially continuous map of forest tree density at a global scale. This map reveals that the global number of trees is approximately 3.04 trillion, an order of

  9. Surface current density K: an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the vector surface of current density K used in electrical insulation studies. K is related to the vector tangential electric field Kt at the surface of a body by the vector equation K=ΓE t where Γ represents the surface conductivity. The author derives a surface continuity...

  10. Continuous Markovian Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Cardelli, Luca; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2012-01-01

    Continuous Markovian Logic (CML) is a multimodal logic that expresses quantitative and qualitative properties of continuous-time labelled Markov processes with arbitrary (analytic) state-spaces, henceforth called continuous Markov processes (CMPs). The modalities of CML evaluate the rates...... of the exponentially distributed random variables that characterize the duration of the labeled transitions of a CMP. In this paper we present weak and strong complete axiomatizations for CML and prove a series of metaproperties, including the finite model property and the construction of canonical models. CML...

  11. Electron Temperature and Density in Local Helicity Injection and High betat Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, David J.

    Tokamak startup in a spherical torus (ST) and an ST-based fusion nuclear science facility can greatly benefit from using non-inductive methods. The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment has developed a non-inductive startup technique using local helicity injection (LHI). Electron temperature, T e(r), and density, ne( r), profiles during LHI are unknown. These profiles are critical for understanding both the physics of the injection and relaxation mechanisms, as well as for extrapolating this technique to larger devices. A new Thomson scattering system has been designed, installed, and used to characterize Te(r, t) and ne(r, t) during LHI. The diagnostic leverages new technology in image intensified CCD cameras, high-efficiency diffraction gratings, and reliable Nd:YAG lasers. Custom systems for stray light mitigation, fast shuttering, and precision timing have been developed and implemented. The overall system provides a low-maintenance, economic, and effective means to explore novel physics regimes in Pegasus. Electron temperature and density profiles during LHI have been measured for the first time. Results indicate Te(r) peaked in the core of plasmas, and sustained while plasmas are coupled to injection drive. Electron densities also peak near the core of the tokamak, up to local values of n e ˜ 1.5 x 1019 m -3. A comparison of Te( r, t) has been made between discharges with dominant drive voltage from induction versus helicity injection. In both cases Te ( r, t) profiles remain peaked, with values for Te ,max > 150 eV in dominantly helicity-driven plasmas using high-field side LHI. Sustained values of betat ˜ 100% have been demonstrated in a tokamak for the first time. Plasmas are created and driven entirely non-solenoidally, and exhibit MHD stability. Measured temperature and density profiles are used to constrain magnetic equilibrium reconstructions, which calculate 80% ramp-down. For a continued decrease in the toroidal field these plasmas disrupt near the ideal MHD

  12. Nutrient density: principles and evaluation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient profiling is the technique of rating or classifying foods on the basis of their nutritional value. Foods that supply relatively more nutrients than calories are defined as nutrient dense. Nutrient profile models calculate the content of key nutrients per 100 g, 100 kcal, or per serving size of food. For maximum effectiveness, nutrient profile models need to be transparent, based on publicly accessible nutrient composition data, and validated against independent measures of a healthy diet. These rigorous scientific standards were applied to the development of the Nutrient-Rich Foods (NRF) family of nutrient profile models. First, the NRF models included nutrients to encourage as well as nutrients to limit. Second, NRF model performance was repeatedly tested against the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), an independent measure of a healthy diet. HEI values were calculated for participants in the 1999-2002 NHANES. Models based on 100 kcal and serving sizes performed better than those based on 100 g. Formulas based on sums and means performed better than those based on ratios. The final NRF9.3 index was based on 9 beneficial nutrients (protein; fiber; vitamins A, C, and E; calcium; iron; potassium; and magnesium) and on 3 nutrients to limit (saturated fat, added sugar, and sodium). Higher NRF9.3 scores were associated with lower energy density and more nutrient-rich diets. The nutrient density of foods, paired with a comprehensive program of consumer education, can become the foundation of dietary recommendations and guidelines.

  13. Density functional theory for polymeric systems in 2D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słyk, Edyta; Roth, Roland; Bryk, Paweł

    2016-06-22

    We propose density functional theory for polymeric fluids in two dimensions. The approach is based on Wertheim's first order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and closely follows density functional theory for polymers proposed by Yu and Wu (2002 J. Chem. Phys. 117 2368). As a simple application we evaluate the density profiles of tangent hard-disk polymers at hard walls. The theoretical predictions are compared against the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. We find that for short chain lengths the theoretical density profiles are in an excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo data. The agreement is less satisfactory for longer chains. The performance of the theory can be improved by recasting the approach using the self-consistent field theory formalism. When the self-avoiding chain statistics is used, the theory yields a marked improvement in the low density limit. Further improvements for long chains could be reached by going beyond the first order of TPT.

  14. Continuous-time signals

    CERN Document Server

    Shmaliy, Yuriy

    2006-01-01

    Gives a modern description of continuous-time deterministic signals Signal formation techniquesTime vs. frequency and frequency vs. time analysisCorrelation and energy analysisNarrowband signals and sampling.

  15. Continuous cultures of phytoplankton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baron, Ron; Davie, Alexander; Gaines, Alec; Grant, Darren; Okay, Oya; Ozsoy, Emin

    2014-01-01

    The development of cultures of phytoplankton adapting throughout several days in an axenic, continuous-flow chemostat to yield a steady kinetic state of competing species is described mathematically...

  16. Automatic penalty continuation in structural topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Labanda, Susana; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Structural topology optimization problems are often modelled using material interpolation schemes to produce almost solid-and-void designs. The problems become non convex due to the use of these techniques. Several articles introduce continuation approaches in the material penalization parameter...... optimization. This is done using performance profiles on 225 minimum compliance and 150 compliant mechanism design problems. The results show that continuation methods generally find better designs. On the other hand, they typically require a larger number of iterations. In the second part of the article...... to reduce the risks of ending in local minima. However, the numerical performance of continuation methods has not been studied in detail. The first purpose of this article is to benchmark existing continuation methods and the classical formulation with fixed penalty parameter in structural topology...

  17. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis - BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures, especially of ...

  18. Local density maxima: Progenitors of structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Y.; Shaham, J.

    1985-10-01

    Assuming structure is formed hierarchically from small to large scales, local density extrema are assumed to be the progenitors of structure. The density contrast profile around local maxima is given, to a good approximation, by the primordial two-point correlation function. The mean number density of objects of a given core mass is calculated as a function of the primordial power spectrum, p(k). Assuming p(k)proportionalk/sup n/, virialized halos in an 0 = 1.0 universe should follow pproportionalr/sup(-9 + 3n/)/(4 + n) for -1< or =n and pproportionalr S for -3< or =n< or =-1. In an open universe, rich clusters should have halos steeper than galactic halos. The observed structure is found to be consistent with 0 < 1.0 and n = -1.

  19. Lipid Profile of Children with Malaria by Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Dias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Changes in lipid profile are commonly reported in adult patients with malaria. However, a few studies evaluated lipid abnormalities in children continuously exposed to P. vivax. Objective. To evaluate lipid abnormalities in children with P. vivax infection and to assess if parasite count or the history of malaria correlates with lipid levels at admission. Methods. A total of 75 children were included in the study, from which 43 were slide confirmed infection by P. vivax. Serial blood samples were collected at admission and, on days 7 and 14, evaluated for the colorimetric measurements of triglycerides, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL. Results. The levels of total cholesterol, LDL, and HDL were significantly lower in malaria cases. The levels of VLDL and triglycerides were significantly higher in children with malaria. Such changes were transient and were not associated with parasite counting as well as with the history of malaria of patients. Conclusion. There are significant lipid abnormalities in children with low level of P. vivax infection and mild signs and symptoms of the disease, which are not associated with parasitaemia and previous episodes of disease.

  20. Mapping tree density at a global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, T W; Glick, H B; Covey, K R; Bettigole, C; Maynard, D S; Thomas, S M; Smith, J R; Hintler, G; Duguid, M C; Amatulli, G; Tuanmu, M-N; Jetz, W; Salas, C; Stam, C; Piotto, D; Tavani, R; Green, S; Bruce, G; Williams, S J; Wiser, S K; Huber, M O; Hengeveld, G M; Nabuurs, G-J; Tikhonova, E; Borchardt, P; Li, C-F; Powrie, L W; Fischer, M; Hemp, A; Homeier, J; Cho, P; Vibrans, A C; Umunay, P M; Piao, S L; Rowe, C W; Ashton, M S; Crane, P R; Bradford, M A

    2015-09-10

    The global extent and distribution of forest trees is central to our understanding of the terrestrial biosphere. We provide the first spatially continuous map of forest tree density at a global scale. This map reveals that the global number of trees is approximately 3.04 trillion, an order of magnitude higher than the previous estimate. Of these trees, approximately 1.39 trillion exist in tropical and subtropical forests, with 0.74 trillion in boreal regions and 0.61 trillion in temperate regions. Biome-level trends in tree density demonstrate the importance of climate and topography in controlling local tree densities at finer scales, as well as the overwhelming effect of humans across most of the world. Based on our projected tree densities, we estimate that over 15 billion trees are cut down each year, and the global number of trees has fallen by approximately 46% since the start of human civilization.

  1. Slabs and plumes crossing a broad density/viscosity discontinuity in the mid lower mantle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Cammarano, F.

    2010-12-01

    The depth-dependence of the viscosity is not well constrained by observations alone. Non-monotonic viscosity profiles have been often proposed in the past and are in the range of possible solutions. Such viscosity structures find new vigor on the light of recent discoveries of iron-spin transition in mantle minerals and their consequences on seismic interpretation [1] and dynamical evolution of the mantle. Using the recently introduced Multipole-Accelerated Boundary Element Method, we study the entire space of possible models of plumes and slabs crossing a broad region where mantle viscosity and/or density are non-monotonic [2]. The viscosity peak considered are 1, to 100 times then the rest of the mantle, while the density step considered is 0 to 2% different from the adiabatic profile. We identify the critical viscosity and density profiles that produce stalling or penetration of slabs and the continuous or intermittent penetration of plumes through the mid lower mantle. Based on our results, we envisage possible dynamic scenarios that would separate the mantle in two regions,suggesting a long term bifurcation originating, probably, from the spin transition itself. References: [1] Cammarano, F.; Marquardt, H.; Speziale, S.; Tackley, P. J., 2010, Role of iron-spin transition in ferropericlase on seismic interpretation: A broad thermochemical transition in the mid mantle? Geophysical Research Letters, Volume 37, Issue 3, CiteID L03308 [2] G. Morra, D. A. Yuen, L. Boschi, P. Chatelain, P. Koumoutzakos and P. Tackley, 2010, The fate of the slabs interacting with a smooth viscosity discontinuity in the mid lower mantle, Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Volume 180, Issues 3-4, 271-282, doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2010.04.001

  2. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  3. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  4. 2015 Workshop on Continuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    his volume contains the papers presented at WoC 2015, the Workshop on Continuations held at ETAPS 2015. There were four submissions. Each of them was reviewed by, on the average, three PC members. The committee decided to accept three papers. The program also includes one invited talk. It also...... documents the depth, variety, and richness of continuations with four distilled tutorials. Thanks are due to the local organizers of ETAPS 2015 for the infras- tructure and to the general chairman of WoC 2015, Ugo de'Liguoro, for initiating this workshop and making it happen...

  5. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  6. Eigenmodes of Langmuir waves trapped into the density holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Sundkvist, D.; Bale, S.; Pulupa, M.; Breuillard, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Kellogg, P.; Kaiser, M.; Zaslavsky, A.

    2009-04-01

    Recently Ergun with co-authors [1] have published an interesting observation by WAVES experiment onboard STEREO (S/WAVES) satellite: Langmuir wave eigenmodes trapped into the density holes in the solar wind. We present the theoretical study of such eigenmodes trapped into the density holes in the framework of the first Zakharov equation, where the prescribed density profile is supposed to be moving but static. We assign different 2 and 3 dimensional density holes, in the last case we consider the profiles having cylindrical symmetry and we analyze the eigenmode type solutions. We compare electric field envelope profiles with the observations of the S/WAVES experiment. We obtain the condition that relates the density hole depth with its characteristic spatial scales for the trapped wave mode to exist. It is similar to the Zakharov's condition that defines the threshold for nonlinearity to dominate over dispersion. The major consequence of this study consists in the conclusion that the role these wave modes can play in the process of the beam-plasma interaction is determined by the characteristics of the density fluctuations in the solar wind. They can be important if the probability of the occurrence of density fluctuations satisfying the condition for the wave trapping is large enough. [1] Ergun, R. et al., PRL, 2007

  7. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in three- dimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide addi-.

  9. Prevalência do hipotiroidismo subclínico e repercussões sobre o perfil lipídico e massa óssea em mulheres na pós-menopausa Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and its effects on lipidic profile and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aguiar Petri Nahas

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a prevalência do hipotiroidismo subclínico e suas repercussões sobre o perfil lipídico e a densidade mineral óssea (DMO em mulheres na pós-menopausa. Métodos: trata-se de estudo transversal com recuperação de dados de prontuários de pacientes acompanhadas em ambulatório de climatério. Critérios de inclusão: mulheres na pós-menopausa com dosagem do hormônio estimulador da tiróide (TSH e de tiroxina livre (T4-L. Critérios de exclusão: hipertiroidismo e carcinoma de tiróide. Considerou-se hipotiroidismo subclínico valores de TSH superiores a 5,0 mUI/mL e T4-L normal. Foram selecionadas 320 pacientes (idade 55,2±6,4 anos divididas em 3 grupos: função tiroideana normal (n=208, hipotiroidismo subclínico (n=53 e hipotiroidismo clínico sob tratamento (n=59. Foram analisados dados clínicos, uso de terapia hormonal, índice de massa corpórea (IMC=kg/m², perfil lipídico (colesterol total, HDL, LDL, triglicerídeos e DMO da coluna lombar e fêmur. Na análise estatística, as diferenças entre as médias dos grupos foram comparadas utilizando-se a análise de variância (ANOVA. Para múltipla comparação, assumindo que a variância era diferente entre os grupos, utilizou-se o método de Tukey. RESULTADOS: o hipotiroidismo subclínico foi diagnosticado em 16,1% dos casos. Os grupos foram homogêneos quanto às características clínicas, IMC e perfil lipídico e uso de terapêutica hormonal. Nas pacientes com hipotiroidismo subclínico ou clínico encontrou-se menor freqüência de osteopenia na coluna lombar e fêmur quando comparadas às eutiroidianas (pPURPOSE: to evaluate the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and its effects on lipidic profile and bone mineral density (BMD in postmenopausal women. METHODS: a cross-sectional study with survey of data from medical records of patients attended at a climacteric outpatient clinic. Inclusion criteria: postmenopausal women with measured thyroid

  10. Plasma density over Svalbard during the ISBJØRN campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    Full Text Available In 1997, reliable operation of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR was achieved and a rocket launching facility at Ny Ålesund on Svalbard (79°N, 12°E (SVALRAK was established. On 20 November, 1977, the first instrumented payload was launched from SVALRAK. Although the payload configuration had been flown many times previously from Andøya Rocket Range on the Norwegian mainland, this presented an unprecedented in situ determination of positive ion density over Svalbard. Simultaneously, ESR measured similar density profiles but in a higher altitude regime. We have combined the ESR measurements with ionosonde data to establish a calibration and subsequently combined the ground-based and in situ determined profiles to give a composite positive ion density profile from the mesosphere to the thermosphere.

    Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere; instruments and techniques

  11. Plasma density over Svalbard during the ISBJØRN campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1997, reliable operation of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR was achieved and a rocket launching facility at Ny Ålesund on Svalbard (79°N, 12°E (SVALRAK was established. On 20 November, 1977, the first instrumented payload was launched from SVALRAK. Although the payload configuration had been flown many times previously from Andøya Rocket Range on the Norwegian mainland, this presented an unprecedented in situ determination of positive ion density over Svalbard. Simultaneously, ESR measured similar density profiles but in a higher altitude regime. We have combined the ESR measurements with ionosonde data to establish a calibration and subsequently combined the ground-based and in situ determined profiles to give a composite positive ion density profile from the mesosphere to the thermosphere.Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere; instruments and techniques

  12. Continued Fractions for e

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 1. Continued Fractions for e. Shailesh A Shirali. General Article Volume 5 Issue 1 January 2000 pp 14-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/01/0014-0028. Author Affiliations.

  13. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review article willintroduce readers to the educational subject matter, along with one-page summarises (in print) of additional articles that may be accessed in full online. We will continue to offer topical and up-to-date CME material. Readers are encouraged to register with samj.org.za to receive future notifications of new ...

  14. Continuous digital health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Halteren, Aart; Gay, Vaĺerie

    2015-01-01

    A transformation is underway regarding how we deal with our health, not only because mobile Internet technology has made it possible to have continuous access to personal health information, but also because breaking the trend of ever-growing healthcare costs is increasingly necessary. Connectivity,

  15. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...

  16. Continuous venovenous haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Bistrup, C; Pedersen, R S

    1996-01-01

    A simple three-pump-based system for the performance of continuous venovenous haemodialysis is described. The method employs access to the circulation via a double-lumen catheter, and by means of a standard extracorporeal peristaltic pump the blood is circulated through a haemofiltration filter. ...

  17. Gap and density theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, N

    1940-01-01

    A typical gap theorem of the type discussed in the book deals with a set of exponential functions { \\{e^{{{i\\lambda}_n} x}\\} } on an interval of the real line and explores the conditions under which this set generates the entire L_2 space on this interval. A typical gap theorem deals with functions f on the real line such that many Fourier coefficients of f vanish. The main goal of this book is to investigate relations between density and gap theorems and to study various cases where these theorems hold. The author also shows that density- and gap-type theorems are related to various propertie

  18. Polarizable Density Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Steinmann, Casper; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We present a new QM/QM/MM-based model for calculating molecular properties and excited states of solute-solvent systems. We denote this new approach the polarizable density embedding (PDE) model and it represents an extension of our previously developed polarizable embedding (PE) strategy. The PDE...... model is a focused computational approach in which a core region of the system studied is represented by a quantum-chemical method, whereas the environment is divided into two other regions: an inner and an outer region. Molecules belonging to the inner region are described by their exact densities...

  19. Holographic magnetisation density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, Aristomenis [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,Stockton Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Pantelidou, Christiana [Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica & Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D=4 Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two U(1) gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to d=3 CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the U(1)’s. Below a critical temperature the system’s magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  20. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF DWARF GALAXIES. II. COLOR TRENDS AND MASS PROFILES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A. [Penn State Mont Alto, 1 Campus Drive, Mont Alto, PA 17237 (United States); Hunter, Deidre A. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G., E-mail: kah259@psu.edu, E-mail: dah@lowell.edu, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In this second paper of a series, we explore the B  −  V , U  −  B , and FUV−NUV radial color trends from a multi-wavelength sample of 141 dwarf disk galaxies. Like spirals, dwarf galaxies have three types of radial surface brightness profiles: (I) single exponential throughout the observed extent (the minority), (II) down-bending (the majority), and (III) up-bending. We find that the colors of (1) Type I dwarfs generally become redder with increasing radius, unlike spirals which have a blueing trend that flattens beyond ∼1.5 disk scale lengths, (2) Type II dwarfs come in six different “flavors,” one of which mimics the “U” shape of spirals, and (3) Type III dwarfs have a stretched “S” shape where the central colors are flattish, become steeply redder toward the surface brightness break, then remain roughly constant beyond, which is similar to spiral Type III color profiles, but without the central outward bluing. Faint (−9 >  M{sub B}  > −14) Type II dwarfs tend to have continuously red or “U” shaped colors and steeper color slopes than bright (−14 >  M{sub B}  > −19) Type II dwarfs, which additionally have colors that become bluer or remain constant with increasing radius. Sm dwarfs and BCDs tend to have at least some blue and red radial color trend, respectively. Additionally, we determine stellar surface mass density (Σ) profiles and use them to show that the break in Σ generally remains in Type II dwarfs (unlike Type II spirals) but generally disappears in Type III dwarfs (unlike Type III spirals). Moreover, the break in Σ is strong, intermediate, and weak in faint dwarfs, bright dwarfs, and spirals, respectively, indicating that Σ may straighten with increasing galaxy mass. Finally, the average stellar surface mass density at the surface brightness break is roughly 1−2  M {sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} for Type II dwarfs but higher at 5.9  M {sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} or 27  M {sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} for

  1. Black Holes and Galactic Density Cusps III From Black Hole to Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Henriksen, Richard N; Macmillan, Joseph D

    2011-01-01

    Aims. In this paper we continue our study of density cusps that may contain central black holes. Methods. We recall our attempts to use distribution functions with a memory of self-similar relaxation, but mostly they apply only in restricted regions of the global system. We are forced to consider related distribution functions that are steady but not self-similar. Results. One remarkably simple distribution function that has a filled loss cone describes a bulge that transits from a near black hole domain to an outer 'zero flux' regime where$\\rho\\propto r^{-7/4}$. The transition passes from an initial inverse square profile through a region having a 1/r density profile. The structure is likely to be developed at an early stage in the growth of a galaxy. A central black hole is shown to grow exponentially in this background with an e-folding time of a few million years. Conclusions. We derive our results from first principles, using only the angular momentum integral in spherical symmetry. The initial relaxatio...

  2. Modelling and simulation of double chamber microbial fuel cell. Cell voltage, power density and temperature variation with process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Ravi; Mondal, Prasenjit; Chand, Shri [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper steady state models of a double chamber glucose glutamic acid microbial fuel cell (GGA-MFC) under continuous operation have been developed and solved using Matlab 2007 software. The experimental data reported in a recent literature has been used for the validation of the models. The present models give prediction on the cell voltage and cell power density with 19-44% errors, which is less (up to 20%) than the errors on the prediction of cell voltage made in some recent literature for the same MFC where the effects of the difference in pH and ionic conductivity between anodic and cathodic solutions on cell voltage were not incorporated in model equations. It also describes the changes in anodic and cathodic chamber temperature due to the increase in substrate concentration and cell current density. Temperature profile across the membrane thickness has also been studied. (orig.)

  3. 46 CFR 151.03-21 - Filling density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filling density. 151.03-21 Section 151.03-21 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-21 Filling density. The ratio, expressed as...

  4. High-power terahertz quantum cascade lasers with ∼0.23 W in continuous wave mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuemin; Shen, Changle; Jiang, Tao; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Deng, Qinghua; Li, Weihua; Wu, Weidong, E-mail: wuweidongding@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900, Sichuan (China); Yang, Ning; Chu, Weidong; Duan, Suqing [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing, 100088 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers with a record output power up to ∼0.23 W in continuous wave mode were obtained. We show that the optimal 2.9-mm-long device operating at 3.11 THz has a low threshold current density of 270 A/cm{sup 2} at ∼15 K. The maximum operating temperature arrived at ∼65 K in continuous wave mode and the internal quantum efficiencies decreased from 0.53 to 0.19 for the devices with different cavity lengths. By using one convex lens with the effective focal length of 13 mm, the beam profile was collimated to be a quasi Gaussian distribution.

  5. Magnetic depth profiling of Fe/Au multilayer using neutron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Au multilayer sample for characterizing the layer structure and magnetic moment density profile. Fe/Au multilayer shows strong spin-dependent scattering at interfaces, making it a prospective GMR material. Fe/Au multilayer with bilayer ...

  6. Incorporation of topside half peak density anchor point in IRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    The F2 layer peak density ( N mF2) and height ( h mF2) are used by the International Reference Ionosphere as anchor point fitted by the electron density profile. The shape of the bottomside Ne( h) distribution is formulated with the help of profile sub-peak semithickness taken as a distance between the peak height and the bottom half-peak density height h05 bot. In a similar manner relevant procedure allowing to fit IRI topside electron density profile to additional anchor point — the half-peak density height h05 top at electron density equal to 0.5 × N mF2 above the F2 peak is included in the IRI ionosphere-plasmasphere model. Two types of :input are used with IRI code for 14 intense magnetic storms during 1999-2003: ionosonde derived data ( ƒoF2, h mF2 and hO5 bot) and Global Positioning System (GPS)-based total electron content (TEC) observation. It is shown that topside half-peak height h05 top and topside scale height can be inferred from the GPS-TEC measurements with an iteration procedure applied to IRI profiling algorithm. The proposed technique is validated with incoherent scatter ionospheric electron content, ITEC, provided by EISCAT electron density profiles. Good correlation is obtained between the height h05 top and the equivalent slab thickness τ, representing ratio of TEC to N mF2. This approach allowed us to reveal a highly variable topside scale height for intense space weather storms at mid latitudes with peaks up to 800 km during the peaks of magnetic activity.

  7. A Tryst With Density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Walter Kohn transformed theoretical chemistry and solid statephysics with his development of density functional theory, forwhich he was awarded the Nobel Prize. This article tries toexplain, in simple terms, why this was an important advancein the field, and to describe precisely what it was that he (togetherwith his ...

  8. Density in Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesin, Gert; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a fourth-grade unit on density which introduces a concept useful in the study of chemistry and procedures appropriate to the chemistry laboratory. The hands-on activities, which use simple equipment and household substances, are at the level of thinking Piaget describes as concrete operational. (BC)

  9. Multiple density layered insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  10. Polarizable Density Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Peter; Kongsted, Jacob; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the performance of the polarizable density embedding (PDE) model-a new multiscale computational approach designed for prediction and rationalization of general molecular properties of large and complex systems. We showcase how the PDE model very effectively handles the use of large...

  11. A Tryst With Density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    related to gender and science. Walter Kohn transformed theoretical chemistry and solid state physics with his development of density functional theory, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize. This article tries to explain, in simple terms, why this was an important advance in the field, and to describe precisely what it was ...

  12. An equilibrium profile model for tidal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Bernabeu

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available During a full tidal cycle, the beach profile is exposed to continuously changing hydrodynamical conditions. Consequently, the profile evolves constantly to adapt to these changes. The equilibrium condition on tidal beaches is defined in terms of the relative occurrence of swash, surf zone and shoaling processes. We have assumed that the tidal beach profile is in equilibrium when the net sediment transport along a tidal cycle is zero. In this model the contribution of swash is considered negligible. A simple and easy-to-apply equilibrium profile formulation is proposed. This model is based on the assumption that surf zone processes dominate the profile morphology wherever wave breaking occurs during the tidal cycle. The obtained equilibrium profile is valid from the high tide level to the breaker point at low tide level. The tidal influence on the profile morphology is the lengthening of the surf profile. The higher the tidal range, the longer the surf profile. The model was tested against field and laboratory data, showing reasonable predictions of measured beach profiles.

  13. Evolution of the SOL plasma background at density shoulder formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Isa, Federico Antonio; Carralero, Daniel; Lunt, Tilmann; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-12-15

    One of the main problems of our age is the ever increasing demand of energy. This prompts the search for new energy sources which should have the advantages of being nearly inexhaustible and usable to produce a predictable amount of energy. A possible solution is to build a reactor based on nuclear fusion. ITER will be the first divertor Tokamak to reach fusion break even and it will pave the way to a commercial use of fusion to produce sustainable and clean energy. One of the biggest obstacles to the construction of a commercial fusion reactor is represented by the heat and particle flux toward the main chamber plasma facing components and the divertor targets. A fusion reactor will likely experience power loads and erosion on the verge of the technical limits of available plasma facing materials. To predict properly the distribution of those fluxes between the divertor and the main chamber, a better understanding of the physics in the open field lines region (called Scrape-off layer or SOL) is required. This thesis, being developed in partnership with the Max-Planck-institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Garching bei Muenchen, DE), is framed in this context. In the SOL of L-mode (low confinement) discharges, qualitatively two kinds of density profiles can be distinguished. The first one is characterized by a strong density gradient in the vicinity of the separatrix, followed by a flat region towards the far SOL. The second profile lacks such a strong gradient and displays an almost linear decay in the whole SOL. The latter kind of density profile is characterized by stronger fluxes toward the first wall with respect to the first kind. This my be a threat for the ITER unlike the divertor targets which are made of tungsten, the first wall will be made beryllium which can suffer damage from sputtering. This work is focused on understanding the physics behind the transition between those two profiles, the so-called density shoulder formation. After the shoulder formation it is

  14. Safety Campaign Continues

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    If you see this poster, stop and read it! This is the third poster produced by TIS Division as part of its information campaign on health and safety in the workplace. It provides statistics on occupational accidents at CERN. You will see that, as in the rest of Europe, falls, slips and trips continue to be the main cause of accident. So, eyes open and take care! For more information : http://safety.cern.ch/

  15. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  16. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-07

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector's size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector's electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  17. DCMDN: Deep Convolutional Mixture Density Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Isanto, Antonio; Polsterer, Kai Lars

    2017-09-01

    Deep Convolutional Mixture Density Network (DCMDN) estimates probabilistic photometric redshift directly from multi-band imaging data by combining a version of a deep convolutional network with a mixture density network. The estimates are expressed as Gaussian mixture models representing the probability density functions (PDFs) in the redshift space. In addition to the traditional scores, the continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) and the probability integral transform (PIT) are applied as performance criteria. DCMDN is able to predict redshift PDFs independently from the type of source, e.g. galaxies, quasars or stars and renders pre-classification of objects and feature extraction unnecessary; the method is extremely general and allows the solving of any kind of probabilistic regression problems based on imaging data, such as estimating metallicity or star formation rate in galaxies.

  18. Quantal density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Viraht

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with quantal density functional theory (QDFT) which is a time-dependent local effective potential theory of the electronic structure of matter. The treated time-independent QDFT constitutes a special case. In the 2nd edition, the theory is extended to include the presence of external magnetostatic fields. The theory is a description of matter based on the ‘quantal Newtonian’ first and second laws which is in terms of “classical” fields that pervade all space, and their quantal sources. The fields, which are explicitly defined, are separately representative of electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, correlation-kinetic, correlation-current-density, and correlation-magnetic effects. The book further describes Schrödinger theory from the new physical perspective of fields and quantal sources. It also describes traditional Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham DFT, and explains via QDFT the physics underlying the various energy functionals and functional derivatives o...

  19. The Combined Influence of Affective, Continuance and Normative Commitment on Employee Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Mark John

    2009-01-01

    In a sample of 288 hospital nurses, commitment profiles were compared to turnover intentions, job search behavior, work withdrawal (absenteeism and lateness) and job stress. Five empirically-derived commitment profiles emerged: highly committed, affective-normative dominant, continuance-normative dominant, continuance dominant, and uncommitted.…

  20. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  1. Contingent kernel density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    Full Text Available Kernel density estimation is a widely used method for estimating a distribution based on a sample of points drawn from that distribution. Generally, in practice some form of error contaminates the sample of observed points. Such error can be the result of imprecise measurements or observation bias. Often this error is negligible and may be disregarded in analysis. In cases where the error is non-negligible, estimation methods should be adjusted to reduce resulting bias. Several modifications of kernel density estimation have been developed to address specific forms of errors. One form of error that has not yet been addressed is the case where observations are nominally placed at the centers of areas from which the points are assumed to have been drawn, where these areas are of varying sizes. In this scenario, the bias arises because the size of the error can vary among points and some subset of points can be known to have smaller error than another subset or the form of the error may change among points. This paper proposes a "contingent kernel density estimation" technique to address this form of error. This new technique adjusts the standard kernel on a point-by-point basis in an adaptive response to changing structure and magnitude of error. In this paper, equations for our contingent kernel technique are derived, the technique is validated using numerical simulations, and an example using the geographic locations of social networking users is worked to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  2. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  3. Toward a Redefinition of Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Amos

    1975-01-01

    This paper suggests that in addition to the recent work indicating that crowding is a subjective phenomenon, an adequate definition of density must also include a subjective component since density is a complex phenomenon in itself. Included is a discussion of both physical density and perceived density. (Author/MA)

  4. To Be Continued

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlmann, Anita; Harrison, Madaline

    2018-01-01

    The article explores the representation of Michael J. Fox’s Parkinson’s disease in the TV-series The Good Wife and The Michael J. Fox Show. We suggest that serial narration may offer intriguing ways to rethink the function and meaning of narratives in health contexts and that the episodic narrative...... structure of TV-series may afford insights into the structure of medical encounters. More specifically, we examine to what extent serial narration with its focus on continuity and repetition might help reimagine the typical narrative of decline, which is implicit in the terminology of neurodegeneration...

  5. Nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christiane; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: A reliable method to detect biochemical nocturnal hypoglycemia is highly needed, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycemia. We evaluated reliability of nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in patients with type 1 diabetes at high risk of severe...... from 23:00 to 07:00 h for plasma glucose (PG) measurements (gold standard). Results: Valid data were obtained in 217 nights. The sensitivity of CGM was 65% (95% confidence interval, 53-77%) below 4 mmol/L, 40% (24-56%) below 3 mmol/L, and 17% (0-47%) below 2.2 mmol/L. PG and CGM readings correlated...

  6. Continuous Shearlet Tight Frames

    KAUST Repository

    Grohs, Philipp

    2010-10-22

    Based on the shearlet transform we present a general construction of continuous tight frames for L2(ℝ2) from any sufficiently smooth function with anisotropic moments. This includes for example compactly supported systems, piecewise polynomial systems, or both. From our earlier results in Grohs (Technical report, KAUST, 2009) it follows that these systems enjoy the same desirable approximation properties for directional data as the previous bandlimited and very specific constructions due to Kutyniok and Labate (Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 361:2719-2754, 2009). We also show that the representation formulas we derive are in a sense optimal for the shearlet transform. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. Continuous Integration in CFMGR

    CERN Document Server

    Frohlingsdorf, David

    2017-01-01

    Cfmgr is a managing tool for network devices. At the moment there is no way to automatically check the working behaviour of the tool, meaning that a lot of effort is spend into manually testing the tool after an update. During my stay at CERN I developed a black-box testing framework for Cfmgr according to Continuous Integration practices and successfully deployed the framework using Jenkins and Docker. This report discusses in detail how the framework works and how it can be configured, and equally gives a broad problem description and outlines future work directions.

  8. Numerical study of traffic flow considering the probability density distribution of the traffic density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L. M.; Zhu, H. B.; Zhang, N. X.

    The probability density distribution of the traffic density is analyzed based on the empirical data. It is found that the beta distribution can fit the result obtained from the measured traffic density perfectly. Then a modified traffic model is proposed to simulate the microscopic traffic flow, in which the probability density distribution of the traffic density is taken into account. The model also contains the behavior of drivers’ speed adaptation by taking into account the driving behavior difference and the dynamic headway. Accompanied by presenting the flux-density diagrams, the velocity evolution diagrams and the spatial-temporal profiles of vehicles are also given. The synchronized flow phase and the wide moving jam phase are indicated, which is the challenge for the cellular automata traffic model. Furthermore the phenomenon of the high speed car-following is exhibited, which has been observed in the measured data previously. The results set demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model in detecting the complicated dynamic phenomena of the traffic flow.

  9. Dissolved oxygen, CDOM, Chl a, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from profile and continuous observations using CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter off the U.S. East Coast during the 2015 East Coast Ocean Acidification (ECOA) Cruise from 2015-06-20 to 2015-07-23 (NCEI Accession 0157080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains CTD profile data of dissolved oxygen, CDOM, chlorophyll a, temperature and salinity data that were collected during the East Coast...

  10. Quadric Resistive Sheet Profile for Wideband Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A new type of a nonreflecting resistive dipole antenna with quadric continuous resistivity profile is presented in this paper. The antenna is mathematically described and compared with the antenna originally proposed by Wu and King. The verification of a proposed theory and the comparison between Wu-King and quadric profile are carried out by simulation models that were designed for this purpose. The attention is turned to the proper attenuation of a wave excited on the resistive sheet, especially.

  11. Continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, D

    1987-04-01

    With the rapid advances in medical science and increasing complexities of patient care, the need for continuing medical education (CME) is widely accepted by the profession. CME follows general and higher professional training, and should be a life long process. Teaching hospitals and postgraduate professional institutions play vital roles in organising, promoting, and monitoring this activity. CME directorates should be established. University authorities must recognise the important role of medical teachers in postgraduate and continuing medical education, and the staff establishment and terms of service should be held regularly. Medical libraries should have easy borrowing facilities. Self-assessment and audio-visual material are particularly helpful to the busy practitioner and inexpensive local or regional journals of quality can provide pertinent and up-to-date information. All charges for attending scientific meetings and educational material should be tax deductible or subsidized. The effectiveness of CME is difficult to assess and participation is almost impossible to enforce. Much depends on the standard of medical practice wanted by society. Recertification of general practitioners or specialists poses many problems. On the other hand, completion of self-assessment programmes, active participation at medical meetings, contributions to scientific literature, and membership of medical societies with built-in peer review could be monitored and regularly used to evaluate professional status.

  12. Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a partnership formed between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to place the next Landsat satellite in orbit in January 2013. The Landsat era that began in 1972 will become a nearly 41-year global land record with the successful launch and operation of the LDCM. The LDCM will continue the acquisition, archiving, and distribution of multispectral imagery affording global, synoptic, and repetitive coverage of the Earth's land surfaces at a scale where natural and human-induced changes can be detected, differentiated, characterized, and monitored over time. The mission objectives of the LDCM are to (1) collect and archive medium resolution (30-meter spatial resolution) multispectral image data affording seasonal coverage of the global landmasses for a period of no less than 5 years; (2) ensure that LDCM data are sufficiently consistent with data from the earlier Landsat missions in terms of acquisition geometry, calibration, coverage characteristics, spectral characteristics, output product quality, and data availability to permit studies of landcover and land-use change over time; and (3) distribute LDCM data products to the general public on a nondiscriminatory basis at no cost to the user.

  13. Continuous steel production and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaslee, Kent D [Rolla, MO; Peter, Jorg J [McMinnville, OR; Robertson, David G. C. [Rolla, MO; Thomas, Brian G [Champaign, IL; Zhang, Lifeng [Trondheim, NO

    2009-11-17

    A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

  14. Integrodifferential diffusion equation for continuous-time random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau; Wang, K G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an integrodifferential diffusion equation for continuous-time random walk that is valid for a generic waiting time probability density function. Using this equation, we also study diffusion behaviors for a couple of specific waiting time probability density functions such as exponential and a combination of power law and generalized Mittag-Leffler function. We show that for the case of the exponential waiting time probability density function, a normal diffusion is generated and the probability density function is Gaussian distribution. In the case of the combination of a power law and generalized Mittag-Leffler waiting probability density function, we obtain the subdiffusive behavior for all the time regions from small to large times and probability density function is non-Gaussian distribution.

  15. Transport-Statistics and Energetics in Stable-Continuous Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Juan Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Continuous turbulence (CT) is the basic condition for relatively simple quantifications in stable stratification, e.g., Monin-Obukhov (MO) theory. From a statistical point of view, CT guarantees spatial and temporal randomness of variables, which is an important basis for quantitative considerations. Also, the entire concept of an exchange (diffusion) coefficient can only be applied under randomness conditions. Thus, there is equivalence of diffusion and random walk (RW), as demonstrated by Einstein in his annum mirabilis 1905. In stable stratification, the limitation of vertical displacements by surface-distance is supplemented by buoyancy-effects. The latter can be quantified by the energy balance of vertical displacements: Vertical turbulent kinetic energy (VTKE) is transformed to potential energy (PE). This transformation happens in combination with deflection of vertical motion by the random interactions of fluid parcels that also happen in neutrality. By application of the RW-definition of the diffusion coefficient it is possible to implement the buoyancy-related limitations (energy balance) to the determination of the exchange coefficient, most simply in the stable limit z >> L. Determination of the exchange coefficient in its turn automatically yields the profile-constant. Depending on a dimensionless turbulence parameter (ratio of average-square vertical velocity to squared friction velocity), the most probable approximate value of the profile-constant is 2.9. This value is within the traditional experimental range (2.0 to 12) but clearly below the ‘community's' favourite range of 5 to 6. Due to an involved approximation, the value of 2.9 is systematically over-estimated, so that the RW result is not compatible with larger values. The applied energy-balance formulation necessarily has to reflect the energetic processes. In the usual concept of energetics, shear-produced TKE is absorbed by the buoyancy flux (BF) and -BF acts as source of turbulent

  16. Patient Profile in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Adışen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Skin diseases are among the most prevalent problems in medical practice. Dermatologists have become active, not only in treatment of skin diseases, but also for the cosmetic and surgical procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the profiles of patients visiting outpatient dermatology clinic of an university hospital and a private dermatologist’s office located in Ankara. Material and Method: The study comprised 5952 patients in each group. Age, gender, diagnosis, and the places they live, were all recorded. Results: There were 3778 women and 2174 men with a mean age of 37.8±15.9 years (6 months-81 years in private visit group, and 3570 women and 2382 men with a mean age of 37.9±18.6 years (1-100 years in hospital visit group. The most common cause for visiting dermatologist’s office was acne. It was fungal diseases for hospital visits. Women with fungal disease, alopecia, nail disorders, urticaria, psychocutaneous dermatoses, bacterial infections, and men with fungal disease, acne, alopecia, urticaria, nail disorders, preferred hospitals over private offices. Both women and men with benign and malignant tumors, nevi, pigmentation disorders, preferred private office over hospital. Men with syphilis, genital herpes, anogenital verruca preferred mainly private offices. Visits to dermatologist’s office for cosmetic procedures constituted only 4% of overall visits.Conclusion: Our finding underscores the fact that medical or clinical dermatology continues to be the focus of most dermatology practices. Apart from cosmetic procedures, the main difference between patient profiles visiting private offices and hospitals is observed in sexually transmitted diseases. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 82-6

  17. Effects of nanoscale density inhomogeneities on shearing fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben, Dalton,; Peter, Daivis,; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    . This gives us a method for direct measurement of the coupling between the density and velocity fields and allows us to introduce various feedback control mechanisms which customize fluid behavior in individual Fourier components. We briefly discuss the role of temperature inhomogeneity and consider whether......It is well known that density inhomogeneities at the solid-liquid interface can have a strong effect on the velocity profile of a nanoconfined fluid in planar Poiseuille flow. However, it is difficult to control the density inhomogeneities induced by solid walls, making this type of system...

  18. Field dependence of critical current density in flat superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Ryuji [Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu Oita (Japan); Fukami, Takeshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Himeji Institute of Technology, Himeji (Japan); Tamegai, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: ryuji-kondo@susi.oita-u.ac.j [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    Surface field of a thin superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-delta} in mixed state is measured by a Hall probe array. To reproduce the measured field profiles, shielding current distributions are determined by numerical iterative calculations without supposing any models for field dependence of critical current density J{sub c} (B). Utilizing the estimated local current density and local magnetic field for x - y coordinates, a field variation of current density is plotted. Though any model for J{sub c} (B) is not used for numerical calculations, the field variation roughly shows a dependence like Kim model.

  19. Investigations of the gravity profile below the Tibetan plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W. B.; Han, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Scientists pay great attention to the structure and dynamics of the Tibetan plateau due to the fact that it is a natural experiment site for geoscience studies. The gravity profiles below the Tibetan plateau with successive high-accuracy play more and more significant role in studying the structure and evolution of the Tibetan plateau. This study focuses on determining the inner gravity field of the Tibetan plateau until to the depth of D and interpret possible mechanism of the gravity profile below the Tibetan plateau, especially reinvestigating the isostasy problem (Pratt hypothesis and Airy hypothesis). The inner gravity field below the Tibetan plateau is determined based on a simple technique (i.e. a combination of Newtonian integral, downward continuation of gravity field, and "remove-restore" scheme) and the following datasets: the external Earth gravitational model EGM2008 and the digital topographic model DTM2006.0 released by NGA (National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, USA), and the crust density distribution model CRUST2.0 released by NGS (National Geological Survey, USA). This study is supported by Natural Science Foundation China (grant No.40974015; No.41174011).

  20. Spaces of continuous functions

    CERN Document Server

    Groenewegen, G L M

    2016-01-01

    The space C(X) of all continuous functions on a compact space X carries the structure of a normed vector space, an algebra and a lattice. On the one hand we study the relations between these structures and the topology of X, on the other hand we discuss a number of classical results according to which an algebra or a vector lattice can be represented as a C(X). Various applications of these theorems are given. Some attention is devoted to related theorems, e.g. the Stone Theorem for Boolean algebras and the Riesz Representation Theorem. The book is functional analytic in character. It does not presuppose much knowledge of functional analysis; it contains introductions into subjects such as the weak topology, vector lattices and (some) integration theory.