WorldWideScience

Sample records for continental army 1775-1781

  1. Army Materiel Requirements to Support the Continental United States Military Mobilization Base Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Level of Organization AMC ............... Army Materiel Command AMOPS ............. Army Mobilization and Operations Planning System AMPC ...Military Personnel Center ( AMPC ) uses an automated mobilization manpower (MOB MAN) requirements data manipulator system to prepare time- phased

  2. Organization and Functions: Major Army Commands in the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-30

    analysis element ( TCAE ) t h a t p r o v i d e s S I G I N T t e c h n i c a l s u p p o r t a n d p r o p o s e d m i s s i o n steerage to all TROJAN...Army Involvement in Recruiting TAQ Total Army Quality TAREX target exploitation TCAE technical control and analysis element TDA tables of distribution

  3. The Saratoga Campaign: Maneuver Warfare, The Continental Army, and the Birth of the American Way of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-12

    13 Higgenbotham, pg 12. 14 Peter G. Tsouras, Warriors Words: A Quotation Book (London: Arms and Armour Press, 1992), pg 262. 7 Strategic...from Canada was a rudimentary road that led east from Lake Ontario down the Mohawk Valley. The American Plan The Americans knew that the British would... Society 11 The commander responsible for the defense of Fort Ticonderoga was a veteran officer who had served in the British Army, General Arthur

  4. Army Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  5. Army Airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    contains some type of internal support structure such as a keel. A rigid airship has a full skeleton, such as the Zeppelin model from the mid 1900‟s...the World War One, the Germans used zeppelins with limited success to attack the United Kingdom (UK) in a “strategic bomber” role. The US used...similar objectives.21 The Army initiated CPR‟s on every acquisition program to identify redundancies and create efficiencies. CPR‟s have led to more

  6. Army Modernization Strategy 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    hazard. The SUGV modular design allows multiple payloads to be integrated in a plug-and- play fashion . Weighing less than 30 pounds, it is capable...the Army will: Continue to field LMP (to include Army Installations) Plan for and field GCSS-Army (F/T) Plan for and field GCSS-Army ( PLM +) Define

  7. Continental Divide Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was created to show the proximity of the Continental Divide to the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail in New Mexico. This work was done as part...

  8. Complexity and Army Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Mark T.

    On 12 Octther 1999, the U.S. Army began a journey down a new path to innovation, when General Eric Shinseki presented his vision of Army Transformation at the 45th annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army. In this speech, General Shinseki described the Army as an organization consisting of heavy forces with excellent staying power but poor strategic responsiveness, light forces with excellent responsiveness but poor staying power, and a logistics system with an excessively large footprint. His proposed solution, a comprehensive change of the Army resulting in full-spectrum dominance and strategic responsiveness, would occur so quickly as to "be unnerving to some." [Shinseki. 1999] While this prediction has turned out in some ways to be true, it is not necessarily the speed of change that is unnerving to many of the people studying Army Transformation.

  9. 2010 Army Modernization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Capability Release ( JCR ) software upgrades with BFT2 and KGV-72s provides Type-1 security and enhanced (10X) L-band bandwidth to current FBCB2 terminals...Additionally, JCR will include the co-host of the TiGR and the Army will leverage to support HBCT to SBCT conversions starting in FY11. By FY13...Army Human Intelligence 89 2010 ARMY MODERNIZATION STRATEGY WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL IBCT: IED: IED: IFPC: IPADS: IRB: ISR: IT: JAB: JBC-P: JCR : JETS

  10. Freshly brewed continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  11. Army Overdependency on Contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-20

    Army Overdependency on Contrators EWS 2005 Subject Area Topical Issues Contemporary Issues Paper Submitted by Captain HL Morris...aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information... service would not be interrupted if the contractor failed to perform. The guidelines also mandated that the Army had to be capable of providing

  12. The Myanmar continental shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Rao, P.S.

    conditions, and neotectonic activity. The most prominent bathymetric feature on the Ayeyarwady continental shelf is the 120 km-wide Martaban Depression, at the centre of which is located the Martaban Canyon. Most of the suspended sediment discharge...

  13. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    STRATEGIC SEALIFT SUPPORTING ARMY DEPLOYMENTS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...THOMPSON, MAJ, US ARMY BFA, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana, 1994 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2016 Approved for...Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew

  14. Continental Scientific Drilling Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Resource Priorities in Continental Drilling J. J. Hemley 12 Aspects of Continental Crustal Structure and Growth Scott Smithson 13 Deep-Drilling Targets...Time of Workshop Allen F. Agnew Library of Congress Clarence R. Allen California Institute of Technology Orson L. Anderson University of California at...Skinner Yale University Norman H. Sleep Northwestern University Laurence L. Sloss Northwestern University Scott B. Smithson University of Wyoming

  15. Raising the continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian H.; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2017-02-01

    The changes that occur at the boundary between the Archean and Proterozoic eons are arguably the most fundamental to affect the evolution of Earth's continental crust. The principal component of Archean continental crust is Granite-Greenstone Terranes (GGTs), with granites always dominant. The greenstones consist of a lower sequence of submarine komatiites and basalts, which erupted onto a pre-existing Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) crust. These basaltic rocks pass upwards initially into evolved volcanic rocks, such as andesites and dacites and, subsequently, into reworked felsic pyroclastic material and immature sediments. This transition coincides with widespread emplacement of granitoids, which stabilised (cratonised) the continental crust. Proterozoic supra-crustal rocks, on the other hand, are dominated by extensive flat-lying platform sequences of mature sediments, which were deposited on stable cratonic basements, with basaltic rocks appreciably less abundant. The siliceous TTGs cannot be produced by direct melting of the mantle, with most hypotheses for their origin requiring them to be underlain by a complimentary dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite root, which we suggest acted as ballast to the early continents. Ubiquitous continental pillow basalts in Archean lower greenstone sequences require the early continental crust to have been sub-marine, whereas the appearance of abundant clastic sediments, at higher stratigraphic levels, shows that it had emerged above sea level by the time of sedimentation. We hypothesise that the production of komatiites and associated basalts, the rise of the continental crust, widespread melting of the continental crust, the onset of sedimentation and subsequent cratonisation form a continuum that is the direct result of removal of the continent's dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite roots, triggered at a regional scale by the arrival of a mantle plume at the base of the lithosphere. Our idealised calculations suggest

  16. Index to Army Times 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    task force told. Army Times; Mar. 14, 1988; 48(31): p. 52. DENTAL RECORDS Army behind in dental record effort. Army Times; Nov. 21, 1988; 49(15): p. 27...p. 17. MILITARY DEPENDENTS-- DENTAL CARE Dental insurance for military families may be expanded. Army Times; Aug. 22, 1988; 49(2): p. 24. MILITARY...compensation bill. Army Times; May 2, 1988; 48(38): p. 38. PENTAGON MEDITATION CLUB Meditators, Soviets munch pasta , push peace. Army Times; May 23, 1988; 48

  17. Branding the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    the specific segment of the population that the marketer or retailer identifies as the most likely consumer of their product or service.14 While the...Target+ Market . 15 Linda Clingan, “US Army Custom Segmentation System” (Fort Knox, KY: June 1, 2007). 16 “Common Language Marketing Dictionary.” 17...Linda Clingan, “US Army Custom Segmentation System.” 11 marketing teams face the harder-to-measure goal of “building awareness,” whereas the sales

  18. THERMAL CONTINENTALISM IN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APOSTOL L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of current climate changes, this article aims to highlight the continental characteristics of Europe’s climate (including a temporal evolution, regarding the multiannual thermal averages. For this purpose, 78 meteorological stations have been selected, placed approximately on two pairs of transects on West-East and South-North directions. The data were extracted from www.giss.nasa.gov (NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, statistically processed (Open Office and mapped (www.saga-gis.org. For the lapse of time 1961-2010, the analysis of multiannual temperature averages has shown the following: if the multiannual average temperature is strongly influenced by latitude, its deviations are more dependent on longitude; the multiannual average thermal amplitude, as well as the Gorczynski continentality index, are strongly related to longitude; their temporal evolution has shown a significant decrease in the Eastern half of the continent and an increase (although less significant in Western Europe.

  19. Women in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-06

    undoubtedly be included in the ultimate AFEES test package for future enlistees. The significance of this study effort, and ultimate value to the Army...FY. 2 2 PART 4 PROXOTIONS AND SELECTIONS Selection by. grade for promocion , command and advanced schooling are presented in this part. o Selections

  20. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  1. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting:...

  2. The continental lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to extract non-thermal signal from seismic tomography models in order to distinguish compositional variations in the continental lithosphere and to examine if geochemical and petrologic constraints on global-scale compositional variations in the mantle are consist......The goal of the present study is to extract non-thermal signal from seismic tomography models in order to distinguish compositional variations in the continental lithosphere and to examine if geochemical and petrologic constraints on global-scale compositional variations in the mantle...... are consistent with modern geophysical data. In the lithospheric mantle of the continents, seismic velocity variations of a non-thermal origin (calculated from global Vs seismic tomography data [Grand S.P., 2002. Mantle shear-wave tomography and the fate of subducted slabs. Philosophical Transactions...... of the Royal Society of London. Series A, 360, 2475–2491.; Shapiro N.M., Ritzwoller M.H. 2002. Monte-Carlo inversion for a global shear velocity model of the crust and upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International 151, 1–18.] and lithospheric temperatures [Artemieva I.M., Mooney W.D., 2001. Thermal structure...

  3. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  4. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Biological (CB) Protective Duty Uniform (STO) • Biometrics (SRO) • Nanoscience (SRO) • Millimeter Wave Material and Dissemination Technology... Biometrics and Nanoscience SROs will enable the development of advanced NBC detection and characterization systems, including the exploitation of biologically...Requirements Trailers • Procure HEMAT Trailers Figure K-23 K-19 //;<?. U.S. Army 1997Modernization Plan This final fleet assessment, made against the

  5. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    to improving the organization. The following are some effective methods and a compilation of techniques and considerations which have been used... improve your understanding of the environment. Outgoing Leader’s Assessment An important item to obtain from the current leader is a list of key contacts...The courseware allows users to tailor training materials to specific needs. Users access this at the CAL AKO website or Army eLearning https

  6. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Intrusion System (BAIS) (14.6 percent of the Army Acquisition Objective (AAO) of 8,933). Provides early seismic /acoustic warning, intrusion detection...The advanced affordable Turbine engine (aaTe), S&T Program developed and demon- strated two new helicopter turbine engines that provide significant...improvements in engine power and operating efficiencies. In FY12, the program transitioned to the Army’s Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP) to

  7. 2007 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Presidential Decision Memorandum (PDM) II OSA Study, the PDM III FCA/ LCA Study and the Joint JCA Analysis of Alternatives. Army senior leadership...control package and a new rocket motor . The M30 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) version of the GMLRS contains 404 sub-munitions...lbs, HE unitary warhead, a multimode (point detonating, delay and proximity) fuze capability; and insensitive munitions (IM) rocket motor , further

  8. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Fired at Fleeing Cars, Soldiers Say, WASH. POST, Oct. 12, 2007, at A1 (quoting Major General (MG) Joseph Fil , Commander of 1st Cavalry Division, as...saying, “It’s yet another challenge, another setback.”). 32 See generally id. (quoting MG Joseph Fil as saying in reference to the incidents of PSC...Prosecutors Research Institute 99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22313 (703) 549-9222 JULY 2008 • THE ARMY LAWYER

  9. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    profile cases of alleged misconduct” were symptomatic of “a much larger issue affecting the armed forces.”9 In the Associated Press, Lolita Baldor ...of-misconduct-among-high-level-military-leaders?lite (accessed January 02, 2013). 10Lolita C. Baldor , "US Army Brigadier General Jeffrey Sinclair to...Science: An Academic Discipline." Army Magazine, no. 5 (May 2005): 14-15. Baldor , Lolita C. and Michael Biesecker. "US Army Brigadier General

  10. 76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries... first-come basis. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates;...

  11. Southeast continental shelf studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1979-02-12

    Research efforts on the southeast continental shelf currently describe the manner in which fluctuations in Gulf Stream motion influence biological and chemical processes. Current meter arrays are maintained in the Georgia Bight and in Onslow Bay to describe general circulation patterns and to identify forcing functions. biological studies describe processes affecting temporal and spatial variations on the shelf and have attempted to track the biological history of intruded Gulf Stream water masses. Chemical studies examine the influence of both physical and biological variables on the distribution and fate of trace elements. The current state of knowledge is reviewed, the hypotheses developed and are described, a rationale for testing these hypotheses is given. 1 figure, 1 table.

  12. NSF Continental Lithosphere Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Michael; MacGregor, Ian

    For several months the Continental Lithosphere Program (CL) of the National Science Foundation has been subject to a major review. The process was stimulated by a series of budget setbacks over the past few years. Although Presidential budget requests have been very favorable for the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR), and there has been strong support within the National Science Foundation and Congress, actual appropriations by Congress have been disappointing.In each year the final allocation to EAR has been affected by external factors beyond the control of the Foundation. In the four fiscal years from 1986 through 1989 the factors include reductions tied to the Gramm-Rudman deficit reduction measures, congressional reaction to the October 1987 stock market crash, and two years of protection for the Ocean Sciences part of the NSF budget that was paid for from the budgets of the Atmospheric and Earth Sciences divisions.

  13. Army Training Study: Concepts of the Army Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    Combat Units. 1 March 1971. Harher, Robert A. and Coleman, Charlie C. Application of Simulation Training Exercises to Crisis Relocation Planning...product or outpit of the Army’s helth -. Ssinn. 0 ro)gram qM is a go example of hw pr hugra-. udgetinc’ is intro-. to work. The Army’s health care

  14. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    the integration with Army Enterprise Resource Planning systems. As a financial feeder system, ACWS will meet the compliance requirements of the...Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996. The system will meet the full scope of Army Contracting requirements, including those in secure and...business process efficiencies, support compliance with the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996, integrate with existing Enterprise

  15. Army Energy Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-08

    ultimate goal. Additionally, electric vehicles, scooters , and bicycles are being widely used for on-post courier, patrol and maintenance operations. Table 4...characteristics. b. Suspension systems. The Army has a new suspension system under develop- ment called the Loopwheel. This new experimental suspension will...200 200 COMPOSITE STRUCTURAL VEH COMPS AMM 2 6.2 AH84 100 0 0 LIGHTWEIGHT SUSPENSION COMPS AMM 0 6.2 AH84 300 350 250 SAMARIUM-COBALT GEN TECH HOL 3 6.2

  16. The French Army and British Army Crimean War Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Dawson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available French army logistics of the Crimean War are generally considered to have been better organized than their British counterpart. This sometimes erroneous belief was fuelled by letters home (from officers and men as well as by the reporting of various ‘special correspondents’ in the Crimea, and created an emotional response favourable to the ordinary soldier and, in particular, towards the French. This then became the basis for arguments for reform of the British army in the military and domestic press and in Parliament. Clamour for reform on French lines led to official studies being made of the French army, especially of logistics, officer education, and even uniforms. The French army, however, was little understood and the resulting ephemeral corps-style units (such as Land Transport Corps, Army Work Corps, and Mounted Staff Corps were quickly found faulty. In fact, official study of the French army often had little or no effect on the major reforms of the war. Emulation of the French was ultimately short-lived and of little effect; the favourable perception of the French was based on short-term emotional response and, indeed, the desire for army reform had its sting drawn with the establishment of the Roebuck Committee. Post-war retrenchment and success in the Indian Mutiny would stifle what was left of the reform debate.

  17. Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, J.D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

  18. The continental record and the generation of continental crust

    OpenAIRE

    Cawood, Peter Anthony; Hawkesworth, Chris; Dhuime, Bruno Philippe Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Continental crust is the archive of Earth history. The spatial and temporal distribution of Earth's record of rock units and events is heterogeneous; for example, ages of igneous crystallization, metamorphism, continental margins, mineralization, and seawater and atmospheric proxies are distributed about a series of peaks and troughs. This distribution reflects the different preservation potential of rocks generated in different tectonic settings, rather than fundamental pulses of activity, a...

  19. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  20. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army proposes to revise its regulations concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army...

  1. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is finalizing revisions to its regulation concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires non-Army agencies (including...

  2. Continental United States Hurricane Strikes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Continental U.S. Hurricane Strikes Poster is our most popular poster which is updated annually. The poster includes all hurricanes that affected the U.S. since...

  3. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  4. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  5. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  6. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    feedback to learners . The level of rigor or challenge posed by all ix courses shows room for improvement, particularly courses offered entirely...The attributes represent the values and identity of Army leaders (character), how leaders are perceived by followers and others (presence), and...degree. Less than 10% attended a resident Army course, completed structured self-development, learned a foreign language , or engaged in other types of

  7. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  8. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries Advisory...: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates; renea-yates@us.army.mil or 571.256.4325. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  9. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Colonel, U.S. Army Director , Center for the Army Profession and Ethic NOTICES DISTRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this...Army leaders regarding the effectiveness of policies and practices intended to inspire and motivate Army professionals to “live by and uphold the Army...FY17/18 AA – OP theme, One Army, Indivisible. Assessment of the State of the Army Profession assists Senor Army leaders in understanding the effects

  10. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army lea

  11. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army lea

  12. U.S. Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Excerpt-3 Building partnerships through military medicine Tripler Army Medical Center assists in medical missions. Read more ... their age, height, and weight. Healthy Living Videos Army Medicine Health Minute View More Videos

  13. Green Remediation: Army Policy and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    treated on-site within a contained asphalt- lined former pH control pond and treated in 300 yard increments – Caustic soda was evenly spread on soil...Army installations and FUDS.  The examples presented are not representative of all Army efforts 11 Energy Example Former Nebraska Ordnance Plant ...Daugherty, mark.e.daugherty@us.army.mil 15 Land and Ecosystems Example #2 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant (Excess) Cleanup Objective: Treat soil

  14. Enhancing Army Joint Force Headquarters Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ad hoc (Army) 2004–2005 MNSTC-I SSTR CENTCOM Ad hoc (Army) 2004-2005 JTF-G8/ DNC /RNC HD/CS NORTHCOM Ad hoc (Army) x 3 2004 JTF-515 SSTR PACOM 2004...AFIC = Armed Forces Inaugural Committee; CENTCOM = Central Command; DNC = Democratic National Committee; EUCOM = European Command; FSSG = Fleet

  15. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Developing Talent, (Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College, March 2010), 4-6...16 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Employing Talent, (Carlisle

  16. Army Science Board 1991 Summer Study - Army Simulation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    May 91, Mr. C. Hatfield, Lawrence Livermore Labor atory JANUS-Technology, 29 May 91, Mr. Paul Herman , Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Aviation...Development, 30 May 91, Mr. Mansur , US Army, Aviation Systems Command Crew Station Research and Development Facility Briefing and Demonstration, 30 May

  17. Full Spectrum Army Officer Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Colonel Ronda G. Urey Department of Military...Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Edwards, Jr. United States Army Colonel Ronda G. Urey Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in

  18. A Mobile Army of Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    their cultural position(s). The following scholars have agreed to participate the event: Pawel Grabarczyk (“Games Within Games: How to Properly Individuate Game Modes?”), Stefano Gualeni (“Augmented Ontologies and Games”), Jesper Juul: (“A Mobile Army of Ontologies”), Veli-Matti Karhulahti (“Videogame...

  19. Male parentage in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    of active research in insect sociobiology. Here we present microsatellite data for 176 males from eight colonies of the African army ant Dorylus (Anomma) molestus. Comparison with worker genotypes and inferred queen genotypes from the same colonies show that workers do not or at best very rarely reproduce...

  20. The Army Needs More Patriots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    the 10th AAMDC by at least 48% to account for requirements to perform Brigade headquarters functions, maintaining AAMDC TAC forward deployed and...Program (MCTP), US Army Combined Arms Center ( CAC ), Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, can coordinate with AAMDCs to send a senior AMD officer to attend unit

  1. Index to Army Times 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Times; Jan. 28, 1991; 51(26): p. 10. DEFENSE OUTPLACEMENT REFERRAL SYSTEM (DORS) Service to find the right desk for your resume. Army Times; Oct. 28...DEPENDENT SCHOOLS (DODDS) DORS SEE DEFENSE OUTPLACEMENT REFERRAL SYSTEM (DORS) DOUBLE DIPPING SEE RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL--DUAL COMPENSATION 0 38 DRAGON

  2. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  3. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...@us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41 CFR 102-3.105(j) and 102-...

  4. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  5. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  6. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  7. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  8. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... ] Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122...

  9. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open- meeting rules. FOR... Designated Federal Officer: ATFL- APO, Monterey, CA, 93944, Robert.Savukinas@us.army.mil , (831)...

  10. Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-30

    Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNL’s established renewable resource assessment methodology.

  11. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Army Net Zero Training Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    reclaim system does not enable Fort Carson to achieve its net zero water goal, which is to reclaim water through the WWTP equal to or greater than the...Class A Recycled Water Plant WWTP rapid infiltration basin #1 (of 4) 426,000 gal water supply storage reservoir Primary Lagoon for WWTP 6 7...cost of water = Longer time to payback  Double charged for incoming and outgoing  Army owned WWTP – true cost of water = water/sewer rates It

  12. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    as the province of practitioners of a profession. For a fiduciary relationship , a profession manifests when the nature of the services provided...9. 94 “5 CFR 2636.305 - Compensation and Other Restrictions Relating to Professions Involving a Fiduciary Relationship ,” linked from The Legal...operations.9 The symbiotic relationship and necessity for Army civilians is apparent in generating land combat power and providing support for

  13. Lithospheric structure and continental geodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许忠淮; 石耀霖

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews main progress in the research on lithospheric structure and continental geodynamics made by Chinese geophysicists during last 4 years since 22nd IUGG general assembly in July 1999. The research mainly covers the following fields: investigations on regional lithospheric structure, DSS survey of crust and upper mantle velocity structure, study on present-day inner movement and deformation of Chinese mainland by analyzing GPS observations, geodynamics of Qingzang plateau, geophysical survey of the Dabie-Sulu ultra-high pressure metamorphic belt and probing into its formation mechanism, geophysical observations in sedimentary basins and study on their evolution process, and plate dynamics, etc.

  14. Army Planning: Comprehensive Risk Assessment Needed for Planned Changes to the Armys Force Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    focus on retaining combat units, and senior Army leaders ’ assessment that shortfalls in combat units are more challenging to resolve than shortfalls in...According to the Army, this reduction will require reductions of both combat and supporting units. Army leaders reported that reducing the Army to...such levels creates significant but manageable risk to executing the U.S. military strategy and that further reductions would result in unacceptable

  15. Army Independent Risk Assessment Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    AMSAA Kadry Rizk, TARDEC Lisa Graf, TARDEC Klaus Sanford, TRAC Elyse Krezmien, TRAC Jerry Scriven, ALU Igor Linkov, ERDC Alison Tichenor...Engineering ATEC - Army Test and Evaluation Command BCA - Business Case Analysis C - Consequence Level C- BA - Cost Benefit Analysis CDD...the AMSAA Risk Team has completed 12 technical and schedule risk assessments to support AoAs and Cost-Benefit Analyses (C- BAs ). AMSAA also developed

  16. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  17. Plain English for Army Lawyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    TELEPHONE (Include Arta Code) 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL Judy CI irk 207-475.1Ull I FA-AR 0D FRM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted SE CURITY...instructions during courts- martial . Contractors and contracting officers outdo each other in blaming lawyers for problems that crop up in Government...of legal practice -- from courts- martial to client services and from business transac- tions to administrative regulations. Although Army clients may

  18. Information Management: Army Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    commander is the franchising authority. When appropriate, the installation commander may designate a non-appropriated fund instrumentality (NAFI) to be...the franchising authority. Overall staff management of CATV is the responsibility of the DISC4 at the Army level and will be executed at the local level...installations are cable television franchising authorities for the purpose of the applicable cable televisions laws. As a result, installations may

  19. Management: Total Army Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-15

    meet current and future customer needs . 3–2. Strategic planning a. Strategic planning is the process by which managers at higher levels envision their...framework for all Army organizations to measure how well they are meeting their stated goals and customer needs . It provides a systematic review that...business. (2) Customer-Driven – The organization’s focus is on its customers – ensuring its operations meet customer needs in the most efficient manner

  20. Considering a Cadre Augmented Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    division equivalents (HDEs) of Abrams tanks in the first year of ____________ 101 Dewar et al (2000), p. 59 102 Dewar et al (2000), p. 61 -200- An...Reserves and the Abrams Doctrine: Unfulfilled Promise, Uncertain Future,” Heritage Foundation Lecture, April 18, 2005. Carey, Benedict, “Stress on Troops... Floyd H., The Standby Reserve Training Corps: An Alternative Mobilization Manpower Policy, Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA, 1985. Dupuy

  1. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    New success indicators are all definable, measurable, and achievable MAY 200918 of 29 Emerging Issues  Emerging contaminants  MMRP progress  NCP...programmatic expectations  NDNODS  Operational range program  Vapor Intrusion MAY 200919 of 29 Emerging Contaminants – Hexavalent Chromium...regulatory standards  Several emerging contaminants have been assessed and judged to have a significant potential impact to Army cleanup programs

  2. Army Training Study: Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    training: dis- tractors, turbulence, and availabilty of training support material. Results from a detailed breakdown of the respondents by rank, type of...report lower usage of Army regulations in training than do respondents in CONUS. Unit differences are noted only insofar as air defense artillery...specialities. Differences by rank are noted on each iteir with junior officers, senior NCOs and junior NCOs reporting higher usage in all areas than

  3. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  4. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-28

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) AWCF Army Working Capital Fund CIP Construction-in-Progress DCD/ DCW DFAS...Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ). The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA[FM&C]) is responsible for the policies, procedures...entity’s information to automatically populate that indicator. As a result, IFS did not send DCD/ DCW correct information for determining the

  5. The US Army Learning Concept for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    Pedagogy is still the right answer… • Learning on demand The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 Mobile Learning enabled by technology • Problem...The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 18 October 2012 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...SUBTITLE The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  6. Army Prisoner Population Prediction Study (AP3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Probability that a prisoner , serving his sentence, will benefit from clemency/ parole board actions. The probabilities that offenders will be...5-9 6-1 Non-Army Prisoners in Army Facilities ............... 6-3 D-1 Generation/Arrival of Offenders ..................... D-2 D-2...8 CHAPTER2 THE ARMY CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 2-1. INTRODUCTION a. In order to understand the flow of offenders into and out of the Amy’s prison system

  7. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    .... SUMMARY: On March 7, 2011 (76 FR 12508-12548), DoD published notice of approval of a personnel management... the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank Automotive Research, Development... 9, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: TARDEC: Mr. Gregory Berry, U. S. Army Tank...

  8. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the United...

  9. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Subgroup Report, Manning Army Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    VA 22314 (703) 751-2745 Major Brad Taylor, DCSP Military Staff Assistant Dr. Dan Risser , ARI Army Staff Assistant Dr. K.C. Emerson 560 Boulder...SINCGARS Meeting with DCSPER Mr. BradshawCAPL) Mr. Bennett(AMSAA) Dr. Risser (ARI) LtCol Abney LtGen Thurman 10 December, 1981 - The Pentagon...ASVAB Update Maintenance Data PM Trade BOIP/QQPRI/Div 86 Dr. Eaton(ARI) Dr. Risser (ARI) Dr. Hofer Col. Bettinger(SSC) 11 December, 1981

  10. Functional Study of CONUSA (Continental U.S. Army) Management. CONUSA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-05-01

    PRESENT REC~~~ ENDED DISPOSITION SUBFUNCTI(~ AL AUTH AREA FORCE D& TAREA STRENGTH CMD - GIlD CMI) ELDIINATE Command and Control 13 6 0 0 7 Plans and...Nonconinissioned Officers’ Academy (NCOA) 3-3e 3-10 Mobilization Planning 3-3f 3-10 DCSPER - Other Areas Surveyed 3-3g 3-12 Adjutant Genera l (AG) - Other...Maintenance 3-3q 3-22 Services 3-3r 3-23 • Procurement 3-38 3-24 Logistics Plans and Operations 3-3t 3-25 Logistics Management 3-3u 3-26 Military

  11. Composition of the continental plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilluly, J.

    1954-01-01

    The structures of continental plates and of oceanic basins suggested by several seismologists are utilized to estimate the relative volumes of sial and sima in the earth's crust. It seems that sial of the composition of the average igneous rock constitutes fully 26% and perhaps as much as 43% of the total crust. This ratio is far higher than seems likely if the sial had been entirely derived through fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. The relative paucity of intermediate rocks as compared with granite and gabbro in the crust points in the same direction. The tentative conclusion is reached that the sial owes a large part of its volume to some process other than fractional crystallization of basalt-possibly to the emanation of low-melting constituents such as water, silica, potassa, soda, and alumina directly from the mantle to the crust. ?? 1954 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  13. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers.

  14. Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497

  15. Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    General surgeon 61K Thoracic surgeon 61L Plastic surgeon 61M Orthopedic surgeon 61N Flight surgeon 61P Physiatrist 61Q Radiation oncologist 61R Diagnostic... veterinarian (immaterial) Branch 65, Army Medical Specialist Corps 65A Occupational therapy Table C.3—Continued 100 Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army

  16. Survey of Army Personnel Interested in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Demographic prof’de CurrentActive Army Personnel rent Teachers Actie - ifl~ = -Employment Active Actve Active Outside Army Officers Enlted Educaion Base: 607...Base: 607 345 206 301 1144 2380 0^ PA Desire to work with young people 71 69 70 64 70 78 Value or significance of education in society 69 68 68 75

  17. After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Arab region, and intercultural communication . She was previously assigned to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Defence College and the...and provides solutions to strategic Army issues affecting the national security community . The Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute...concern topics having strategic implications for the Army, the Department of Defense, and the larger national security community . In addition to its

  18. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  19. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  20. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply.

  1. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... informational purposes only. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams in the North Atlantic,...

  2. Aviation medicine and the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this short series of articles is not to present the reader with a vast amount of technical data, soon to be forgotten, but to provide some items of general interest from the past, present, and future of Army aviation. Obviously there will be a concentration on medical matters, but the aim is to give the reader a feel for the rapid progress being made in helicopter design and the likely problems we may face in the future. The first article serves as an introduction to the series and three further articles will cover various aspects of the speciality. The second will be concerned with AAC helicopter accidents and will include accident investigation, crashworthiness and the contribution made by pilot error. The third article will cover major environmental problems of helicopters, particularly noise, vibration and thermal stress. The fourth article will examine ways in which microprocessors and modern technology will affect future helicopter and ancillary equipment development; for instance, a helicopter with no external windows has been suggested, 'The Iron Cockpit'. The fifth article will be concerned with the clinical aspects of Army Aviation medicine.

  3. 32 CFR 651.14 - Integration with Army planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Integration with Army planning. 651.14 Section... the Decision Process § 651.14 Integration with Army planning. (a) Early integration. The Army goal is to concurrently integrate environmental reviews with other Army planning and decision-making actions...

  4. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  5. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August 10, 2011. Time(s) of Meeting: 0800-1200. Location: Newport News Marriott at City Center, 740 Town Center...

  6. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  7. Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 20052014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Army Publ ic Heal th Center (Provis ional Public Health Report Army Public Health Center (Provisional) Army Public Health Center (Provisional...Public Health Report Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 2005-2014 PHR No. S.0034370-14 Approved for public release, distribution unlimited...Disease Surveillance Portfolio Behavioral and Social Health Outcomes Program Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 2005–2014 Brent E

  8. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health ... required by Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 6055.12, Department of the Army Pamphlet (DA Pam) 40-501, and the Chief of Staff of the Army’s

  9. Getting it right: revamping Army talent management

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited U.S. Army officers face countless opportunity costs, especially at the mid-grade level, when deciding to stay in the Army past the ten-year mark of service. The scarcity of skilled labor in today’s economy makes it important that organizations, especially the Army, retain their human capital investment. This thesis suggests techniques to acquire, manage, and retain talent to ensure that the Army’s officer talent pool is not depleted. S...

  10. Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  11. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  12. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  13. Exploration of the continental margins of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Siddiquie, H.N.; Hashimi, N.H.; Vora, K.H.; Pathak, M.C.

    In mid 1970's the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India prepared a plan for systematic regional, geological and geophysical surveys of the continental margins of India. This involved over 75,000 km of underway (bathymetric, side scan sonar...

  14. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... Through a survey of the literature of published corporate business plans and models, military reports, Army depot case studies, and comparative analysis of emerging computer software technology...

  15. Principles of the continental copyright law

    OpenAIRE

    Matveev A.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that there are two key copyright law traditions: English–American and Roman–Germanic copyright laws. The French and German copyright law is in the vanguard of the continental copyright law, with the copyright law of Russia being among the others in this copyright law system. However, the Russian copyright law has some specific characteristics. Copyright law is based on the defined principles. The purpose of the present article is to define the principles Continental Copyright Law....

  16. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  17. Mechanisms of continental intraplate earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Abhijit Kumar

    To better understand the mechanisms of continental intraplate earthquakes, a multistep approach was used. The first step involved analysis and synthesis of multidisciplinary data from 39 intraplate earthquakes spanning 20 continental intraplate regions, to identify their characteristic and diagnostic features. This led to the following testable hypothesis: Intraplate earthquakes occur within pre-existing zones of weakness (most commonly failed rifts), in the vicinity of stress concentrators, such as, intersecting faults, buried plutons, and/or rift pillows in the presence of the ambient stress field. The next step involved testing this hypothesis---first with 2-D mechanical models and then with 3-D models. Since two-thirds of the examined intraplate regions had intersecting faults as a stress concentrator, its role was first evaluated. A Distinct Element Method was used wherein the models comprised of the structural framework of the concerned region represented by a set of rock blocks that are assigned elastic properties conforming to the known geology, and subjected to tectonic loading along the direction of maximum regional compression (S Hmax) at a rate similar to the ambient plate velocity. The 2-D modeling was performed for two major intraplate regions in eastern U.S., viz., New Madrid and Middleton Place Summerville seismic zones, using a commercially available code called UDEC. These models adequately explain the spatial distribution of current seismicity in the regions. However, the absence of the third dimension limited the observation of tectonics in the depth dimension. Thus, 3-D models were developed for these two regions using the 3-D version of UDEC, called 3DEC. The preliminary results of these models adequately demonstrate correlation of locations of current seismicity with fault intersections in 3-D space, and also duplicate vertical movements. Although, the mechanical models demonstrated a causal association of seismicity with intersecting faults

  18. Stratigraphic Modelling of Continental Rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondy, Luke; Duclaux, Guillaume; Salles, Tristan; Thomas, Charmaine; Rey, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Interlinks between deformation and sedimentation have long been recognised as an important factor in the evolution of continental rifts and basins development. However, determining the relative impact of tectonic and climatic forcing on the dynamics of these systems remains a major challenge. This problem in part derives from a lack of modelling tools capable of simulated high detailed surface processes within a large scale (spatially and temporally) tectonic setting. To overcome this issue an innovative framework has been designed using two existing numerical forward modelling codes: Underworld, capable of simulating 3D self-consistent tectonic and thermal lithospheric processes, and Tellus, a forward stratigraphic and geomorphic modelling framework dedicated to simulating highly detailed surface dynamics. The coupling framework enables Tellus to use Underworld outputs as internal and boundary conditions, thereby simulating the stratigraphic and geomorphic evolution of a realistic, active tectonic setting. The resulting models can provide high-resolution data on the stratigraphic record, grain-size variations, sediment provenance, fluvial hydrometric, and landscape evolution. Here we illustrate a one-way coupling method between active tectonics and surface processes in an example of 3D oblique rifting. Our coupled model enables us to visualise the distribution of sediment sources and sinks, and their evolution through time. From this we can extract and analyse at each simulation timestep the stratigraphic record anywhere within the model domain. We find that even from a generic oblique rift model, complex fluvial-deltaic and basin filling dynamics emerge. By isolating the tectonic activity from landscape dynamics with this one-way coupling, we are able to investigate the influence of changes in climate or geomorphic parameters on the sedimentary and landscape record. These impacts can be quantified in part via model post-processing to derive both instantaneous and

  19. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nikolas I.

    Nearly 80 years ago, Yugoslavian seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic recognized, while studying a Balkan earthquake, that velocities of seismic waves increase abruptly at a few tens of kilometers depth , giving rise to the seismological definition of the crust. Since that discovery, many studies concerned with the nature of both the continental and oceanic crusts have appeared in the geophysical literature.Recently, interest in the continental crust has cascaded. This is largely because of an infusion of new data obtained from major reflection programs such as the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) and British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) and increased resolution of refraction studies. In addition, deep continental drilling programs are n ow in fashion. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach is a summary of present knowledge of the continental crust. Meissner has succeeded in writing a book suited to many different readers, from the interested undergraduate to the professional. The book is well documented , with pertinent figures and a complete and up-to-date reference list.

  20. Continental crust generated in oceanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hayes, Jorden L.; Hoernle, Kaj; Kelemen, Peter; Everson, Erik; Holbrook, W. Steven; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Vance, Eric A.; Chu, Shuyu; Calvert, Andrew J.; Carr, Michael J.; Yogodzinski, Gene M.

    2015-04-01

    Thin oceanic crust is formed by decompression melting of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges, but the origin of the thick and buoyant continental crust is enigmatic. Juvenile continental crust may form from magmas erupted above intra-oceanic subduction zones, where oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath other oceanic lithosphere. However, it is unclear why the subduction of dominantly basaltic oceanic crust would result in the formation of andesitic continental crust at the surface. Here we use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American land bridge, which formed above an intra-oceanic subduction system over the past 70 Myr. We find that the geochemical signature of erupted lavas evolved from basaltic to andesitic about 10 Myr ago--coincident with the onset of subduction of more oceanic crust that originally formed above the Galápagos mantle plume. We also find that seismic P-waves travel through the crust at velocities intermediate between those typically observed for oceanic and continental crust. We develop a continentality index to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust globally. We conclude that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone--a process probably more common in the Archaean--can produce juvenile continental crust.

  1. Continental growth seen through the sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Delavault, Hélène; Cawood, Peter A.

    2017-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks and detrital minerals sample large areas of the continental crust, and they are increasingly seen as a reliable archive for its global evolution. This study presents two approaches to model the growth of the continental crust through the sedimentary archive. The first builds on the variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in global databases of detrital zircons. We show that uncertainty in the Hf isotope composition of the mantle reservoir from which new crust separated, in the 176Lu/177Hf ratio of that new crust, and in the contribution in the databases of zircons that experienced ancient Pb loss(es), adds some uncertainty to the individual Hf model ages, but not to the overall shape of the calculated continental growth curves. The second approach is based on the variation of Nd isotopes in 645 worldwide fine-grained continental sedimentary rocks with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter referred to as K. This dimensionless parameter relates the proportions of younger to older source rocks in the sediment, to the proportions of younger to older source rocks present in the crust from which the sediment was derived. We suggest that a Hadean/Archaean value of K = 1 (i.e., no preferential erosion), and that post-Archaean values of K = 4-6, may be reasonable for the global Earth system. Models built on the detrital zircon and the fine-grained sediment records independently suggest that at least 65% of the present volume of continental crust was established by 3 Ga. The continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the growth rate at 3 Ga. The period from > 4 Ga to 3 Ga is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (2.9-3.4 km3 yr- 1 on average), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated (and destroyed) at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (0

  2. Army Response Letter - signed April 27, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Army response letter regarding a request to elevate the decision of the New England Division Engineer (DE) to issue a permit to the Maine Department of Transportation to construct a marine terminal at Sears Island.

  3. Current and Future Army Resiliency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    organizational learning, Peter Senge , illustrates this point very well: “Organizations learn only through individuals who learn. Individual learning does not...downloads/CSF2Newsletter- Issue3.pdf, (accessed March 3, 2013). 11 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 496. 12 Casey, “Comprehensive Soldier Fitness,” 2. 13 Peter ... Senge , The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization (New York, NY: Doubleday, 2006), 129. 14 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 505

  4. Army Cyber Mission Force - Ambitions and Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    as part of the CyMF. This represents a departure from previous Army recruiting paradigms. Equally important as branding is the significance of...readdress branding , compensation, professional development and organization in order to increase the likelihood of success for the Cyber Mission Force...unique character traits that differ from the typical traits of Army enlistees. The research has further shown that compensation, branding

  5. Strategic Planning and Army Installation Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    program. The U.S. Army has adopted the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria for use in the ACOE program. Strategic planning is one of the...seven pillars of the Baldrige criteria. The Army has recognized that strategic planning is the key to the future. Strategic planning is the key to...and utilization of strategic planning . This paper examines through case study analysis several civilian communities and lessons learned through their

  6. Army JTIDS: A C3 Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Guerra , Director of Combat Developments, United States Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon for his sponsorship. Professor Donald A. Lacer and Professor...radio frequency band. This insures compatibility with civil Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), Military Tactical Air Navigation equipment (TACAN...LEBMNN~JORDAN ,AFGHNISTrAN ISRAEL, EGYPT SAD SUDAN SOUT)H YEMEN YEMEN ETHIOPIA Figure 22 The JSTARS Radar Platform data to Army fire support

  7. The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-10

    34 Ada " for Ada Lovelace (1815-1851), a mathematician who worked with Charles Babbage on his difference and analytic engines.9 Later in 1979, the HOLWG...OF ADA FOR ARMY MODELING BY COLONEL MICHAEL L. YOCOM DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for publie releases distribution is unlimited. 1% LF-, EC TE...TITLE (ad Subtitle) a. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling Individual Study Project 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

  8. Geological features and geophysical signatures of continental margins of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.

    and classification of continental margins are in general dependent on style of continental splitting, rifting, subsidence and their proximity to the tectonic plate boundaries, at times the margins undergo for modifications by sediment deposition and volcanic... by Deccan-Reunion hotspot volcanism and Bengal Fan sedimentation respectively. Volcanism has dominated on the western continental margin of India, thereby the margin had been turned into a volcanic passive continental margin, while eastern continental...

  9. Seismic probing of continental subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Xu, Xiaobing; Malusà, Marco G.

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution images of Earth's interior provide pivotal information for the understanding of a range of geodynamic processes, including continental subduction and exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks. Here we present a synthesis of available global seismic observations on continental subduction zones, and selected examples of seismic probing from the European Alps, the Himalaya-Tibet and the Qinling-Dabie orogenic belts. Our synthesis and examples show that slabs recognized beneath exhumed continental UHP terranes generally have shallow dip angles (100 km. Slabs underlined by a clear high velocity anomaly from Earth's surface to the mantle are generally Cenozoic in age. Some of these slabs are continuous, whereas other continental subduction zones are located above discontinuous high velocity anomalies possibly suggesting slab breakoff. The density of seismic stations and the quality of recordings are of primary importance to get high-resolution images of the upper mantle to be used as a starting point to provide reliable geodynamic interpretations. In some cases, areas previously indicated as possible site of slab breakoff, such as the European Alps, have been later proven to be located above a continuous slab by using higher quality travel time data from denser seismic arrays. Discriminating between oceanic and continental slabs can be challenging, but valuable information can be provided by combining teleseismic tomography and receiver function analysis. The upper mantle beneath most continental UHP terranes generally shows complex seismic anisotropy patterns that are potentially preserved even in pre-Cenozoic subduction zones. These patterns can be used to provide information on continental slabs that are no longer highlighted by a clear high-velocity anomaly.

  10. Army Transformaton: A View from the U.S. Army War College

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    71 4. THE ARMY THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS William F. Grimsley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 5...THE ARMY THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS William F. Grimsley “Who are you?" said the caterpillar. “I-I hardly know, Sir, just at present—at least I know...

  11. Army Working Capital Fund: Army Industrial Operations Could Improve Budgeting and Management of Carryover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    throughs of four Army depot maintenance operations to observe the work being performed and discussed with officials the causes for workload carrying...the preponderance of the Industrial Operations workload . Army Materiel Command (AMC) serves as the management command for Industrial Operations... automotive and Armaments Command LCMC mission of developing, acquiring, fielding, and sustaining ground systems, such as the Mine Resistant Ambush

  12. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Effective/Very Effective (AC, 2007-2009) Army Values Empathy Warrior Ethos Military Bearing/Physical Fitness Composure/ Resilence Mental Agility Sound...dependents ( children ) does not appear to have as much of an impact on morale, as 21% of Army leaders who indicate having no dependents report low or

  13. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed February 5, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reply to a letter from Mr. J. Charles Fox, former Administrator for Water requesting to review the proposed decision of the Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District Department of the Army (DA) permit to Vail Associates.

  14. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and thank you for your interest in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). ... This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) ...

  15. Bot armies as threats to network security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  16. French Extended Continental Shelf Mapping: example of new continental margin understanding offshore French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Walter; Loubrieu, Benoit; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Graindorge, David; Shipboard Party, Guyaplac

    2017-04-01

    Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Coastal States can extend sovereign rights over the natural resources of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles (M) if they can demonstrate that their continental margin extends beyond this distance from the coast. Article 76 of the Convention defines the continental shelf and includes geomorphological and geological criteria to claim such a shelf beyond 200 M. Since 2006, France has filed 7 submissions for a total of 10 distinct geographic regions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf that was established by the Convention to examine those claims, and make recommendations with respect to the justification of the outer limits of the continental shelf. To support the French submissions, a significant effort was employed in acquiring new marine geophysical and geological data and compiling existing data along the deep water parts of the continental margins offshore all the French overseas territories. In this presentation, we will discuss the example of French Guiana, where the data collected for the purpose of fulfilling the obligation under the Convention to submit data and information to the Commission within a 10 year time frame have led to new understanding of the transform continental margin and the Demerara Plateau located to the north of French Guiana and Surinam. In addition, the data collected for this purpose have led to new scientific questions and have encouraged new and enhanced scientific collaboration between French government organizations and the academic community. Follow up research and scientific cruises that will be presented in separate communications have addressed sedimentary processes including contourites, giant comet tail like depressions probably associated with the strong bottom currents observed along the continental slope and potentially related to pockmarks, as well as giant submarine landslides. Most recently, multichannel reflection and wide angle

  17. Reform of the Army Physical Disability Evaluation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-24

    that USAPDA currently falls under the Army Human Resources Command and not the Army Medical Command in that the medical department only provides...confusing to Soldiers, and leaves the impression that the Army ‘ underrates ’ disability in order to achieve fiscal savings.33 While that may not be the...Adapted from the PDES Review for the Commanding General, Human Resources Command as presented by the U.S. Army Physical Disability Agency, 3 July 2008

  18. Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    64 OPTIMIZING SUSTAINMENT OF ARMY SYSTEMS 6 Chapter 1 - Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems In a paradigm shift from...past 13 years. The result has been the erosion of perishable maintenance skills. The Army must develop the most effective plan to sustain these...communities to study and effectively manage Army sustainment . One effort is the development of Maintenance Steering Groups (MSG) to perform extensive

  19. Army Communicator. Volume 32, Number 2, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Engineering requires skilled leaders LTC Tony Roper 14 Update Telecommunications Systems Engineering Course MAJ Mark Thomson 16 The Paradigm shift in enabling...to 200 locations. Each TLA stack includes, at a minimum, an Army Security Router and an Intrusion Detection System or Intrusion Protection System...Security Center APC – Area Processing Center ARNET – Army Reserve Network ARSTRAT – Army Strategic Com- mand ASR – Army Security Router CIF – Central Issue

  20. Retaining Talent for Army 2020: Overcoming Institutional Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    Assignments for Leaders, RETAL, 8. 18 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, and Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for...Opportunities (Boston: Harvard University, 2011), 17. 22 32 Wardynski, Lyle, and Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for...www.hrc.army.mil/milper/11-282 (accessed March 14, 2012). 34 Wardynski, Lyle, and Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for

  1. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    National Guard 7% Army Reserve 2% of Soldiers have a hearing loss that requires a Fit-for-Duty (Readiness) evaluation: 1% Active Duty 2% Army...Reserve ARMY HEARING PROGRAM TALKING POINTS CALENDAR YEAR 2016 TIP No. 51-065-0817 2 BACKGROUND Hearing health in the Army has improved...over time, largely due to the dedicated work of hearing health experts. However, noise-induced hearing loss and associated problems have not been

  2. Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Up to 100 Rain Barrel Catchment Up to...US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals Richard J. Scholze Dick L. Gebhart H...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals 5a. CONTRACT

  3. The Women’s Army Corps: 1945-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    floor-length wool skirt, white silk blouse , blue tiara with gold thread embroidery, blue suede pumps, white kid gloves, and a finger-tip length blue...24, 33, 267 Army Uniform Board, 162, 260 chief, 64, 94, 162, 212. See also Blanch - Army Uniform Branch, 394 field, Col. Florence A.; Bryant, Col. Army

  4. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Utilization of Army bands. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a)...

  5. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of Army lands. 644.517 Section 644.517 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... and Improvements § 644.517 Clearance of Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance...

  6. Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    SPECIAL REPORT RDMR-AE-16-02 CERTIFICATION REPORT: ARMY AVIATION ALTERNATIVE FUELS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Dale Cox...NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS AN OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY POSITION UNLESS SO DESIGNATED BY OTHER AUTHORIZED DOCUMENTS. TRADE NAMES USE...COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6

  7. APPLYING PRACTICAL NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHIC INSPECTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ARMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    INSPECTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ARMY Stephan C. Zuber November 2016 Approved for public...release; distribution is unlimited. AD U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Enterprise and Systems Integration Center...are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by

  8. Training America’s Army for the Next Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Corte Madera , California: Waite Group Press, 1994), 28. 9 William W. Hartzog and Susan Canedy, "TRADOC: Moving the Army Into the Future," Army...Future. Corte Madera , California: Waite Group Press, 1994. Romjue, John, L. American Army Doctrine for the Post-Cold War. Washington, D.C.: U.S

  9. An Organizational Climate Assessment of the Army Contracting Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE...professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...13 dimensions within the area of organizational climate . This research analyzes the responses from active Army civilian and military workforce

  10. ARMY DOCTRINE AND THE PHYSICAL DOMAIN REQUIREMENTS OF STRATEGIC LEADERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    agencies and organizations outside of the Army for the physical domain concept design and research commitments in developing strategic leaders... organizations outside the Army offer an abundance of potential contributions to human performance capability development . Notes 1 Department of the...components of the human dimension for Army leader development as individuals move through a career from direct to strategic leadership. Using a qualitative

  11. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636.10... Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. Personnel assigned or employed at Hunter Army Airfield are required to register their privately owned vehicles within five days...

  12. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 5, September-October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    consumption during flight. During the colder seasons, sustainment packs included ther- moses of coffee or hot chocolate . During night opera- tions, they...divisions, he added the 89th Division and the 90th Division. [The National Army was a volunteer Army (almost analogous to today’s Army Reserve) that was

  13. Installation Management Command: Preparing Civilians for the Army of 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    resist change.55 “Walt Disney is credited with saying that “change is inevitable, growth is optional.”56 If we are to execute the best plan to...Management Command Regulation 350-1 (Washington, DC, U.S. Department of the Army, June 1 2010). 11 U.S. Department of the Army, The Army, A-3. 12

  14. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  15. Making continental crust: The sanukitoid connection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiyuki TATSUMI

    2008-01-01

    The average continental crust possesses intermediate compositions that typify arc magmatism and as a result it is believed to have been created at ancient convergent plate boundaries. One possible mechanism for intermediate continental crust formation is the direct production of andesitic melts in the upper mantle. Sanukitoids, which characterize the Setouchi volcanic belt, SW Japan, include unusually high-Mg andesites (HMA). They were generated by slab melting and subsequent melt-mantle interactions under unusual tectonic settings such as where warm lithosphere subducts into hot upper mantle. Such conditions would have existed in the Archean. Hydrous HMA magmas are likely to have solidified within the crust to form HMA plutons, which were then remelted to produce differentiated sanukitoids. At present, generation and differentiation of HMA magmas may be taking place in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc-trench system (IBM), because (1) HMA magmatism characterizes the initial stages of the iBM evolution and (2) the IBM middle crust exhibits Vp identical to that of the bulk continental crust. Vp estimates for plutonic rocks with HMA compositions support this. However tonalitic composition for middle-crust-forming rocks cannot be ruled out, suggesting an alternative possibility that the continental crust has been created by differentiation of mantle-derived basaltic magmas.

  16. InterContinental Cuisine for Charity 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Cuisine for Charity is one of the most important annual events for InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) hotels in Beijing. It is a good opportunity not only for chefs to showcase them-selves, learn from each other and improve their cooking skills, but also to show that we take care of our social responsibilities.

  17. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, F.C.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  18. 25 years of continental deep subduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG YongFei

    2009-01-01

    @@ This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of coesite in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal origin.This initiated a revolution of the plate tectonics theory due to intensive studies of ultrahigh pressure metamorphism and continental deep subduction.The occurrence of coesite was first reported in 1984 by two French scientists,C.Chopin and D.C.Smith,respectively.

  19. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  20. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.C. [Radiation Standards and Dosimetry Laboratory, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  1. Tectonics and melting in intra-continental settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Vogt, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Most of the geodynamic theories of deformation aswell asmetamorphismandmelting of continental lithosphere are concentrated on plate boundaries and are dominated by the effects of subduction upon deformation of the margins of continental lithospheric blocks. However, it is becoming increasingly

  2. Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics by month and summarized annually. Outer Continental Shelf consists of Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and...

  3. Tectonics and melting in intra-continental settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Vogt, Katharina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370618947

    2015-01-01

    Most of the geodynamic theories of deformation aswell asmetamorphismandmelting of continental lithosphere are concentrated on plate boundaries and are dominated by the effects of subduction upon deformation of the margins of continental lithospheric blocks. However, it is becoming increasingly appar

  4. Tectonics and melting in intra-continental settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Vogt, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Most of the geodynamic theories of deformation aswell asmetamorphismandmelting of continental lithosphere are concentrated on plate boundaries and are dominated by the effects of subduction upon deformation of the margins of continental lithospheric blocks. However, it is becoming increasingly appar

  5. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    clinically significant hearing loss: 4% Active Duty 8% Army National Guard 7% Army Reserve 2% of Soldiers have a hearing loss that requires a...Guard (ARNG) Data % Require Fit-for-Duty Evaluation 2.5% 6,000 / 241,256 Army Reserve (USAR) Data % Require Fit-for-Duty Evaluation 2.4% 3,117...STATISTICS FOR CY15 25% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing loss: 21% Active Duty 27% Army National Guard 28% Army Reserve 6% of Soldiers have a

  6. 2013 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    the Leadership Requirements Model and Leader Effectiveness Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan , 1975; Yukl, 2002) indicates followers...D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army. Eden, D. & Leviatan , U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure

  7. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  8. 78 FR 32183 - Importation of Avocados From Continental Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Continental Spain AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule; reopening... allow the importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding the Balearic Islands and Canary... vegetables regulations to allow the importation of avocados from continental Spain (excluding the...

  9. 78 FR 32184 - Importation of Fresh Apricots From Continental Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... From Continental Spain AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule... allow the importation into the United States of fresh apricots from continental Spain. This action will... of fresh apricots from continental Spain into the United States subject to a systems approach...

  10. "Work Hard, Fly Bight"——Today's Continental Airlines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2006-01-01

    @@ On June16, 2006, Continental Airlines celebrated the first anniversary of its daily nonstop flight from Beifing to New York. China's Foreign Trade exclusively interviewed Kwok Hing-Cheong, Chief Representative & Country Director-Continental Airlines, China. He talked about the developments, challenges and benefits of Continental Airlines in China.

  11. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.10 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in...

  12. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  13. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ...: 2010-119] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil... maximum daily civil penalty assessment. SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to... operations in the Outer Continental Shelf at least once every 3 years. This review ensures that the...

  14. Building A Better Force: Regular Army / Reserve Components Integration In The Army Chemical Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    capabilities. Today, these changes detract from the Army Chemical Corps’ ability to provide the required capabilities to the joint force commander to execute...structural changes , including the creation of the US Army Reserve Command (USARC) and elevation of the Chief of the National Guard Bureau (NGB) to a...will enhance the CBRN force’s capabilities, evolving threats, changes in operational requirements , and equipment modernization continue to energize

  15. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Mercado University of Central Florida Randall D. Spain U.S. Army Research Institute July 2014 United States Army...NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Mercado ; Randall D. Spain 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A792 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC and Subject Matter Expert: Joseph E. Mercado 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): As the U.S

  16. The Army’s Institutional Values: Current Doctrine and the Army’s Values Training Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    called Generation X, and the generation after that is being referred to as the Millennials . The current demographic makeup of the Army includes members...Fraternization, Code of Conduct Training, Character Development, Law of War, Military Ethics, Suicide Prevention, Army Family Advocacy, Alcohol and Drug...explains that by introducing height and weight 112 standards, raising PT standards, emphasizing training and education, and deglamorizing alcohol

  17. Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready. Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Disadvantaged Business Utilization, Department of the Army Price, Lee, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, PEO, Command Control Communications-Tactical...based on QDRs or future forecasts. Task Force ODIN was a successful rapid acquisition. It delivered a counter-Improvised Explosive Device (CIED...new build • Deliver 6 Lots of 250 a/c • IOTE using five AB3 aircraft in Mar 2012 • FRP decision planned for Jul 2012 • Development will continue

  18. Typology of Army Families. Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    22% Individuals ( Trainees , holdees, etc.) 101,000 13% The Army has approximately 100 different job titles, called Military Occupational Specialties...management trainee program. He received his draft notice, and he enlisted in the Army under the College/Officer C-ndidate School (OCS) program. His...not really like it there. TPhe neighbor s were, not very friendly, bu~t Betty has been trying to organize a block Clb I h U elt that she as gained o

  19. 2010 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Volume 2, Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    address uncertainty to face the challenges in Full Spectrum Operations (Nicely, Bryson, Aude, Keller-Glaze, & Vowels , in preparation). 21 3...Affective commitment is an emotional or attachment to the Army. Those strongly committed leaders identify with and enjoy working for the Army...Medical Command. Nicely, K., Bryson, J., Aude, S., Keller-Glaze, H., & Vowels , C. (in preparation). Preparatory Skillsets for Brigade Combat Teams

  20. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Sub-Group Report on Energy Needs of the Army,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    and solar. The goal for the year 2000 is to reduce the use of natural petroleum by 75 percent and to replace natural gas with synthetic gas ( syngas ...example, one * goal states that (by 2000) syngas will replace natural gas. The Army has therefore programed efforts to Implement syngas tech- nologies at...the reactor would run at full capacity to make up for shortages and to allow the Army to meet expanded needs. The AHSG notes that such systems resolve

  1. Estimating active Army and Army Reserve competition for high quality recruits with other military services

    OpenAIRE

    Demyanovich, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis concentrated primarily on the recruiting of high quality recruits for the period FY 1987 through 2d Quarter FY 1995. The U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command (USMEPCOM) data used contained sufficiently accurate figures on Active Army and Army Reserve accessions. The data appears to represent a relatively accurate historical record of the number of non prior service enlistments into the Military Services, with the exception of the Air National Guard and Ai...

  2. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-22

    of representativeness across the Army. The respondent sample closely approximated the population of the Army in distribution of component and gender ...be Europe 25 (56%), while the smallest percentages of high morale are reported in Korea (48%). Low morale is reported by 19% and 21% of...standards are types of behaviors that hinder trust by creating climates of perceived inequality . As expected, the display of favoritism is negatively

  3. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination.

  4. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples.

  5. Distance Education Findings for Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    operated by the U.S. Army Logistics Management College at Ft. Lee, VA was studied. The SEN student examination scores did not significantly differ...Baccalaureate Nursing Program Bollinger, M., Danon , N., Maddox, K., University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire School of Nursing Teaching approaches incorporated

  6. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... statements specifying that they have no financial or other interest in the outcome of the project. The..., or any protected natural or ecological resources of global importance. (g) Army NEPA documentation.../statement and also avoid extensive, time-consuming, and costly analyses or revisions. Project proponents...

  7. The Army’s Local Economic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    available to the general public. 6 U.S. Army Environmental Command, 2014. 7 James Hosek, Aviva Litovitz, and Adam C. Resnick , How Much Does Military Spending...Hosek, James, Aviva Litovitz, and Adam C. Resnick , How Much Does Military Spending Add to Hawaii’s Economy? Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND Corporation, TR

  8. Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

  9. Army Information Operations Officer Needs Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    helping with formatting the final report iv ARMY INFORMATION OPERATIONS OFFICER NEEDS ANALYSIS REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research...time.” One IO officer suggested the IPO try to get a access the database that has all the old APA reports archived as a way to look at assessment

  10. Army Reserve (AR) Educational Assistance (EA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army TRADOC Analysis Center Ft. Lee, VA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...Programs REAP: Reserve Education Assistance Program; MGIB-SR: Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve; SRK: Selected Reserve Kicker ; OFF: Officer; EM

  11. Army Reserve Accessions and Retention Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army TRADOC Analysis Center Ft. Lee, VA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...incentives, TRICARE, and TSP matching funds as opposed to large bonuses. – Provide small kickers to critical MOSs. 10 June 2008 29ARARA Brief to MORSS

  12. Automation impact study of Army training management 2: Extension of sampling and collection of installation resource data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; McCallum, M.C.; Hunt, P.S.; Slavich, A.L.; Underwood, J.A.; Toquam, J.L.; Seaver, D.A.

    1989-05-01

    This automation impact study of Army training management (TM) was performed for the Army Development and Employment Agency (ADEA) and the Combined Arms Training Activity (CATA) by the Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of the study was to provide the Army with information concerning the potential costs and savings associated with automating the TM process. This study expands the sample of units surveyed in Phase I of the automation impact effort (Sanquist et al., 1988), and presents data concerning installation resource management in relation to TM. The structured interview employed in Phase I was adapted to a self-administered survey. The data collected were compatible with that of Phase I, and both were combined for analysis. Three US sites, one reserve division, one National Guard division, and one unit in the active component outside the continental US (OCONUS) (referred to in this report as forward deployed) were surveyed. The total sample size was 459, of which 337 respondents contributed the most detailed data. 20 figs., 62 tabs.

  13. Moroccan crustal response to continental drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanes, W H; Saadi, M; Ehrlich, E; Alem, A

    1973-06-01

    The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic as a marine carbonate environment; that it was dominated by tensile stresses in the early Mesozoic, resulting in two fault systems paralleling the Atlantic and Mediterranean margins and a basin and range structural-depositional style; and that it was affected by late Paleozoic metamorphism and intrusion. Mesozoic events record the latter portion of African involvement in the spreading episode; late Paleozoic thermal orogenesis might reflect the earlier events in the initiation of the spreading center and its development beneath significant continental crust. In that case, more than 100 million years were required for mantle dynamics to break up Pangea.

  14. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  15. Sustainable Offshore Wind Potential in Continental Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, P.; Simões, T. (Tânia); Estanqueiro, Ana

    2010-01-01

    This study intends to depict the availability of the sustainable offshore wind energy for Continental Portugal and identify the preliminary areas for developing offshore wind parks. Two scenarios were performed to distinct the different offshore wind turbine prototypes assembled by the manufactory energy sector – bottom fixed and floating models. The results achieved until now indicate that Portugal has a very large potential for offshore wind deployments ready to be exploited, especial...

  16. Authigenic minerals from the continental margins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    phosphorites have been presumed to be sedimented plankton organic matter, fish debris, and iron-redox phosphate pump. Several workers investigated the genesis of sedimentary phosphorites occurring from Precambrian to Recent and proposed different...-phosphate sediments of the western continental margin of India showed that phosphate occurred as apatite microparticles that resembled fossilized phosphate bacteria and/or microbial filaments (Fig. 3). This established the prominence of micro- environments...

  17. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  18. Continental moisture recycling as a Poisson process

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    On their journey across large land masses, water molecules experience a number of precipitation-evaporation cycles (recycling events). We derive analytically the frequency distributions of recycling events for the water molecules contained in a given air parcel. Given the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, continental moisture recycling is shown to develop either into a Poisson distribution or a geometric distribution. We distinguish two cases: in case (A) recycling events a...

  19. Cyclic growth in Atlantic region continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Atlantic region continental crust evolved in successive stages under the influence of regular, approximately 400 Ma-long tectonic cycles. Data point to a variety of operative tectonic processes ranging from widespread ocean floor consumption (Wilson cycle) to entirely ensialic (Ampferer-style subduction or simple crustal attenuation-compression). Different processes may have operated concurrently in some or different belts. Resolving this remains the major challenge.

  20. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E.; Butterworth, Nathaniel P.; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth’s major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength-velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  1. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  2. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] ACTION: Request for information regarding support to Army Core Competencies... 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army requests information on science and technology...

  3. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  4. Continental emergence in the Late Archean reconciles early and late continental growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Nicolas; Coltice, Nicolas; Rey, Patrice

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of ancient sediments (Rare Earth Element composition of black shales, isotopic strontium composition of marine carbonates, isotopic oxygen composition of zircons) suggests that continental growth culminated around the Archean-Proterozoic transition. In stark contrast, the geochemical analysis of ancient basalts suggests that depletion of the mantle occurred in the Hadean and Eoarchean. This paradox may be solved if continents were extracted from the mantle early in Earth's history, but remained mostly below sea level throughout the Archean. We present a model to estimate the area of emerged land and associated isotopic strontium composition of the mantle and oceans as a function of the coupled evolution of mantle temperature, continental growth and distribution of surface elevations (hypsometry). For constant continental hypsometry and four distinct continental growth models, we show that sea level was between 500 and 2000 m higher in the Archean than at present, resulting in isotopic composition of the mantle and oceans, we show that a reduced area of emerged continental crust can explain why the geochemical fingerprint of continents extracted early in Earth's history was not recorded at the surface of the Earth until the late Archean.

  5. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  6. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  7. Reconstructing Rodinia by Fitting Neoproterozoic Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructions of Phanerozoic tectonic plates can be closely constrained by lithologic correlations across conjugate margins by paleontologic information, by correlation of orogenic belts, by paleomagnetic location of continents, and by ocean floor magmatic stripes. In contrast, Proterozoic reconstructions are hindered by the lack of some of these tools or the lack of their precision. To overcome some of these difficulties, this report focuses on a different method of reconstruction, namely the use of the shape of continents to assemble the supercontinent of Rodinia, much like a jigsaw puzzle. Compared to the vast amount of information available for Phanerozoic systems, such a limited approach for Proterozoic rocks, may seem suspect. However, using the assembly of the southern continents (South America, Africa, India, Arabia, Antarctica, and Australia) as an example, a very tight fit of the continents is apparent and illustrates the power of the jigsaw puzzle method. This report focuses on Neoproterozoic rocks, which are shown on two new detailed geologic maps that constitute the backbone of the study. The report also describes the Neoproterozoic, but younger or older rocks are not discussed or not discussed in detail. The Neoproterozoic continents and continental margins are identified based on the distribution of continental-margin sedimentary and magmatic rocks that define the break-up margins of Rodinia. These Neoproterozoic continental exposures, as well as critical Neo- and Meso-Neoproterozoic tectonic features shown on the two new map compilations, are used to reconstruct the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent of Rodinia. This approach differs from the common approach of using fold belts to define structural features deemed important in the Rodinian reconstruction. Fold belts are difficult to date, and many are significantly younger than the time frame considered here (1,200 to 850 Ma). Identifying Neoproterozoic continental margins, which are primarily

  8. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  9. Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martinón-Torres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Terracotta Army of the First Emperor of China is one of the most emblematic archaeological sites in the world. Many questions remain about the logistics of technology, standardisation and labour organisation behind the creation of such a colossal construction in just a few decades over 2,000 years ago. An ongoing research project co-ordinated between the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Emperor Qin Shihang's Terracotta Army Museum is beginning to address some of these questions. This paper outlines some results of the typological, metric, microscopic, chemical and spatial analyses of the 40,000 bronze weapons recovered with the Terracotta Warriors. Thanks to a holistic approach developed specifically for this project, it is possible to reveal remarkable aspects of the organisation of the Qin workforce in production cells, of the standardisation, efficiency and quality-control procedures employed, and of the sophisticated technical knowledge of the weapon-makers.

  10. Women in the Army Policy Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-12

    chondromalacia of the perfornmance-limiting conditions thait *eiulted from an 8-1%eek patella (21). hip or neck of femur stress fracture (20). sprains...by the Chondromalacia of patella 21 10 Hip or neck or femur stress fracture 20 9 apparent lack of heel stability inherent in ;he Army boot used Ankle...of the patella a miaieary training program on males and females Aveat Space wert also reported. Environ Afed 30: 562-566. 1979 Although the

  11. Army Aviation Operations in the Pacific Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    on any part of Libyan territory.”31 The deteriorating situation in the city of Benghazi triggered the first air action of the campaign as the French ...Gadhafi’s forces. Attack helicopters also had a role in the campaign with the British Army fielding the AH-64 Apache and the French providing their...number of armed vehicles, displaying the flexibility of helicopter operations in this particular theatre .36 A total of 22 Apache missions (49 combat

  12. US Army Cultural Obstacles to Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    leaders capable of building an organizational culture that promotes deep individual “ buy in,” are necessary to keep Army units committed and cohesive...Covey, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, (New York, NY: Fireside, 1989), 42. 19 Bass and Riggio, 4. 20 Ibid, 5. 23 21 Adapted from US...25 Author not stated, “Generation Y: The Millennials , Ready or not, here they come”, available from http://www.nasrecruitment.com/TalentTips

  13. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The second technology substitutes fatty acid monomers for styrene in unsaturated polyester and vinyl ester repair resins , while maintain- ing...U.S. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection...of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering

  14. Women in the Army: A Selected Bibliography,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    through their natural differentiation men and women unequivocally -. . affirm their brotherhood." Simone de Beauvoir The Second Sex , 1950. -... . a...worth: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1977. (Micro- fiche DDC AD-A 043 084) (The author argues that qualifications other than sex be used to...Performance at West Point: Relationships with Intelligence and Attitudes Toward Sex Roles." Armed Forces and Society, Vol. 7, Winter 1981, pp. 246-255

  15. Army Reserve Capabilities-Based Prioritization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-15

    journal databases such as JSTOR , ABI Inform, Proquest, and Emerald; syllabi for courses in strategic management and planning at Harvard, MIT, Wharton, and...methodology for prioritization. • Secure, database repository of appropriate bins, criteria or metrics for prioritization. • Reproducible...Prioritization PPBC/SRG Initial POM Database turned over to Army Budget TGM Issued ARB Final POM/BES Decisions Price/Rate Changes Other Fact-of-Life Changes

  16. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents...characteristics. ACHIEVEMENTS: A commercial dental X-ray film processor unit devel- oped and marketed by the Air Techniques Inc. Company of New Hyde Park, NY, was...has been designed which will increase the usefulness of the standard r. ubered containers. Prototypes will be procured during 2nd Quarter FY80. 83 D

  17. Army Air and Missile Defense. Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Peace/ Colombia Scenario " Features of this Future "* Spread of democracy eliminates risk of wars "* EU, China, Japan economic, but not political, U.S...multinational effort to restore order to Bogota, Colombia , led by the U.S. Army. This would follow extensive and debilitating urban conflict between...Egypt Civil War Scenario . Features of this Future "* Nation-states destroyed in several regions by overpopulation , environmental degradation, ethnic

  18. The U.S. Army Capstone Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    leadership.10 This strategic guidance describes a joint force that will be smaller and leaner , but will be agile, flexible, ready, and technologically...becomes a smaller, leaner force, it must take advantage of this war dividend and reinvest it in the future.39 These experienced leaders form the...enable assured mobility, vertical maneuver, strategic mobility, operational reach, and unmanned ground autonomy . These investments will enable the Army

  19. Global Demands: Limited Forces. US Army Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    space lot tirve. hence a rlassical moble defense is !uled out. in Eur ope, one finds not only a lack of geostrategic depth but also an understandable...fuel and ammunition require- ments, putting greater reliance on technology ; Clausewitz-like "friction" always diminishes expected performance...34 Moreover, as General Donald R. Keith has said, " Technology won’t save us if we don’t field it." 18 One serious drain on Army resources is POMCUS-prepo

  20. Army Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Investment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    with a substantial force multiplier by enabling preconfigured loads to be positioned on demountable cargo beds (flat racks ) that allow for increased...International Organization for Standardization (ISO) containers without flat racks . • Modernize Container Handling Units (CHU) with new procurement...theater. The standard CHU utilized on the HEMTT does not have an on board stowage capability. As HEMTT M1120s are cycled through the Recap 20 The Army

  1. Electronic Warfare in Army Models - A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Improvement Program (AMIP), Joint (Army, AF, Marines) EW Center, and SAGA (Studies, Analysis, and Gaming Agency) of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to identify an...Virginia, January, 1973. 5. Catalog of Wargaming and Military Simulation Models, 7th Edition, SAGA 180-77, Studies, Analysis, and Gaming Agency, Organization...snow/sleet. It can simulate nighttime with full moon and twilight , smoke and dust as they affect the target acquisition capability of an RPV-type device

  2. The United States Army 1996 Modernization Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Targeting-Air, Bi -static Radar for Weapons Location, Combined Arms Command and Control, Battlefield Combat Identification, The Army Combined Arms Weapon...Suppression system (BASS) and the Small Arms Protection system ( SAPS ), reducing weight of the removable armor paneling while providing improved...weapons. The effectiveness of biological warfare ( BW ) agents can now be enhanced through advanced biotechnology. Viruses may be made resistant to

  3. 30 Brigade Combat Teams: Is the Army too Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this...capacity. In order to increase the number of BCTs, the Army will have to increase its end strength. 14. SUBJECT TERMS simulation, Army...brigade combat teams, Army end strength, boots on the ground to dwell time ratio 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  4. [The army nurse, from hospital to overseas operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérot, Françoise; Saliou, Henri; Lefort, Hugues; De Rudnickl, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Assigned to French army teaching hospitals, the army nurse can be deployed on overseas operations in support of the armed forces. Experience in the treatment of casualties in life-threatening emergencies is essential, as is the ability to adapt and react. Designated on a voluntary basis, after some two years of working in an army teaching hospital, the hospital nurse receives training in the specificities of the theatre of deployment.

  5. A Review of the Army’s Modular Force Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and coordinating the schedules of busy Army stakeholders . Rickey Smith, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Army Capabilities Integration Center...and Terry Pudas at the National Defense University for their thorough reviews of this report and for their thoughtful sug- gestions , which were...formations found in the pages of the docu- ments cited in the bibliography. The project also hosted interim reviews with stakeholders from the Office of

  6. Technology and the Era of the Mass Army

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Gaetano Onorato; Kenneth Scheve; David Stasavage

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how technology has influenced the size of armies. During the nineteenth century the development of the railroad made it possible to field and support mass armies, significantly increasing the observed size of military forces. During the late twentieth century further advances in technology made it possible to deliver explosive force from a distance and with precision, making mass armies less desirable. We find strong support for our technological account using a new data set co...

  7. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1904 and Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 6055.12 require reporting of occupational hearing illness and...U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q3 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health Management System and provides a means for the installation Hearing Program Managers

  8. Professionalism and Leadership in the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Colonel Daniel F . Perugini U. S. Army Faculty Research Advisor Dr. John E. Bokel Dut&~Unaz~i :.4l The Industrial College of the Armed Forces National...profession, from patient care to command. Daniel F . Perugini 1992 Executive Research Project RS 3f Professionalism and Leadership in the Army Medical...Department Colonel Daniel F . Perugini U. S. Army Faculty Research Advisor Dr. John E. Bokel 4- I-orce 4Ls • ..... ’ /or The Industrial College of the Armed

  9. Know Before You Go: Improving Army Officer Sociocultural Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-04

    by Lieutenant Colonel James C. Laughrey United States Army Dr. Richard Meinhart Project Adviser This SRP is...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: IMPROVING ARMY OFFICER SOCIOCULTURAL KNOWLEDGE BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL JAMES C...LAUGHREY United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for Public Release. Distribution is Unlimited. USAWC CLASS OF 2008 This SRP is

  10. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army and Political Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    THE CHINESE PEOPLE’S LIBERATION ARMY AND POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION by LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE K. OSBORN, USA (What is the role of the Chinese ...People’s Liberation Army in the Political Socialization o f the Chinese People?) The hypothesis here advanced is that, except for a period during...the decade of the 1950’s, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has played a major role in the political socialization not only of those who

  11. Army Green and Sustainable Remediation: Policy and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    with caustic soda • More than 112,000 cubic yards of soil treated using alkaline hydrolysis • Total TNT/DNT mass removed is more than 75 tons...system • In-situ pilot study using bacteria to treat perchlorate in groundwater • Targeted species removal and use of native plants and grass seed...pump-and-treat technologies Aerial view of the Seneca Army Depot June 2010Army Green and Sustainable Remediation 13 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant

  12. Initiation of continental accretion: metamorphic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Conand; Frederic, Mouthereau; Gianreto, Manatschal; Adbeltif, Lahfid

    2017-04-01

    The physical processes involved at the beginning of the continental collision are largely unknown because they are transient and therefore hardly identifiable from the rock record. Despite the importance of key parameters for understanding mountain building processes, especially the formation of deep mountain roots and their impacts on earthquakes nucleation, rock/fluid transfers and oil/gas resources in the continental crust, observations from the earliest collision stages remain fragmentary. Here, we focus on the example of Taiwan, a young and active mountain belt where the transition from oceanic subduction, accretion of the first continental margin to mature collision can be followed in space and time. We present preliminary results and provide key questions regarding the reconstruction of time-pressure-temperature paths of rocks & fluids to allow discriminating between rift-related thermal/rheological inheritance and burial/heating phases during convergence. Previous studies have focused on peak temperatures analyzed by Raman Spectrometry of Carbonaceous Matter from the deeper structural layers exposed in the Central Range of Taiwan. In the pre-rift sediments, these studies reported a positive gradient from West to Est, and values from units. Cross sections and maps with high resolution peak temperatures are in process as well as pressure estimations to determine how the sediments were metamorphosed. In addition to this work, we report a few inherited temperatures in the 390-570 °C range, indicating recycling of organic matter from metasediments that recorded HT events, likely originated from higher grade metamorphic units of mainland China, which have been eroded and deposited in the post-rift sediments.

  13. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fractal behavior in continental crustal heat production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vedanti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of crustal heat production, which is the most important component in the elucidation of continental thermal structure, still remains a theoretical assumption. In general the heat production values must decrease with depth, but the form of decrease of heat production in the crust is not well understood. The commonly used heat production models are: "block model", in which heat production is constant from the surface to a given depth and the "exponential model", in which heat production diminishes as an exponential function of depth. The exponential model is more widely used wherein sources of the errors are heterogeneity of rock and long wavelength changes due to changes in lithology and tectonic elements, and as such exponential distribution does not work satisfactorily for the entire crust. In the present study, we analyze for the first time, deep crustal heat production data of six global areas namely Dharwar craton (India, Kaapvaal craton (South Africa, Baltic shield (Kola, Russia, Hidaka metamorphic belt (Japan, Nissho pluton (Japan and Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB, Germany. The power spectrum of all the studied data sets exhibits power law behaviour. This would mean slower decay of heat production with depth, which conforms to the known geologic composition of the crust. Minimum value of the scaling exponent has been found for the KTB borehole, which is apparently related to higher heat production of gneisses, however for other study areas, scaling exponent is almost similar. We also found that the lower values of scaling exponents are related to higher heat production in the crust as is the case in KTB. Present finding has a direct relevance in computation of temperature-depth profiles in continental regions.

  15. Crew coordination concepts: Continental Airlines CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Darryl; Morgan, Alice

    1987-01-01

    The outline of the crew coordination concepts at Continental airlines is: (1) Present relevant theory: Contained in a pre-work package and in lecture/discussion form during the work course, (2) Discuss case examples: Contained in the pre-work for study and use during the course; and (3) Simulate practice problems: Introduced during the course as the beginning of an ongoing process. These concepts which are designed to address the problem pilots have in understanding the interaction between situations and their own theories of practice are briefly discussed.

  16. Continental DC电动汽车

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    在“Greenpower Corporate Challenge”(2008绿色动力团体挑战赛)上,宾利向世人展示了他们的最新研究作品——Continental DC电动汽车。这款获得“Spirit of Greenpower”(最佳精神奖)的小型单座式电动车由Tom Hodgson、Andrew Conneely、Martyn Brookes等九名宾利汽车的年轻学员组成的小团队共同完成。

  17. Army Air and Missile Defense Network Design Facility (AAMDNDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides JTIDS network designs and platform initialization load files for all Joint and Army-only tests, exercises, operations, and contingency events...

  18. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... creativity, flexibility and adaptability throughout the Institutional Army, without creating a new organizational construct. 7. Committee's Designated Federal Officer or Point of Contact: COL David Trybula, david...

  19. Battling Bullying in the British Army 1987 – 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Wither

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the attempts by the UK MOD to eradicate bullying in the British Army. Although British recruits are not confronted by mistreatment that compares with the phenomenon of dedovshchina, the Army has struggled to eliminate incidents of bullying from the ranks, which have tarnished the image of the British Army. The article examines the nature and extent of the problem, the efficacy of official policy to combat it, and suggests reasons why bullying persists even in a long- standing professional army. It also seeks to provide instructive insights for those militaries of the successor states of the Soviet Union that are currently blighted by dedovshchina.

  20. INVENTORY CONTROL OF ARMY NON-COMBAT ESSENTIAL ITEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARMY EQUIPMENT, INVENTORY CONTROL , MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, SPARE PARTS, CONTROL SYSTEMS, TEST METHODS, MILITARY FACILITIES, UNITED STATES, WEST GERMANY, THAILAND, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, JAPAN.

  1. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas.

  2. Interview with Susan Morrisey Livingstone, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Logistics and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center - The Army Environmental History Project Interview with Susan Morrisey...The Army Environmental History Project ERDC/CERL M-07-1 March 2007 Interview with Susan Morrisey Livingstone, Assistant Secretary of the Army for...Environmental Quality," Work Item 6HF9K5, "The Army Environmental History Project." The technical monitor was John J. Fittipaldi, Army Environmental

  3. Developing the plate tectonics from oceanic subduction to continental collision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG YongFei; YE Kai; ZHANG LiFei

    2009-01-01

    The studies of continental deep subduction and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism have not only promoted the development of solid earth science in China,but also provided an excellent opportunity to advance the plate tectonics theory.In view of the nature of subducted crust,two types of subduction and collision have been respectively recognized in nature.On one hand,the crustal subduction occurs due to underflow of either oceanic crust (Pacific type) or continental crust (Alpine type).On the other hand,the continental collision proceeds by arc-continent collision (Himalaya-Tibet type) or continent-continent collision (Dabie-Sulu type).The key issues in the future study of continental dynamics are the chemical changes and differential exhumation in continental deep subduction zones,and the temporal-spatial transition from oceanic subduction to continental subduction.

  4. Deformation and seismicity associated with continental rift zones propagating toward continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovsky, V.; Segev, A.; Schattner, U.; Weinberger, R.

    2012-01-01

    We study the propagation of a continental rift and its interaction with a continental margin utilizing a 3-D lithospheric model with a seismogenic crust governed by a damage rheology. A long-standing problem in rift-mechanics, known as thetectonic force paradox, is that the magnitude of the tectonic forces required for rifting are not large enough in the absence of basaltic magmatism. Our modeling results demonstrate that under moderate rift-driving tectonic forces the rift propagation is feasible even in the absence of magmatism. This is due to gradual weakening and "long-term memory" of fractured rocks that lead to a significantly lower yielding stress than that of the surrounding intact rocks. We show that the style, rate and the associated seismicity pattern of the rift zone formation in the continental lithosphere depend not only on the applied tectonic forces, but also on the rate of healing. Accounting for the memory effect provides a feasible solution for thetectonic force paradox. Our modeling results also demonstrate how the lithosphere structure affects the geometry of the propagating rift system toward a continental margin. Thinning of the crystalline crust leads to a decrease in the propagation rate and possibly to rift termination across the margin. In such a case, a new fault system is created perpendicular to the direction of the rift propagation. These results reveal that the local lithosphere structure is one of the key factors controlling the geometry of the evolving rift system and seismicity pattern.

  5. Potential mechanisms of pore-fluid movement from continental lithospheric mantle into upper continental crust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chong-bin; PENG Sheng-lin; LIU Liang-ming; B.E.HOBBS; A.ORD

    2008-01-01

    Through integrating the state of the art scientific knowledge in different research fields, some potential mechanisms of large-scale movements of underground pore-fluids such as H2O and CO2 in the continental lithosphere were presented and discussed. The results show that the generation and propagation of porosity waves are important mechanisms to transport mass and heat fluxes from the continental lithospheric mantle into the lower continental crust; the generation and propagation of porosity waves, pore-fluid flow focusing through lower and middle crustal faults, aclvection of pore-fluids through the lower and middle crust, and whole-crustconvection in some particular cases are important mechanisms to transport mass and heat fluxes from the lower into the upper continental crust; heat and mass transport through convective pore-fluid flow is the most effective mechanism of ore body formation and mineralization in hydrothermal systems; due to heat and mass exchange at the interface between the earth surface, hydrosphere and atmosphere, it is very important to consider the hydro-geological effect of the deep earth pore-fluids such as H2O and CO2 on the global warming and climate change in future investigations.

  6. Army Warfighter Information NetworkTactical Increment 2 Procurement Quantity Not Supported for Future Army Forces (REDACTED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Increment 2 to enter the production and deployment phase of the acquisition process. The Army awarded an indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity...contract in March 2010 for the production of WIN-T Increment 2 equipment. Table 1 shows the Army’s organizations and responsibilities for the WIN-T...estimate the necessary Army units beyond the approved Army structure memorandum to cover the WIN-T Increment 2 production and fielding period

  7. America’s Army: Our Families Give Us Strength. Fiscal Year 2010 United States Army Annual Financial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    States Army Annual Financial Report The Army GF recognizes excess, obsolete, and unserviceable OM&S at a net realizable value of $0 pending...been addressed, to include logistics interfaces. The Army WCF recognizes excess, obsolete, and unserviceable inventory at net realizable value of $0...27,818,640 $ (4,654,388) $ 23,164,252 Legend for Valuation Methods: LAC = Latest Acquisition Cost NRV = Net Realizable Value SP = Standard Price LCM

  8. Multinational Force Integration: The ROK Army’s Integration With The US Army In The Vietnam War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    British 1st Armoured Division serving directly under I MEF.53 The coalition’s special operations command consisted of the special operations forces of...War, the US Army successfully integrated a foreign army into a multinational force under a unified headquarters, through a mix of formal and informal...then escalating into combat operations in 1965. The US Army operated with small teams of advisors under the Military Advisory Assistance Group

  9. The Army Metering Data Management System (MDMS): Using MDMS To Meet the Army’s Energy Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    strategies such as AEWCP, AESIS, and IMCP US Army Corps of Engineers Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville Meeting Army Energy Goals Policy...Planning AEWCP, AESIS, IMCP Program/Project Needs Assessment EACA, EEAP, REM, ESCO DES as Prioritized by Army Energy Manager ECIP,UESC,ESPC, ESP,UMCS,AMP...Management Campaign Plan ( IMCP ) Goals Energy Goals (EN) • EN 1 – Reduce energy and water consumption • EN 2 – Increase energy and water efficiency

  10. Continental cement trial burn strategy follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodford, J. [Gossman Consulting, Inc., Springboro, OH (United States); Winders, H. [Continental Cement Company, Hannibal, MO (United States); Constans, D.L. [Gossman Consulting, Inc., Peachtree City, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Continental Trial Burn strategy, presented at the 1995 BIF Conference, included the use of {open_quotes}data-in-lieu-of{close_quotes} from previous compliance testing conducted at the facility. Since the submission of the Trial Burn Plan and the 1995 presentation, Continental Cement has completed their two campaign trial burn. This paper will update the implementation of the Continental Trial Burn strategy. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Generation of continental crust in intra-oceanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Kelemen, P. B.; Everson, E. D.; Holbrook, W. S.; Vance, E.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of continental crust is still an unsolved mystery in the evolution of our planet. Although the best candidates to produce juvenile continental crust are intra-oceanic arcs these systems are dominated by basaltic lavas, and when silicic magmas are produced, the incompatible-element compositions are generally too depleted to be a good match for continental crust estimates. Others, such as the W. Aleutians, are dominated by andesitic melts with trace element compositions similar to average continental crust. In order to evaluate which intra-oceanic arcs produced modern continental crust, we developed a geochemical continental index (CI) through a statistical analysis that compared all available data from modern intra-oceanic arcs with global estimates of continental crust. Our results suggest that magmas from Costa Rica (100 have the least continent-like geochemical signatures. In these arcs the subducting plate is old (>100 Ma), not overprinted by enriched intraplate volcanism and the geochemistry may be dominated by slab-derived, aqueous fluids. We also found a strong correlation between the CI and average crustal P-wave velocity, validating the geochemical index with the available seismic data for intra-oceanic arcs. In conclusion, the production of young continental crust with compositions similar to Archean continental crust is an unusual process, limited to locations where there are especially voluminous partial melts of oceanic crust.

  12. Aeromagnetic data and geological structure of continental China: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Sheng-Qing; Tong, Jing; Ding, Yan-Yun; Li, Zhan-Kui

    2016-06-01

    We review the latest aeromagnetic geological data of continental China. We discuss the latest achievements in geological mapping and the newly detected features based on aeromagnetic data. Using aeromagnetic data collected for more than 50 years, a series of 1:5000000 and 1:1000000 aeromagnetic maps of continental China were compiled using state-of-the-art digital technology, and data processing and transformation. Guided by plate tectonics and continental dynamics, rock physical properties, and magnetic anomalies, we compiled maps of the depth of the magnetic basement of continental China and the major geotectonic units, and presented newly detected geological structures based on the aeromagnetic data.

  13. Organic acids in continental background aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbeck, Andreas; Puxbaum, Hans

    With a newly developed method aerosol samples from three distinctly different continental sites were analyzed: an urban site (Vienna), a savanna site in South Africa (Nylsvley Nature Reserve, NNR) and a free tropospheric continental background site (Sonnblick Observatory, SBO). In all samples a range of monocarboxylic acids (MCAs) and dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) has been identified and quantified. The three most abundant MCAs in Vienna were the C18, C16 and C14 acids with concentrations of 66, 45 and 36 ng m -3, respectively. At the mid tropospheric background site (SBO) the three most abundant MCAs were the C18, C16 and C12 acid. For the DCAs at all three sites oxalic, malonic and succinic acid were the dominant compounds. For some individual compounds an information about the sources could be obtained. For example the determined unsaturated MCAs in South Africa appear to result from biogenic sources whereas in Vienna those acids are considered to be derived from combustion processes. Oxalic and glyoxalic acid appear to have a free tropospheric air chemical source. The relative high amounts at SBO in comparison to Vienna can only be explained by secondary formation of oxalic acid in the atmosphere.

  14. Continental moisture recycling as a Poisson process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Goessling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available On their journey across large land masses, water molecules experience a number of precipitation-evaporation cycles (recycling events. We derive analytically the frequency distributions of recycling events for the water molecules contained in a given air parcel. Given the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, continental moisture recycling is shown to develop either into a Poisson distribution or a geometric distribution. We distinguish two cases: in case (A recycling events are counted since the water molecules were last advected across the ocean-land boundary. In case (B recycling events are counted since the water molecules were last evaporated from the ocean. For case B we show by means of a simple scale analysis that, given the conditions on Earth, realistic frequency distributions may be regarded as a mixture of a Poisson distribution and a geometric distribution. By contrast, in case A the Poisson distribution generally appears as a reasonable approximation. This conclusion is consistent with the simulation results of an earlier study where an atmospheric general circulation model equipped with water vapor tracers was used. Our results demonstrate that continental moisture recycling can be interpreted as a Poisson process.

  15. Seaweed culture and continental shelf protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przhemenetskaya, V.F.

    1985-07-01

    The initial impression that the resources of the oceans were limitless has been replaced by a more rational appreciation that everything has its limits, including the seemingly infinite resources of marine plant life. In addition, experience in California, Australia, China, Japan and Korea has demonstrated that depletion of seaweed resources for commercial utilization has a deleterious effect on the biocenotic status of the continental shelf. In view of this, many countries, such as Japan, China, Korea, the Philippines and the USSR, have embarked on aquaculture programs, in which seaweeds are cultivated on marine plantations. Successful developments in this direction should go a long way to preserving the natural ecologic balance on the continental shelf, and yet provide mankind with the resources of the deep. Many difficulties remain to be resolved before aquaculture programs become fully cost effective, one of which deals with the susceptibility of a monoculture to a given predator or disease. To that end, such programs necessitate the creation of well balanced systems that would support a variety of marine plant and animal life without an adverse effect on the desired crop. 4 references, 6 figures.

  16. A vision for a continental energy strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R. [Borden Ladner Gervais LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tobin, B. [Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP. Toronto, ON (Canada); Angevine, G. [Angevine Economic Consulting Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Fryer, K.; Martin, L.T. [Fraser Inst., Vancouver, BC (Canada)] (eds.)

    2008-02-15

    This paper presented a vision with respect to a continental energy strategy and the principles and goals that must underlie such a strategy. These principles include relying on signals emanating from energy markets to guide investment; limiting the role of government to that of ensuring that the policy and institutional framework is conducive to the development and operation of competitive and innovative energy markets; and ensuring free and open energy trade in energy commodities, both within the continent and with the rest of the world. The paper also identified a number of important factors that, would shape and condition continental energy development and trade. The paper provided an overview of the North American energy use and supply situation for the following resources: oil; natural gas; electricity; coal; nuclear power; hydroelectricity; geothermal energy; wind power; solar power; and ethanol. It also discussed the contribution of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) through increased natural gas exports. It was concluded that given the petroleum resources of the three countries and their increased value because of higher oil and gas prices, there was considerable incentive for Canada, the United States, and Mexico to streamline regulations in order to facilitate the efficient development, transportation, and use of the continent's energy resources in accordance with market conditions. 38 refs., 2 tabs., 21 figs.

  17. Analog Modeling of Continental Lithosphere Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingshofer, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Luth, S.; Beekman, F.; Cloetingh, S.

    2012-12-01

    Lithospheric-scale analog modeling sheds light on the consequences of decoupling within the continental lithosphere and along plate interfaces during continental collision. The model results provide valuable information in terms of strain localization, deformation of the subducting slab and the evolution and architecture of the overlying mountain belt and its topography. A weak layer has been implemented in three-layer models to simulate decoupling along the plate interface and at different levels of the lithosphere (brittle-ductile transition, entire lower crust, crust-mantle boundary). Additionally, varying the strength of the mantle lithosphere of both the upper as well as the lower plate regulated the degree of plate coupling. Plate boundaries were orthogonal to the convergence direction. All models emphasize that strong decoupling at the plate interface is a pre-requisite for the subduction of continental lithosphere. In addition, deformation of the subducting slab was found to be sensitive to the strength contrast between the subduction zone and the mantle lithosphere of the downgoing as well as the upper plate. As such, a low strength contrast between the plate interface and the lower plate leads to deformation of the subducting slab by thickening and the development of a shallow slab. Conversely, when the strength contrast is high, deep slabs evolve which undergo relatively less deformation. Furthermore, the level of decoupling in the downgoing plate governs how much continental crust is subducted together with the mantle lithosphere. Shallow decoupling, at the brittle-ductile transition, results in subduction of the lower crust whereas small amounts of lower crust are subducted when decoupling occurs at the level of the Moho. Weak plate coupling and a weak lower crust of the lower plate steer the evolution of mountain belts such that deformation propagates outward, in the direction of the incoming plate, by successive imbrication of upper crustal thrust

  18. The 1984 ARI (Army Research Institute) Survey of Army Recruits: Codebook for October 84/February 85 Active Army Survey Respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    TOOK/PASS IN HIGH SCHOOL:COMPUTR SCI 202 T198E TOOK/PASS IN HIGH SCHOOL:INTRMED ALGBRA 203 T198F TOOK/PASS IN HIGH SCHOOL:TRIGONOMETRY 204 T198G TOOK...OCTOBER 84/FEBRUARY 85 ACTIVE ARMY SURVEY RESPONDENTS WHEN DO YOU REGULARLY WATCH TV DURING THE WEEKEND -- SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS? T233C - EARLY EVENING...I PERCENTI VALUE I MEANING 81 0.71 NO RESPONSE 2418 . D QUESTION NOT ON SURVEY 857 77.5 0 NOT CHECKED 241 21.8 1 CHECKED - EARLY EVENING --- 6PM TO

  19. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  20. A quantification of the physiological demands of the army emergency responder in the Australian army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofari, Paul J; Laing Treloar, Alison K; Silk, Aaron J

    2013-05-01

    The Australian Defence Force is reviewing the physical demands of all employment categories in the Australian Army to establish valid and legally defensible assessments. The current assessments, performed in physical training attire, are not specific to job demands. Moreover, the fitness standards decrease based on age and are lower for females, and as job requirements are constant, these assessments are counterintuitive. With regard to the Army Emergency Responder employment category, tasks of physical demand in the present study were selected through consultation with subject-matter experts. Participants consisted of 10 qualified Army Emergency Responder soldiers and three noncareer firefighters under instruction. Real-life firefighting scenarios were witnessed by researchers and helped form task simulations allowing measurement of heart rate and oxygen consumption. Peak oxygen consumption ranged from 21.8 ± 3.8 to 40.0 ± 3.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1) during cutting activities and a search and rescue task, respectively, representing values similar to or higher than the current entry standards. Manual handling tasks were also assessed, with the heaviest measured being two soldiers lifting a 37.7-kg Utility Trunk to 150 cm. The findings provide a quantitative assessment of the physiological demands of Army Emergency Responders, and highlight the need for change in current fitness assessments.

  1. The Rift between the Army National Guard and the Active Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Behavioral and Social Sciences, December 1988), 48. 16 Ibid., 59. 17 Bettina A. Babbitt , Essex Corporation and Charles 0. Nystrom, U.S. Army Research...Sciences, June 1989) 209. 40 BIBLIOGRAPHY Babbitt , Bettina A., and Nystrom, Charles 0., Questionnaire Construction Manual, Research Product 89-20

  2. Army Posture Statement: A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    decentralized, adaptive, creative and deadly enemy. The Army’s generating force, which prepares, trains, educates and supports Army forces worldwide, is also...Life Consultant MOUT Military Operations in Urban Terrain MRAP Mine-Resistant, Ambush- Protected MRE Mission Readiness Exercise MRT Master Resiliency

  3. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    .... Purpose: Hear the preliminary findings of the Strategic Directions for Army Science and Technology and vote on adoption. Proposed Agenda: Open Session, the ASB will hear preliminary findings of the Strategic Directions for Army Science & Technology study and vote on adoption. FOR FURTHER...

  4. Rear Area Security In The Field Army Service Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    his ma.jor subordinate Commanders, the arm support brigade commander. Rear are? ecurity doctrine requires the area coriander to coordin- ate unit...field army service area. Response The army support brigade coriander conducts phase I rear area security operations within the limits of current

  5. An Army in Transition: Maintaining the Competitive Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    leaders attempt to create a culture that promotes trust and the innovation sought after by the 21st Century Army. Hofstede defined the dimension of...SUBJECT TERMS Innovation, Adaptability, Creativity, Agile, Culture , Trust 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UNLIMITED...Adaptability, Creativity, Agile, Culture , Trust CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified The United States Army still remains the most powerful land

  6. Rapid Acquisition of Army Command and Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    requirements documents, and sustainment structures of existing programs to choreograph rapid initiation of a concept and ensure its fielding and...manner of choreographing the transition to the Army from DARPA. The establishment of CDRT in 2004 indicated that senior leaders in the Army were aware of

  7. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed January 19, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    A response to the letter, which requested a review of the proposed decision by the Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District to issue four Department of the Army permits to Baltimore County (3 permits) and Anne Arundel County (1 permit), MD.

  8. Soldier Education in the British Army, 1920-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys the history of compulsory education for soldiers' career advancement in the British army. It begins with an examination of the organizational context before analyzing the rationale, syllabus, teaching and assessment of soldier education. It concludes that for members of the army education organization their self-perception as…

  9. Can the Army Become a Learning Organization? A Question Reexamined

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    tions (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1957), 7–17. 20 Marilyn Darling, Charles Parry, and Joseph Moore, “Learning in the Thick of It,” Harvard...U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Pamphlet 525–3–7–01, The U.S. Army Study of the Human Dimension of the Future (Fort Monroe , VA: Department

  10. USACE Environmental Support to the Army and the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Environmental Workload $1.9B Obligations (M) Army IRP/MMRP $164 Army EQ $189 AF IRP/MMRP $208 AF EQ $103 Superfund $312 FUSRAP $152 FUDS $457 BRAC ER...Federal Agencies •Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program ( FUSRAP ) •Defense State Memorandum of Agreement (DSMOA) 5 BUILDING

  11. The Culminating Point and U.S. Army Tactical Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-18

    at the tactical level. 16 SECTION III CONTEMPORARY USE AND FUTURE APPLICABILITY Forewarned, forearmed; to be prepared is half the victory. Miguel de... Cervantes U.S ARMY CONTEMPORARY USE OF TACTICAL CULMINATION The U.S. Army has been actively attempting to address the ramifications of culmination at

  12. Army Drawdown and Restructuring: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to a...35 Vago Muradian, “Odierno Pushes BCT Revamp, 4 Must-Have Programs, Army Times, October 29, 2012. 36 Sebastian Sprenger, “Draft Army

  13. New Initiatives in the Army Green Procurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Symbol/(703) XXX - XXX (DSN XXX ) / email address Date-Time-GroupSECURITY CLASSIFICATION HERE New Initiatives in the Army Green Procurement Program Army...Program (GPP) Strategy will accompany the policy memo Slide 3 of 5Name/Office Symbol/(703) XXX - XXX (DSN XXX ) / email address Date-Time-GroupSECURITY

  14. Army Logistician. Volume 39, Issue 2, March-April 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    With over 90 fixed interrogators at key nodes throughout Iraq and the availability of the upgraded Standard Army Retail Sup- ply System (SARSS) at...not change or supersede official Army publications. The masculine pronoun may refer to either gender. Reprints: Articles may be reprinted with

  15. Closing the Candor Chasm: The Missing Element of Army Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    BIBLIOGRAPHY Baldor, Lolita C. “Army Chief Sees Greater Role for Guard and Reserves.” Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. January 27, 2012. hampton- roads.com/2012/01...20. 41. Lolita C. Baldor, “Army Chief Sees Greater Role for Guard and Reserves,” Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, January 27, 2012; Budget Control Act of

  16. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 6, November-December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Joseph L. Bass Commanding General Army Expeditionary Contracting Command Major General James K. Gilman Commanding General Army Medical Research and...administration, optical fabrication, laboratory services, preventive medicine, dentistry , medical operations and planning, evacuation, and practical nursing...advantage of a lot of lessons learned from previous deployments,” said Brigadier General Joseph L. Bass, commanding general of the ECC. “We

  17. Army Corps of Engineers: Water Resource Authorizations, Appropriations, and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Army Corps of Engineers: Water Resource Authorizations, Appropriations, and Activities Nicole T. Carter Specialist in Natural Resources Policy...of Engineers: Water Resource Authorizations, Appropriations, and Activities Congressional Research Service Summary The U.S. Army Corps of...congressional attention because its water resource projects can have significant local and regional economic benefits and environmental effects

  18. U. S. Army Directory of Technical Information Holdings and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Dale L.

    The directory identifies 111 Army sources of technical information that include 2200 specialized subject areas. The sources are indexed by subject matter, and name of holding, so that a searcher can find a description of all available indexed Army information services, with details on scope and size of collections, services available, and means of…

  19. US Army Medical Department Journal, April-June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    793. AUTHOR: 12. Bailit M, Dyer MB. Beyond bankable dollars: Establishing a business tMedical Corps, U.S. Army. Lieutenant Colonel Rice is an...Available at http://www.emwf.org/usr _ d o / Care Administration and is assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Medical Bailitbeyond bankable

  20. Soldier Capability - Army Combat Effectiveness (SCACE). Volume 2. Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Ground, MD: US Army Human Engineering Laboratories, 1964. 228. Highsmith , Raymond Carl. Proposed Measures of Effectiveness for Human Resource Availability...A079Z33. Washington: US Army Personnel Research Office, April 1964. 564. Thomas, Patricia J., and Thomas E. D. School Validation of theBasic Test Battery

  1. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    management to develop effective internal controls over its financial reporting process. The Circular requires that agencies document the business ...Indianapolis correct these control deficiencies, there is considerable risk that the AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army...deficiencies, there is considerable risk that the AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army will not achieve audit readiness by

  2. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R C; Stein, M B; Bliese, P D; Bromet, E J; Chiu, W T; Cox, K L; Colpe, L J; Fullerton, C S; Gilman, S E; Gruber, M J; Heeringa, S G; Lewandowski-Romps, L; Millikan-Bell, A; Naifeh, J A; Nock, M K; Petukhova, M V; Rosellini, A J; Sampson, N A; Schoenbaum, M; Zaslavsky, A M; Ursano, R J

    2015-11-01

    Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2-39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2-22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-1.8). Adjustment for a differential 'healthy warrior effect' cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk.

  3. Army Leadership. Competent, Confident, and Agile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    in desert camouflage patterns. While some peacetime fieldings may take 18 to 24 months to complete, the two logistic leaders set an ambitious goal...London: Octopus Books, 1974), 98- 111. Department of Veterans Affairs: casualty numbers. 4-4 4-10 “There is a great deal…”: George S. Patton, Jr., War...KS: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Press, 1997. Taylor, A. J. P. and S. L. Mayer. History of World War II. London: Octopus Books, 1974

  4. Army Transformation: Navigating into the Blue Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    posed by the Domino Theory.7 Since 2004, the MA is embarking on a transformation program known as the ‘Army 2 10 plus 10’. General Tan Sri Dato ’ Sri... based political parties, lost its two-third majority in the federal parliament for the first time in history and was ousted as the ruling party in four...within the military or civilian community they are based , at a larger and more significant scale. The MA may consider allowing organizational

  5. WAR ELEPHANTS IN THE PYRRHUS' ARMY

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In the IIIrd century BC king of Epirus Pyrrhus has used Indian elephants in his army. These animals have been brought to his forces from Ptolemy Thunderbolt. These beasts came to Europe with Seleucus Nicator and took part in many battles between the Diadochi in Asia. Pyrrhus has used them in Italian campanign and he was the first who had brought these animals to Italy. They became the first elephants which terrified Romans and were the first elephants which have been defeated by them. This wa...

  6. Korean War Logistics Eighth United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-09

    from defensive to offensive, as CINCUNC directed it to attack north to Pyongyang, capital city of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (OPRK), North...weapons to kill the tanks. General Eberle, G-4, FEC, described the urgent need for Bazookas in Korea . ... the Russians provided the North Koreans with T...8217,- ’S~ I6 0 iI. RONIOJ3A2DS PO.;S KOREA APR t gN -I S * ~z T- -:*J *1* Porto3~, r -. r 4< ,Ž . BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Appleman, Roy E. US Army in the Korean War

  7. A Pilotless Army in the Megalopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    they will be holding 74 David B. Glade , “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – Implications for Military Operations,” Occasional Paper No. 16 (Maxwell A.F.B...ComancheProjectGrounded.htm, accessed 26 February 2004. 89 David B. Glade , “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – Implications for Military Operations,” 1. 29 away from the...in equipment, parts or personnel to maintain their functionality. According to US Army MAJ John V. McCoy, graduate of the US Army’s Logistics

  8. Continental Transform Boundaries: Tectonic Evolution and Geohazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Steckler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Continental transform boundaries cross heavily populated regions, and they are associated with destructive earthquakes,for example, the North Anatolian Fault (NAFacross Turkey, the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault in Haiti,the San Andreas Fault in California, and the El Pilar fault in Venezuela. Transform basins are important because they are typically associated with 3-D fault geometries controlling segmentation—thus, the size and timing of damaging earthquakes—and because sediments record both deformation and earthquakes. Even though transform basins have been extensively studied, their evolution remains controversial because we don’t understand the specifics about coupling of vertical and horizontal motions and about the basins’long-term kinematics. Seismic and tsunami hazard assessments require knowing architecture and kinematics of faultsas well as how the faults are segmented.

  9. Moho and magmatic underplating in continental lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina M.

    2013-01-01

    fractionation during cooling and solidification in the lower crust. Separation of the low density material from the high-density residue may be a main process of formation of continental crust with its characteristic low average density, also during the early evolution of the Earth. Despite the assumed...... importance of underplating processes and associated fractionation, the available geophysical images of underplated material remain relatively sparse and confined to specific tectonic environments. Direct ponding of magma at the Moho is only observed in very few locations, probably because magma usually...... interacts with the surrounding crustal rocks which leads to smearing of geophysical signals from the underplated material. In terms of processes, there is no direct discriminator between the traditional concept of underplated material and lower crustal magmatic intrusions in the form of batholiths and sill...

  10. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  11. Crude oil production prospects for continental Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleby, P. [British Petroleum Co. Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    A medium term view of the prospects for oil production in continental Europe, focusing on the offshore production in UK and Norwegian waters, is presented. The paper begins with a recent history and an overview of current oil production and recent trends. The growth of North Sea production has been important, contributing more than two-thirds of the growth in non OPEC oil production. The development of the Andrew field in the UK North Sea is presented as an example of new management methods succeeding in enhancing the economic viability of oil fields that would otherwise be marginal or non economic The Foinaven field in the new West of Shetlands province illustrates the way in which the combination of technological advances and changes in industry practices is extending the frontiers of commercial viability. Supply projections show North Sea production continuing to grow, but not as rapidly as over the past five years. (author). 7 figs., 8 refs.

  12. Oceanography of the Southeastern Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume, the second in the Coastal and Estuarine Sciences series, provides a synthesis of the physical, chemical, and biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). The results presented derive from a decade-long multidisciplinary investigation of the SAB continental shelf regime.The SAB extends from West Palm Beach, Fla., where the narrow south Florida shelf begins to broaden, to Cape Hatteras, N.C., where the shelf again narrows. This broad and shallow area is distinguished by the proximity of the Gulf Stream to the shelf break. Large contrasts in the distribution of properties, the strength of oceanic and atmospheric forces, and the high frequency (4-12 days) at which these forces vary have created a unique natural laboratory in which a variety of oceanic processes may be studied.

  13. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  14. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  15. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust...

  16. Crustal growth at active continental margins: Numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Katharina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370618947; Gerya, Taras; Castro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics and melt sources for crustal growth at active continental margins are analyzed by using a 2D coupled petrological–thermomechanical numerical model of an oceanic-continental subduction zone. This model includes spontaneous slab retreat and bending, dehydration of subducted crust, aqueous

  17. Temporal change in fragmentation of continental US forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Wickham; Kurt H. Riitters; Timothy G. Wade; Collin Homer

    2008-01-01

    Changes in forest ecosystem function and condition arise from changes in forest fragmentation. Previous studies estimated forest fragmentation for the continental United States (US). In this study, new temporal land-cover data from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) were used to estimate changes in forest fragmentation at multiple scales for the continental US....

  18. Ethical Wills – a Continental Law Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Swennen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethical wills are testaments, or planning instruments mortis causa alike, that contain provisions regarding the deceased’s (non-economic values rather than his (economic valuables. The authors define and analyse the substance and form of ethical wills from a comparative Continental law perspective, drawing on Belgian, Dutch, French and German law. The focus primarily is on charges or conditions in restraint or constraint of (non- denominational or family choices by testamentary beneficiaries; and in this context it is contended that both the doctrine of public policy (“ordre public” and the horizontal application of the ECHR extensively restrict testamentary freedom. Nevertheless, the analogous application of estate planning techniques increasingly allows benevolent testators to plan their ethical legacy. Los testamentos éticos son testamentos, similares a instrumentos de planificación mortis causa, que contienen disposiciones relativas a los valores (no económicos del difunto, en lugar de sus objetos de valor (económico. Los autores definen y analizan el contenido y la forma de los testamentos éticos desde una perspectiva comparativa de derecho continental, basada en la legislación belga, holandesa, francesa y alemana. Se centra principalmente en los cargos o las condiciones de restricción o limitación de las opciones (aconfesionales o familiares de los herederos; y en este contexto se afirma que tanto la doctrina de política pública ("ordre public" como la aplicación horizontal del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, restringen ampliamente la libertad testamentaria. Sin embargo, la aplicación análoga de técnicas de planificación y gestión patrimonial y sucesoria, permite cada vez más a los testadores de últimas voluntades planificar su legado ético.

  19. Progress towards Continental River Dynamics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Wei; Zheng, Xing; Liu, Frank; Maidment, Daivd; Hodges, Ben

    2017-04-01

    The high-resolution National Water Model (NWM), launched by U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in August 2016, has shown it is possible to provide real-time flow prediction in rivers and streams across the entire continental United States. The next step for continental-scale modeling is moving from reduced physics (e.g. Muskingum-Cunge) to full dynamic modeling with the Saint-Venant equations. The Simulation Program for River Networks (SPRNT) provides a computational approach for the Saint-Venant equations, but obtaining sufficient channel bathymetric data and hydraulic roughness is seen as a critical challenge. However, recent work has shown the Height Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) method can be applied with the National Elevation Dataset (NED) to provide automated estimation of effective channel bathymetry suitable for large-scale hydraulic simulations. The present work examines the use of SPRNT with the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and HAND-derived bathymetry for automated generation of rating curves that can be compared to existing data. The approach can, in theory, be applied to every stream reach in the NHD and thus provide flood guidance where none is available. To test this idea we generated 2000+ rating curves in two catchments in Texas and Alabama (USA). Field data from the USGS and flood records from an Austin, Texas flood in May 2015 were used as validation. Large-scale implementation of this idea requires addressing several critical difficulties associated with numerical instabilities, including ill-posed boundary conditions generated in automated model linkages and inconsistencies in the river geometry. A key to future progress is identifying efficient approaches to isolate numerical instability contributors in a large time-space varying solution. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant number CCF-1331610.

  20. Modelling of temperatures in continental convergence zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toksoz, M.N.; Bird, P.

    1977-08-03

    The thermal histories of continent-continent convergence zones are modelled by a finite-difference technique in an attempt to explain geologic observations of heating and melting in such zones. The suture zone between two converging continents divides a passively heated overriding plate from a quiet continental margin which is suddenly deformed in the collision. Both regions may be metamorphosed and intruded. On the continental-shelf side where mountains are formed by underthrusting within the crust, it was found that adiabatic and radioactive heating are negligible during the orogeny. Shear-strain heating may raise the fault zones to about 500/sup 0/C. At higher temperatures, dislocation creep of crustal rocks would be expected from laboratory results. Even high crustal radioactivity will not produce melting in less than 40 m.y. Thus any plutons in this zone (the granites of the Zagros, Urals, and Himalayas) probably result indirectly by melting of crust that is heated by deep asthenospheric intrusions, which may reach the crust at the time of detachment of the oceanic slab, combined with the effects of friction and water along the subduction plane. Across the suture, the thermal history begins before the collision during the oceanic subduction phase. The sinking slab creates asthenospheric circulations, which warm the passive plate from below and intrude it in an Andean-type arc along the suture (Zagros and Himalayan region). If total subduction exceeds about 3000 km the slow warming has time to weaken the plate and extensive crustal shortening may follow the collision. Crustal shortening and thickening is accompanied by differentiation and volcanism (Tibetan and Grenville orogenies). Thermal modelling of Tibet shows that volcanism cannot be produced in the available time by crustal thickening alone, but requires the initial warming phase as well.

  1. The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps: A Compromise to Overcome the Conflict of Women Serving in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeswaran, Yashila

    2008-01-01

    Though people now take the idea of women in the military for granted, in the 1940s it was a vigorously debated suggestion. Men protected their country; women stayed at home. Because of the conflict over whether women should serve in the army, Congress compromised by creating the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). This article describes the…

  2. 76 FR 58273 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental... Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; EPA ICR... all outer continental shelf (OCS) sources except those located in the Gulf of Mexico west of...

  3. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY... revised North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram,...

  4. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  5. 77 FR 52630 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  6. 76 FR 15898 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources... oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate matter, Permits, Reporting and...

  7. Musculoskeletal injuries sustained in modern army combatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possley, Daniel R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2012-01-01

    Participation in martial arts has grown over the past 15 years with an estimated 8 million participants. In 2004, the Chief of Staff of the Army directed that all Initial Military Training soldiers receive Modern Army Combatives (MAC) training. The mechanical differences between the various martial arts styles incorporated into mixed martial arts/MAC pose challenges to the medical professional. We report the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries by Level 1 and 2 trained active duty soldiers participating in MAC over a 3-year period. From June 1, 2005 to January 1, 2009, the Orthopaedic Surgery service treated and tracked all injuries in MAC. Data was analyzed using the Chi(2) method of analysis. (p < 0.05). 155 of 1,025 soldiers presenting with MAC injuries reported inability to perform their military occupation specialty duties. The knee was most frequently injured followed by shoulder. Surgical intervention was warranted 24% of the time. Participants in MAC reported injuries severe enough to impact occupational duties at 15.5%. Surgical intervention was warranted only 24% of the time. The knee and shoulder are the most frequently injured body parts. Labral repair was the most frequent surgical procedure.

  8. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. 634.12 Section 634.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... § 634.12 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. Army commanders will take...

  9. Building the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Building the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned A Monograph by MAJ...Jonathan R. Gregory United State Army School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General Staff College Fort Leavenworth...Building of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned Approved by: __________________________________, Monograph Director

  10. How to Maintain an Operational Reserve? Further Engaging Army Reserve Component Forces in the Coming Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    with mobilizing Reserve Component units for overseas missions. This flexibility will allow the Army to meet ongoing mission requirements , while... reserve will impose an increased cost on the Army. First (and most obviously), the Army will have to fund the additional pay and allowances required ...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY HOW TO MAINTAIN AN OPERATIONAL RESERVE ? FURTHER ENGAGING ARMY RESERVE COMPONENT FORCES IN

  11. Adapting the Army’s Training and Leader Development Programs for Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Army Corps of Engineers USAR U.S. Army Reserve USARC U.S. Army Reserve Command USASMA U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy USR Unit Status Report VTT ...increases flexibility. Previ- ously, this portion of the course was taught either in residence or by video tele-training ( VTT ), which either required

  12. [Medical research in the US Armed Forces (Report 3). The US Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V I; Ivchenko, I V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2012-12-01

    The US Army. The present article is the third part of the review dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. The first and the second parts have been published in the previous issuses of the journal. Specifically this article is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Army. It is shown that in the US Army the medical and biological research is conducted and coordinated by the special US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. The following units are successively presented: US Army Institute of Surgical Research, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. The particular research programs conducting in the above mentioned institutions are presented.

  13. Tectonics of China: Continental scale cataclastic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, John J., Jr.

    Stratigraphic, structural, and earthquake evidence indicates that cataclastic flow, that is, flow by brittle mechanisms (e.g., fracture and slip), was dominant in China from late Paleozoic. This process has operated over a range of scales including the continental scale. China is made up of large brittle basement elements immersed in ductile zones which are analogous to porphyroclasts (large, often brittle fragments) surrounded by fluxion (foliation or flow) structures in cataclastic rocks, respectively. This basement fabric for China is seen on Landsat imagery and on tectonic maps and is comparable to cataclastic rock fabrics seen in fault zones, on outcrops, and in thin sections. Brittle basement elements are broken into two or more large rigid blocks, and the dimensions of elements and blocks are within 1 order of magnitude of each other. Ductile zones are made up of fragments which are many orders of magnitude smaller than the ductile zones. Rigid blocks and fragments are identified, and their dimensions are measured through earthquake, fault, and fracture patterns. Rigid basement blocks are surrounded by earthquakes. The sedimentary rocks over the basement faults at the block boundaries seem to be affected by fault movements because they are characterized by facies changes, thickness changes, high-angle faults, and forced folds. Ductile basement zones are earthquake prone, and deformation of the ductile basement affects the overlying sedimentary rocks, as is demonstrated by unconformities and by a wide variety of structures. Thrust faults, buckle folds, and strike slip faults are common in and adjacent to western ductile zones. Structures are most intensely developed where ductile zones abut brittle elements. Both brittle elements and ductile zones are rifted and cut by strike slip faults in eastern China. The mechanical fabric of China and the boundary conditions acting on China are now and always have been determined by its plate tectonic history. This

  14. Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences.

  15. UNIDADES GEOMORFOLÓGICAS DE PORTUGAL CONTINENTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantino Insua Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available São representadas cartograficamente as unidades geomorfológicas identificadas para os 89015 km2 do território de Portugal Continental. A delimitação das unidades teve por base a análise dos padrões da textura fornecida por imagens SRTM, com revisão e adaptação posterior à altimetria e à geologia, para os quais foram usadas bases cartográficas digitais. Foram considerados três níveis taxionómicos que permitem descrever e caracterizar áreas homogéneas do ponto de vista geomorfológico. As três unidades de 1º nível baseiam-se nas unidades morfostruturais clássicas consideradas para a Península Ibérica. As dez unidades de 2º nível constituem, na sua maioria, divisões clássicas do relevo de Portugal Continental, agora agrupadas de acordo com a metodologia adoptada e designadas como unidades morfosculturais. As 56 unidades de 3º nível, ou subunidades morfosculturais, foram individualizadas com base nos padrões de relevo identificados nas imagens SRTM e na observação de campo e adquiriram uma designação baseada essencialmente nas geoformas que as individualizam e na toponímia local. As unidades geomorfológicas identificadas são descritas através de características do relevo, dissecação fluvial, estruturas, tipo de drenagem e base geológica, bem como de parâmetros numéricos gerados de forma automática, como classes de altitude e de declividade. Pretende-se que o mapa elaborado possa contribuir para a gestão territorial, em especial na tomada de decisões em conservação da natureza.

  16. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  17. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  18. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones.

  19. the Army Ethic-Educating and Equipping the Army Mid-Level Leaders in the CGSOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Dynamics” category, there are two annual and two semiannual training requirements. Army values training and combating human trafficking program are...expectation of soldiers to both “kill enemies and cultivate stable, effective, and humane polities.”57 Regardless of the focus area, ethics education...traits without principles are blind.”66 The virtue ethics ultimately holds that to separate good soldiers from good human being is “logically defective

  20. United States Army Medical Department Journal. Leadership in the Army Medical Department, October - December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    work, The Origin of Species,’ is that the key to survival in biological evolution is the ability of a species to adapt. A species that does not adapt...attorneys, military paralegals , and civilian paralegals providing legal support throughout the AMEDD at the 8 medical centers and numerous hospitals...Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), mobilized 18 Judge Advocates and paralegals in 2007 and has continued a cycle of mobilizations of legal personnel to

  1. Evaluation of Support Provided to Mobilized Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-05

    with family members. CENTCOM and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command have significantly improved access to communications with family as the...contract with Bahrain Maritime and Mercantile International, beginning in August 2002 through December 2003.10 Seven Seas Shiphandlers became the...Switching Network (DSN) • MWR phone banks through the Army and Air Force Exchange System (AAFES) • Internet cafes (provided by the Navy Space and Naval

  2. Improving Army Basic Research: Report of an Expert Panel on the Future of Army Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2004. During the early 1990’s her studies with Dr. Richard Axel led to the discovery of a large gene family...dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates. 2004 Medicine : Linda Buck—odorant receptors...Research: An Uncertain Future for the Bell Legacy,” Prometheus , Vol. 21, No. 2, June 2003. Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for

  3. Enlisting Lean Six Sigma in the Army Acquisition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    One of the strategic objectives of this overarching strategy is to “support Army-wide LSS [Lean Six Sigma ] and business transformation and focus on...re- sults of financial management LSS projects Army-wide.” • • • • • • I M P R O V I N G P R O C E S S E S Enlisting Lean Six Sigma in the Army...Lean Six Sigma process. The LSS process has its own methodology that can be applied to any manufacturing, transactional, or service process to reduce

  4. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R. C.; Stein, M. B.; Bliese, P. D.; Bromet, E. J.; Chiu, W. T.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gilman, S. E.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Ursano, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. Method The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. Results There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2–39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2–22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8–1.8). Adjustment for a differential ‘healthy warrior effect’ cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Conclusions Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk. PMID:26190760

  5. Discoveries on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    As discussed in this document, there are 108 discoveries on the Norwegian continental shelf which so far have not been approved for development. The oil and gas resources of the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea are mostly found in discoveries containing large volumes of gas. Eighty-one of the discoveries which are not approved for development are located in the North Sea and more than 60% of the discoveries in this province contain less than 5 mill Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. In the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea there are 27 discoveries which are not approved for development and whose total resources are estimated at 500 mill Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. About 60% of the oil resources is expected to be comprised by development plans in 1997 or 1998. Another 20% is in new discoveries currently being evaluated or in discoveries containing large volumes of gas. Production forecasts indicate substantial vacant oil processing capacity after 2000. Vacant gas processing capacity will mainly arise after 2005. 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Growth of the lower continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    1988-01-01

    One of the largest uncertainties in crustal composition and growth models is the nature of the lower continental crust. Specifically, by what processes is it formed and modified, and when is it formed, particularly in reference to the upper crust? The main reason for this lack of information is the scarcity of lower crustal rock samples. These are restricted to two types: rocks which outcrop in granulite facies terrains and granulite facies xenoliths which are transported to the earth's surface by young volcanics. The important conclusions arising from the xenolith studies are: the majority of mafic lower crustal xenoliths formed through cumulate process, resitic xenoliths are rare; and formation and metamorphism of the deep crust is intimately linked to igneous activity and/or orogeny which are manifest in one form or another at the earth's surface. Therefore, estimates of crustal growth based on surface exposures is representative, although the proportion of remobilized pre-existing crust may be significantly greater at the surface than in the deep crust.

  7. Estimating the global volume of deeply recycled continental crust at continental collision zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, D. W.; Huene, R. V.

    2006-12-01

    CRUSTAL RECYCLING AT OCEAN MARGINS: Large volumes of rock and sediment are missing from the submerged forearcs of ocean margin subduction zones--OMSZs. This observation means that (1) oceanic sediment is transported beneath the margin to either crustally underplate the coastal region or reach mantle depths, and that (2) the crust of the forearc is vertically thinned and horizontally truncated and the removed material transported toward the mantle. Transport of rock and sediment debris occurs in the subduction channel that separates the upper and lower plates. At OMSZs the solid-volume flux of recycling crustal material is estimated to be globally ~2.5 km3/yr (i.e., 2.5 Armstrong units or AU). The corresponding rate of forearc truncation (migration of the trench axis toward a fix reference on the continent) is a sluggish 2-3 km/Myr (about 1/50th the orthogonal convergence rate). Nonetheless during the past 2.5 Gyr (i.e., since the beginning of the Proterozoic) a volume of continental material roughly equal to the existing volume (~7 billion cubic km) has been recycled to the mantle at OMSZs. The amount of crust that has been destroyed is so large that recycling must have been a major factor creating the mapped rock pattern and age-fabric of continental crust. RECYCLING AT CONTINENT/ARC COLLISIONS: The rate at which arc magmatism globally adds juvenile crust to OMSZs has been commonly globally estimated at ~1 AU. But new geophysical and dating information from the Aleutian and IBM arcs imply that the addition rate is at least ~5 AU (equivalent to ~125 km3/Myr/km of arc). If the Armstrong posit is correct that since the early Archean a balance has existed between additions and losses of crust, then a recycling sink for an additional 2-3 AU of continental material must exist. As the exposure of exhumed masses of high P/T blueschist bodies documents that subcrustal streaming of continental material occurs at OMSZs, so does the occurrence of exhumed masses of UHP

  8. Comparative riftology: insights from crustal structure into the evolution of continental rifts and passive continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, Jonas; Stein, Carol; Stein, Seth; Keller, Randy; Wysession, Michael; Frederiksen, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Continental rifts evolve to seafloor spreading and are preserved in passive margins, or fail and remain as fossil features in continents. Rifts at different stages give insight into these different evolutionary paths. Of particular interest is how volcanic passive margins evolve. These features are characterized by sequences of volcanic rocks yielding magnetic anomalies landward of and sometimes larger than the oldest spreading anomalies. Seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) occur in stretched continental crust landward of the oldest oceanic crust and are underplated by high-velocity lower crustal bodies. How and when these features form remains unclear. Insights are given by the Midcontinent Rift (MCR), formed by 1.1 Ga rifting of Amazonia from Laurentia, that failed once seafloor spreading was established elsewhere. MCR volcanics are much thicker than other continental flood basalts, due to deposition in a narrow rift rather than a broad region, giving a rift's geometry but a LIP's magma volume. The MCR provides a snapshot of the deposition of a thick highly magnetized volcanic section during rifting. Surface exposures and seismic-reflection data in and near Lake Superior show a rift basin filled by inward-dipping flood basalt layers. Had the rift evolved to seafloor spreading, the basin would have split into two sets of volcanics with opposite-facing SDRs, each with a strong magnetic anomaly. Because the rift formed as a series of alternating half-grabens, structural asymmetries between conjugate margins can naturally occur. Hence the MCR shows that many features form prior to breakup. Because the MCR was massively inverted by regional compression long after it failed and was uplifted, its structure is better known than failed rifts that incurred lesser degrees of inversion. It provides an end member for the evolution of actively extending rifts, characterized by upwelling mantle and negative gravity anomalies, in contrast to failed and inverted rifts without

  9. OSUS sensor integration in Army experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganger, Robert; Nowicki, Mark; Kovach, Jesse; Gregory, Timothy; Liss, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Live sensor data was obtained from an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS, formerly Terra Harvest)- based system provided by the Army Research Lab (ARL) and fed into the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) sponsored Actionable Intelligence Technology Enabled Capabilities Demonstration (AI-TECD) Micro Cloud during the E15 demonstration event that took place at Fort Dix, New Jersey during July 2015. This data was an enabler for other technologies, such as Sensor Assignment to Mission (SAM), Sensor Data Server (SDS), and the AI-TECD Sensor Dashboard, providing rich sensor data (including images) for use by the Company Intel Support Team (CoIST) analyst. This paper describes how the OSUS data was integrated and used in the E15 event to support CoIST operations.

  10. Continental Crust Growth as a Result of Continental Collision: Ocean Crust Melting and Melt Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, D.; Dong, G.; Mo, X.; Xie, G.; Dong, X.

    2010-12-01

    The significance of the continental crust (CC) on which we live is self-evident. However, our knowledge remains limited on its origin, its way and rate of growth, and how it has acquired the “andesitic” composition from mantle derived magmas. Compared to rocks formed from mantle derived magmas in all tectonic settings, volcanic arc rocks associated with oceanic lithosphere subduction share some common features with the CC; both are relatively depleted in “fluid-insoluble” elements (e.g., Nb, Ta and Ti), but enriched in “fluid-soluble” elements (e.g., U, K and Pb). These chemical characteristics are referred to as the “arc-like signature”, and point to a genetic link between subduction-zone magmatism and CC formation, thus leading to the “island-arc” model widely accepted for the origin of the CC over the past 40 years. However, it has been recognized also that this “island-arc” model has several difficulties. These include (1) bulk arc crust (AC) is basaltic, whereas the bulk CC is andesitic [1]; (2) AC has a variably large Sr excess whereas the CC is Sr deficient [2]; and (3) AC production is mass-balanced by subduction-erosion and sediment recycling, thus contributing no new mass to CC growth, at least in the Phanerozoic [3,4]. Our data on magmatic rocks (both volcanic and intrusive) formed during the India-Asia continental collision (~65 - ~45Ma) [5] show a remarkable compositional similarity to the bulk CC with the typical “arc-like signature” [6]. Also, these syncollisional felsic rocks exhibit strong mantle isotopic signatures, implying that they were recently derived from a mantle source. The petrology and geochemistry of these syncollisional felsic rocks is most consistent with an origin via partial melting of upper oceanic crust (i.e., last fragments of underthrusting oceanic crust) under amphibolite facies conditions, adding net mantle-derived materials to form juvenile CC mass. This leads to the logical and testable hypothesis

  11. An Examination of Potential Misclassification of Army Suicides: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kenneth L; Nock, Matthew K; Biggs, Quinn M; Bornemann, Jennifer; Colpe, Lisa J; Dempsey, Catherine L; Heeringa, Steven G; McCarroll, James E; Ng, Tsz Hin; Schoenbaum, Michael; Ursano, Robert J; Zhang, Bailey G; Benedek, David M

    2016-07-22

    Debate continues about the accuracy of military suicide reporting due to concerns that some suicides may be classified as accidents to minimize stigma and ensure survivor benefits. We systematically reviewed records for 998 active duty Army deaths (510 suicides; 488 accident, homicide, and undetermined deaths; 2005-2009) and, using research criteria, reclassified 8.2% of the nonsuicide cases to definite suicide (1), suicide probable (4), or suicide possible (35). The reclassification rate to definite suicide was only 0.2% (1/488). This low rate suggests that flagrant misclassification of Army deaths is uncommon and surveillance reports likely reflect the "true" population of Army suicides.

  12. Slumping on the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Mohan, R.; Muralinath, A.S.

    A short gravity core from the Western Continental Margin of India has been examined to understand the nature and characteristics of slumping in the area. The present study and also the earlier studies revealed that the slumping on the western...

  13. First assessment of continental energy storage in CMIP5 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Valero, Francisco José; García-García, Almudena; Beltrami, Hugo; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2016-05-01

    Although much of the energy gained by the climate system over the last century has been stored in the oceans, continental energy storage remains important to estimate the Earth's energy imbalance and also because crucial positive climate feedback processes such as soil carbon and permafrost stability depend on continental energy storage. Here for the first time, 32 general circulation model simulations from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are examined to assess their ability to characterize the continental energy storage. Results display a consistently lower magnitude of continental energy storage in CMIP5 simulations than the estimates from geothermal data. A large range in heat storage is present across the model ensemble, which is largely explained by the substantial differences in the bottom boundary depths used in each land surface component.

  14. International Conference on Continental Volcanism-IAVCEI 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yigang Xu; Martin A Menzies

    2006-01-01

    @@ The International Conference on Continental Volcanism, sponsored by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI), was held at White Swan Hotel, Guangzhou, China, May 14th to 18th, 2006.

  15. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  16. Comparative biogeochemistry–ecosystem–human interactions on dynamic continental margins..

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Levin, L.A.; Liu, K-K.; Emeis, K.-C.; Breitburg, D.L.; Cloern, J.; Deutsch, C.; Giani, M.; Goffart, A.; Hofmann, E.E.; Lachkar, Z.; Limburg, K.; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, E.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ragueneau, O.; Rabouille, C.; Sarkar, S.K.; Swaney, D.P.; Wassman, P.; Wishner, K.F.

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1...

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  18. U.S. East Coast Continental Margin (CONMAR) Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The USGS/WHOI Continental Margin (CONMAR) Data set was compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution as a joint program of...

  19. Continental Divide of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the Continental Divide of the United States. The map layer was created by extracting Hydrologic Unit Boundary line features from an existing...

  20. Continental Airlines Receives J.D. Power and Associates Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ On June 29, 2006, Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL) was ranked the highest in Customer Satisfaction Among Traditional Network Carriers in North America in the J.D.Power and Associates 2006 Airline Satisfaction Index StudySM.

  1. Persistence of Initial Conditions in Continental Scale Air Quality Simulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains the data used in Figures 1 – 6 and Table 2 of the technical note "Persistence of Initial Conditions in Continental Scale Air Quality...

  2. Sulfur and metal fertilization of the lower continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locmelis, Marek; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Rushmer, Tracy; Arevalo, Ricardo; Adam, John; Denyszyn, Steven W.

    2016-02-01

    Mantle-derived melts and metasomatic fluids are considered to be important in the transport and distribution of trace elements in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. However, the mechanisms that facilitate sulfur and metal transfer from the upper mantle into the lower continental crust are poorly constrained. This study addresses this knowledge gap by examining a series of sulfide- and hydrous mineral-rich alkaline mafic-ultramafic pipes that intruded the lower continental crust of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone in the Italian Western Alps. The pipes are relatively small (tectonic architecture of any given terrain, metals and volatiles stored in the lower continental crust may become available as sources for subsequent ore-forming processes, thus enhancing the prospectivity of continental block margins for a wide range of mineral systems.

  3. Continental Shelf Boundary - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of...

  4. Topographic features over the continental shelf off Visakhapatnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.C.S.; Machado, T.; Murthy, K.S.R.

    water depth and the continental shelfedge several interesting topographic features such as Terraces, Karstic structures associated with pinnacles and troughs and smooth dome shaped reef structures are recorded. The nature of these features...

  5. 75 FR 71734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE),...

  6. Continental United States Hurricane Strikes 1950-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Continental U.S. Hurricane Strikes Poster is our most popular poster which is updated annually. The poster includes all hurricanes that affected the U.S. since...

  7. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  8. University of Idaho Daily Meteorological data for continental US

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This archive contains daily surface meteorological (METDATA) data for the Continental United States at 4-km (1/24-deg) resolution. The meteorological variables are...

  9. US Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Providing Relevant Solutions to the Armed Forces and the NationThe USACE Reachback Operation Center at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)...

  10. US Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Providing Relevant Solutions to the Armed Forces and the Nation The USACE Reachback Operation Center at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)...

  11. Developing Strategic Thinking Leaders in the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    Michael J. Colarusso , Accessing Talent: The Foundation of a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy (Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, February 2010), 36. 24 44 Gerras, Strategic Leadership Primer, 29.

  12. 78 FR 60864 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Science Board members to review and deliberate on the FY14 Army Science Board study reports. Agenda: The board will convene to present the results of the Fiscal Year 2013 study titled, ``Creating an...

  13. Caloplaca coeruleofrigida sp. nova, a species from continental Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søchting, Ulrik; Seppelt, R.

    2003-01-01

    Caloplaca coeruleofrigida Søchting & Seppelt is described from Southern Victoria Land, continental Antarctica. It is characterized by vertically elongated papillae and a pale orange pigmentation on shaded parts, and black thallus and apothecia on exposed parts of the thallus......Caloplaca coeruleofrigida Søchting & Seppelt is described from Southern Victoria Land, continental Antarctica. It is characterized by vertically elongated papillae and a pale orange pigmentation on shaded parts, and black thallus and apothecia on exposed parts of the thallus...

  14. Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

  15. Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

  16. Evolving Army Needs for Space-Based Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    College is to produce graduates who are skilled critical thinkers and complex problem solvers. Concurrently, it is our duty to the U.S. Army to also...missile warning data—launch loca- tion, flight tracking, and predicted impact area—to operational communities writ large.42 For space force enhancement...of cyberspace theory writ large to better coordinate actions related to space, cyberspace, and the electro- magnetic spectrum. • The Army should

  17. Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Industry Summit (portfolio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    financing to accelerate efficiency projects – Implement technologies to significantly reduce energy footprint in the field • Build Resilience through...for patrols and required for Soldier sustainment • Alternative energy capabilities & interoperability builds flexibility and resilience Soldiers of...https://eko.usace.army.mil/public/fa/ netzero / • http://army-energy.hqda.pentagon.mil/ netzero / Energy Initiatives Task Force UNCLASSIFIED Assistant

  18. The Importance of Morale in the Modern New Zealand Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    became a tribe: Ngati Tumatauenga, the “Tribe of the War God,” an initiative that was aimed at embracing both the Maori culture and the warrior spirit...integration, and Maori culture integration. The Future Battlefield In an age of rapidly developing technological advancements, the battlefield of the future...gender integration of women into the combat trades is undertaken in the modern NZ Army. Maori Culture Integration In 1995, the NZ Army became a tribe

  19. Magnesium Nanocomposites: Current Status and Prospects for Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    reviewed the current state of Mg development for Army-related ground vehicle applications (56). Two Mg alloys—WE43 and Elektron 675—currently under...development through a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Magnesium Elektron , NA show great promise for a variety of...applications. WE43 has superior corrosion resistance to many early Mg alloys and is being considered for a variety of applications. Elektron 675 is

  20. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 3. May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Jeffrey Pfeffer and Gerald R. Salancik, is a theory that “emphasizes the point that the environment is a...Perspectives, Oxford University Press, New York, 1997, pp. 78–79. “Resource dependence theory was most fully developed by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Gerald...study on their own. Lieutenant General Jeffrey A. Sorenson, the Depart- ment of the Army G–6, has observed, “Because the Army is moving to a

  1. Tactical UAV’s in the French Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    DLRFCMP SDTI Maintien en service jusqu’à l’arrivée du MCMMContrat Fabrication CL 289 Contrat Retrofit drone Adaptation véhicules Maintien en...Tactical UAV’s in the French Army LtCol Pierre-Yves HENRY, Technical Service of the French Army, Program Officer for Battlefield Surveillance Report...suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis

  2. Army Phase 3. Small Business Innovation Research Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Project Manager: The final concern was full system militarization. Mr. Edgar Neira The AECU was designed from the start as a military U.S. Army ARDEC...for unimplanted and flu- vehicles (rain, insects) and tactical ground vehicles orine implanted ion beam deposited DLC films. (sand), as well as the...unicharges into the gun chamber and insures Army Project Manager: the engagement of the last unicharge into the gun’s swiss Mr. Edgar Neira notch. The

  3. Advancing Architecture-Centric Practices in US Army Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Stephen Blanchette, Jr. & John Bergey 27 April 2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon University Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB...FREEDOM FROM PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT. 2 Architecture-Centric Army Acquisition Blanchette & Bergey , 27 April 2010 © 2010 Carnegie...Mellon University DoD Systems are Increasingly Complex… 3 Architecture-Centric Army Acquisition Blanchette & Bergey , 27 April 2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon

  4. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Certification exam. Additionally, they are offered the opportunity to take the ServSafe ® certification examination.† The Navy trains Preventive Medicine...the ServSafe Exam.5(p5) Navy  Scope of practice – a concern because Navy PMTs operate clinically, unlike Army preventive medicine personnel...with other programs relocating and integrating into the Medical Education and Training Campus concept. *Army Training Course 322-68S10 †The ServSafe

  5. Army Organizational Culture of Innovation: A Strategic Imperative for Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-15

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT AN ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE OF INNOVATION: A STRATEGIC IMPERATIVE FOR TRANSFORMATION by Lieutenant Colonel Martin... Organizational Culture of Innovation A Strategic Imperative for Transformation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Lieutenant Colonel Martin T. Carpenter TITLE: An Army Organizational Culture of

  6. Army Information Technology Enterprise Solutions-2 Services Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-09

    Contracting personnel from the Army and other Federal agencies who are involved in information technology service acquisition decisions should read...IDIQ) contracts. The Inspector General (IG), DoD initiated the audit of the Army Information Technology Enterprise Solutions-2 Services (ITES-2S...contract because of the material impact this contract will have on the acquisition of information technology resources within DoD and the Federal Government

  7. Army Social Media: Harnessing the Power of Networked Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    9/1/2011 Army Social Media : harnessing the power of networked communications Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Social Media : harnessing the power of networked communications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...the Chief of Public Affairs,Online and Social Media Division,1500 Pentagon,Washington,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  8. Army Communicator. Volume 31, Number 2, Spring 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    see Army Commu- nicator article titled HF Combat Net Radio Lesson Learned Again, by David M. Fiedler , Spring 2004). Integrating more communications...year- round,” said Drew. According to Fred Porzio, project leader for this effort with PM DCATS’ Product Manager, Defense Wide Transmission Systems, the...Army Communicator 49 singling out Fred Porzio, the project lead for PM DWTS; Greg Parks, who designed the system for prime contractor Eaton/Powerware

  9. Army Materiel Requirements Documents: Qualitative Analysis of Efficiency and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    tough examination of the assumptions of our past and real ideas for change that solve issues,” said Paul Mann (personal communication, October 25...for Acquisition and Systems Management (U.S. Army) and Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology, Paul Mann / SES...Systems, and Michael Aldridge, J8 staff (Requirements Analyst, JUONS/ JEONS , Joint Capabilities Division). Interview questions used to collect data

  10. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Net Zero Waster Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Colorado • Fort Bliss, Texas These sites served as test beds for the Army’s Net Zero Initiative, specifically, Net Zero Water , and the Army provided...have sustainability, energy efficiency, water conservation, recycling, pollution prevention, and green procurement programs in place that they can...ARMY NET ZERO PROVE OUT Final Net Zero Water Best Practices November 18, 2014 Distribution A Approved for public release

  11. Investigating the U.S. Armys Human Dimension Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    challenged and expanded my mental model. I am honored to be part of this amazing institution. To my family, thanks for the unconditional love and... surprising , but it emphasizes that leadership and the army as a professions continue to be one of foundation for future Army. Furthermore, Leadership...therapy, performance dietetics, and cognitive enhancement (Kelley et al. 2013, 16). The benefits of the social and physical are not surprising , but

  12. Army Model and Simulation Stewardship Report FY98

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    capability. 6. BENEFITS TO THE ARMY: This effort is a key component to the Virtual Sealift Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise ( SEDRE ). With the...reduction in the numbers of SEDREs performed in a year, the Army deployment community needs alternative methods to train and prepare units for actual...deployments. The Virtual SEDRE will simulate and visualize the deployment activities that occur at specific installations and ports and supplement

  13. The United States Army Operating Concept, 2016-2028

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    retrograde operations. f. Theater armies may also include a medical command for deployment support that provides health services to Army and other...tenets of jus in bello ,120 discrimination (between combatants and noncombatants), and proportionality in the use of force,121 measured against the...Barracks, PA, 19. (Used with permission.) 119 Biddle, 9. 120 Jus in bello , translated as justice in war, are agreements defining limits on acceptable

  14. Integration of New Technology in Army Libraries. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-02

    Topographic Laboratories Scientific and Technical Information Center B-65 SFacilities Engineering Support Agency B-72 Mobility Bquipment Research and...requests received 222 B-14 -- : -.- t -o . . -I j INTEGRATION OF NEW TECHNOILOGY IN ARMY LIBRARIES: DATA COLLECTION LIBRARY: Ballistic Research...4 u.._9.C F , i -. t- ’’- • -- -- .•_ •-g• _ "dt LIBRARY: U.S. ARMY MOBILITY EQUIPMENT RESEARH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND (MERADCOM) COMMAND: DARCOM

  15. Army Logistician. Volume 38, Issue 4, July-August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    information are demonstrated in this view of a BCS3 computer screen. It shows the locations of radio frequency tag interrogators at Wiesbaden Army...cifically the computer, printers, and interrogator . TC–AIMS problems also should be anticipated. The 16th CSG had hardware problems at every ISA, and...Department of Defense or any of its agencies, and do not change or supersede official Army publications. The masculine pronoun may refer to either

  16. Army Logistician. Volume 40, Issue 4, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    allow users to track shipments, observe activity at a specific location or site, determine the operating status of RFID interrogators , and obtain RF... interrogate it. Onboard Sensors One might do well to study exactly what com- mercial, even consumer, products provide. OnStar offers a level of...Army publications. The masculine pronoun may refer to either gender. Reprints: Articles may be reprinted with credit to Army Logistician and the author

  17. Defense Logistics: Marine Corps and Army Reset Liability Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-22

    reset the item will likely equal the historical average spent to repair the item. 12Unit repair cost refers to the amount of funding to reset a...equipment reset amounting to more than $700 million and that in the event of a crisis the Army would deploy units at a significantly lower readiness level.6...Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Budget. Finally, we interviewed officials from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Office of Cost

  18. Army Sustainment. Volume 41, Issue 5, September-October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    redis - tribute it where it is needed. We’re changing how we develop new vehicles, so instead of enumerating a variety of specifications that say a...classified environment. Integrating SMS With Existing Army Databases SMS is a web-enabled database management system that is structured to meet the...organizational priorities and goals for balancing the Army. SMS can automate the input of all performance data directly from source databases . For

  19. US Army And The Emergence Of Unmanned Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Doctrine Publication ADRP Army Doctrine Reference Publication ATP Army Techniques Publication GPS Global Positioning Service IDF Israeli Defense...Nations Possess Drones ,” Washington Times, 10 November 2013, accessed 28 September 2015, http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/nov/10/skys-the-limit...for-wide-wild-world-of­ drones /. 5 Matt Tedesco, Tom Arnold, and Christopher Lowe, “The Future Challenge to US Air Superiority,” Fires (March-April

  20. Grease versus Oil Lubrication of Wheel Bearings in Army Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    and David A. Brown 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK Fuels and Lubricants Div, STRBE-VF; Materials, Fuels...I Commander-. M60 Tank Development US Army Troop Support Command US Army Tank-Automotive Command ATTN: DRSTS-M Bradely Fighting Vehicle Systems 4300...Mr. Layne) Program Planning, STRBE-HP Washington, DC 20362 Program Support, STRBE-HR Systems Analysis, STRBE-HA 2 Commander CIRCULATE David Taylor

  1. Group Technology Assessment: U.S. Army Materiel Command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    63120 Army Ammunition Plants: Cdr, Crane AAA, Attn: SMCCN-CO, Crane, IN 47522 Cdr, Hawthorne AAP, Attn: SMCHW-CO, Hawthorne , NV 89415 Cdr, Iowa AAP...5 INDIVIDUALS INTERVIEWED DURING ON-SITE VISITS Name/Title Organization/Location Mr. Nathaniel Scott AMCCOM-ARDC Industrial Engineer Dover, New Jersey...Rock Island, Illinois 61299 Commander U.S. Army Armament Munitions & Chemical Command Attn: AMSMC-CG (D) 0 Dover, New Jersey 07801 Mr. Nathaniel Scott

  2. Formation waters of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCartney, R. A.; Rein, E.

    2006-03-15

    New and previously published analyses of formation waters for the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) have been evaluated and interpreted to determine the compositional distribution of formation waters in the region and factors controlling their compositions, and also to obtain information on subsurface fluid flow. Formation waters in the region are Na-Cl and Na-Ca-Cl-type waters that display a wide range of salinity (2500-212000 mg/kg Cl). Generally, the concentrations of most dissolved constituents are positively correlated with Cl so that their distribution in formation waters largely reflects the variations shown by salinity. Exceptions are SO4 which is generally low (less than 40 mg/l) regardless of Cl, and HCO3 and in-situ pH which are negatively correlated with Cl. The main factors determining the compositions of the formation waters are mixing of meteoric water (probably late-Jurassic to Eocene), ancient seawater and primary brine together with diagenetic reactions that have affected each of these components individually as well as mixtures of them. Evaluation of the distribution of salinity has helped us identify where vertical and/or lateral migration of brine from the evaporites has occurred. This has in turn provided us with information on the presence of leak-points and vertical mixing, although further investigation of the location of evaporites and basin palaeohydrogeology are required to determine whether regional lateral advection has occurred in the past. The results of this study may benefit oil exploration and production activities in the NCS including constraint of hydrocarbon migration models, economic evaluation of undrilled prospects, scale management and compartmentalisation studies. (Author)

  3. Australian Continental Shelf as an Inverse Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjabin, T.; Pattiaratchi, C. B.; Hetzel, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Transport of inshore waters and suspended material off the continental shelf by Dense Shelf Water Cascades (DSWC) has important ecological and biogeochemical implications in Australian waters. Because of high rates of evaporation, denser saline water along the sea bed occurs in a majority of the shallow coastal regions around Australia, setting up horizontal density gradients that can form DSWC. This study uses data available from the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), which is operated by the Australian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (ANFOG) located at the University of Western Australia, to measure cross-shelf density profiles under varying conditions around the entire continent. Analysis of 143 transects of 97 sets of spatial and temporal resolution data from the ocean gliders under varying wind and tide conditions for seven contrasting regions surrounding Australia has allowed us to confirm that DSWC occurs on a regular basis during autumn and winter seasons. Results indicate that cascades occur during these seasons mainly due to cooling of the coastal water which already have higher salinity due to evaporation during the summer months. The cascades were present under different wind and tidal energy conditions and the controlling parameter for cascade formation is the cross-shelf density gradient. The cross-shelf density gradient in North-West Australia is maximum in July (14.23x10-6 kgm-4); whereas it is a maximum in June in South Australia (18.78x10-6 kgm-4) and in May in South-West Australia (25.884x10-6 kgm-4). Greater knowledge of the occurrence of DSWC will enhance understanding of the offshore transport of larvae, nutrients, salt, heat, carbon, low-oxygen water, sediment, and pollutants in Australian waters.

  4. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  5. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  6. Deep observation and sampling of the earth's continental crust (DOSECC): Continental scientific drilling workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Research summaries are presented of ongoing or proposed deep drilling programs to explore hydrothermal systems, buried astroblemes, continental crust, magma systems, mountain belt tectonics, subduction zones, and volcanoes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  7. Identifying ethical issues of the Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Constance L; Elliott, Aaron R; Harris, Janet R

    2006-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the ethical issues Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) encountered in their anesthesia practice and how disturbed they were by these issues. This descriptive study used a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of Army Nurse Corps officers and Department of the Army civilian registered nurses (N = 5,293). The CRNA subset (n = 97) was obtained from questionnaires that indicated a primary practice setting as anesthesia. The most frequently occurring ethical issue identified was conflict in the nurse-physician relationship, whereas the most disturbing issue was working with incompetent/impaired colleagues. Unresolved ethical conflicts can negatively influence the nurses' morale, leading to avoidance of the issue and contributing to burnout. Identifying the ethical issues and disturbance level experienced by CRNAs should contribute to the development of an ethics education program that addresses issues encountered in CRNA practice.

  8. Centralized HIV Program Oversight: An Investigation of a Case Series of New HIV Infections among US Army Soldiers, 2012 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacha, Laura A; Hakre, Shilpa; Myles, Otha; Sanders-Buell, Eric E; Scoville, Stephanie L; Kijak, Gustavo H; Price, Michael W; Mody, Rupal M; Liu, Ying; Miller, Shana L; Pham, Phuc T; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Peel, Sheila A; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Cersovsky, Steven B; Scott, Paul T

    2015-11-01

    Centralized HIV program oversight and repeal of the Department of Defense policy "Don't Ask Don't Tell" permitted characterization of HIV transmission among soldiers assigned to a large US Army base continental United States from 2012 to 2013. An investigation of a greater than expected number of new HIV infections among soldiers was initiated to characterize transmission and identify opportunities to disrupt transmission and deliver services.All soldiers who were assigned to the base at the time of their first positive HIV test and who had their first positive HIV test in 2012 or in the first 6 months of 2013 and who had a clinical genotype available for analysis were eligible for inclusion in the investigation.All patients (n = 19) were men; most were black (52%) and less than 30 years old (64%). Fifteen of the 19 patients participated in in-depth interviews. Eighty percent were men who have sex with men who reported multiple sex partners having met through social and electronic networks. All were subtype B infections. Significant knowledge gaps and barriers to accessing testing and care in the military healthcare system were identified. Most (58%) belonged to transmission networks involving other soldiers.This investigation represents an important step forward in on-going efforts to develop a comprehensive understanding of transmission networks in the Army that can inform delivery of best practices combination prevention services. The Army is developing plans to directly engage individuals in key affected populations most at risk for HIV infection to identify and address unmet needs and expand delivery and uptake of prevention services. Further investigation is underway and will determine whether these findings are generalizable to the Army.

  9. Comparing U.S. Army Systems with Foreign Counterparts: Identifying Possible Capability Gaps and Insights from Other Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    75 7.1. World War II U.S. Army Rifle Squad ................................................................................... 78...since the Vietnam War in the 1960s, when thousands of helicopters were used. Today the U.S. Army has helicopter units in aviation brigades that are...Helicopter to Algerian Air Forces,” RussianAviation.com, June 20, 2012; “Chapter Five: Russia and Eurasia,” 2013. 54 If we compare the CH-47F

  10. The United States Army Criminal Investigation Command and Its Role in the Army’s War on Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-15

    of cases involving marihuana , narcotics, dangerous drugs, or other controlled substances. Drug suppression, as conducted by USACIDC, refers to law...of particular -- 40 percent of soiders In theyounger ago groups have used legal drugs, principally marthuana, at some concern to the Army’s leadership...younger age groups have used illegal drugs, orincipally marihuana , at sometime during their lives -- not necessarl-y since entering the Army. In

  11. Pricing and Escalation Issues Weaken the Effectiveness of the Army Contract With Sikorsky to Support the Corpus Christi Army Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    Honeywell Rotor under a long- term contract that uses a process called “one-pass pricing.” In one-pass pricing, a group of DoD pricing experts provides real...e P ted on ® Recycled Peper C REPLY TO ATTENTION OF· AMSCC·IR DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY u.s. ARMY CONTRACTING COMMAND 3334A WELLS ROAD REDSTONE

  12. Sales Training for Army Recruiter Success: Sales Strategies and Skills Used by Excellent U. S. Army Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Army recruiters. Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) was used as the protocol for modeling performance and acquiring information on the communication...kills -Linguistic pattern~ Sales cycle, Communica tion s trategies Mode-H.R-g. Sales skills, {:( ~Expert kn0\\vlc dge1 ’ Neurolinguist ic~ Sales...describe s a program of r esearch on the communicat ion st rate - gies a nd skills use d by excellen t Army r ecrui t e rs. Information to be used to

  13. Sexual Assault: Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    ensure it has the staff needed to complete investigations within 3 weeks, as required by OCI guidance. Eligibility for follow-up or long-term health ...long-term mental and medical health -care services. DOD’s sexual assault prevention and response instruction requires the commander of the Army...correct or mitigate the challenges of funding behavioral health care for Army Reserve soldiers, particularly those who require coverage for trauma

  14. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    organization , or dedication to the Army as a profession. Essential elements of analysis include perceptions of: mutual trust ( internal ) – within the team...honorable service” (95%); accept risk in the performance of duty – demonstrate courage (98%); and to pursue lifelong learning and professional development...development and lifelong learning ; leading by example; mission and “Calling to Honorable Service;” shared Identity as Trusted Army Professionals; and to

  15. Prepare the Army for War. A Historical Overview of the Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1973 - 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    three years by the Society for History in the Federal Government to the official who has done most to promote the use and preservation of history in... Warrior which flew close reconnaissance and attack support for the Apache. Likewise deployed and successful were the Army tactical missile system...initiative settled the aeria! platform question when the Army agreed to accept the Air Force C- 18 transport and to drop sponsorship of its own Mohawk

  16. Continental collision zones are primary sites for net continental crust growth — A testable hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaoling; Zhao, Zhidan; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Mo, Xuanxue

    2013-12-01

    The significance of the continental crust (CC) on which we live is self-evident. However, our knowledge remains limited on its origin, its way and rate of growth, and how it has acquired the "andesitic" composition from mantle derived magmas. Compared to rocks formed from mantle derived magmas in all geological environments, volcanic arc rocks associated with seafloor subduction share some common features with the CC; both are relatively depleted in "fluid-insoluble" elements (e.g., Nb, Ta and Ti), but enriched in "fluid-soluble" elements (e.g., U, K and Pb). These chemical characteristics are referred to as the "arc-like signature", and point to a possible link between subduction-zone magmatism and CC formation, thus leading to the "island arc" model widely accepted for the origin of the CC over the past 45 years. However, this "island-arc" model has many difficulties: e.g., (1) the bulk arc crust (AC) is basaltic whereas the bulk CC is andesitic; (2) the AC has variably large Sr excess whereas the CC is weakly Sr deficient; and (3) AC production is mass-balanced by subduction erosion and sediment recycling, thus contributing no net mass to the CC growth, at least in the Phanerozoic. Our recent and ongoing studies on granitoid rocks (both volcanic and intrusive) formed in response to the India-Asia continental collision (~ 55 ± 10 Ma) show remarkable compositional similarity to the bulk CC with the typical "arc-like signature". Also, these syncollisional granitoid rocks exhibit strong mantle isotopic signatures, meaning that they were recently derived from a mantle source. The petrology and geochemistry of these syncollisional granitoid rocks are most consistent with an origin via partial melting of the upper ocean crust (i.e., last fragments of underthrusting ocean crust upon collision) under amphibolite facies conditions, adding net mantle-derived materials to form juvenile CC mass. This leads to the logical and testable hypothesis that continental collision

  17. Can Access to Data Prevent Army Suicides?: Identifying Optimal Response Strategies for Army Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Kelly, Theresa

    2016-06-20

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Army has invested significant resources in its efforts to prevent suicide and respond to a well-documented increase in suicides among active-duty soldiers. Among the efforts under way is a program to develop an information system that provides leaders with data on individual- and unit-level suicide risk factors and could serve as the basis for prevention and intervention activities. One shortfall of this approach is the lack of guidance on how Army leaders should interpret and use this information. To address this gap, RAND Arroyo Center convened a group of experts to reach consensus on recommended actions for leaders who are informed that an individual soldier exhibits a risk factor for suicide or that their unit exhibits an atypically high prevalence of suicide risk factors or a concerning trend of suicidality. The experts generally agreed that information on suicide risk indicators could be useful to unit leaders if they also received guidance on appropriate actions from behavioral health providers-and central to any response is the need to keep information about individual soldiers confidential. At the unit level, data on atypically high-risk behaviors should prompt a "root cause" analysis to discern whether the heightened prevalence is a reflection of actual behaviors or can be explained by other factors. The experts concluded that unit-level suicide trend data have limited utility for leader action because suicide is a relatively rare event and because individuals assigned to a unit change over time. The results of the exercise led to several recommendations on the use of data in response planning for Army leaders and directions for future research.

  18. Continental reach: The Westcoast Energy story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, P. C.

    2002-07-01

    A historical account is given of the spectacular success that was Westcoast Energy Inc., a Canadian natural gas giant that charted a wilderness pipeline from natural gas fields in Canada's sub-arctic solitude. The beginning of the company is traced to an event in 1934 when near the bank of the Pouce Coupe River, close to the Alberta-British Columbia border, Frank McMahon, a solitary wildcatter and the eventual founder of the company, first sighted the fiery inferno of a runaway wildcat well, drilled by geologists of the Imperial Oil Company during their original search for the Canadian petroleum basin's motherlode. It was on this occasion in 1934 that McMahon first conceived a geological profile that connected the gas-bearing sandstone of Pouce Coupe with the reservoir rock of the biggest natural gas field of Alberta, and a pipeline from this sandstone storehouse across the rugged heart of British Columbia to Vancouver, and south into the United States. It took the better part of a quarter century to realize the dream of that pipeline which, in due course, turned out to be only the first step towards reaching the top rank of Canadian corporations in operational and financial terms, and becoming one of only a handful in terms of a story that became a Canadian corporate legend. By chronicling the lives and contributions of the company's founder and senior officials over the years, the book traces the company's meteoric rise from a gleam in its founder's eye to a cautious regional utility, and to the aggressive Canadian adventurer that went on to burst the boundaries of its Pacific Coast world, until the continental reach of its operations and interests run from Canada's Pacific shoreline to its Atlantic basins and Mexico's Campeche Bay to Alaska's Prudhoe Bay. The company's independent existence came to an end in 2002 when Westcoast Energy, by then a $15 billion operation, was acquired by Duke Energy Limited of North

  19. Western Ross Sea continental slope gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Arnold L.; Orsi, Alejandro H.; Muench, Robin; Huber, Bruce A.; Zambianchi, Enrico; Visbeck, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water of the world ocean is derived from dense Shelf Water that is carried downslope by gravity currents at specific sites along the Antarctic margins. Data gathered by the AnSlope and CLIMA programs reveal the presence of energetic gravity currents that are formed over the western continental slope of the Ross Sea when High Salinity Shelf Water exits the shelf through Drygalski Trough. Joides Trough, immediately to the east, offers an additional escape route for less saline Shelf Water, while the Glomar Challenger Trough still farther east is a major pathway for export of the once supercooled low-salinity Ice Shelf Water that forms under the Ross Ice Shelf. The Drygalski Trough gravity currents increase in thickness from ˜100 to ˜400 m on proceeding downslope from ˜600 m (the shelf break) to 1200 m (upper slope) sea floor depth, while turning sharply to the west in response to the Coriolis force during their descent. The mean current pathway trends ˜35° downslope from isobaths. Benthic-layer current and thickness are correlated with the bottom water salinity, which exerts the primary control over the benthic-layer density. A 1-year time series of bottom-water current and hydrographic properties obtained on the slope near the 1000 m isobath indicates episodic pulses of Shelf Water export through Drygalski Trough. These cold (34.75) pulses correlate with strong downslope bottom flow. Extreme examples occurred during austral summer/fall 2003, comprising concentrated High Salinity Shelf Water (-1.9 °C; 34.79) and approaching 1.5 m s -1 at descent angles as large as ˜60° relative to the isobaths. Such events were most common during November-May, consistent with a northward shift in position of the dense Shelf Water during austral summer. The coldest, saltiest bottom water was measured from mid-April to mid-May 2003. The summer/fall export of High Salinity Shelf Water observed in 2004 was less than that seen in 2003. This difference, if real

  20. Fifteen years of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqin; Yang, Jingsui; Wang, Chengshan; An, Zhisheng; Li, Haibing; Wang, Qin; Su, Dechen

    2017-05-01

    Continental scientific drilling can be regarded as a telescope into the Earth's interior because it provides process insight and uncompromised samples of rocks, fluids, and even sampled from the deep biosphere from the Earth's surface to great depths. As one of the three founding members of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), ICDP China has made great achievements in many scientific drilling-related research fields. Based on the ICDP participation it attracted global attention of scientists and set up not only the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) Program in 2001 but also a growing number of ambitious drilling projects in the country. The 5158 m deep borehole of the CCSD project at Donghai County in the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terrain demonstrates that large amounts of crustal rocks of the South China Block have been subducted to at least 120 km, followed by rapid uplift. After successful completion of drilling at Donghai, several continental scientific drilling projects were conducted with funding of the Chinese government and partially with support of ICDP, resulting in a total drilling depth of more than 35 000 m. These projects encompass the Continental Environmental Scientific Drilling Program of China, the Scientific Drilling Project of Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone, the Continental Scientific Drilling Project of Cretaceous Songliao Basin, and the Program of Selected Continental Scientific Drilling and Experiments. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the ICDP and the 15th anniversary of the CCSD Program, this paper reviews the history and major progress of the CCSD Program.

  1. US Army hangar, Fort Carson, Colorado, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollick, J. [Solar Wall International Ltd., Downsview (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    The US Army's first solar-ventilated hangar is located at Fort Carson, Colorado. Fumes from the fuel tanks of up to 30 helicopters stored in the building are displaced with solar-warmed fresh air. A conventional gas-heated ventilation system had been specified, but a value engineering analysis done for the Corps of Engineers showed that a solar-heated ventilation system would be comparable in cost to what was specified, so the design was changed. The fans were installed with the original building in 1992, but the solar cladding system was installed later, in 1995. The panels had to be supplied later as a retrofit project because of scheduling concerns at the time of construction. The solar-transpired collectors cover 725 m{sup 2} of the south wall above the hangar doors and heat 107,000 m{sup 3}/h of ventilation air. Cost savings have been calculated at US $14,000 (ECU 12,600) a year based on energy savings of 974,000 kWh a year. (author)

  2. Numerical models of trench migration in continental collision zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Continental collision is an intrinsic feature of plate tectonics. The closure of an oceanic basin leads to the onset of subduction of buoyant continental material, which slows down and eventually stops the subduction process. We perform a parametric study of the geometrical and rheological influence on subduction dynamics during the subduction of continental lithosphere. In 2-D numerical models of a free subduction system with temperature and stress-dependent rheology, the trench and the overriding plate move self-consistently as a function of the dynamics of the system (i.e. no external forces are imposed. This setup enables to study how continental subduction influences the trench migration. We found that in all models the trench starts to advance once the continent enters the subduction zone and continues to migrate until few million years after the ultimate slab detachment. Our results support the idea that the trench advancing is favoured and, in part provided by, the intrinsic force balance of continental collision. We suggest that the trench advance is first induced by the locking of the subduction zone and the subsequent steepening of the slab, and next by the sinking of the deepest oceanic part of the slab, during stretching and break-off of the slab. The amount of trench advancing ranges from 40 to 220 km and depends on the dip angle of the slab before the onset of collision.

  3. Formation of Continental Fragments: The Tamayo Bank, Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, J.; Abera, R.; Axen, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Potential field data are used to construct a two-dimensional crustal model along a profile through the Tamayo Trough and Bank in the Gulf of California. The model is constrained by seismic reflection and refraction data, and field observations. The potential field data do not fit a model where the crust of the Tamayo trough is continental, but they fit well with a model where the Tamayo trough crust is oceanic. This implies that the Tamayo Bank is entirely bounded by oceanic crust and is a microcontinent. The oceanic crust of the Tamayo trough that separates the Tamayo Bank from the mainland of Mexico is thin (~4 km), so oceanic spreading was probably magma-starved before it ceased. This led us to come up with a model that explains the formation of microcontinents that are smaller in size and are not found in the proximity of hotspots. At first, seafloor spreading commences following continental breakup. When the magma supply to the ridge slows down, the plate boundary strengthens. Hence, the ridge may be abandoned while tectonic extension begins elsewhere, or slow spreading may continue while a new ridge starts to develop. The old spreading ridge becomes extinct. An asymmetric ocean basin forms if the ridge jumps within oceanic lithosphere; a microcontinent forms if the ridge jumps into a continental margin. This model for formation of continental fragments is applicable to other regions as well, eliminating the need of mantle plume impingement to facilitate rifting of a young continental margin and microcontinent formation.

  4. Tectonic escape in the evolution of the continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Sengor, C.

    1986-01-01

    The continental crust originated by processes similar to those operating today and continents consist of material most of which originated long ago in arc-systems that have later been modified, especially at Andean margins and in continental collisions where crustal thickening is common. Collision-related strike-slip motion is a general process in continental evolution. Because buoyant continental (or arc) material generally moves during collision toward a nearby oceanic margin where less buoyant lithosphere crops out, the process of major strike-slip dominated motion toward a 'free-face' is called 'tectonic escape'. Tectonic escape is and has been an element in continental evolution throughout recorded earth-history. It promotes: (1) rifting and the formation of rift-basins with thinning of thickened crust; (2) pervasive strike-slip faulting late in orogenic history which breaks up mountain belts across strike and may juxtapose unrelated sectors in cross-section; (3) localized compressional mountains and related foreland-trough basins.

  5. Sm/Nd Evolution of Upper Mantle and Continental Crust:Constraints on Gowth Rates of the Continental Crust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李曙光

    1992-01-01

    A new approach to the investigation of the Sm/Nd evolution of the upper mantle directly from the data on lherzolite xenoliths is described in this paper.It is demonstrated that the model age TCHUR of an unmetasomatic iherzolite zenolith ca represent the mean depletion age of its mantle source, thus presenting a correlation trend between fSm/Nd and the mean depletion age of the upper mantle from the data on xenoliths.This correlation trend can also be derived from the data on river suspended loads as well as from granitoids.Based on the correlation trend mentioned above and mean depletion ages of the upper mantle at various geological times, an evolution curve for the mean fSm/Nd value of the upper mantle through geological time has been established.It is suggested that the upwilling of lower mantle material into the upper mantle and the recycling of continental crust material during the Archean were more active ,thus maintaining fairly constantfSm/Nd and εNd values during this time period. Similarly ,an evolution curve for the mean fSm/Nd value of the continental crust through geological time has also been established from the data of continental crust material.In the light of both evolution curves for the upper mantle and continental crust ,a growth curve for the continental crust has been worked out ,suggesting that :(1)about 30%(in volume )of the present crust was present as the continental crust at 3.8 Ga ago ;(2)the growth rate was much lower during the Archean ;and (3)the Proterozoic is another major period of time during which the continental crust wsa built up .

  6. Boundaries - US Army Corps of Engineers - Habitat Restoration and Enhancement Projects (HREPs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — Congress authorized the Environmental Management Program (EMP) in the 1986 Water Resources Development Act to help address ecological needs on the Upper Mississippi...

  7. The Future of Army Space Forces: A Vision to Optimize Tactical and Operational Space Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    variety of satellite communications capabilities. 5. Expand Army Space Support Team Role in Headquarters Without Space Support Elements. The...Space capabilities, improving Space technical training, modifying FA40 manpower allocations, expanding Army Space Support Team roles in headquar

  8. In search of the Malaysian Extended Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Musa, T. A.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Abdullah, N. M.; Othman, A. H.; Wahab, M. I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Over the years, the sovereignty proclamation of Coastal States for their extended continental shelf has been a crucial matter. The declaration and extension of a continental shelf under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea provide significant potential for many developing nations in economics, trades, resource exploitation, communication and security. Hence, the application of satellite altimeter, as one of the solutions for collecting bathymetry data to define the approximate limits of the continental shelf, is reviewed. This paper also discusses the possible significance or contribution of space-derived bathymetry, i.e. the seafloor topography, either independently or harmoniously with different datasets, to meet the element of the Article 76 of UNCLOS.

  9. Cultural Changes Required in the Army to Truly Achieve a Total Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY CULTURAL CHANGES REQUIRED IN THE ARMY TO TRULY ACHIEVE A TOTAL FORCE by John Gobrick, LTC...and Army Reserve need to act now and implement enduring cultural changes . Leaders must invest the time and effort to address the underlying cultural...employment, technicians are required to have a simultaneous membership in the Army Reserve , typically in the same unit. The vast majority of Army

  10. Army Needs to Improve Processes Over Government-Furnished Material Inventory Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    under AMC are Aviation and Missile LCMC, Joint Munitions and Lethality LCMC, U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, and U.S. Army Tank– Automotive ...the contractor. U.S. Army Tank– Automotive Command did not specify in the contract a quantity of retrograde equipment to be repaired and entered an...Development,” November 2, 2010 Army Report No. A-2010-0188-ALM, “Depot-Level Maintenance Workload Reporting – FY 09,” September 27, 2010 Appendixes

  11. Integrating Bill of Materials Data Into the Armys Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    management with a concentration in human resources from Virginia State University and an MBA from Averett University, and he is a public policy... Resource Planning Systems  By LeQuan M. Hylton TOOLS The fielding of Global Combat Support System–Army has changed the way the Army manages bill...57 Army Sustainment November–December 2015 As the Army moves to an en-terprise resource planning

  12. Sustainability as a Force Multiplier in the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations & Environment),Army Enviromental Policy Institute,110 Army Pentagon Room 3E464,Washington,DC,20310-0600 8...environmental issues during deployments, Army units and commanders can gain tactical and strategic benefits that can extend from combat into the post...Environmental management • Management of natural resources • Wildlife protection Environmental issues include: (UNCLASSIFIED) (UNCLASSIFIED) Note: Many of the

  13. Advancements in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrographic Survey Capabilities: The SHOALS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Advancements in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrographic Survey Capabilities: The SHOALS System JEFF LILLYCROP U.S. Army Corps...the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers has undertaken a joint development program with Canada to construct and field test an operational prototype...hydrographic survey, airborne lidar. Introduction The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for surveying over 40,000 kilometers of federally

  14. Medal of Honor Award Process Review: U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer Nominee (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    surrounding the recommendation to award the Medal ofHonor (MOH) to a U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer for his valorous actions in combat while deployed...Secretary of the Army downgraded the nominee’s MOH award recommendation to the Silver Star (SS). Specificaliy, Representative Hunter requested that DoD...determine how the Army reached the conclusion to downgrade the nominee’s MOH recommendation to a SS; whether the Secretary ofthe Army has the authority

  15. Suicide attempts in U.S. Army combat arms, special forces and combat medics

    OpenAIRE

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Naifeh, James A.; Mash, Holly Herberman; Fullerton, Carol S.; Ng, Tsz Hin Hinz; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Wynn, Gary H; Dinh, Hieu M.; McCarroll, James E.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Schoenbaum, Michael; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Army suicide attempt rate increased sharply during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Risk may vary according to occupation, which significantly influences the stressors that soldiers experience. Methods: Using administrative data from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS), we identified person-month records for all active duty Regular Army enlisted soldiers who had a medically documented suicide attempt from 2004 through 2009 (n = 96...

  16. Army Science Planning and Strategy Meeting: The Fog of Cyber War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    ARL-TR-7902 ● DEC 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Army Science Planning and Strategy Meeting: The Fog of Cyber War by...Army Science Planning and Strategy Meeting: The Fog of Cyber War by Alexander Kott and Ananthram Swami Computational and Information Sciences ...Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) December 2015–February 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Science Planning and Strategy Meeting: The

  17. How the Army Runs: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Architecture and Component ERP Systems, page 309 Figure 12–9: Army Working Capital Fund, page 313 Figure 13–1: Strength Relationships, page 324 Figure 13...functional proponent for the Standard Army Ammunition System-Modernized ( SAAS –MOD) and 283 How the Army Runs responsible for programming, budgeting, and...Process Executives, and the 3–Star Enterprise Resource Planning ( ERP ) IPT. Support the BSIT–ESG chaired by the Under Secretary of the Army. (f

  18. Evolving the Army’s Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) Facilities Business Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    two are GOGOs, Tooele Army Depot ( TEAD ) and Anniston Army Depot (ANAD), and the other two are GOCO‟s, Hawthorne Army Ammunition (HWAAD) and Holston...Making-the-Military-More-Efficient. (accessed January 27, 2011) 15 Kathy Anderson, “ TEAD Participates in Special Installation Pilot Study”, May 26...2010 http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/05/26/39847- tead -participates-in-special-installation-pilot-study/ (accessed February, 27 2011) 16 Ibid. 21

  19. Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ARL-TN-0736 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army...Laboratory Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory by Jennifer L Gottfried...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable -Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  20. Hybrid accretionary/collisional mechanism of Paleozoic Asian continental growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmann, Karel; Lexa, Ondrej; Janousek, Vojtech; Pavla, Stipska; Yingde, Jiang; Alexandra, Guy; Min, Sun

    2016-04-01

    Continental crust is formed above subduction zones by well-known process of "juvenile crust growth". This new crust is in modern Earth assembled into continents by two ways: (i) short-lived collisions of continental blocks with the Eurasian continent along the "Alpine-Himalayan collisional/interior orogens" in the heart of the Pangean continental plates realm; and (ii) long lived lateral accretion of ocean-floor fragments along "circum-Pacific accretionary/peripheral orogens" at the border of the Pacific oceanic plate. This configuration has existed since the late Proterozoic, when the giant accretionary Terra Australis Orogen developed at periphery of an old Palaeo-Pacific ocean together with collisional Caledonian and Variscan orogens. At the same time, the large (ca. 9 millions km2) Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) developed in the NE part of the Pangea. This orogen reveals features of both peripheral and interior orogens, which implies that the generally accepted "peripheral-accretionary" and "interior- collisional" paradigm is not applicable here. To solve this conundrum a new model of unprecedented Phanerozoic continental growth is proposed. In this model, the CAOB precursor evolved at the interface of old exterior and young interior oceans. Subsequently, the new lithospheric domain was transferred by advancing subduction into the interior of the Pangean mostly continental realm. During this process the oceanic crust was transformed into continental crust and it was only later when this specific lithosphere was incorporated into the Asian continent. If true, this concept represents revolutionary insight into processes of crustal growth explaining the enigma of anchoring hybrid lithosphere inside a continent without its subduction or Tibetan-type thickening.

  1. Numerical models of slab migration in continental collision zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continental collision is an intrinsic feature of plate tectonics. The closure of an oceanic basin leads to the onset of subduction of buoyant continental material, which slows down and eventually stops the subduction process. In natural cases, evidence of advancing margins has been recognized in continental collision zones such as India-Eurasia and Arabia-Eurasia. We perform a parametric study of the geometrical and rheological influence on subduction dynamics during the subduction of continental lithosphere. In our 2-D numerical models of a free subduction system with temperature and stress-dependent rheology, the trench and the overriding plate move self-consistently as a function of the dynamics of the system (i.e. no external forces are imposed. This setup enables to study how continental subduction influences the trench migration. We found that in all models the slab starts to advance once the continent enters the subduction zone and continues to migrate until few million years after the ultimate slab detachment. Our results support the idea that the advancing mode is favoured and, in part, provided by the intrinsic force balance of continental collision. We suggest that the advance is first induced by the locking of the subduction zone and the subsequent steepening of the slab, and next by the sinking of the deepest oceanic part of the slab, during stretching and break-off of the slab. These processes are responsible for the migration of the subduction zone by triggering small-scale convection cells in the mantle that, in turn, drag the plates. The amount of advance ranges from 40 to 220 km and depends on the dip angle of the slab before the onset of collision.

  2. Closing the North American Carbon Budget: Continental Margin Fluxes Matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, R.; Benway, H. M.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Boyer, E. W.; Cai, W. J.; Coble, P. G.; Cross, J. N.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Goni, M. A.; Griffith, P. C.; Herrmann, M.; Lohrenz, S. E.; Mathis, J. T.; McKinley, G. A.; Pilskaln, C. H.; Smith, R. A.; Alin, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, continental margins are regions of intense carbon and nutrient processing, export and exchange, and thus have a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles. In response to recommendations for regional synthesis and carbon budget estimation for North America put forth in the North American Continental Margins workshop report (Hales et al., 2008), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program and North American Carbon Program (NACP) began coordinating a series of collaborative, interdisciplinary Coastal CARbon Synthesis (CCARS) research activities in five coastal regions of North America (Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, Gulf of Mexico, Arctic, Laurentian Great Lakes) to improve quantitative assessments of the North American carbon budget. CCARS workshops and collaborative research activities have resulted in the development of regional coastal carbon budgets based on recent literature- and model-based estimates of major carbon fluxes with estimated uncertainties. Numerous peer-reviewed papers and presentations by involved researchers have highlighted these findings and provided more in-depth analyses of processes underlying key carbon fluxes in continental margin systems. As a culminating outcome of these synthesis efforts, a comprehensive science plan highlights key knowledge gaps identified during this synthesis and provides explicit guidance on future research and observing priorities in continental margin systems to help inform future agency investments in continental margins research. This presentation will provide an overview of regional and flux-based (terrestrial inputs, biological transformations, sedimentary processes, atmospheric exchanges, lateral carbon transport) synthesis findings and key recommendations in the science plan, as well as a set of overarching priorities and recommendations on observations and modeling approaches for continental margin systems.

  3. Continental Fog Attenuation Empirical Relationship from Measured Visibility Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nadeem

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Free Space Optics (FSO has the great potential for future communication applications. However, weather influenced reduced availability had been the main cause for its restricted growth. Among different weather influences fog plays the major role. A new model generalized for all FSO wavelengths, has been proposed for the prediction of continental fog attenuation using visibility data. The performance of the proposed model has been compared with well known models for measured attenuation data of Continental fog. The comparison has been performed in terms of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE.

  4. GENERATION OF NONLINEAR INTERNAL WAVES ON CONTINENTAL SHELF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A 2-D KdV equation is derived under condition of arbitrary continuous density profiles. A non-fission version of initial internal solitary waves propagating onto the continental shelf is studied by means of the 2-D KdV equation. Under non-Bohr and Sommerfeld’s condition, numerical calculations are carried out based on the KdV equation. The results shows that the initial internal solitary waves in deep ocean break down into internal undular bores on the continental shelf. And the bores have a like-soliton leading fronts and undular trails.

  5. Data Assimilation in Hydrodynamic Models of Continental Shelf Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jacob Viborg Tornfeldt

    2004-01-01

    This thesis consists of seven research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2002-2004 together with a summary report. The thesis mainly deals with data assimilation of tide gauge data in two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of the continental shelf seas. Assimilat......This thesis consists of seven research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2002-2004 together with a summary report. The thesis mainly deals with data assimilation of tide gauge data in two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of the continental shelf seas...

  6. Response bias, weighting adjustments, and design effects in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Heeringa, Steven G; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Hwang, Irving; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase knowledge about determinants of suicidality. Three Army STARRS component studies are large-scale surveys: one of new soldiers prior to beginning Basic Combat Training (BCT; n = 50,765 completed self-administered questionnaires); another of other soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (n = 35,372); and a third of three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan who are being followed multiple times after returning from deployment (n = 9421). Although the response rates in these surveys are quite good (72.0-90.8%), questions can be raised about sample biases in estimating prevalence of mental disorders and suicidality, the main outcomes of the surveys based on evidence that people in the general population with mental disorders are under-represented in community surveys. This paper presents the results of analyses designed to determine whether such bias exists in the Army STARRS surveys and, if so, to develop weights to correct for these biases. Data are also presented on sample inefficiencies introduced by weighting and sample clustering and on analyses of the trade-off between bias and efficiency in weight trimming.

  7. 76 FR 69293 - U.S. Army Installation Management Command; Notice of Issuance of Director's Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION U.S. Army Installation Management Command; Notice of Issuance of Director's Decision Notice is... the possession, by the U.S. Army, of depleted uranium (DU), a source material, in spent spotting...) license. The Petition requested that the NRC take enforcement action against the U.S. Army by...

  8. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. 636.5 Section 636.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. For...

  9. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  10. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records. 581.3 Section 581.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a)...

  11. 32 CFR 516.14 - Service of process on DA or Secretary of Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Service of process on DA or Secretary of Army. 516.14 Section 516.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF... or Secretary of Army. The Chief, Litigation Division, shall accept service of process for...

  12. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: A Vision for Psychological Resilience in the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, George W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The stress and strain on the U.S. Army's community due to nearly a decade of protracted war is well documented in the press and in scientific literature. In response, the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program is a preventive program that seeks to enhance psychological resilience among all members of the Army community, which includes…

  13. 32 CFR 643.25 - Policy-Grants which may embarrass the Department of the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Army. 643.25 Section 643.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.25 Policy—Grants which may embarrass the Department of the Army. The use of property under DA control will not be authorized for any purpose when...

  14. The Army’s Approach to Property Accountability: A Strategic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    States Army Dr. Richard M. Meinhart Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the...The Army’s Approach to Property Accountability: A Strategic Assessment by Colonel Thomas Rivard United States Army ...United States Army War College Class of 2012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: A Approved for Public Release Distribution is Unlimited This

  15. Boundaries - US Army Corps of Engineers - St. Paul District (MVP) Civil Works

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The US Army Corps of Engineers - St. Paul District Civil Works boundary. Boundary is based on 1:24k watershed data and coordination with MVR to determine shared...

  16. Domestic and Expeditionary Readiness in the Twenty-First Century: Maintaining an Operationalized Army National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    1974 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1997), 5. 11 Marvin A. Kreidberg and Merton G. Henry, Department of the Army Pamphlet 20-212...Kreidberg, Marvin A. and Merton G. Henry, Department of the Army Pamphlet 20-212, History of Military Mobilization in the United States Army: 1775-1945

  17. Conserving the Future Force Fighting Strength: Findings from the Army Medical Department Transformation Workshops, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    TRADOC, AAN Overview Briefing: Army After Next-Knowledge, Speed and Power, Fort Monroe : U.S. Army TRADOC, 1999. 6 Conserving the Future Force Fighting...to Army if AMEDO hseof Pr Issue Not Resolved in Another Reovd Control mation Conditional Issue 1AN:, What doctrina mdchange mconsiderations of MOUn T

  18. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for...

  19. Is the British Army medical grading functional assessment tool effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Isobel

    2015-12-01

    Decision Support Aids (DSAs) have been widely used throughout industry and one (known as Table 7) is available to support British Army Medical Officers (MOs) grade soldiers against the Joint Medical Employment Standards. It is unknown how useful this DSA is in practice. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to British Army MOs working within Defence Primary Care facilities enquiring about MOs views on the usefulness of the DSA. Although the response rate was low, informative data were obtained. Between a half and a third of respondents felt that their judgement was affected in the application of the grading system when there were career implications to the grading MOs felt that the DSA allowed subjectivity in the grading. The results of this research suggest that although minor changes to Table 7 may improve service provision, an improvement in training in the application of Table 7 would be of greater benefit to the quality of occupational health service provision in the British Army.

  20. The Army Primary Health Care Service: from foundation to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J

    2010-09-01

    Following the British Government's implementation of policies to improve quality and introduce clinical governance into healthcare delivery in the late 1990s, the British Army commissioned a study into how primary healthcare for the Regular Army should best be delivered in UK. The study recommended a unitary command structure, with more central control based upon a model of a main headquarters and seven regions. The change has been largely successful and has been subject to external scrutiny. Areas still to be developed include improving information management and benchmarking standards against the NHS, improvements in practice management, plus developments in occupational health and the nursing cadres. The forthcoming Strategic Defence and Security Review and other ongoing studies are likely to have a profound influence on how the current Army Primary Health Care Service develops.

  1. Quaternary nanofossils on the Brazilian continental shelf; Nanofosseis calcarios do quaternario da margem continental brasileira

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Rogerio Loureiro [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Bioestratigrafia e Paleoecologia], E-mail: rlantunes@petrobras.com.br

    2007-07-01

    The study of calcareous nanofossils occurring in the deposits on the Brazilian continental margin began in the late 1960s, undertaken solely by PETROBRAS. Instead of presenting an academic outlook, the purpose of these investigations is first to formulate a biostratigraphic framework to apply to oil well samples. The initial result was the first zoning for the Brazilian continental margin, which considered the deposits formed between the Aptian and Miocene series. Since the 1960s to date, many papers have been written either with details of that original zoning or applying nanofossil biostratigraphy to solve stratigraphic problems. Regardless of all the papers and studies undertaken, little attention has been paid to the Quaternary, since these deposits are normally of no interest to petroleum geology stricto sensu, especially in a large part of the Brazilian margin. On the other hand, there are a few articles and some Master's dissertations and PhD theses that were written and/or are in progress in Brazilian universities. On the other hand, elsewhere in the world, Quaternary nanofossils have been thoroughly investigated in terms of biostratigraphy and paleoceanography. It is, therefore, very clear that there is a gap between what is being done elsewhere in the world and what has been done in Brazil. In fact, this gap is not larger simply because of a few researchers in Brazilian universities who are studying this topic. The intention of this paper is to contribute toward a richer study of Quaternary nanofossils. It, therefore, contains illustrations and taxonomic descriptions of many species observed in the younger strata of the Brazilian margin basins. This article not only aspires to portray and disseminate the potential of nanofossils for the marine Quaternary study but is also an invitation to students (under and post-graduates) and university researchers - an invitation to learn a little more about the subject and spend some time studying these real gems

  2. Conceptual Design for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, W. A.; Langtimm, C. A.; Adams, M. J.; Gallant, A. L.; James, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    In 2000, the President of the United States (US) and Congress directed Department of Interior (DOI) agencies to develop a program for monitoring trends in amphibian populations on DOI lands and to conduct research into causes of declines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was given lead responsibility for planning and implementing the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Land Management. The program objectives are to (1) establish a network for monitoring the status and distribution of amphibian species on DOI lands; (2) identify and monitor environmental conditions known to affect amphibian populations; (3) conduct research on causes of amphibian population change and malformations; and (4) provide information to resource managers, policy makers, and the public in support of amphibian conservation. The ARMI program will integrate research efforts of USGS, other Federal, and non-federal herpetologists, hydrologists, and geographers across the Nation. ARMI will conduct a small number (~20) of intensive research efforts (for example, studies linking amphibian population changes to hydrologic conditions) and a larger number (~50) of more generalized inventory and monitoring studies encompassing broader areas such as NPS units. ARMI will coordinate with and try to augment other amphibian inventory studies such as the National Amphibian Atlas and the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program. ARMI will develop and test protocols for the standardized collection of amphibian data and provide a centrally managed database designed to simplify data entry, retrieval, and analysis. ARMI pilot projects are underway at locations across the US.

  3. The US Army and the New National Security Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    for Strategic Plans and Policy on the Joint Staff Maj. Gen. Charles F. "Chuck" Wald , USAF, presented a briefing in the Pentagon entitled "Operation...of a decade. But if you can change that 10 percent, you can, in fact, change the capability of the entire force" ( Wolfowitz , 2002). 288 The U.S. Army...Four Weapons Programs," Inside theArmy, October 14, 2002. Wolfowitz , Paul, Deputy Secretary of Defense, remarks delivered to the Ameri- can Institute of

  4. Parameters: US Army War College Quarterly. Volume 20. Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    South Vietnam; and siege-breaking at Dien Bien Phu and Khe Sanh. In all of these cases, CAS substituted for a lack of available artillery assets, and...service persona . But is it in the Army’s interest to take over CAS, much less all of tactical aviation? No. The Army cannot afford the force structure...of a Former Iron Curtain Official." 10 (September, 1980), 8-15. Radvanyi, Janos. "Dien Bien Phu: Tiirt ’ears After." 15 (Summer, 1985), 63-68. Raho

  5. Mentoring the Afghan Army at the Officer Academy in Kabul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster Christensen, Maya

    Capacity building of host nation militaries is a central component of current multinational military operations, which is likely to become increasingly vital to future military interventions in conflict settings. Focusing on the mentoring of the Afghan National Army at the British-led officer...... academy in Kabul, this policy brief stresses the urgency with which Western militaries should improve military capacity building efforts. Based on qualitative data collected at the British Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the Afghan National Army Officer Academy, the brief outlines five clusters...

  6. The United States Army 1995 Modernization Plan. Force 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-06

    Added Bteck I. ER tIERS beco n - av.~fe to Owu Gapcabily df the LRS oldn~ Candwed 4wit comikied oaw~qslh of repo Iwv sensors.W end lsl of AFATDS. Owe...fevlution of the Army tacal computer program., prowdes tolow-•n syst•nm in support of combat service support maisons . The Sund Army Manwaogment Worma...commanders will nave a common, reel time picture of the battlefield NBC% hazards. Avoidar~e- Warn,/ Repo rt" S ’. " AaNear-Term Mid-Term lar-Term Manual

  7. Compact networked radars for Army unattended ground sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.; Viveiros, Edward A.; Wellman, Ronald; Clark, John; Kurtz, Jim; Pulskamp, Jeff; Proie, Robert; Ivanov, Tony; Polcawich, Ronald G.; Adler, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory is in partnership with the University of Florida - Electronics Communications Laboratory to develop compact radar technology and demonstrate that it is scalable to a variety of ultra-lightweight platforms (<10 lbs.) to meet Army mission needs in persistent surveillance, unattended ground sensor (UGS), unmanned systems, and man-portable sensor applications. The advantage of this compact radar is its steerable beam technology and relatively long-range capability compared to other small, battery-powered radar concepts. This paper will review the ongoing development of the sensor and presents a sample of the collected data thus far.

  8. Early diagenesis of phosphorus in continental margin sediments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the organic material in the oceans that reaches the sea floor is deposited on continental margins and not in the deep sea. This organic matter is the principal carrier of phosphorus (P) to sediments. A part of the organic material is buried definitely. The other part decomposes, resulting in

  9. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of @iRV gaveshani@@ were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral cntent. The distribution of total clay (< 4~k fraction...

  10. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  11. Potential for Suboxic Ammonium Oxidation in Louisiana Continental Shelf Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediments deposited onto the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) west of the Mississippi River Delta form mobile muds varying in thickness from meters near the outfall to centimeters on the western portion of the shelf. The muds have high concentrations of iron which promote rapid...

  12. Microbial Communities in Sediments across the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Louisiana continental Shelf (LCS) is a dynamic system that receives discharges from two large rivers. It has a stratified water column that is mixed by winter storms, hypoxic bottom water from spring to fall, and a muddy seafloor with highly mixed surficial sediments. Spatia...

  13. Structure and tectonics of the southwestern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Rao, D.G.; Ramana, M.V.; Krishna, K.S.; Murty, G.P.S.; Rao, M.G.

    , V., 1987. A note on the occurrence of ortho-amphibolites on the inner shelf off Bhatkal, west coast of India. J. Geol. Soc. India, 30: 499-506. Subrahmanyam, V., 1992. Structure and tectonics of part of the western continental margin of India...

  14. Continental Tire to Build New Tire Plant in USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Ye

    2012-01-01

    According to Tire Comments of USA, Continental Tire earlier announced that in order to meet the increasing market demand on replacement tires of USA, German Tire Company had negotiated and reached an agreement on production capacity expansion with the South Carolina Government.

  15. Geochemistry of sediments of the eastern continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A; Paropkari, A; Murty, P.S

    The bulk and partition geochemistry of Al, Fe, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Cu have been investigated in sediments of the eastern continental shelf of India. The results show that (1) the bulk geochemistry varies from one shelf unit to the other, (2) all...

  16. Marine magnetic anomalies off Ratnagiri, Western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.

    . Identification of these basalts in offshore areas along the northwestern continental shelf of India would support (1) the idea that the onshore Deccan basalts of western India and the rhyolitic tuffs at the Laccadive ridge system (DSDP Site 210) are related...

  17. The petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    In this document the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate estimates the total recoverable petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf to be 12.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. There is considerable uncertainty regarding the undiscovered resources, the expected value being 3.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. The new estimates signify an increase of 14% since the calculations made last year. This increase is chiefly due to an upward adjustment of the expectations for a future increase in the recovery factor for the in place resources on the continental shelf. In 1995, the Norwegian oil production accounted for 4.3% of the global oil production. It is estimated that Norway has a total of about 1.3% of the discovered recoverable oil resources and about 1.8% of the discovered recoverable gas resources in the world. The Norwegian annual oil production is expected to reach a maximum of 3.7 million barrels per day in the year 2000. Many new discoveries are still being made on the Norwegian continental shelf. In the last two years, 20 new discoveries have been made, giving a resources growth of about 260 million Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. Great technological progress has been made on the Norwegian continental shelf during the last five years concerning exploration, development and production. As for mapping, the introduction of 3D seismic data and the development of interpolation tools have helped to provide a much better understanding of the substratum. 88 figs.

  18. Mineralogy of the carbonate sediments - western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    An X-ray diffraction study of forty-six sediment samples and three oolitic limestone samples from the western continental shelf of India shows that aragonite is the dominant carbonate mineral (99% maximum), followed by low-magnesium calcite (77...

  19. The petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    In this document the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate estimates the total recoverable petroleum resources on the Norwegian continental shelf to be 12.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. There is considerable uncertainty regarding the undiscovered resources, the expected value being 3.5 billion Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. The new estimates signify an increase of 14% since the calculations made last year. This increase is chiefly due to an upward adjustment of the expectations for a future increase in the recovery factor for the in place resources on the continental shelf. In 1995, the Norwegian oil production accounted for 4.3% of the global oil production. It is estimated that Norway has a total of about 1.3% of the discovered recoverable oil resources and about 1.8% of the discovered recoverable gas resources in the world. The Norwegian annual oil production is expected to reach a maximum of 3.7 million barrels per day in the year 2000. Many new discoveries are still being made on the Norwegian continental shelf. In the last two years, 20 new discoveries have been made, giving a resources growth of about 260 million Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. Great technological progress has been made on the Norwegian continental shelf during the last five years concerning exploration, development and production. As for mapping, the introduction of 3D seismic data and the development of interpolation tools have helped to provide a much better understanding of the substratum. 88 figs.

  20. Sediments of the western continental shelf of India - Environmental significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.

    the occurrence of abundance peaks at similar depths in the other regions of the continental shelf that they must correspond to the presence of lowered strands. The disposition of the black shells in a linear fashion parallel to the coast line at the depths...

  1. CEO compensation, family control, and institutional investors in Continental Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croci, Ettore; Gonenc, Halit; Ozkan, Neslihan

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of family control and institutional investors on CEO pay packages in Continental Europe, using a dataset of 754 listed firms with 3731 firm-year observations from 14 countries during 2001-2008. We find that family control curbs the level of CEO total and cash compe

  2. Continental Announces Carbon Offsetting Program with Sustainable Travel International

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On December 3,2007,HOUSTON,-Continental Airlines announced that it has launched acarbon offsetting program,developed in partnership with non-profit Sustainable Travel International which is a US-based non-profit organization whose mission is to promote sustainable development and responsible travel by providing programs.

  3. Switching between alternative responses of the lithosphere to continental collision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baes, M.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2011-01-01

    We study possible responses to arc–continent or continent–continent collision using numerical models. Our short-term integration models show that the initial stage of deformation following continental collision is governed by the competition between three potential weakness zones: (1) mantle wedge,

  4. A continuous seismic section across the continental slope off Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagaay, R.A.; Collette, B.J.

    1967-01-01

    Continuous seismic reflection data show that there are no unconsolidated sediments on the outer part of the Irish continental shelf west of Donegal Bay and on the upper part of the slope. Both the “basement” and the sediment cover on the lower part of the slope are heavily intersected, presumably by

  5. The structural evolution of the deep continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Miller, Meghan S.; Moresi, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Continental lithosphere houses the oldest and thickest regions of the Earth's surface. Locked within this deep and ancient rock record lies invaluable information about the dynamics that has shaped and continue to shape the planet. Much of that history has been dominated by the forces of plate tectonics which has repeatedly assembled super continents together and torn them apart - the Wilson Cycle. While the younger regions of continental lithosphere have been subject to deformation driven by plate tectonics, it is less clear whether the ancient, stable cores formed and evolved from similar processes. New insight into continental formation and evolution has come from remarkable views of deeper lithospheric structure using enhanced seismic imaging techniques and the increase in large volumes of broadband data. Some of the most compelling observations are that the continental lithosphere has a broad range in thicknesses ( 300 km), has complex internal structure, and that the thickest portion appears to be riddled with seismic discontinuities at depths between 80 and 130 km. These internal structural features have been interpreted as remnants of lithospheric formation during Earth's early history. If they are remnants, then we can attempt to investigate the structure present in the deep lithosphere to piece together information about early Earth dynamics much as is done closer to the surface. This would help delineate between the differing models describing the dynamics of craton formation, particularly whether they formed in the era of modern plate tectonics, a transitional mobile-lid tectonic regime, or are the last fragments of an early, stagnant-lid planet. Our review paper (re)introduces readers to the conceptual definitions of the lithosphere and the complex nature of the upper boundary layer, then moves on to discuss techniques and recent seismological observations of the continental lithosphere. We then review geodynamic models and hypotheses for the formation

  6. US Army Research Office research in progress, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The US Army Research Office, under the US Army Materiel Command (AMC), is responsible for coordinating and supporting research in the physical and engineering sciences, in materials science, geosciences, biology, and mathematics. This report describes research directly supported by the Army Research Projects Agency, and several AMC and other Army commands. A separate section is devoted to the research program at the US Army Research, Development and Standardization Group - United Kingdom. The present volume includes the research program in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, engineering sciences, metallurgy and materials science, geosciences, electronics, and the European Research Program. It covers the 12-month period from 1 July 1991 through 30 June 1992.

  7. Department of the Army Justification of Estimates for Fiscal Year 1979 Submitted to Congress January 1978. Research Development, Test and Evaluation, Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Development Administration - Pipe Line Gas; HYBLA Gold; DIABLO HAWK; Grout StudiesJl Borerffle Waste; A Fracturing; High Temperature IXist Energy...392012 AJWCC Improvement- Plan 208015 Project AVID GUARDIAN . Total O&M, Army 403 Total Army 2 462 Total Army Included in Other Ceiling 604...ELEMENT MITRE CORPORATIOH (Continued) , 8. Project AVID GUARDIAN - a. Project AVID GUARDIAN , established in 197A, has been conducting studies to

  8. Structural lineaments from the magnetic anomaly maps of the eastern continental margin of India (ECMI) and NW Bengal Fan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murthy, K.S.R.; Rao, T.C.S.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Rao, M.M.M.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    extension of 85 degrees E ridge, abutting the continental shelf off Chilka Lake and (3) trend 3, locted over the continental shelf/slope between Visakhapatnm and Paradip represents a folded (ridges and depressions) nature of the continental basement...

  9. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf and slope off Saurashtra, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    the Deccan trap coastal province is the predominant clay mineral in the sediments of the continental shelf south of the Gulf of Kutch. Lateral variations reveal that the montmorillonite contents are high in the innershelf and on the continental slope...

  10. Continental Airlines Again Ranked NO.1 Most Admired Global Airline by Fortune Magazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ HOUSTON, March 12, 2007 Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL) announced that it was again rated the top airline on FORTUNE magazine's annual airline industry list of Most Admired Global Companies. This is the fourth year that Continental has topped that list.

  11. 75 FR 10809 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee-Notice of Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee--Notice of Renewal AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of renewal of the Outer Continental Shelf Scientific...

  12. 77 FR 15382 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (Committee). The Committee provides advice...

  13. 75 FR 3423 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY.... Requirements applying to Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward..., Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer...

  14. 76 FR 43230 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia AGENCY... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources located within...

  15. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    KAUST Repository

    Laruelle, G. G.

    2013-05-29

    Past characterizations of the land-ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems). Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation) and 149 sub-units (COSCATs). Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric profiles. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air-water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies. © 2013 Author(s).

  16. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laruelle, G.G.; Dürr, H.H.; Lauerwald, R.; Hartmann, J.; Slomp, C.P.; Goossens, N.; Regnier, P.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Past characterizations of the land–ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and dista

  17. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Laruelle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Past characterizations of the land–ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems. Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation and 149 sub-units (COSCATs. Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric profiles. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air–water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies.

  18. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Laruelle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex coastline of the Earth is over 400 000 km long and about 40% of the world's population lives within 100 km of the sea. Past characterizations of the global coastline were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCAT: Coastal Segmentation and related CATchments or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LME: Large Marine Ecosystems. Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles which retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation and 149 sub-units (COSCATS. Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and fresh water residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric profiles. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. These results can be used for regional analyses and combined with various typologies for upscaling and biogeochemical budgets. In addition, the three levels segmentation can be used for application in Earth System analysis.

  19. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    KAUST Repository

    Laruelle, G. G.

    2012-10-04

    Past characterizations of the land–ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems). Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation) and 149 sub-units (COSCATs). Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric pro- files. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air–water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies.

  20. Army Communicator. Volume 35, Number 3, Fall 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ophthalmology industry in Atlanta through his civilian job...signal officer…” Wildman went on to request the latest European wireless sets for training at the school. During MAJ Wildman’s time as commandant...in Journalism . AAFES - Army Air Force Exchange System ACENET - Active Directory/COOP/Exchange/NAS/ Enterprise Vault/Telemetry-Tapeless AGM -

  1. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... and Technology and Small Unit Data to Decisions. Proposed Agenda: Thursday 26 July 2012: 1530-1630--The study results for Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology and Small Unit Data to Decisions studies are presented to the ASB. The ASB will deliberate and vote upon adoption of the...

  2. Water Efficient Installations - A New Army Guidance Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Detection and Repair 4. Water Efficient Landscaping 5. Water Efficient Irrigation 6. Toilets and Urinals 7. Faucets and Showerheads 8. Boiler/Steam...lose 8760 to 219,000 gal/year Broken flush valve on toilet can lose 40 gal/hour US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research and Development Center...Amendments ( Compost ) 20 Irrigation Scheduling

  3. The United States Army Infantry Squad: Year 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-04

    time is a testament to the selfless service they provide the Army daily. To Kellie, Ashley, and Haley, thank you for the notes, pictures, love , and... astrology . "s Before World War I, the world’s major military powers studied major battles to determine how best to prepare their forces to fight in the

  4. Army Sustainability and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    strategies that DOD and the Army have implemented are policies such as buy-ing green products for cleaning and promoting tele- work or telecommuting ...environmentally preferable materials, products , and services; design, construct, maintain, and operate high performance sustainable buildings in sustainable...glues, and solvents commonly used in building construction products and some industrial cleaners. In general, when people work in a sustainable

  5. Army Study Shows Decline In Behavioral Health Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    downrange are the protocols that last year led to diagnoses for 9,000 soldiers who had concussions downrange, Chiarelli said. The protocols Report...occur when concussions are not treated. "I think this is a huge step forward that we made," he said, added that the Army has diagnosed 126,000 cases of

  6. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 1, January-February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    forces in Iraq. In the early stages of the fielding, brand -new MRAPs rolling off airplanes and ships were plagued by unforeseen trouble with a...Hagenston 30 RSR and CSR : Why the Confusion? Dr. Thomas E. Ward II 16 Spectrum: Army Logistics Knowledge Management and SALE: A Paradigm for

  7. Army - Air Force Cooperation: Looking Backward to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    30 Shape and Influence Security Environments...wars and battles are fought, it is not surprising that the Army and Air Force, each with their own culture and philosophies, can’t always agree. The...over the undue emphasis on defense over offense. The argument centered around the 32 Blumenfeld, AirLand Battle Doctrine, 13. 33 Ibid., 14. 15

  8. The US and Canadian Army Strategies: Failures in Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    Staff memorandum dated 23 June 1999. 124 Army Strategy. 125 Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad, “ The Core Competence of the Corporation ”, HBR (1990). The...Psychology, Volume 42, Annual Reviews, Inc., 1991 Prahalad, C.K., and Gary Hamel,” The Core Competence of the Corporation ,” Harvard Business Review, May

  9. The U.S. Army Religious Support Environment of 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    the potential to impact the Army Chaplaincy during the next eight years. Second, it will demonstrate the use of forecasting techniques to discover...often use their own money to purchase new technology for use in some worship services, while other services still use old hymnals and ancient pianos

  10. The Organizational Anomaly of US Army Strategic Counterintelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    piles of tinder in the organization, but these recommendations are no substitute for the deliberate planning that will be necessary to secure the... tinder before it can ignite and ensure continued vitality within Army CI. Coming to grips with the new challenges and threats of the twenty-first

  11. Materiel Acquisition Management of U.S. Army Attack Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-02

    incorporated into a mast mounted sight ( MS ). CO The initial OH-58D did not have provisions for a weapon suite. However, with the proliferation of...Briefing, "Apache Multi Stage Improvement Program ( MSIP )," Apache Program Manager’s Office, U.S. Army Aviation Support Command, St Louis, Missouri

  12. Streamlining U.S. Army Military Installation Map (MIM) Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Assurance Plans ( QAPs ). Serves as the standardized data structure across all Army training and testing installations. Once populated, this...produced NGA MIMs and supporting documentation. All aspects reflect the layout, fonts, and features which are common to MIMs. Based on SRP QAP (CIP

  13. The Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology: Final Report 83 MCWL USMC Warfighting Laboratory MEDEVAC Medical Evacuation MEP Mobile ...Environment Findings: The technology playing field is changing, important t echnology breakthroughs are principa lly driven by commercial and...control charge localization and mobility in the film; initial results have demonstrated substantial improvements in dielectric performance. The

  14. Assessing the Value of U.S. Army International Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    of U.S. Army International Activities Tajfel , Henri , Human Groups and Social Categories, Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1981. Taw...more recent treatment, see Fearon (1997, pp. 68–90). 3 For general discussions, see Tajfel (1981, p. 36), Hogg and Abrams (1998, pp. 31–63), and Goffman

  15. Branding: A Strategy for Manning an All-Volunteer Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-12

    Command G2, “ Competitive Intelligence Assessment,” briefing slides with scripted commentary, Fort Knox, U.S. Army Accessions Command, 2 October 2007...USAAC G2, “ Competitive Intelligence Assessment,” 22. 56 Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), “National Defense Budget Estimates

  16. The Army’s Cargo Fleet in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-05-01

    Hodson forwarded a detailed memorandum to the Command- ing General, !few York Port of Embarkation, directing that a number of officers be selected, trained...grading of personnel. In a memorandum of 23 April 1943 for the Army Chief of Staff, CGeorge C. Marshall, Admiral Ernest J. King noted that in the early

  17. Learning Organization Dimensions of the Sri Lanka Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahanayake, Nishada Dhananjaya; Gamlath, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study intends to investigate the extent to which the Sri Lanka Army can be described as a learning organization. Design/methodology/approach: The main tool of analysis used was the Dimensions of the Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) developed by Marsick and Watkins, with the exclusion of the sections on financial and…

  18. Master Resilience Training in the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; McBride, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Army Master Resilience Trainer (MRT) course, which provides face-to-face resilience training, is one of the foundational pillars of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program. The 10-day MRT course is the foundation for training resilience skills to sergeants and for teaching sergeants how to teach these skills to their soldiers. The…

  19. Net Zero Ft. Carson: making a greener Army base

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Army Net Zero program seeks to reduce the energy, water, and waste footprint of bases. Seventeen pilot bases aim to achieve 100% renewable energy, zero depletion of water resources, and/or zero waste to landfill by 2020. Some bases are pursuing Net Zero in a single secto...

  20. U.S. Army Interwar Planning: The Protective Mobilization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Arnold, in addition to others, to discuss the state of the Army air forces. Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Morgenthau was present and noted in......argument. When asked by Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau , if it was true that he could only field 75,000 fully equipped troops, Chief of