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Sample records for contents foreword preface

  1. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropila, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this foreword author deals with historical aspects of reactor accidents on Chernobyl NPP and Three Mile Island NPP. These accidents are warning for peoples and shows on risks at use of nuclear energy

  2. Foreword

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engen, John R.; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this article as: J.R. Engen, T.J.D. Jørgensen, Foreword, International Journal of Mass Spectrometry (2010), doi:10.1016/j.ijms.2011.02.010......Please cite this article as: J.R. Engen, T.J.D. Jørgensen, Foreword, International Journal of Mass Spectrometry (2010), doi:10.1016/j.ijms.2011.02.010...

  3. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this foreword chairman introduce to the Congress. The scientific work of the congress was divided into 8 sections: General Aspects of Radiation Protection (19); Impact of Workplaces with Radiation Sources on the Environment (13); Environmental Monitoring (19); Dose assessment (18); Natural Sources of Radiation (21); Biological Dosimetry and Health Effects (13); Radiation Protection in Medicine (10); Optimisation of Radiation Protection and Quality Assurance (8); The numbers refer to the number of papers presented under the given topic

  4. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razykov, Z.A; Gusakov, E.G.; Marushenko, A.A.; Botov, A.Yu.; Yunusov, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Searches of uranium industrial mines in Tajikistan began during he post-war period. Soon they resulted with discovery of a number of mines. Uranium mines in Taboshar and Adrasmon made the region of Northern Tajikistan as priority area for organization of their industrial processing. Also the foreword gives short description about geological searches for other uranium mines on the territory of the Republic of Tajikistan [ru

  5. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratynski, W.; Sujkowski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    In the Foreword to the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies Annual Report - 1996 directors of the Institute professor Wojciech Ratynski and professor Ziemowit Sujkowski present briefly the scientific output of the institute, its problems, new departments and new activities. Among of the important scientific results one can mention: the further prediction of the properties of heaviest elements, theoretical work on the quantum approach to the classical formula of one body dissipation, the experimental work on the deep inelastic scattering of muons(within the CERN collaboration), the work on the propagation of strange matter in the atmosphere, the project of new accelerating structure for the medical purpose (COLINE accelerator), the work on the polarization of X-rays emitted in the Plasma-Focus systems and the work on measuring the absolute quantal efficiency of various scintillation materials. The production of the new accelerators for medical as well as for scientific purposes is also mentioned. As an important kind of activities the international collaboration and new initiative, formation of the Department of Training and Consulting, which allow the Institute for connection with the national education system is also described

  6. Foreword

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratynski, W.; Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In the Foreword to the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies Annual Report - 1996 directors of the Institute professor Wojciech Ratynski and professor Ziemowit Sujkowski present briefly the scientific output of the institute, its problems, new departments and new activities. Among of the important scientific results one can mention: the further prediction of the properties of heaviest elements, theoretical work on the quantum approach to the classical formula of one body dissipation, the experimental work on the deep inelastic scattering of muons(within the CERN collaboration), the work on the propagation of strange matter in the atmosphere, the project of new accelerating structure for the medical purpose (COLINE accelerator), the work on the polarization of X-rays emitted in the Plasma-Focus systems and the work on measuring the absolute quantal efficiency of various scintillation materials. The production of the new accelerators for medical as well as for scientific purposes is also mentioned. As an important kind of activities the international collaboration and new initiative, formation of the Department of Training and Consulting, which allow the Institute for connection with the national education system is also described.

  7. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Cancela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The 20th volume of the CLEI electronic journal includes six papers selected from an open call for papers on Natural Language Processing (NLP, processed by invited editors Gerardo Sierra and César Aguilar, and an additional regular paper. The NLP subject was suggested by Gabriela Marín and Antonio Leoni de León, the chairs of NLPCR 2016, the First Costa-Rican Colloquium on Natural Language Processing. The invited editors took care of the review process and the selection of the six papers, as discussed in their Preface which opens this issue. The additional regular paper is a contribution by Jose Aguilar, Guido Riofrío, and Eduardo Encalada, titled "Learning Analytics focused on student behavior. Case study: dropout in distance learning institutions", which focuses on the use of Learning Analytics for undestanding student behavior in the context of distance learning universities, particularly focuses on the students’ behavior, with the goal of identifying factors that influence the decision of a student to abandon their studies, predicting students susceptible to abandon their studies, and defining their motivational patterns. This issue, which opens the 20th volume of the journal, is a mark of the success of the mission of CLEIej as a vehicle for publishing Latin American based original research in subjects of international interest; we are glad to be able to develop this mission with the support of the researchers who kindly contribute their time as invited editors and reviewers of the papers received.

  8. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Full text:There is always a temptation while writing a Foreword to the Annual Report of a big research institute to address the big issues of the scientific policy in the country in which you operate. The declared policy in our country is to follow the Lisbon declaration, to increase the funding of research at an accelerating pace, so as to reach soon the goal of 3% of GNP. Along with that declaration, there is a steady decrease of the funding, the present state budget providing about 0,3% GNP with some wishful thinking about the private industry doing the rest. No comments. We can invite foreigners for various survival courses, fashionable in extreme sports but less attractive in normal daily life. There is a question of mission for a large, multi-disciplinary institute like ours in a country like Poland to-day, undergoing the convulsions of transformation and urgently trying to catch-up with the world of wealth, the world of hi-tech. Personally, I am convinced that we have such a mission, that there is an important role to fill in a modern society for an institute of our type: a fair size national laboratory with a fifty-fifty share of basic research and of R and D, being a natural research back-up for high technology development as well as an important contributor to the cultural and educational advancement of the country. Within the present organization of scientific research in Poland our mission should and could best be carried out under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences. I hope that the rather artificial difficulties in the transfer of our Institute from our present formal supervising body, the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Labour, to the Academy will eventually be removed and the transfer will finally take place. We try to pursue our mission within the limited resources we have, the best we can. I invite the reader to glance through the pages of this Report to hopefully find confirmation of this. A few highlights as well as some trends worth

  9. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: For Polish science the year 2002 was the year of struggle for survival. The state financing has reached the lowest-ever level. The sudden drop in this financing was like pulling a pillow from under a dying. Many a weaker man dies, many a weaker institution perishes. This Annual Report bears witness that we have managed to survive, though we did not emerge quite unscathed: our personnel had decreased in number by about 15 %, the number of our publications did not increase (about 200), no discovery worth the Nobel prize was announced, etc. We do, however, have some pieces of good work to brag about (see the forewords to various chapters in this Report by the department leaders). As examples, I'll mention two very different award gaining contributions. One is a piece of advanced mathematics applied elegantly to a rather general physical problem, the other is a piece of advanced electronics which has finally matured to commercialization. We have also started to explore new research territories. Thus e.g. we are now actively engaged in the fast growing international collaboration on the hottest subject in subatomic physics: the neutrino physics (as it happens, the topic of the latest Nobel lecture). Our belt tightening happens at the time of a natural ''change of guards''. Several of our senior colleagues retire and leave the institute or continue part time only. One of the presently most essential tasks for our long term survival is to fill the vacancies with ''fresh blood''. Against the odds, we can claim at least a partial success in this task, though far below the needs. In addition to our Ph. D. studies and to opening a few post-doc positions, we also engage in educational activities at other levels. We took active part in the ''Warsaw Science Picnic'' in the spring and in the Science Festival in the autumn, we managed to greatly enrich the permanent exhibition of our Training Department (notably with a rather sophisticated, 1:10 scale model of a nuclear

  10. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Science in Poland seems to be like the horse in the story: the owner of the horse has embarked on an experimental programme to teach the animal to break its habit of eating. The programme was very successful. The final effect, however, was partly spoiled by the untimely death of the horse. With ever diminishing subsidies for science in Poland, we are still kicking. Our scientific output does not seem to be correlated with financing. We published nearly 200 papers in journals acknowledged by the Philadelphia Institute, about the same as in previous years, we managed to make progress in several fields of technology (e.g. the new, higher energy therapeutical accelerator, the installation of a new, quite powerful ion implantation device for modification of material properties, the further development of the ''photon needle'' for brachytherapy, or the very promising first experience with the innovative technique of niobium coating for superconducting cavities). One thing we did not manage: we did not manage to get younger. And this, really is correlated with finances, and even more so, with the lack of prospects for young people, as they see it, for careers in science. We do what we can in this respect, witness our PhD programme, but this is a loosing battle as long as the present policy towards science in Poland does not change. Details of development in various fields of activities carried out at our institute are best described in the forewords to each chapter of this Annual Report. Here, I wish to mention just a few highlights, pleasant happenings, to catch a few fleeting memories. Thus, e.g., our PhD programme for youngsters seems to be nicely supplemented by the one for grown-ups. Example: the honoris causa doctorate for professor Adam Sobiczewski, granted by Lublin University. Another pleasant memory: the fun under the roof of our Institute's tent during the ''Scientific Picnic'' at the New Marker Square in the Old Town. The fun (e.g. the in various

  11. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej BEKEŠ

    2011-05-01

    , Asia and beyond.   Acta Linguistica Asiatica will, following Roman Jakobson’s saying, “Linguista sum, linguistici nihil a me alienum puto”, cover all the subject areas and theoretical approaches pertaining to theoretical and applied research on Asian languages. An international editorial board takes care of the research quality of the journal. The contents of the first issue reflect this orientation and openness. Three papers deal with various aspects of the role played by language in the process of modernization during and after Meiji Japan, i.e., The Relation Between the View on the Language and Educational Ideology in the Early Meiji Period in Japan Through the Discourse of Regionalism by Ichimiya Yufuko, Towards Theoretical Approach to the Understanding of Language Ideologies in Post-Meiji Japan by Luka Culiberg, and Images of Pre-WW II: National Language Policies as Reflected in the Field of “National Language Studies” Itself by Andrej Bekeš. Another focus of interest is philological, represented by two papers. One is Morphology and Syntax in Holes and Scratches: The Latest Stage of Kugyol Research, an interesting research on kugyol, a system devised to facilitate reading Chinese Buddhist texts in Korean, by Lee Yong. The other,The Typology of Āmreḍita Compounds in the Ṛgveda by Tamara Ditrich, investigates āmreḍita compounds in the Ṛgveda, a type of coordinative nominal constructions, closely related to dvandva compounds. Finally, this issue is concluded with the article Collocational Relations in Japanese Language Textbooks and Computer-assisted Language Learning Resources, by Irena Srdanović and deals with the teaching of collocations in modern Japanese, based on corpora.         Andrej Bekeš University of Ljubljana and University of Tsukuba     April 23, 2011

  12. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, A.; Goriely, S.; Rayet, M.; Siess, L.; Boffin, H.

    The international conference The Future Astronuclear Physics was held at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) from August 20 to 22, 2003, to celebrate Marcel Arnould on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday. Marcel Arnould is full professor at ULB and was appointed director of the Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique (IAA) of this university in 1983, when he was still a Research Associate of the National Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS). Since the late sixties he has played a leading role in the development of a trans-disciplinary field of research, the object of which is the study of nuclear phenomena in astrophysics. Those phenomena being the main source of energy in stellar interiors and being also responsible for the synthesis of the chemical elements, the study of the often peculiar, sometimes exotic, nuclear physics in a rich variety of astrophysical conditions, is crucial to understand almost all stages of stellar evolution as well as the chemical and isotopic content of the neighboring and remote places of our universe. All along his scientific career, Marcel Arnould has worked to give the so-called nuclear astrophysics, born in the second half of the twentieth century and marked by a few prominent physicists in the United States and in Canada, a fertile ground for development inside Europe as a fully grown discipline, collecting the knowledge on the infinitely small with that on the infinitely large, a true interdisciplinary science that ought to be more appropriately called “astronuclear physics". We like to remind that to achieve this goal, Marcel Arnould has promoted and directed two important projects in the framework of the EU scientific programs. The first one (1989 1992), “Nuclear Astrophysics: experimental and theoretical studies", involved 11 European research centers and led to the first measurement, at the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility, of a nuclear reaction rate involving a short-lived nuclide, ^{13}N. This experiment was

  13. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina HMELJAK SANGAWA

    2012-10-01

    collaborative project in which Italian learners of Japanese compiled an on-line Japanese-Italian dictionary using a purposely developed on-line dictionary editing system, under the supervision of a small group of teachers. One practical and obvious outcome of the project is a Japanese-Italian freely accessible lexical database, but the authors also highlight the pedagogical value of such an approach, which stimulates students' motivation for learning, hones their ICT skills, makes them more aware of the structure and usability of existing lexicographic and language learning resources, and helps them learn to cooperate on a shared task and exchange peer support. The third project report by Raoul Blin, Automatic Addition of Genre Information in a Japanese Dictionary, focuses on the labelling of lexical genre, an aspect of word usage which is not satisfactorily presented in current Japanese dictionaries, despite its importance for foreign language learners when using dictionaries for production tasks. The article describes a procedure for automatic labelling of genre by means of a statistical analysis of internet-derived genre-specific corpora. The automatisation of the process simplifies its later reiteration, thus making it possible to observe lexical genre development over time. The final paper in this issue is a report on The Construction of a Database to Support the Compilation of Japanese Learners’ Dictionaries, by Yuriko Sunakawa, Jae-ho Lee and Mari Takahara. Motivated by the lack of Japanese bilingual learners' dictionaries for speakers of most languages in the world, the authors engaged in the development of a database of detailed corpus-based descriptions of the vocabulary needed by learners of Japanese from beginning to advanced level. By freely offering online the basic data needed for bilingual dictionary compilation, they are building the basis from which editors in under-resourced language areas will be able to compile richer and more up-to-date contents even

  14. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Huisman, Marieke; Huisman, M.; van de Pol, J.C.; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis

    This is a preface of the special issue of the 14th international workshop on Automated Verification of Critical Systems. This workshop covers all aspects of automated verification, including model checking, theorem proving, SAT/SMT constraint solving, abstract interpretation, and refinement

  15. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avrachenkov, K.; Donato, D.; Avrachenkov, Konstantin; Donato, Debora; Litvak, Nelly

    2009-01-01

    PrefaceThis volume constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 6th Workshop on Algorithms and Models for the Web Graph, WAW 2009, held in Barcelona in February 2009. The World Wide Web has become part of our everyday life, and information retrieval and data mining on the Web are now of enormous

  16. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Dan; Muller, Alexandru

    2003-07-01

    in MEMS topics. This year special attention was devoted to the emerging RF MEMS technology. In addition, a presentation of `Microsystems in FP6' was held as a special invited talk at the end of the conference. The selection of papers for inclusion in this issue was difficult, due to the high quality of the papers of the workshop. The final content is a result of the collaboration of the programme committee and Institute of Physics Publishing staff. We wish to thank our colleagues from the MME'02 programme committee: A G R Evans (Southampton University), M Hill (Cork Institute of Technology) and R Wolffenbuttel (Delft University of Technology). We are grateful to all participants for making the workshop a very stimulating meeting place for the MEMS community in Europe.

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefeld, Robert M.

    2017-04-01

    create an especially successful conference in terms of both technical content with formal talks and informal communications as well as the social elements that enable the atmosphere necessary for a productive and enjoyable conference.

  18. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Hostis, Valérie; Foct, François; Féron, Damien

    2006-11-01

    programmes. The sessions of the workshop covered the following areas, from fundamental aspects to technically relevant industrial applications: - Present and Future Expectations on regulations, design codes and R& D programmes; - Experimental Studies mainly focused on corrosion of embedded steels and its mechanical consequences, reactive agents transport and chemical degradation of concrete; - Phenomenological Modelling of the different mechanisms involved in reinforced concrete degradation (corrosion, transport, mechanics, etc.); - Service Life Models focused on the assessment of reinforced concrete structures and life cycle analysis; - Feedback Experience use of field experiences and archaeological artefacts for the phenomenological understanding and modelling; - Monitoring and Repair on-site corrosion evaluation, repairing techniques performance... The organisation and the success of this Workshop have been made possible thanks to CEA (Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique) and EDF (Électricité de France) which co-organised this event. It was co-sponsored by EFC/WP4 (European Federation of Corrosion, Nuclear corrosion working party) and OECD/NEA (Nuclear Energy Agency) which the editors want to warmly thank for their active scientific and practical contributions. The editors would also like to thank the authors who presented papers of outstanding scientific content and who responded enthusiastically to the discussions and questions raised during the Workshop, the programme committee, who had to make the tricky selection of the presented papers, and finally the reviewers of the papers presented in this special issue. This Workshop was a forum to exchange state-of-the-art knowledge on corrosion and long-term performance of concrete in nuclear power plants and waste facilities. The editors hope that the scientific results gathered in these proceedings will be useful to scientists and engineers in the field of reinforced concrete materials for nuclear applications. Valérie L

  19. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Ulf; Goobar, Ariel; Nilsson, Bengt E. W.

    2005-01-01

    The idea of organizing a Nobel Symposium focusing on the recent exciting developments in the overlap between string theory and cosmology was born about two years prior to the meeting. The progress, both observational and theoretical, was sparked off by the spectacular new measurements of the geometry and content of the universe. These included ever more accurate observations of the cosmological background radiation testing our ideas of the very early universe, as well as observations of distant supernovae indicating that the universe is in a phase of accelerated expansion. This development was a fertile ground for cosmologists as well as for the string community where people were looking for contacts with observations by applying string theory at the cosmological scale. We are now witnessing the impact of improved observational data coming in regularly, and on the theory side, the appearence of large amounts of collaborative work between cosmologists and string theorists. In view of these facts, we believe that the timing of the Symposium was close to optimal. As organizers, we felt very pleased with the Symposium, and were very happy to see so many prominent scientists being enthusiastic about the meeting. We direct our most profound thanks for the success of the Symposium to all the participants. A special thanks goes to the speakers and chairmen. With half of the time allocated for discussions in the sessions, each one devoted to a particular issue, it was of paramount importance that the chairmen could get both cosmologists and string theorists to contribute with their views and expertice to penetrate the questions to the limit. The resulting debates in several sessions will linger in the memories of those present for many years to come. The Symposium ended with a question and answer session with the whole audience acting as panel. The participants had been asked to formulate what they thought were the key questions in the field. Although consensus was not

  20. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, J. F.; Dufty, J. W.; Murillo, M. S.

    2003-06-01

    conference, including 34 invited speakers. Unfortunately, some international speakers could not attend due to problems with obtaining visas, and we deeply regret the difficulties and lost opportunities. These individuals and all others giving presentations at the conference, including invited plenary and topical talks and posters, were asked to contribute to this special issue and most have done so. We trust that this special issue will accurately record the contents of the conference, and provide a valuable resource for researchers in this rapidly evolving field. We would like to thank all members of the International Advisory Board for their contributions to the conference. In particular, we thank Chairman Jean-Pierre Hansen for his diligent work at coordinating the International Advisory Board, the Programme Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. Of course, nothing would have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the Local Organizing Committee. We wish to thank the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Theoretical, Physics, Applied Physics, Materials Science and Technology divisions) and Sandia National Laboratory (Pulsed Power Sciences) for sponsoring this conference. We also gratefully acknowledge the administrative support we received from Marianna Martinez, Marion Hutton and Ellie Vigil of Los Alamos National Laboratory, all of whom were major contributors to the success of the conference. John F Benage, James W Dufty and Michael S Murillo Guest Editors Please see PDF for photograph of conference participants. Local Organizing Committee J F Benage Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA M Desjarlais Sandia National Laboratory, USA G J Kalman Boston College, USA J Kress Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA M S Murillo Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA G Ortiz Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA J Weisheit Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA SCCS International Advisory Board A Alastuey Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France D Andelman Tel Aviv University

  1. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorse, D.; Boutard, J.-L.

    2002-09-01

    , limitations of existing sensors and proposed new developments allowing to interpret e.m.f measurements at temperatures well below 450 °C. Intercomparisons between oxygen sensors, using various static facilities (BIP, JACOMEX and COLIMESTA) were carried out by J.-L. Courouau et al. This study is now going on including our EU partners in the closely related TECLA program granted by the 5th framework program. C. Lesueur et al. developed original methods for measuring wettability, permitting to determine the stability of native oxides (on Al, Fe, Ni and also T91 steel) in contact with molten lead. A. Maitre et al. presented a preliminary thermodynamic study of the quinary Bi-Fe-Hg-O-Pb system, beginning with the Bi-Hg-Pb system. No solid ternary phase was found in Pb-Bi eutectic in the temperature range expected for the spallation target. Then the authors focused on the possible formation of oxygenated compounds of low melting point either at the T91 steel/Pb or at the T91 steel/Pb-Bi eutectic interface. Section 4 concerns the resistance to LMC and LME of structural materials pre-selected for the spallation target of ADS, with special emphasis on the liquid Pb-Bi eutectic target concept. The compatibility of 9% Cr martensitic steels (like EM10 or T91...) with liquid Pb and Pb-Bi eutectic was examined. Qualification of the T91 steel/LBE system is required to build the liquid Pb-Bi target in PSI in 2005 and for further applications. A comparative study of the long-term corrosion behaviour of various martensitic and austenitic steels in forced circulation loop was carried out by F. Balbaud-Celerier et al. allowing to vary the temperature and oxygen content in LBE covering the range 10-8wt% -10-6wt.% . This work results from a fruitful collaboration with IPPE (Obninsk, Russia). The two following papers of Section 4 deal with the tensile behaviour of T91 steel in contact with lead and its alloys. The most severe metallurgical (J.-B. Vogt et al.) and environmental (J.-L. Pastol et al

  2. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    the meeting was that all plenary talks presented the state-of-the-art and were at the same time educational and exciting, promoting the multidisciplinary aspects of the research, and thus were inspirational for young scientists considering work in these fields. The plenary talks, each lasting 1 hour, were given by distinguished world experts and some young 'rising stars': Richard Ward, Ulf Leonhardt, Jens Eisert, Michael Berry, Shahn Majid, Arndt von Haeseler, Michio Jimbo, Katrin Wendland, Raymond Goldstein, Mark Trodden, Maria Vozmediano and Giulio Chiribella. The public lecture was given by Francesco Iachello and was open to participants and other people from the Newcastle-Durham region. In addition, talks of 30 minutes duration each and including more technical content, were given in four parallel sessions. Each parallel session had a designated time for informal interaction with the speakers, discussions of new directions of research and for forming new collaborations. The poster session, in a room where posters were exhibited for the duration of the conference, was easily accessible, and had a friendly and relaxed atmosphere, encouraging discussions of work and exchanges of new ideas. To secure a high quality scientific programme, all contributions were reviewed. Another interesting feature of the conference was the Open Forum on the Friday afternoon, which was lively and well attended. It took the form of a question and answer session with a panel chaired by Allan Solomon, with the following members: Gerald Goldin, Jean-Pierre Gazeau, Mark Trodden and Giulio Chiribella. The focus was on new directions of research, novel applications and the further development of group theory, education, training and career opportunities for young researchers. The participants were asked to submit questions in advance; examples are: "What is the role of symmetries and conservation principles in deducing underlying physics from experimental data?" and "What are the most

  3. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chaohui; Wang, Zhong Lin; Zhou, Bingkun

    2011-02-01

    The 3rd International Photonics and OptoElectronics Meeting (POEM 2010) was held from November 2-5, 2011, in Wuhan, China. POEM takes place annually, usually in November, with the aim of focusing on the key techniques of scientific frontiers and industry in the field of optoelectronics, understanding future trends as well as making the most of the industrial advantages of Wuhan - Optics Valley of China (OVC). POEM 2010 presented a plenary session and six parallel sessions. The latter comprised Laser Technology and Applications; Nano-enabled Energy Technologies and Materials; Optoelectronic Devices and Integration; Optoelectronic Sensing and Imaging; Solar Cells, Solid State Lighting and Information Display Technologies; and Tera-Hertz Science and Technology. 700 delegates from the field of optoelectronics - including world-famous experts, researchers, investors and entrepreneurs from more than 20 countries - attended the conference, among whom were 160 invited speakers. POEM 2010 once again received extensive praise for its intricate planning, rich contents, and the high-level and influential invited speakers which it attracted. Participants remarked that the presentations by the invited experts, the 'hot topic' discussions, students' posters, and the awards for papers were very engaging. They appreciated this valuable and beneficial opportunity for exchanging ideas with top photonics and optoelectronics experts. Our thanks are extended to the Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee, who have been completely dedicated to their work, and who made the conference such a great success. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and for the help with organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Proceedings of POEM 2010234 papers were selected out of the 343 manuscripts submitted. The organizers of POEM 2010 are grateful to all the authors

  4. Book received: Paul van den Akker, Looking for Lines: Theories of the Essence of Art and the Problem of Mannerism, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press 2010 including preface, contents and introduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul van den Akker

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul van den Akker, Looking for Lines: Theories of the Essence of Art and the Problem of Mannerism, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press 2010 including preface, contents and introduction.

  5. Functionality of Preface in the Integral Perception of Text (“Trans-Atlantic” by Witold Gombrowicz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona Tychinina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of detection of paratextual connections detailed by Gerard Genette is analyzed. It is proved that such at first sight peripheral elements of a text are able not only to frame it specifically but also to make possible its transformation into a book. It is emphasized that paratextual modi respectively generate the mechanism of receptive action, narrow or/and broaden the expectation horizon of a reader. Subsequently, adjusted by the experience, they form a different perspective of perception which nevertheless is restricted and emphasized by a kind of paratextual “frame” that is sometimes called the interpretational one. An author's foreword is a sort of proxemic center in architectonics of literary text. The main function of the textual threshold that can be created directly by an author, publisher, and other writer is to inform readers about circumstances the text was written under, stages of creation, interpretation of important or complicated (from the standpoint of the author moments of the text, its conception, genre, biographic motives that guide a reader's reception in one way or another. In line with the historical poetry considering a text with a few author's prefaces is the most effective way. Three prefaces (1951, 1953, 1957 to the novel “Trans-Atlantic” (1953 by the Polish writer-immigrant Witold Gombrowicz (1904–1969 have become the subject of the analysis. Obviously, the specifics of narration in the aforementioned prefaces appear interesting. Not only is the experimental character of Gombrowicz's shape proved but also the dynamics of his texts' content in the historical time. Proofs of that, apart from the prefaces, are found in his diaries. The function of the author's preface has the exceptional receptive weight as it directs the reader's receptions only to the indicated destination and establishes the profound contact, more precisely the dialog, with a reader. Serving as an interpretative frame that

  6. Foreword - (reviewers’ view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorab Sadri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is indeed a singular honor to be asked to write this Foreword for a prestigious journal like JEDEP that has now come out with its fifth issue. I would like to share a thought that came to me as I was reading the abstracts. When you are presented with a bouquet of flowers all of the same hue and color it is beautiful. But when the flowers are in various colors but yet of the same biological genre this beauty is enhanced. That is true of this issue of the journal and the contribution of the authors as well. To begin with, for a person who has been looking into organizational excellence and business sustainability for the past two decades, this cluster of essays made delightful reading...

  7. Exploring the Macrostructure of Management Forewords of Corporate Annual Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Mobasher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Management foreword is an unedited qualitative section of Corporate Annual Reports (CARs. It is also considered as the most widely read section of CARs which may reveal the financial condition of the company. So far, only few language studies have embarked on analysis of this section and they have mainly focused on the genre content of management foreword rather than its genre structure. Nevertheless, the few genre studies conducted had several shortcomings in the model proposed. Besides, none of the previously move analysis studies on management foreword have considered corpus analysis tools in their procedure of analysis. Accordingly, the present study is aimed to bridge the gap in previous studies by describing the genre structure of management forewords. To that aim, a qualitative genre analysis study was conducted on 64 samples of management forewords of Asian companies using AntConc software. The analysis revealed six moves and nineteen move-strategy combinations. Most of the identified moves and strategies were also identified in previous move analysis studies on management forewords and other types of business reports and hence verified. The proposed move analysis model defined move boundaries and provided the most frequent words and verbs that represent each move. Additionally, the proposed moves consist of predictable strategies which are bound to their moves and do not appear within the boundary of more than one move. The findings of the present study could be useful for ESP practitioners as teaching material and raise awareness among business ESP students about the genre conventions of this genre.

  8. Foreword. Annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: My Foreword to the 2002 Annual Report ended with a handful of best wishes for the year 2003. One of them, rather highly pitched, was addressed to our funding authorities: may their preaching about a ''Knowledge Based Society in Poland'' come true ! There is, unfortunately, little evidence that this preaching is taken seriously by the preachers, even though the time for that in a unifying Europe is high. I hope that this Annual Report bears witness that at least we are doing our bit in this direction. Thus: We have published 203 papers in international journals. Several of them quickly gain international recognition. There was hard competition for our internal awards. The four emerging winners are behind the contributions: on the creation of circular vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates (contribution 8.23), on our share in the NA49 experiment at CERN (contribution 6.4), on our use of solid state nuclear track detectors, SSNTD, in the hostile environment of hot plasma experiments (contribution 5.5) and on some special detectors for positron emission tomography to be applied in hadron therapy (contribution 3.7). We have also contributed to the general education by, e.g., having over 7000 young guests at our Training Department (see Chapter 11 ), taking part in the Science Festival in Warsaw and Lodz, or starting the ''Roland Maze project'' in that city. The project aims at involving a large number of high school pupils in active research concerning extensive air showers at highest energies (contribution 7.6). Very importantly, it has gained approval and financial support of the local authorities in Lodz. Two international meetings were organized by our Institute: the 28 Mazurian Lakes Conference, ''The Atomic Nucleus as a Laboratory for Fundamental Processes'', EPS sponsored, see e.g. CERN Courier 44 (2004), and the ''Conference on Plasma Research and Applications, PLASMA 2003'', biannual gathering of plasma physics its. Our attempts at obtaining EU

  9. Translator's preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiell, James T

    2013-08-01

    Presents a preface from James T. Lamiell, who translates Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology's Struggle for Existence (Die Psychologie im Kampf ums Dasein), in which Wundt advised against the impending divorce of psychology from philosophy, into English. Lamiell comments that more than a decade into the 21st century, it appears that very few psychologists have any interest at all in work at the interface of psychology and philosophy. He notes that one clear indication of this is that the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, which is Division 24 of the American Psychological Association (APA), remains one of the smallest of the APA's nearly 60 divisions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Foreword: Biomonitoring Equivalents special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, M E; Sonawane, B; Becker, R A

    2008-08-01

    The challenge of interpreting results of biomonitoring for environmental chemicals in humans is highlighted in this Foreword to the Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) special issue of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. There is a pressing need to develop risk-based tools in order to empower scientists and health professionals to interpret and communicate the significance of human biomonitoring data. The BE approach, which integrates dosimetry and risk assessment methods, represents an important advancement on the path toward achieving this objective. The articles in this issue, developed as a result of an expert panel meeting, present guidelines for derivation of BEs, guidelines for communication using BEs and several case studies illustrating application of the BE approach for specific substances.

  11. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiat J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The international thematic school on “Crystallography and Neutrons” was organized in order to celebrate the International Year of Crystallography in 2014, under the patronage of the “Société Française de la Neutronique” (SFN with the support of the CNRS and the European neutron facilities network NMI3. The school took place in September 2014 in Oléron, France, as first part of the “22ème Journées de la Neutronique” (JDN22. The school gathered participants from European countries and therefore the lectures were given in English. It intended to promote cooperation and networking among users of large scale facilities with researchers involved in the field of Crystallography.

  12. Foreword

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of ethnicity, and the third takes into account both ethnicity and religiosity. In our field of dealing ... are apparently observing the fascinating diversities on the human scene, but interpreting them as ... of being on top of the world. Our feet are kept ...

  13. Foreword

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Gurgu

    2017-01-01

    At the end of 2017, according to World Economic Forum Agenda, it seems that economic competitiveness matters, but not as an end in itself. It matters because nations that are more competitive are more productive, and are therefore more able to provide for the social needs of their people. The world has changed dramatically over the last decade, and measuring the factors that determine competitiveness continues to be a highly complex process. It is certainly true that the Fourth Industrial Rev...

  14. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela EPURE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital world is changing constantly and the way in which it affects our life and work seems to be dramatically and somehow unpredictable. New skills and competencies are required and more than ever our learning efforts must be equally distributed between old, traditional and new knowledge, more abundant and diverse far from what you learned before and beyond any imagination a decade ago. Performance at work is redefined in such a way that has no connection at all with what was expected from us at the beginning of our working life. We have been trained to use our knowledge to solve problems, now we need to be trained to use machine learning systems to deal with complex problems and to relay on artificial intelligence when it comes about understanding our digital world and his diverse connectivity with our real life.....

  15. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Editorial Board for the articles in the mathematical sciences section consisted of. G. Misra, R. Mukherjee, R. Sujatha and myself. We decided to seek articles on the follow- ing broad themes: mathematical analysis, probabil- ity and statistics, number theory, the theory of Lie and algebraic groups, and algebraic geometry.

  16. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej BEKEŠ

    2012-01-01

    In the technical article, in Slovene, at the end of this issue, Andrej BEKEŠ investigates the classification of genres in Japanese corpora, based on recent research he has also been involved in. He argues that various modal expressions, such as suppositional adverbs, may provide an interesting base for such classification.

  17. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina HMELJAK SANGAWA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Having received a lively response to our call for papers on the lexicography of Japanese as a second language, the editorial board decided to dedicate two issues of this year's ALA to this theme, and I am happy to introduce the second round of papers, after the first thematic issue published in October this year. This issue is again divided into two parts. The first two papers offer analyses of two aspects of existing dictionaries from the point of view of Japanese language learners, while the following four papers present particular lexicographic projects for learners of Japanese as a foreign language. The first paper, by Kanako Maebo, entitled A survey of register labelling in Japanese dictionaries - Towards the labelling of words in dictionaries for learners of Japanese, analyses register labelling in existing dictionaries of Japanese, both in those expressly intended for learners of Japanese as a second language and those intended for native speakers, pointing out how register information provided by such dictionaries is not sufficient for L2 language production. After stressing the usefulness of usage examples for learners trying to write in Japanese, she offers an example of a corpus-based register analysis and proposes a typology of labels to be assigned to dictionary entries, calling for the development of corpora of different genres to be used for lexical analysis. In the second paper, An analysis of the efficiency of existing kanji indexes and development of a coding-based index, Galina N. Vorobеva and Victor M. Vorobеv tackle one of the most time-consuming tasks learners of Japanese are confronted with: looking up unknown Chinese characters. After a comprehensive description of existing indexes, including less known indexing systems developed by Japanese, Chinese, Russian and German researchers, they compare the efficiency of these systems using the concept of selectivity, and propose their own coding-based system. Although searching for unknown characters is becoming increasingly easy with the use of optical character recognition included in portable electronic dictionaries, tablets and smart-phones, not all learners have yet access to such devices. Efficient indexes for accessing information on Chinese characters are therefore still a valuable tool to support language learners in this most tedious task, while the ability to decompose a character into component parts remains an important basis for character memorisation. The second part of this issue presents four projects aimed at supporting particular lexical needs of learners of Japanese as a second language. In the first paper, Development of a learners' dictionary of polysemous Japanese words and some proposals for learners’ lexicography, Shingo Imai presents a new lexicographic approach to the description of polysemous words. As Imai rightfully stresses, the most basic and common words learned by beginning language learners are actually often very polysemous; being deceivingly simple at first glance, they are often introduced with simple glosses or basic prototypical examples at the first stages of learning, and later treated as known words in intermediate or advanced textbooks, even if used for less common senses which are still unknown to the learners, causing much confusion. In the dictionary series presented here, polysemous headwords are thoroughly and systematically described within their semantic networks, where the connections between core and derived meanings are schematically visualised and exemplified. The following two papers present two of the first and most popular web-based systems for Japanese language learning support, both of which have been developing for more than a decade, supporting Japanese language learners all over the world. Reading Tutor, a reading support system for Japanese language learners, presented by Yoshiko Kawamura, is a widely known and used system based at Tokyo International University, which offers automatic glossing of Japanese text with Japanese definitions and examples, and translations into 28 languages. After introducing the system, its development, functionalities and its tools for signalling the level of difficulty of single words, characters, or whole Japanese texts, the author describes its possible uses in language instruction and autonomous learning, and one concrete example of its application to the development of learning material for a specific segment of learners, foreign candidates to the Japanese national examination for certified care workers, mostly Filipino and Indonesian nurses working in Japan. The author concludes with suggestions for fostering autonomous vocabulary learning. The other Japanese language learning support system with an equally long and successful tradition, developed at Tokyo Institute of Technology, is presented by its initiator, Kikuko Nishina, and one of its younger developers, Bor Hodošček, in Japanese Learning Support Systems: Hinoki Project Report. The article presents the many components of this successful system, including Asunaro, a reading support system aimed especially at science and engineering students and speakers of underrepresented Asian languages, Natsume, a writing assistance system using large-scale corpora to support collocation search, Natane, a learner corpus, and Nutmeg, an automatic error correction system for learners' writing. The last project report, by Tomaž Erjavec and myself, introduces resources and tools being developed at the University of Ljubljana and at Jožef Stefan Institute: JaSlo: Integration of a Japanese-Slovene Bilingual Dictionary with a Corpus Search System. The dictionary, corpora and search tools are being developed primarily for Slovene speaking learners of Japanese, but part of the tools, particularly the corpus of sentences from the web-harvested texts, divided into five difficulty levels, can be used by any learner or teacher of Japanese. I hope you will enjoy reading these articles as much as I did, and wish you a peaceful New Year.  

  18. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Epure

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human capital is an important asset for any organization or country. Looking into the future, it seems that a human-centric vision of the work of time ahead that recognizes the people’s knowledge, talent, creativity and skills is the key positioning for a prosperous and inclusive economy. “Human capital means the knowledge and skills people possess that enable them to create value in the global economic system”.  To measure the development of this capital is imperative to determine how it can be better used to achieve a solid economic growth. Similarly, at the company level, the development of the human capital means to secure a competitive advantage in the long run. More skilled and efficient employees will yield an increase of productivity and more competitive prices....

  19. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The year 1997 marked a minor jubilee for the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR), five years of its existence and activities in the area of nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic. The main activities of the NRA SR are reviewed

  20. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The year 1997 was marked by the hundredth birthday anniversary of professor Andrzej Soltan, the first director of our Institute and the pioneer of nuclear physics in Poland. It is also about hundred years since nuclear physics has begun with the discovery of Polonium and Radium by Maria Sklodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie. In honour of these anniversaries an Exhibition entitled ''Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Technique in Service of Medicine - from Radium Needle to Accelerators'' has been organized. Some lectures, radio broadcasts, popular level articles have supplemented this effort to bring the present day nuclear sciences closer to the general public. In the year of 1997 227 articles in international journals have been published, supplemented by 24 invited talks and 219 communications at conferences. The lists of these publications are given separately for each of the Research Departments throughout this Annual Report. They are preceded by articles on the work in progress and by the brief overviews written by the Department Heads. The selected highlights of the past year are: progress in materials science (deep surface layers - on transformation of uranium lattice induced by water corrosion). The work on modification of surface properties by hot and cold ion implantation. In nuclear physics the careful study of polarization phenomena in the decay of light, weekly bound nuclei. The works on the properties of the heaviest elements have been continued (Adam Sobiczewski - international prizes: in 1997 the Alfred Jurzykowski and the Flerov prize). The study of new scintillation techniques provided by Marek Moszynski has also mentioned. The highlight this time is the demonstration of advantages offered by avalanche diodes for the light output readout. The particle physicists continue their involvement in various international projects. This year they managed to give a noteworthy instrumental and technical input to: Resistive Plate Chambers for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the LHC in CERN and on the development of the WASA system at CELSIUS, Uppsala. In plasma physics it was welcomed the decision to establish in Warsaw the International Centre of Dense Magnetized Plasma: This is one result of the increased international activities of our plasma group lead by Marek Sadowski. Our accelerator physics group and the production unit ZdAJ have embarked on a new project of a 15 MeV therapeutical accelerator. They also managed to export some high technology work to DESY (Hamburg) and to CERN. As usual most of our scientific effort is based on various international collaborations. A regular, every second year accent on the international exchanges is the International Mazurian Lakes School of Physics. This has been organized in 1997 for the 25th time. lt has had the symmetries in micro- and macro worlds as the main subject

  1. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Bartalesi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Aesthetics emerges today as a young and lively field of studies whose main aim is to rethink the traditional questions of philosophical Aesthetics in the light of biological theories, in particular in the light of Darwin's evolutionary theory by means of natural selection. The aim of this issue is to introduce Evolutionary Aesthetics into the Italian philosophical debate. Contributions collected cover almost entirely the lively, multifaceted spectrum of the discipline: 1 the high-debated question of the adaptive value of aesthetic sense, artistic practices and art fruition (Stephen Davies, Zach Norwood, Joseph Carroll; 2 the evolutionary explanation of human sexual preferences and production of artefacts (Hannes Rusch & Eckart Voland; 3 the possibility for a Darwinian non-reductionist definition of art as a culturally differentiated behavior (Kathryn Coe; Nancy E. Aiken; Roberta Dreon; 4 a comparative analysis of aesthetic experience from a cognitive viewpoint (Gianluca Consoli and from a morphological one (Salvatore Tedesco; 5 the influence of Darwinian perspective beyond the English boundaries, with particular reference to the Italian scientific community in the Nineteenth century (Elena Canadelli and to the tradition of Gestaltpsychologie (Michele Gardini; 6 a naturalistic approach to aesthetic experience and medial experience (Antonino Pennisi & Francesco Parisi.

  2. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Michael Rauscher; Richard E. Plant; Alan J. Thomson; Mark J. Twery

    2000-01-01

    This article includes the central themes of the keynote speakers for the scientific conference "The Application of Scientific Knowledge to Decisionmaking in Managing Forest Ecosystems." This International Union of Forestry Research Organizations (IUFRO) conference presented the latest developments concerning the entire range of topics dealing with ecosystem...

  3. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, François; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine

    Scientific awareness of the galactic magnetic field arose in the late 40's with Fermi's work on cosmic rays, the discovery of the polarization of dust reddened starlight by Hiltner and Hall, and its interpretation in terms of magnetically aligned dust grains by Spitzer and Tukey and Davis and Greenstein. It was soon clear that the magnetic field and the cosmic ray are tied to the interstellar gas and form together an active dynamical system. Its importance for star formation and interstellar matter energetics was also quickly recognized but more than 50 years after most questions remain quantitatively open due to the paucity of data on the small scale structure of the field. In the last decade, interferometric surveys have revealed striking patterns in the diffuse polarized emission, imposed by Faraday rotation, that give a way to study the field structure in the intervening ionized medium. The advent of high sensitivity measurements of polarized emission at sub-millimeter wavelengths promise to further open our perspective on the Galactic field. The dust observations will soon extend from high resolution observations from star forming regions with ground based telescopes and the ALMA interferometer to the continuous mapping of the diffuse interstellar medium with Planck. A few months after the discovery of optical interstellar polarization, the Galactic magnetic field was an unexpected highlight of the first symposium on Cosmical Gas Dynamics held in Paris in august 1949. The Polarization 2005 meeting held at the University of Orsay was also a premiere. For the first time, two communities with disconnected backgrounds but common interests in polarization observations were given the opportunity to meet and learn from each other's research. The measurement of the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background has become a major Physics challenge of the decade(s) to come. The numerous experiments designed to achieve this goal have started providing data with unprecedented sensitivity on the Galactic polarization from sub-millimeter to centimetric wavelengths. Detailed modeling of the Galactic contribution to the observed polarization is a required key to the success of their endeavor. This book gathers invited lectures presented at the meeting. It gives an in depth account of our present knowledge of the Galactic magnetic field from measurements of its structure and intensity to its role in the physics of interstellar matter and star formation. The Galactic part of the book is complemented by three papers that introduce the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization and describe the experiments being built to observe it, with special attention to the Planck ESA mission. Few years after the Paris Cosmical Gas Dynamics symposium, the discovery of polarized synchrotron emission in the Crab was a new highlight in magnetic field research. Quoting a review by van de Hulst: “From that time on, measuring the polarization and thus mapping the magnetic field became a prime desideratum in galactic radio astronomy”. We hope that observations to come will stimulate similar enthusiasm and bring more and more scientists to the field for whom this book will be a useful and lasting reference. The editors would like to thank the IAS staff that took care of the organization with a special mention for Catherine Cougrand.

  4. Foreword

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More recently, the peace-oriented set, 'peacemaking, peacekeeping and peacebuilding', has gained currency, especially since the publication of the. United Nations ... international crimes such as genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, impunity cannot be tolerated and perpetrators have to be held accountable.

  5. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    We live in a world in which the risks and benefits of the various influences impacting upon our lives are constantly being revisited and weighed against each other. Radiation, the issue with which we are concerned herein, forms one example of such a two-edged sword, offering immense benefits under well-controlled conditions but posing risks to health as well as more generally to the environment when controls are poor or absent. It is a truism, non the less true in its re-stating, that the extent to which control is successful can be measured through the amount of radiation imparted, the name accorded to the endeavour of measurement being 'radiation dosimetry'. It forms the basis of numerous technological approaches, passive or active. Passive forms of dosimeter will for instance include thermoluminescence, radioluminesence, optically stimulated luminescence, and numerous other diverse forms, offering advantages and disadvantages in accord with the particular applications. And here too the interests are manifold, ranging from the very low doses (for example the dose-rates of the undisturbed terrestrial environment or single bite-wing dental radiographs), through to general radiography (that of the chest for instance), highly specialised radiography (mammography, CT, PET/CT, fluoroscopy, angiography), the entire range of nuclear medicine, the various radiotherapies (eg external beam and brachytherapy), food irradiations and radiation processing. The range-change across this diverse set of interests approaches of the order of 1012 (from μGy through to in excess of 100 kGy) and yet there are technologies and the supporting science that can be demonstrated to serve that need. Undoubtedly there exists the need for highly versatile technologies, placing minimal demand on allied technological support and human resource. Clearly there is need to demonstrate useful response of dosimeters to a broad range of radiations, from the ultraviolet and low-energy x-rays, to electrons, gamma, alpha, proton, neutron and heavy ion irradiations as well as the need in unison to develop high throughput readout systems that perfectly augment the dosimetric devices that are on offer. No less desirable is the need for reusable/long lifetime systems that can be applied in highly inhospitable environments, including at elevated temperatures and in aqueous systems. These Proceedings are intended to showcase the various issues and solutions, also providing an awareness of state-of-the-art systems that can serve such a broad range of radiation dosimetry needs, adaptable to the less well endowed budget and modest desires through to applications involving highly sophisticated beam manipulations.

  6. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The present guide has been assembled within the International Scientific Center project No. 113 with purpose of enhancement both qualification and literacy of a whole population in the items of radioecology and radioactive waste management. During the project fulfillment the lectures texts with a set of figures and tabular materials have been composed. The lectures have been read for pupils, teachers of nature sciences and a wide circle of specialists. The guide structure has been composed under an influence of the American textbook on nuclear wastes: 'Science, Society, and American Nuclear Waste' (teacher guide in 4 units, US Department of Energy, 1993). In the guide only principal ideas of the American textbook have been preserved

  7. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gurgu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of 2017, global activity is firming broadly as expected. Manufacturing and trade are picking up, confidence is improving and international financing conditions remain benign. Global growth is projected to strengthen to 2.7 percent in 2017 and 2.9 percent in 2018-19, in line with OECD January forecasts. In emerging market and developing economies (EMDEs, growth is predicted to recover to 4.1 percent in 2017 and reach an average of 4.6 percent in 2018-19, as obstacles to growth in commodity exporters diminish, while activity in commodity importers continues to be robust. Risks to the global outlook remain tilted to the downside. These include increased trade protectionism, elevated economic policy uncertainty, the possibility of financial market disruptions, and, over the longer term, weaker potential growth.  .....

  8. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrochna, G.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In 2010 our institute was again ranked among the best (class A) research organizations. This was mainly thanks to a large number of publications in prestigious scientific journals. A good example is given by prof. Janusz Wilczynski, who was awarded the prize for the best achievement in IPJ in 2010 in basic research. He published a series of papers in '' Physical Review Letters '' and '' Physical Review '' devoted to the discovery and study of a new mechanism of fast ternary or quaternary breakup of a heavy system into massive fragments. Experimental results obtained at LNS Catania in collaboration with an international, mostly Italian and Polish, were analyzed and interpreted by prof. Wilczynski and his collaborators. The corresponding award for applied research was given to dr Lukasz Swiderski for studies of liquid scintillators, in particular loaded with boron-10, as neutron detectors (work done in collaboration between IPJ and Germany). This work was a response to the world crisis of the shortage of 3 He, needed for neutron detection. Such detectors are used e.g. for security control at all borders and airports. The results of dr Swiderski show a path for application of liquid scintillators as neutron detectors for border monitoring. The synergy between basic and applied research was always the strong point of IPJ. The most evident case of this synergy is the construction of sophisticated apparatus for large international experiments. The largest one - the LHC at CERN in Geneva - began to collect data with the world record collision energy of 7 TeV. They are being analyzed with the participation of our physicists. In order to reach the designed beam energy and intensity, one needs to modernize several elements of the accelerator chain. In 2010 IPJ delivered for CERN a proton buncher and started preparation for production of Pi-mode Structures for the Linac4 accelerator. The second largest European research project is the X-ray Free-Electron Laser (E-XFEL). The Polish parliament ratified the XFEL convention and IPJ was nominated to represent Poland as the E-XFEL GmbH shareholder. Most of the 21 mln EUR of the Polish contribution will be provided in-kind. This includes elements of the accelerator delivered by our institute. IPJ was also granted over 4 mln EUR to provide Neutral Beam Injection elements for the stellarator (thermonuclear reactor) W7-X being built in Greifswald, Germany. Our experts are participating in the design of the European Spallation Source in Lund, Sweden. We are also considering contributions to other large research projects in Europe, especially those from the ESFRI roadmap. Development of new technologies resulted in 2010 in a few patent proposals. A method of surface modification by ion beams to make better forms for the production of rubber elements was given an award at international exhibition ITEX in Kuala Lumpur. It was a joint development with the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) in Warsaw and the Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes (IMPiB) in Torun. Another award was given at the International Exhibition of Innovations in Warsaw to IPJ and the Techtra company for a new detector for non-destructive industrial radiography. An important element of the mission of our institute is to share the excitement of front-line research with the general public. It is not easy, however, for scientists to meet the demands of the media to present in just a few sentences the essence of a sophisticated theory or an advanced technology. This changed when dr Marek Pawlowski was appointed the IPJ Spokesman. Journalists appreciated his role in bridging the gap between scientists and the media and granted him a special award in the '' Science Popularizer of the Year 2010 '' contest. In the perspective of implementing nuclear power in Poland, society requires quite detailed information on this subject, given in an understandable way. This is the mission of our Department of Training and Education and the passion of its head, prof. Ludwik Dobrzynski. For his achievements he was awarded in 2010 the Medal of the Komisja Edukacji Narodowej. In addition to a research and information service related to nuclear power, IPJ has begun preparations to support public administration and future investors in this field. In the frame of the Swierk Computing Centre Project we hired a number of young people to create the Reactor Analysis Team. With the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency and experts from the Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea and the US, they are learning intensively how to simulate phenomena inside a reactor and make safety assessment analyses. These activities are organized together with the Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM - our neighbor at Swierk. Following our common initiative, the Minister of Economy supervising the two institutes decided to begin the process of merging them together. This will be the largest research institute in Poland having about 1000 employees. I hope that the next issue of the Annual Report you receive from Swierk will have on the cover the name of the National Centre for Nuclear Research. (author)

  9. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    understanding, analysis, modelling, design, fabrication, manipulation, optimization ... problems of energy, water, environment, health, ... focusing on protein and nucleic acid diagnostics. Easy to use ... rials, designer materials, meta-materials, advanced materials ... there are 'low-hanging fruits', in general this prob- lem class ...

  10. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrochna, G.

    2007-01-01

    Last year was a year of solid good work. The number of publications has grown again, as shown in the graph below. With 276 papers in 2006 produced by 134 scientists, we crossed the point of 2 papers per scientist. This might be easy to achieve in a small, exclusive institute, but in the case of a large national laboratory it requires maintaining a high level in all its departments. Our scientific achievement over the last few years was appreciated by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education awarding IPJ the first category among physics institutes. This report briefly describes all scientific activities of IPJ in 2006. One of the most interesting results is the first observation of spectral lines in a pure tungsten plasma using a RPI-IBIS device at Swierk contrib. 5.8. Another important achievement is solving the puzzle of U 4 O 9 crystal structure contrib. 1.11. Most work, however, concentrated on long term projects which are expected to bring important results in the future. The first to come will be the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Our Institute participates in three experiments: CMS, LHCb and ALICE. Almost 18 years designing, prototyping and constructing of the muon trigger for the CMS in collaboration with Warsaw University and Warsaw University of Technology began to pay off. A cosmic ray test of the full chain of the apparatus has proved that the device can work correctly and will soon be ready to trigger the first interesting events in the LHC. In 2006 we joined T2K - the world-largest neutrino experiment, to be built in Japan. Nuclear physics in the next decade will concentrate on a number of experiments to be built at the FAIR facility at GSI in Darmstadt. Another great international lab - DESY in Hamburg - plans an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). The Institute coordinates an XFEL-Poland consortium and will contribute to the construction of the XFEL accelerator. Research in plasma physics has the goal of building a thermonuclear reactor, ITER in Cadarache (France). One step on this way is the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, under construction in Greifswald. Our Institute will contribute to the construction of the Neutral Beam Injection plasma heating system. Structural funds of EU for Poland in 2007-2013 also offer an opportunity to build large infrastructures for science and its applications in our country. We actively participate in three large consortia: '' National Center for Hadron Therapy '', '' High Temperature Reactor in Poland '' and '' Sieroszowice Underground Laboratory SUNlab ''. Our institute also leads several national scientific networks: '' Polish Astroparticle Physics Network '', '' Polish Neutrino Physics Network '' and others. New challenges require larger '' critical mass '' and close collaboration of several institutes. For this reason the '' Atomic Center CeAt '' has been created - a consortium of IPJ, Institute of Atomic Energy, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microsynthesis, led by our Institute. The plans mentioned above are often addressed to the next generation of physicists. Today, they are still in school and we perform many activities to attract them to physics and science in general. This effort has been appreciated by nominating us to the '' Educator of the year '' award. Last year also marks a beginning of reforms in Polish science. In this context we are often asked if IPJ is a '' pure science '' or '' applied science '' institute. In my opinion such a division would be somewhat artificial. '' There can be no applied science unless there is science to apply '' . On the other hand, any '' pure science '' research will sooner or later pay off in everyday live. A good example is furnished by medical accelerators produced by our Department of Nuclear Equipment. Experience in scientific experiments made our Institute one of the five producers of such apparatus in the world. In 2006 we obtained a CE certificate for Coline accelerators for cancer therapy. A dark shadow upon our successes in 2006 was the death of our Director, Professor Ziemowid Sujkowski. We lost a distinguished scientist, solicitous preceptor of students, our colleague and friend. He led the institute over a very difficult period. In spite of severe budget cuts and required personnel reduction, he managed to save the Institute without serious damage with a still growing scientific output measured e.g. in the number of publications. Now, it seems that science in Poland has new, bright perspectives. I am sure that we will catch the wind in our sails and we will be facing a wonderful time of exciting scientific adventures. (author)

  11. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrochna, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The year 2007 brought a further increase in our scientific output. The number of publications has grown by 10%, exceeding 300. This expands the systematic growth observed over the last 7 years. It is worth noting that this increase was obtained with a constant number of 140 scientists. Among those who contributed not only to the number but also to the value of the papers were two researchers who deserved a prize of '' IPJ achievement of 2007 ''. Prof. Wilczynski published several articles explaining the mechanisms of nuclear collisions at low and medium energies [Contrib. 2.3, 2.4]. Dr. Spalinski wrote a series of papers developing theories of cosmic inflation as a consequence of D-brane dynamics of string theory [p. 155]. Apart from these theories, the group led by Dr. Barlak found an important practical application of plasma discharges [Contrib. 9.2]. They developed a technique to prepare the surface of carbon and silicone carbide for firm adhesion to copper. On the experimental side, 2007 was the last but one year of preparation for the startup of the LHC accelerator. The Department of High Energy Physics created a GRID-based infrastructure for analysis of data from LHC experiments [Contrib. 6.6]. Last year also brought new achievements in education and outreach. We organized courses for teachers introducing nuclear energy and particle physics. Lecturers from the International Atomic Energy Agency and CERN, as well as visits of teachers to CERN made those courses especially attractive. The '' Scientific Picnic '' in Warsaw and science festivals in other cities gave occasion to explain advanced science with simple words and demonstrations. The '' Physics Playground '' for children organised by Drs Pawlowski and Rozynek was invited to South Korea [p. 22]. All these activities were appreciated by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education and honored by the award of '' Science popularizer of the year ''. Effort was invested in the preparation of new initiatives. We have been involved in several scientific networks and consortia, some of them even initiated and led by us [p. 19]. An important example is the Polish Nuclear Technology Platform grouping science and industry. Practical applications of nuclear technologies are the goal of the IPJ project '' Development of accelerator and detector systems for medicine and security '' which was accepted as one of the key projects in the '' Innovative Economy '' European program. The most ambitious idea developed by IPJ in 2007 is the plan to build a Polish version of the Free-Electron Laser (POLFEL) at Swierk. The project is already affiliated to the '' IRUVX FEL Network '' - pan-European distributed infrastructure recommended by the European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). POLFEFL - a 400 m long device - may become the largest and the most modern scientific facility in our region. A decision on funding from European structural funds is expected in 2008. POLFEL, together with other research facilities in Swierk, may attract high-tech industry to collaborate with scientists on developing novel technologies. In order to facilitate technology transfer a Science and Technology Park is planned at Swierk. This idea is supported by the local authorities and we hope it will realized with structural funds of the Mazovia region. 2007 was a year of developing new ambitious projects. Next year will show us if these plans will be realized. (author)

  12. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The Institute's of Atomic Energy POLATOM main interest is safe energy generation with particular emphasis on nuclear energy as the most environment friendly technology. This has been expanded into the realm of hazards analysis and its applications to conventional plants. After Polish Government decision of 2005 on the use of nuclear power for electricity generation, the Institute in cooperation with few universities started training of students in the nuclear safety and radiation protection. The Institute takes part in preparation of expertise reports as well as research and education programs crucial for the implementation of nuclear power plants in Poland. The ionising radiation protection issues furnish the basis of our health physics research. Material science studies performed mainly with non-destructive nuclear techniques like neutron scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy or X-rays form an important part of our research. The Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM operates the multifunctional nuclear research reactor MARIA. In 2010 the reactor was successfully operated for 3803 hours with fuel elements of 36% enrichment in 235 U. No radiological accidents, failures or breakdowns due to the fuel behaviour were recorded in 2010, confirming the good quality of the fuel elements. The tests of AREVA fuel element with 19% enrichment and 40% burnup have been successfully completed in 2010. The main technological facilities of the MARIA reactor for radioactive isotopes production, neutron doping of silicon and minerals properties modification were widely employed. The irradiations of 235 U targets for 99 Mo production started in March and MARIA has supplied 5% of world demand for 99 Mo in 2010. 320 spent fuel elements were transferred to Russia according to the Global Threat Reduction Initiative sponsored by the US government. One of our main goals is to provide the scientific community of Poland an easy access to source of neutrons. This involves widest possible applications of MARIA reactor in research and technology. The beams of thermal neutrons are used in neutron scattering and radiography studies of condensed matter structures and processes occurring at various levels of length scales. About 50 papers describing the results of our research were published in 2010. Some of the results were accounted for in 144 IAE Reports as the preliminary step before publication. Several new results obtained in 2010 on drying of particulate and rigid porous media, properties of ion beams modified materials as well as extensive use of synchrotron topography in crystal defects studies should be mentioned. The recombination methods for assessment of mixed radiation doses at various facilities were mastered. The studies on models and software tools for emergency management were carried out within the EU Framework projects by the Centre of Excellence Management of Health and Environmental Hazards MANHAZ. The research project ''Analysis of the thorium application in nuclear power reactors '' (THORIUM PROJECT) established within the Innovative Economy Operational Program has been performed in cooperation with Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The project on testing and implementation of radioisotopes for neuroendocrine tumour therapy has been accepted for realization within the Innovative Economy Operational Program. Our institute is open for the community. We are proud that above 5000 visitors came to enjoy our presentations and lectures on nuclear techniques developed on the basis of nuclear research reactor MARIA during 2010. Several students from Polish universities obtained student summer training in IAE laboratories in 2010. (author)

  13. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Institute's of Atomic Energy POLATOM main topic is safe energy generation with particular emphasis on nuclear energy as the most environment friendly technology. This has been expanded into the realm of hazards analysis and its applications to conventional plants. After Polish Government decision of 2005 on the use of nuclear power for electricity generation, the Institute in cooperation with few universities started training of students in the nuclear safety and radiation protection. The Institute takes part in preparation of expertise reports as well as research and education programs crucial for the implementation of nuclear power plants in Poland. The ionising radiation protection issues furnish the basis of our health physics research. Material science studies performed mainly with non-destructive nuclear techniques like neutron scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy or X-rays form an important part of our research. The Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM operates the multifunctional nuclear research reactor MARIA. In 2009 the reactor was successfully operated for 4270 hours with fuel elements of 36% enrichment in 235 U. No radiological accidents, failures or breakdowns due to the fuel behaviour were recorded in 2009, confirming the good quality of the fuel elements. Two new types of AREVA fuel elements with 19% enrichment and permitting higher burnup have been tested. The main technological facilities of the MARIA reactor for radioactive isotopes production, neutron doping of silicon and minerals properties modification were widely employed. The preparations for irradiation of 235 U targets for 99 Mo production conforming to the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors programme have been accomplished. The Reactor Facility for Neutron Transmutation Doping of Silicon Single Crystals was used in doping of single crystalline and multicrystalline silicon wafers for research purposes. One of our main goals is to provide the scientific community of Poland an easy access to source of neutrons. This involves widest possible applications of MARIA reactor in research and technology. The beams of thermal neutrons are used in neutron scattering and radiography studies of condensed matter structures and processes occurring at various levels of length scales. About 60 papers describing the results of our research were published in 2009. Some of the results were accounted for in 136 IAE Reports as the preliminary step before publication. Several new results obtained in 2009 on water migration in particulate porous media, properties of ion beams modified materials as well as extensive use of synchrotron topography in crystal defects studies should be mentioned. The recombination methods for assessment of mixed radiation doses at various facilities were mastered. The studies on models and software tools for emergency management were carried out within the EU Framework projects by the Centre of Excellence Management of Health and Environmental Hazards MANHAZ. The research project '' Analysis of the thorium application in nuclear power reactors '' (THORIUM PROJECT) established within the Innovative Economy Operational Program has been performed in cooperation with Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The project on testing and implementation of radioisotopes for neuroendocrine tumour therapy has been accepted for realization within the Innovative Economy Operational Program. Our institute is open for the community. We are proud that above 5000 visitors came to enjoy our presentations and lectures on nuclear techniques developed on the basis of nuclear research reactor MARIA during 2009. Several students from Polish universities obtained student summer training in IAE laboratories in 2009. (author)

  14. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GOLOB

    2016-12-01

    Last but not least is a technical note by Qasier ABBAS "Semi-Semantic Annotation: A Guideline for the URDU.KON-TB Treebank POS Annotation", in which the author proposes annotation guidelines of semi-semantic parts of speech for the URDU.KON-TB treebank.

  15. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel; Drapier, Sylvain; Feulvarch, Éric; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In the face of increasingly fierce global competition, industrial companies must develop products more and more quickly and cheaply. In such a context, the numerical simulation of manufacturing processes is a big challenge and a key factor for success. Indeed, numerical simulation enables the control of manufacturing processes and of the consequences that they induce on the manufactured parts in terms of material modifications, geometrical changes or residual stresses, each of them playing an important role in the lifetime of the component.

  16. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Eduardo L.; Magazzù, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    These proceedings are hosted by Astronomische Nachrichten. In order to be published in such an international journal, all the contributions needed to go through a refereeing process. We thank all the referees for their reports, which have been very useful to the improve the quality of the proceedings. Thanks also to the authors, for their patience in making all the changes required by the referees and by ourselves. A special thank to the Astronomische Nachrichten staff for their collaboration. Finally, thanks to all the participants, who came to La Palma, this little spot on the Atlantic Ocean map, to gather and make an enjoyable and fruitful meeting.

  17. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gurgu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The 10th anniversary of the worst downturn since the Great Depression finds the global economy at risk of a fresh crisis and ill-prepared for the disruption likely from the robot age, the World Economic Forum has warned.The body that organises the annual gathering of the global elite in Davos each January used its annual league table of competitiveness to stress that the failure to push through growth and productivity-friendly policies since the crash of 2007-08 had jeopardised chances of a sustained recovery.....

  18. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on its surface, and in its atmosphere and oceans, particularly over the ... lunar samples. Amongst these are the discoveries of the signatures of ancient solar activity embed- ded in meteorites and of the characteristics of solar wind, solar energetic ... Bajpai, in his article, presents evidence of how these events influenced.

  19. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (The National. Academies Press, 2003). molecular frontier' into creating and understanding supramolecular and nanoscale assemblies of molecules. 1 . The article by Ashwini Nangia discusses the art and science of supramolecular synthesis of organic molecules to create solid-.

  20. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the article on epigenetics would reveal how the basic paradigm of gene regulation is fast changing in the post-genome era, the article on a detailed study on one type of protein throws light on the amazing diversity in functions and thereby the physiology of organisms that evolution can throw up by varying the structure ...

  1. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GOLOB

    2016-06-01

    Finally, Pankaj DWIVEDI and Somdev KAR contributed a survey article on a Hindi dialect called Kanauji. The article exposes problems researchers have to deal with on the field when monitoring and documenting spoken language of a certain area, and fitting the findings into concepts such as a language and a dialect.

  2. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The year 2005 was the year of Physics, the year of Albert Einstein. Many scientific events were organized to mark this occasion. We took part in many of these, delivering lectures, organizing exhibitions, showing experiments for the general public, etc. In particular: - several lectures delivered at the 29 th Mazurian Conference on Physics organized by our Institute. These concerned the history of physics as well as an attempt to look into the future. The violin concert, coupled to a talk on physics, added an extra dimension to the issue. - The Environmental Physics laboratory of our Institute organized a countrywide experiment of air dust measurement with the participation of high school pupils. The year 2005 was also a special year for our Institute: the 50 th anniversary of establishing the Institute of Nuclear Research (IBJ) in Swierk, which was later transformed into several specialized institutes of nuclear science, one of which is ours. To celebrate the anniversary we organized a symposium Atomic Science in the XXI-st Century. Many other events took place during those days, including Open Days at Swierk with more than 1000 guests visiting the Institute. Besides celebrating, we did our everyday work. Some highlights are worth mentioning. There were 254 papers published in high ranking journals. Most of these report work done within major international collaborations. To our dismay, this is considered as a shortcoming by our funding authorities. Notwithstanding their lip service to the importance of the European dimension of scientific work, they downgrade the multi-institutional papers in their new evaluating procedure. We still hope to convince the authorities that, in the long run, this is suicidal. Our yearly internal award in the basic research category was won by work on the first evidence for the excited hyperon Y 0* (1480). Three distinctions were also won by: work on the role of coupling to the continuum in reactions with the B oromean nuclei , on the formation of superconducting regions in layers of MgB 2 obtained by implantation of magnesium ions into a boron substrate followed by intense pulsed plasma treatment, and on the first evidence of ν μ oscillation in an accelerator-based experiment. In the technical category, the winning work was on large scale production of straw tube modules for the LHCb experiment at CERN together with the design of basic hardware modules concerning overall control of this experiment. Another technical achievement was that the system for brachytherapy of brain tumors based on the Photon Needle X-ray generator has entered the phase of clinical testing. Worth mentioning is also the work of our DESY team on the leptoproduction in a nuclear medium as well as that of our KASCADE collaboration participants on the detection and imaging of atmospheric radio flashes from cosmic ray air showers (see Nature 435 (2005) 313) Participation in the EURATOM fusion program was continued. The International Conference Plasma 2005 was organized by our Plasma Physics Department. Our activity in the field of general education and popularization of science has increased. As usual in such cases, we owe this to a few enthusiasts. My thanks for this go to Leszek Nowicki, Jacek Jagielski, Marek Pawlowski, Jacek Szabelski and many others as well as to our Training Department led by Professor Ludwik Dobrzynski. There was a small but significant change in the organization of the Institute: the formation of the Information Technology Division headed by Jacek Szlachciak. This brings a degree of order and expertise into the rapidly developing field with even more rapidly growing needs, possibilities and expectations. We all wish Jacek and his colleagues every successes in carrying out their tasks. The Reader of our Annual Reports may notice a certain novelty in this year's issue: the expanded general part including some details about events which we judge significant. I hope the Reader will find this part as well as the whole of the Report interesting. (author)

  3. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej BEKEŠ

    2013-04-01

    In the fifth paper, We Have It too: A Strategy Which Helps to Grasp the Japanese Writing System for Students from Outside of the Chinese Character Cultural Zone, the author, Andrej BEKEŠ, argues for employment of analogy transfer strategies to help beginner learners of Japanese to overcome cognitive and affecctive blocade when facing the complexities of Japanese writing system.

  4. Foreword

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysanthis, P. K.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Kumar, V.

    2006-01-01

    it is our great pleasure to welcome you all to the Fifth ACM International Workshop on Data Engineering for Wireless and Mobile Access (MobiDE 2006), which is held in conjunction with ACM SIGMOD/PODS 2006. This workshop brings together researchers in databases, networking, and mobile computing...... of very high quality, making the selection process quite competitive. All submissions were reviewed by at least 3 members of the Program Committee. This was followed by a discussion phase, where the reviewers of each submission had the opportunity to discuss the submission and its reviews. As a result, 10...... in the program. This talk probes into the consumer side of the mobile environment.The program reflects the depth and breadth of the field, with sessions covering important aspects of mobility, location-based processing, and the introduction of sensor technology into the real world. Thus, these proceedings...

  5. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aime, C.; Soummer, R.

    This book reports the proceedings of the second Journées d'Imagerie grave{a} Très Haute Dynamique et Détection d'Exoplanètes (Days on High Contrast Imaging and Exoplanets Detection) that were held in Nice in October, 6-10, 2003 with the joint efforts of the Collège de France, the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) and the Laboratoire Universitaire d'Astrophysique de Nice which organized the meeting. The first Journées led to the publication of Volume 8, 2003 EAS Publications Series: Astronomy with High Contrast Imaging: From Planetary Systems to Active Galactic Nuclei that collected 33 papers presented during the session of May, 13-16, 2002. It covered a very large domain of research in high contrast imaging for exoplanet detection: astrophysical science (from protoplanetary disks to AGNs), instruments and techniques (from coronagraphy to nulling), data processing. These Journées took place because of the need of a working session giving enough time to the participants to explain their work and understand that of their colleagues. The second Journées took the form of an École thématique du CNRS. The courses were held in French, but the reports are in English. The present edition reports 29 courses and short presentations given at this occasion. The texts correspond to original presentations, and a few communications, too similar to those of 2002, were not reported here to avoid duplication. This makes the two books complementary. The general theme of the school was similar to that of the former meeting, with a marked teaching objective. The courses and presentations were also more centered in optics and instrumental techniques. The main idea was to study what we could call “exoplanetographs”, instruments using apodisation, coronagraphy, nulling or other techniques to directly record the light of an exoplanet. Fundamental aspects of signal processing were deferred to a third edition of the school. A very short explanation of how the reports are ordered is given here. The Journées of 2003 started with the delocalized lectures (delocalized means here “not in Paris”!) of the Collège de France, of Antoine Labeyrie who wrote a report on Removal of coronagraphy residues with an adaptive hologram. Three invited seminars follow: Olivier Guyon (Pupil remapping techniques), Daniel Rouan (Ultra-nulling interferometers), and Kjetil Dohlen (Phase masks in astronomy). An illustration from Daniel Rouan's talk on the properties of Prouhet-Thué-Morse series was also selected for the cover figure of this edition. These papers are followed by the courses and communications given during the 4 days of the school, in a slightly different order of their presentation. The first two days were on atmospheric turbulence and adaptive optics for coronagraphy, and also coronagraphic space projects. Steve Ridgway gives a general introduction to the problem (Astronomy with high contrast imaging). This is followed by a presentation on Fourier and Statistical Optics: Shaped and Apodized apertures (Claude Aime), The effect of a coronagraph on the statistics of adaptive optics pinned speckles (Claude Aime and Rémi Soummer). A general introduction to the problem of atmospheric turbulence is made by Julien Borgnino. A presentation of the Concordia site with emphasis on its advantages for high contrast imaging is given by Eric Fossat. Several presentations relative to numerical simulations of Adaptive Optics and coronagraphy follow: Marcel Carbillet (AO for very high contrast imaging), Lyu Abe and Anthony Boccaletti share two presentations on Numerical simulations for coronagraphy. These presentations are followed by reports on experiments: Sandrine Thomas (SAM-the SOAR adaptive module), Pierre Baudoz (Cryogenic IR test of the 4QPM coronagraph), Anthony Boccaletti (Coronagraphy with JWST in the thermal IR). Pierre Bourget (Hg-Mask Coronagraph) ends this part with a coronagraph using a mercury drop as a Lyot mask. The next session focused on nulling interferometry and we gather here the corresponding contribution. Two complementary reports on theory and experiment of Bracewell interferometry were made by Yves Rabbia (Theoretical aspects of Darwin) and Marc Ollivier (Experimental aspects of Darwin). Olivier Absil gave a report on the ground based nulling interferometer experiment (Effects of atmospheric turbulence on GENIE) and Valérie Weber on MAII (Nulling interferometric broadbord). A comparison between nulling and different classes of coronagraphs was made by Olivier Guyon (Coronagraphy vs. nulling). A few prospective papers have been regrouped at the end of the book: Interferometric remapped array nulling (Lyu Abe), Multiple-stage apodized Lyot coronagraph (Claude Aime and Rémi Soummer), Piston sensor using dispersed speckles (Virginie Borkowski), Principle of a coaxial achromatic interfero coronagraph (Jean Gay), Coronagraphic imaging on the VLTI with VIDA (Olivier Lardière), Phase contrast apodisation (Frantz Martinache) The last section regroups science aspects and results on sky, using high contrast imaging: Low mass companions searches using high dynamic range imaging (Jean-Luc Beuzit). The last paper by Claire Moutou (Ground-based direct imaging of exoplanets) can be read as a prospective conclusion of the Journées. C. Aime and R. Soummer

  6. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    2006-01-01

    Institute of Atomic Energy was established in 1983 on the basis of dissolved Institute for Nuclear Research. The IAE main topic is safe energy generation with particular emphasis on nuclear energy as the most environment friendly technology. This has been expanded into the realm of hazards analysis and its applications to conventional plants. The ionising radiation protection issues furnish the basis of our health physics research. The second topic of research is material science studies performed mainly with non-destructive nuclear techniques like X-rays and neutron scattering or Moessbauer spectroscopy. Institute of Atomic Energy is the operator of the multifunctional nuclear research reactor MARIA. In 2005 the reactor was successfully operated for 3850 hours with a new type of fuel elements of 36% enrichment in U-235. No radiological accidents, failures or breakdowns due to the new fuel were recorded in 2005, confirming the good quality of the new fuel. The new radiation monitoring system was completed at the reactor. One of our main goals is to provide the scientific community of Poland an easy access to source of neutrons. This involves widest possible applications of MARIA reactor in research and technology. The thermal neutrons are used in research for neutron scattering and radiography. The main applications of the MARIA in technology are radioactive isotopes production, neutron doping of silicon and minerals properties modification. 45 papers describing the results of our research were published in 2005. Some of the results were accounted for in 60 IAE Reports as the preliminary step before publication. Several new results obtained in 2005 such as temperature spikes occurring during soil imbibition, and determination of stress distribution in implanted GaAs layers should be mentioned. The recombination methods for assessment of mixed radiation doses were mastered. The numerical methods developed by Prof. Z. Woznicki found recognition with the award for the best paper at the IPSI-2005 conference. The studies on models and software tools for emergency management were carried out within the EU Framework projects by the Centre of Excellence Management of Health and Environmental Hazards MANHAZ. The experience of the Material Research Laboratory in radioactive materials analysis was employed in Materials Testing Centre formed within the consortium of the IAE and the Radioactive Waste Management Plant for quick identification and categorisation of the unidentified or of unknown origin radioactive or nuclear items. The Materials Test Centre has been one link of Polish system for the response to illicit trafficking and inadvertent movement of radioactive materials. After Polish Government decision on the use of nuclear power for electricity generation the Institute, in cooperation with few universities, began preparation for training students in the nuclear safety and radiation protection. In this endeavour we found the European Union assistance in the form of Transition Facility. Our institute is open for the community. We are proud that about 4,000 visitors took part during 2005 in our presentations and lectures on nuclear techniques developed on the basis of nuclear research reactor MARIA. The 50th anniversary of the establishing the National Nuclear Centre at Swierk as the Institute of Nuclear Research was celebrated officially on May 2005 and acknowledged by Polish President and State Ministry of Science and Polish Academy of Sciences. The Institute of Atomic Energy celebrated the event with special medal issued on this occasion and meetings, including the emeritus employees meeting

  7. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The Reports on Research are grouped in ten chapters corresponding to the ten scientific departments of the Institute. Chapters eleven and twelve give reports of activities of the Training Department and of the production unit ZdAJ, correspondingly. Each of these chapters begins with a short overview written by the head of the department; these are followed by short accounts of the work in progress and lists of publications and other output of each of the departments. The activities of the Institute concentrate on the nuclear physics (low, medium and high energy), the particle physics, the cosmic radiation and the hot plasma physics on one hand and on such domains of the applied research and instrumentation as the accelerator development, the materials science (notably the surface properties), the development of detectors and of specialised, short-series electronics. Therapeutical accelerators and diagnostic devices feature highly on the Institute technical output list. There is a clear shift of interest of nuclear physics experts towards higher energy accelerator experiments. There is still, however, a worthy output concerning the more traditional low energy nuclear physics. An example to mention is the work on the 6 He nucleus with the suggested two- neutron halo structure. The high energy nuclear and particle physics groups are increasingly involved in preparations for the ''next century physics'', be it at CERN or elsewhere. The two modest and aged nuclear accelerators: the 2MV van de Graaff and the 30 MeV proton cyclotron, serve successfully the solid state related research. Examples: the work on defects in GaAs crystals, one of the most studied material in the recent years because of its technological potential or the radiation-induced modification of optical properties of various materials. The plasma physics group continues the work on the polarisation of X-rays emitted during the PF-type discharges. They gained a new insight to the effect by observing it for discrete X-ray lines. A noteworthy also is their methodical work on the track detectors and their use in plasma research. The Institute nuclear electronics group, developed years ago to partly offset the shortages of ready-made electronics on the Polish market and partly to assist the physics oriented groups. The work on the front-end electronics for the Euroball system or on the acquisition system for the NA 48 experiment at CERN are examples of these activities. The Institute over many years has been engaged in development, construction and implementation of linear electron accelerators for cancer therapy. Last year the activity have been honoured by the award ''Teraz Polska'', the prestigious prize for the best industrial product made in Poland and based on Polish technology, for the therapeutical range SACON. The Report consists also descriptions of works on the high energy atomic physics, on the implantation techniques to technic modify the surface properties of materials and many other ''goodies''. The Institute has co-organized the ''International Workshop on Plasma - Focus Research PF'98'' in Kudowa in July 1998. A permanent exhibition ''Nuclear wastes: problems, solutions'' prepared by the Department of Training and Consulting has been opened in the fall of 1998

  8. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    practical consequence of research in the domain of cognitive neurosciences. Raman Kutty traces the ascent of science in public health. He illustrates how ideas and methodological rigours of science helped to transform public health from a social science to a scientific discipline in its own right and in that process helped to ...

  9. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Ann Kirss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Methis is a new quarterly journal of literary and cultural studies in Estonia, a collaborative publication of the Department of Literature and Theatre Research of the University of Tartu and the Estonian Literary Museum. Its predecessors were series of collections of articles “Studia litteraria estonica“ of the Chair of Estonian Literature of the University of Tartu, and series such as “Tradition and pluralism”, and “Accommodating Texts” of the Estonian Literary Museum. With due respect to its genealogy, the purpose of Methis is to provide a new forum for publication by young and established scholars, balancing between international and Estonian-language readerships. Since any new periodical is fraught with risk, especially in a country where the scholarly base is small, it is crucial to take the measure of the landscape, both in the homeland and in Europe. The pressures of publishing must take into account perils and perishing, both on the level of individual scholars and their institutions. Methis is primarily and philosophically committed to peer-reviewed publishing in the Estonian language. The editorial board sees this not as a symptom of insularity, but rather as a deep, intentional investment in the cultivation of scholarly Estonian as a flexible, rich medium for scientific expression and communication at a level in keeping with the highest international standards. The first double issue of Methis, published in December 2008 under the editorship of Dr. Marin Laak and Dr. Sirje Olesk, was devoted to the Young Estonia movement of the last decades of the 19th century and the opening decade of the 20th – a time of crucial self-positioning of Estonian scholars, thinkers and activists with respect to the Europe they both imagined and encountered in their peregrinations and political exile. It is, however highly and fortunately symbolic of Methis’ position in Estonian letters that this issue is published in English, and that it commemorates another important anniversary in Estonian cultural history. The editors, Dr. Luule Epner, and Dr. Anneli Saro, have elicited and prepared a very fine selection of articles based on papers given at a conference in December 2006 devoted to the 100th anniversary of the first professional theatres in Estonia. We anticipate that the future of Methis will entail other such occasions for English-language special issues and clusters of articles. 6 As with any new venture, Methis has already encountered controversy – particularly about its name, the choice of which entailed a tension between pure loyalty to long humanistic traditions and pragmatism. Metis is the mythological mother of Athena, and the symbolism of this lineage is connected with Tartu, a historic university city, referred to frequently with the locution “Emajõe Ateena” (“Athena on the Banks of the River Emajõgi“. The “Tartu spirit”, whether it is a figure for intellectual passion or a haunting of the past (or the name given to a very peppery chocolate truffle in one of Tartu’s famous cafes is part folklore and part ideology. We hope that on the pages of this journal, it will be “catching” in the best sense of that word. Scholarly wisdom, championed by Athena, needs nurture and protection, perhaps especially these days, when the heat of institutional production requirements and bureaucratic quotas threaten to overpower the coolness, caution, slow absorption, meticulous tending and acumen of real scholarship. As a journal, Methis seeks to honour the solicitude of its mythological patroness. However, many of our colleagues in Classical Studies have been quite vocal about the extra letter in the name of our journal. While their objections are certainly justified, there is no gratuitous playfulness in the extra letter “H“. Since another European journal of the humanities already exists under the name Metis, we merely wished to avoid confusion. While many of the forthcoming issues of Methis will be topical or thematic, at least every fourth issue will be a multi-topic or free issue. Methis 4 (2009, our first free issue, will be edited by Andrus Org, a lecturer in Estonian literature at the University of Tartu, and it will expand the full repertoire of regular features. In addition to the book reviews in Methis 3 (2009, each of the following issues will contain translations into Estonian of theoretical and methodological articles in literary and cultural studies, and publication of archival source material. The editorial board of Methis is grateful to the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research, the Estonian Cultural Endowment, and the Publications Committee of the University of Tartu for ongoing financial support.

  10. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Raffaelli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is with immense satisfaction that we introduce the opening issue of the INTERthesis Interdisciplinary International Journal, created with the aim of encouraging and contributing to the interdisciplinary discussion. In this first issue, we have included five articles which have an extremely wide-ranging subject matter .The article by Carlos Walter Porto Gonçalves argues the geopolitical question implied in the purported dichotomy between hunger and environment, analyzing the environmental - social consequences of the use of an agrarian and agricultural pattern incompatible with the populations' needs throughout several regions of the world, thus generating a contradiction between the increase of food production and the concomitant increase of hunger. Javier Bustamante Donas analyzes the educational parameters, which are essential for the conversion of the society of information into a society of knowledge, pondering that the lack of reflection upon the human dimensions of technology causes disarray that threatens its purposes of greatest reach. Marika Moisseeff examines the conjugal relationship and the autonomy, focusing the couple as an initiative experience, which is settled by the development of intimacy along their connubial life, taking into account the differentiation between the spouses and the learning of respect for each one's space. Paulo Henrique Battaglin Machado evaluates the impact of public policies on the society, by means of a methodology of life quality rates assessment, considering intraurban differentials, and analyzes the inequalities and inequities among regions in Curitiba, confronting the urban model and the city image. Finally, Salvador Giner highlights the importance of sociology in the study of the human condition, emphasizing its multidimensional characteristic and the need of a moral competence that searches the union between the rational intention and the human freedom evinced in the utopia. We hope these articles can expand the discussion of these relevant subject matters and that their reading can be very profitable for researchers of the several areas of knowledge. See you in our next edition, in December of the current year! Rafael Raffaelli - Editor

  11. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrochna, G.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In 2008 IPJ strengthened its position in basic research and opened a new chapter in applied studies. Scientific output exceeded 250 publications, including 232 in reviewed international journals from the ISI Master Journal List. The Hirsch index, taking into account the number of citations in the years 2000-2008, reached about 40, which gives us the seventh place among Polish research units, after two institutes of the Polish Academy of Sciences: Institute of Nuclear Physics and Institute of Physics, Faculties of Physics and Chemistry of Warsaw and Jagiellonian Universities and Warsaw Medical University. The H-index cannot be used as the only measure of the quality of scientific output, as it depends on the size of the institute. However, it gives a good feeling of the '' scientific strength ''. This output has been created by a staff of 405 people, including 130 researchers. Our most spectacular achievement in 2008 was the early optical observation of a gamma-ray burst GRB080319B. The detector '' Pi of the Sky '' built in collaboration with several other institutes from Warsaw recorded a '' movie '' of the phenomenon which probably leads to the creation of a black hole. It was the most powerful cosmic explosion ever registered, as it occurred 7 bln light years from the Earth and could be seen by the naked eye. Combining the data with gamma ray measurements by the '' Swift '' satellite gave a new insight into the mechanism of GRBs, as presented in a paper published in '' Nature ''. Two other important results were obtained in nuclear physics. In both cases our theorists explained phenomena observed by experimental groups with IPJ participation. A group in GSI Darmstadt measured electron capture dependence on ionization. Prof. Zygmunt Patyk noticed that the results can be explained by invoking angular momentum conservation. A group in GANIL Caen studied neutron halo structure in 6 He by neutron transfer reactions in the 6 He + 65 Cu system. Dr. Nicholas Keeley provided an interpretation of the data. IPJ also participated in the most important scientific event of 2008, the startup of the LHC accelerator at CERN. Unfortunately, the breakdown of the machine ruled out the possibility of obtaining interesting results. However, the event as such attracted a lot of attention and gave us a chance to present the beauty and importance of elementary particle physics to a wide audience. Active participation in the top-tech endeavor of the LHC remains in high contrast with the day-today problems caused by the old technical infrastructure of the nuclear center in Swierk. The lack of adequate funding makes an upgrade impossible. Power and water supply suffer from frequent breakdowns and only the strong motivation and high qualifications of the technical staff keeps the center in regular operation. Hope for change comes with EU funds available for Poland in 2007-2013. Indeed, we have already obtained the first success. The project '' Development of accelerator and detector systems for medicine and security '' has 79 mln PLN (∼18 mln EUR) for 5 years which doubles the budget of the institute. It brings a breakthrough in the applied studies conducted by IPJ, but also in the way the institute is managed. Introducing project-driven management is the challenge for 2009. It should result in a boost towards modern and dynamic ways of doing science. This should be followed by new projects funded from EU programs, including the most ambitious one, which is the free electron laser POLFEL. As a part of a distributed infrastructure EuroFEL it stands for the key element of the European scientific roadmap recommended by the ESFRI committee. In the case of positive decision on funding, the 400 m long accelerator producing 0.2 GW pulses of UV light will be the largest and the most modern research infrastructure in the new Europe. A powerful tool for physicists, chemists, biologists, medical researchers and materials engineers, it should bring scientific research in Poland to a new level. The year 2009 will tell us if this opportunity will be won or wasted. (author)

  12. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoupanos, G.

    These are the Proceedings of the scientific activities of CORFU2016, the 16th Hellenic School and Workshops on Elementary Particle Physics and Gravity, which took place from August 31st till September 23rd, 2016. The School and Workshops were hosted by the European Institute for Sciences and their Applications (EISA) at the conference center of the ex-Royal Palace garden of Mon Repos in Corfu, Greece. The scientific activities consisted of a series of three events, the Summer School and Workshop on the Standard Model and Beyond, the Recent Developments in Strings and Gravity, the ATLAS Hadronic Calibration Workshop 2016 and a rich set of outreach activities ( TV and radio interviews, Master Classes, series of lectures to High School teachers and talks for the public). We refer to the website www.physics.ntua.gr/corfu2016 for the various organizational and practical details. These proceedings are dedicated to our beloved friend and colleague Giannis (Ioannis) Bakas who passed away on Tuesday, Aug 30, 2016.

  13. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gurgu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of 2017, according to World Economic Forum Agenda, it seems that economic competitiveness matters, but not as an end in itself. It matters because nations that are more competitive are more productive, and are therefore more able to provide for the social needs of their people. The world has changed dramatically over the last decade, and measuring the factors that determine competitiveness continues to be a highly complex process. It is certainly true that the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR – new, rapidly changing technologies in many different fields – has changed the way we need to measure some aspects of competitiveness, particularly in relation to innovation and ideas. We need to stress, for example, the value of ideas and collaboration within companies; the values of open-mindedness, of connectivity, and the value of an entrepreneurial spirit. And we have had to emphasize a new kind of education: one that is more conducive to students’ creativity, their ability to observe and generate ideas. The new industrial revolution, also known as the 4IR, has forced us to put more emphasis on all these aspects of a nation’s innovation ecosystem. The appearance of very disruptive technologies has been incredibly rapid. If we go back 10 years, the iPhone didn’t even exist. We have seen huge developments in artificial intelligence, new materials, synthetic biology, big data and on-demand technologies, and all these are changing the business landscape at a planetary level. Significantly, many of these innovations did not occur in those countries where technology used to be produced almost monopolistically. It is no longer the case that only the US and Europe innovate; the new industrial revolution has created opportunities for nations across the globe. This is a hugely important trend.

  14. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James E.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings include the invited papers plus a few contributed papers from the Eighth International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS 8). The meeting was held from 8 to 12 August 2004 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ASOS meetings bring together basic and applied atomic spectroscopists, including some astronomers, from across the globe. The triennial ASOS meetings provide important opportunities for interaction between "consumers" and "producers" in the field of atomic spectroscopy. With new orbiting facilities extending astronomical observations into the infrared, extreme UV, and x-ray regions, and with new greatly improved ground-based telescopes, there is widespread recognition that we are living in a "Golden Age" of astronomy. The increasing availability of very large aperture, ground-based telescopes has made it possible to record high spectral resolution data with a high signal-to-noise ratio on a rapidly growing number of stars in the disk and halo of our Galaxy. Recent progress in x-ray astronomy, some of which is described in these proceedings, has been breathtaking. High red-shift studies using both large ground-based and orbiting observatories are changing our understanding of the Universe. Profound questions about the origins of the chemical elements, about stellar evolution, and about the origins and fate of the Universe are being addressed today. Atomic spectroscopy has a central role in many of these astrophysical explorations. Atomic spectroscopy of laboratory plasmas continues to be important in plasma R&D efforts to meet urgent needs of our society and all of humanity. This is particularly true of plasma R&D in lighting science and in the area of thermonuclear fusion research. The energy and environmental problems that we are now discussing will be much more serious in a very few decades. The impact of atomic spectroscopy in energy conservation is illustrated by work on Metal Halide High Intensity Discharge (MH-HID) lamps as discussed in these proceedings. MH-HID lamps have the potential to reduce energy consumption for roadway and other outdoor lighting by a factor of 2 to 3 using current technology. It is now widely realized that the extra "red" lumens provided by High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lamps over old fashioned "blue" mercury HID lamps are not useful in reducing the reaction time of drivers with dark adapted eyes. Indeed, we could replace existing HPS lighting in North America with half as many Watts of MH-HID lighting and achieve the same safety levels for drivers. The improved color rendering provided by MH-HID lamps has additional security advantages in many applications. Atomic spectroscopy continues to play a key role in diagnosing fusion research plasmas as described in these proceedings. A few decades ago heavy refractory elements, especially tungsten, were leading candidates for use in fusion research devices. Tungsten and other heavy elements fell out of favor because line radiation from partially stripped tungsten ions represented a serious power loss from the plasma core. New reactor design concepts involving limiters and divertors have renewed interest in the use of tungsten in fusion machines, and have restored interest in heavy element spectroscopy from the fusion community. The ASOS 8 meeting had 63 registered participants. The relatively small size of the conference provided enhanced opportunities for interactions and discussions, but eventually the small number of students entering our field will adversely impact astronomy and other fields. The talks and poster sessions were held at the Pyle Center on the shore of Lake Mendota in the heart of the UW campus. A special session was held to honor Professor Charles R (Chuck) Cowley of the University of Michigan and to recognize his many contributions to stellar spectroscopy. The conference excursion included a visit to Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural school, Taliesin, followed by dinner at a historic restaurant and a Shakespeare play at the American Players (outdoor) Theatre in Spring Green, Wisconsin. We thank: Dr Elizabeth A (Betsy) Den Hartog for her outstanding efforts on local arrangements, the staff of the Pyle (conference) Center for their excellent service, the International Organizing Committee for suggesting invited speakers, NASA for providing travel support to encourage the participation in ASOS 8 of international and domestic graduate students, and the US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, for providing partial support for the publication of these proceedings.

  15. Foreword

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent; Thellefsen, Torkild Leo

    2017-01-01

    Hitherto, there has been no book that attempted to sum up the breadth of Umberto Eco's work and it importance for the study of semiotics, communication and cognition. There have been anthologies and overviews of Eco's work within Eco Studies; sometimes, works in semiotics have used aspects of Eco......'s work. Yet, thus far, there has been no overview of the work of Eco in the breadth of semiotics. This volume is a contribution to both semiotics and Eco studies. The 40 scholars who participate in the volume come from a variety of disciplines but have all chosen to work with a favorite quotation from...... Eco that they find particularly illustrative of the issues that his work raises. Some of the scholars have worked exegetically placing the quotation within a tradition, others have determined the (epistemic) value of the quotation and offered a critique, while still others have seen the quotation...

  16. Foreword

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thellefsen, Torkild Leo; Søresen, Bent

    This volume contributes to the advancement of the understanding of Umberto Eco's (1932-2016) excellent work on semiotics, communication and cognition. Forty Eco-scholars from 12 contries located on 3 continents bring together insights across the wide range of Eco's writings, as well...... as the contemporary trends in his interpretation, including innovative applications of Eco's semiotic models...

  17. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    An equally important purpose that we had in mind was to expose talented ... This special issue of Journal of Biosciences contains articles based on most of the presentations made at ... Basic Sciences Building, New York Medical College,.

  18. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanny MOULIN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Orlando looking at Jaque's reverberated image: “Which I take to be either a fool or a cipher.” ( As You Like It III.ii 279Melancholia posits the intersection of the biological and the symbolic, ambivalently motivating and undermining the imaginary (viz. for example, Kristeva's “On the melancholic imaginary”. That reverberates across history in assessments of loss, mourning and absence. “Acedia,” the radical melancholy of the Egyptian monks of early Christianity, the “noontime demon” of slot...

  19. Foreword

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1999-10-01

    The Reports on Research are grouped in ten chapters corresponding to the ten scientific departments of the Institute. Chapters eleven and twelve give reports of activities of the Training Department and of the production unit ZdAJ, correspondingly. Each of these chapters begins with a short overview written by the head of the department; these are followed by short accounts of the work in progress and lists of publications and other output of each of the departments. The activities of the Institute concentrate on the nuclear physics (low, medium and high energy), the particle physics, the cosmic radiation and the hot plasma physics on one hand and on such domains of the applied research and instrumentation as the accelerator development, the materials science (notably the surface properties), the development of detectors and of specialised, short-series electronics. Therapeutical accelerators and diagnostic devices feature highly on the Institute technical output list. There is a clear shift of interest of nuclear physics experts towards higher energy accelerator experiments. There is still, however, a worthy output concerning the more traditional low energy nuclear physics. An example to mention is the work on the {sup 6}He nucleus with the suggested two- neutron halo structure. The high energy nuclear and particle physics groups are increasingly involved in preparations for the ``next century physics``, be it at CERN or elsewhere. The two modest and aged nuclear accelerators: the 2MV van de Graaff and the 30 MeV proton cyclotron, serve successfully the solid state related research. Examples: the work on defects in GaAs crystals, one of the most studied material in the recent years because of its technological potential or the radiation-induced modification of optical properties of various materials. The plasma physics group continues the work on the polarisation of X-rays emitted during the PF-type discharges. They gained a new insight to the effect by observing it for discrete X-ray lines. A noteworthy also is their methodical work on the track detectors and their use in plasma research. The Institute nuclear electronics group, developed years ago to partly offset the shortages of ready-made electronics on the Polish market and partly to assist the physics oriented groups. The work on the front-end electronics for the Euroball system or on the acquisition system for the NA 48 experiment at CERN are examples of these activities. The Institute over many years has been engaged in development, construction and implementation of linear electron accelerators for cancer therapy. Last year the activity have been honoured by the award ``Teraz Polska``, the prestigious prize for the best industrial product made in Poland and based on Polish technology, for the therapeutical range SACON. The Report consists also descriptions of works on the high energy atomic physics, on the implantation techniques to technic modify the surface properties of materials and many other ``goodies``. The Institute has co-organized the ``International Workshop on Plasma - Focus Research PF`98`` in Kudowa in July 1998. A permanent exhibition ``Nuclear wastes: problems, solutions`` prepared by the Department of Training and Consulting has been opened in the fall of 1998

  20. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutron, Claude; Ferrari, Christophe

    2003-05-01

    It is our pleasure to host the “12th International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment” in the city of Grenoble (France), in the heart of the Alps. This is the latest in this successful and popular series of conferences, which previously took place in Toronto (1975), London (1979), Amsterdam (1981), Heidelberg (1983), Athens (1985), New Orleans (1987), Geneva (1989), Edinburgh (1991), Hamburg (1995) and Ann Arbor (2000). Grenoble is one of the major research centres in Europe, with a very large number of researchers in various fields, especially Physics and Chemistry, Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Biology and Medicine, and Earth and Universe Sciences. There are two internationally recognized scientific Universities: Université Joseph Fourier (UJF), and Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (INPG). There are also the main research laboratories of various French and European governmental organizations such as Commissariat à l'énergie Atomique (CEA), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and Institut de Radio-Astronomie Millimètrique (IRAM). Finally, there are various hi-tech companies such as Hewlett Packard, ST Microelectronics, Schneider Electric and SGS-Thomson. There is a long tradition of research in the field of heavy metals in the environment, especially at the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement and at the Laboratoire de Géophysique Interne et Tectonophysique. These two volumes contain papers presented both in oral and poster sessions. The papers are not organised in order of presentation, but according to the alphabetical order of the family name of the first author of each paper. It is our pleasure to thank the authors for the excellent level of their submissions. We are also particularly grateful to Isabelle Houlbert and Laurence Castagné for editorial assistance. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the members of the organising committee and Jerome Nriagu (chairman of the 11th Conference) for helping us to put together the program of this conference. Also, very special thanks are due to Christine Echevet for her continuous and expert efforts to make the Grenoble Conference a success, and to various members of the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, especially Jocelyne Roquemora. Special thanks are also due to the President of Grenoble Alpes Métropole and the Mayor of the City of Grenoble. Finally, we are very grateful to the various co-sponsors of the conference, especially the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the University Joseph Fourier of Grenoble, the Ministère des Affaires Étrangères, the Ministère de l'Écologie et du Développement Durable, the Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l'Énergie (ADEME), Grenoble Alpes Métropole (La Métro), the City of Grenoble, the Region Rhône-Alpes, the Conseil Général de l'Isère, the Association Minéraux, Métaux non ferreux, Santé, Environnement (AMSE), the University of Michigan and the Société Hydrotechnique de France (SHF). Claude BOUTRON and Christophe FERRARI - Conference Co-Chairmen 12th International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment, Grenoble, France, 26-30 May 2003 Préface C'est un grand plaisir pour nous d'accueillir la “12e Conférence Internationale sur les Métaux Lourds dans l'Environnement en France Grenoble, au coeur des Alpes. Cette conférence est la 12e du nom, après celles qui ont eu lieu avec beaucoup de succès à Toronto (1975), Londres (1979), Amsterdam (1981), Heidelberg (1983), Athènes (1985), La Nouvelle Orléans (1987), Genève (1989), Edimbourg (1991), Hambourg (1995) et Ann Arbor (2000). Grenoble est l'une des principales ville d'Europe pour la recherche scientifique avec un très grand nombre de chercheurs dans des domaines trés variés, notamment en Physique et Chimie, Mathématiques et Informatique, Biologie et Médecine, et Sciences de la Terre et de l'Univers. Il y a deux grandes Universités Scientifiques de renommée internationale: l'Université Joseph Fourier (UJF) et l'Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (INPG). Il y a aussi d'importants laboratoires de différents organismes publics français et européen comme le Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique (CEA), le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), l'Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), l'European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) et l'Institut de Radio-Astronomie Millimètrique (IRAM). C'est aussi le lieu d'implantation de nombreuses sociétés de haute technologie comme Hewlett Packard, ST Microelectronics, Schneider Electric and SGS-Thomson. Il a à Grenoble une longue tradition de recherches dans le domaine des métaux lourds dans l'environnement, notamment au Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement et au Laboratoire de Géophysique Interne et Tectonophysique. Ces deux volumes regroupent les articles issus de communication présentées aussi bien au cours des sessions orales que des sessions posters. Ces articles sont classés selon l'ordre alphabétique du nom de famille du premier auteur. Nous remercions vivement les auteurs pour l'excellente qualité de ces articles. Nous remercions aussi tout particulièrement Isabelle Houlbert et Laurence Castagné pour leur collaboration. Nous aimerions aussi remercier les membres du comité d'organisation ainsi que Jerome Nriagu (organisateur de la 11e conférence) pour l'aide apportée à l'organisation de cette conférence. Nous remercions aussi tout spécialement Christine Echevet qui n'a pas ménagé ses efforts pour faire de cette conférence un succés, ainsi que de nombreux collègues du Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, en particulier Jocelyne Roquemora. Nous tenons également à remercier le Président de Grenoble Alpes Métropole et le Maire de la Ville de Grenoble pour leur soutien. Cette conférence n'aurait pas pu avoir lieu sans le soutien financier de nombreux organismes: le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), l'Université Joseph Fourier de Grenoble, le Ministère des Affaires Étrangères, le Ministère de l'Écologie et du Développement Durable, l'Agence de l'Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l'Énergie (ADEME), Grenoble Alpes Métropole (La Métro), la Ville de Grenoble, La Région Rhône-Alpes, le Conseil Général de l'Isère, l'Association Minéraux, Métaux non ferreux, Santé, Environnement (AIMSE), l'Université du Michigan et la Société Hydrotechnique de France (SHF). Claude BOUTRON et Christophe FERRARI Co-organisateurs de la 12e Conférence Internationale sur les Métaux Lourds dans l'Environement, Grenoble, France, 26-30 Mai 2003

  1. Foreword

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rix, Robert William

    2018-01-01

    Augustus Tulk. Subsequent chapters go on to explore Wilkinson’s early role in publishing the poetry of William Blake; his dealings with Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson; his lifelong friendship with Henry James, Sr; his association with Daniel Dunglas Home, Thomas Lake Harris and Andrew Jackson Davis......; his homoeopathic practice and its influence on James Tyler Kent; and his engagement with such causes as utopian socialism, environmentalism, women’s suffrage, antivivisectionism and the deregulation of medicine. The book concludes with a broader study of Wilkinson’s interest in mythology, psychology......Malcolm Peet’s Medicine, Mysticism and Mythology: Garth Wilkinson, Swedenborg and Nineteenth-Century Esoteric Culture explores the life and cultural milieu of the nineteenth-century Swedenborgian James John Garth Wilkinson (1812-99), whose largely forgotten influence touched a diverse range...

  2. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Burns

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I would like to welcome all readers to the first issue of this new not-for-profit open access journal: the Leibniz Transactions on Embedded Systems (LITES. Unless you have come across this journal by accident then you will already understand the key role that embedded systems have in modern life. One can hardly think of a single human activity that is not underpinned by such systems; transport, entertainment, supply lines for supermarkets, health care and drug production, energy production and transmission, robotic manufacturing, control systems and communication media of all kinds are now dependent on the fusion of embedded hardware and software. For researchers in this domain this provides great opportunities but also responsibilities. We need to make sure that society can justifiable rely on technology that is increasing beyond the understanding of most ordinary people. Computer-based technologies have been described as modern magic; it follows that we are therefore magicians. But the spells we cast must be based on sound principles, solid theory and demonstrable performance.One of the influences that embedded and other IT technology has had in the last decade is in publishing itself. Online services are now the norm. And early and open access to publicly funded research is now rightly demanded by Government bodies and related funding councils. This new journal has been created to meet this challenge. All papers are open access, with copyright being retained by the authors. Moreover, only a small fee is charged to authors due to low operational overheads and the support of Google and the Klaus Tschira Stiftung. But the lack of a physical page limit in an online-only journal does not mean that quality is undermined. All papers are thoroughly reviewed, with only the best work, in terms of originality and rigour, being accepted. Our aim is to evolve an excellent and effective venue for publish scholarly articles. To help achieve this aim LITES benefits greatly from having the name and reputation of Schloss Dagstuhl behind it.The volume of research material produced world-wide relating to embedded systems has lead to the spawning of many conferences and workshops, special issues and focused publications. In LITES we intend to cater for the broadest collection of relevant topics. We currently have subject editors to cover: the design, implementation, verification, and testing of embedded hardware and software systems; the theoretical foundations; single-core, multi-processor and networked architectures and their energy consumption and predictability properties; reliability and fault tolerance; security properties; applications in the avionics, automotive, telecommunication, medical and production domains; cyber-physical systems; high performance and real-time embedded systems; and hybrid systems. This is an impressive list, but it is not exhaustive. New areas will emerge and new editors will be appointed.LITES obtains its governance from EDAA (European Design and Automation Association and EMSIG (Embedded Systems Special Interest Group as a joint endeavour with Schloss Dagstuhl. EDAA/EMSIG appoint the Editor-in-Chief (EiC and the subject area editors. The terms for editors is four years, renewable once. All editorial work is done voluntarily.The first few issues of the journal will contain standard papers that have been through the review process. Later, comments on previously published papers will be allowed and commentaries included that will help the reader trace forward the influence of each paper. Comments will be reviewed; commentaries will just need to be passed by the EiC. I hope that as a reader you will find the papers in this journal of interest and often inspirational. As a researcher I hope you will consider it as a worthy place to entrust your work. All the editorial team will work towards building up the reputation of the journal. I hope the community at large will be part of that journey.I am proud to be the founding EiC of this journal, but I promise not to include editorials in future issues. The papers are quite capable of introducing themselves.Alan Burns

  3. Foreword

    OpenAIRE

    Baatz, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Once graduates of conservation programs find employment at an institution or work to capacity as free-lance conservators, they are usually confronted with a large amount of different tasks. Young professionals are confronted with a wide array of new challenges and each of them requires time and attention. As a result, there will be little or no time for extra activities like research or writing papers – the necessities and priorities of everyday life prevail. Most job profiles in the area of ...

  4. Foreword

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sizes, and in a well-planned collage-like arrangement, it contained a dozen motivating words. While I waited for a few minutes to see a consultant,. I wrote them down in my pocket book: confidence, excellence, honesty, inspiration, strength, freedom, ambition, team work, motivation, courage, creativity, passion, authenticity.

  5. Foreword

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Code of Best Practice in Editorial Discretion and Peer Review for. South African Scholarly Journals, namely 'new findings and/or insights'. (ASSAf 2008:2, my emphasis). According to this Code of Best Practice, this is perhaps the most fundamental principle of research publishing. When reading this five-word ...

  6. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    whom it made very interesting reading. Thirty odd years later, in the Platinum Jubilee. Year of the Indian Academy of Sciences, the two of us were requested by ... and anomalous behaviour in the normal phase in a variety of correlated systems. G. Ravindra. Kumar's article sheds light on light and its inter- action with matter.

  7. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    get activated under conditions of cellular stress) to ecological and ... (vii) S C Lakhotia: Role of a Non-coding RNA in Cellular Adaptation to ... (xi) Michèle Trémolières: Plant Response Strategies to Stress and Disturbance: The Case of Aquatic.

  8. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol Picciotto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is very appropriate that this first issue of the first volume of the Oñati Socio-Legal Series should be devoted to the best of the Master´s theses produced in 2010 (those graded eximia or magna cum laude. These research papers demonstrate much of what is best about the Oñati Institute´s wide range of activities. The Institute is now well known worldwide, as well as being firmly rooted in the Basque Country. It welcomes researchers and scholars for short and long stays: as visiting researchers, from doctoral students to emeritus professors; as participants in the workshops held weekly from April to July on many topics organised by leading researchers from all over the world; and as teachers in the Master´s programmes. They come to use the excellent facilities: the Library, the Old University, the Residence; to debate and interact, think and write, while enjoying the pleasures of Basque cuisine and culture and the beautiful location.

  9. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuk, A. I.; Ryabov, M. I.

    This issue includes articles based on some plenary reports made during the 5th International Gamow Conference and the 15th Gamow conference-school. The Conference was devoted to a number of remarkable events:the 111 year Jubilee of George Gamow, one of the great physicists and cosmologists of the 20th century; the 150th anniversary of the Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University and the Department of Astronomy; the 100th and 110th anniversaries of the Einstein's general and special relativity; the 50th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) predicted by Gamow. The number 111 (three units!) represents the three major fundamental Gamow's achievements: alpha decay, the hot model of the universe and the prediction of CMB and deciphering of the genetic code. With 120 experts from 13 countries (Ukraine, Russia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, France, Italy, Switzerland, Poland, Egypt, Kazakhstan, Czech Republic, Belarus, USA) delivering 20 plenary talks, 113 contributed talks and 21 posters, both the Conference and the School were very successful. The main topics of the Conference were astrophysics, cosmology, gravity, high energy physics, radioastronomy, solar activity, solar system and astrobiology. Organizing Institutions: Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University (Astronomical Observatory and Astronomy Department), Radio-Astronomical Institute of the NAS of Ukraine, Odessa Astronomical Society. The conference was held with the support of Ukrainian Astronomical Association, Euroasian Astronomical Society, Department of Physics and Astronomy of the NAS of Ukraine, South Scientific Center of the NAS of Ukraine.

  10. Foreword

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists and ‘ordinary’ citizens alike have different thresholds with respect to the amount of un-clarity, conflict and confusion that they can handle. Some see merit in all three factors and embrace them as drivers of deeper thinking and reflection, while others need clarity, confirmation and

  11. Foreword

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1998-12-31

    The year 1997 was marked by the hundredth birthday anniversary of professor Andrzej Soltan, the first director of our Institute and the pioneer of nuclear physics in Poland. It is also about hundred years since nuclear physics has begun with the discovery of Polonium and Radium by Maria Sklodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie. In honour of these anniversaries an Exhibition entitled ``Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Technique in Service of Medicine - from Radium Needle to Accelerators`` has been organized. Some lectures, radio broadcasts, popular level articles have supplemented this effort to bring the present day nuclear sciences closer to the general public. In the year of 1997 227 articles in international journals have been published, supplemented by 24 invited talks and 219 communications at conferences. The lists of these publications are given separately for each of the Research Departments throughout this Annual Report. They are preceded by articles on the work in progress and by the brief overviews written by the Department Heads. The selected highlights of the past year are: progress in materials science (deep surface layers - on transformation of uranium lattice induced by water corrosion). The work on modification of surface properties by hot and cold ion implantation. In nuclear physics the careful study of polarization phenomena in the decay of light, weekly bound nuclei. The works on the properties of the heaviest elements have been continued (Adam Sobiczewski - international prizes: in 1997 the Alfred Jurzykowski and the Flerov prize). The study of new scintillation techniques provided by Marek Moszynski has also mentioned. The highlight this time is the demonstration of advantages offered by avalanche diodes for the light output readout. The particle physicists continue their involvement in various international projects. This year they managed to give a noteworthy instrumental and technical input to: Resistive Plate Chambers for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the LHC in CERN and on the development of the WASA system at CELSIUS, Uppsala. In plasma physics it was welcomed the decision to establish in Warsaw the International Centre of Dense Magnetized Plasma: This is one result of the increased international activities of our plasma group lead by Marek Sadowski. Our accelerator physics group and the production unit ZdAJ have embarked on a new project of a 15 MeV therapeutical accelerator. They also managed to export some high technology work to DESY (Hamburg) and to CERN. As usual most of our scientific effort is based on various international collaborations. A regular, every second year accent on the international exchanges is the International Mazurian Lakes School of Physics. This has been organized in 1997 for the 25th time. lt has had the symmetries in micro- and macro worlds as the main subject

  12. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Raffaelli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this second issue of the Interthesis Interdisciplinary Journal, we bring you unpublished articles, reviews and even one translation. The article by Gilberto Montibeller leads to a reflection on how the international commercial relationships can generate an ecologically unsustainable situation concerning an environmental social space, presenting the coal region of the state of Santa Catarina as an example. Javier Echeverría discusses critically the progress and the economic development issues, emphasizing the importance of ethics in the analysis of the social and human cost in economy. The contribution of Paulo Krischke raises questions on the current political culture of the Brazilian youth and its likely future changes, based on the data examination of a nationwide research performed by "survey". Daniel Widlöcher makes a cognitive verification of the psychoanalytical silence, taking into account the neuropsychology of the aphasia and the communication ways present in the clinical work of Psychoanalysis, employing for that the theoretical frames of the communication pragmatics. The article by Rodrigo Duarte has, as its starting point, the discovery of an incongruity in the date of construction of a chapel in the state of Minas Gerais, and reflects upon the influence of the culture industry over the countryside Brazilian architecture, characterized by the "kitsch" element. In addition to the articles described above, we still count on five reviews of recently published books, written up by Leandro Oltramari, Carlos Serbena, Cláudia Silveira, Silmara Cimbalista and Clóvis Dorigon. Finally, we present a translation into Portuguese by Selvino Assmann, from an Italian text by Umberto Galimberti, still unpublished in Brazil. We would like to let you know that, from now on, we will be publishing articles only in Portuguese, Spanish and English. We have a great expectancy that the themes presented in the material published here generate reflection and disseminate knowledge. Thank you very much for your interest in our publications and we do hope you can profit from reading them, and can have a good time as well. We will be back in August, 2005! Rafael Raffaelli Editor

  13. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: There is a very strong emphasis placed recently by our funding Agency, the State Committee for Scientific Research, KBN, on the number of publications each scientific institution produces. It really becomes ''publish or perish''. Sometimes the quality of publications goes down the drain as a result of this race, but on the whole the effort to quantify the scientific output and to relate the funding with the result of this quantification is laudable. It is our task then to adapt. Adapt to these rules or perish. The KBN quantification results in a number of points roughly proportional to the number of publications in high quality international journals. Compared with the year 1998, the last year has brought us an increase of this number from about 1500 to about 2000. This year will show whether this was a fluctuation or a trend, as I'd like to believe. Going from the quantities to qualities here are some highlights to mention: Our theory group has continued their work on the properties of the heaviest nuclei. This year the limelight of international recognition has focused on the phenomenological model of synthesis of the heaviest elements proposed by Robert Smolanczuk. Smolanczuk was able to predict, among other things, the particular reactions leading with high cross-sections to such exotic species as the element 118. The experimentalists in Berkeley followed the lead and, lo and behold, they identified the α-decay chains involving isotopes of two new elements: 116 and 118. Our particle physicists have entered the harvest years of two major CERN collaborations: DELPHI and SMC. One result to mention is the quantification of the relative contributions of the spins of quarks and gluons to the total spin of the nucleon (the SMC collaboration). The various collaborations in and outside Poland which our plasma group has established in the recent years begin to bring rewarding results. This is shown, among other things, by the experiments with liners done with the PF-1000 device or by the theoretical analysis of the polarisation phenomena for X-rays and electrons from the hot spots in plasma discharges (the effect found earlier by our group) as well as by the quick increase of the number of publications in this field. Our atomic physics groups give justice to the term ''High Energy Atomic Physics'' with their work on the electron capture processes for relativistic projectiles, on the properties of the deeply bound hole state atoms and on the inner shell processes occurring to a projectile traversing solids. The Institute was awarded a KBN contract to design and build a new, higher energy electron linac for cancer therapy. This is an ambitious task for our accelerator physics group as well as for the production unit ZdAJ. The internationally recognized quality mark, ISO, gained by the ZdAJ for their products is also worth mentioning. Our contacts with nuclear medicine are not limited to the therapeutical accelerators. A minuscule X-ray device for brachytherapy with a needle-like anode is another example. The device was designed and built thanks to the KBN grant. We hope it will soon find applications in therapy as well as in medical research. The study of small ion clusters (on the scale of the DNA structure) produced by ionizing radiation is more remote from immediate applications but has a potential relevance for the field. So does a study of new scintillating materials for the use of medicine. Several international events were organized or co-organized by our Institute, like the International Symposium Plasma'99 ''Research and Applications of Plasma'' (Warsaw, July 7-9) together with Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, the NATO Advanced Research Workshop devoted to the ''Techniques and Selected Applications of Nuclear Physics'' (Krzyze, Mazurian Lakes District, September 2-4,1999) and, of course, the 26 Mazurian Lakes School of Physics, Krzyze, September 4-11, 1999, the bi-annual event of the international nuclear physics community. We have also played host to a gathering of physicists engaged in the nuclear medicine together with the elite of the Polish cancer therapy experts. They met in Swierk on June 8 th in a one day symposium on the ''Nuclear Physics in service of medicine: the therapeutical accelerators and medical diagnostics''. The meeting was honoured by the very active presence of the President of the Polish Republic, Aleksander Kwasniewski, who took part in the panel discussion and gave a summary of the symposium. The presence of the Minister of Health and of other top decision makers raised hopes for, among other things, a green light for our ambitions to set up a therapeutical and diagnostic centre at our Institute. A consequential cost-cutting reorganization of our service unit, ZOiT, took place last year. We hope that all our customers in Swierk, to whom we provide heat, water, electricity and transportation, find the changes for the better. The ''publish or perish'' syndrome is supplemented in Poland nowadays by the ''join the EU's Fifth Framework Programme or perish''. This programme is tailored for various applications of science rather than for pursuing science for its own merits. As such it is poorly suited for the Polish scientific community with its well developed network of international collaborations in basic natural sciences and the underdeveloped applied research. We do hope that we'll manage to beat the odds and to score also in the Fifth Framework Programme. Time will show whether these hopes are realistic. (author)

  14. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GOLOB

    2016-06-01

    Finally, Pankaj DWIVEDI and Somdev KAR contributed a survey article on a Hindi dialect called Kanauji. The article exposes problems researchers have to deal with on the field when monitoring and documenting spoken language of a certain area, and fitting the findings into concepts such as a language and a dialect. 

  15. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Institutes, which are not intimately coupled to higher education, can crudely be divided into two groups: those which concentrate on the fundamental research in a particular discipline of science and those involved in the R and D phase, associated with a particular field of application. A balanced mix of the two is rare, so rare in fact, that if such an unorthodox organization is set, it has hard time in adapting to the rules of financing. The same difficulty applies to cross-disciplinary hybrids. And all that in spite of the lip service of various decision-taking bodies that it is the cross-disciplinary harmonious transfer of ideas-to-research-to-development-to production which is the ultimate objective of their policies. Our institute has the mixed fortune of being such a mix of basic research, of multidisciplinary research and development and even of production of some end products. We take pride in doing so in a relatively harmonious way on a satisfactory level. But we also take heavy beating because we do not fit to the schematic rules of financing. Yet we are convinced that this way of doing research in non-educational scientific institutions is right, that in the long run it is the most efficient one and that if the rules limit this efficiency, it is the rules which ought to be changed. However up-hill struggle that is !. The Readers of this Report are invited to take a look at this mixture of ours. They can begin with e.g. the account of the work concerning testing the Standard Model, searching for the Higgs boson or for the supersymmetric particles - the front line in the elementary particle physics of the day. Or with the preparations for the presumable front line of to-morrow the new projects at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The technology pull that these projects exert is difficult to measure and likewise difficult to overestimate. Leaving the accelerator-produced particles and going to still higher energies, we learn about the cosmic rays in the ''knee region'' (10 15 - 10 17 ) eV from the cosmic showers (the KASCADE collaboration) or inquire the Nature about the possible correlation of some cosmic radiation with the solar activity. One front-line in the low energy nuclear physics nowadays is the quest for the heaviest nuclear species - one of the specialities of our theory group. This group is known for its close contacts with experimentalists around the world. Recently, they highlighted these contacts by suggesting a new method to improve the mass determination for heavy nuclides from the Schottky noise signals in a storage ring. We move on to the plasma physics. The physics of the fourth state of matter, dominating in the Universe, the physics of non-linear phenomena, the physics of the XXI century. The physics closely linked to nuclear sciences and yet distinctly different. The physics which has numerous technological spin-offs, be it because of the experimental techniques it develops or of the phenomena it discovers. It is good to see that we are strongly entrenched in this field and have justified appetites for more. We focus now on the materials science done with nuclear techniques. We are pleased to note that our implantation techniques develop well and are now applied to e.g. hardening the steel edges. And we brag a bit about our latest work on the new crystallographic forms of uranium compounds after having done experiments we now propose explanations. The experimental physicist needs detectors. Ever better, bigger, more sophisticated. We have a strong group pursuing this improvement task, especially with respect to the scintillators. It was rewarding to learn that the international community has appreciated this effort. The appreciation came from the IEEE/Nuclear and Plasma Science Society with the award of their prestigious prize ''to Marek Moszynski for outstanding contributions to the modern scintillation detector and its application in physics experiment, nuclear medicine and other fields of use''. Almost any development in experimental techniques of nuclear physics results very quickly in new techniques in medicine, in the diagnostics as well as in therapy. Our miniature X-ray tube for brachytherapy, nick-named ''the photon needle'', gained a nomination for the prestigious ''Polish product of the future'' award. We hope that it will soon become a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The traditional line of our medical applications is the development and production of linear electron accelerators for tumor therapy. Our 10 MeV ''Neptun'' accelerator has got a significant face-lifting this year and the construction of a new 6-to-15 MeV machine is well advanced. We hope this will meet the needs of our customers in Poland and abroad. Last but not least I'd like to mention the quickly increasing flow of people passing the premises of our Training Department. The number of school students visiting us last year reached unprecedented level of 2500, there were also courses and trainings for various professionals. We consider this activity as an additional but important way of paying back ''the tax-payer'' for the support we are getting and also as our contribution to fight ''the anti-nuclear fobia''. (author)

  16. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Institute's of Atomic Energy main topic is safe energy generation with particular emphasis on nuclear energy as the most environment friendly technology. This has been expanded into the realm of hazards analysis and its applications to conventional plants. After Polish Government decision of 2005 on the use of nuclear power for electricity generation, the Institute in cooperation with few universities started training of students in the nuclear safety and radiation protection. The Institute takes part in preparation of expertise reports as well as research and education programs crucial for the implementation of nuclear power plants in Poland. The ionizing radiation protection issues furnish the basis of our health physics research. Material science studies performed mainly with non-destructive nuclear techniques like neutron scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy or X-rays form an important part of our research. The Institute of Atomic Energy operates the multifunctional nuclear research reactor MARIA. In 2007 the reactor was successfully operated for 4002 hours with a new type of fuel elements of 36% enrichment in U-235. No radiological accidents, failures or breakdowns due to the fuel behavior were recorded in 2007, confirming the good quality of the new fuel. The new fuel elements' integrity monitoring system was performing its task efficiently. The main technological applications of the MARIA reactor are: radioactive isotopes production, neutron doping of silicon and minerals properties modification. The Reactor Facility for Neutron Transmutation Doping of Silicon Single Crystals was used in doping of single crystalline and multicrystalline silicon wafers. One of our main goals is to provide the scientific community of Poland an easy access to the source of neutrons. This involves widest possible applications of MARIA reactor in research and technology. The beams of thermal neutrons are used in neutron scattering and radiography studies of condensed matter structures and processes occurring at various levels of length scales. 66 papers describing the results of our research were published in 2007. Some of the results were accounted for in 141 IAE Reports as the preliminary step before publication. Several new results obtained in 2007 on water migration in granular media, properties of ion beams modified materials as well as extensive use of synchrotron topography in crystal defects studies should be mentioned. The recombination methods for assessment of mixed radiation doses at various facilities were mastered. The studies on models and software tools for emergency management were carried out within the EU Framework projects by the Centre of Excellence Management of Health and Environmental Hazards MANHAZ. The Materials Testing Centre formed within a consortium of the IAE and the Radioactive Waste Management Plant for quick identification and categorization of unidentified or of unknown origin radioactive or nuclear items acts as an important link to the Polish response system to illicit trafficking and inadvertent movement of radioactive materials. Our institute is open for the community. We are proud that above 5000 visitors came to enjoy our presentations and lectures on nuclear techniques developed on the basis of nuclear research reactor MARIA during 2007. Several students from Polish and foreign universities obtained student summer training in IAE laboratories in 2007. The fusion of the Institute of Atomic Energy and the Centre of Isotope Production POLATOM, appears to be very advantageous and resulted in the substantial increase in the number of projects, publications and other accomplishments in 2007. (author)

  17. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Institute's of Atomic Energy main topic is safe energy generation with particular emphasis on nuclear energy as the most environment friendly technology. This has been expanded into the realm of hazards analysis and its applications to conventional plants. After Polish Government decision of 2005 on the use of nuclear power for electricity generation, the Institute in cooperation with few universities started training of students in the nuclear safety and radiation protection. The Institute takes part in preparation of expertise reports as well as research and education programs crucial for the implementation of nuclear power plants in Poland. The ionizing radiation protection issues furnish the basis of our health physics research. Material science studies performed mainly with non-destructive nuclear techniques like neutron scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy or X-rays form an important part of our research. The Institute of Atomic Energy operates the multifunctional nuclear research reactor MARIA. In 2008 the reactor was successfully operated for 4305 hours with a new type of fuel elements of 36% enrichment in U-235. No radiological accidents, failures or breakdowns due to the fuel behavior were recorded in 2008, confirming the good quality of the new fuel. The new fuel elements' integrity monitoring system was performing its task efficiently. The main technological applications of the MARIA reactor are: radioactive isotopes production, neutron doping of silicon and minerals properties modification. The Reactor Facility for Neutron Transmutation Doping of Silicon Single Crystals was used in doping of single crystalline and multicrystalline silicon wafers. One of our main goals is to provide the scientific community of Poland an easy access to the source of neutrons. This involves widest possible applications of MARIA reactor in research and technology. The beams of thermal neutrons are used in neutron scattering and radiography studies of condensed matter structures and processes occurring at various levels of length scales. 80 papers and 4 IAE monographs describing the results of our research were published in 2008. Some of the results were accounted for in 135 IAE B Reports as the preliminary step before publication. Several new results obtained in 2008 on water migration in zeolites, properties of ion beams modified materials as well as extensive use of synchrotron topography in crystal defects studies should be mentioned. The recombination methods for assessment of mixed radiation doses at various facilities were mastered. The studies on models and software tools for emergency management were carried out within the EU Framework projects by the Centre of Excellence Management of Health and Environmental Hazards MANHAZ. The Materials Testing Centre formed within a consortium of the IAE and the Radioactive Waste Management Plant for quick identification and categorization of unidentified or of unknown origin radioactive or nuclear items acts as an important link to the Polish response system to illicit trafficking and inadvertent movement of radioactive materials. Our institute is open for the community. We are proud that above 5000 visitors came to enjoy our presentations and lectures on nuclear techniques developed on the basis of nuclear research reactor MARIA during 2008. Several students from Polish and foreign universities obtained student summer training in IAE laboratories in 2008. The 2006 fusion of the Institute of Atomic Energy and the Centre of Isotope Production POLATOM has been very advantageous and resulted in the substantial increase in the number of projects, publications and other accomplishments in 2008. (author)

  18. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J.

    This book deals with the, happy, encounter of one of the oldest well-formulated scientific questions, namely the quest for “other worlds”, with one of the most sophisticated developments in astronomical instrumentation, high contrast imaging. The quest for other worlds started indeed with the Greeks and has led, until the first scientific approach by Huygens in 1698, only to speculations by thinkers like Epicurus, Bruno, Descartes etc. A more profound question behind these other worlds is the existence of life outside the Solar System. It occupies a remarkable place in science: it is in the forefront of science and at the same time it is one of the easiest to understand by the general public and its philosophical and psychological subfoundations provides strong motivations to researchers. Until the recent times, astronomical instrumentation was powerless to detect the other planetary systems. Starting in the late '30s, the search for extrasolar planets has first begun with astrometry. After some unfortunate false alarms (e.g. the case of the Barnard star), no exoplanet could be detected until the late '80s. The first successes came from the radial velocity and the pulsar timing techniques. These discoveries by the way present an interesting case of the non-linearity of the development of science. On the one hand, what was found was a series of complete surprises. On the other hand, with the interplay of announcements, retractations, rediscoveries of planets and the ambiguities of the mass value for the planets γ Cephei b, ɛ Eridani b and HD 114762 b, it is not easy to tell what was the first planet discovered. All these discoveries, making use of the parent star's wobble, detect the planets only indirectly, they do not “see” it. The amount of informations on the planet is rather poor and the stellar wobble alone does not help for the goal behind all these efforts: the detection of extrasolar life. Here then comes the main topic of the present book: the development of high contrast imaging techniques. The high contrast is mandatory because the planets are so faint compared to their parent stars. Since they are so close to the star, they also required a sufficient angular resolution. These two areas of astronomical instruments are experiencing spectacular developments, both in the domain of interferometry and in coronagraphy. They lead to ambitious instrumental developments at the major ground-based telescopes (such as the Very Large Telescope operated by the European Southern Observatory Organization) and space mission projects such as the european Darwin project and the numerous NASA projects. Major preliminary technological efforts on subsystems and components such as adaptive optics, coronagraphic masks are necessary. The european astronomical community is very active in both the scientific and the instrumental aspects of the search for planets by imaging. Some of its members have met for one week and this volume presents an up-to-date account of this promising field of research.

  19. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. Krischke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The third issue of the International Interdisciplinary Journal INTERthesis covers a round-table about the Contemporary Brazil, explanation and discussion of Canadian and Brazilian University students' papers, accomplished at the Canadian Congress of Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CALACS, in the city of Guelph (Ontario, Canada, on October 30, 2004. The president was Prof. W.E. (Ted Hewitt (University of Western Ontario, and the coordinator was Prof. Edgar Dosman (York University, having Prof. Judith Hellman (York as mediator. The round-table was organized and presented to honor Betinho (Herbert de Souza, creator of IBASE in Brazil, who was exiled in Canada between 1974 and 1978, becoming at that time highly acknowledged at the academic environment, for his capacity of leadership, organization and initiative towards the fight for social justice, for the intellectual innovation, and the practical sympathy with the Latin American peoples. Such qualities have been reconsidered today by several Brazilian and Canadian University professors and students, as necessary to rebuild and broaden the exchange, the convergence and the reflection in common, between Brazil and Canada. The reasons for this search for the mutual acknowledgement and cooperation between Brazil and Canada are many. Brazil is today very little known and studied in Canada and the same happens in Brazil concerning Canada. Whenever we hear something involving these two countries, it has to do with occasional incidents and conflicts of interests. Recently we have seen successive complaints from both countries to the World Trade Organization (WTO, mutually denouncing the state subsidies to the plane industries - Embraer, in Brazil, and Bombardier in Canada, for violation to the rules of free formation and price competition in the international market. Whatever the practical results of these arbitrages for interest might be, the Brazilian and Canadian public opinion just receives very partial information regarding the existence of competition and occasional contradictions between these two countries. However there are convergent characteristics and long-term contributions, even complementary, of both - Brazil and Canada - that have never reached the media. Among these characteristics which challenge the comparative study and the bilateral cooperation, we can highlight, in the internal aspect: the Canadian multiculturalism and the Brazilian ethnic pluralism; the importance of the civil society and of the social mobilizations in the magnification of the public sphere in both countries; the gradual integration of the migratory groups in the national society and the native peoples' rights to the defense of their cultural patrimony; the existence of vast inhabited areas and the challenges they mean to Nature preservation and the national integration. Beyond any doubt, the Parliament in Canada and the Presidentship in Brazil (among other inheritances and historical differences conditions the development of these common characteristics and challenges in each country. Therefore, this divergent institutional-juridical inheritance must also be the object of a comparative study, that enlightens its relative efficacy in the environmental, social and cultural diversity approach. But besides the convergent national challenges, there are also important Brazilian and Canadian experiences in the international scope, which are unknown to public opinion as well. Let us mention just three examples that present great similarities: 1 The contributions that both Brazil and Canada have been efficiently and constantly giving to the special forces of the UN for the maintenance and reestablishment of peace in areas of conflict all over the world; 2 Regarding the Americas, both countries, in their peculiar ways, have tried to oppose to the ambitions of the United States unilateral hegemony. In North America, Canada has been showing the virtues of the so called North Model accepted at a state of minimum welfare, contrasting with the individualization of the social problems predominant in the United States. Yet Brazil, even having pragmatically accepted the alliance with Bush's government, attempts, through Mercosur and new diplomatic cooperation, establish a constructive presence among its neighbors in South America and other emergent countries around the world; 3 There is also an influential presence of Canada in the British Community of the Nations, as well as of Brazil among the Portuguese speaking countries - in both cases, concerning the preservation and development of their political - cultural traditions. There is no doubt that there are many other national and international similar experiences worth mentioning, showing that both countries have played a most important role, having a moderating and multilateral influence in the construction of a more peaceful and pluralist world. Unfortunately, the international news does not highlight these common objectives practiced by Brazil and Canada, and by several other countries, in favor of the peace and the cooperation among the peoples of the world. This round-table about the contemporary Brazil at the CALACS Conference lines up, therefore, with a greater effort of cooperation, aiming at promoting a mutual study and knowledge of their national realities. The papers selected for presentation at CALACS, have chosen, for discussion among the Canadian University public, a few central themes of studies of the current Brazilian reality. Ted Hewitt begins presenting a report of recent studies about Brazil, performed by intellectual Canadians. The results of the studies have verified significant growth and pending challenges in the area. All the papers presented can be found in this issue of our journal; in the language they have been written and presented, followed by their abstracts. It is important to mention the importance of each study: Sérgio Costa, for instance, approaches the current changes in the ethnic mobilization in Brazil (mainly of those with Afro background, pointing out the contributions of the international studies on the theme, as well as the links that this mobilization establishes abroad. Paulo Krischke discusses the characteristics of the government social politics, emphasizing that they are not only redistributing, but they also turn to the acknowledgement of the social and cultural diversity and the political tolerance as well - hence its impact in the popular approval of the government, in spite of the pending social-economical problems. Leandro Vergara-Camus analyzes the objectives and principles that guide the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra - MST (Landless Rural Workers' Movement, and pictures the existing tension between their objectives and the policies of the current government. Finally, Tullo Vigevani and Marcelo Fernandes de Oliveira show the attempts to change the Brazilian international politics in the last decade, concerning a more autonomous and deliberate participation, facing imminent difficulties, such as the ones occurring along the ALCA negotiations. In short, all the presentations reveal the current Brazilian reality, as a historical process in progress, dedicated to the accomplishment and development of democracy, and, as such, teeming with ambiguities, challenges and problems of difficult solutions. The examples of Canada and other democracies more fully consolidated than ours might provide profitable comparative studies and promote the strengthening of democracy in Brazil. Last, but not least, it is necessary to thank the multilateral support that allowed this round-table at CALACS to be held: the CNPq, which paid for the trip of some of the Brazilians who participated the Congress; their Universities, which released them from their classes and allowed them to travel during that week; CALACS, which paid for their stay and internal trips in Canada; The Study Center on Security and International Relations of the University of York, which provided opportunities of lodging, research and exchange with other colleagues of that University in Toronto and also sponsored all the trip of one of the Brazilian participants; all the Canadians at CALACS - participants, organizers, workers - who welcomed us, Brazilians, so warmly and cordially. We will surely never forget such hospitality and we hope we can soon meet again, this time in Brazil, so that we can also offer them a warm and cordial reception.

  20. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej BEKEŠ

    2013-12-01

    The last paper, by Azadeh Sharifi MOGHADDAM and Farimah Farrahi MOGHADDAM also deals with Persian. While pointing out the lively cultural contacts between Iran and France since the 17 c. the authors are examining the semantic change undergone by French loanwords in Persian during the last 150 or so years. To explain and categorize the changes the authors propose an elaborate synchronic model of semantic change, able to encompass all of the observed changes.

  1. Foreword

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Darwin but also the birth of an idea that has changed the way we look at life, ... on when lineages diverged but also provides insight into rates of processes, ... extinctions result in biotic reorganization tuned to the new world around them.

  2. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirne, José

    2006-08-01

    As engineering continues to cross boundaries of known practices, materials and manufacturing techniques and into the frontiers of new materials, environments and applications, the opportunities for research in general will inevitably increase. The necessity understand the behaviour of these new materials and how to engineer ever increasingly sophisticated structures, requires that industry must be able to develop and apply analytical and experimental tools to evaluate their potential behaviour for damage or failure. Dynamic analysis performs an important role in this complex, but at the same time fascinating frontier between the world of the known and the unknown world of materials, and their hypothetic applications, that human curiosity and necessity is always exploring and discovering. In all this effort, research and communication of progress takes a fundamental role. The main objective of the DYMAT Conferences is to contribute in this effort giving an opportunity to researchers, engineers, academics and people from industry worldwide to improve their knowledge about the recent developments in the field of dynamic behaviour of materials and their new applications. During the twenty three years of its life, the DYMAT Association has developed efforts to promote these contacts through either the triennial International Conferences or the annual and thematic technical meetings. I am convinced that the number of communications and presences in all of these events is the best demonstration that the Association is of value, just because it was able to begin a series of actions with a prestige recognized by the international community. With the same spirit, the Governing Board of DYMAT is encouraging the appearance of sub-groups with the objective to stimulate discussion in some specific subjects covered by the objectives of the DYMAT Association in the field of mechanical behaviour of materials at high rates of strain. We believe that these sub-groups are able to increase the contacts between university and college researchers and people from industry in particular themes of joint interest. At the moment there are two sub-groups, the Light-Weight Armour Group (LWAG) and the Group of Transport Security (CRASH), developing their activities and organizing regular workshops. But DYMAT is keen on seeing others. I cannot finish this small text without thanking most sincerely the CEA (Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique) at Valduc, and their collaborators, for having accepted the task of organising the Conference. A particular and very special thank you to Richard Dormeval, not only for the excellent and arduous work that, as chairman of the Conference, developed during the long period of its preparation, but also for his continuous assistance as Vice-President of the DYMAT Association over the last three years. I would equally like to thank the friendly and engaged team of the Administrative Council of the Association for all their work in reading, selecting and re-reading manuscripts, thus assuring our Conference is of a high academic level. Together with my colleagues at the DYMAT Bureau, I hope that this Conference can contribute on the development of the knowledge in the field of the dynamic behaviour of materials. Especially I hope that the participants can profit from these days exchange their experiences and develop contacts and projects. Please, enjoy these days in Dijon. Coimbra, the 11th of May 2006 José Cirne President of Dymat Association

  3. Foreword

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Thomsen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Ressources management, enviromental degradation, natural resources, conflicts, boundaries, Africa......Ressources management, enviromental degradation, natural resources, conflicts, boundaries, Africa...

  4. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Epure

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available More and more, the today’s economic debates gravitate around the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the global transformation characterized by the digital, physical and biological technologies that interfere and change the world around us and our perception of the humankind progress.

  5. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Epure

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We are living in a globalized world, hence the need to reconsider the way in which we are interacting and working bothlocally and internationally.  The Fourth Industrial Revolution not onlybrings us new technologies, but requires a new leadership approach. It is about responsive and responsible leadership that could allow us to keep up with the major changes likelyto occur due to new technologies in place.

  6. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Epure

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting took place from 17-20 January 2017 at Davos-Klosters, Switzerland and then key topic was Global Governance and the related issues such as: Fourth Industrial Revolution, responsive and responsible leadership, restoring economic growth and global collaboration.[1] Important changes are expected regarding size, speed and scope of these transformations that Fourth Industrial Revolution generated.  The transformations consist mainly of new systems built on the infrastructure of the digital revolution. Also, this will fundamentally change the way in which we produce, consume, move, communicate and interact with one another.  Nanotechnologies and given new powers of genetic engineering will impact dramatically who we are and how we think and behave[2] .

  7. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOLOB Nina

    2015-06-01

    Finally, in the context of describing under-documented languages, the influence of the existing language policy is also noticed by Erwin Soriano FERNANDEZ and his book review on Pangasinan, entitled Panuntunán na Ortograpiya éd salitan PANGASINAN 2012. Manila: Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino.

  8. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, M.; Ristorcelli, I.

    Guy Serra died prematurely on August 15th 2000 aged 52. He was one of the most active pioneers in the field of infrared and submillimeter space astronomy. After completing a PhD thesis on gamma ray astrophysics in 1973, he was among the first to measure the far-infrared dust emission from our Galaxy with the AGLAE balloon-borne experiment. He then devoted his whole career to contribute in a decisive manner to the emergence and achievement of the infrared and submillimeter space program at the French and European levels with the AROME and PRONAOS balloon borne experiments, and with the satellite missions ISO, ODIN, Planck, and FIRST (which became Herschel). This three day conference dedicated to Guy Serra was held in Toulouse on June 11-13 2001. We took time both to remember the legacy of Guy Serra, and to discuss current advances and prospects in the field of infrared and submillimeter space astronomy. It was clear to all of us that in this first year of the XXIst century, with the construction of the SIRTF, Planck and Herschel satellites, we were close to enter in the golden age of infrared astronomy which would bring us fabulous new insights on our Origins. A Great Humanist Guy Serra was passionately interested in science and physics. He had such generosity and enthusiasm to share with others his very wide-ranging knowledge, his intellectual refinement, and his perceptive views of things, that it was a real joy to work with him. His creativity and capacity for hard work were stunning, and extremely motivating. But first of all, we deeply appreciated his exceptional human qualities. He showed a deep respect for the views of others and had a great capacity for listening. In particular, he was very concerned with the training of PhD students for, and through, research, and with their future after the defense of their thesis. Guy was also exceptional in his will to communicate with the general public, including very young pupils in primary schools. Beyond his own scientific work, and because he had always considered the collective interest as a priority, he was someone who thought deeply about astronomy as a science and about its evolution in France. He devoted a lot of energy to such reflections and played an active role in local and national committees. Among the ideas he defended was that the standing of astronomy as a science depends on a unity between modelling and observation. He particularly liked to point out that similar advanced physics is needed both in the field of instrumentation and in the astrophysical modelling. He considered instrumentation as an essential component in astronomy, that had to be continuously developed, and to remain a part of the astronomers activity. He also liked to emphasize the importance of the collective aspect in the success of a project, which directly depend on researchers and engineers working together as a team. He was also extremely active in developing interfaces and cooperation with others communities: physicists, chemists, mathematicians, biologists. He considered that this was the best way to trigger great leap forward for astronomy. Guy Serra was a real pillar for many of us who worked with him. He was a dazzingly talented friend, passionate not only to astrophysics, but also for history, philosophy, music. Guy was a lover of nature and of life, remarquably altruist, and always concerned with the collective interest. His sudden departure has left a tremendous empty space. The memory of Guy , smiling warmly, with his sparkling eyes full of intelligence and sensitivity shall always remain in our hearts. M. Giard I. Ristorcelli

  9. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmaphaka Tau

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The conditions prevailing in the world, where fast growing populations are coupled with rapidly expanding urbanization and a general increase in poverty levels, are greatly aggravating the disaster risks and vulnerabilities of a large part of the world’s populations.

  10. Foreword

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Hassanieu, Aboul Ella; Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2015-01-01

    Interest in Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI) is growing. This can be concluded from the number of BCI papers appearing in neuro-engineering and neuroscience journals and that are being presented at BCI conferences and workshops. More importantly, it can also be concluded from the growing number of

  11. FOREWORD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael SOFER

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of urban and regional development affairs is a complex task, and one that has many competing and worthwhile perspectives, on a huge array of issues whose importance and approaches to analysis often varies between countries. In many ways, this volume testifies amply to such themes and illustrates the rich tapestry of problems, and their analysis and remedies in both developed and developing economies. And of course systems of governance also vary significantly between countries, so that ideas and analysis generated in one jurisdiction may not apply readily to others. This said, much can be gained from reading about issues, their form, resulting problems, and potential solutions in other countries, whether involving governments, the market sector or both together. As we, the guest editors see it, the articles in this issue of Jura could well spark new ideas among readers about the definition and analysis of spatial problems, whether urban or rural, and the success or otherwise of attempts to manage them. The contributions also cover such diverse issues as infrastructure, job opportunities, income, levels of welfare, housing, cultural issues, traditions, and the respective roles of government and the market sector. Indeed, the swirl of perspectives and ideas on all these issues will become ever more important in our current age which is dominated by a huge array of transformative technologies. So there is much to learn from how different countries or regional administrations manage their urban, regional and rural affairs in our complex and uncertain world. In assembling this collection of papers the editorial team also saw it as their duty to help contributors whose first language was not English to assist them in improving their expression and delivery of ideas.

  12. Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Cometti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The essays collected in this issue all stem from talks delivered at the International Conference, Aesthetic preferences, language games and forms of life: from Ludwig Wittgenstein, which was held on 23-25 January 2013 in the Aula Magna of the Faculty of Education at the University of Florence. Contributions are here published in the same order they were presented at the Conference. With fruitful variety of approach, the entire thematic spectrum of the relationship between Wittgenstein and aesthetics is covered: 1 the question of the presence of specific aesthetic issues in Wittgenstein’s works: from aesthetic judgment to the concept of the beautiful (J.-P. Cometti, G. Tomasi, G. Matteucci; 2 the question of the aesthetic paradigm as the key to understanding Wittgenstein’s philosophical research as a whole as well as the philosopher’s unmistakable style (F. Desideri, S. Säätelä, S. Borutti, F. Valagussa; 3 the issue concerning the crucial difference between showing and saying and the thin boundaries between sense and nonsense (V. Sanfélix, L. Distaso, M. De Iaco; 4 the peculiar, but extremely relevant, question concerning the relationship between music and language (J. Schulte, A. Arbo; 5 the question of the expressive character of the work of art and of the linguistic nature of poetry, considered as a vantage point for the pursuit of the analysis of linguistic facts, as well as the issue of the literary form of Wittgenstein’s later philosophy, with its deeply romantic character (M.W. Rowe, G. Di Giacomo; 6 the controversial issue of "seeing-as" and of its role within theories of depiction and pictoriality (K. Stock, A. Voltolini, E. Caldarola, E. Terrone.

  13. Foreword by the director of Bohunice NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this foreword the director briefly describes activities of the NPP Bohunice in 1997. Main activities were: electric and heat production , the V-1 NPP Gradual Reconstruction Programme, nuclear safety programmes, environment protection, international co-operation as well as national and international public information

  14. FOREWORD: Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Ian

    2014-06-01

    EMAG2013 was certainly the biggest EMAG conference I can remember in my twenty years of going to EMAG conferences. We had a total of about 180 scientific delegates, not including exhibitors. The conference also benefited from the York conference centre allowing us to integrate the scientific sessions, refreshments and exhibition in one building. This all made for a very vibrant and focused conference. The quality of the presentations was again very high and judging by many of the student talks given, there is plenty of hope for an excellent future for electron microscopy in the UK. A unique feature of this conference was a chance to organise a session to commemorate the 80th year of one of the pioneers of electron microscopy in the UK, Professor Archie Howie. An excellent symposium was organised in his honour by one of his former students, Professor Pratibha Gai of the University of York. This was dedicated to one field that he made some important initial contributions to: in-situ microscopy. The symposium gave a depth and breadth of overview to this field unusual at an EMAG conference, with speakers from the UK, Europe, Japan and the USA and gave a real taste of some of the possibilities in the latest instruments to observe real materials at work at nanometre or even atomic resolution. Professor Howie himself gave a highly entertaining retrospective of his time working in microscopy from the 1950s until the present in his talk after the conference dinner on the Thursday evening at the excellent York National Railway Museum. We also had excellent plenary lectures from Professor Wolfgang Baumeister on a topic perhaps novel to many at EMAG, TEM in Structural Biology; from Professor Prathibha Gai on atomic resolution in-situ studies of chemical reactions in the TEM; and Professor Archie Howie discussing some of the important current open questions in TEM and STEM. This proceedings therefore presents a snapshot of a broad cross-section of the exciting work going on in electron microscopy in 2013. As always, the papers are ordered thematically according to the sessions organised at the conference. As ever, I have a great debt of gratitude to my fellow EMAG committee members who chaired the various sessions and who, together with the programme chair, Dr Cate Ducati of the University of Cambridge helped to put together such an excellent programme. I also gratefully acknowledge the many hours invested by Professor Pete Nellist of the University of Oxford who then edited this proceedings and ensured that the peer review and revision process ran as smoothly as possible. Finally, I hope that you enjoy reading the contributions made by many to this excellent conference. Dr Ian MacLaren, Chair of the Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group

  15. FOREWORD Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appourchaux, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Volume 271 (2011) of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series provides a record of the invited and contributed talks, and of the posters presented at the GONG2010-SoHO24 conference entitled 'A new era of seismology of the Sun and solar-like stars'. The conference was held from 27 June 2010 to 2 July 2010 in Aix-en-Provence, France. More than 120 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. I would like to express my gratitude for the the financial support from the following organisations: Université Paris-Sud; the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES); the Programme National des Relations Soleil-Terre (PNST) and the Programme National de Physique Stellaire (PNPS) (both programmes under the umbrella of the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers, INSU); INSU of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); the SoHO project of the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Science Programme of ESA; the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG); and finally the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS). The Scientific Organizing Committee comprised Thierry Appourchaux (chairman, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay, France), Frank Hill (co-chairman, GONG / National Solar Observatory, Tucson, Arizona, United States), Annie Baglin (Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France), William Chaplin (University of Birmingham, United Kingdom), Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard (Aarhus Universitet, Denmark), Thierry Corbard (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Nice, France), Bernhard Fleck (European Space Agency), Laurent Gizon (Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Lindau, Germany), Travis Metcalfe (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, United States), Michael Thompson (Sheffied University, United Kingdom; High Altitude Observatory, Boulder, Colorado, United States) and Jesper Schou (Stanford University, California, United States). The Editorial Committee of these proceedings was composed of Thierry Appourchaux (chairman), Annie Baglin, William Chaplin, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Laurent Gizon, Michael Thompson, Takashi Sekii (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo) and John Leibacher (IAS, Orsay, France; GONG / NSO, Tucson, Arizona, United States). This volume consists of 86 articles organised in sections reflecting the scientific programme of the conference: 012001-012024 Local helioseismology 012025-012030 Solar diameter, irradiance and activity 012031-012044 Solar and stellar modelling 012045-012056 Low degree stellar seismology 012057-012063 First results from space missions 012064-012082 Convection, dynamo and flows 012083-012086 Prospective All papers are freely accessible on the internet, in colour, at http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/271/1, and an interactive picture of the conference is available in the attached PDF. I am also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee for making this conference a success: Catherine Cougrand (secretary), Stéphane Caminade (web designer), Delphine Prival (administration) and Jean-Paul Rozet (logistics). I could not have done it without your help! Last but not least, let me also thank the official photographer of the conference, Pierre Assus, for producing excellent photographs, including the group photo. Please feel free to send me an e-mail at Thierry.Appourchaux@ias.u-psud.fr if you would like copies of these pictures. Thierry Appourchaux Editor Orsay, France 24 December 2010 Conference photograph IAS logo  Université Paris-Sud logo  CNRS logo  SOHO logo ESA logo  NASA logo  Gong logo  EADS ASTRIUM logo

  16. FOREWORD Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriplach, Jan; Procházka, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The 6th International Workshop on Positron Studies of Defects (PSD) took place in Prague, Czech Republic, from September 1 to 5, 2008. It was hosted by the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the Charles University in Prague. The PSD Workshop brought together positron scientists interested in studying various defects in mainly crystalline materials, and provided an opportunity to report on new results and achievements as well as on novel experimental and theoretical methods in this field. The workshop topics can be characterized as follows: Defect formation, migration, agglomeration and annealing Momentum distribution studies of defects: Doppler broadening, angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) Slow positron beam studies of defects at surface and near surface regions Theoretical calculations and simulations of momentum distributions, positron lifetimes and other characteristics for defects Defects in unusual materials: quasicrystals, nanostructures Advances in positron experimental methods applicable to defect studies Complementary experimental methods in defect studies (TEM, XRD, AP, SANS, DLTS, PL and others) Industrial applications of positron defect studies The first PSD workshop was organized in Wernigerode, Germany in 1987. The next four workshops were held in Halle, Germany (1994), Hamilton, ON, Canada (1999), Sendai, Japan (2002) and Pullman, WA, USA (2004) under the name Positron Studies of Semiconductor Defects (PSSD). As studying defects in metals is once again gaining importance - as is also documented in these Proceedings - the name of the Workshop in Prague was changed to the original version PSD. The PSD workshops will be organized every three years and the next one will be held in Delft, The Netherlands at the turn of August and September, 2011. We would like to express our gratitude to all of the workshop participants for their presentations and contributions to discussions, which made the PSD Workshop a successful scientific event. In total 65 scientists and students from 15 countries took part in the PSD Workshop. The workshop programme comprised 24 invited lectures, 19 contributed talks and 22 posters. Thirty contributions are included in these Proceedings, covering various aspects of positron defect studies. In particular, proceedings papers are divided into five categories: defects in semiconductors, defects in metals, nanostructures, larger free volumes and experimental apparatus including data evaluation. For the previous PSD/PSSD workshops proceedings were not published on a regular basis and, hopefully, these Proceedings will be the start of a new tradition. Jan Kuriplach Ivan Procházka Editors

  17. Foreword and introductory comments to CEA annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This article is a foreword to the annual report of the Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and summarises the main achievements of the research teams such as the commissioning of the electron-positron collision ring (LEP), the fuel reprocessing plant at The Hague, the PROTEINE 2000 programme, the laser enrichment programme and advances in microelectronics. (author)

  18. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance, 2014: Syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance Table of Contents Introductory Section Foreword Preface Acronyms Figures- National Profile Figures – ... GISP Profiles Related Links STD Home STD Data & Statistics NCHHSTP Atlas Interactive STD Data – 1996-2013 STD ...

  19. 2012 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance, Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance Table of Contents Introductory Section Foreword Preface Acronyms Figures- National Profile Figures - ... GISP Profiles Related Links STD Home STD Data & Statistics NCHHSTP Atlas Interactive STD Data - 1996-2013 STD ...

  20. Guest Foreword by Lord Phillips KG PC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Phillips

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rt Hon The Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers KG PC, President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland Ambition and excellence. Those two words epitomize Qatar. Under the leadership of his Highness the Emir, this small State has set out to make an impact on the world that belies its size. Ambitious was the plan to have an international broadcasting station. Ambitious was the plan to build from scratch a Museum of Islamic Art. Ambitious was the bid – the successful bid to host the World Cup in 2022. Ambitious is the bid to stage the Olympic Games in 2020. Qatar not merely has ambitions, it realizes its ambitions. And when it does so it is not enough to say that the result is ‘world class’, for Qatar sets out to be a world leader in whatever it puts its hand to. Excellence is the norm. Al Jazeera has established itself as the broadcasting station of choice for many throughout the world. The Doha Museum of Islamic Art is recognized as being second to none. In addition, the scale and standard of development in Doha itself is setting new standards of excellence in the fields of architecture and civil engineering. Thus when Qatar focuses its energies on education and the law, high achievements are expected. I shall have the honour of helping to achieve those expectations when I succeed Lord Woolf as President of Qatar’s new and impressive Civil and Commercial Court. The College of Law at Qatar University is already achieving excellence in the field of legal education. So, naturally, all expect great things of this new International Review of Law and I am delighted to have been invited to welcome it by this foreword. The range of the first edition is both international and topical. Those countries that have experienced the turbulence of the Arab Spring are settling new constitutions, and other countries are bent on constitutional reform designed to avoid such turbulence. So an erudite article on

  1. Foreword Thought and Practice: Taking Stock, Re-engaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jean-Paul Sartre's famous “Orphée noir” (1948) still ranks among the most memorable Prefaces aimed at capturing the significance of the moments of historical regeneration of interrupted cultural expressions. For that piece, simultaneously celebrated and controverted, Sartre borrowed the idea from the ancient Greek ...

  2. FOREWORD Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal for their enthusiastic help. The articles contained in this section of the Special Issue represent diversity and content. We hope that the readers are stimulated by the choice of the articles and their presentation. May 2015. AMIT AGRAWAL. Department of Mechanical Engineering,. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay ...

  3. Foreword. The Knowledge Economy: The Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin Bratianu

    2017-01-01

    All the statistics and evaluations show that the Knowledge Economy is our future. However, a close look at the developed economies demonstrates that the Knowledge Economy is already here, shaping our present time. Although there are many definitions of this new economic framework, their core content stresses the importance of data, information, and knowledge in the production of goods and delivering services in creating value for society. For instance, Powell and Snellman (2004, p.1999) defin...

  4. Preface: Irgac 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà Joan

    2007-06-01

    , Joan Camps, Noela Fariña, Javier Grande, Laia Jornet, David López Val, Guillem Pérez and Hrvoje Štefančić. I cannot finish without mentioning Dolors (my wife) and Clara (my daughter) who suffered during the many months I had to devote to the detailed organization of this event, a task that I had to combine of course with the research work and the ordinary duties of any university professor. In fact, although the conference took place during just those five (sunny) days of July 2006 mentioned above, the first preliminary searches for speakers had begun in mid-2004, and now I still find myself writing this preface in May 2007—roughly three years' intermittent work for just a one-week event! No complaints whatsoever, of course. I just feel immensely gratified knowing in my heart that most of the participants, if not all of them, truly enjoyed IRGAC 2006 in Barcelona. The challenge was worth it!

  5. The Emancipation of the Preface in the "Phenomenology of Spirit"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Parcero Oubiña

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In his work Prefaces, Kierkegaard’s pseudonym Nicolaus Notabene refers satirically to the preface of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, claiming the value of a preface beyond its connection with the book, against the hegelian objections to prefaces. The present paper aims to compare both works in order to reconsider the relation between them, proposing and alternative interpretation according to which Kierkegaard’s book, beyond its ironical nature, can be regarded as an explicit statement of the inherent meaning to Hegel’s critique of prefaces carried out in the very preface to the Phenomenology of Spirit. Thus Notabene’s satire will help to identify the hegelian preface as an “emancipated preface”, just as Kierkegaard’s heteronym describes them, as texts whose real meaning would consist in its ability to operate exclusively as a disposition [Stemning / Stimmung] towards the work that they precede.

  6. Foreword. The Knowledge Economy: The Present Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Bratianu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available All the statistics and evaluations show that the Knowledge Economy is our future. However, a close look at the developed economies demonstrates that the Knowledge Economy is already here, shaping our present time. Although there are many definitions of this new economic framework, their core content stresses the importance of data, information, and knowledge in the production of goods and delivering services in creating value for society. For instance, Powell and Snellman (2004, p.1999 define the knowledge economy as “production and services based on knowledge-intensive activities that contribute to an accelerated pace of technical and scientific advance, as well as a rapid obsolescence. The key component of the knowledge economy is a greater reliance on intellectual capabilities than on physical inputs or natural resources”. In the knowledge economy, knowledge becomes a strategic resource (Davenport & Prusak, 2000; Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995 and knowledge strategies contribute directly to the competitive advantage (Bratianu & Bolisani, 2015. In this new economy, data, information, and knowledge are the driving forces of development and the knowledge economy is the engine of the global economy growth...

  7. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  8. Preface: LEHTSC2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanagi, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-01

    discussions. Starting from well-organized reviews of HTSC, the conference developed into detailed lectures. The atmosphere of the conference was open and casual so that everyone, including young scientists who will take on future responsibility, could have the opportunity to participate in constructive discussions. An interactive-mode voluntarymeeting was held before closing the last session which focused on important issues left for future discussions. The conference made us confident that our voyage will certainly continue in the future. In this conference, we took the open access policy. We recorded all talks in the conference as a multimedia, which will be open at the conference web site. The electronic proceeding (Journal of Physics: Conference Series) is an open access journal. By linking multimedia talks and electronic proceeding, scientific contents of LEHTSC2007 are accessible to all researchers around the world. We are optimistic that following conferences will be equally successful and contribute to shortening the time for the discovery of HTSC mechanism. Lastly, I would like to introduce some words from a philosopher that explains the process of finding the truth in the HTSC research. All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as self-evident. —Arthur Schopenhauer Acknowledgements We would like to express our greatest thanks to Kazunobu Tanaka in providing financial support for this conference. The efforts of the local organizing committee are appreciated which persisted for almost a year. Particular thanks are due to Misako Tsutsui for her outstanding work in website design and technical editing of the proceedings. AIST is thanked for the use of the conference rooms and related facilities. We appreciate backup support by The Physical Society of Japan and The Japan Society of Applied Physics. For multimedia recording, we wish to thank Media Site KK for their support and cooperation. We

  9. 32 CFR 644.1 - Preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Project Planning § 644.1 Preface. Subpart A sets out basic procedures to be followed in planning and scheduling for the acquisition of lands in connection with Military and Civil Works projects. It is not... the acquisition phase. Civil Works ...

  10. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Šis Santalkos numeris yra skirtas religijos ir etikos sambūviui apmąstyti. Iškeltas tikslas nėra naujas ir pratęsia ilgaamžę istorinę ir teorinę šių žmoniškosios būties sričių koegzistavimą (kartais įgydavusį simbiozės, o kartais ir griežtos opozicijos pavidalą refleksijos tradiciją. Nuo garsiosios Eutifrono dilemos iki šių laikų taikomosios etikos problemos skleidžiasi sudėtingas etikos ir religijos sąveikų bei kontroversijų laukas. Nepaisant to, kad gyvename sekuliarioje ir vartotojiškoje epochoje, religiniai ir etiniai klausimai tebėra aktualūs. Kita vertus, į juos nebus atsakyta, kol tyrinėjimus kreips ir „karūnuos“ ištisomis tradicijomis tapę diskursyvūs modeliai. Todėl reikalinga nuolatinė fundamentalių religinių ir etinių sąvokų revizija bei konstruktyvi reinterpretacija, atsižvelgiant į intelektualinius ir kultūrinius šiandienos pokyčius. Toks hermeneutinės prieigos reikalaujantis požiūris, be kita ko, rodo tradicinius autoritetus naujoje šviesoje.

  11. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Rodriguez, V.A.; Bravo Cebrejos, Jorge

    1997-01-01

    The Fifth Latin American Conference on Applications of the Moessbauer Effect, LACAME '96, held in Cusco, Peru, September 9-14, 1996,was co-hosted by the Physics Sciences Faculty of the San Marcos Major University of Lima and the San Antonio Abad National University of Cusco. Contributions related to the traditional scientific subjects connected with applications of the Moessbauer Effect were presented in sixteen plenary talks, twenty-one selected contributions for oral presentation, and eighty-eight posters. The conference was attended by some eighty-five scientists from fourteen countries.The Proceedings of LACAME '96 consist of two parts. The first includes invited papers and selected contributed papers for oral presentations, which are published in a special issue of the journal Hyperfine Interactions. The second includes forty-eight selected papers for poster presentation, which are published in a special volume of Hyperfine Interactions C (Conferences).The Editor is grateful to the authors and to the referees for their joint effort, contributing to the scientific quality of both these proceedings.We remember that, since 1988, several Latin American research groups which work with Moessbauer spectroscopy have met at Latin American Conferences in Rio de Janeiro (1988), Havana (1990),Buenos Aires (1992), and Santiago de Chile (1994). LACAME '96 was the fifth of its kind in this series. The attendance at these meetings has been about one hundred physicists from Europe and North America. Presently, in the Latin American scientific community there are about twenty groups working with Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the last six years, the interactions among these different groups have increased due to these meetings. They have allowed the integration of this scientific community. However, we expect to strengthen these relations even more through future new collaborations.The Latin American scientists attending the Cusco meeting agreed that these conferences are extremely useful in the area and are committed to organizing the sixth LACAME '98 Conference in Columbia

  12. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Romão, Teresa; Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Antinus; Romão, Teresa; Reidsma, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment ACE 2012). ACE has become the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. Interactive entertainment is one of the most vibrant

  13. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Mjølsnes, Stig Frode

    2015-01-01

    Hackers, in the wide positive sense, are often enthusiastic presenters of their practical experience and exploits, but quite indifferent to writing papers. By contrast, scientists are good at writing papers, but often oblivious to the actual details of practice. At times, this difference in approach incites antagonistic attitudes between these communities. We wanted to mingle the two, shall we say, the explorers and the explanators, for mutual inspiration and communication to the benefit of t...

  14. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ystad, S.; Kronland-Martinet, R.; Jensen, K.

    2009-01-01

    . The field of computer music embraces a large number of research areas that span from information retrieval, programming, artificial intelligence to acous- tics, signal processing and sound modeling. In the last CMMR gatherings an increased emphasis was placed on the role of human interaction at all levels...

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovics, A.

    2007-06-01

    The International Scientific Colloquium "Modelling for Material Processing" took place last year on June 8-9. It was the fourth time the colloquium was organized. The first colloquium took place in 1999. All colloquia were organized by the University of Latvia together with Leibniz University of Hannover (Germany) that signifies a long-term tradition (since 1988) of scientific cooperation between researchers of these two universities in the field of electrothermal process modelling. During the last colloquium scientific reports in the field of mathematical modelling in industrial electromagnetic applications for different materials (liquid metals, semiconductor technology, porous materials, melting of oxides and inductive heating) were presented. 70 researchers from 10 countries attended the colloquium. The contributions included about 30 oral presentations and 12 posters. The most illustrative presentations (oral and poster) in the field of MHD were selected for publication in a special issue of the international journal "Magnetohydrodynamics". Traditionally, many reports of the colloquium discuss the problems of MHD methods and devices applied to the metallurgical technologies and processes of semiconductor crystal growth. The new results illustrate the influence of combined electromagnetic fields on the hydrodynamics and heat/mass transfer in melts. The presented reports demonstrate that the models for simulation of turbulent liquid metal flows in melting furnaces, crystallization of alloys and single crystal growth in electromagnetic fields have become much more complex. The adequate description of occurring physical phenomena and the use of high performance computer and clusters allow to reduce the number of experiments in industrial facilities. The use of software and computers for modelling technological and environmental processes has a very long history at the University of Latvia. The first modelling activities in the field of industrial MHD applications had led to the establishment of the chair of Electrodynamics and Continuum Mechanics in 1970, the first head of which was professor Juris Mikelsons. In the early 90's, when all research institutions in our country underwent dramatic changes, not all research directions and institutions managed to adapt successfully to the new conditions. Fortunately, the people who were involved in computer modelling of physical processes were among the most successful. First, the existing and newly established contacts in Western Europe were used actively to reorient the applied researches in the directions actively studied at the universities and companies, which were the partners of the University of Latvia. As a result, research groups involved in these activities successfully joined the international effort related to the application of computer models to industrial processes, and the scientific laboratory for Mathematical Modelling of Environmental and Technological Processes was founded in 1994. The second direction of modelling development was related to the application of computer-based models for the environmental and technological processes (e.g., sediment transport in harbours, heat transfer in building constructions) that were important for the companies and state institutions in Latvia. Currently, the field of engineering physics, the core of which is the computer modelling of technological and environmental processes, is one of the largest and most successfully developing parts of researches and educational programs at the Department of Physics of the University of Latvia with very good perspectives in the future for the development of new technologies and knowledge transfer.

  16. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Revised version of a book first published in 1982 in Dutch entitled "Oude produktiewijzen en binnendringend kapitalisme" by the Free University, Amsterdam, in association with the African Studies Centre, Leiden. The modern history of Africa can be seen in Marxist terms as a process by which the

  17. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Mamatov, E.D.; Safiev, Kh.S.

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the results of research works conducted in V.I. Nikitin Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan and Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan. Present book describes the specifics of chloric decomposition process of boron-silicate and aluminium containing ores of the Republic of Tajikistan. One of the main purpose of research is elaboration of methods of boron- and aluminium containing compounds obtaining from ores by chloric methods.

  18. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and sinks, the meso-scale and synoptic scale dynamics of the atmosphere, and long-range 'trans- boundary' transport at different altitude levels, with specific focus on the Indian mainland and the surrounding oceans is of great importance in assessing the radiative impacts and the conse- quent regional climate implications.

  19. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCrescenzi, Maurizio; Bellucci, Stefano

    2003-09-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains some of the invited papers presented at the School and Workshop on Nanotubes and Nanostructureswhich was held in Frascati, Italy in October 2001 (http://wwwsis.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2001/). The motivation and aim of this initiative was to promote the growth and development of science at the interface between different fields, where methods in one field are used to solve problems in others, bearing in mind the need to strengthen areas of research which are between fields. The School and Workshop covered an area - that of nanotubes and nanostructures - of overlap between field theory and statistical mechanics. This area has important consequences for the study of condensed matter physics and chemistry and also has impressive potential for applications in many fields. We focussed on nanotubes because they appeared to be ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes, in fact, have proved to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electrochemical and chemical devices. Similar efforts have been devoted to growing artificially nanostructured magnetic materials. The new structural and magnetic properties of these materials are discussed with an emphasis on the correlation between structure and magnetism, which also serves as guidance for improving their magnetic properties.

  20. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scientists and engineers, astronomers, business people and ... Earth/Moon system and its current environment, but also ... the space environment, together with the products ... Ivashkin, V V, M V Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Russia.

  1. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bonin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available « Avec ténacité, ce qu’il veut (l’homme, c’est arracher aux Alpes la seule richesse qu’elles recèlent, asservir la force de leurs eaux. » (Documentaire du 17 octobre 1960, La Grande Dixence, 3’50’’, TSR, http://www.ideesuisse.ch/250.0.html?&L=1, consulté le 15 décembre 2007 Hydroelectricity has been officially classified as a renewable resource by the Beijing Declaration on Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development – obviously, it was not by chance that this declaration was made in China...

  2. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, L.; Chaparro, A. M.

    The CONAPPICE congress series is dedicated to forstering fuel cell technology activities and related processes, like the hydrogen production, storage and use. Latest advances are shown by groups from universities, research centres, technology centres, companies and administration. CONAPPICE is organised every two years by the Spanish Fuel Cells Association (APPICE) as one of the main activities within its education and dissemination program. The third edition, CONAPPICE 2008, took place in the Spanish city of Zaragoza, from 24 to 26 September. Zaragoza was, during 2008, a reference for renewable energies, sustainable development and environment protection, and hosted an international exposition dedicated to these concepts. Fuel cells, with their demonstrated clean and secure behaviour, are one of the central concepts to bring the desired energy paradigm based on hydrogen conversion, so the presence of CONAPPICE 2008 in Zaragoza this year was more than justified.

  3. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    This book is addressed to scholars and students of linguistics and compu- tational linguistics as well as others. Constraints are fundamental notions in the characterisation and processing of language. A model of language may consist of a generative and a constraining part, independently of wheth...... not claim to provide a unified view of constraints, but aims at creating a mutual inspiration and transfer of results between the different fields and directions covered in this book. . . ....

  4. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    1998-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 1997. The reports consist of two sections: ''Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure'' and ''Experimental Methods and Instrumentation''. The research program includes investigations of the giant dipole resonance, studies of nuclear dissipation, Coulomb excitations and spectroscopy of nuclei around A=130. The study of the GDR decay of 76 Se * has been completed using the beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron. The deformation of this nucleus at E x =45 MeV has been found. These studies were extended to higher excitation energies at the University of Washington Superconducting Linear Accelerator. We continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE collaborations. The FOPI group carried out its experiment on strangeness production in HI collisions, using the SIS accelerator at GSI Darmstadt where evidence of the formation of Δ(1232 MeV) resonance at a beam energy per nucleon below the pion production threshold has been found. The nuclear spectroscopy group continues its interest in the properties of nuclei in the vicinity of doubly closed shells. High spin states in nuclei near 208 Pb were populated in strongly damped HI collisions. New states were found in 209,210 Pb and 207 Tl. Spins and parities were assigned based on the shell-model. In the region of A≅100, new data on the of high spin states in 104 Sn have been reported. Lifetimes of these states were measured. In studies of nuclear superdeformation the search for transitions linking the yrast superdeformed bands in 144 Gd and 143 Eu to normal deformed states has been carried out. The candidate for such linking transition (E=3361 keV) in 143 Eu has been confirmed. Motivated by nuclear structure and astrophysical considerations studies on 180 Ta have been continued to find its intermediate states connecting the isomer to its ground state. Referring to the section on Experimental Methods and Instrumentation, one should to mention the PPCO method. It can be used to assign spin, parity and multipolarity of oriented nuclei

  5. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    1999-01-01

    This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 1998. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes activities using the beams from the Warsaw cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year substantial progress has been made in completing the ISOL/IGISOL isotope separator which was connected to the heavy ion beam line, the ion source chamber was mounted and equipped with the target and the ion guide chambers. To study, control and improve the ion optics system, a special corona ion source was designed, mounted and installed in the ion guide chamber. We continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions in the projectile energy range of 4-11 MeV/u. The analysis of experimental data obtained in collaboration with the NPL in Seattle shows the importance of the bremsstrahlung emission in the γ-ray spectra at photon energies above 20 MeV. An improved theoretical description, including complete and incomplete fusion, preequilibrium emission and bremsstrahlung process, indicates that the bremsstrahlung cross-section at high γ-ray energies is smaller than predicted by the simple model using exponential formula. The extracted GDR parameters and their dependence on average temperature and spin are strongly influenced by the inclusion of incomplete fusion and preequilibrium processes. We continued our participation and active involvement in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. Data from experiments of the FOPI collaboration were analysed in terms of event-by-event fluctuations. A novel method of studying equilibration processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions was applied to the data from the Ru + Ru reaction at 1.69 A·GeV. By an appropriate choice of the fluctuating variables, chemical and thermal equilibration could be studied independently. Preliminary results show that equilibration of the system changes with centrality of the collision. The data from Au + Au collisions at 0.8 A·GeV were analysed for the presence of the intermittency signal. Our participation in the TAPS collaboration included studies of particle production in reactions induced by 190 MeV protons on nuclei. Analysis of particles which are in coincidence with neutral pions (produced below the NN threshold) revealed existence of two distinct production mechanisms: the first one being the emission from a hot equilibrated compound nucleus and the second one the quasi-direct, forward-directed process with the single proton carrying most of the energy remaining after pion production. The nuclear spectroscopy group concentrated their interest on studying properties the nuclei in the region of Z>50 and N 119 In were determined from lifetime measurements of 31 negative parity states. This unique experimental information about four negative parity bands in 119 I made it possible to determine the shape of this nucleus as being quadrupole close to maximal nonaxiality. The description of these negative parity bands by a γ-soft core is better than by a γ-rigid core. Our spectroscopy group also continued their involvement in studies of nuclear superdeformation. High spin states in neutron-deficient nuclei around A∼140 were studied with the γ detector array EUROBALL 3. Dipole bands representing the rotation of a magnetic dipole were found in the 142 Gd nucleus

  6. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The main goal of the joint Slovak-Hungarian monitoring is to mutually record and evaluate the impacts of the water supply by the underwater weir. The evaluation includes the changes in the hydrological regimes of the surface and ground water, the changes in the surface and ground water quality, the changes in soil moisture and changes in forestry and biota. The goal of the mutual data exchange is to provide information on monitoring results characterising the environmental changes on the influenced area of the respective Parties. The basic condition of data exchange is use of equal or compatible methods of measurements and analysis and the application of agreed interpretation methods. The final goal of the Joint Annual Report is to submit the joint evaluation of the monitoring results and the joint recommendations for monitoring improvement and environment protection activities to the respective governments

  7. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Light is absorbed by promoting electrons between quantum states. Our control of this key optoelectronic interaction has improved radically in recent years as we become smarter about finding ways to affect this fundamental process. For decades, researchers concentrated on improving optical properties through changing the properties of the electronic states, by choosing appropriate atoms, molecules or solids, and by growing crystals of a perfection not found in nature. Huge developments in material science saw the introduction of many optically special materials, such as compound semiconductors and their nanostructures. Recently we have found new ways to manipulate the light-matter interaction by modifying the photonic components, for instance by enhancing the optical field with feedback in cavities. This second `knob' on the light-matter interaction manipulates the optical density of states. Besides simply enhancing the interaction by locally amplifying the electromagnetic fields, the modified optical density of states produced by photonic structuring allows emission and absorption rates to be enhanced or suppressed, now known as the Purcell effect. Atom-filled optical cavities exhibit many of these interesting phenomena. But it was not until the advent of high-quality semiconductor epitaxy that transitions with sufficient oscillator strength and a narrow-enough linewidth could be produced to uncover a third approach to modifying the light-matter interaction. A simple offshoot of the technology development of vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers, the combination of high-reflectivity semiconductor mirrors and narrow strong absorption lines of semiconductor quantum wells, opens a new regime. This `strong-coupling' regime emerges when the time it takes a photon to be emitted and pass once around the cavity to be then reabsorbed (known as the inverse `Rabi' frequency) becomes less than the time for the photon to leak out of the cavity or for the electronic transition to lose its phase coherence. In 1991 the first such semiconductor structure showed the resulting Rabi splitting, with electron and photon states being mixed together by the optical interaction into polaritons (Weisbuch et al 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 3314). Why do polaritons in semiconductors give us so many new properties, many of which are explored in this special issue? They are the third knob to tweak on the light-matter box because the mixing revises the underlying quantum states; polaritons then have different properties to electron-hole pairs. Instead of merely working on reshaping the wavefunctions of the electrons, we use the electric-dipole coupling to mix in some photon component and alter the way that optical energy couples in and out of the material. Polaritons have one of the biggest spatial wavefunctions that we know how to make, they possess boson symmetry, and weigh very little compared to electrons. But it is not really their individual properties that make them of such importance, it is their interactions. It took another decade after the first polaritons were seen in semiconductor microcavities before it was found that the interaction between polaritons was orders of magnitude stronger than between electron-hole pairs (Baumberg 2001 Physics World 15 (3) 37 and Savvidis et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 1547). The key revelation in understanding polaritons has been their dispersion relation, which is completely distorted compared to that of the electron-hole pairs (Houdre et al 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 2043). Of course polaritons exist in bulk materials (Hopfield 1958 Phys. Rev. 112 155) but the shape of the dispersion there is again different and not favourable for many of the polariton interactions that are reported throughout this issue. In semiconductor microcavities, the new dispersion relations take the form of an energy `trap' in momentum space. As in golf, polaritons tend to collect either at the bottom of the trap or around its edges. Through an intense concentration of research, both theoretical and experimental, over the past three years much has become clearer about how polaritons behave, including suggestions about how they can be made to work for us in producing hitherto inaccessible physical phenomena of technological interest. Thus, it is timely to collect many of the excellent contributions together into a special issue in which much of this science can be treated in the depth it deserves. We can divide the contributions into those that promise new sorts of strongly-coupled microcavity devices; those which explore how polaritons are formed, how they scatter, and how they decay; and those which identify more of the unusual polariton particularly at the bottom of the dispersion relation). This latter topic reopens the question of whether Bose-Einstein (or in this case, polariton) condensation is possible or has been seen in these unusual structures. This field then crosses a number of important research areas including micro-lasers, lasing without inversion, condensation and superfluidity, new spin properties, ultrafast optical nonlinearities and quantum optics. We have included a review article by Quatropanni and co-workers, which discusses theoretical aspects of the nonlinear optical properties of semiconductor microcavities in the strong exciton-photon coupling regime, which was planned to appear as a separate paper in Semiconductor Science and Technology, but which was considered more appropriate to be incorporated in this issue. A theoretical description of coherent nonlinearities in semiconductor microcavities is given by Savasta et al, who show that the strong energy dependence of the two exciton states damping is crucial to explain the dependence of the experimentally reported results on Rabi splitting and detuning. Stimulated polariton scattering, arising from the bosonic character of polaritons, is described by Skolnick's group, who also emphasize the role of the unusual dispersion of the lower polariton branch to allow much of the new physics in semiconductor microcavities. Non-linear effects in semiconductor microcavities, which include stimulated polariton scattering, parametric oscillation, spin dynamics, and the possibilities of a polariton condensate, are discussed by Baumberg et al. The suppression of the relaxation bottleneck on the lower polariton branch and the stimulation of the emission in II-VI based microcavities is demonstrated by Dang and collaborators, who also probe the coherent dynamics along the lower polariton branch by means of angle-resolved four wave mixing experiments. The possibility to observe parametric polariton amplification at room temperature is discussed by Deveaud's team, who demonstrate that this could be achieved in cavities, in which quantum wells with a large exciton binding energy are embedded, such as in GaN-based cavities. The effects induced by a two-dimensional electron gas on the interaction between the electromagnetic field and the excitons in a semiconductor microcavity are discussed by Cohen et al, who show that the presence of the electron gas is responsible for an efficient interaction between electrons and polaritons. The modification of the optical mode spectrum in microcavities, by introducing lateral photon confinement, is demonstrated by Bayer and collaborators, who show the possibility of tailoring elastic polariton pair-scattering and a suppression of the spontaneous emission for quantum dots embedded in such cavities. The optical properties of biexcitons in microcavities are reviewed by Langbein et al, who perform a detailed investigation of the polariton-biexciton transition and study the biexciton binding energy and dephasing in a microcavity at low temperature. A detailed experimental study of linear and circular polarization dynamics in secondary emission of microcavities in the strong coupling regime is presented by Amand's group, who show that it is possible to manipulate the polariton spin and alignment within the optical dephasing time. The spin dynamics under non-resonant excitation is presented by Viña's co-workers, who demonstrate that the polarization of the emission is controlled by the detuning of the cavity and the exciton modes, leading to crossed-polarized emission after circularly-polarized excitation at negative detunings. The enhancement of the resonant Raman scattering using semiconductor planar microcavities is described by Fainstein and Jusserand, who also propose a novel phonon microcavity structure and demonstrate the existence of acoustical phonon confined modes in these structures. Exciton-polariton lasing and its relation with the formation of a macroscopic coherence, associated with a Bose-Einstein phase transition, is reviewed by Yamamoto et al. A calculation of the phase diagram of a weakly interacting polariton gas in a microcavity is given by Kavokin and collaborators, who also describe the possible condensation of polaritons using a quantum kinetic formalism. The quantum mechanical nature of the light field in semiconductor microcavities is revealed by the teams of Gibbs and Koch, who describe entanglement effects in the probe reflectivity of a microcavity system and squeezing in the incoherent emission. Normal-mode coupling in photonic crystals is demonstrated by Ishihara's group, who present experimental evidence of the strong coupling regime, detuning schemes, and anticrossing behaviour in absorption and photoluminescence investigations. Characteristic features of organic semiconductor microcavities, the similarities and differences between inorganic and organic cavities operating within the strong coupling regime and the identification of novel features of the organic systems that can be exploited in new structures are discussed by Bradley et al, who also present prospects for inorganic/organic hybrid materials that may form the seed of a new paradigm in optoelectronic devices. A theoretical analysis of resonant acousto-optic Stark effects for microcavity polaritons is presented by Ivanov and Littlewood, who also discuss possible applications of this effect for optical modulation and switching. Hopefully, as well as providing a new resource, this issue will stimulate imaginative exploitation of this emerging field. Guest Editors J J Baumberg Departments of Physics & Astronomy, Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK L Viña Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid, Spain

  8. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    lems arising, for example, after discretization of optimal control problems. Lucien developed a general framework for quantifying near-optimality...Polak, E., Da Cunha, N.O.: Constrainedminimization under vector valued-criteria in finite dimensional spaces. J. Math . Anal. Appl. 19(1), 103–124...1969) 12. Pironneau, O., Polak, E.: On the rate of convergence of certain methods of centers. Math . Program. 2(2), 230–258 (1972) 13. Polak, E., Sargent

  9. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auret, Danie; Swart, Hendrik; Venter, André

    2014-04-01

    The 5th South African Conference on Photonic Materials (SACPM) was again hosted very successfully at the beautiful Kariega private game reserve situated in the Eastern Cape, the second largest of South Africa's nine provinces. It is the traditional home of the Xhosa people and the birth place of many prominent South Africans including Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki. This movingly beautiful region is a remarkably diverse biosphere - ranging from lush evergreen forests to rugged mountains - incorporating the sunshine coast, with miles of sun-drenched coastline, pristine beaches and the warm sparkling Indian Ocean dotted with rivers, lagoons and coastal villages.

  10. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Valeria V.; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.

    2016-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials contains selected peer-reviewed papers from the International Baltic Conference on Magnetism: focus on biomedical aspects (IBCM-2015) held in Svetlogorsk, Kaliningrad region, Russia on the base of Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (IKBFU, Kaliningrad, Russia) during August 30-September 03, 2015. Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin (UrFU, Yekaterinburg, Russia) acted as a co-organizer of the IBCM-2015. IKBFU and UrFU vice-rectors for science - Prof. Artyom V. Yurov and Prof. Vladimir V. Kruzhaev - took a special care for the IBCM-2015.

  11. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droste, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific contributions are classified into three sections: 1) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure, 2) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation, 3) Other Research. In the section 1 the information about an experimental setup for studing high energy gamma rays produced in heavy ion collisions is given. Other research described in this section is the study of the mechanism of fusion-fission reactions where complete set of data on precission neutron multiplicities was analysed. The very long fusion-fission time scale is reported that may suggest some unexpected properties of hot nuclear matter. Our permanent interest in gamma rays accompanying heavy ion reactions is represented by a contribution in which extremely energetic photons, above the kinematics limit set by the beam and Fermi motion velocities, has been observed. Reactions at higher energies are represented by two works, an experimental one in which η meson production cross section were measured and a theoretical one that deals with the properties of hot nuclear matter produced in 200 AGeV nucleus-nucleus collision. The nucler spectroscopy group reports some new information concerning shell structure of the spherical nuclei. The decay of the I = 8 + isomer in strongly neutron deficient 100,102 Cd was studied and the results were analysed in the framework of a shell model. The wave functions for many excited states in 208 Pb were derived from the large set of experimental data and interesting information about residual interactions was obtained. The electromagnetic properties of some deformed nuclei were investigated. The 125,127 La nuclei were studied using RDM lifetime measurements and 129 Xe and 156 Gd - using Coulomb excitation. The superdeformed states were studied in 145 Gd where the SD bands have been discovered. One of them shows two band crossing. In the second section a new experimental method for determination of gamma ray polarization is proposed and in the last one the results of experimental test of Bell's inequalities are presented

  12. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    MEM03: The Second International Workshop on Mechano-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (Kyoto, Japan, 3–5 March 2003) Superconductivity is on course to be widely applied in various advanced technologies including: (1) magnetically levitated vehicles (MAGLEV), international thermonuclear experimental reactors (ITER), electric generators, high energy accelerator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using metallic composite superconductors; (2) cable, fault-current-limiters (FCL), transformers, flywheels and motors by using oxide composite superconductors; (3) high field NMR and other sophisticated devices by combining both metallic and oxide superconductors. In order to create a real market for these advanced technologies using superconductivity, it is absolutely essential to develop superconducting wires/tapes with better performance. The development of accompanying assessment technologies is therefore indispensable for their R&D. Some important properties are related to the mechanical properties of the conductors. It is well known that degraded superconducting and mechanical properties (during fabrication as well as under operation) can cause serious problems, because the critical current depends sensitively on bending and tensile stresses, electromagnetic force, and mechanical and thermal cycling. Therefore he assessment of mechanical properties and the effect of strain on transport properties is crucial for improving and developing high performance superconducting devices. It is now very timely to have a meeting in order to discuss common scientific problems systematically and comprehensively. The Second International Workshop on Mechano-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors, MEM03, was held in Kyoto, Japan, 3–5 March 2003, mainly to discuss the fundamentals of the following topics. • Electromagnetic properties: change of critical current, RRR and ac loss due to external forces like bending, compressive and tensile stresses, electromagnetic force, and mechanical and thermal cycling. • Mechanical properties: tensile and compressive properties, fatigue characteristics and fracture behaviour. • Thermal properties: thermal conductivity, thermal dilatation and thermal strain. • Modelling: prediction of critical current and mechanical properties of composite superconductors through statistical analysis, finite element analysis, etc. • Test methods: international cooperative research work to establish test methods for assessing mechano-electromagnetic properties based on the activity of VAMAS/TWA-16. This discussion took place with respect to three types of composites: • MFC (multifilamentary composite): BSCCO, MgB2, Nb-Ti, Nb3Sn and Nb3Al. • CCC (coated conductor composite): YBCO and ReBCO. • BCC (bulk crystal composite): YBCO and ReBCO. More than 55 researchers attended the MEM03 workshop, coming from eight different countries. A total of 42 papers were presented. In this special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology selected papers have been included that are concerned with the comprehensive scientific research subjects mentioned above. The aim of this issue is to provide a snapshot of some of the current state-of-the-art research and to promote further research into the mechano-electromagnetic properties of composite superconductors. The workshop was organized under the activities of NEDO technology quest and VAMAS/TWA-16. We wish to thank the following for their contribution to the success of the workshop: NEDO Super-ACE project, AFOSR, AOARD and IEC/TC90-JNC. Guest Editors: Kozo Osamura Hitoshi Wada Arman Nyilas Damian Hampshire

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Mee; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2018-05-01

    This special issue of the Spectrochimica Acta A is dedicated to the retirement of Professor Yukihiro Ozaki of Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan as an internationally well recognized scientist in molecular spectroscopy studies including vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  14. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldev Arora

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth is a complex dynamic system and study of the geomagnetic field can provide
    insight to the dynamic processes operative in the outer core where the main field is
    produced by a geo-dynamo mechanism. By contrast the study of transient geomagnetic
    variations is an important tool for studying the complex solar wind-magnetosphere-
    ionosphere coupling. In addition the currents induced by the time varying external
    current system allow us to image the crust and the upper mantle in terms of
    electric conductivity. Lack of measurements and collection of geomagnetic data from
    certain strategic locations restricts the development of high quality models of main
    geomagnetic field as well as the current systems responsible for transient geomagnetic
    variations. Division V of the International Association of Geomagnetic Aeronomy
    (IAGA jointly with the Interdivisional Commission for Developing Countries organized
    a special symposium «Geomagnetic Measurements in Remote Regions» at General
    Assembly of IUGG held at Perugia (Italy during July 2-12, 2007. Papers were
    presented on data base numerical simulations identifying strategic gaps in the existing
    observatory network where new measurements of geomagnetic field could improve
    upon existing geomagnetic reference models. Special focus was on describing the
    novel design of equipment, modes of data collection and dissemination from remote
    regions. During the symposium, 21 presentations were presented and this issue of
    Annals of Geophysics compiles a selection of papers.
    It is significant that each paper in this special issue is multi-authored by several
    institutions and countries. This emphasizes the importance of worldwide collaboration
    when obtaining and analyzing data from geophysical observations in remote regions.
    With current technology magnetic observatories still require people to take measurements
    at least once per week to enable baselines to be established and must be
    away from power sources and transmission lines. This restricts the location of magnetic
    observatories used for deep Earth investigations. However, presented here are
    papers describing ways to overcome harsh conditions and obtain magnetic data in
    remote locations. The need for long term ground based geomagnetic observatories
    for reference models is well established and discussed. Also discussed, is the study
    of magnetic field variations for determining transient phenomena. The measuring
    stations can exist unmanned as highlighted during the session by the Japanese group (not included in this volume and Chambodut et al.
    Five papers (Cafarella et al., Chambodut et al., De Lauretis et al., Maksymchuk
    et al., and Torta et al. describe magnetic observations in Antarctica. Most of this
    continent is covered by ice so it is almost impossible to sample the continental surface
    directly: magnetic exploration allows us to overcome much of this problem, providing
    important information on the geological and tectonic settings of this continent.
    Antarctica is also an interesting magnetic region because it is in darkness for
    half of the year, so production of the ionospheric plasma that creates the daily Solar
    quiet variation is reduced for this period in this region (Chambodut et al.. In addition,
    it contains the southern polar cap current system – a window to the solar wind
    and the magnetospheric-ionospheric energy transfer processes (De Lauretis et al..
    Torta et al. and Chambodut et al. describe the exceptional means necessary for a
    magnetic observatory in Antarctica attempting to attain INTERMAGNET status. Torta et
    al. use Livingston Island (LIV, in the South Shetland Islands archipelago (in operation
    for ten years, and Chambodut et al. describe Concordia Base (in operation for
    just over 3 years. Both have not yet achieved INTERMAGNET status.
    De Lauretis et al. use two stations Concordia at Dome C and Mario Zucchelli at
    Terra Nova Bay to show that the geomagnetic signals, measured by the two stations,
    have very different signatures that depend upon the position of the stations with respect
    to the sources.
    The paper by Cafarella et al., describes long-term trends in geomagnetic measurements
    which have non-absolute baselines for six months of the year at Mario
    Zucchelli station (TNB. These authors compare TNB data with the models from
    satellite measurements and find them to be in good agreement. They exhibit the different
    long-term trend in source currents for example, daily variation, pulsations
    and internal Earth sources such as jerks.
    Maksymchuk et al. also describe the results of long-term (1998-2005 yrs. magnetic
    investigations but use tectonomagnetic techniques in the Western Antarctic
    near the location of Ukrainian Antarctic Station «Academic Vernadsky». This new
    type of research is described.
    A novel approach to remote data acquisition is given in Torta et al. They describe
    the development of data transmission facilities for real time access between Antarctica
    and Spain using METEOSAT and GOES satellites and recently the move to a
    high frequency (HF digital radio-link, using ionospheric propagation.
    Geomagnetic measurements from the deep sea are discussed in Vitale et al. From
    2000 to 2005 two exploring geophysical missions were undertaken in the Tyrrhenian
    deep seafloor at depths between around -2000 and -3000 m in the framework of the European-funded GEOSTAR Projects. During the two GEOSTAR deep seafloor
    missions, scalar and vector magnetometer measurements were used to improve
    global and regional geomagnetic reference models and to infer specific geoelectric
    information about the two sites.
    Three papers (Korte et al., Macmillan et al., Matzka et al. describe magnetic observations
    in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly. This is the region between
    Africa and South America where Earth’s main magnetic field is depressed causing
    localized space weather hazards (some described in Macmillan et al., especially
    satellite outages. Korte et al. describes the installation of new magnetic observatories
    in Bolivia, Namibia and St Helena, and Macmillan et al. describe two older
    magnetic observatories located on Ascension Island and Port Stanely.
    Repeat station surveys are a way of measuring the secular variation of main field.
    Matzka et al. contains a detailed report of a repeat station survey in this region at
    Tristan da Cunha Island. They also describe the drawbacks of repeat station surveys
    and prefer a magnetic observatory in the region which will be established for the
    SWARM satellite mission. However, Korte et al. show that when nothing else exists
    repeat stations are still a good way of obtaining secular variation data. They describe
    the addition of several repeat stations in the South Atlantic anomaly area in
    Africa.
    Torta et al. and Korte et al. also describe efforts being made to create an unmanned
    magnetic observatory, which would have INTERMAGNET standards.
    The Guest Editors wish to thank Enkelejda Qamili for her assistance during the
    session in Perugia, the numerous referees who reviewed the papers and the Editorial
    office of Annals of Geophysics for their continued support and encouragement in
    bring out this special issue of the Journal.

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, V.; Iacomi, F.; Dubourdieu, C.; Sánchez Barrera, F.; Kompitsas, M.

    2015-10-01

    The present issue contains a collection of representative papers presented at the 10th International Conference on Physics of Advanced Materials, ICPAM-10 (https://www.icpam.ro/), held in Iasi, Romania, September 22-28, 2014. ICPAM-10 was organized under the auspices of the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research and had as co-organizers 22 prestigious institutions from Romania, France, U.K, Russia, Japan, Portugal, Ukraine, Netherlands, Switzerland, Hungary, Turkey, Greece and USA and benefited of the support of 20 sponsors and exhibitors. The financial support offered by NanoAndMore, ExpressCredit, American Elements, ArcelorMittal Tubular Products Iasi, Agilrom Scientific, Schaefer SouthEast Europe, Iasi City Hall, PIM Copy, Histeresis, ApelLaser, Nitech, Technosteel LBR, THORLABS GmbH, MaTecK, Sartorom, Antalis, EMFUTUR and Romanian Physical Society helped to support the attendance of many young researchers and PhD students, as well as several prizes that were awarded.

  16. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, D.

    Sixteen years ago, the first international conference on lead-acid batteries LABAT'89 laid the foundations of a world community of scientists, technologists and experts working in the field of lead-acid batteries, who gather together every 3 years to discuss the latest achievements, problems and challenges facing the development of this most widely used electrochemical power source. These conferences of ours have become traditional and have withstood the fierce competition of numerous other meetings on power sources, which abound in the calendar of events lately. This year, the lack of international coordination resulted in a clash of three international conferences on electrochemical power sources held within the same week. The Organizing Committee of LABAT'2005 announces with great satisfaction that this year's conference was attended by nearly 200 battery experts from 30 countries. Sixty-two papers were submitted for presentation at the conference by speakers from all six continents. Twenty-one companies chose to exhibit their products and services at LABAT'2005.

  17. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorandi, Daniele; Maltese, Vincenzo; Rovatsos, Michael; Stewart, James; Miorandi, Daniele; Maltese, Vincenzo; Rovatsos, Michael; Nijholt, Antinus; Stewart, James

    2014-01-01

    Social collective intelligence is an emerging area at the intersection of collective intelligence and social informatics, where social processes between humans are being leveraged and enhanced, by means of advanced Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), to solve challenging problems using

  18. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batail, Patrick

    2004-04-01

    ISCOM'2003, the fifth venue of a series of successful Symposia, was mainly supported by the Région des Pays de la Loire; with complementary funding from the Chemistry and the Physics Departments of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the Délégation Générale à l'Armement, the Ministère Délégué a la Recherche et aux Nouvelles Technologies and the University of Angers. We are very grateful to these funding agencies, especially as the sponsorship has allowed for many young researchers (below 35) to attend the Conference. The Symposium brought together chemists and physicists concerned with the latest developments in the synthesis, crystal growth, molecular crystal structure and electronic structure, phase transitions and electronic properties of low dimensional crystalline molecular materials, molecular metals and superconductors, and the theoretical aspects of these systems of strongly correlated electrons for advanced technologies. 240 participants from Japan (86), France (35), USA (18), Russia (17), UK (14), Spain (14), Germany (12), Canada (7), Italy (7), Portugal (7), Croatia (4), Danemark (4), Switzerland (4), Australia (3), Korea (3), Poland (3), The Netherlands (2), China (1), Finland (1), and Greece (1) - the two youngest of whom were a Japanese and an Australian PhD students - stay in residence from the evening of Sunday 21st September to Friday 26th September 2003 at the hotel "Les Jardins de l'Atlantique", in Talmont-Saint Hilaire (Vendée, France). It should be noted that 50% of the participants were younger than 35 - of whom 51 were PhD students (that is, 20% of the total number of participants). These rather impressive. figures are seen as significant of the spirit or a multidisciplinary domain whose biannual high level international Symposium, also serves as an exceptional venue for the training of young researchers in the field. Given - and despite this overwhelming response and the eagerness of the participants to contribute oral presentations - we have decided to keep with as many 20 minutes talks as possible and had to resolve - rather reluctantly to run parallel sessions on Wednesday and Thursday mornings. Yet, in the end, there has been a significant number of solicitations for oral contributions of great interest which were simply impossible to fit in the schedule. We thank all the colleagues who have submitted their exciting work and who have presented their oral and posters contributions during the 23 sessions of the Symposium. Seven sessions were devoted to materials chemistry, of which two sessions dealt more specifically with organic synthesis and two sessions with molecular magnetic materials. The experimental aspects of one- and two-dimensional physics were discussed in two and four sessions, respectively. Aside several theoretical talks interspersed within the former experimental sessions, two sessions were dedicated to theoretical aspects of strongly correlated electron systems in low dimension. One session focused on high magnetic field phenomena and two sessions covered charge ordering phenomena. Finally, upcoming issues related to surface and interface phenomena in molecular conductors were addressed in one session. The current research in chemistry of molecular precursor is dominated by the concepts of multifunctional π systems constructed on tetrathiafulvalene-based redox cores equipped with hydrogen-bond donor-acceptor functionalities or tetrathiafulvalene-based ligands capable of coordinating a metal center. Likewise, in the same spirit, the introduction of chiral functionalities is reported in several contributions. Aside those in the chemistry of stabilized polyacenes and the chemistry of molecular inorganic macrospins species: most of the creative developments continue to involve the TTF platform. In that context, crystal engineering concepts associated with the manipulation of hydrogen bonds and complementary weak intermolecular interactions in competition with p _π-p_π overlap interactions between frontier orbitals of the precursors is today a very active field of research reaching out in field of molecular magnetic materials. Also, the materials chemistry of single component molecular metals and the development of strategies for the chemical control of band filling in molecular metals are areas of intense research. Considerable progress reported in first principle-based electronic structure calculations for large complex systems and band structure calculations of molecular metals should diffuse promptly in the molecular materials community. On the physics side, recent advances in understanding the localization-delocalization-charge ordering competition in low dimensional systems of strongly correlated electrons, and their formulation at ISCOM'03 in a language and format accessible to experimentalists and materials scientists, carries a great many promises for significant developments in the conception of novel molecular superconductors. The physics of one- and two-dimensional molecular metals and superconductors was a strong component of ISCOM'03 with very diverse complementary experimental approaches including transport, uniaxial and isotropie high pressures and high magnetic fields studies, thermal conductivity, STM. Two dimensional conductors have proved to be prototype materials for the study of interacting electron gases through the phenomenon of Mott localization exhibited in some BEDT-TTF salts. Applications of angle-resolved photo-emission investigations have been reported and emerge as a very promising area for future developments. Coupled to quantum chemistry calculations the latter carry along an enormous potential, as exemplified by the wealth of information delivered on the nature of the chemical bonding and electronic structure of molecular solids. The reports of superconductivity induced by a large magnetic field in RETS salts containing magnetic anions have shown how organic materials have brought the experimental proof for a theory which was proposed several decades ago. For the past two decades, the field of low dimensional molecular materials has developed a rather singular, integrated culture where organic and inorganic chemists, materials scientists, quantum chemists, joined forces with condensed matter physicists: experimentalists and theoreticians a like, shared concepts and cut across disciplinary barriers in a symbiosis which was there plain to see at ISCOM'03. The international committee has decided that ISCOM'2005 will be organized by Jim Brooks (Tallahassee, Florida, USA) who will lead a joint effort of the High Magnetic Fields Laboratories and the American community in the field. Patrick Batail Chairman, ISCOM'2003 E. Canadell, N. Dupuis, M. Fourmigué, D. Jérome and J.-P. Pouget Co-chairmen and editors of the ISCOM'2003 proceedings

  19. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwerdtner Máñez, Kathleen; Poulsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    as long term catch rates has been investigated through the use of past paper documents, including photographs. Equally important, and more frequently, historians are answering anthropogenic questions evolving around individual fishermen, fishing fleets, consumers, managers and marine scientists. Listing......This chapter shows how historians’ methodologies and approaches are being used to reconstruct marine ecological phenomena of the past. In terms of the use of history in historical marine ecology, a number of examples are presented of how past species abundance and spatial aggregation as well...... all relevant historical scholarship, which can be termed marine environmental history are beyond the scope of this chapter. What is mainly in focus here, is historical research, where the methodologies have been used to infer knowledge on past marine resource use. The final parts of this chapter...

  20. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... Computational methods are essential for analysing biological data because ... Many problems in the above areas are closely related to different tasks .... roles in the maintenance of cell's functional responses by regulating the.

  1. Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan; Ding; Hervé; Stolowy

    2013-01-01

    <正>Since the seminal JFE paper published by Jensen and Meckling in 1976(Jensen and Meckling,1976)the agency theory has been widely applied in numerous studies in the fields of corporate finance and accounting.Meanwhile,many researchers also notice that the conflicts between the principal(shareholder)and the agent(manager)may not be the predominant issue in most of the firms around the world,since the dispersed shareholding and separation between ownership and management are relatively uncommon phenomenon,limited to certain type of firms(listed firms)and to certain countries(like the USA).

  2. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A young research scientist who had only joined the staff at Texas a year before I ... wide range of close collaboration with the rest of the Indian institutions as ... to have continuous coverage of the observations without gaps because of the day–.

  3. Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huijun

    2009-01-01

    @@ Climate change is one of the most challenging issues faced by human beings.Although many remarkable achievements have been made in climate change research,there is still a tremendous amount of uncertainty in the field.Comprehensive and rational understanding of climate change processes and mechanisms,assessment of future climate change,and formulating proper mitigation policy are all still a long way from realization.These uncertainties make the climate change problem extremely complicated,requiring interdisciplinary exploration.

  4. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, R. B.

    2003-03-01

    It is not an exaggeration to say that over the past forty years solid-state electronic devices have revolutionized working practices and the way leisure time is spent. The semiconductor at the heart of the vast majority of these electronic devices is silicon. Predictions that new semiconductors will be required to enable the pace of the electronics revolution to be kept at its present level are regularly made, but silicon device engineers just keep coming up with ways to make silicon devices better and better. It is the year 1990, and reliable chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques for the formation of large area films of diamond have been demonstrated in a number of research laboratories around the world. The first major international conferences on the growth, properties and potential applications for diamond, now available in a form useful to device engineers for the first time, have taken place. A survey of the basic properties of diamond suggests that it is an ideal material for electronics. It has a wide bandgap (5.5 eV, indirect), high saturated carrier velocities and carrier mobilities (and electrons and holes have similar values), a high electric field breakdown strength, low dielectric constant, high thermal conductivity and high visible-infrared radiation transparency. Many potential applications can, and have been proposed, including high power and high frequency electronic devices. When the resilience of diamond to high levels of radiation or heat, and the prospect of a negative electron affinity surface are also considered, many more applications come to mind such as high temperature or radiation hard electronics, radiation detectors, optoelectronic devices and cold cathodes. At this time, diamond films grown on non-diamond substrates are polycrystalline, and highly defective, but high purity single crystal material is considered `just around the corner'. There is even a naturally occurring dopant, boron, to enable p-type diamond to be produced and surely it is only a matter of months before n-type material is realized. Researchers can be found talking to the media about future computers that will have within them semiconducting chips made of diamond early in the new century. Let us now move to the present, the year 2003. Diamond films grown on non-diamond substrates are still polycrystalline, although far less defective. Single crystal material is available, but not in large areas since it is produced through the homoepitaxial growth of a high purity layer on a (relatively) cheap, but small, substrate. The only dopant that all laboratories can master is still boron, but at least three labs have reliably generated n-type conductivity through the incorporation of phosphorus, although the donor level formed is deep at around 0.6 eV (nor is boron shallow, forming an acceptor level at 0.37 eV). There are no mass market active diamond electronic devices for sale, and certainly no computers with diamond-based chips at their heart. Why? Well perhaps the early predictions were simply too ambitious. Ten or so years is not a long time in terms of the development of a new semiconductor. Also the predictors were far too ready to dismiss silicon. This article is being written on a Macintosh laptop computer, whose base can get too hot for the lap after prolonged use! Silicon for high temperature electronics? Well yes, if you introduce silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology as Motorola have done. The level of investment required for even the most basic semiconductor fabrication facility is measured in billions of US dollars. New semiconductors will not be used within mass production environments unless they offer not just incremental improvements, but major steps forward, and do so reliably. It can be argued that it was the need for microwave devices that emerged with modern communications that gave III-V semiconductors their breakthrough, not the prospect of an improved computer. In this new century those working in the field of diamond electronics have become more realistic in their ambitions, and with this realism have come many successes, even though they are on a smaller scale than originally predicted. You can buy active electronic devices based upon CVD diamond, but they are aimed at niche markets. For this reason, many of the multi-national companies no longer support programmes in diamond electronics, but in their place are plenty of medium and small enterprises for whom niche markets are just fine. Optoelectronic devices and radiation detectors, in particular, have been produced with performance levels that are commercially useful. For example, aspects of my own work at UCL have led to the commercial introduction of deep UV diamond-based photodetectors, and CEA in Paris have introduced a range of radiation detectors that are being purchased for use within the nuclear industry. This is not to say that mass market applications for diamond will not emerge, it is simply that if they do they are likely to be where diamond enables a new technology, not an incremental improvement to an existing one. Perhaps the exciting new topic of quantum computing could be just such a technology in 10-20 years time. Equally exciting is the integration of electronics with biological materials, and nano-biotechnology could perhaps be a major application area for diamond-based devices in the future. All future developments of diamond electronics will be underpinned by fundamental insight into the way that the diamond grows, its properties and the physics controlling the operation of device structures. Whilst many CVD methods have been used to grow diamond, micowave plasma enhanced CVD has proved to be the most effective for the growth of high purity material. Until recently growth rates were limited to around 1 µm h-1, making the material fairly costly to produce. This can now be increased to beyond 50 µm h-1 making even the highest quality diamond substrates commercially accessible for many applications. The electronic properties of the material have also been improving dramatically over the last few months, such that it is possible to produce CVD material with carrier mobilities that surpass the best natural diamonds (see for example, Science (2002) 297 1670). This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology is dedicated to surveying recent developments in diamond electronics that are being enabled by these improvements in growth. Most of this special issue addresses crystalline diamond. However, two articles have been included on diamond-like carbon (DLC), to give the reader some insight into the properties and applications of this related, but different, material. In fact DLC is not a single material, but is a fully constrained network of sp2 and sp3 carbon (sometimes with hydrogen), where the sp2 and sp3 ratio, and hence the materials properties, can be varied. The issue begins with an article on the electronic properties of diamond; doping diamond is then considered. The fascinating observation that hydrogen terminated diamond surfaces display p-type conductivity is then discussed, followed by some diamond processing issues and electronic device fabrication. Papers on properties and applications follow. At the end of the issue are two largely theoretical papers submitted by Johann Prins. These papers are thought provoking, but make some very controversial claims. They are included here so that the reader can consider the approach developed within these two associated papers, perhaps thinking how this impacts upon their own work, even if the end conclusions remain open to debate. Indeed, it is hoped that this debate will be opened up through their publication, enabling this area of thought to be more widely explored and critically examined. Optical picture of a homoepitaxial film Figure 1. Optical picture of a homoepitaxial film grown at a rate of more than 50 µm h-1. Figure 1 is an optical picture of a homoepitaxial film grown in my laboratories at UCL at a rate of more than 50 µm h-1. It is included for no scientific or technical reason, nor is it our best layer. It is simply included as a beautiful picture, and to remind us that not all good things have to be for a commercial application! It has been a pleasure working with the authors and IOPP in bringing together this special issue. I hope you, the reader, find it useful.

  5. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Jackie M., , Dr; Swart, Hendrik C., , Prof; Reinhardt Botha, J., , Prof

    2016-01-01

    The 6th South African Conference on Photonic Materials took place at Mabula Game Lodge, South Africa, from 4 to 8 May 2015. The conference venue, Mabula Game Lodge, is located in the Waterberg Mountains outside Bela-Bela in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. This part of our beautiful country is home to some of the most impressive bushveld and is particularly renowned for its exceptional private game lodges, Mabula Game Lodge being no exception. It is located a mere two hours' drive from O.R. Tambo International Airport in Gauteng and offers an unforgettable "Big Five" game experience on the malaria free reserve.

  6. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Magdalena; Błaszczak, Zdzislaw

    2017-11-01

    It is with great pleasure that we are presenting the subsequent volume of the International Poznan Workshop proceedings. The conferences of this cycle have been since the beginning devoted to laser light interaction with atomic nuclei and since more recently also to the applications of ion-storage devices. The first edition entitled "Laser Spectroscopy of Atomic Nuclei" took place in Dubna in December 1990, and since then the subsequent conferences have been held every two to three years in Poznan, where they have been jointly organized by the Faculty of Physics at the Adam Mickiewicz University (Poznan) and the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna). The conferences have enjoyed increasing popularity and have attracted increasing numbers of specialists from a number of research institutions engaged in laser spectroscopy of radioactive and other exotic (e.g. anti-) atomic nuclei and related instruments. Over the years the workshops have gained a reputation of presenting research of a high scientific level and having impact on the directions of future studies. The 2016 workshop on the Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research has been already the 10th edition and it was a pleasure to see that the event was thriving and the participants were enjoying it in all fronts. Around 100 scientists met on May 16 -19 in Poznan for the 4-day event. They were even more international than in the previous edition, representing institutes in Europe, North America, Japan, and even Australia. Many have returned to Poznan, but there were also new faces, especially among the younger participants. It was great to see the leaders in their topics discussing physics, but not only, with PhD students and starting post-docs. More than sixty talks were delivered, reflecting well the state-of-the art in the covered fields which were all related to the techniques, experimental results and theory connected to lasers and storage devices applied to exotic nuclei. The presentations were supplemented with many posters covering even more results. We hope that the participants also enjoyed the concert of renaissance music. In this warm atmosphere (much warmer than the temperatures outside the lecture hall), we are looking forward to the 11 th edition, which has been already announced to take place again in Poznan. In the next 3 years many new results will be certainly collected, so that without doubt we will participate in another interesting workshop.

  7. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siirola, Jeffrey; Gani, Rafiqul

    2017-01-01

    include economics (raw material consumption, energy requirement, labor requirement, other operating costs, equipment capital, working capital, etc.), environmental impacts, physical plant size, employment, flexibility, controllability, robustness, reliability, safety, etc. Topics covering synthesis issues...... Engineering has collected papers from invited authors covering a wide range of topics within PI. We include the idea of any process design feature that retains the primary process objectives (production rate and fitness-for-use criteria) while also improving one or more performance parameters which could...

  8. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franks, Stewart; Boegh, Eva; Blyth, Eleanor

    2011-01-01

    The hydro-climatological approach of this volume illustrates the scientific and practical value of considering hydrological phenomena and processes in a climate context to improve understanding of controls, process interaction, and past and future variability/change. Contributions deal with under......The hydro-climatological approach of this volume illustrates the scientific and practical value of considering hydrological phenomena and processes in a climate context to improve understanding of controls, process interaction, and past and future variability/change. Contributions deal...... considered. The interdisciplinary approach reveals information and perspective that go beyond the study of cli ate and hydro gy alone...

  9. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The PLASMA-2001- International Symposium on Research and Applications of Plasmas - was held in Warsaw, Poland on September 19-22, 2001. It was the fifth general symposium organized (every two years since 1993) under auspices of the Plasma Physics Section, Committee of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences. The scientific program of PLASMA-2001 was relatively wide in order to cover all the directions of plasma studies carried out in Poland. All the invited and contributed papers were divided into 9 topical groups: 1. Elementary processes and general theory of plasma phenomena. 2. Plasmas in tokamaks and stellarators, including related experiments. 3. Plasmas produced by Z-Pinch and Plasma-Focus discharges. 4. Plasmas generated by intense laser beams. 5. Plasmas of microwave and glow discharges. 6. Plasmas produced by spark- and arc-discharges. 7. Plasmas in space (ionospheric, interplanetary, and heliospheric). 8. Diagnostic methods and experimental facilities for plasma studies. 9. Applications of quasi-stationary and pulsed plasmas. The responsibility for the selection of contributed papers and appointments of invited speakers was taken by an International Scientific Program Committee (ISPC) chaired by Prof. M. Sadowski from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk by Warsaw, Poland. The organization activities were coordinated by a Local Organizing Committee (LOC), acting at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland, and chaired by Dr. Z. Skladanowski. There were 141 registered participants (including 14 invited speakers), who represented 22 different countries. Honorary guests represented the Polish Committee for UNESCO, Polish Atomic Agency, and scientific councils of several Polish research centers. About half of the participants constituted plasma researchers from Polish institutes and universities. Also represented were different foreign research centers and universities, and particularly those involved in the scientific collaboration with the Polish research teams. The most numerous groups of the foreign participants arrived from the Czech Republic (18 persons), Germany (14 persons), Russia (14 persons), and Ukraine (5 persons). Other countries (some very distant from Poland, as Argentina, Japan, USA, etc.) were represented by individuals. During three working days of the Symposium there were run 8 plenary sessions, at which the participants listened and discussed 14 invited talks and 20 selected oral presentations. About 170 contributed papers, which were accepted by the ISPC, were presented during 3 poster sessions. The most important scientific results of the Symposium can be summarized as follows: In the field of theory - there were presented new results on numerical modeling of plasmas in tokamaks, analysis of behavior of dusty plasmas, the description of collisional absorption within dense laser-produced plasma, and theoretical interpretations of various plasma experiments. In the field of experiments - there were reported results of recent studies with stellarators Wendelstein-7AS and Uragan-3M as well as research with tokamak TEXTOR-94, the development of diagnostic methods adopted for magnetic confinement experiments as well as for inertial confinement of laser- and pinch-produced plasmas. Also reported were some new results of wave measurements in ionosphere, and results of the recent Plasma-Focus (PF) experiments (including those obtained with the PF-1000 facility operated at a 1-MJ level). In the field of applications - there were presented characteristics of high-Z heavy ions produced by means of laser pulses, and applications of X-ray pulses from PF discharges for material studies. Also reported were the uses of pulsed plasma-ion streams for the modification of different materials, and the applications of plasma discharges for the neutralization of injurious chemical compounds. Abstracts of all the invited and accepted papers were collected in the Book of Abstracts, which was distributed among the guests and participants of the Symposium. The full versions of the invited and contributed papers, which were delivered to the LOC in proper time and form, have been presented in Internet (http://www.ifpilm.waw.pl) and in this compact disk. The most interesting papers have also been submitted by their authors to different scientific journals (e.g. Nukleonika, Acta Phys. Polon., J. Tech. Phys., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., etc.). Since the editorial activity was very limited, the presented papers represent opinions of the authors, and their publication means neither an endorsement by ISPC nor opinions of editors. Taking into consideration that the invited and contributed papers covered a wide scope of plasma research and applications, these proceedings may be of interest not only for the participants of PLASMA-2001, but also for many physicists and engineers. Persons interested in some scientific problems or details of the presentations are kindly asked to contact responsible authors directly. This compact disk is delivered to all the registered participants free of charge, but some additional copies are available from the LOC upon a special order. (author)

  10. Preface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, Ch. [Warsaw Univ., Inst. of Experimental Physics, Nuclear Physics Division, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: 1. Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; 2. Experimental methods and instrumentation. In the first section we present the newly developed technique of identification of hydrogen isotopes in the electromagnetic calorimeter TAPS. It allowed for an exclusive study that evidenced the decay {Delta}{sup +}{yields}p{pi}{sup 0} in nuclear matter at pion subthreshold beam energy. Our program of studying nuclear dissipation has been continued and extended to include the analysis of pre-scission neutron multiplicities in fusion-fission reactions in term of the Kramers-Grange-Weidenmueller formalism. I would like to emphasize also one of the first scientific results obtained using the Warsaw Cyclotron, where high-energy {gamma}-ray spectra from the {sup 12}C + {sup 58}Ni reaction at 47.5 MeV were measured and the giant dipole resonance parameters of the {sup 70}Se were extracted. In the mass A{approx}100 region ({sup 98}Cd, {sup 102}Sn) new isomeric states were identified. For nuclei around {sup 208}Pb many excited states were found which can be interpreted as octupole vibrations coupled to the high spin one-particle one-hole orbitals. The structure of the {sup 125,127}La and {sup 127}Pr nuclei was investigated. The interesting questions whether the shape transition between highly deformed and superdeformed nuclei is sharp or whether a coexistence of the both shapes occurs have been studied in the {sup 143}Gd nucleus. Reports on experimental methods and instrumentation are presented in the second section. Here, I would like to mention that after two years of preparation, the experimental setup for high energy {gamma}-ray studies (JANOSIK) installed at the Warsaw Cyclotron was accomplished during 1996. The report gives the present status of this apparatus that began to bring first scientific results (see contribution in the Report). During 1996 a remarkable progress was achieved in installation of the isotope separator on line of the Warsaw Cyclotron. The first ion beam (off line) was extracted for Xe isotopes and the resolving power of about 560 was obtained.

  11. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den M.G.J.; Gasevic, D.; Gray, J.; Brand, van den M.G.J.; Gasevic, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-01-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings of the Second International Conference on Software Language Engineering (SLE 2009). The conference was held in Denver, Colorado (USA) during October 5–6, 2009 and was co-located with the 12th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering

  12. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   The First National Conference on Advances in Superconductivity was the first of a series of conferences in the field of superconductivity planned to be held biannually in one of the universities or scientific research centers in the country. The goal of these meetings is to bring together groups of researchers in the field of experimental and theoretical superconductivity, to discuss their latest research results. Also, to educate and exert the superconductivity phenomenon among the researchers, scholars, and graduate students in the country as well as to introduce the vast applications of superconductivity in the country’s different industries. We hope that these conferences would lead to more collaboration and convergence among the country’s researchers in solving the important challenges remained in the field of superconductivity, and in particular, high temperature superconductivity. It is only through these sharing of experiences that we can fully benefit from our human resources and facilities, and expect a breakthrough in the superconductivity research and its application in the country.   This conference was organized by the National Centre of Excellence in Complex Systems and Condensed Matter, Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology in collaboration with the Iran Physics Society, and took place in the Department of Physics of Sharif University of Technology in Tehran during June 30-31, 2008. Besides many sessions for scientific presentations, the poster section attracted the attention of many. At the end of the conference, a panel discussion was organized by the members of the Scientific Committee and Dr. E. Arzi, Head of the Physics Society of Iran, and the importance of the following points was emphasized:   1- Supporting interdisciplinary research.   2- Proposing group research and joint projects in superconductivity.   3- Proposing application oriented projects in superconductivity.   4- Requesting the authorities to support and equip the superconductivity research laboratories.   5- Requesting authorities of the Ministry of Science, Research, and Technology to place the field of superconductivity among the country’s scientific research priorities.   6- Considering the research in the interdisciplinary field of nano-superconductivity.   7- Organizing a superconductivity committee formed in the Iran Physics Society.   8- Organizing group scientific activities such as schools and workshops in superconductivity, and inviting eminent international scientists and Nobel laureates in this field.   9- Presenting undergraduate superconductivity course including the standard BCS theory on a yearly basis.   10- Giving special consideration to research in the field of unconventional superconductivity, with proper investment allocation.   One important event in the conference was the recognition given to young scientists (under 40 years and the poster presentation. The Scientific Committee gave the Young Researcher Award and Prize in superconductivity to Dr. A. Jafari from Isfahan University of Technology and Dr. M.R. Mohammadizadeh from University of Tehran for their extended scientific activities in the country and research achievement with the international standards. Also, the best poster award was given to Dr. V. Daadmehr, S. Falahati, and S. Saeb from Alzahra University.   The Science Book Exhibition, especially in the field of superconductivity, was another activity of the conference. The Sharif University of Technology Publishing, Iran Atomic Agency Publishing, Sharif Extended Electronic Teaching, Jahan Adib, Kokab Gheshm, Ammeh International, and University Publishing Centre Companies had extensive participation in the exhibition. This exhibition was well received by the conference participants.   The response of the condensed matter physics community to this conference has been excellent. 74 researchers from various universities and research centers presented their contributions as the following: University of Isfahan (10, Sharif University of Technology (6, Alzahra University (6, Islamic Azad University (5, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (4, Basic Sciences Research Institution (3, University of Isfahan (3, University of Urmia (2, Institution for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (2, and Kashan University (2 shared contributions, and Ardebili University, Payam Noor University, University of Tabriz, Sabzevar Tarbiat Moallem University, University of Tehran, Khajeh Nasireddin Toosi University of Technology, Ferdousi University, University of Kordestan, University of Kentuky (USA, Communication Research Centre, University of Australia, and University of Yazd, each shared in one contribution. Overall, 24 papers were accepted for the oral and 14 papers for the poster presentations. Finally, in accordance with the standard of the Iranian Physics Research Journal, 25 full papers, of which, 14 in the experiment and 11 in the theory of superconductivity were accepted for publication in the Proceedings. In order to choose each paper, at least two favorable reports were received from the referees.   The organization of this conference was made possible through the financial support of the National Centre of Excellence in Complex Systems and Condensed Matter (Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Magnet Research Laboratory (MRL (Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Alzahra University, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, University of Kordestan, Abasic Industrial Group, and Payvand Adab Cultural and Educational Institution. Also, its success should be credited to the tireless efforts extended by the Organizing Committee, active students staff, and specially, Dr. M. Bahmanabadi. Here, it is necessary to extend our special thanks to each of them.   The successful organization of this conference can be attributed to the active participation of the researchers, scholars, students, and cooperation and support of many colleagues. This has brought about closer understanding and collaboration among the scientists and also between the active laboratories in this field. We hope that the participants carried with them good experience and memories of their presence in the conference. Many will find themselves in the conference photographs taken during the conference, which are shown in the Proceedings. Surely, this successful experience will be carried out to the future conferences, and we will witness successful organization of the future conferences. The Second National Conference on Advances in Superconductivity (NCAS2 will be organized by Dr. M. Zargar Shoushtari and his colleagues in Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz during 3-4 Feb., 2010 with the website addresses: www.psi.ir/?ncas2 and www.ncas2.com or email addresses: ncas2@scu.ac.ir and ncas2@psi.ir. We look forward to seeing you all in Ahvaz.       M. Akhavan   N. Nafari   H. Salamati   M. A. Shahzamanian   M. Zargar Shoushtari     Fall 2008

  13. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Itioka, Takao; Pungga, Runi Anak Sylvester; Meleng, Paulus; Sakai, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of findings and progress activities of research collaboration between the Forest Department Sarawak (FDS) and the Japan Research Consortium for Tropical Forests in Sarawak (JRCTS). To highlight the research findings, An International Symposium entitled "Frontier in Tropical Forest Research: Progress in Joint Projects between the Forest Department Sarawak and the Japan Research Consortium for Tropical Forests in Sarawak" was ii held in Kuching, Sarawak on 21-22...

  14. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The contributors to this volume, who practice phenomenology in six countries in Europe and North America, all agree that these questions are to be answered with a clear and resounding No. The readers of this volume are bound to find out that this common critique of phenomenology is more of a caricature than its accurate description.

  15. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Korhola

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a general increase in the awareness of political, business and financial institutions for the necessity of concrete action to allow sustainable development in mountain regions. This increased interest in mountain regions is documented by the resolution of the UN General Assembly that declared 2002 the International Year of Mountains. The world’s mountains clearly do not lend themselves to a simple definition because of their complexity. For each region, specific characterisation is necessary. The Arctic and Alpine regions of Europe often represent the most remote and least disturbed natural environments; yet they are threatened by acid deposition, toxic air pollutants and by climate change. These environments are fragile, being subject to adverse and harsh climatic conditions (high levels of precipitation, low temperatures, aridity, high solar radiation, natural disasters (avalanches, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and poor, shallow soils prone to erosion because of steep slopes. However, the fragility of mountain ecosystems means that they are not only vulnerable to environmental change, but that they are also excellent sensors of change. Their sensitivity and the presence of high quality environmental records preserved in lake sediments can be used to infer the speed, direction and biological impact of changing air quality and climate.

  16. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieška Juzefovič

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This issue is dedicated to phenomenon of creativity which becomes particularly popular among the humanities and social sciences. Essays are divided into two problematic parts - in the first part the topic of creativity is connected with theoretical-philosophical approach and the field of aesthetics, while in the second one it is connected precisely with the social and economic area.

  17. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Poel, Mannes; Hondorp, Hendri; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2008-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 20th edition of the Belgian-Netherlands Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The conference was organized by the Human Media Interaction group of the University of Twente. As usual, the conference was under the auspices of the Belgian-Dutch Association for

  18. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Duvenhage

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this trans-disciplinary special issue, diverse themes are dealt with that can be reduced to sustainable development (and that which is related to it in a distinctive manner. Matters which are discussed include: the conceptualisation of power, political transformation as an ideology, ethical political communication, white-collar crime; ministry in a post-literary communication context; development cooperation in Africa; and the problem of liaison between academics, students and practitioners regarding public management in the North West Province.

  19. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Distante, Cosimo; Hua, Gang

    2017-01-01

    World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers....... The organizers of the two workshops would like to express their sincere thanks to the authors of the contributed papers, the reviewers who made sure of the good quality of the papers, and the attendees of the workshops....

  20. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Dijk, Nico; van Dijk, Nico M.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of queueing theory and its application traces back to Erlang’s historical work for telephony networks as recently celebrated by the Erlang Centennial, 100 Years of Queueing, Copenhagen, recalling his first paper in 1909. Ever since, the simplicity and fundamental flavour of Erlang’s

  1. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Robert Villehad Wikman

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Plutarch Lachesis was the third of the Sisters of Fate. She joined Generation and Destruction in the sublunar world. Nemesis, on the contrary, was a daughter of Tyche. Mythical thought in late Hellenic times saw in these goddesses an expression of Natural and Divine necessity dominating human life. Carl Linnæus conceives Lachesis and Nemesis as symbols behind realities included in his views about human life and conduct. How he regarded Lachesis naturalis and Nemesis Divina is the subject of the present study.

  2. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    ل Rahighi

    2017-01-01

    Particle accelerators are engines of discovery and innovation. Design, construction and use of particle accelerators have made numerous scientific and technological achievements in recent decades, having an undeniable influence on society. In medicine and pharmacy, particle accelerators provide in more efficient treatment with fewer side effects. Disease diagnostics are how much straightforward with the help of radio isotopes, accelerators have made it possible to develop new antibiotics with...

  3. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ل Rahighi

    2017-08-01

    The availability of educated individuals at the present scale in Iran is indeed exceptional. This is a unique opportunity which should not be missed by science policy makers at the political levels.  

  4. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2001. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities using the beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year we continue our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMICE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI upgrade project, especially in the construction of the modified TOF detector. The upgrade of scintillation sub-detector BARREL has been completed and TOF resolution of 110-140 ps for minimum ionizing particles was achieved. The analysis of ''event-by-event'' fluctuations in nuclear collisions has been the subject of interest for quite some time. Some new results concerning the possible effect of unphysical fluctuations generated by the response function of the FOPI detector as well as by mixing of events of different centrality are presented in this report. A new approach in studying of chemical equilibrium in dense, hot nuclear matter was tested. For this purpose, fluctuations of rare particles (K + , K - ) produced in 58 Ni + 58 Ni and 96 Ru + 96 Ru nuclear collisions were used. Unfortunately, the number of double-kaon events from these experiments was too small to obtain conclusive results. The question of mass dependence of sub-threshold neutral pion production in heavy-ion collisions was studied with the TAPS spectrometer. The analysis of experimental data obtained with the Ar beam at 95 AMeV on several targets was completed and neutral pions have been identified through invariant mass analysis. A new approach to the analysis of fusion excitation functions and fusion-barrier distributions was proposed. About 50 precisely measured fusion excitation functions were perfectly reproduced within the phenomenological model and the systematics of the parameters were obtained allowing to predict not yet measured fusion- or capture excitation functions. This result is important for better planning of future experiments on synthesis of superheavy elements. During the last year, we continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in an energy range of 5-11 MeV/u. The purpose of this work is to investigate the properties of hot, fast rotating compound nuclei and to extract information on GDR built on excited states - as a function of the nuclear temperature. In our resent experiments with the modified JANOSIK set-up, measurement of high energy γ-rays have been combined with detection of light charged particles. In such a way a more accurate information on the excitation energy and the mass and charge of the decaying nucleus could be obtained. Using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the OSIRIS experimental set-up, lifetimes of high spin rotational levels in 131 La were measured. The mean lifetimes were extracted with DSA method and were obtained for six high-spin rotational levels of the yrast band built on the h 11/2 proton orbital. The extracted values range from 0.3 ps for the 43/2 - state to 1.3 ps for 23/2 - state. Some interesting results have been obtained for nuclei in the atomic mass region around A∼170. For example , 174 Yb was produced in the 170 Eu( 7 Li, pxn) reaction and identified with the GASP spectrometer and the charge particle-telescope system ISIS. A set of four identical γ bands originating from orbitals of different shells was found. Among contributions concerning experimental methods and instrumentation, I would like to mention the interesting proposal of using EUROBALL CLUSTER sub-detectors as in-beam polarimeters. Properties of CLUSTER detectors have been studied and compared with the results obtained for CLOVER detectors. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign as well as Polish institutes an universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author)

  5. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Dorożyński, Tomasz; Kuna-Marszałek, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Considering environmental protection requirements in business operations may, in the long run, determine if a lasting comparative advantage can be achieved. That is why our textbook, rich in case studies, identifies not only the threats a business may pose to the environment but stresses the ways of reducing its negative impact. It discusses, among other things, the concept of corporate social responsibility, environmental management systems, methods and the importance of eco-labelling goods ...

  6. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Døvling; Rodger, C.

    2009-01-01

    This issue is a collection of papers dedicated to Anthony Hilton on the occasion of his retirement. The variety of topics bears testimony to the broad scope of Anthony's research, and the quality of the contributions witnesses to the impact his work has had on high class mathematicians in many...

  7. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rune Møller; Pacino, Dario; Voß, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computational Logistics, ICCL 2013, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in September 2013. The 19 papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in the book. They are organized in to...... in topical sections named: maritime shipping, road transport, vehicle routing problems, aviation applications, and logistics and supply chain management....

  8. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Velička

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ publications are a valuable contribution to linguistics and methodical science of foreign language teaching. They will help to improve language teaching methods in higher schools, and the obtained results of linguistic researches will motivate language teaching methods more theoretically.

  9. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Suvaryan, Yu. M.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature, this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. During the past few decades interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary sciences have become the main incentive for the development of science. While studying astronomical topics in various areas of culture interesting discoveries have been occurred; such topics are widely used in folklore and other genres of literature, painting, architecture and music. Ancient astronomy, chronologies and calendars created on the basis of astronomical knowledge, Astrolinguistics and other fields play an important role in culture and national heritage. There are a number of organizations related to "Astronomy in Culture", appropriate specialists are being prepared, in this area conferences are being organized and papers are being published in professional and scientific-popular journals. Astronomy has also a leading role in scientific tourism, scientific journalism and in general science pularization and popular science dissemination, as well as social awareness and world perception. All these led to the idea of holding a Young Researchers conference with the subject on "Cultural Astronomy in Armenian Highland". Conference was held on June 20-23, 2016 in Armenian National Academy of Sciences. Among the participants there were astronomers, philosophers, historians, archeologists, specialists of literature, linguists, culturologists, experts in tourism and other fields. The opening session of the conference was attended by the president of NAS RA acad. Radik Martirosyan, NAS RA Academician-secretary of the Department of Armenology and Social Sciences acad. Yuri Suvaryan, ambassadors of foreign countries in Armenia, Presidents of RA Creative Unions, scientists, young researchers and journalists. The last sessions of the conference were held in the "Metsamor" Historical-Archeological Museum-Reserve, Art academy of Byurakan and Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory. The meeting is focused on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation. The meeting is aimed at the development of problems of interdisciplinary sciences in Armenia and preparation of a basis for further possible collaborations by means of presentations of available modern knowledge in various areas of culture by experts from different professions and by joint discussions. A number of thematic sessions were held: Cultural Astronomy, Archaeoastronomy, Scientific Tourism & Scientific Journalism, Astronomical Education & Amauter Astronomy, Invited and contributed talks were presented by reknown and young researchers. The present Proceedings includes most of the talks. We hope that the Proceedings will be an interesting and valuable resource for many professionals and broad mass of readers.

  10. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stręk, Wiesław; Zych, Eugeniusz; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-12-01

    We are pleased and proud to present this Special Issue of the Optical Materials with papers presented at the Sixth Excited States of Transition Elements Conference - ESTE2016 organized by Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research Polish Academy of Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry University of Wrocław, and Intech Transfer Technology Centre. The conference was held under the honorary auspices of the Minister of Science and Higher Education of Republic of Poland, dr. Jarosław Gowin. The event had also patronage of Polish Academy of Sciences and Patent Office of Republic of Poland. ESTE2016 was held in Hotel Polanica Resort & Spa in Polanica - Zdrój, Poland in August 21-26, 2016. About 130 scientists from Europe, Asia and both Americas participated in the conference. As usually, in ESTE both experienced, world-wide recognized scientists and young researchers presented their new groundbreaking research achievements which were discussed during the lectures, poster sessions and evening informal discussions. A part of the ESTE2016 conference was devoted to presentations of the participants of LUMINET project - European Network on Luminescent Materials supported by Marie Curie Actions - Initial Training Networks. The scientific level of these presentations proved that through a rigorous, well-executed trainings, and a multidisciplinary research programme, LUMINET strategically positioned the EU with respect to new and improved possibilities and young scientists educated for that purpose.

  11. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 1999. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes ''in house'' activities using the beams from the Warsaw cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year, the first on-line test experiments with the IGISOL separator were performed. The first radioactivity measurements of short lived isotopes were made with the helium chamber. This work is being carried out in close collaboration with the Nuclear Spectroscopy Division and the Heavy Ion Laboratory. We continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in an energy range of 4-11 MeV/u. The measured γ-ray spectra and angular distributions from 12 C+ 58,64 Ni reactions have been consistently analyzed by taking into account complete and incomplete fusion processes as well as Bremsstrahlung emission. It has been shown that the contribution of incomplete fusion and processes increases with increasing relative energy and strongly distorts the derived GDR parameters. We also continued our participation and active involvement in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI upgrade project especially in the construction of the modified TOF scintillation subdetector BARREL. The problem of the mass dependence of subthreshold pion production in heavy ion collisions was studied with the TAPS spectrometer. The analysis of the experimental data obtained with the Ar-beam on several targets, from carbon to gold, is in progress. A new method of reconstructing neutral pion momenta from measurements of two decay photons has been developed. Careful analysis of the measurements errors revealed that the γγ invariant mass window for events selected for the reconstruction should be much narrowed than commonly used. The nuclear spectroscopy group continued their study of the properties nuclei in the region of Z>50 and N 119 I were identified. Altogether, lifetimes for 60 levels in 9 bands were measured. This allowed the group to determine about 100 B(E2) and B(M1) transition probabilities. Mean lifetimes have also been measured for superdeformed bands of the 145 Gd nucleus with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The extracted quadrupole moments made it possible to make a more conclusive assesment of which orbitals are active in the configurations od SD bands. In another study, the nuclear structure of 142 Gd was investigated with the EUROBALL spectrometer. The identified rotational bands with strong magnetic dipole transitions show characteristic features of magnetic rotation. The expected M1 multipolarity of the in-band transitions has been confirmed by an analysis of the linear polarization. The results are well reproduced within the framework of the tilted axis cranking model. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign and Polish institutes and universities. In this place I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author)

  12. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in years 2002 and 2003. As in previous years the scientific reports are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The present research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities concentrated on experiments with beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last two years we continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMICE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI project. The analysis of ''event-by-event'' fluctuations in nuclear collisions has been the subject of our interest for quite some time. Recently results of an analysis of Au + Au collisions were compared with predictions of the IQMD model. The dependence of the model simulation on various values of the nucleon-nucleon interaction cross sections is presented in this report. Two-photon interferometry experiment for the Ta + Au system at 40 A MeV was repeated by the Taps collaboration with the aim to significantly improve the statistics. The obtained two-photon correlation function shows no evidence of any fluctuating structure, suggested by results of the previous experiment. This result rules out the possibility of a simple double-source scenario of photon emission. The neutral pion angular distribution in 95 A MeV Ar induced reactions on several targets were reanalyzed. Namely, it was found that the presence of mixed electromagnetic and hadronic clusters has to be properly taken into account in order to obtain final angular distributions of subthreshold neutral pions. A new type of an analysis of fusion excitation functions and fusion-barrier distributions was proposed. About 50 precisely measured fusion excitation functions were perfectly reproduced within a phenomenological model, and systematics of the model parameters were obtained allowing to predict not yet measured fusion- or capture excitation functions. This result is important for better planning future experiments on synthesis of superheavy elements. During the last year, we continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in the energy range of 5-11 MeV/u. The purpose of this work was to investigate properties of hot, fast rotating compound nuclei. In our resent experiments using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the modified JANOSIK set-up, isospin mixing in 32 S at high excitation energies was studied. The degree of the isospin mixing was extracted from the statistical decay of the giant dipole resonance. It was shown that at 58.3 MeV excitation energy, the isospin mixing is small, in agreement with previously published data. Recent theoretical and experimental works have attracted attention to the problem of chirality in atomic nuclei with odd number of protons and neutrons. These investigations are in a very preliminary stage and up to now there was no information concerning the lifetimes in chiral bands. Using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the OSIRIS experimental set-up, lifetimes of supposedly chiral bands in 132 La were measured for the first time. These interesting results, compared with theoretical calculations, are presented in this Report. High spin states in deformed nuclei in the region of atomic mass number around A ≅ 170 have also been studied.The band crossing related to the alignment of the pair of neutrons in the i 13/2 orbital has been observed in the yrast band of 173 Yb. Among contributions concerning experimental methods and instrumentation, I would like to call attention to an interesting proposal to use the beam of of the Warsaw Cyclotron for radiobiological studies. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign as well as Polish research institutes and universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research. (author)

  13. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2000. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities using the beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year, the first on-line test experiments with the IGISOL separator were performed, which allowed to estimate the overall efficiency of the device as well as the evacuation time of the radioactive ions from the ion guide source. The first radioactivity measurements of short lived isotopes were made with the helium chamber. This work is being carried out in close collaboration with the Nuclear Spectroscopy Division and the Heavy Ion Laboratory. We continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in an energy range of 4-11 MeV/u. The measured gamma-ray spectra and angular distributions have been consistently analyzed by taking into account complete and incomplete fusion processes as well as Bremsstrahlung emission. It has been shown that the role of incomplete fusion and Bremsstrahlung processes increases with increasing relative energy and strongly influences the derived GDR parameters. Existing data on precisely measured fusion excitation functions were used to investigate dynamical properties of very heavy nuclear systems, in particular the fusion energy thresholds. This information is important for predictions of close-contact energy thresholds in reactions considered for future experiments on synthesis of superheavy elements. We also continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI upgrade project, especially in the construction of the modified TOF scintillation sub-detector BARREL that has been recently completed. TOF resolution of 110-140 ps for minimum ionising particles has been achieved. The analysis of ''event-by-event'' fluctuations in nuclear collisions has been a subject of our interest for quite some time. Some new results concerning the possible effect of unphysical fluctuations generated by the response function of the FOPI detector as well as by mixing of events with different centrality are presented in this report. The question of mass dependence of subthreshold pion production in heavy-ion collisions was studied with the TAPS spectrometer. The analysis of experimental data obtained with the Ar-beam on several targets, was used to study the effect of pion absorption in nuclear matter. The experimental data are well described within a geometrical model, where pion absorption takes into account the momentum dependence of pion absorption length. The nuclear spectroscopy group continued their study of the properties of nuclei in the region of Z>50 and N 132m Ce, 134m Nd) were investigated using the beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron. New results concerning the decay paths and hindrance factors have been obtained. For this interesting region of soft gamma deformation, the experimental results were compared with predictions of a recent theoretical model based on the band mixing mechanism. Mean lifetimes in the range of picoseconds have been determined for 10 levels of the 118 Te nuclei. This gives the unique opportunity to study transition probabilities in the ground state band above the band crossing. To explain the experimental data, an extended version of the IBFM has been proposed. A new type of rotation, interpreted as the rotation of a large magnetic dipole around the nuclear spin was recently identified in nuclei in the mass region A∼140. In this report the structure of 141 Eu was investigated with the EUROBALL III spectrometer, rotational bands with strong magnetic dipole transitions showing characteristic features of magnetic rotation were observed. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign and Polish institutes and universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author)

  14. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first time that our Annual Report is distributed in electronic version. You can also find it on our web page: http://zfjavs.fuw.edu.pl/npd/raporta/. We hope that you will appreciate this change. This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2005. Contributions are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. As in previous years the research program of our Division combines ''in-house'' activities including experiments with beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as participation in the research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this Report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year we continued our participation in the FOPI and CBM international collaborations. In this Report we present preliminary results of an analysis of K 0 meson production in pion induced reactions at 1.15 GeV/c momentum. Products of these reactions were registered using the FOPI detector setup. The aim of these experiments is to study the influence of the dense nuclear matter on the elementary production cross sections of strange mesons and baryons. Recently, essential changes of the pion-induced processes, such as π - p → K 0 , were suggested as a result of the in-medium modifications of hadron properties. Results of the measurements of the neutral pion angular distributions for argon induced reactions on four targets at 95 A MeV are presented. To describe the observed asymmetry in these angular distributions, and also other data available in the literature, a simple phenomenological model is proposed. It is assumed in this model that mesons produced in elementary nucleon-nucleon collisions are absorbed in the surrounding nuclear matter. Results are in good agreement with experimental data. In this Report we give first results of an analysis of the experiment carried out at LNS INFN in Catania, aimed to study the basic features of the mechanism of energy dissipation in nucleus-nucleus collisions. A very heavy system, 197 Au + 197 Au, was studied at a bombarding energy of 15 MeV/nucleon by using the CHIMERA multidetector array. Preliminary results indicate that the observed processes already at such relatively low energy show presence of the two-body dissipation mechanism. In order to verify methods of calculating the fusion-evaporation cross sections in reactions leading to the production of new super-heavy elements in '' cold '' and '' hot '' fusion reactions, we analyzed experimental data on the evaporation residue cross sections for two systems 12 C+ 236 U and 16 O + 208 Pb. The agreement between data and results of calculations verifies the proposed method of calculating the '' survival probability ''. This method can be then applied for heavier systems and help to plan future experiments aimed at the synthesis of new superheavy elements. New experiments with the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the modified JANOSIK set-up were carried out recently. Information on the isospin mixing at an excitation energy of 49 MeV in 36 Ar, 44 Ti and 60 Zn was obtained from the analysis of statistical decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance. Comparisons with values of the isospin mixing coefficient obtained for lighter nuclei ( 28 Si, 32 S) at the same excitation energy suggest that the isospin mixing increases with the increasing mass and charge of the nucleus. Some recent theoretical and experimental works have drawn attention to the question of the chirality in atomic nuclei with odd numbers of protons and neutrons. These studies are still in a very preliminary stage and the information on the lifetimes in chiral bands is rather scarce. Using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the OSIRIS experimental set-up, lifetimes of the supposedly chiral bands in 128 Cs were measured. For precise determination of the lifetimes in 128 Cs, the dE/dx values for the Cs recoils moving in the target material (Sn) were measured. A substantial difference between the electronic stopping power obtained in our experiment and that in Ziegler's predictions was found. Some new data on the half-life of the isomeric states in neutron reach nuclei( 97 Sr, 97 Y and 131 Sb) are presented. Neutron reach nuclei were produced by thermal-neutron induced fission of the actinium elements at the high-flux reactor at the ILL (Grenoble). Among contributions concerning experimental methods and instrumentation, I would like to mention the report on a new radiobiological facility operating at the Heavy Ion Laboratory in Warsaw. The facility allows to vary the energy from 2 MeV/nucleon to 10 MeV/nucleon. As already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign as well as Polish institutes and universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Ministry of Education and Science (MEiN). (author)

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.; Vaclavikova, M.

    2007-12-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held on July 23-27, 2007 in Kosice, Slovakia. The attendance was high and motivated, in line with previous ten conferences within the ICMF series organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guaruja. The conference in Slovakia reflected the enthusiasm of the scientific community from all around the world, with 256 participants from 30 countries. The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote the progress and the knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As the research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to extend the frontiers of knowledge in the field and to present the new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in the Book of Abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in 2 poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations helped to expand the frontiers of the area and to establish new bridges between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Outcomes of this conference are presented by 115 scientific papers, which are published partly in the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JoPCM) and partly in Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of P.J. Safarik and Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from the Ferrotec, Cryosoft, Mikrochem, Liquids research, Askony, U.S. Steel Kosice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Ali, Nasar; Fierro, Giuseppe; Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood; Chipara, Mircea

    2017-11-01

    The ;International Conference on Surfaces, Coatings and Nano-Structured Materials; (NANOSMAT) has rapidly emerged as the premier conference in the field of materials science, engineering, technology and all aspects of ;nano;. Since 2005, it has been very successfully organised in several European countries, including Portugal, Spain, Italy, France, Poland, Czech Republic, Ireland, United Kingdom and also in USA, and in Asia, including Turkey and China.

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Yuri; Tassi, Franco; Varekamp, Johan; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Kalacheva, Elena

    2017-10-01

    Many volcanoes at any tectonic settings host hydrothermal systems. Volcano-hydrothermal systems (VHS) are result of interaction of the upper part of plumbing systems of active volcanoes with crust, hydrosphere and atmosphere. They are heated by magma, fed by magmatic fluids and meteoric (sea) water, transport and re-distribute magmatic and crustal material. VHS are sensitive to the activity of a host volcano. VHS may have specific features depending on the regional and local tectonic, geologic and geographic settings. The studies reported in this volume help to illustrate the diversity of the approaches and investigations that are being conducting at different volcano-hydrothermal systems over the world and the results of which will be of important value in furthering our understanding of the complex array of the processes accompanying hydrothermal activity of volcanoes. About 60 papers were submitted to a special session of "Volcano-Hydrothermal Systems" at the 2015 fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. The papers in this special issue of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research were originally presented at that session.

  18. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this book is to elucidate the role of forests as part of a landscape in the life of people. Most landscapes today are cultural landscapes that are influenced by human activity and that in turn have a profound effect on our understanding of and identification with a place. The book...

  19. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues François

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Even as we venture into this new millennium, climate change has become emblematic of the “mal du siècle” foreboding a veritable cataclysm for human societies and their organisation by the year 2100. However, beyond the overtones of catastrophism, the upheavals that climate change can bring about in our land management practices are a reality. Rather than giving in to the allures of an alarmist discourse, it becomes imperative to better understand the mechanisms of these changes and to assess ...

  20. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiger, M.; Kals, H.J.J.; Shirvani, B; Singh, U.P.

    2001-01-01

    The multiple facets of modern sheet metal manufacturing techniques are applied throughout a wide spectrum of economy, ranging from the automotive industry and machine manufacturing to electrical engineering and electronics. This wide range of applications means that sheet metal manufacturers produce

  1. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspect, Alain

    2002-06-01

    COLOQ est une conférence regroupant, tous les deux ans, la communauté scientifique et industrielle nationale travaillant dans les domaines des lasers, de l'optique non-linéaire et de l'optique quantique. Elle s'est tenue pour sa septième édition à Rennes, du 5 au 7 septembre 2001, sur le campus de Beaulieu de l'Université de Rennes I. Cette réunion a pour but de favoriser les rencontres entre les membres des différents laboratoires nationaux publics ou privés travaillant sur ces sujets. C'est donc un moyen privilégié de resserrer les liens de cette communauté et d'y intégrer les jeunes chercheurs. Une dimension importante de COLOQ est de permettre aux jeunes chercheurs de se connaître, de se faire connaître, de découvrir la communauté à laquelle ils appartiennent et d'élargir leurs connaissances des thèmes qui la structurent. La participation de 200 chercheurs et de 18 exposants de matériels spécialisés dans les lasers et l'optoélectronique témoigne de la vitalité de COLOQ. Le programme de COLOQ 7 a comporté des conférences générales données par des chercheurs de renom international et des séances de communications par voie d'affiches. Les exposés ont porté sur des sujets d'optique particulièrement actifs au niveau national et international : les télécoms, thème cher à la région Bretagne en particulier, les phénomènes fondamentaux, les nouvelles percées de l'optique en métrologie et mesures ultra-sensibles, sujets privilégiés du laboratoire organisateur, les sources de l'extrême (incluant X et V-UV). Parallèlement à 20 conférences invitées, 130 communications par affiches ont présenté, tout au long du colloque, les plus récents résultats concernant les atomes froids et la métrologie, les télécoms optiques, l'optique non-linéaire et les nouveaux matériaux, les nanostructures et l'optique de champ proche, la physique des lasers, etc. Ce volume spécial du Journal de Physique IV regroupe la presque totalité des conférences invitées et des communications par affiches. Pour la première fois, un forum pour l'emploi a été mis en place afin de permettre aux doctorants et post-doctorants de nouer des premiers contacts avec leurs futurs employeurs. Enfin, COLOQ 7 a été clôturé par une conférence de Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, ouverte au public, qui a enthousiasmé non seulement les participants du colloque, mais aussi les étudiants et les lycéens de Rennes, qui avaient été conviés avec leurs enseignants. La réussite de cette manifestation est due, avant tout, à la qualité scientifique des présentations, mais elle repose aussi sur l'action conjuguée des comités d'organisation national et local, au généreux soutien des diverses instances publiques nationales, régionales, locales, et à la forte participation des sociétés industrielles du secteur optoélectronique et laser qui nous ont permis de maintenir les frais d'inscription à un niveau particulièrement raisonnable ; en particulier pour les jeunes. Que tous soient ici remerciés, en particulier le comité local qui a su, au delà d'une organisation impeccable, nous faire apprécier la chaleur de l'accueil breton !

  2. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, M.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Hydrobiologia brings together a series of papers resulting from an intensified effort to describe the current status of the physical and biological conditions present at California's Salton Sea. Most of the studies were contract investigations that were part of a project initiated in January 1998 to pursue the improvement of environmental conditions at the Salton Sea. The remainder are independent investigations resulting in information of importance for the Salton Sea Restoration Project. The information provided by those investigations resulting in information of importance for the Salton Sea Restoration Project. The information provided by those investigations is the most holistic assembly of scientific knowledge about the Salton Sea ever brought together in a single publication. The resulting findings provide an important foundation of knowledge for what has been stated to be '. . . one of the worlds' most dynamic salt lakes . . .' (Hart et al., 1998). We hope this publication will serve as a catalyst to stimulate additional scientific investigations that will further enhance understanding of the dynamics of this unique ecosystem. The purpose for these introductory comments is to place the scientific investigations reported on and the Salton Sea Restoration Project in context and entities, and to one another.

  3. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Grabbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On September 30, 2015, the American Studies Journal published its Occasional Paper No. 10, entitled “Rape as Spectator Sport and Creepshot Entertainment: Social Media and the Valorization of Lack of Consent.” The author, Kelly Oliver, is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. Drawing attention to recent cases of rape on American college campuses, she shows how cell phones and social media have been used to prolong the humiliation of the victims, giving rise to a culture of voyeurism that no longer hides its contempt for women.

  4. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2003-05-01

    This special issue presents a series of papers on biological physics. It emphasizes the fact that Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter welcomes papers in this area and foresees a fruitful cross-fertilization between this and other more conventional condensed matter fields. The work was presented at the conference ÂNanophysics in Life SciencesÂ' held in Copenhagen on 21-22 June 2002. The meeting was arranged by, and marked the start of, the new Division of Physics in Life Sciences (DPL) within the European Physical Society (EPS). It also celebrated the opening of a new Danish research centre on quantum protein physics (QUP), which was co-organizer and co-sponsor. The meeting was organized at short notice and yet attracted some 80 participants from a number of countries (despite the fact that the chosen weekend included the `midsummer night', a feast nobody in the Northern Scandinavian countries would wish to miss - even when offered an event in the beautiful venue of the Carlsberg estate). The audience included many young people and students, demonstrating the great interest in the field of biological physics and in the topics chosen within that field. The selection represented, furthermore, the present scope of the new DPL division. All but one of the board members of DPL were able to attend and present their work, among others. They have subsequently delivered valuable contributions to this special issue. The subjects cover a large area (the full programme can be found on the division's web-page: DPL.risoe.dk). To mention a few: the dynamical and optical properties of biomolecules (proteins), experimental studies of single biomolecules, various theoretical approaches to the protein folding problem and DNA motion, biomolecular motor and transport functions, quantum chemical calculations. Many of these problems are closely related to those studied in conventional condensed matter. To emphasize one topic we have written the Viewpoint article (pages V5-V9) which ties together the concepts of solitons, self-trapping, polarons and pump-probe experiments used in both realms. The scope of biological physics is of course still wider. All biological processes occur in water, hence an important topic is how proteins and biomolecules behave and interact in liquids. There is in this case a strong overlap between subjects generally published in the Liquids, Soft Matter and Biophysics section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, but not covered in this issue. Another branch not covered is the more mathematical, generally non-linear models of physiological processes. It is hoped that this issue will serve as a valuable current state-of-the-art overview of interesting and important problems in biological physics, which will stimulate the interest of the general readership of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and inspire the application of the knowledge and expertise accumulated in condensed matter physics. I wish to thank the participants for their contributions to the meeting and to this special issue, Institute of Physics Publishing editorial staff for the efficient and smooth handling of the refereeing of the articles, and finally the QUP Center, The Danish Graduate School of Biophysics, EPS and The Carlsberg Academy for financial and other support.

  5. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present issue of Santalka is named Intersubjectivity: Phenomenological and Hermeneutical Perspectives continues and broadens the topics of the previous issue named Phenomenological ethics (Santalka (Coactivity vol. 17, no 3. It is dedicated to phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches to subjectivity and intersubjectivity. The following questions still constitute the core of phenomenology and philosophical hermeneutics, though for the time being they are also actively discussed in analytic tradition. On the other hand, the problem of intersubjectivity enables to link together philosophy and ethics, psychology, psychotherapy, sociology, philosophy of religion and other humanitarian and social disciplines.

  6. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  7. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this part of book author give the explanation and purposes of necessity of new elaborations inculcation to industry, in particular to the process of wastes complex reprocessing of aluminium plant in Tajikistan

  8. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowell, Robert J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Jamieson, Heather E.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Majzlan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is perhaps history’s favorite poison, often termed the “King of Poisons” and the “Poison of Kings” and thought to be the demise of fiction’s most famous ill-fated lovers. The toxic nature of arsenic has been known for millennia with the mineral realgar (AsS), originally named “arsenikon” by Theophrastus in 300 B.C.E. meaning literally “potent.” For centuries it has been used as rat poison and as an important component of bactericides and wood preservatives. Arsenic is believed to be the cause of death to Napoleon Bonaparte who was exposed to wallpaper colored green from aceto-arsenite of copper (Aldersey-Williams 2011). The use of arsenic as a poison has been featured widely in literature, film, theatre, and television. Its use as a pesticide made it well known in the nineteenth century and it was exploited by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the Sherlock Holmes novel The Golden Pince-Nez (Conan-Doyle 1903). The dark comedy Arsenic and Old Lace is a prime example of arsenic in popular culture, being first a play but becoming famous as a movie.

  9. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bianco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Vesuvius is one of the most hazardous volcanoes in the world, due to the highly populated surrounding area, where more than 800,000 people live. It experienced various regimes of eruptive activity, from effusive to Plinian. Its last eruption, a mild effusive event, occurred on March 1944. After that the volcano started a period of quiescence, characterized by low seismicity, low deformation pattern, widespread fumaroles emissions accompanied by diffuse CO2 degassing in the crater area and CO2-rich groundwater along the southern flank and in the adjacent plain. Despite the low level of activity, Vesuvius is one of the best-monitored volcanoes in the world. During the last decades many researchers have been involved in the volcano monitoring, covering a wide range of topics, in order to discover any signals that could contribute to understand the volcano dynamics. However, in spite of so much effort, an exhaustive comprehension of the volcano system, aimed at a reliable prediction of the future activity, is far from having been reached. On the other hand, the fast technological evolution makes new instruments and methodologies available for a more sensitive monitoring in the future. [...

  10. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlocha, J.

    1996-01-01

    Ministry of the environment of the Slovak Republic looks back about United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 where the document Agenda for 21 century, famous as AGENDA 21 (Declaration from Rio de Janeiro about environment and development) was accepted. From 132 indicators of sustainable development (which were proposed on Forty sitting of the Commission of the United Nations for Sustainable Development (CSD) 18 April - 3 May 1996 in New York) 76 indicators on the social, economic and institutional questions, and only 56 indicators on the environmental problematic are aimed. In the next part minister deals with the environmental politic after UNCED in the Slovak republic up to 1996. After UNCED the Slovak Republic as first state the document Strategy, principles and priority of state environmental politic has developed in 1993. The National environmental action program approved in 1996. Other activities and documents which were approved in the Slovak Republic are described

  11. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinwen; Xiao, Guoqing; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Xing

    2017-09-01

    This issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B contains selected papers presented at the 27th International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids (ICACS-27) that was held from 24 to 29 July 2016 at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Lanzhou, China. ICACS is a series of biannual conferences, those most recently ones were held in Debrecen, Hungary (2014), Kyoto, Japan (2012), Kraków, Poland (2010), Phalaborwa, South Africa (2008), Berlin, Germany (2006) and Genova, Italy (2004).

  12. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Quintana, Jacqueline

    2002-03-01

    Complex systems represent one of the richest and more fascinating fields of current scientific research. The reason behind this is the important role that the properties of complex systems and materials play in a variety of different but overlapping areas in physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, and social sciences, like medicine and economy. Such unusually broad research field is, therefore, of primary interest nowadays in pure science and technology. The role of statistical physics in this new field of complex systems has been present since its onset and it has been accelerating recently. Methods developed for studying ordering phenomena in simple systems have been generalized for application to more complex forms of matter (polymers, biological macromolecules, glasses, etc) and complex processes (e.g. chaos, turbulence, economy, jamming, biological processes). In particular, many different phenomena (considered in the past to belong to separate research fields) have now a common description. Pillars of such a description are the concepts of scaling and universality. The International Conference on `Scaling Concepts and Complex Systems' (a satellite meeting of STATPHYS21) was devoted to give an overview on recent developments around these two concepts. The Conference took place in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, in July 9-14 2001. The meeting was held in the Gordon Conference style and was attended by about 100 scientists, it covered a large variety of theoretical and experimental research topics of current interest in complex systems and materials. The meeting consisted of a total number of about 40 invited and contributed talks and a poster session. The topics covered included: scaling behaviour, supra-molecular systems, aggregation, aggregation kinetics, growth mechanisms, disordered systems, soft condensed matter (polymers, biological polymers, bio-colloids, gels, colloids, membranes and interfacial phenomena), granular matter, phase separation and out-of-equilibrium dynamics, non-linear dynamics, chaos, turbulence and chaotic dynamics. The present issue contains a substantial number of the invited and contributed talks presented at the meeting. We made an effort to arrange these papers with an order similar to that of presentation during the meeting. It is our pleasure to thank the scientific committee, all the speakers, the session chairs and all participants who contributed to the success of the conference. We are grateful to the Bonino-Pulejo Foundation (Messina-Italy), and to the President On. Nino Calarco, for the Patronage and the enthusiastic support. Our thanks goes also for the Messina University, the INFM (Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Italy), the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT, Mexico) and the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM). The Conference was sponsored by the INFM-Sec.C, CONACyT, UNAM, the Bonino-Pulejo Foundation which contributed financial support to participants and to the publication of the present issue. We are grateful to them for the support. Last, but not the least, we express our warmest gratitude to all the members of the local organizing committee for their assistance and for the work spent in organizing this meeting and especially to Professor~Alberto Robledo for his valuable advice.

  13. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    rate has not shown any notable decline, but there has been a decline in the ... attempted to provide 'state of the art' information on fertility control methods and a ... the world and provide glimpses of how these populations may have evolved.

  14. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Chen, Xi

    2018-02-01

    Global IP traffic is predicted to increase nearly threefold over the next 5 years, driven by emerging high-bandwidth-demanding applications, such as cloud computing, 5G wireless, high-definition video streaming, and virtual reality. This results in a continuously increasing demand on the capacity of backbone optical networks. During the past decade, advanced digital signal processing (DSP), modulation formats, and forward error correction (FEC) were commercially realized to exploit the capacity potential of long-haul fiber channels, and have increased per channel data rate from 10 Gb/s to 400 Gb/s. DSP has played a crucial role in coherent transceivers to accommodate channel impairments including chromatic dispersion (CD), polarization mode dispersion (PMD), laser phase noise, fiber nonlinearities, clock jitter, and so forth. The advance of DSP has also enabled innovations in modulation formats to increase spectral efficiency, improve linear/nonlinear noise tolerance, and realize flexible bandwidth. Moving forward to next generation 1 Tb/s systems on conventional single mode fiber (SMF) platform, more innovations in DSP techniques are needed to further reduce cost per bit, increase network efficiency, and close the gap to the Shannon limit. To further increase capacity per fiber, spatial-division multiplexing (SDM) systems can be used. DSP techniques such as advanced channel equalization methods and distortion compensation can help SDM systems to achieve higher system capacity. In the area of short-reach transmission, the rapid increase of data center network traffic has driven the development of optical technologies for both intra- and inter-data center interconnects (DCI). In particular, DSP has been exploited in intensity-modulation direct detection (IM/DD) systems to realize 400 Gb/s pluggable optical transceivers. In addition, multi-dimensional direct detection modulation schemes are being investigated to increase the data rate per wavelength targeting 1 Tb/s interface.

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Stan; Basu, Asish

    Publication of this monograph will coincide, to a precision of a few per mil, with the centenary of Henri Becquerel's discovery of "radiations actives" (C. R. Acad. Sci., Feb. 24, 1896). In 1896 the Earth was only 40 million years old according to Lord Kelvin. Eleven years later, Boltwood had pushed the Earth's age past 2000 million years, based on the first U/Pb chemical dating results. In exciting progression came discovery of isotopes by J. J. Thomson in 1912, invention of the mass spectrometer by Dempster (1918) and Aston (1919), the first measurement of the isotopic composition of Pb (Aston, 1927) and the final approach, using Pb-Pb isotopic dating, to the correct age of the Earth: close—2.9 Ga (Gerling, 1942), closer—3.0 Ga (Holmes, 1949) and closest—4.50 Ga (Patterson, Tilton and Inghram, 1953).

  16. Preface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe (ed.); Kincaid, D. R. (ed.)

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2010), s. 141-142 ISSN 1070-5325 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : David M. Young * iterative methods * partial differential equations of elliptic type Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.163, year: 2010 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nla.752/pdf

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Robin E.; Nel, Jackie M.; Botha, J. Reinhardt

    2018-04-01

    The 7th South African Conference on Photonic Materials took place at the secluded Amanzi Game Reserve, South Africa, from 27 to 31 March 2017. The conference venue is about 70 km north of Bloemfontein in beautiful 'Bushveld' surroundings, as well as being located in the Free State's Maize Triangle which forms an integral part of South Africa's staple crop production. It is about 200 km east of Kimberley, where the discovery of diamonds around 1870 sparked a mining rush - and about a decade later brought the first electric street lights to Africa and the Southern Hemisphere.

  18. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster-Swendsen, Mia; Vogt, Helle

    2006-01-01

    and legal schooling that the 'creators' of the laws received at major centres of learning throughout Europe. Moreover the authors address a number of important questions concerning the creation and development of legal professions and the dynamics between legal practice and theoretical, learned approaches...

  19. PREFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Velička

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The edition of scientific articles that you are holding in your hands is both new and old. Its history dates back to 1993, when research workers of the Department of Foreign Languages and Department of the Lithuanian Language of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University put in a great deal of effort on the initial publication of “Filologija”, an annual collection of scientific works. 13 volumes of this collection have been published.

  20. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    2000-01-01

    The research activities of the H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) results in publication of 600 scientific papers, reports and conference contributions. Among the most important results one can consider: In the elementary particle physics, the DELPHI Collaboration in which INP participate, determined the mass and width of the W boson with an accuracy comparable to that obtained by D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron. New results on the parton structure of the photon were obtained by the H1 detector and the properties of the hadronic final state were further studied by the ZEUS Collaboration. Studies of the electron pairs in cosmic ray cascades by the JACEE experiment indicate the possibility of the existence of a new neutral particle with mass around 9 MeV/c 2 decaying into an electron-positron pair. A new technique of coherent inclusive exponentiation was used in the analysis of the LEP data. It allowed an analysis of the quantum interference between the incoming and outgoing photons as well as art evaluation of the higher order QED corrections to the of Z + γ process. The COSY 11 Collaboration found that the cross section for the p+p→K + Λ 0 +p reaction is 28 times higher than that for the p+p→K + Σ 0 +p reaction. It was suggested that the final state interaction was responsible for this phenomenon. Studies of the nonpartonic components in the nucleon structure function led to a better understanding of the higher order twist effects. A review paper summarizing the results on the role of leading baryons in high energy reactions appeared in Progress on Nuclear and Particle Physics. A theory of the interaction of very high energy neutrinos with nucleons was developed and applied to calculate the change in flux of the neutrinos traversing the Earth. Multichannel analysis of the properties of the scalar mesons f 0 (500), f 0 (980) and f 0 (1400) was completed. New results on the condensation of kaons inside the neutron star matter were obtained. In the nuclear spectroscopy studies, a 10 + isomeric state was identified in the 206 Hg nucleus. For the nuclei around A = 150, e.g. 149 Gd, discrete transitions joining SD bands with normal deformed states were unambiguously observed. Owing to the use of the Recoil Filter Detector with EUROBALL, and consequently significant reduction of the Doppler line broadening, new data on 45 Sc and nuclei near-by were obtained. The muon catalysed fusion studies led to a remarkable success in explanation of the resonance formation of the ddμ molecule in solid deuterium. A series of experiments on the elasticity and adhesion properties of the biological cell measured in vivo were completed with the atomic force microscope. Complementary studies of the properties of the isopentylcyanobiphenyl by dielectric relaxation, adiabatic calorimetry, infrared absorption, neutron scattering and polarization microscopy methods Ied to the conclusion of the existence of an universal character of the relaxation process in a broad range of temperatures and thermodynamic phases. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectra, both static and Magic Angle Spinning, of 51 V nuclei deposited on various substrates were measured. It was then possible to determine coordination, local symmetry and association of vanadium complexes. New effects like the tunneling of NH 2 D 2 and confirmation of the existence of the dipole moment of the NH 3 D ions were found. Many ab inito studies of lattice dynamics of various crystal, some of them for the first time (TiC, CuInSe 2 ), were performed. In the applied physics, we should mention the extreme sensitivity in measurements of the concentration of SF 6 at the level 10 -19 mol/cm 3 in water. The method of artificial intelligence was elaborated to find differences between two methods of measurements of neutron total absorption cross section on separated data samples. In the NMR imaging the water diffusion tensor components in vivo and in vitro both for spinal cord tissues were obtained and the influence of formaline fixture on its absolute value was found. Conditions were determined for selective separation of Hf and Nb in the solutions of sulphuric and muriatic acids using inorganic sorbents, such as hexacyanoferrate(II) of nickel and cobalt. Ratios of 137 Cs components from resuspension and stratosphere in both the average global fall-out and the Chernobyl fall-out were determined. The INP participated also in the first experiments to apply radioactive 32 P to intra-arterial brachytherapy. Results of comparative studies showed that SCGE method when applied for measuring DNA damage induced by a challenging dose of X-rays and an efficiency of cellular repair capacity, can be used in clinical studies as a predictive assay. Results suggest also that this method can be used in environmental studies for testing an individual susceptibility to the induction of the DNA damage. One can noted also some success in the development of new experimental equipment. The upgraded design of the luminosity monitor for the ZEUS detector was constructed and commissioned. A new mechanical structure and cooling system for the PHOBOS detector at the BNL were completed. The Institute was involved in the preparation of the ATLAS and ALICE experiments at the future LHC collider at CERN. The conversion of the heating plant from coal to gas have been completed which radically reduced the pollution level in the area of our Institute and Krakow in winter. The Institute hosted 10 conferences and collaboration meetings and also participates in the EU Socrates-Erasmus educational programme

  1. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    earthquake of 26 January 2001, held at New Delhi during October 3–5, ... the stresses and modes of failure of this mid-plate region. ... effects of flexure in imposing a stress system ... masonry structures to intense ground shaking of the area ...

  2. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Harris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The papers in this volume explore the history and the enigmatic, elusive identity of Britain’s Liberal Party. Clearly, the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition formed in May 2010 provides an excellent opportunity and context in which to do so.It is a question which has, in various ways and at various times, risen to the agitated surface of British political life, to remind us that beneath the near century-old Conservative-Labour hegemony there still lurks, in the quieter depths below, what...

  3. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Beth Adams; Dale W. Cole; Charles B. Davey; Scott H. Chang

    2009-01-01

    This volume represents the proceedings from the 11th North American Forest Soils Conference, held June 22?26, 2008 in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. The theme for the conference "Forest Soil Science: Celebrating 50 Years of Research on Properties, Processes and Management of Forest Soils" captures the celebratory, but thoughtful, nature of the conference. Forest...

  4. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Zheng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The 1 st and 2 nd International Conferences on Modern Economic Technology and Management have been successfully held in 2014 and 2015 and the contributions have aroused more attention from the academic researching field. Since the success of the previous conferences, the 3 rd International Conference on Modern Economic Technology and Management (ICMETM 2016 will be held as scheduled on April 28-29, 2016 in Kyoto, Japan so as to further search the new problems and underlying reasons existing in economic technology and management under globalization and marketization. The proceedings in the conference mainly focus on the topics including analysis of economic policy, international finance and trade, theory of consumer behavior, evaluation and management of public project, economic development strategy and planning of new region, administrative management, business management and management of public affairs and policy and so on.

  5. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Vladimir S.; Miranda, Eva; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Przybylska, Maria; Tabachnikov, Sergei

    2017-05-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Geometry and Physics gathers several contributions to the conference FDIS 2015 3-rd Conference on Finite Dimensional Integrable Systems in Geometry and Mathematical Physics which took place in Będlewo in July 12 to 17, 2015. It also contains other contributions by specialists in the field of integrable systems and related subjects. This is the second special issue which corresponds to the third installment of a series of Workshops called FDIS, which take place every other year.

  6. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Eric T.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    Readers of this book will generally fit into two groups. One group is geologists and geochemists, who have studied the global carbon cycle for many decades. These readers will find that the papers in this book present a new view of familiar themes. Whereas much previous work on the carbon cycle, and other geochemical cycles, has emphasized the nature of the steady state maintained by complex networks of feedbacks, recent attention has shifted to the changes implied by the way these feedbacks respond to perturbations. The other group of readers is the community of scientists who are concerned with anticipating the effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Like the geologists and geochemists, these readers have a long tradition of carbon cycle research within their own disciplines. They, also, have raised subtle but profound questions about the role of the steady state assumption in their studies. As the evidence for preanthropogenic CO2 variations grows, they are no longer satisfied with predictive models that assume ipso facto that the carbon cycle was at a steady state before man's intervention. And as they discover more about the complexities of carbon cycle processes, they seek to know how these processes have behaved in the geologic past.

  7. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BULLETIN OF CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING & CATALYSIS (ISSN 1978-2993, Volume 7, Number 2, Year 2012 is an electronic international journal. The journal is a media for communicating all research activities in chemical reaction engineering and catalysis fields, and disseminating the novel technology and news related to chemical reaction engineering, catalyst engineering and science, bioreactor engineering, membrane reactor, and catalytic reactor engineering.In this issue, effect of calcination temperature on the physic-chemical properties was presented with respect to some characterizations of the catalyst. In addition, synthesis and characterization as well as their relationship was studied. Effect of some preparation methods of catalyst and their relationship with catalyst performance and characterization was reported. The review on biodiesel-based heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production using homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis was highlighted. In addition, the synthesized zinc oxide based acid catalyst was explored to be used in the heterogeneous biodiesel production by using the vegetable oils and methanol. Original research articles focusing on enzymatic hydrolysis was also highlighted targeted for production of glucose from cellulosic material. Beside that, development of an alternative process to obtain the industrially important benzyl aromatics by benzylation of aromatics using benzyl chloride was focused which catalysed by mesoporous solid acid catalysts including their characterization and analysis. Finally, the study on cationic copolymerization in one step takes place between carbon–carbon double-bond monomer styrene with cyclic monomer tetrahydrofuran. The reaction was initiated with maghnite-H+ an acid exchanged montmorillonite as acid solid eco-catalyst. The oxonium ion of tetrahydrofuran and carbonium ion of styrene propagated the reaction of copolymerization.Currently, the BCREC journal is an open access electronic international journal. Readers can read and download any full-text articles for free of charge. However, Authors may pay some processing fees once their articles has been accepted, i.e. for subscription of Original Reprint Articles. Authors may also pay some fees for Original Reprint Articles with some eligible rates. The research articles submitted to the BCREC journal will be peer-reviewed by at least two reviewers. Accepted research articles will be available online following the journal peer-reviewing process as well as assigned to DOI number from CrossRef. Official language used in this journal is English.Official website address of BCREC journal is: http://bcrec.undip.ac.id.Editor would like to appreciate all researchers, academicians, industrial practitioners focused on chemical reaction engineering and catalysis to contribute to this online journal.---------------------------------------------Assoc. Prof. Dr. I. Istadi (Editor-in-Chief Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University E-mail: bcrec@undip.ac.id http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.4368.iv 

  8. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Młodawska-Bronowska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This monograph covers the output of the conference titled “2014 − New Opportunities for Japan and V-4 Cooperation” and contains Japanese and Polish contributions. It offers reflections on the statu nascendi of economic and cultural relations between the two nations. Viewpoints and research results mirror the various interests and arguments of the scholars (mainly economists, sociologists, and japanlogists), businessmen, and representatives of administrative bodies (central and local governme...

  9. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei; Balaev, Dmitrii; Val'kov, Valery

    2017-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (JMMM) is a collection of selected papers presented at the International Conference Euro-Asian Symposium ;Trends in Magnetism; (EASTMAG-2016), held at the Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center, Krasnoyarsk Science Center of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, Russia, during August 15-19,2016. The papers were selected for publication after an intensive peer review, with a minimum of two reviewers for every paper. The editors would like to place on record the unstinted support received from over 130 reviewers which culminated in the selection of 61 manuscripts for publication. We take this opportunity to thank every one for participating in the EASTMAG-2016. As it happened in the previous EASTMAG-conferences of this once in three years scientific event, the EASTMAG-2016 covered a large spectrum of subjects that attract the interest of a wider community devoted to magnetic materials and their applications. The five days conference comprised special sessions for Section 1. Fundamental magnetic properties, 2. Magnetism and Superconductivity, 3. Magnetism of strongly correlated electronic systems, 4. Transport phenomena and spin electronics, 5. Dynamics of spin systems and magnetic resonances, 6 Magnetooptics and X-ray magnetooptics, 7. Ultrafast magnetism, 8. Magnonics, 9. Magnetic nanoparticles and granular systems, 10. Low dimensional magnetism and nanostructured materials, 11. Magnetic memories. With more than 430 registered participants from 19 countries comprising researchers from universities, academia, scientists and engineers from R&D institutions and industry, EASTMAG-2016 provided a perfect platform for an excellent interaction among all participants. Overall, the conference was well received with a keynote, seven plenary, eighty eight invited, one hundred oral and more than two hundred poster presentations. We would like to place on record with thanks the constant encouragement and support received from the Rector and the staff of Siberian Federal University for hosting this conference. The success of hosting the EASTMAG-2016 is largely due to the sponsorship extended by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, NPP ;Radiosviaz;Krasnoyarsk, Center of Technical support ;NAUKA; Moscow, Cryotrade Engineering Company Moscow. We thank every one of them. It is the pleasant duty of the organizers to record and thank the excellent support received from the Editorial and Publishing team of JMMM. We hope that the readers will find this special issue of EASTMAG-2016 exciting as well as useful for stimulating further research activities and conjecturing future trends.

  10. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haugan Are

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The 6th International Conference on Tracers and Tracing Methods (TRACER 6 was arranged in Oslo, 6–8 June 2011. The conference was organized by Institute for Energy Technology (IFE, located at Kjeller in Norway. The internet sites for TRACER 6 and IFE can be found at www.tracer6.com and www.ife.no, respectively.

  11. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybler, P.

    2004-01-01

    Scientific conference deals with problems in environmental sciences and radio-environmental sciences. The conference proceeded in two sections: (A) Environmental engineering; (B) Nuclear technologies. Sixty registered people and fifty guests participated on this conference. Twenty-seven presentations and eleven posters were presented. This number of the journal contains twenty-one papers from which eighteen papers deals with the scope of INIS

  12. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, P. L.; Pugh, D. T.; De Ronde, J. G.; Warrick, R. G.; Hannah, J.

    The measurement of sea level is of fundamental importance to a wide range of research in climatology, oceanography, geology and geodesy. This volume attempts to cover many aspects of the field. The volume opens with a description by Bolduc and Murty of one of the products stemming from the development of tide gauge networks in the northern and tropical Atlantic. This work is relevant to the growth of the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS), the main goal of which is to provide the world with an efficient, coherent sea level monitoring system for oceanographic and climatological research. The subsequent four papers present results from the analysis of existing tide gauge data, including those datasets available from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level and the TOGA Sea Level Center. Two of the four, by Wróblewski and by Pasarić and Orlić, are concerned with European sea level changes, while Yu Jiye et al. discuss inter-annual changes in the Pacific, and Wang Baocan et al. describe variability in the Changjiang estuary in China. The papers by El-Abd and A wad, on Red Sea levels, are the only contributions to the volume from the large research community of geologists concerned with sea level changes.

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, A.; Lielausis, O.; Chopart, J.-P.

    2003-09-01

    PAMIR 2002 was organized in Ramatuelle, France, on September 16-20, 2002. The conference was attended by scientists working in various fields of magnetohydrodynamics and in this view has played an important role in the exchanges of ideas, promoting new scientific collaborations. The conference has managed about 160 oral and poster presentations regrouped in the form of specific topics. The audience of the conference has extended compared with PAMIR 2000 by considering that about 190 scientists, representing 22 countries, attended the Ramatuelle site. All scientific aspects of the liquid MHD were represented including: 1. Fundamental MHD enclosed all aspects of the MHD flows under various conditions of the magnetic Reynolds number. Problems involving steady, alternating or travelling magnetic field as well as the stability problems were considered. The specific problem of strong magnetic fields was also considered in this session. 2. Mettalurgical application of MHD. The communications have analyzed the possibilities offered by the magnetic fields in metallurgy to increase the quality of the product. The problems of interface stabilities, which control various industrial applications, have been also considered in this session as well as the transport of liquid metals by electromagnetic pumps. Some applications in electromagnetic filtration have been also reported. 3. Magnetoelectrolysis (poorly conducting fluids). The possibility to control the mass transfer phenomena in electrochemical systems by using the action of a magnetic field is one of the most promising and new applications of electromagnetism in Europe. The field of magnetoelectrolysis is extremely wide and provides, only for electrodeposition, the possibility to improve the quality, the structure, and to control the homogeneity and the rate of the deposit. Some particular applications for electrodeposition of magnetic materials have been also presented. 4. Magnetic fluids. This topic was announced for the second time in the conference program after its first presentation at PAMIR 2000. All aspects of the topic were presented, including applications for microelectronics and new possibilities in power engineering regarding the thermodynamic machine to produce electricity. 5. Cristal growth. The magnetic fields are used here to stabilize the interfaces between the crystal and the solution allowing to improve the quality of the crystals as well as to grow large-size single crystals. Various configurations with various types of magnetic fields (DC, AC or travelling, etc.) were reported. 6. Dynamo effect. The last day of the conference was devoted to the dynamo effect. This was a very important session, characterizing a very high level of activity in the European countries, especially in the domain of experiment. All the existing experiments in this field, using sodium as a liquid metal, with extremely important results for some of them considering the self-generation of magnetic fields, were examined. The next generation of dynamo experiments was also discussed, involving the papers devoted to the theoretical approach including turbulence. The conference was combined with the management committee of COST (COST P6 Magnetodynamics of Liquids) and with a meeting of the COST P6 working groups. They were devoted to metallurgical applications of MHD (person-in-charge - Prof. B. Nacke from Hannover, Germany), poorly conducting fluid (person-in-charge - Dr. G. Gerbeth from Dresden, Germany) and fundamental MHD (person-in-charge - Dr. J. Leorat from Paris, France). Additionally, a special meeting dedicated the Ampere program was organized to consider the second generation of dynamo experiments in Riga (Latvia), capable to reproduce the main mechanisms of the earth dynamo (reversion of polarity, for example). In this experiment, the Coriolis and Laplace forces will be combined. The proposed facility consists of a spherical container of 2 m in diameter, filled with liquid sodium and mounted on a rotating table. Therefore, Riga has a vocation to become a European center for the MHD studies at high magnetic Reynolds numbers. This project is a part of the construction of a scientific and technologic park in Riga, with the Ampere program being presented as an incubator of the project. A consensus about the program from different European partners interested in experimental dynamo has been achieved. The audience at the conference is extremely important, and new countries have participated for the first time, for example, China and some countries from North Africa. Magnetohydrodynamics moves forward in Europe. The vitality of MHD has been demonstrated from the diversity of the topics reported at PAMIR 2002. A new PAMIR conference will be organized in 2005.

  14. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Alok

    2015-03-01

    Facing the French Alps from the northern shore of Lac Léman, the campus of EPFL - Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - hosted the 17th International Conference on Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (ICMOVPE XVII). As a written memory of this event, this special issue of Journal of Crystal Growth offers an insight into the research presented in Lausanne between July 13 and 18, 2014.

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Valentin; Iacomi, Felicia; Tetean, Romulus

    2017-12-01

    The 11th International Conference on Physics of Advanced Materials, ICPAM-11 (https://www.icpam.ro/) was organized under the auspices of the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research by Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania in collaboration with Babes-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Romania and other 22 prestigious institutions from Romania, France, U.K, Russia, Japan, Portugal, Ukraine, Netherlands, Switzerland, Hungary, Turkey, Greece and USA. During September 8-14, 2016, ICPAM 11, together with the other three events, 2nd Autumn School on Physics of Advanced Materials, PAMS-2, 4th International Festival of NanoArt and 2nd Art and Science Photography Exhibition and Workshop, attracted in Cluj-Napoca 290 participants, of which an important number were young researchers, postdocs, artists and PhD and Master students. The financial support offered by important sponsors and exhibitors such as Al Fateh@Sons Traders, Emerson, ArcelorMittal, THORLABS, Histeresis, Specs, Blade Solutions, had a major contribution to provide gratuities and to award many prices to young researchers and PhD students.

  16. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A decade back, the word 'wireless' generally meant a 'mobile phone' in which talk when you walk. However, the modern mobile communication systems are shifting their focus from solely voice communication to Internet. ... It's all about data, we need to protect it and thus the term 'secured wireless networks'.

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourbesville, Philippe; Mujumdar, Pradeep P.; Kojiri, Toshiharu

    It is obvious that water resources management has become an important issue in this century under the specified situation of climate change, regional development and population increase. Moreover, the modern life has become vulnerable to water environments affected with climate evolution and with growing urbanisation. New water-related technologies may create the additional water consumption or drastic water saving. Freshwater withdrawals by human activities have increased dramatically over the years. Already, at the beginning of the 21st century, one-sixth of the world's population is without access to clean water supply while two-fifths lacked access to sanitation. Problems of water resources have also become much discussed in the international conferences and multi-national organizations.

  18. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Martin; Brodd, Ralph J.; Qiu, Xinping; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    The 2007 meeting of the International Battery Material Association (IBA) was held in the Kylin Villa Hotel and Resort in Shenzhen (China) from November 16-20, 2007. The local meeting was organized by Tsinghua University (China). This was the first meeting of the IBA in China and a most successful one with more than 210 attendees. The meeting benefited from prestigious scientific sponsorship by the International Society of Electrochemistry (ISE), Gold Peak Batteries (Hong Kong), Amperex Technology Limited (ATL, China), PEC (Belgium), Ametek Inc. (USA), Evonik Degussa (Germany), Suedchemie (Germany), TIMCAL AG (Switzerland), Hong-Sen Materials Company (China), Hydro-Quebec (Canada), Pulead Technology Industry Co. (China), and Neware Technology Limited (China).

  19. Foreword to the Special Focus on Mathematics, Data and Knowledge

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiaoyu

    2013-12-01

    There is a growing interest in applying mathematical theories and methods from topology, computational geometry, differential equations, fluid dynamics, quantum statistics, etc. to describe and to analyze scientific regularities of diverse, massive, complex, nonlinear, and fast changing data accumulated continuously around the world and in discovering and revealing valid, insightful, and valuable knowledge that data imply. With increasingly solid mathematical foundations, various methods and techniques have been studied and developed for data mining, modeling, and processing, and knowledge representation, organization, and verification; different systems and mechanisms have been designed to perform data-intensive tasks in many application fields for classification, predication, recommendation, ranking, filtering, etc. This special focus of Mathematics in Computer Science is organized to stimulate original research on the interaction of mathematics with data and knowledge, in particular the exploration of new mathematical theories and methodologies for data modeling and analysis and knowledge discovery and management, the study of mathematical models of big data and complex knowledge, and the development of novel solutions and strategies to enhance the performance of existing systems and mechanisms for data and knowledge processing. The present foreword provides a short review of some key ideas and techniques on how mathematics interacts with data and knowledge, together with a few selected research directions and problems and a brief introduction to the four papers published in the focus. © 2013 Springer Basel.

  20. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  1. Foreword in "RF imperfections in high-rate wireless systems: impact and digital compensation"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnartz, J.P.M.G.; Schenk, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Foreword This book takes a modern, multidisciplinary view on radio system design: the advantages of digital signal processing are exploited to satisfy the ever increasing demands on better performing, flexible radio frequency (RF) circuits. By accepting that analog circuits are inherently imperfect,

  2. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  3. Preface: Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak R. Mishra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Special Issue (SI on “Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments” presents a wide range of articles focusing on a variety of remote sensing models and techniques to address coastal issues and processes ranging for wetlands and water quality to coral reefs and kelp habitats. The SI is comprised of twenty-one papers, covering a broad range of research topics that employ remote sensing imagery, models, and techniques to monitor water quality, vegetation, habitat suitability, and geomorphology in the coastal zone. This preface provides a brief summary of each article published in the SI.

  4. Prefreshman and Cooperative Education Program. [PREFACE training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Of the 93 students enrolled in the PREFACE program over its four-year history, 70 are still in engineering school. Tables show profiles of student placement and participation from 1973 to 1977 (first semester completed). During the 1977 summer, 10 students were placed at NASA Goddard, 8 at DOE-Brookhaven, and 2 at American Can. Eleven students with less high school math preparation remained on campus for formal precalculus classes. Majors of the students in the program include civil, chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Student satisfaction with their training experiences is summarized.

  5. "Prefacing the Script" as an Ethical Response to State-Mandated Abortion Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Mara; Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    Laws governing abortion provision are proliferating throughout the United States, yet little is known about how these laws affect providers. We investigated the experiences of abortion providers in North Carolina practicing under the 2011 Women's Right to Know Act, which mandates that women receive counseling with specific, state-prescribed information at least 24 hours prior to an abortion. We focus here on a subset of the data to examine one strategy by which providers worked to minimize moral conflicts generated by the counseling procedure. Drawing on Erving Goffman's work on language and social interaction, we highlight how providers communicated moral objections and layered meanings through a practice that we call prefacing the script . We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and clinic managers who provide abortion care in North Carolina. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive, iterative analytic approach, which included reading for context, interpretive memo-writing, and focused coding. Roughly half of the participants (14/31) reported that they or the clinicians who performed the counseling in their institution routinely prefaced the counseling script with qualifiers, disclaimers, and apologies that clarified their relationship to the state-mandated content. We identified three performative functions of this practice: 1) enacting a frame shift from a medical to a legal interaction, 2) distancing the speaker from the authorial voice of the counseling script, and 3) creating emotional alignment. Prefacing state-mandated abortion counseling scripts constitutes a practical strategy providers use to balance the obligation to comply with state law with personal and professional responsibilities to provide tailored care, emotional support, and serve the patient's best interests. Our findings suggest that language constitutes a powerful resource for navigating and

  6. Prefacing the Script” as an Ethical Response to State-Mandated Abortion Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laws governing abortion provision are proliferating throughout the United States, yet little is known about how these laws affect providers. We investigated the experiences of abortion providers in North Carolina practicing under the 2011 Women’s Right to Know Act, which mandates that women receive counseling with specific, state-prescribed information at least 24 hours prior to an abortion. We focus here on a subset of the data to examine one strategy by which providers worked to minimize moral conflicts generated by the counseling procedure. Drawing on Erving Goffman’s work on language and social interaction, we highlight how providers communicated moral objections and layered meanings through a practice that we call prefacing the script. METHODS We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and clinic managers who provide abortion care in North Carolina. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive, iterative analytic approach, which included reading for context, interpretive memo-writing, and focused coding. RESULTS Roughly half of the participants (14/31) reported that they or the clinicians who performed the counseling in their institution routinely prefaced the counseling script with qualifiers, disclaimers, and apologies that clarified their relationship to the state-mandated content. We identified three performative functions of this practice: 1) enacting a frame shift from a medical to a legal interaction, 2) distancing the speaker from the authorial voice of the counseling script, and 3) creating emotional alignment. CONCLUSIONS Prefacing state-mandated abortion counseling scripts constitutes a practical strategy providers use to balance the obligation to comply with state law with personal and professional responsibilities to provide tailored care, emotional support, and serve the patient’s best interests. Our findings suggest that language constitutes a

  7. With Courage: The U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    SHAKESPEARE , Henry V Act I11, scene 1 Contents Foreword .......... ................... v Preface ........... .................. vii A Weapon and an Idea...reconnaissance pilot brought back film that revealed two large rockets lying on trailers at a research center in the Baltic hamlet of Peenemiinde. On the night of

  8. FOREWORD: Special section on electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesselier, Dominique; Chew, Weng Cho

    2004-12-01

    ), and was co-ordinated by the Guest Editors, D Lesselier and T Habashy, and comprised 14 invited papers; and `Electromagnetic and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation', which was published in December 2002 (volume 18, issue 6), was organized by the Guest Editors, D Lesselier and J Bowler, and comprised 12 invited papers. In particular in the latter special section, it was noted in the foreword that: `Much of the research effort in NDE (nondestructive evaluation) is aligned with the interests of the broader community of scientists and engineers who study inverse problems and their applications in areas such as geophysics, medical imaging, remote sensing or underwater acoustics, to mention but a few. Indeed, many of the basic methods adopted for NDE including tomography, synthetic aperture techniques and iterative inversions, under many guises, are widely used in these other areas'. In a similar fashion, the foreword of the former special section noted that: `Many developments have been driven by several new applications and some old ones, such as mathematical physics, atmospheric sciences, geophysical prospecting, quantum mechanics, remote sensing, underwater acoustics, nondestructive testing and evaluation, medical imaging, to mention only a few'. One was confronted in these two previous special sections, as one is confronted today, with the same difficult endeavour: a signal resulting from the interrogation of an object embedded in some complicated medium by a probing radiation contains arcane, encoded information about this object. Inversion is the procedure by which this signal is transformed into some intelligible, decoded form in order to provide the user with some of this information. This could be estimates of locations, volumes, boundaries, shapes, values, and distributions of electromagnetic (elastic) constitutive parameters. This endeavour forces us to go from mathematical theory to numerical solution methods, to validation from laboratory-controlled data, to

  9. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    their help in producing this special section. We hope that it conveys some of the excitement and significance of the field. Semiconducting oxides contents Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO2 (M = In, Ga, Sc) K G Godinho, B J Morgan, J P Allen, D O Scanlon and G W Watson Electrical properties of (Ba, Sr)TiO3 thin films with Pt and ITO electrodes: dielectric and rectifying behaviourShunyi Li, Cosmina Ghinea, Thorsten J M Bayer, Markus Motzko, Robert Schafranek and Andreas Klein Orientation dependent ionization potential of In2O3: a natural source for inhomogeneous barrier formation at electrode interfaces in organic electronicsMareike V Hohmann, Péter Ágoston, André Wachau, Thorsten J M Bayer, Joachim Brötz, Karsten Albe and Andreas Klein Cathodoluminescence studies of electron irradiation effects in n-type ZnOCasey Schwarz, Yuqing Lin, Max Shathkin, Elena Flitsiyan and Leonid Chernyak Resonant Raman scattering in ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Mn:Al thin films grown by RF sputteringM F Cerqueira, M I Vasilevskiy, F Oliveira, A G Rolo, T Viseu, J Ayres de Campos, E Alves and R Correia Structure and electrical properties of nanoparticulate tungsten oxide prepared by microwave plasma synthesisM Sagmeister, M Postl, U Brossmann, E J W List, A Klug, I Letofsky-Papst, D V Szabó and R Würschum Charge compensation in trivalent cation doped bulk rutile TiO2Anna Iwaszuk and Michael Nolan Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of n-type ZnO single crystals grown by different techniquesL Scheffler, Vl Kolkovsky, E V Lavrov and J Weber Microstructural and conductivity changes induced by annealing of ZnO:B thin films deposited by chemical vapour depositionC David, T Girardeau, F Paumier, D Eyidi, B Lacroix, N Papathanasiou, B P Tinkham, P Guérin and M Marteau Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modellingAron Walsh, Juarez L F Da Silva and Su-Huai Wei Thickness dependence of the strain, band gap and transport properties of

  10. PREFACE: Specical issue on reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, F. C.

    2006-09-01

    like to encourage the submission of more letters by speeding up the peer-review procedure as much as is possible without lowering the quality of the review. Book reviews The Editorial Board has decided to stop publishing book reviews based on books sent to us since it is difficult to find reviewers for this very time-consuming job. However, authors and/or publishers who would like to announce the publication of a book can do so by sending the Editorial Office a short text describing the contents of the book. These should be relevant for fusion research. This text will then be published as an announcement outside the editorial responsibility of Nuclear Fusion. Founding of an annual Nuclear Fusion Award The Editorial Board and the IAEA accepted a proposal by the Chairman of the Editorial Board to establish an annual award for the best article published in Nuclear Fusion during a given period. This award will be presented for the first time during the upcoming IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2006. The Nuclear Fusion Award paper will be selected every year from among original papers published in Nuclear Fusion 2--3 years before. The 2006 award will therefore be selected from the 2003 and 2004 volumes and we will usually consider the ten most cited papers and the ten most downloaded papers. Other exceptional papers may also be proposed and considered. Selection of the winning article will be based on confidential voting by all members of the Editorial Board.

  11. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanyi, Amalia; Iványi, Péter; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2011-02-01

    The International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis conference series focuses on singular perturbation problems and hysteresis as common strongly nonlinear phenomena occurring in mathematical, physical, economical, engineering and information systems. The term 'strongly nonlinear' means, in particular, that linearization will not encapsulate the observed phenomena. Singular perturbation problems and hysteresis can be manifested at different stages of the same or similar processes. Furthermore, a number of fundamental hysteresis models can be considered as a limit of time relaxation processes, or admit an approximation by a differential equation, which is singular with respect to a particular parameter. However, interaction between researchers in the areas of systems with time relaxation and systems with hysteresis (and between the 'multi-rate' and 'hysteresis' research communities) has so far been limited, and there is little cross-fertilization of ideas. It is the aim of the conference series to fill this gap. The 5th International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS 2010) was hosted by the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, Hungary, from 31 May to 3 June 2010, on the occasion of Pécs being the Cultural Capital of Europe in 2010. The workshop was organized in cooperation with University College Cork, Ireland, which hosted all of the previous Workshops: International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (University College, Cork, Ireland, 31 March-5 April 2008). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 138. See http://euclid.ucc.ie/appliedmath/murphys2008/murphys2008.htm; International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (University College, Cork, Ireland, 3-8 April 2006). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 55. Further information is available at http://Euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2006.htm; International Workshop on Hysteresis and Multi-scale Asymptotic (University College, Cork, Ireland, 17-21 March 2004). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 22. Further details are available at http://Euclid.ucc.ie/hamsa2004.htm; International Workshop on Relaxation Oscillations and Hysteresis (University College, Cork, Ireland, 1-6 April 2002). The related collection of invited lectures was published as a volume Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2005. International Workshop on Geometrical Methods of Nonlinear Analysis and Semiconductor Laser Dynamics (University College Cork, Ireland, 5-6 April 2001). A collection of invited papers has been published as a special issue of Proceedings of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences: Nonlinear dynamics of laser and reacting system, available at http://euclid.ucc.ie/appliedmath/gmna2001/ProcGMNA2001p1.pdf. Among the aims of this and previous workshops were: to bring together the leading experts in singular perturbation and hysteresis phenomena in applied problems; to discuss important problems in the areas of reacting systems, semiconductor lasers, shock phenomena, economic modelling, fluid mechanics, electrical engineering and modelling biological systems with emphasises on hysteresis and singular perturbations; to learn and share modern techniques in areas of common interest. The International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, Hungary, 31 May-3 June 2010) brought together about 50 scientists who are actively researching the areas of dynamical systems with hysteresis and singular perturbations with applications to physical, engineering and economic systems. The countries represented at the Workshop included the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia, the United Kingdom and USA. Workshop photo Workshop photo 31 May 2010 Sponsorship of the Workshop by the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs (Hungary), University College Cork (Ireland), University of Pécs (Hungary), The University of Texas at Dallas (USA), and the Cultural Capital of Europe 2010, Pécs (Hungary), is gratefully acknowledged. The Editors and Organizers of the Workshop are sincerely grateful to Dr Géza Várady, Ms Andrea Zseni and Mr Ádám Schiffer of the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, and Dr Alexander Pimenov of University College Cork for managing the organization of the conference and for the assistance in formatting of all the manuscripts. More information about the workshop can be found at http://murphys5.pmmk.pte.hu/ Amalia Ivanyi, Péter Iványi, Dmitrii Rachinskii and Vladimir A SobolevEditors MURPHYS 2010, PMMK PTE, 31 May - 3 June 2010 Sponsored by Pollack Mihály logo POLLACK MIHÁLY FACULTY OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF PÉCS UCC logo PÉCSI TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM logo PÉCSI TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM UNIVERSITY OF PÉCS UTD logo Cultural capital logo Cultural Capital of Europe 2010, Pécs, Hungary International Steering Committee Z I BalanovIsrael M BrokateGermany R CrossUK K DahmenUSA M DimianRomania G FriedmanUSA A Ivanyi (Co-Chairman)Hungary P Iványi (Co-Chairman)Hungary L KalachevUSA P KrejčíCzech Republic R O'Malley (Co-Chairman)USA A Pokrovskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland N PopovicUK D Rachinskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland S S SazhinUK V Sobolev (Co-Chairman)Russia S SzabóHungary C VisoneItaly International Program Committee G AlmásiHungary Z BalanovIsrael M BrokateGermany R CrossUK K DahmenUSA M DimianRomania G FriedmanUSA A Ivanyi (Co-Chairman)Hungary P Iványi (Co-Chairman)Hungary S JeneiHungary G KádárHungary L KalachevUSA R KersnerHungary G KovácsHungary P KrejčíCzech Republic P M KuczmannHungary P P O'KaneIreland R O'Malley (Co-Chairman)USA A Pokrovskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland N PopovicUK D Rachinskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland B V H ToppingUK V C VisoneItaly

  12. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2011-03-01

    The 17th edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters, and Surfaces (MPS) was held in Sendai, Japan, from September 4-7, 2010. It was the first time that a meeting of this series of biennial conferences was hosted in a non-European country. The conference was attended by 110 researchers (90 regular participants and 20 students) from 15 different countries around the world. The themes that the conference covered can be divided into three broad areas: lepton impact, photon impact and heavy-particle impact. A total of 43 oral presentations - including 2 plenary talks, 29 progress reports and 12 hot topics - and 87 poster presentations were held during the course of the program. Rapid progress both in experimental and theoretical techniques has led to discussions across a broad range of currently hot topics, such as many-body dynamics and electron correlation effects in excitation processes, as well as in single and multiple ionization processes for various kinds of targets including atoms, molecules, clusters, solid state and even biological systems. A snapshot of the present status of many particle spectroscopy is given in this proceedings. The chairs of the conference gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Morino Foundation for Molecular Science, Iwatani Naoji Foundation, Sendai Tourism and Convention Bureau, and Intelligent Cosmos Academic Foundation. They are indebted to the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, for co-hosting the conference, as well as to the international advisory board members for their extremely helpful suggestions to make the program attractive. The united effort of the local organizing committee, involving N Watanabe (Secretary), M Okunishi (Treasurer), H Fukuzawa, M Yamazaki, Y Kino, and N Kishimoto, is also gratefully acknowledged. Without the help of these institutions and individuals it would have been impossible to organize the conference. Finally, the chairs would like to express their thanks to all the participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the conference. Masahiko Takahashi and Kiyoshi Ueda International Advisory Board Lorenzo Avaldi (Italy)Klaus Bartschat (USA) Azzedine Lahmam-Bennani (France)Jamal Berakdar (Germany) Nora Berrah (USA)Igor Bray (Australia) XiangJun Chen (China)Claude Dal Cappello (France) Reinhard Dörner (Germany)Alexander Dorn (Germany) Danielle Dowek (France)Alexey Grum-Grzhimailo (Russia) Noriyuki Kouchi (Japan)Birgit Lohmann (Australia) Don Madison (USA)Fernando Martin (Spain) Andrew Murray (England)Bernard Piraux (Belgium) Roberto Rivarola (Argentina)Emma Sokell (Ireland) Giovanni Stefani (Italy) Conference photograph

  13. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains both invited and contributed papers presented at the International Symposium on "New Quantum Phases Emerging from Novel Crystal Structure", which was held from 24-25 September 2015 at the Minami-Osawa Campus of Tokyo Metropolitan University (TMU). The Graduate School of Science and Engineering of TMU is now promoting a research project on "New Quantum Phases Emerging from Novel Crystal Structure" with the support of the university. This is the cooperative project involving the electrical and electronic engineering and physics departments to discover new quantum phases in strongly correlated electron systems on novel crystal structures, with geometrically characteristic properties such as cage, layered, and geometrical frustrated structures. In this international symposium, we have mainly picked up BiS2-based layered superconductors, cage-structure materials such as 1-2-20 and filled skutterudites, geometrically frustrated systems such as pyrochlore compounds, and noncentrosymmetric materials. Topics on other materials with exotic crystal structure have been also discussed. I believe that this symposium provides a good opportunity to present recent research results on magnetism and superconductivity in such materials, and to discuss future directions of research on strongly correlated electron systems with novel crystal structure. I would like to give thanks, on behalf of the organizing committee, to all participants of the TMU International Symposium and all members of the Advisory Committee, who have contributed to the success of this symposium. I further thank the TMU Research Organization for the financial support of this symposium.

  14. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Keith; Kephart, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    This online volume contains a selection of papers arising from two workshops organised within the six-month programme Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, from July to December 2012. The first of these was a 'satellite workshop' held at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS), Edinburgh, 15-19 October 2012, under the title Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, and with Scientific Organising Committee: Konrad Bajer (Warsaw), Mitchell Berger (Exeter), Steve Cowley (Culham Centre for Fusion Energy), Andrew Gilbert (Exeter), Gunnar Hornig (Dundee), and Clare Parnell (St Andrews). The second was the workshop Quantised Flux in Tightly Knotted and Linked Systems held at the Newton Institute, 3- 7 December 2012, with Scientific Organising Committee: Natalia Berloff (DAMTP, Cambridge), Anne-Christine Davis (DAMTP, Cambridge), Jason Cantarella (University of Georgia), Thomas Kephart (Vanderbilt University), Paul Sutcliffe (Durham University), and Tanmay Vachaspati (Arizona State University). Videos of the lectures given at this second workshop can be viewed at http://www.newton.ac.uk/webseminars. The papers published here follow a natural progression through the following topics: helicity and related invariants of magnetic fields in ideal MHD; relaxation under topological constraints; lower bounds on magnetic energy; current and vortex filaments; applications in the solar corona, tokamak plasmas, and cyclone dynamics; higher-order invariants; topology of curves and surfaces, and energy measures; tight knots; applications to Bose-Einstein condensates, QCD, and cosmic superstring theory. Some of the papers span more than one of these areas. We owe a great debt of gratitude to Konrad Bajer, who was one of the guiding spirits behind the whole Newton Institute program, and who took particular responsibility for the Satellite Workshop at ICMS, Edinburgh. Konrad fell seriously ill in June 2014, having completed much of the editorial work for these Proceedings. Following an operation at the end of July, he remained optimistic of a complete recovery, but sadly this was not to be, and he died from a particularly malignant form of cancer on 29th August. The funeral was held in Warsaw on 5th September. Konrad's warmth of personality and generosity of spirit will be remembered by all who participated in these workshops and in the wider Newton Institute program. The Isaac Newton Institute provided an ideal environment for informal interactions before and after both these workshops. We wish to express our thanks to the Director and staff of the Institute for their tireless efforts to ensure the success of the whole program; also to the staff of ICMS, Edinburgh, for their expert hosting of the satellite workshop.

  15. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Migaku; Saito, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Satoru; Takanashi, Koki; Sahashi, Masashi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd International Symposium on Advanced Magnetic Materials and Applications 2010 (ISAMMA 2010) was held in Sendai, Japan, from 12-16, July 2010. ISAMMA is the first consolidated symposium of three independent symposia held in the Asian region: ISPMM (International Symposium on Physics of Magnetic Materials) of Japan which was first held in 1987 in Sendai, and was subsequently held five times, Beijing (1992), Seoul (1995), Sendai (1998), Taipei (2001), and Singapore (2005); ISAMT (International Symposium of Advanced Magnetic Technology) of Taiwan, and SOMMA (International Symposium on Magnetic Materials and Applications) of Korea, both of which were started in 1999, and were held five times up to 2005. ISAMMA was established as a new international symposium which will be held every 3 years in Asia. The concept of this unified international symposium was mainly developed by Prof. M. Takahashi, Conference Chair of this conference, ISAMMA 2010. The first memorial symposium, ISAMMA 2007, was held on Jeju Island, Korea, from 28 May to 1 June 2007. The main purpose and scope of the ISAMMA conferences are to provide an opportunity for scientists and engineers from all over the world to meet in Asia to discuss recent advances in the study of magnetic materials and their physics, and spin related phenomena and materials. Conference photograph The categories of ISAMMA 2010 were: Fundamental Properties of Magnetic Materials; Hard/Soft Magnetic Materials and Applications; Spintronics Materials and Devices; Structured Materials; Multi Functional Magnetic Materials; Spin Dynamics and Micromagnetics; Magnetic Storage; Materials for Applications (Sensors, High Frequency, Power, and Bio/Medical devices); Magnetic Imaging and Characterization. The scientific program commenced on Tuesday 13 July 2010 with opening remarks by the Symposium Chairman and the plenary talks were presented by T Rasing, P Fischer, H Yoda and S Sugimoto. The conference was attended by 511 participants from 23 countries, with about 40 percent of participants attending from overseas (see figure). The program involved 4 plenary talks (45 minutes each), 37 invited talks (30 minutes), 85 contributed talks (15 minutes), and 352 posters. Pie chart Organizing Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chairman K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Program Committee H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, Chair of the Publication Committee M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Treasury Committee M TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan, General Secretary H AkinagaAIST, Japan H FukunagaNagasaki Univ., Japan K HonoNIMS, Japan S IshioAkita Univ., Japan S IwataNagoya Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., Japan S NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan T OnoKyoto Univ., Japan Y SuzukiOsaka Univ., Japan M TanakaEhime Univ., Japan T Tanaka Univ. of Tokyo, Japan Program Committee of ISAMMA 2010 K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS MizukamiTohoku Univ., Japan M MizuguchiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH NaganumaTohoku Univ., Japan M DoiTohoku Univ., JapanS NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan A FujitaTohoku Univ., JapanK NakamuraTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanK OnoKEK, Japan T KatoNagoya Univ., JapanT OnoKyoto Univ., Japan T KawagoeOsaka Pref. Univ.of Edu., JapanF SatoTohoku Univ., Japan O KitakamiTohoku Univ., JapanM ShiraiTohoku Univ., Japan Y KitamotoTokyo Inst. of Tech., JapanS SugimotoTohoku Univ., Japan F MatsukuraTohoku Univ., JapanM YamaguchiTohoku Univ., Japan C MitsumataHitachi Metals, Japan Publication Committee of ISAMMA 2010 H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, ChairS MitaniNIMS, Japan S YoshimuraAkita Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH MuraokaTohoku, Japan Y AndoTohoku Univ., JapanM NakanoNagasaki Univ., Japan J AriakeAIT, JapanR NakataniOsaka Univ., Japan H AsanoNagoya Univ., JapanK O'GradyUniv. of York, UK M FutamotoChuo Univ., JapanA SakumaTohoku Univ., Japan J HayakawaHitachi, ARL, JapanT SatoKeio Univ., Japan T HondaKyushu Inst. of Tech., JapanT SatoShinshu Univ., Japan M IgarashiHitachi, CRL, JapanK TajimaAkita Univ., Japan H ItoKansai Univ., JapanM TakedaJAEA, Japan H IwasakiToshiba, JapanY TakemuraYokohama Nat'l Univ., Japan H KatoYamagata Univ., JapanM TanakaUniv. of Tokyo, Japan M KonotoAIST, JapanA TsukamotoNihon Univ., Japan H KubotaAIST, JapanS YabukamiTohoku Gakuin Univ., Japan Treasury Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS SaitoTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanT TanakaEhime Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., JapanN TezukaTohoku Univ., Japan T OgawaTohoku Univ., Japan Executive Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS SaitoTohoku Univ., Japan K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairY SakurabaTohoku Univ., Japan K MiyakeTohoku Univ., JapanT ShimaTohoku Gakuin Univ., Japan T OgawaTohoku Univ., JapanN TezukaTohoku Univ., Japan S OkamotoTohoku Univ., JapanM TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan M OoganeTohoku Univ., Japan We are grateful to all the participants for their valuable contributions and active discussions. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from 17 Japanese companies (ASAKA RIKEN CO., LTD, Fujikin Incorporated, Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd, Hitachi Metals, Ltd, IZUMI-TEC CO., LTD, Miwa Electric Industrial CO., LTD, MIWA MFG CO., LTD, NEOARK Corporation, Optima Corporation, PRESTO CO., LTD, SHOWA DENKO K.K., TAIYO YUDEN CO., LTD, TDK Corporation, TEIJIN LIMITED, Ube Material Industries, Ltd, ULVAC, Inc, and V TEX Corporation) and 7 foundations (SENDAI TOURISM & CONVENTION BUREAU, The Iwatani Naoji Foundation, Tohoku University Electro-Related Departments Global COE Program 'Center of Education and Research for Information Electronics Systems', The Murata Science Foundation, Research Foundation for Materials Science, Nippon Sheet Glass Foundation for Materials Science and Engineering, and Aoba Foundation for The Promotion of Engineering).

  16. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The bi-annual Meeting of the Spanish Neutron Scattering Association, V RSETN, took place in Gijón (Asturias), Spain, from 28-30 June 2010, at the Hotel Silken 'Ciudad Gijón', close to the beautiful Cantabric seashore. It was the fifth in a series of successful scientific meetings, beginning in 2002 (Donostia - San Sebastián), and followed by conferences in: Puerto de la Cruz (Canary Islands, 2004), Jaca (Pyrenees, 2006) and Sant Feliú de Guixols (Costa Brava, 2008). Vicente Gotor, Rector of the University of Oviedo and Paz Fernández Felgueroso, Mayor of the city of Gijón chaired the opening ceremony. The conference covered a broad range of topics related to the use of neutron scattering techniques, from soft matter and biosciences to magnetism, condensed matter and materials applications. In addition to those topics, Spanish scientists working at neutron facilities talked about the recent upgrades of the neutron instruments. Colin Carlile (ESS, Lund), F J Bermejo (ESS, Bilbao) and Michael Steiner (Chairman of the European Neutron Scattering Association, ENSA) gave their personal views concerning the present and future perspectives of neutron scattering in Europe. They reviewed the situation of the running and new neutron facilities (European Spalation Source, ESS), the increase in the number of users and the spread of the scientific topics in which neutron scattering is used or where the impact of ESS will be most significant. Wonderful Plenary talks by Albert Furrer, Juan Manuel Pérez-Mato and José Antonio Alonso opened the scientific sessions of this three-day meeting. The V RSETN was organized by the Department of Physics of The University of Oviedo in cooperation with the Spanish Society for Neutron Techniques (SETN, 'Sociedad Española de Técnicas Neutrónicas'). The meeting attracted around 80 participants, including 13 invited talks, 23 oral presentations and more than 30 posters, both domestic and from abroad. The three best oral presentations by young Spanish scientists (Imanol de Pedro, Gerardo Garcés and Clara Rodriguez) were awarded with a copy of the book 'Neutron Scattering in Condensed Matter Physics' by A Furrer, J Mesot and Th Strassle, provided by Albert Furrer. The success of the V RSETN was due to the efforts of many colleagues involved at all stages of the meeting. We take the opportunity to thank the Scientific Committee, the local organizing committee, the chairs of the conference sessions as well as all the reviewers who agreed generously to spend much time for our community. We would like also to emphasize the excellent scientific quality of all the presentations, and we would like to thank the support received from the sponsors (Gijon City Council, University of Oviedo, Tekniker, Cajastur, FICYT, MICINN), which was really important for the successful organization of the conference. Finally, we are convinced that the readers will enjoy these 26 scientific contributions published in the present volume, which give an overview of the science currently done by Spanish scientist using neutron scattering techniques. It is worth noting that the Spanish Neutron Scattering Community has experienced major growth during the last two decades, and now more than 200 active researchers belong to it. Pedro Gorria Jesús A Blanco Conference Chairs Conference photograph Chairpersons Pedro Gorria and Jesús A Blanco (Department of Physics, University of Oviedo, Spain) Scientific Committee Arantxa Arbe (San Sebastián), Javier Campo (Zaragoza), Gabriel Cuello (ILL, France), Luis Fernández Barquín (Santander), José Luis García Muñoz (Barcelona), Victoria García-Sakai (ISIS, UK), Pedro Gorria (Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez (Bilbao) Editors of the Proceedings Pedro Gorria and Jesús A Blanco Plenary speakers Albert Furrer (Wien) J M Pérez-Mato (Bilbao) José Antonio Alonso (Madrid) Invited speakers A Fernández-Martínez (Berkeley) V Recarte (Pamplona) V Carlile (ESS, Lund) M A González (ILL, Grenoble) V García-Sakai (ISIS, UK) L C Pardo (Barcelona) M Steiner (Chair of ENSA) M Rotter (Wien) F J Bermejo (ESS, Bilbao) E López-Cabarcos (Madrid) R Lund (San Sebastián) R Granada (Bariloche) A Sanz (Madrid)

  17. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houée-Levin, Chantal; Gauduel, Yann A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the four day COST CM0603-MELUSYN Joint Meeting 'Damages induced in Biomolecules by Low and High Energy Radiations', held in March 2010 in Paris, France, was to create a timely forum for multi-disciplinary discussions related to the recent developments on biomolecular damage triggered by low or high energy ionising radiations (photons, relativistic particles and accelerated ions). Created in September 2007, the European network COST CM0603 'Free radicals in Chemical Biology' (http://www.chembiorad.inct.pl/index.php) gathers specialists of free radical chemistry, biochemistry and biology. It aims to promote a chemical biology approach for the investigation of free radical pathways of biological interest and the improvement of communication and exchange among neighbouring scientific fields, such as chemistry with several domains of life sciences, specifically addressing the real barriers of specialist language and tools. The MELUSYN network was born in January 2006. This French think-tank and task force involves about one hundred scientists and clinicians who contribute to the emerging interdisciplinary domain of advanced spatio-temporal radiation biomedicine. One important mission of the MELUSYN network is to explore and identify new medical fields to which the specificity of 3rd generation synchrotron sources could be applied, either by themselves or in synergy with other advanced radiation sources. The network also contributes to the organization of international multidisciplinary conferences. In the framework of experimental and theoretical approaches, the conference gathered together 50 scientists from both communities and addressed a number of highly relevant aspects of bioradical chemistry and radiation biology, considering classical and more advanced radiation sources (synchrotron, ultra-short particle bunches based on high power laser technologies, microbeams) operating in the broad energy range eV-MeV, classical or semi-quantum simulations of molecular radiation processes. Considering some physical, chemical and biological aspects of radical mechanisms, including their consequences in medicine (radiotherapy for instance), the selected contributions of this Special Issue provide guidance for future interdisciplinary developments. In this way, the multi-scale aspects of radiation based bioradical chemistry and radiation biology should be considered. We would like to express our thanks to all the authors for their time and genuine efforts, and to the reviewers for their fruitful comments during the preparation of this volume. Editors Chantal Houée-LevinUniversity of Paris Sud, Orsay, France COST logo Yann A GauduelEcole Polytechnique - ENS Techniques Avancées Palaiseau, France MELUSYN logo

  18. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zela, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    RIAO-OPTILAS, one of the most important Iberoamerican conferences for optics, was held on 20-24 September, at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru (PUCP) in Lima. The conference, which is held every three years, gathered around 400 attendees from different countries, some of them coming from beyond the Iberoamerican region. The conference traditionally covers topics which range from optical design to optoelectronics and technological applications, including fundamental as well as applied areas of the optical sciences. A remarkable feature of the present conference was the increased attendance of people working in quantum optics. This area had not been strongly represented in former meetings of RIAO-OPTILAS, something that appears to have now changed, according to the comments of people in the field. Indeed, they realized the advantages of participating in a conference that offers the opportunity to meet researchers from several different areas. Merging expertise with open questions, and delineating new trends and goals; all this becomes possible when direct contact happens, and this has been always the main goal of RIAO-OPTILAS. The first plenary session began with a presentation by Duncan Moore (Rochester) about gradient-index materials, followed by Aristide Dogariu (Central Florida) who talked about variable coherence sensing. The plenary sessions of the following days included James C Wyant (Arizona) who presented precision interferometric measurements in non-ideal environments, and Daniel Malacara (CIO, Mexico) who discussed the design of optical systems with off-axis spherical mirrors. Wolfgang Dultz (Frankfurt, Germany) talked about the transfer of spin angular momentum from photons to birefringent particles, while Ulrik Lund Andersen (Technical University of Denmark) showed how to manipulate continuous variables of light. Halina Rubinzstein (Queensland, Australia) approached the subject of angular momentum of light from the viewpoint of optical tweezers, and Pierre Meystre (Tucson, Arizona) addressed the exciting field of cavity optomechanics. Celebrating 50 years of the laser, Mario Bertolloti (La Sapienza, Rome) revealed the hidden history of the laser and Sune Svanberg (Lund, Sweden) paid homage to the laser from the perspective of its applications in environmental and medical research. Focusing more tightly on cancer diagnosis and therapy, Katarina Svanberg (Lund, Sweden) discussed the application of optical tools in her work as an oncologist. Applications in technology was the chosen subject of Mitsuteru Inoue (Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan), who addressed magneto and multiferroic photonics as applied to spatial light modulators. In a closing plenary session, Luis Jaime Castillo (PUCP, Peru) presented his archeological findings related to ancient Peruvian cultures, something that was not directly related to optics but provided the attendees with the background to better appreciate what they could see during their tourist excursions. Besides the plenary talks, there were also oral and poster sessions that covered a wide range of topics in optics and photonics. Prompted by the fact that several attendees were prestigious authors of books in the optical sciences, a book exhibition was organized giving readers - especially students - the opportunity to meet the authors. In the weeks following the conference and in response to a call for papers, around 170 contributions were submitted for publication in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. RIAO-OPTILAS was partially sponsored by several agencies and organizations: OSA, SPIE, ICO, JPCS, Quantel, and CIO. At the end of the conference four cash awards were granted to students for the best poster presentations. Three awards were sponsored by SPIE. Recipients were Pablo Solano, from Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Dulce-María González-Utrera, from Universidad Autónoma de México, Mexico, and Job Mendoza, from Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico. The OSA award went to Facundo Orte, from ANPCyT and Ceilap (Citefa-Conicet), Argentina. For the first time, RIAO-OPTILAS was preceded by the Andean School for Optics: OPTOANDINA. The School was organized with the aim of boosting the development of optics and photonics in the Andean countries, which are among the less developed ones in the Iberoamerican region. A welcome sign for the effectiveness of such an initiative was given by the increased participation of Bolivia in the present edition of RIAO-OPTILAS. Over one hundred participants attended OPTOANDINA, of which 65 were students and 30 were lecturers, while 6 facilitators were ready to help during the hands-on sessions. RIAO-OPTILAS has traditionally been organized by the host institution. Though this will remain the case for future gatherings of the conference, its increased importance and growing magnitude - in both number of participants and represented areas - has made it necessary to provide the conference with a permanent organizational umbrella. With such an aim, a network called RIAO (Red Iberoamericana de Óptica) - was officially established during RIAO-OPTILAS. One of its main tasks will be to delineate a general framework and guidelines for future sessions of RIAO-OPTILAS. The two next hosts have already been chosen: Portugal in 2013, and Chile in 2016. The contributions contained in the present issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series cover a wide range of subjects in the optical sciences. They reflect the growing scientific production from the Iberoamerican region and provide the reader - or so we hope - with valuable information on what is being developed by several representative research groups of that region. Finally, I would like to gratefully acknowledge the valuable contribution of the Editorial Committee: Guillermo Baldwin (Chairman of RIAO-OPTILAS 2010)Departamento de Ciencias, Sección Física,Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Enrique J GalvezDepartment of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University Miguel LevyMichigan Technological University José Benito VázquezDepartamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo Román CastañedaPhysics School, Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Medellin Miguel AsmadDepartamento de Ciencias, Sección FísicaPontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Miguel V AndrésDepartamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Valencia Francisco De Zela

  19. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-02-01

    The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010), combined with the 3rd Photonics and Optoelectronics Meetings (POEM 2010), was held from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China. The present volume contains papers from a selection from the invited, oral, and poster presentations. PIBM is the largest international biomedical photonics conference series in Asia. It was initially held at HUST bi-yearly from 1999. After being held three times in Wuhan (1999, 2001 and 2003), it was hosted once in Tianjin (2005), before returning to Wuhan every year since 2006. PIBM is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and clinical researchers from a variety of disciplines engaged in applying optical science, photonics and imaging technologies to problems in biology and medicine. The scope of this conference ranges from basic research to instrumentation engineering, and biological and clinical studies. It is recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive international conferences in China, and represents the highest level of worldwide research in this field. In the past ten years, 7 volumes of proceedings with a total of 672 papers were published by SPIE (International Society for Optical Engineering), and a volume with 75 papers was published by World Scientific Publishing Co. in 2007. Proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009 were indexed by EI Compendex, while proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2007 were indexed by SCI. Some excellent papers were recommended for publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences (JIOHS). An increasing number of young researchers present and exchange their innovative ideas on this friendly and professional platform, which has made PIBM an unforgettable annual meeting in Wuhan. This year PIBM attracted distinguished scholars in the field of biomedical photonics and imaging from all over the world, including the United States, Russia, Australia, Canada, Israel, France, Ireland, Japan, Korea and China. The major topics covered at the conference and presented in this volume include: Photonic Therapeutics, Diagnostics and Instrumentations; Tissue Optics and Laser Tissue Interaction; Biomedical Spectroscopy and Microscopy; Multimodal and Hybrid Biomedical Imaging; and Optical Molecular Imaging. The conference voted for the three best student papers; awards were presented to the participant students whose posters were recognized as excellent and who took part in the oral presentation competition. The conference received 133 submitted abstracts, and this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 53 excellent submissions. The Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee deserve recognition for planning a smoothly run and productive conference with comprehensive, instructive lectures and innovative work displayed in poster presentations. The faculties and students from Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics were dedicated to their work in reception and service during the conference. It is a pleasure to thank all of them for their efficient and hard work. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and the assistance in organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors for their contributions to PIBM 2010 and all the members of the Committees for their cooperation and time spent reviewing submissions. Special thanks are due to the Advisory Committee members Shu Chien, Aaron Ciechanover, Steve Dahms, Da Hsuan Feng, Steven R Goodman, Brian Salzberg, Fujia Yang, Jianquan Yao, Baoyong Zheng and Olivia Ho Cheng for their participation on-site, and their significant contributions to the conference. Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010 Qingming LuoLihong V WangValery V TuchinConference Chairs 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010)2-5 November 2010Wuhan, China EditorsQingming Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Lihong V Wang , Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia) Sponsored and Organized byHuazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics (China) Technical Co-sponsored byIBOS-International Biomedical Optics SocietyThe Chinese Optical SocietyThe Biophysical Society of China Co-organized byKey Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics, Ministry of Education (China)Virtual Research Center of Biomedical Photonics, Ministry of Education (China)Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory (China) CONFERENCE COMMITTEES Honorary ChairsBritton Chance, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Bingkun Zhou, Tsinghua University (China) Conference ChairsQingming Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Lihong V Wang , Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia) Advisory CommitteeSydney Brenner, The Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (USA)Howard Chen, K&L Gates (USA)Jing Cheng, Tsinghua University (China)Shu Chien, University of California, San Diego (USA)Paul Ching-Wu Chu, University of Houston (USA)Aaron Ciechanover, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)A Stephen Dahms, Alfred E Mann Foundation for Biomedical Engineering (USA)Da Hsuan Feng, National Cheng Kung University (Taiwan, China)Steven R Goodman, SUNY Upstate Medical University (USA)Barry Halliwell, National University of Singapore (Singapore)John Hart, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA)George Radda, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)Zihe Rao, Nankai University (China)Brian M Salzberg, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Ruey-Jen Sung, Stanford University (USA)A Dean Sherry, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA)Bruce Tromberg, University of California/Irvine (USA)Fujia Yang, Nottingham University (UK)Jianquan Yao, Tianjin University (China)Yixin Zeng, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (China)Baoyong Zheng, Hua Wei Technologies Corporation, Inc (China) Program CommitteeWei R Chen, University of Central Oklahoma (USA)Zhongping Chen, University of California/Irvine (USA)Arthur Chiou, National Yang-Ming University (Taiwan, China)Frank Y S Chuang, University of California, Davis (USA)Zhihua Ding, Zhejiang University (China)Congwu Du, Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA)Stefan Haacke, Strasbourg University - IPCMS-DON (France)Weiping Han, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)Zheng Huang, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (USA)Zhiwei Huang, National University of Singapore (Singapore)Steven L Jacques, Oregon Health & Science University (USA)Fu-Jen Kao, National Yang-Ming University (Taiwan, China)Hideaki Koizumi, Hitachi, Ltd (Japan)Xingde Li, Johns Hopkins University (USA)Yong-qing Li, East Carolina University (USA)Chengyi Liu, South China Normal University (China)Hong Liu, University of Oklahoma (USA)Zuhong Lu, Southeast University (China)Dennis L Matthews, University of California/Davis (USA)Avraham Mayevsky, Bar Ilan University (Israel)Stephen P Morgan, University of Nottingham (UK)Shoko Nioka, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Yingtian Pan, State University of New York at Stony Brook (USA)Alexander V Priezzhev, MV Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia)Jianan Y Qu, The Hongkong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)Colin J R Sheppard, National University of Singapore (Singapore)Mamoru Tamura, Tsinghua University (China)Sergey Ulyanov, Saratov State University (Russia)Ruikang K Wang, Oregon Health & Science University (USA)Xunbin Wei, Fudan University (China)Da Xing, South China Normal University (China)Haishan Zeng, BC Cancer Research Centre (Canada)Gang Zheng, University of Toronto (Canada)Dongping Zhong, The Ohio State University (USA) Organizing CommitteeLing Fu (Chair), Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Yuandi Zhao (Chair), Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Hui Gong, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Pengcheng Li, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Bifeng Liu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Qian Liu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Shaoqun Zeng, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Zhihong Zhang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Dan Zhu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China) Local SecretariatHua Shi, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)

  20. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The National Seminar on Medical Physics (NSMP) is a scientific conference organised every two years by the Malaysian Association of Medical Physics (MAMP). Its purpose is to provide a platform for researchers, medical physicists and clinicians from Malaysia and surrounding nations to discuss recent advances of research and development in medical imaging and radiotherapy. NSMP 2014, the 9th national medical physics conference was held in Marriott Hotel, Putrajaya, Malaysia on 5 April 2014. The conference was organised in parallel to the College of Radiology (COR) Malaysia Scientific Meeting. The theme for the 9th NSMP is "Advances in Multidisciplinary Research and Clinical Practice". About 65 participants from universities and hospitals participated in the conference. 17 oral contributions and 12 posters were presented at the conference. We had three invited lectures at the conference; two of the lectures were presented by international experts on state-of-the-art medical imaging and radiotherapy. The lectures were: bold dot "Hybrid imaging: research and clinical practice" by Prof David Townsend, A*STAR-National University Singapore Clinical Imaging Research Centre bold dot "Outline of treatment planning for carbon-ion radiotherapy" by Dr Nobuyuki Kanematsu, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan bold dot "Implementing medical physics clinical training programme in Malaysia: challenges and experiences" by Dr Noriah Jamal, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Many thanks to all invited speakers for their participation and to the Organising Committee members for all their hard work in making the conference happen. Thanks to all who submitted an abstract and making this a successful conference. The Scientific Committee members and reviewers are also thanked for reviewing the submitted manuscripts and improve the scientific quality of this proceedings. Finally, thanks to all who attended the conference and the sponsors for their financial support. The proceedings consists of 22 manuscripts, organised into five different topics; medical imaging, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, radiation protection and dosimetry, and biomedical engineering. All papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the proceedings Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. We would like to thank all authors and reviewers for their contribution to this proceedings. We look forward to seeing everyone in 2016 for the 10th anniversary. Hafiz M Zin, Ahmad Taufek Abdul Rahman, Nahzirul Adib and Rafidah Zainon Editors, Proceedings of NSMP 2014

  1. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoin, Bertrand; Dehoux, Thomas; Guillet, Yannick

    2011-02-01

    Conference logo In the year 2010 we celebrated the 50th birthday of the laser, and laser-ultrasonics is only slightly younger. For the last few decades, laser-ultrasonics has attracted the attention of an increasing number of academics and engineers. It has motivated research in many directions, often in pluridisciplinary fields; and in parallel, having gained maturity, it has attracted more and more interest from industry. Over the years laser-ultrasonics has been the topic of several sessions in different conferences dedicated to ultrasonics, optics, photo-acoustics, phonon scattering, material characterization, and non-destructive evaluation and control. With the aim of creating a fruitful forum for the exchange of ideas, national periodic meetings dedicated to laser-ultrasonics have been organized in Asia, North America and in Europe. For example, from 1999, we began holding convivial meetings in France, in which contributions by PhD students are strongly encouraged. Discussions at an international level were initated a few years ago, examining the opportunity for creating a dedicated international conference assembling researchers and end-users with an interest in the field. Under Jean-Pierre Monchalin's instigation, the first International Symposium on Laser-Ultrasonics took place in Montreal in July 2008, and was a great success. We were very honoured to be in charge of the organization of the second meeting of the conference in Bordeaux in July 2010. The second symposium assembled about 150 attendees from 30 countries. The program included 90 oral contributions, with 17 invited and plenary talks, and 40 contributions with posters. Despite extending the conference from three to four days, the organization of two parallel sessions was necessary. Thanks to the contributions of the participants, the scientific and organizing committees could construct an intensive and attractive scientific program. The conference tour was a sunny visit to Saint-Emilion vineyard and the gala dinner took place in a wine chateau in the medieval village. We hope this experience will remain in the attendees' memories as a pleasant and convivial time. We would like to express our thanks to the members of the organizing committee, the scientific committee, and all our generous sponsors, either institutions or companies, for their help in making this event possible. We would also like to thank the scientists involved for their confidence in our organization, and for their contributions. As unanimously decided by the attendees, the next symposium will be held in Japan, most likely in 2012. The papers published in this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series provide a collection of state-of-the-art and recent advances in research and applications of laser ultrasonics as presented at this second Symposium. Bertrand Audoin - Conference ChairThomas Dehoux - Conference proceedings co-editorYannick Guillet - Conference proceedings co-editor Conference photograph Scientific committee Bertrand AudoinUniversité Bordeaux 1, France Alain BlouinNRC, Canada Christ GlorieuxKatholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium Vitalyi GusevUniversité du Maine, France Peter HessUniversity of Heidelberg, Germany Alexander A KarabutovMoscow State University, Russia Sridhar KrishnaswamyNorthwestern University, USA Humphrey MarisBrown University, USA Jean-Pierre MonchalinNRC, Canada Todd MurrayBoston University, USA Makoto OchiaiToshiba Corp, Japan Menglu QianTongji University, China Daniel RoyerEcole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie, France Hervé TrétoutDassault Aviation, France Hubert VoillaumeEADS, France Oliver B WrightHokkaido University, Japan Shu-yi ZhangNanjing University, China Organizing committee Bertrand AudoinChair Sandrine GuitLocal administrator Christophe Aristégui Thomas Dehoux Evelyne Dewayse Yannick Guillet Armelle Guilloux

  2. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachor, Hans; Drummond, Peter; Hannaford, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The 22nd International Conference on Atomic Physics (ICAP 2010) was held from 25 to 30 July, 2010 in Cairns, Tropical North Queensland, Australia. This conference followed on from the series of highly successful biennial ICAP conferences held in Storrs, Innsbruck, Rio, Cambridge MA, Florence, Windsor, Amsterdam, Boulder, Munich, Ann Arbor, Paris, Tokyo, Seattle, Göteborg, Cambridge MA, Riga, Berkeley, Heidelberg, Boulder, Oxford and New York. ICAP 2010 was attended by 630 participants from 37 countries. The conference presented an outstanding program of papers covering the most recent advances in atomic physics, including atomic tests of fundamental physics and basic symmetries; precision measurements, including atomic clocks, atom interferometers and fundamental constants; ultracold gases and Bose-Einstein condensates; ultracold Fermi gases; ultracold molecules; quantum simulators with atoms and ions; few-body systems; ultrafast phenomena and free electron lasers; quantum information with atoms and ions; quantum optics and cavity QED with atoms; and hybrid and optomechanical systems. The papers in this Proceedings represent a collection of the invited talks. The conference program consisted of 48 invited talks presented in plenary sessions, including 10 'hot topic' talks highlighting the most recent advances in the field, and about 490 poster papers presented in three afternoon sessions. The program included talks by Nobel Laureates Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, Wolfgang Ketterle and Bill Phillips, a memorium talk commemorating the scientific life of Vladilen Letokhov, and an evening lecture by Alain Aspect on 'Wave particle duality for a single photon: quantum weirdness brought to light'. The conference was preceded by a two-day workshop in Cairns on Variation of Fundamental Constants and Violation of Fundamental Symmetries P, T(EDM), CPT, Lorentz Invariance, organised by the University of New South Wales; and three-day Student Workshop at Cape Tribulation, organized by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics (ACQAO). A website with full details of the conference program, abstracts and other information can be found at: http://www.swin.edu.au/icap2010. We would like to thank the participants, especially those who contributed talks, posters and manuscripts, for making ICAP2010 such an exciting and memorable conference. We thank the Program Committee for putting together an outstanding program and the ICAP International Advisory Committee for their expert advice and suggestions. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of our sponsors: the Australian National University, the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Griffith University, the Ian Potter Foundation, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, and contributors to the trade exhibition: Coherent, Coherent Scientific, the Institute of Physics Publishing, Lastek, NewSpec, Nufern, Oxford University Press, Spectra-Physics, Springer, Toptica Photonics and Warsash Scientific. Finally, we thank our Conference Secretariat, Maria Lamari, and the Local Organising Committee for their tireless and expert efforts in the organisation of ICAP2010, and the staff of the Cairns Convention Centre, whose friendly and efficient service contributed much to the success of the conference. The next ICAP conference is planned to be held in Palaiseau, France from 23 to 27 July 2012 (http://www.ifraf.org/icap2012). Hans BachorPeter DrummondPeter HannafordEditors

  3. PREFACE: International Conference on Solid Films and Surfaces (ICSFS 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achete, C. A.; Almeida, C. M.; Cremona, M.; Rocca, M.; Stavale, F.

    2015-03-01

    Foreword The 17th ICSFS took place at the wonderful city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from the 8th to the 11th of September, 2014. The conference focused on recent advances in controlling and characterizing the physical and chemical properties of films and surfaces, with a particular emphasis on materials for electronic, photonic and spintronic applications. In addition, themes of bio-functionalized structures and devices were strongly discussed in the ICSFS, covering interdisciplinary nano and nano-bio science and technology. The conference has promoted, in various sub-fields of materials surfaces and thin films, an excellent forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical achievements and discussion of future directions in the field. In this volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering we are glad to present 11 peer-reviewed ICSFS contributing papers. The cross-disciplinary nature of conference topics is clearly reflected in these Proceedings' contents. The themes discussed ranged from those close to more traditional condensed matter physics, such as semiconductor surfaces to physical chemistry related issues. The Proceedings were organized in accordance with contributions presented at the Conference. We were glad with the presence of over 160 participants, including 24 invited and plenary talks and over 50 oral contributions. We strongly believe that these Proceedings will be useful for a wide audience of those interested in basic and applied surfaces and thin solid interfaces. Acknowledgment We would like to acknowledge the hard work, professional skills and efficiency of the team which oversaw the general organization, particularly of Dicom (Social Communication Division) from the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology, Inmetro (Brazil). We also would like to thank all the invited speakers and session chairs for making the meeting such a great success. The Conference was supported and sponsored by Academia

  4. Success through Failure: Wittgenstein and the Romantic Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Rowe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available I argue that the Preface to Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations represents a form of preface found in several other major works of Romanticism. In essence, this kind of preface says: ‘I have tried very hard to write a work of the following conventional type … . I failed, and have thus been compelled to publish, with some reluctance, the following fragmentary, eccentric, unfinished or otherwise unsatisfactory work.’ It sometimes transpires, however, that a work which appeared unfinished and unsatisfactory to the author and his contemporaries, later comes to be seen as both complete and startlingly original. Indeed, not initially recognizing what you have achieved is sometimes a mark of the greatness-through-originality so highly prized by Romantic writers. Besides the Investigations, I concentrate on Coleridge’s Preface to ‘Kubla Khan’, and the first 269 lines of Wordsworth’s Prelude (in both the 1805 and 1850 versions, discussing exactly why all three authors found their projects so recalcitrant, why their solutions were so original, and why the magnitude of their achievements was not appreciated from the first. I end with some reflections on why Wittgenstein’s work on aesthetics, the aesthetic impact of his work, and the cognitive impact of his work should not be separated.

  5. FOREWORD: Jefferson Lab: A Long Decade of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Hugh

    2011-04-01

    Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 and started operating in about 1996. 2011 is an appropriate time to try to take a look at the results that have appeared, what has been learned, and what has been exciting for our scientific community. Rather than attempt to construct a coherent view with a single author or at least a small number, we have, instead, invited small groups of people who have been intimately involved in the work itself to make contributions. These people are accelerator experts, experimentalists and theorists, staff and users. We have, in the main, sought reviews of the actual sub-fields. The primary exception is the first paper, which sets the scene as it was, in one person's view, at the beginning of Jefferson Lab. In reviewing the material as it appeared, I was impressed by the breadth of the material. Major advances are documented from form factors to structure functions, from spectroscopy to physics beyond the standard model of nuclear and particle physics. Recognition of the part played by spin, the helicities of the beams, the polarizations of the targets, and the polarizations of final state particles, is inescapable. Access to the weak interaction amplitudes through measurements of the parity violating asymmetries has led to quantification of the strange content of the nucleon and the neutron radius of lead, and to measurements of the electroweak mixing angle. Lattice QCD calculations flourished and are setting the platform for understanding of the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons. But the star of the game was the accelerator. Its performance enabled the physics and also the use of the technology to generate a powerful free electron laser. These important pieces of Jefferson Lab physics are given their place. As the third Director of Jefferson Lab, and on behalf of the other physicists and others presently associated with the lab, I would like to express my admiration and gratitude for the efforts of the directors, chief

  6. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some

  7. Metadiscourse in Book Prefaces of Filipino and English Authors: A Contrastive Rhetoric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munalim, Leonardo O.; Lintao, Rachelle B.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded on the tradition of Contrastive Rhetoric (CR), this paper aimed at contrasting the presence of metadiscourse resources in a book preface of Filipino and English authors. It especially sought to see the similarities and differences of interactive and interactional markers between two cultures. A total of thirty book prefaces on language…

  8. Dynamos of the Sun, Stars, and Planets - Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stix, M.

    2005-04-01

    The conference ``Dynamos of the Sun, Stars, and Planets'' was organized by the Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik Freiburg, and was held at the University of Freiburg from 4th to 6th October 2004. About 50 participants attended the conference, with 8 review lectures, 20 contributed talks, and 6 posters. With only few exceptions, these contributions appear in the present issue of Astronomische Nachrichten. This preface summarizes the discussion of the closing session.

  9. EDITORIAL, FOREWORD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Foreword

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials and SurfacesSeptember 20th-23th, 2016Herbertov, Czech RepublicOrganized by:Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in PragueInstitute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CRSociety for composite and carbon materialsGuest editor: Ing. Zdeněk ToldeThe colloquium "Biomaterials and surfaces" focuses on methods for biocompatibility testing and methods for characterization and modification of biomaterials and their surfaces. The goal of this seminar is to inform the participants about fundamental problematic of biomaterials and the recent state of research and development of prostheses or artificial replacements in Czech Republic. At the seminar, participants and students are meeting with the scientific capacities in the field of biomaterials and surfaces (materials engineering, medicine, physics, chemistry, biology and with the experts from practice (doctors, representatives of leading Czech companies in the industry.Scientific comitee:Doc. RNDr. Vladimír Starý CSc. (Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringIng. Karel Balík, CSc. (Society for composite and carbon materialsIng. Tomáš Suchý Ph.D. (Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CR Ing. Radek Sedláček Ph.D. (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Ing. Zdeněk Tolde (Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringGuarantors of peer review process: Prof. RNDr. Petr Špatenka CSc. (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Doc. RNDr. Vladimír Starý CSc. (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Ing. Tomáš Suchý Ph.D. (Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CR Doc. RNDr. Václav Nehasil, Dr. (Faculty of Mathematics and Physics RNDr. Marta Vandrovcová, Ph.D. (Institute of Physiology CAS Guarantor of language editing:Ing. Stanislav Krum PhD.Organizing comitee: Ing. Karel Balík, CSc. RNDr. Martin Braun, Ph.D. Ing. Ladislav Cvrček Ph.D. Ing. Zdeňka Jeníková Ph.D. Ing. Radek Sedláček Ph.D. Doc. RNDr. Vladimír Starý CSc. Ing. Tomáš Suchý Ph.D. Ing. Zdeněk Tolde Ing. Petr Vlčák Ph.D. Vlasta Voňková

  10. 1. Foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, the attention of many researchers has turned to decontamination of the territories where radioactive substance extraction took place in the past. As of today, radioactive waste has not been utilized, but now they can be secondarily reprocessed, for the purpose of uranium extraction and waste utilization, since uranium prices are increasing. There is a lack of data in the literature on secondary reprocessing technologies of uranium industry wastes in Tajikistan. Each uranium tailing pile requires an individual secondary reprocessing waste technology, since they were formed as a result of different reprocessing methods (acid, soda leaching) and from different ore compositions. Their ph medium and storage conditions are different. This fact led the authors to publish the present edition of this book. The basic direction of the book is in developing manufacturing fundamentals of uranium industry waste reprocessing in Tajikistan, with specific attention on practical applications of technological investigation results. (author)

  11. Foreword1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hans den Besten (1948-2010) was one of those rare phenomena in modern Linguistics: someone who not only made seminal contributions to more than one sub-field within the discipline, but who also made them in areas that are very often assumed to require very different. – not to say entirely incompatible! – ways of ...

  12. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D. Martin

    2011-06-01

    Electrostatics 2011 was held in the city of Bangor which is located in North West Wales in an area of outstanding natural beauty close to the Snowdonia mountain range and bordering the Irish Sea. The history of the area goes back into the mists of times, but a continuous technological thread can be traced from the stone- and bronze-age craftsmen, who inhabited the area several thousand years ago, via the civil engineering and fortifications of the Romans and Edward I of England, through Marconi's long-wave trans-Atlantic transmitter near Caernarfon to the conference host. The School of Electronic Engineering at Bangor University has contributed much to the discipline of Electrostatics not only in teaching and research but also in supporting industry. It was a great pleasure for me, therefore, to have the pleasure of welcoming the world's experts in Electrostatics to Bangor in April 2011. In my preface to the Proceedings of Electrostatics 1999, I reported that almost 90 papers were presented. Interestingly, a similar number were presented in 2011 testifying to the importance and endurance of the subject. The all-embracing nature of electrostatics is captured in the pictorial depiction used for the conference logo: a hand-held plasma ball with its close link to gaseous discharges and the superimposed Antarctic aurora highlighting the featured conference themes of atmospheric, planetary and environmental electrostatics. Leading these themes were three invited contributions, the first by Giles Harrison who delivered the Bill Bright Memorial Lecture 'Fair weather atmospheric electricity', Carlos Calle on 'The electrostatic environments of Mars and the Moon' and Istvan Berta on 'Lightning protection - challenges, solutions and questionable steps in the 21st century'. Leading other key sessions were invited papers by Atsushi Ohsawa on 'Statistical analysis of fires and explosions attributed to static electricity over the last 50 years in Japanese industry' and Antonio

  13. Discussion of Alfred Alder's preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    In his preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky, Alfred Adler (1) found his theory of the dynamics of schizophrenia supported in the Diary, (2) alluded to Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, and (3) briefly touched on the possibility and conditions of recovery. To add to the understanding of Adler's "Preface," this discussion (1) expands his theory of schizophrenia, (2) gives some concrete data of Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, (3) describes two episodes of recovery subsequent to the "Preface," and (4) introduces an important aspect of Adler's theory, which he had to omit out of consideration for Nijinsky's wife, Romola-namely, her role in her husband's disorder. With the larger theoretical and historical context established. Adler's "Preface" can be appreciated for its predictive validity.

  14. Preface to Berk's "Regression Analysis: A Constructive Critique"

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, Jan

    2003-01-01

    It is pleasure to write a preface for the book ”Regression Analysis” of my fellow series editor Dick Berk. And it is a pleasure in particular because the book is about regression analysis, the most popular and the most fundamental technique in applied statistics. And because it is critical of the way regression analysis is used in the sciences, in particular in the social and behavioral sciences. Although the book can be read as an introduction to regression analysis, it can also be read as a...

  15. Unbound color, prefaced by remarks on baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, O.W.

    Theoretical and experimental issues related to the possibility that color is unbound are surveyed. This implies that quarks, gluons and other particles carrying color can exist as isolated objects. It is surprisingly difficult to distinguish models with unbound color from those in which color is permanently confined. None-the-less, the present situation seems discouraging for unbound color because there is no unambiguous support for it and because the crucial prediction of formation of a colored gluon in e + e - collisions has been ruled out wherever sufficient data exists. The above survey is prefaced by remarks on the symmetric quark model for baryon spectroscopy

  16. On The Problem of Constructing Routes, Part I: Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertsbakh Ilya B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a preface of the translation of the 1967 paper by Linis and Maksim, “On the problem of constructing routes” (in Russian (in the Proceedings of the Institute of Civil Aviation Engineering, Issue 102, pp. 36-45. It marks 50-year to the deficit function (DF model initially developed in this 1967 work; the DF model then paved the way to further research of vehicle-fleet management in terms of optimal routing and scheduling. The merit of this translation is to describe the roots of the DF modelling to enable further studies to emerge with more contributions.

  17. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17–21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue

  18. Preface to the Focus Issue: chaos detection methods and predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Georg A; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17-21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  19. Frontiers of quantum Monte Carlo workshop: preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernatis, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The introductory remarks, table of contents, and list of attendees are presented from the proceedings of the conference, Frontiers of Quantum Monte Carlo, which appeared in the Journal of Statistical Physics

  20. Preface to QoIS 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comyn-Wattiau, Isabelle; Thalheim, Bernhard

    Quality assurance is a growing research domain within the Information Systems (IS) and Conceptual Modeling (CM) disciplines. Ongoing research on quality in IS and CM is highly diverse and encompasses theoretical aspects including quality definition and quality models, and practical/empirical aspects such as the development of methods, approaches and tools for quality measurement and improvement. Current research on quality also includes quality characteristics definitions, validation instruments, methodological and development approaches to quality assurance during software and information systems development, quality monitors, quality assurance during information systems development processes and practices, quality assurance both for data and (meta)schemata, quality support for information systems data import and export, quality of query answering, and cost/benefit analysis of quality assurance processes. Quality assurance is also depending on the application area and the specific requirements in applications such as health sector, logistics, public sector, financial sector, manufacturing, services, e-commerce, software, etc. Furthermore, quality assurance must also be supported for data aggregation, ETL processes, web content management and other multi-layered applications. Quality assurance is typically requiring resources and has therefore beside its benefits a computational and economical trade-off. It is therefore also based on compromising between the value of quality data and the cost for quality assurance.

  1. FOREWORD: Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean (RADIO 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monebhurrun, Vikass; Lesselier, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    It was an honor and a great pleasure for all those involved in its organization to welcome the participants to the 'Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean' (RADIO 2012) international conference that was held from 24th to 27th September 2012 at the Sugar Beach Resort, Wolmar, Flic-en-Flac, Mauritius. RADIO 2012 is the first of a series of conferences that is to be regularly organized in the Indian Ocean region. The aim is to discuss recent developments, theories and practical applications covering the whole scope of radio-frequency engineering, including radio waves, antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility. Following discussions with engineers and scientists from the countries of the Indian Ocean as well as from other parts of the world, a need was felt for the organization of such an international event in this region. The Island of Mauritius, worldwide known for its white sandy beaches and pleasant tropical atmosphere, provided an excellent environment for the organization of the 1st RADIO international conference. The Local Organizing Committee consisted of scientists from SUPELEC, the University of Mauritius, and the University of Technology, Mauritius. Various members of staff of the University of Mauritius provided help for the organization of the conference. The International Union of Radio Science (URSI) made available technical and financial sponsorship for partial support of young scientists. A number of companies also supported RADIO 2012 ('Platinum': GSMA, ICTA & MMF, 'Gold': CST & FEKO). The event itself was organized in a premier hotel on Mauritius. In this foreword, we would like to take the opportunity again to thank all the people, institutions and companies that made the event such a success. More than 120 abstracts were submitted to the conference and were peer-reviewed by an international scientific committee. RADIO 2012 overall featured six oral sessions, one poster session and two workshops. Three internationally recognized

  2. PREFACE: Focus section on Hadronic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Swanson, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Hadronic physics is the study of strongly interacting matter and its underlying theory, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The field had its beginnings after World War Two, when hadrons were discovered in ever increasing numbers. Today, it encompasses topics like the quark-gluon structure of hadrons at varying scales, the quark-gluon plasma and hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density; it also underpins nuclear physics and has significant impact on particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Among the goals of hadronic physics are to determine the parameters of QCD, understand the origin and characteristics of confinement, understand the dynamics and consequences of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, explore the role of quarks and gluons in nuclei and in matter under extreme conditions and understand the quark and gluon structure of hadrons. In general, the process is one of discerning the relevant degrees of freedom and relating these to the fundamental fields of QCD. The emphasis is on understanding QCD, rather than testing it. The papers gathered in this special focus section of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics attempt to cover this broad range of subjects. Alkofer and Greensite examine the issue of quark and gluon confinement with the focus on models of the QCD vacuum, lattice gauge theory investigations, and the relationship to the AdS/CFT correspondence postulate. Arrington et al. review nucleon form factors and their role in determining quark orbital momentum, the strangeness content of the nucleon, meson cloud effects, and the transition from nonperturbative to perturbative QCD dynamics. The physics associated with hadronic matter at high temperature and density and at low Bjorken-x at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the SPS at CERN, and at the future LHC is summarized by d'Enterria. The article of Lee and Smith examines experiment and theory associated with electromagnetic meson production from nucleons and

  3. The quantitative study of marked individuals in ecology, evolution and conservation biology: a foreword to the EURING 2003 Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senar, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Few fields in modern ecology have developed as fast as the analysis of marked individuals in the study of wild animal populations (Seber & Schwarz, 2002. This is the topic of EURING Conferences, which from 1986 have been the premier forum for advances in capture-recapture methodology. In this sense, EURING Conferences still maintain the flavour that originally inspired scientific meetings: to disseminate the very last findings, ideas and results on the field. Traditionally, EURING Conferences have been published in the form of Proceedings, which because of their relevant content, become a required reading to anyone interested in the capture-recapture methodology. EURING 2003 was held in Radolfzell (Germany, hosted by the Max Planck Research Centre for Ornithology, and the Proceedings appear as a special issue of Animal Biodiversity and Conservation. The full title of the 2003 meeting was “The quantitative study of marked individuals in ecology, evolution and conservation biology”, which stands for one of the main aims of the meeting: to establish the capture-recapture approach as one of the standard methodologies in studies within these fields. One of the shared views is that capture-recapture methodologies have reached a considerable maturity, but the need still exists to spread their use as a “standard” methodology. The nice review paper by Lebreton et al. (1993 in Trends in Ecology and Evolution is still applicable, in that general ecologists and evolutionary biologists still resist their general use. The same applies to conservation biology, where the analysis of marked individuals may also be a key tool in its development. We hope, with the spread of 2003 Proceedings, to help to fill this gap. The Proceedings follow the same general structure as the Conference. We organised the EURING meeting in 10 technical sessions, covering what we considered as fastest growing areas in the field. We appointed for each session, two chairs, which

  4. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    YRM_LOGO The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has confirmed once again this year the enthusiasm and determination of Ph.D. students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in the scientific progress. Since 2009, we regularly gather together to discuss the most recent developments and achievements in Physics, firmly convinced that sharing our expertise and experience is the foundation of research activity. The format we chose is an informal meeting primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in brief presentations that provide genuine engagement of the audience and cross-pollination of ideas. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of Physics. After four editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2014 was held at the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA, Trieste, for the second time. The fifth appointment was a two-day conference on July 14th-15th 2014. It has been sponsored by a number of research groups of SISSA, the University of Udine and the Solar Physics group of the University of Rome "Tor Vergata", thus gathering even broader support than previous editions. The success of this year event is testified by an increased number of participants and institutions all around Europe. This resulted in an extremely rich and interactive poster session that covered several areas of pure and applied Physics. With the intent of broadening the contents and stimuli adopting multidisciplinary tools, the YRM 2014 hosted the workshop "Communicating Science" held in collaboration with SISSA Medialab. This choice reflects the growing importance of the outreach activity performed by scientists, especially at the earliest stages of their career, as a way of increasing their expertise and developing soft

  5. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    Central Florida, Orlando, in March 2010. Several speakers at this meeting were invited to contribute to the special section in this issue. As is clear from the articles in this special section, the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces continues to be a dynamic field of investigation. In fact, there is a resurgence of effort because the insights provided by surface dynamics are still fundamental to the development of an understanding of the microscopic factors that control surface structure formation, diffusion, reaction and structural stability. Examination of dynamics at surfaces thus complements and supplements the wealth of information that is obtained from real-space techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy. Vibrational dynamics is, of course, not limited to surfaces. Surfaces are important since they provide immediate deviation from the bulk. They display how lack of symmetry can lead to new structures, new local atomic environments and new types of dynamical modes. Nanoparticles, large molecules and nanostructures of all types, in all kinds of local environments, provide further examples of regions of reduced symmetry and coordination, and hence display characteristic vibrational modes. Given the tremendous advance in the synthesis of a variety of nanostructures whose functionalization would pave the way for nanotechnology, there is even greater need to engage in experimental and theoretical techniques that help extract their vibrational dynamics. Such knowledge would enable a more complete understanding and characterization of these nanoscale systems than would otherwise be the case. The papers presented here provide excellent examples of the kind of information that is revealed by vibrations at surfaces. Vibrations at surface contents Poisoning and non-poisoning oxygen on Cu(410)L Vattuone, V Venugopal, T Kravchuk, M Smerieri, L Savio and M Rocca Modifying protein adsorption by layers of glutathione pre-adsorbed on Au(111)Anne Vallée, Vincent Humblot

  6. PREFACE: Quantum dots as probes in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2013-05-01

    photosynthetic systems. The next paper, by Olejnik et al, discussed metallic QDs which enhance photosynthetic function in light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. Such hybrid structures with gold QDs are shown to exhibit a strong increase in the fluorescence quantum yield. The next two papers, by Sikora et al and Kaminska et al deal with the ZnO nanoparticles passivated by MgO. In the first of these two papers, the authors describe the behavior of ZnO/MgO when introduced to human cancer cells. In the second, the authors describe the QDs with an extra outer layer of Fe2O3 which makes the nanoparticles superparamagnetic and also capable of generation of reactive oxygen species which could be applied to form localized centers of toxicity for cancer treatment. Finally, in the last paper by Yatsunenko et al, the authors discuss several semiconducting QDs like ZnO with various rare-earth dopands. They propose a microwave-driven hydrothermal technology to make them, characterize their luminescence and demonstrate their usefulness in the early recognition of cancer tissues. Quantum dots as probes in biology contents Quantum dots as probes in biologyMarek Cieplak Luminescent nanoparticles and their applications in the life sciencesVarun K A Sreenivasan, Andrei V Zvyagin and Ewa M Goldys Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase in junction with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: characteristics of an enzymatically active nanohybrid Krzysztof Szczepaniak, Remigiusz Worch and Joanna Grzyb Spectroscopic studies of plasmon coupling between photosynthetic complexes and metallic quantum dotsMaria Olejnik, Bartosz Krajnik, Dorota Kowalska, Guanhua Lin and Sebastian Mackowski Luminescence of colloidal ZnO nanoparticles synthesized in alcohols and biological application of ZnO passivated by MgOBożena Sikora, Krzysztof Fronc, Izabela Kamińska, Kamil Koper, Piotr Stępień and Danek Elbaum Novel ZnO/MgO/Fe2O3 composite optomagnetic nanoparticles I Kamińska, B Sikora, K Fronc, P Dziawa, K Sobczak, R Minikayev, W

  7. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    , Uhlmann et al and articles to be published in a later issue by Bäumchen and Jacobs, Walz et al). Moreover, simulations accounted for these new phenomena (see articles in this issue by Leonforte et al, Hyväaluoma et al, Varnik et al, Chelakkot et al, Litvinov et al and the article to be published in a later issue by Boettcher et al), since commercial software packages typically override these special yet fundamentally new conditions. For future applications, the know-how can be used, for instance, to manipulate particles or molecules in microfluidic systems (see articles in this issue by Nottebrock et al, Straube, Uhlmann et al and the article to be published in a later issue by Boettcher et al). The articles have been divided into four subsections: 'Probing the boundary condition', 'Flow over or in special geometries', 'Soft objects in fluid flow' and 'Manipulating flow'. Many articles, however, cover more than only one aspect and could easily be listed under one of the other subsections. Three articles, two listed in the section 'Probing the boundary condition' and one listed in 'Manipulating flow', could not be included and will be published in a later issue (Bäumchen and Jacobs, Walz et al, Boettcher et al). The collection of studies gives a comprehensive overview of what has been achieved to 'bridge the gap between molecular motion and continuum flow', which was the mission of the programme and which will now form a sound platform for continuative studies. References [1] Bowtell D D 1999 Nature Genet. 21 25 [2] Lion N et al 2003 Electrophoresis 24 3533 [3] Weston A D and Hood L 2004 J. Proteome Res. 3 179 [4] Li D 2004 Microfluidics Nanofluidics 1 1 Nano- and microfluidics contents Impact of slippage on the morphology and stability of a dewetting rim Andreas Münch and Barbara Wagner Nanoscale discontinuities at the boundary of flowing liquids: a look into structure Max Wolff, Philipp Gutfreund, Adrian Rühm, Bulent Akgun and Hartmut Zabel Capillary waves of

  8. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    -molecule that is able to describe relatively slow conformational transitions of a bio-molecule. Stef et al present their goal to grow good quality YbF3-doped and PbF2-codoped CaF2 crystals with high divalent Ytterbium content for investigating the influence of Pb2+ ions on the valence conversion, on the dielectric and optical absorption spectra. Vasile et al present the fabrication and SEM and photoluminescence characterization of zinc gallate doped with Eu and Er ions. The results could be important for photonic applications of spinels. Vasiljevic et al present the process of production of microlenses by irradiation of a tot'hema eosin sensitized gelatin (TESG) layer with a laser beam (2nd Nd:YAG harmonic, 532 nm). Microlenses chemically processed after production with 10% alum solution had near diffraction limited performance. The production and application of microlenses are fast expanding because they are increasingly used in biomedical and general optics. Prizes for the poster presentations Authors under 35 years of age were invited to take part in the poster competition. Two first prizes EX-AEQUOAE were awarded to Zoran Grujic from the Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia, for the poster 'Numerical simulation of Raman-Ramsey effects induced by thermal motion of rubidium atoms' and to Andrey Popov from Altai State Technical University, Bernaul, Russia, for the poster 'Beryllium atoms in intense fields'. The third prize was awarded to Alex Crosse from Imperial College, London, UK, for the poster 'Quantum electrodynamics in absorbing nonlinear media'. Members of the Jury were: Mirjana Bozic (Chairperson), Victor Dodonov, Margarita Man'ko, Helmut Rauch, Saverio Pascazio, Richard Tanas and Philip Walther. Sponsors of the awards were the Institute of Physics, Belgrade, European Physical Journal (EPJ) and John Wiley and Sons. CEWQO 2009 and 2010 The 16th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics was held in Turku, Finland, 23-27 May 2009. CEWQO09 was chaired by Professor

  9. Sustainability in the Design, Synthesis and Analysis of Chemical Engineering Processes 1st edition (Preface)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book preface explains the needs found by the book editors for assembling the state of the art of technical and scientific knowledge relevant to chemical engineering, sustainability, and sustainable uses of wastes and materials management, and to do so in an accessible and c...

  10. Preface [Special issue on dataTEL – Data Supported Research in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Verbert, Katrien; Manouselis, Nikos; Vuorikari, Riina; Wolpers, Martin; Lindstaedt, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Drachsler, H., Verbert, K., Manouselis, N., Vuorikari, R., Wolpers, M., & Lindstaedt, S. (2012). Preface [Special issue on dataTEL – Data Supported Research in Technology-Enhanced Learning]. International Journal Technology Enhanced Learning, Vol. 4, Nos. 1/2, 2012.

  11. PREFACE: XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, V. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Karamurzov, B. S.; Efremov, V. P.; Sultanov, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is a preface to the proceedings of the XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter, which was held in Elbrus settlement, in the Kabardino-Balkar Republic of the Russian Federation, from March 1-6, 2015.

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Structural Nano Composites (NANOSTRUC 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuguna, James

    2012-09-01

    Dear Colleagues It is a great pleasure to welcome you to NanoStruc2012 at Cranfield University. The purpose of the 2012 International Conference on Structural Nano Composites (NanoStruc2012) is to promote activities in various areas of materials and structures by providing a forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical achievements and discussion of future directions. NanoStruc brings together an international community of experts to discuss the state-of-the-art, new research results, perspectives of future developments, and innovative applications relevant to structural materials, engineering structures, nanocomposites, modelling and simulations, and their related application areas. The conference is split in 7 panel sessions, Metallic Nanocomposites and Coatings, Silica based Nanocomposites, safty of Nanomaterials, Carboin based Nanocomposites, Multscale Modelling, Bio materials and Application of Nanomaterials. All accepted Papers will be published in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), and included in the NanoStruc online digital library. The abstracts will be indexed in Scopus, Compedex, Inspec, INIS (International Nuclear Information System), Chemical Abstracts, NASA Astrophysics Data System and Polymer Library. Before ending this message, I would like to acknowledge the hard work, professional skills and efficiency of the team which ensured the general organisation. As a conclusion, I would like to Welcome you to the Nanostruc2012 and wish you a stimulating Conference and a wonderful time. On behalf of the scientific committee, Signature James Njuguna Conference Chair The PDF of this preface also contains committee listings and associates logos.

  13. Preface of the Special Issue: “Recent CMV Research”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla Dufrene

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This Viruses Special Issue on Recent Cytomegalovirus (CMV Research is dedicated to the patients who have suffered CMV infection and to their parents, families and caregivers. We are including as a Preface to this issue the insights of a young college student, Kayla Dufrene, who suffered congenital CMV infection and contacted me and Dr. Roberta DeBiasi, to interview us to learn more about CMV. As I was just returning to the DC area from the 4th Congenital CMV Conference in San Francisco, I was particularly receptive to her request. When we met Kayla, we were both impressed with her personal strength and ability to cope with her disabilities and needed medical treatments. Despite it all, Kayla has an exceptionally positive outlook on life, feeling even lucky. She has not only coped, but has transcended her difficulties. I am proud to say that she was on the Dean’s List (Figure 1 at Gallaudet University. Ultimately, her hope lies in our fields’ efforts to develop a vaccine to prevent CMV disease in other children.

  14. FOREWORD: Foreword from Peter Adams Foreword from Peter Adams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter D.

    2009-11-01

    As part of this twentieth anniversary special issue I was asked to write a few words about Richard Palmer, the one permanent fixture on the journal over its twenty year history. Richard and I go back a (very) long way! He began his career at IOP Publishing in Bristol in 1971 while my publishing career with the American Physical Society began a little earlier, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island NY. Since then, and for nearly forty years we have met often, if irregularly, at many locations throughout the world. As members of two very strong physics organizations we were clearly in competition with each other to seek out and publish the best physics research. At the same time we frequently exchanged experiences and policy ideas for dealing with serious violations of scientific ethical standards and how academic society-run journals can best serve the general scientific community. Overall my relationship with Richard has been a most rewarding one and I shall miss his opinions and sage advice. Richard: Compatriot; competitor; collaborator; I salute you!

  15. Machine Intelligence, a Foreword: The Brain as Electronic Circuitry; Electronic Circuitry as a Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Precribed byv ANSi Sto Z39-!8 296-.102 TABLE OF CONTENTS THE BOTTO M LINE ............................................................. I BACKG RO UN D...DIRECTOR US ARMY BALLISTIC RESEARCH LABORATORY ATTN: SLCBR-IB-M (DR. BRUCE BURNS ) 1 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD 21005-5066 NOTE: PLEASE NOTIFY COMMANDER

  16. Preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky by Alfred Adler, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    This is a previously unpublished work by Alfred Adler that was written in 1936 as a preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky. A theory of schizophrenia is described in which characteristic prepsychotic features, especially lack of social interest and oversensitivity to real and imagined slights, lead to increasing irrationalism and preoccupation with grandiose ideas. The establishment of a cooperative therapeutic relationship and the instilling of hope are presented as central factors for successful treatment.

  17. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between the afternoon outing to Arundel Castle and dinner in the evening at Wiston House, a mansion of Tudor origin near Steyning, West Sussex. So a short audience-participation seminar was held in the conference room of the manor, covering the history of dislocations and the history of the conference series. We were also able to extend the appreciation of the life of Prof. Yuri Ossipyan (15 Feb 1931 - 10 Sep 2008) briefly given at EDS2008. EDS2010 continued the drive into graphene-based materials with a session devoted to them, and it gave immense pleasure to many of us who were his former students to dedicate a session to the work of Professor R Jones. We are grateful to his present and former co-workers who came and presented an impressive perspective on their work with him and a vision of a vigorous future for him in his retirement and for AIMPRO, the current Density Functional Theory code that derives from the one he established with his former student, Dr Patrick Briddon. For EDS2010 we made two minor modifications to the appearance of the conference: a central webpage www.eds-conferences.org, ably managed by our webmaster, Dr Gemma Haffenden, and a Facebook page, "EDS conference series", which Dr Amy Gandy runs enthusiastically. Amongst other things the conference photographs appear here. "I like this". In fact, currently 22 FB-ers "like this" and I am sure it will grow. Finally, it is a pleasure to acknowledge the significant contributions of Co-Chair, Prof. Marek Skowronski, Conference Manager, Dr Christopher Latham, and the editors of this volume, Drs Jon Goss and Chris Ewels, who in turn wish to thank Dr Alexis Vlandas for his help proof reading the articles. We all wish the best of luck to Prof. Philomela Khomninou and her team in the organisation of EDS2012.

  18. Thomas Jefferson, I dilemmi della democrazia americana, translated and edited by Alberto Giordano, with a preface by Dino Cofrancesco (Novi Ligure: Città del Silenzio, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Chiassoni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of Thomas Jefferson, I dilemmi della democrazia americana, translated and edited by Alberto Giordano, with a preface by Dino Cofrancesco (Novi Ligure: Città del Silenzio, 2007

  19. FOREWORD: 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Yuan, Shouqi; Shi, Weidong; Liu, Shuhong; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2013-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF 2013) was held in Beijing, China, 19-22 September 2013, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University and Jiangsu University. The co-organizers were Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, The State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, The State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy and Beijing International Science and Technology Cooperation Base for CO2 Utilization and Reduction. The sponsor of the conference was Concepts NREC. The First International Conference on Pumps and Systems (May 1992), the Second International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1995), the Third International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1998), and the Fourth International Conference on Pumps and Fans (26-29 August 2002) were all held in Beijing and were organized by the late famous Chinese professor on fluid machinery and engineering, Professor Zuyan Mei of Tsinghua University. The conference was interrupted by the death of Professor Mei in 2003. In order to commemorate Professor Mei, the organizing committee of ICPF decided to continue organizing the conference series. The Fifth Conference on Pumps and Systems (2010 ICPF) took place in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, 18-21 October 2010, and it was jointly organized by Zhejiang University and Tsinghua University. With the development of renewable energy and new energy in China and in the world, some small types of compressor and some types of pump, as well as wind turbines are developing very fast; therefore the ICPF2013 conference included compressors and wind turbines. The theme of the conference was the application of renewable energy of pumps, compressors, fans and blowers. The content of the conference was the basic study, design and experimental study of compressors, fans, blowers and pumps; the CFD application on pumps and fans, their transient behavior, unsteady flows and multi-phase flow

  20. Preface for Discussion on Mid-Ocean Ridges: dynamics of processes associated with creation of new ocean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, J. R.; Elderfield, H.; Laughton, A.

    Preface for Discussion on Mid-Ocean Ridges: dynamics of processes associated with creation of new ocean crust. A Discussion held at the Royal Society on 6th and 7th March 1996. Organized and edited by J. R. Cann, H. Elderfield and A. Laughton.

  1. CHAIRMEN'S PREFACE AND EDITORS' NOTE: Unification of Fundamental Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Lars; Nilsson, Jan S.; Salomonson, Per; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1987-01-01

    Chairmen's PrefaceIn 1984 we obtained a grant from the Nobel Foundation to organize a Nobel Symposium on "Unification of the Fundamental Interactions". In our proposal which we submitted in the fall of 1983 we stated that we wanted to cover the various attempts to unification such as GUT'S, supergravity, Kaluza-Klein theories and superstrings. What has happened in particle physics since then is already history. With the realization that certain superstring theories could be anomaly free, it became clear that these models could encompass earlier attempts to unification as well as solving the fundamental problem of quantum gravity. The excitement that some of us had felt for some time now spread through most of the particle physics community and this excitement certainly was evident during the Symposium. With the international advisory committee we originally chose a list of around 30 invitees which could best represent the various subjects listed above. When it came to the final planning of the programme essentially all talks dealt with superstrings! We were very fortunate that almost all of the invitees managed to come to the Symposium. From the western world only three were unable to participate, André Neveu, Steven Weinberg and Bruno Zumino. We certainly missed them during the meeting. We were particularly happy that Stephen Hawking managed to take part actively. Our real problem was to get participants from the Soviet Union. Out of eight invitations only one came through. We were very happy to have Renata Kallosh, who really did her utmost to enlighten us about not only her own work but also about recent progress in the USSR, However, we were very sorry that in spite of all our letters, telegrammes and endless attempts to get telephone calls through and despite the good relations between the Swedish and Soviet Academies of Sciences we had to miss Ludwig Faddeev, Valodja Gribov, Andrej Linde, Victor Ogievetsky, Sasha Polyakov, Misha Shifman and Arkadij

  2. PREFACE International Symposium on Spintronic Devices and Commercialization 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, You-wei; Judy, Jack; Qian, Zhenghong; Wang, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    SSDC logo Preface The International Symposium on Spintronic Devices and Commercialization (ISSDC' 2010) was held in Beijing, China, from 21 to 24 October 2010. The aim of the symposium was to provide an opportunity for international experts, academics, researchers, practitioners and students working in the areas of spintronic theories, spintronic materials, and spintronic devices to exchange information on the R&D and commercialization of spintronic materials and devices. New developments, concepts, future research trends and potential commercialization areas were also discussed. The topics covered by ISSDC' 2010 were: Fundmental Spintronic Theories/Experiments Spin polarization, spin-dependent scattering, spin relaxation, spin manipulation and optimization, as well as other related characterizations and applications, etc. Spintronic Materials Giant magnetoresistance materials, magnetic tunnel junction materials, magnetic semiconductor materials, molecular spintronic materials. Spintronic Devices Sensors, isolators, spin logic devices and magnetic random access memories (MRAMs), microwave devices, spin diodes, spin transistor, spin filters and detectors, spin optoelectronic devices, spin quantum devices, single chip computer, spin molecule and single electron devices. Other Magnetic Materials Soft magnetic materials, hard magnetic materials, magneto-optical materials, magnetostriction materials. Applications of Spintronic Devices Magnetic position/angle/velocity/rotation velocity sensors, magnetic encoders, magnetic compasses, bio-medical magnetic devices and other applications. Future Research Trends and the Commercialization of Spintronic Devices Approximately 85 scientists from almost 10 countries participated in the conference. The conference featured 6 keynote lectures, 8 invited lectures, 12 contributed lectures and about 30 posters. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference

  3. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Preface These proceedings arose from the 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS12), which was held on Magnetic Island, North Queensland, Australia, between 1-6th August 2010. Meetings in the SLOPOS series are held (roughly) every three years and have now been held on (almost) all continents, indicating the truly international nature of the field. SLOPOS12 marked the second time that the Workshop had been held in the southern hemisphere, and the first time in Australia. SLOPOS12 attracted 122 delegates from 16 countries. Most encouraging was the attendance of 28 student delegates, and that about half of the overall delegates were early career researchers - a good sign for the future of our field. We also enjoyed the company of more than a dozen partners and families of delegates. In a slight departure from previous SLOPOS meetings, the International Advisory Committee approved a broader scope of scientific topics for inclusion in the program for the 2010 Workshop. This broader scope was intended to capture the applications of positrons in atomic, molecular and biomedical areas and was encapsulated in the byeline for SLOPOS-12: The 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques for Solids, Surfaces, Atoms and Molecules. The scientific and social program for the meeting ran over 6 days with delegates gathering on Sunday August 1st and departing on August 6th. The scientific program included plenary, invited, contributed and student lectures, the latter being the subject of a student prize. In all there were 53 oral presentations during the week. There were also two poster sessions, with 63 posters exhibited, and a prize was awarded for the best poster by a student delegate. The standard of the student presentations, both oral and posters, was outstanding, so much so that the judging panel recommended an additional number of prizes be awarded. Topics that were the focus of invited presentations and contributed papers at

  4. Tax wedge on labour income in Croatia and the European Union : Preface to the special issue of Financial Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Urban

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is a preface to a special issue of Financial Theory and Practice, which is devoted to the comparison of tax wedge on labour income in Croatia and other EU countries. The articles in this issue have arisen from the students’ research project, undertaken in 2015. This Preface outlines the motivation behind the research project, explains the most important methodological issues, and reviews the literature on the measurement of tax wedge in Croatia.

  5. FOREWORD: The XXV IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems marks half a century tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan-Resiga, Romeo

    2010-05-01

    far from the best efficiency regime. The traditional partnership with the Romanian Academy - Timisoara Branch, Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Cavitation, led to complex projects that combine both basic theoretical developments with advanced experimental investigations leading to practical engineering solutions for modern hydraulic machines. The International Association of Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) celebrates its 75th anniversary this year. IAHR particularly promotes the advancement and exchange of knowledge through working groups, specialty symposia, congresses, and publications on water resources, river and coastal hydraulics, risk analysis, energy, environment, disaster prevention, industrial processes. The IAHR - Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems deals with the advancement of technology associated with the understanding of steady and unsteady flow characteristics in hydraulic machinery and conduit systems connected to the machinery. The technology elements include the fluid behaviour within machine components, hydro-elastic behaviour of machine components, cavitation, and two phase flow in turbines and pumps, hydraulic machine and plant control systems, the use of hydraulic machines to improve water quality, and even considerations to improve fish survival in their passage through hydro plants. The main emphases of the IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are to stimulate research and understanding of the technologies associated with hydraulic machinery and to promote interaction between the machine designers, machine users, the academic community, and the community at large. Hydraulic machinery is both cost effective and environmentally responsible. The increasing atmospheric content of carbon dioxide related to pollution from thermal power plants, is one of the most significant threats to our global ecology. The problem is exacerbated by the need for increased energy production in third world countries. This

  6. FOREWORD: Cultural heritage and civil engineering Cultural heritage and civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Nicola; Soldovieri, Francesco; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2012-08-01

    combine archaeology and geoarchaeology with remote sensing, including aerial images collected by a drone equipped with a high-resolution range-finder camera, and geophysical tools (ground penetrating radar, SQUID magnetometry, geoelectric) to obtain a comprehensive picture of the timing, archaeological meaning and environmental history of archaeological remains in the Orkhon Valley in Central Mongolia. Leucci et al evaluate the practical application of attenuation-based GPR attribute analysis methods in providing indirect information on moisture content, which is one of the main factors contributing to the decay of historical monuments. The results obtained confirm the presence of a relationship between soil hydraulic properties and amplitudes in the radargram. The papers by Catapano et al describe the effectiveness of the joint use of ground penetrating radar and advanced data processing based on microwave tomography as a solution to real problems in the field of cultural heritage and civil engineering. In particular, the use of an integrated strategy proved very helpful in driving excavations at an important survey at the Domus Centauro in Pompeii. The other successful case was concerned with the monitoring of the inside of a concrete beam affected by direct impacts, part of the Montagnole experiment within the ISTIMES project. The Montagnole experiment is concerned with the exploitation and performance of a large variety of electromagnetic sensing techniques for the non-invasive monitoring of the damage to a one-scale structure, such as a concrete beam, from controlled direct impacts. The surface properties of any material need to be modified to adapt to new conditions. As Vazquez-Calvo et al show, the measurement of surface roughness is a reliable test of the suitability of stone cleaning methods; this is a non-destructive technique, portable and easy to use, that can help us—together with other techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, scanning electron

  7. PREFACE: Atom-surface scattering Atom-surface scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    had to decline with regret because they had been retired for a long time, or had changed their research field, or were not able to meet the deadline. In any case, this initiative was really very welcome and supported with great enthusiasm by everybody. From all of the correspondence I have received expressing gratitude and honor for being invited to contribute, I would like to quote some words from G Comsa which reflect all of these feelings: 'Dick deserves, indeed, to be honored for both his scientific accomplishments and certainly no less for his modesty, honesty, friendliness and human warmth, qualities which are rarely honored'. I certainly cannot close this preface without mentioning the praiseworthy and professional work carried out by the Editorial Board, publishing team and Editors; in particular, L Smith and G Wright for their help and enthusiastic disposition. Thank you very much to everybody. 1 A healthy mind in a healthy body.

  8. FOREWORD: V S Letokhov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke, H. Henry; Linnartz, Harold

    2012-04-01

    Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (CAMOP) endeavors periodically to devote an issue to the life and accomplishments of physicists who have made significant contributions to the fields represented in this journal. Vladilen Letokhov is certainly one of them. For a number of years he was also a CAMOP Correspondent. We are grateful to Professor Victor Balykin for having organized this CAMOP special section. It is particularly significant to one of us (HHS) to remember a person who has made seminal advances in so many areas which to this day are at the forefront of studies by a number of physicists. But over the years this acquaintance developed into friendship and gave the wife of one of us, Norma, and HHS the opportunity to host Tina and Vladik in their home, and get to know both a bit better. There was also the seminal International School on Laser Applications in Physics in Vilnius organized by Letokhov, and then a visit to Troitsk and his group at the Institute of Spectroscopy (and even the organization of a couple of piano recitals by one of our daughters, Marija, who accompanied her parents in the then USSR). Our interests crossed in a couple of fields: laser interactions with atoms and sensitive spectroscopy of radioactive atoms. Letokhov was a participant in the early organization of laser spectroscopy at CERN and was instrumental in providing copper vapour lasers to the isotope separator facility, ISOLDE. To this day laser ion sources are under the aegis of Valentin Fedoseyev who came to CERN from Troitsk. The interaction of lasers with atoms, in particular the process of slowing atoms, is discussed by Balykin. It was Christmas time when a card arrived from Oleg Tumanov of the Institute of Spectroscopy: it included a graph of temperature achieved by laser cooling as a function of calendar date. The results of Letokhov's group were the earliest (see figure 1), even though lower temperatures achieved subsequently by others extended our knowledge. To many, the lack of formal recognition was a bit puzzling, and this will have to await the usual number of decades before relevant discussions become publicSee, for example, Friedman R M 2001 The Politics of Excellence (New York: Henry Holt).. But, as can be attested by the most prolific, diverse and creative contributions presented in the bibliography, Letokhov's work will leave a long-lasting legacy. Progress in laser cooling Figure 1. Progress in laser cooling.

  9. What is Liquid? Foreword

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Henderson, D.; Holovko, M.; Nezbeda, Ivo; Trokhymchuk, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2015), 10101-1-10101-4 ISSN 1607-324X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluid * liquid * physics modelling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.621, year: 2015

  10. Foreword: Mervyn Silas Paterson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, J. N.

    Born on March 7, 1925 at Booleroo, South Australia, Mervyn Paterson's childhood revolved around life on the family farm. His father was a methodist lay preacher and the local church with its practices was part of his early experiences—it is rare nowadays for people to attend church services four times on Sunday! His early life contrasted markedly with Maginnis Magee of Australian bush fame, whom the namesake poet A. B. Paterson described so colorfully in A Bush Christening: "On the outer Barcoo where the churches are a few, And men of religion are scanty". Mervyn's early sharing of the beauties of nature developed, no doubt, during those peaceful moments as he rode his horse to the local bush school. Such interests continue to this day with his frequent treks from his home in the suburb of Aranda to the lab through the picturesque, relatively unspoilt forest that adorns Black Mountain in Canberra. Mervyn grew up with a respect for nature tempered by an experiential awareness of its hazards as in 1939 he drove with his father through one of those horrendous, nightmarish bushfires that periodically sweep through the Australia bushland, as they transferred the family possessions from one farm to another.

  11. Vice Presidents' Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear Reader, In the early sixties, the eminent American hydrologist, Walter Langbein, founded Water Resources Research on behalf of the Section of Hydrology of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Today, Water Resources Research is undisputed as the leading international journal in its field, and the key factors in its success are: * sustained emphasis on high quality papers; * the reviewing, editing, and management processes are all controlled by the scientists; * the allegiance of the AGU community to WRR; * a verv reasonable cost both to institutions and members; * financial benefits from the sales of the journal are fed back to the AGU, to the benefit of the members. In Europe, we now have a well established community of hydrologists in EGS, and the need for a high quality journal was addressed initially by adopting the already well established Elsevier journal of Hydrology as the official journal of the Hydrological Sciences Section. However, it became apparent that several of the factors associated with WRR's success were not working in the Society's favour, and so it has been decided to establish a new journal which, we hope, can emulate the success of WRR in the fullness of time. Much has been written over the past decade about the need to establish a strong identity for hydrology as a distinct geoscience alongside the atmospheric, ocean and solid earth sciences. The aims and scope of Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) have been designed to give full expression to this goal, and have been strongly influenced by 'Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences' (National Academy Press,1991). The functioning of the hydrological cycle within an earth system undergoing global change is currently the focus of research by many leading scientists and it is hoped that HESS will become a major forum for the publication and discussion of such research, as well as all new findings which enhance the position of hydrology as a geoscience. The success of a new journal is dependent not only on attracting high quality papers, but on the preservation of high standards in the overall editorial process. This requires, inter alia, a sympathetic managing editor to assist non-native English speakers in Europe and beyond to communicate their research findings with good clarity. We are highly fortunate that Dr j S G (Jim) McCulloch, who has had such a major impact on the success of the Journal of Hydrology, has agreed to take on the onerous task of launching and managing HESS. He will be supported by a panel of Scientific Editors and by an Editorial Board, who will advise him. We are indebted to Dr McCulloch and his editorial office team for their dedicated efforts in bringing this first issue to fruition. We also thank the authors, who have entrusted their papers to HESS, the reviewers who have responded so promptly and Arne Richter, the Secretary-General of EGS, for his continual support and enthusiasm for this venture. Finally, and most important of all, we appeal to you, and all members of the scientific community, to support HESS by * taking out a personal subscription; * arranging for an institutional subscription; * contributing your best papers; * helping with the peer review process. By rallying around HESS and giving it the priority which will ensure that high quality is achieved from the outset, we can, as a community, eventually match the achievements of WRR. You and future generations of European hydrologists will be the beneficiaries. Philip O'Kane Enda O'Connell EGS Vice-President Past-EGS Vice-President (Hydrological Sciences) (Hydrological Sciences)

  12. Vice Presidents' Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Reader, In the early sixties, the eminent American hydrologist, Walter Langbein, founded Water Resources Research on behalf of the Section of Hydrology of the American Geophysical Union (AGU. Today, Water Resources Research is undisputed as the leading international journal in its field, and the key factors in its success are: * sustained emphasis on high quality papers; * the reviewing, editing, and management processes are all controlled by the scientists; * the allegiance of the AGU community to WRR; * a verv reasonable cost both to institutions and members; * financial benefits from the sales of the journal are fed back to the AGU, to the benefit of the members. In Europe, we now have a well established community of hydrologists in EGS, and the need for a high quality journal was addressed initially by adopting the already well established Elsevier journal of Hydrology as the official journal of the Hydrological Sciences Section. However, it became apparent that several of the factors associated with WRR's success were not working in the Society's favour, and so it has been decided to establish a new journal which, we hope, can emulate the success of WRR in the fullness of time. Much has been written over the past decade about the need to establish a strong identity for hydrology as a distinct geoscience alongside the atmospheric, ocean and solid earth sciences. The aims and scope of Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS have been designed to give full expression to this goal, and have been strongly influenced by 'Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences' (National Academy Press,1991. The functioning of the hydrological cycle within an earth system undergoing global change is currently the focus of research by many leading scientists and it is hoped that HESS will become a major forum for the publication and discussion of such research, as well as all new findings which enhance the position of hydrology as a geoscience. The success of a new journal is dependent not only on attracting high quality papers, but on the preservation of high standards in the overall editorial process. This requires, inter alia, a sympathetic managing editor to assist non-native English speakers in Europe and beyond to communicate their research findings with good clarity. We are highly fortunate that Dr j S G (Jim McCulloch, who has had such a major impact on the success of the Journal of Hydrology, has agreed to take on the onerous task of launching and managing HESS. He will be supported by a panel of Scientific Editors and by an Editorial Board, who will advise him. We are indebted to Dr McCulloch and his editorial office team for their dedicated efforts in bringing this first issue to fruition. We also thank the authors, who have entrusted their papers to HESS, the reviewers who have responded so promptly and Arne Richter, the Secretary-General of  EGS, for his continual support and enthusiasm for this venture. Finally, and most important of all, we appeal to you, and all members of the scientific community, to support HESS by * taking out a personal subscription; * arranging for an institutional subscription; * contributing your best papers; * helping with the peer review process. By rallying around HESS and giving it the priority which will ensure that high quality is achieved from the outset, we can, as a community, eventually match the achievements of WRR. You and future generations of European hydrologists will be the beneficiaries. Philip O'Kane                                                                  Enda O'Connell EGS Vice-President                                                       Past-EGS Vice-President (Hydrological Sciences                                                (Hydrological Sciences

  13. Foreword ACII 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pun, T.; Pelachaud, C.; Sebe, N.; D' Mello, S.; Nijholt, Antinus; D' Mello, S.; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to Geneva and to ACII 2013, “the‿ conference in Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction. After Beijing in 2005, Lisboa in 2007, Amsterdam in 2009, and Memphis in 2011, researchers from all over the world will converge to Geneva on 2-5 September 2013 for the 5th biannual ACII

  14. foreword 1237..1237

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the decades. It is accurate, swift and inexpensive, accounting for its great popularity. Initially, chemists were interested in determining the structure and stereochemistry of isolated molecules. Later, attention shifted to examining patterns of molecules, held together by intermolecular interactions, the most important of which is.

  15. Recent Trends in the Presentation of Neuroanatomy in Contemporary Neuroanatomy Books as Revealed in Their 'Preface's: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Q S; Banu, L A; Rahman, M F; Paul, S

    2015-04-01

    Many changes have been made in the field of Neuroanatomy teaching and assessment. One important way to know the changes in other country is by analyzing the Neuroanatomy text books and we can compare their reflections in our curriculum by analyzing the assessment system. To analyze the 'Preface's of contemporary Neuroanatomy text books, qualitatively, for noting the approaches taken and means applied in dealing with Neuroanatomy in the text books. This review was done in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka from July 2008 and June 2009. The 'Preface's of ten contemporary text books dealing with Neuroanatomy, published since 1993, was analyzed. Among them, the two that are most commonly recommended to the medical postgraduates in Bangladesh were selected for analyzing their presentation of text and illustrations. The 'Preface's of ten books were analyzed qualitatively to identify the information and explanations provided and comments made by their author(s)/editor(s) on the approaches taken and the means applied in the books in selecting and presenting topics, text and illustrations. The observations were organized into specific 'theme's. Twelve 'theme's were identified from the analyses of the 'Preface's of ten contemporary Neuroanatomy text books. These include special emphasis in the books on incorporation of new information, on practical application of Neuroanatomical facts. Addition and improvement regarding illustrations are also highlighted. By incorporating the findings of the present study with the present-day ideas and trends in Neuroanatomy in the developed world as evident from the available literature, suggestions could be formulated on improving the methods of teaching and assessment of Neuroanatomy in Bangladesh.

  16. Preface: Current perspectives in modelling, monitoring, and predicting geophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancho, Ana M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; López, Cristóbal; Turiel, Antonio; Wiggins, Stephen; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2018-02-01

    The third edition of the international workshop Nonlinear Processes in Oceanic and Atmospheric Flows was held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) in Madrid from 6 to 8 July 2016. The event gathered oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, physicists, and applied mathematicians sharing a common interest in the nonlinear dynamics of geophysical fluid flows. The philosophy of this meeting was to bring together researchers from a variety of backgrounds into an environment that favoured a vigorous discussion of concepts across different disciplines. The present Special Issue on Current perspectives in modelling, monitoring, and predicting geophysical fluid dynamics contains selected contributions, mainly from attendants of the workshop, providing an updated perspective on modelling aspects of geophysical flows as well as issues on prediction and assimilation of observational data and novel tools for describing transport and mixing processes in these contexts. More details on these aspects are discussed in this preface.

  17. Local Content

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Local content refers to materials and products made in a country as opposed those that are imported. There is an increasing interest in the concept of local content as a means of supporting local economies and providing jobs (Belderbos & Sleuwaegen...

  18. PREFACE Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMAN 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aidy

    2011-02-01

    This special issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials science and Engineering contains papers contributed to the Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMAN 2009) held on 3-5 November 2009 in Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of the congress is to provide a platform for professionals, academicians and researchers to exchange views, findings, ideas and experiences on advanced science and technology. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 50 papers were selected for publications in this issue. The policy of editing was the content of the material and its rapid dissemination was more important than its form. In 2009, the conference received close to 120 papers from leading researchers and participants from countries such as Iran, India, Switzerland, Myanmar, Nigeria, Canada, Yemen and Malaysia. We strongly hope the new ideas and results presented will stimulate and enhance the progress of research on the above conference theme. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this conference. They are also the ones who help make this conference possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We wish to thank all the authors who contributed papers to the conference and all reviewers for their efforts to review the papers as well as the sponsors. We would also like to thank the members of the CAMAN 2009 Organising Committee and the International Advisory Committee for their efforts in making the conference a success. Thank you very much indeed. Guest Editor Aidy Ali

  19. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  20. PREFACE: International Symposium on Geohazards and Geomechanics (ISGG2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utili, S.

    2015-09-01

    These Conference Proceedings contain the full papers in electronic format of the International Symposium on 'Geohazards and Geomechanics', held at University of Warwick, UK, on September 10-11, 2015. The Symposium brings together the complementary expertise of world leading groups carrying out research on the engineering assessment, prevention and mitigation of geohazards. A total of 58 papers, including 8 keynote lectures cover phenomena such as landslide initiation and propagation, debris flow, rockfalls, soil liquefaction, ground improvement, hazard zonation, risk mapping, floods and gas and leachates. The techniques reported in the papers to investigate geohazards involve numerical modeling (finite element method, discrete element method, material point method, meshless methods and particle methods), experimentation (laboratory experiments, centrifuge tests and field monitoring) and analytical simplified techniques. All the contributions in this volume have been peered reviewed according to rigorous international standards. However the authors take full responsibility for the content of their papers. Agreements are in place for the edition of a special issue dedicated to the Symposium in three international journals: Engineering Geology, Computational Particle Mechanics and International Journal of Geohazards and Environment. Authors of selected papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work to these Journals that will independently assess the papers. The Symposium is supported by the Technical Committee 'Geo-mechanics from Micro to Macro' (TC105) of the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE), 'Slope Stability in Engineering Practice' (TC208), 'Forensic Geotechnical Engineering' (TC302), the British Geotechnical Association and the EU FP7 IRSES project 'Geohazards and Geomechanics'. Also the organizers would like to thank all authors and their supporting institutions for their contributions. For any

  1. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  2. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2014: FAIR Next Generation ScientistS 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FAIRNESS 2014 was the third edition in a series of workshops designed to bring together excellent international young scientists with research interests focused on physics at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) and was held on September 22-27 2014 in Vietri sul Mare, Italy. The topics of the workshops cover a wide range of aspects in both theoretical developments and current experimental status, concentrated around the four scientific pillars of FAIR. FAIR is a new accelerator complex with brand new experimental facilities, that is currently being built next to the existing GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Schwerionenforschung close to Darmstadt, Germany. The spirit of the conference is to bring together young scientists, e.g. advanced PhD students and postdocs and young researchers without permanent position to present their work, to foster active informal discussions and build up of networks. Every participant in the meeting with the exception of the organizers gives an oral presentation, and all sessions are followed by an hour long discussion period. During the talks, questions are anonymously collected in a box to stimulate discussions. The broad physics program at FAIR is reflected in the wide range of topics covered by the workshop: • Physics of hot and dense nuclear matter, QCD phase transitions and critical point • Nuclear structure, astrophysics and reactions • Hadron Spectroscopy, Hadrons in matter and Hypernuclei • New developments in atomic and plasma physics • Special emphasis is put on the experiments CBM, HADES, PANDA, NUSTAR, APPA and related experiments For each of these different areas one invited speaker was selected to give a longer introductory presentation. The write-ups of the talks presented at FAIRNESS 2014 are the content of this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and have been refereed according to the IOP standard for peer review. This issue constitutes therefore a collection of the forefront of research that

  3. PREFACE: Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2013-02-01

    Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter staff for their help, patience and professionalism. Since this is a fast-moving field, there is absolutely no way of presenting definitive answers to all open questions, but we hope that this special section will provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding this topic. Furthermore, we hope that the exciting science and technology described in this section will attract and inspire other researchers and students working in related fields to enter into the study of ultrafast and nonlinear optical phenomena in carbon-based nanostructures. Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials contents Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterialsJunichiro Kono The impact of pump fluence on carrier relaxation dynamics in optically excited grapheneT Winzer and E Malic Time-resolved spectroscopy on epitaxial graphene in the infrared spectral range: relaxation dynamics and saturation behaviorS Winnerl, F Göttfert, M Mittendorff, H Schneider, M Helm, T Winzer, E Malic, A Knorr, M Orlita, M Potemski, M Sprinkle, C Berger and W A de Heer Nonlinear optics of graphene in a strong magnetic fieldXianghan Yao and Alexey Belyanin Theory of coherent phonons in carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbonsG D Sanders, A R T Nugraha, K Sato, J-H Kim3, J Kono3, R Saito and C J Stanton Non-perturbative effects of laser illumination on the electrical properties of graphene nanoribbons Hernán L Calvo, Pablo M Perez-Piskunow, Horacio M Pastawski, Stephan Roche and Luis E F Foa Torres Transient absorption microscopy studies of energy relaxation in graphene oxide thin film Sean Murphy and Libai Huang Femtosecond dynamics of exciton localization: self-trapping from the small to the large polaron limit F X Morrissey, J G Mance, A D Van Pelt and S L Dexheimer

  4. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  5. PREFACE: Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cally, Paul; Erdélyi, Robert; Norton

    2013-06-01

    A total solar eclipse is the most spectacular and awe-inspiring astronomical phenomenon most people will ever see in their lifetimes. Even hardened solar scientists draw inspiration from it. The eclipse with 2 minutes totality in the early morning of 14 November 2012 (local time) drew over 120 solar researchers (and untold thousands of the general public) to the small and picturesque resort town of Palm Cove just north of Cairns in tropical north Queensland, Australia, and they were rewarded when the clouds parted just before totality to reveal a stunning solar display. Eclipse photograph The eclipse was also the catalyst for an unusually broad and exciting conference held in Palm Cove over the week 12--16 November. Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending served as GONG 2012, LWS/SDO-5, and SOHO 27, indicating how widely it drew on the various sub-communities within solar physics. Indeed, as we neared the end of the ascending phase of the peculiar Solar Cycle 24, it was the perfect time to bring the whole community together to discuss our Sun's errant recent behaviour, especially as Cycle 24 is the first to be fully observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The whole-Sun perspective was a driving theme of the conference, with the cycle probed from interior (helioseismology), to atmosphere (the various lines observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assemble (AIA) aboard SDO, the several instruments on Hinode, and other modern observatories), and beyond (CMEs etc). The quality of the presentations was exceptional, and the many speakers are to be commended for pitching their talks to the broad community present. These proceedings draw from the invited and contributed oral presentations and the posters exhibited in Palm Cove. They give an (incomplete) snapshot of the meeting, illustrating its broad vistas. The published contributions are organized along the lines of the conference sessions, as set out in the Contents, leading off with a provocative view of

  6. PREFACE: XXII International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    The 22nd International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes (ICSLS) was convened at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA, during June 1 to 6, 2014. A variety of topics of interest to the line shape community were addressed during invited and contributed oral and poster presentations. General categories of the ICSLS 2014 scientific contents included Astrophysics, Biomedical Physics, High and Low Temperature Plasma Physics, Magnetic Fusion Physics, Neutrals Atomic-Molecular-Optical (AMO) Physics, and Applied Physics. Research interests at UTSI and at the Center for Laser Applications (CLA) focus on Applied Physics and Plasma Physics areas such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, spectroscopy with ultra-short light pulses, combustion diagnostics, to name a few. Consequently, the presentations during the conference addressed a variety of these topics. Attendance at the conference included researchers from North America, Africa, Asia and Europe, with an international representation showing 250 authors and co-authors with over 25 different citizenships, and 100 participants at the Conference. Figure 1 shows a photo of Conference attendees. The schedule included 82 contributions, 41 oral and 41 poster presentations. The 29 invited, 12 contributed oral and 41 contributed poster presentations were selected following communication with the international organizing committee members. A smart phone ''app'' was also utilized, thanks to Elsevier, to communicate electronic versions of the posters during the conference. Special thanks go to the members of the international and local committees for their work in organizing the 22nd ICSLS. In addition, thank you notes also go to the peer reviewers for the proceedings. Following the success of the IOP: Journal of Physics Conference Series selected for the 21st ICSLS publication, the proceedings papers report ongoing research activities. Papers submitted amount to 68 in number, or 83% of

  7. PREFACE: The Science of Making Torque from Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Hansen, Martin O. L.; Hansen, Kurt S.

    2007-06-01

    conference to bring together scientists and engineers working in the fields of aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, aeroacoustics, aeroelastic control, wind conditions and wind farms. The first conference entitled `The Science of making Torque from Wind' was organized by DUWIND and held at Delft University, 19-21 April 2004. Owing to the great success of this conference where more than 60 papers were presented, we decided to follow it with a similar conference at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in Lyngby. It is our hope that others will take up the idea and continue this series of conferences. An explicit objective of the conference is to meet the high standards applied in several other branches of science and technology. The EAWE has the responsibility for the scientific quality of the content. All papers presented at the conference have had an abstract review as well as a full paper review by at least two reviewers. Out of the approximately 120 submitted abstracts, 86 papers were finally approved to be presented at the conference. It is expected that many of the papers will subsequently be published in scientific journals. Toward that end, the editors of Wind Energy and Journal of Solar Energy Engineering have expressed their interest in letting the most promising papers be subjected to a second review, for the purpose of having them published as journal papers. The EWEA staff is thanked for organizing the PR on the conference and the EAWE board members for valuable help in the reviewing process and for delivering session chairmen. Staff members at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at DTU and Risø were responsible for the organization. Special thanks go to DTU for providing lecture and meeting rooms, and to LM Glasfiber, Vestas Wind Systems and Siemens Wind Power for financial support. Jens Nørkær Sørensen, Conference Chairman 21 June 2007

  8. PREFACE: EmQM13: Emergent Quantum Mechanics 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    these proceedings represent the talks of the invited speakers as written immediately after the symposium. The volume starts with a contribution by organizers Jan Walleczek and Gerhard Grössing, essentially explaining why emergent quantum mechanics, and other deterministic approaches to quantum theory, must be considered viable approaches in quantum foundations today. This is followed by the exposition of Stephen Adler's talk who introduced to a general audience key questions at the current frontiers of quantum mechanics during the opening evening (with the contents of his conference talk appearing elsewhere). The conference proceedings then continues with the presentations as given in their chronological order i.e. starting with the opening talk of the scientific program by Gerard 't Hooft. While the page number was restricted for all invited speakers, the paper by Jeff Tollaksen was given more space, as his invited collaborator Yakir Aharonov was unable to deliver a separate talk, in order to represent both contributions in one paper. Note that the talks of all speakers, including the talks of those who could not be represented in this volume (M. Arndt, B. Braverman, C. Brukner, S. Colin, Y. Couder, B. Poirier, A. Steinberg, G. Weihs and H. Wiseman) are freely available on the conference website as video presentations (http://www.emqm13.org). The organizers wish to express their gratitude to Siegfried Fussy and Herbert Schwabl from AINS for the organizational support. The organizers also wish to thank Bruce Fetzer, President and CEO, John E. Fetzer Memorial Trust, and the Members of the Board of Trustees, for their strong support and for funding this symposium. We also wish to thank the Austrian Academy of Sciences for allowing the symposium to be held on their premises, and Anton Zeilinger, President of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, for his welcome address. The expertise of the Members of the Scientific Advisory Board of the EmQM13 symposium, Ana Maria Cetto

  9. PREFACE: International Symposium on `Vacuum Science and Technology' (IVS 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, K. C.; Gupta, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    equipments, accessories, products etc by different manufacturers and suppliers has been organized at the venue of the symposium hall for the benefit of the participants. The interest shown by the exhibitors reveals that the industry has come of age and the advances that have taken place over the years is quite significant. During the symposium, the Indian Vacuum Society felicitated two distinguished personalities who have contributed significantly for the development of vacuum science and technology in the country. The C AMBASANKARAN memorial and Smt SHAKUNTALABAI VYAWAHARE memorial Awards were also conferred on the two best contributed papers. A committee constituted by the Symposium Organizing Committee evaluated the relevance, scientific content, and clarity of presentation to decide the award winning papers. It is hoped that the discussion generated by the delegates at the symposium will help in a better understanding vacuum science and technology. K C Mittal Convener S K Gupta Co Convener International Advisory Committee Kakodkar, Anil DAE/India, Chairman Badve, Cdr A.V.(IN Retd.) Pfeiffer Vac India Banerjee, S. BARC/India Bhandari, R.K. BRNS/India Chander, Shekhar CEERI/India Chopra, K.L. IIT Delhi/India Day, Chris ITER Grover, R.B DAE,BARC/India Jakub, Szajman VSA/ Australia Jayaraj, R.N. NFC/India Kamath, H.S. BARC/India Kaw, P.K. IPR/India Kobayashi, M. VSJ/Japan Kumar, Lalit MTRDC, India Kumar, Vikram NPL., India Langley, Robert AVS, USA Larour, Jean Ecole/France Mendonsa, R.H. Lawrence and Mayo Myneni, Ganapatirao Jlab/USA Narsaiah, S.V. HHV Padamsee, Hasan Cornell/USA Pillay, R.G. TIFR Raj, Baldev IGCAR/India Raju, P.T. IVS/India Ramasami, T. DST/India Ray, A.K. BARC/India Reid, RJ IUVSTA/UK Roy, Amit IUAC/india Sahni, V.C. RRCAT, BARC/India Schamiloglu, E. UNM/USA Shankara, K.N. VSSC,ISRO/India Sinha, Bikash VEC,SINP/India Strubin, P. CERN/Switzerland Local Organizing Committee Ray, A.K. BARC (Chairman) Kailas, S. BARC, (Co Chairman) Chakravarty, D.P. BARC

  10. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion require us to understand electrochemistry on the scale of a single atom; and we already know that the only prospect for effective high temperature superconductivity involves strongly correlated materials. Even novel IT technologies are now seen to have value not just for novel function but also for efficiency. While strongly correlated electron systems continue to excite researchers and the public alike due to the fundamental science issues involved, it seems increasingly likely that support for the science will be leveraged by its impact on energy and sustainability. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Strongly correlated electron systemsSiddharth S Saxena and P B Littlewood Magnetism, f-electron localization and superconductivity in 122-type heavy-fermion metalsF Steglich, J Arndt, O Stockert, S Friedemann, M Brando, C Klingner, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Wirth, S Kirchner and Q Si High energy pseudogap and its evolution with doping in Fe-based superconductors as revealed by optical spectroscopyN L Wang, W Z Hu, Z G Chen, R H Yuan, G Li, G F Chen and T Xiang Structural investigations on YbRh2Si2: from the atomic to the macroscopic length scaleS Wirth, S Ernst, R Cardoso-Gil, H Borrmann, S Seiro, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Kirchner, U Burkhardt, Y Grin and F Steglich Confinement of chiral magnetic

  11. Preface: Eighth European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudio, Spitaleri; Livio, Lamia; Gianluca, Pizzone Rosario

    2016-01-01

    often quoted statement of Carl Sagan, “We are all star stuff,” is exhaustively describing one of the great discoveries of the 20th century as well as the main aim of nuclear astrophysics. The present theory of stellar nucleosynthesis (based on the famous paper B 2 FH) predicts chemical evolution of the Universe, which is testable by looking at stellar spectral lines, meteorites, pre-solar grains or other means of investigation. Quantum mechanics explains why different atoms emit light at characteristic wavelengths, and so by studying the light emitted from different stars, one may infer the atmospheric composition of individual stars. However, upon undertaking such a task, observations indicate a strong correlation between a star’s heavy element content (metallicity) and its age (red shift). Big bang nucleosynthesis tells us that the early universe consisted of only the light elements, and so one expects the first stars to be composed of hydrogen, helium, and lithium, the three lightest elements. The recent achievements of WMAP and Planck missions, with the precise measurement of many cosmological parameters, have re-ignited the interest on the primordial nucleosynthesis, especially for the still unclear Lithium primordial abundance. Stellar structure and the H-R diagram indicate that the lifetime of a star depends greatly on its initial mass and chemical composition, so that massive stars are very short-lived, and less massive stars are longer-lived. As a star dies, nuclear astrophysics argues that it will enrich the interstellar medium with “heavy elements” (in this case all elements heavier than lithium, the third element), from which new stars are formed. This account is consistent with the observed correlation between stellar metallicity and red shift. The theory of stellar nucleosynthesis would not be very convincing if reliable nuclear physics inputs are adopted. By carefully scrutinizing the table of nuclides, nuclear astrophysicists were able to

  12. Advertising Content

    OpenAIRE

    Simon P. Anderson; Régis Renault

    2002-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that most advertisements contain little direct informa- tion. Many do not mention prices. We analyze a firm'ss choice of advertising content and the information disclosed to consumers. A firm advertises only product informa- tion, price information, or both; and prefers to convey only limited product information if possible. Extending the "persuasion" game, we show that quality information takes precedence over price information and horizontal product information.T...

  13. John Norris, Collision Course: NATO, Russian and Kosovo (foreword by Strobe Talbott. Westport: Praeger Publishers, 2005. 333 pages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Colin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Recension requires thoroughness in reading and examining a book, including its cover. In this connection, the cover of John Norris' book bodes ill for its content. A physical map with mountains, waterways, a few localities - most of which are half hidden by the title. However, enough of them can be made out (Argun, Aksay, Khasavyurt, Gudermes... to understand that this is no map of Kosovo but that of Chechnya! Could anyone fail to suspect an unfortunate mistake, a slip of the pen confirming ...

  14. Preface paper to the Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D.C.; Chehbouni, A.; Goff, B.; MacNish, B.; Maddock, T.; Moran, S.; Shuttleworth, W.J.; Williams, D.G.; Watts, C.; Hipps, L.H.; Cooper, D.I.; Schieldge, J.; Kerr, Y.H.; Arias, H.; Kirkland, M.; Carlos, R.; Cayrol, P.; Kepner, W.; Jones, B.; Avissar, R.; Begue, A.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Boulet, G.; Branan, B.; Brunel, J.P.; Chen, L.C.; Clarke, T.; Davis, M.R.; DeBruin, H.; Dedieu, G.; Elguero, E.; Eichinger, W.E.; Everitt, J.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Gempko, V.L.; Gupta, H.; Harlow, C.; Hartogensis, O.; Helfert, M.; Holifield, C.; Hymer, D.; Kahle, A.; Keefer, T.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Lhomme, J.-P.; Lagouarde, J.-P.; Lo, Seen D.; Luquet, D.; Marsett, R.; Monteny, B.; Ni, W.; Nouvellon, Y.; Pinker, R.; Peters, C.; Pool, D.; Qi, J.; Rambal, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Santiago, F.; Sano, E.; Schaeffer, S.M.; Schulte, M.; Scott, R.; Shao, X.; Snyder, K.A.; Sorooshian, S.; Unkrich, C.L.; Whitaker, M.; Yucel, I.

    2000-01-01

    The Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere Program (SALSA) is a multi-agency, multi-national research effort that seeks to evaluate the consequences of natural and human-induced environmental change in semi-arid regions. The ultimate goal of SALSA is to advance scientific understanding of the semi-arid portion of the hydrosphere-biosphere interface in order to provide reliable information for environmental decision making. SALSA approaches this goal through a program of long-term, integrated observations, process research, modeling, assessment, and information management that is sustained by cooperation among scientists and information users. In this preface to the SALSA special issue, general program background information and the critical nature of semi-arid regions is presented. A brief description of the Upper San Pedro River Basin, the initial location for focused SALSA research follows. Several overarching research objectives under which much of the interdisciplinary research contained in the special issue was undertaken are discussed. Principal methods, primary research sites and data collection used by numerous investigators during 1997-1999 are then presented. Scientists from about 20 US, five European (four French and one Dutch), and three Mexican agencies and institutions have collaborated closely to make the research leading to this special issue a reality. The SALSA Program has served as a model of interagency cooperation by breaking new ground in the approach to large scale interdisciplinary science with relatively limited resources.

  15. Acknowledgements; Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Valkenburg

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 180 people attended the 10th North American Caribou Workshop which was held immedi¬ately following the annual meeting of the Northwest Section of The Wildlife Society. Participants came from Canada, Greenland, Finland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States (primarily Alaska. Over 80 papers and posters were presented and about 25% of those are published here in this special edition of Rangifer. Many of the papers, including the keynote address by Dr. Gunter Weller, concerned climate change and global warming.

  16. PREFACE: Ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Professor Stefan

    2006-09-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to results in the field of ferrofluid research. Ferrofluids—suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles—exhibit as a specific feature the magnetic control of their physical parameters and of flows appearing in such fluids. This magnetic control can be achieved by means of moderate magnetic fields with a strength of the order of 10 mT. This sort of magnetic control also enables the design of a wide variety of technical applications such as the use of the magnetic forces for basic research in fluid dynamics. The overall field of ferrofluid research is already about 40 years old. Starting with the first patent on the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions by S Papell in 1964, a vivid field of research activities has been established. Looking at the long time in which ferrofluids have been the focus of scientific interest, one can ask the question, what kind of recent developments justify a special issue of a scientific journal? New developments in a field, which depends strongly on a certain material class and which opens research possibilities in different scientific fields will nowadays usually require an interdisciplinary approach. This kind of approach starting from the synthesis of magnetic suspensions, including research concerning their basic properties and flow behaviour and focusing on new applications has been the core of a special research programme funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) over the past 6 years. Within this programme—entitled `Colloidal Magnetic Fluids: Basics, Synthesis and Applications of New Ferrofluids'—more than 30 different research groups have been coordinated to achieve new results in various fields related to ferrofluid research. The basic approach of the program has been the assumption that new applications well beyond the typical ferrofluid techniques, for example loud speaker cooling or sealing of rotary shafts, will require tailored magnetic suspensions with properties clearly focused towards the need of the application. While such tailoring of fluids to certain well defined properties sounds like a straightforward approach one has to face the fact that it requires a clear definition of the required properties. This definition itself has to be based on a fundamental physical knowledge of the processes determining certain magnetically controlled phenomena in ferrofluids. To make this point concrete one can look into the detailed aims of the mentioned research program. The application areas identified for the future development of research and application of suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles have been on the one hand the biomedical application—especially with respect to cancer treatment—and on the other hand the use of magnetically controlled rheological properties of ferrofluids for new active technical devices. Both directions require, as mentioned, as a basis for success the synthesis of new ferrofluids with dedicated properties. While the medical applications have to rely on biocompatibility as well as on stability of the suspensions in a biomedical environment, the use of ferrofluids in technical devices employing their magnetically controlled rheological properties will depend on an enhancement of the changes of the fluid's viscous properties in the presence of moderate magnetic fields. For both requirements ferrofluids with a make up clearly different from the usual magnetite based fluids have to be synthesized. The question of how the detailed microscopic make up of the fluids would have to look has to be answered on the basis of basic research results defining the physics background of the respective phenomena. Taking these aspects together it becomes obvious that the aforementioned research program had goals aiming far beyond the state of the art of classical ferrofluid research. These goals as well as the basic strategy to achieve them is in a way reflected by the structure of this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The issue contains results emerging from the research programme as well as invited papers from researchers not participating in the programme but working in closely related areas. The issue is subdivided into five main sections dealing with synthesis, basic physical description, rheology, and both the medical and technical applications of ferrofluids. As can be expected from work done within an interdisciplinary context many of the papers would fit into more than one of these sections and catagorization is thus sometimes difficult. We have therefore tried to place them into the section reflecting the main field of research to which the respective results belong. The first section is on synthesis and characterization of magnetic suspensions. The first paper in this section is dedicated partly to magnetite ferrofluids but with special aspects concerning the particle size tailoring them for applications especially in the field of magnetic hyperthermia. After this, three different types of `new' ferrofluids are presented. Fluids based on pure metal particles exhibiting much stronger magnetic properties than the common magnetite fluids, fluids with a temperature sensitive surfactant shell allowing a change of the particle’s hydrodynamic diameter by variation of the fluid’s temperature and fluids containing spheres of nonmagnetic material with embedded magnetic particles which are already used in new medical applications. The second section is dedicated to the basic physics of ferrofluids and highlights three different topics. First the question of magnetization dynamics is discussed and different aspects of this fundamental problem, which determines the basic description of ferrofluids, are highlighted. The second topic is the well known surface instability appearing in ferrofluids in a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the fluid surface. This part shows clearly how many undiscovered phenomena can be found, even in an area which is as old as the whole research field, if an appropriate measuring technique is used and fresh ideas help to find unexpected effects. The last part of this section deals with the question of dynamics and structure of ferrofluids and shows the experimental possibilities of scattering techniques in this field. Within the third section the question of field dependent changes of the rheological behaviour of ferrofluids is discussed. The first three papers provide theoretical approaches for the understanding of the connection between the rheological properties and shear and field induced changes in the fluid’s microstructure. The fourth paper provides the related experimental results showing the combination of microstructural and rheological measurements under well defined conditions. The last paper of this section does not directly belong to ferrofluid research but to a closely related field—so called magneto-rheological (MR) suspensions, which differ from ferrofluids mainly by the size of the suspended particles and the strength of the rheological effects. As modern theoretical approaches, like the one discussed by Liu et al in the second section have shown, the relation between the effects in ferrofluids and those in MR fluids is so close that it could probably be described in a common theory. Sections four and five contain the application orientated results. In the fourth section the medical applications are the focus of interest. The section starts with a paper which could have also been placed in the synthesis section—the growth of magnetotactic bacteria and the extraction of the magnetic particles produced by these bacteria. The paper also contains information about the characterization of the particles especially with respect to their application. The characterization aspect is then continued in two papers outlining new diagnostic techniques with close relation to future biomedical application of magnetic fluids. Next in vitro applications, especially questions of cell separation using magnetic forces, are highlighted before the final papers address the therapeutic aspects of magnetic drug targeting and magnetic hyperthermia. Finally the fifth section describes three different new approaches for the technical use of ferrofluids. Again, the specialized design of the fluids themselves is an important step towards the new application goals. Altogether the papers within this issue outline the unique potential of magnetically controlled suspensions, the interdisciplinary nature of the related research and the prospects of strongly networked and interdisciplinary activities in the field. I hope that it will give an insight into the fascination of ferrofluid research and a feeling for the advances made in the past years.

  17. Forord - Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Skjenneberg (ed.

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available As the case in the previous year, the conference was highly marked by the Chernobyl reactor accident. According to the contributed papers and the subsequent discussions, the problems are a good step nearer to be solved after one year trials and efforts.

  18. Editor's Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Jon Bartley

    2007-01-01

      This volume, the third in the series, contains the proceedings of the conference 'Law before Gratian' and covers a wide range of topics from individual and local studies to broader reflections on the status and function of law in medieval European societies before the scholastic legal 'revoluti...... to this volume are Maurizio Lupoi (Genova), Alic Rio (Oxford), Charles Radding (Michigan), Martin Brett (Cambridge), Bruce Brasington (West Texas A&M) and Dominique Bauer (Ghent)....

  19. PREFACE: Editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikhanov, Mikhail N.; Pivovarov, Yury L.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at 8th International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS'09), which was held in Zvenigorod, Moscow Region, Russia, from 7 to 11 September 2009, organized jointly by National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk), Russia. University MEPhI (Moscow) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk), Russia. RREPS was founded in September 1993 by an initiative of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia, with the intention of strengthening basic and applied research focused on radiation from relativistic particles in natural and artificial periodic structures. Since then, the symposium has developed into a forum attracting scientists from different fields and from many countries all over the world. RREPS'09 followed previous successful series of biennial RREPS symposia at Tomsk (1993, 1995, 1997, 2003), Baikal Lake (1999), Aya Lake (Altai, Russia, 2001) and Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic, 2007). Five NIMB topical issues (V 145 No 1-2, October 1998; V 173 No 1-2, January 2001; V 201(1) January 2003; V 227, Issues 1-2, January 2005; V 266, Issue 17, September 2008) have been published as outgrowth of these symposia. Traditionally, the RREPS program includes following topics: General Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation from Relativistic Particles Transition Radiation Parametric X- Radiation Diffraction Radiation and Smith-Purcell Effect Coherent Bremsstrahlung and Channeling Radiation Crystal- Assisted Processes Applications of Monochromatic X- and Gamma- Beams Produced at Electron Accelerators The present RREPS'09 Symposium was dedicated to the modern problems in radiation from relativistic electrons in crystals and other periodic structures, as well as to new applications of photon and electron beams. During the last few decades, electromagnetic radiation from relativistic particles, both in external fields and in matter, has always been an interesting field for investigation. Every kind of radiation reflects specific processes of fundamental atomic physics, classical or quantum electrodynamics and might have specific applications in accelerator physics (beam diagnostics), nuclear physics (hard photon sources), material science and medicine (X-Ray sources). Nowadays, electromagnetic radiation studies cover electron energies from a few MeV up to hundreds of GeV in many laboratories throughout the world. The goal is to study the physics of generation of various kinds of radiation and their interplay or combined effects and to find successful applications for them. New photon sources, which use new types of radiation at new accelerators (e.g. tabletop synchrotrons), may be considered complementary to conventional photon sources based on synchrotron radiation, undulator radiation and free electron lasers. We express our thanks to the members of the International Program Committee for their suggestions during the preparation of the scientific program of the workshop. We warmly thank the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow) and the Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk) for the financial and administrative support. We also acknowledge the valuable financial contributions by Russian Fund for Basic Research and "Dynasty" Foundation. Editors Mikhail N. Strikhanov National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Yury L. Pivovarov Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia

  20. GISP Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Pries-Heje , Jan; Roseman , Michael

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The process-based view is now an established paradigm for the design of organizations and their supportive systems. Business process management (BPM) is the discipline that comprises the set of methodologies, tools and techniques which facilitate the enterprise-wide establishment of process capabilities and projectspecific process lifecycle management support. Over the last decade, the field of BPM has matured substantially in terms of its practical uptake and impact a...

  1. Editor's preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    2001-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The Symposium on Fundamental Issues in Elementary Matter was held from September 25-29, 2000, in Bad Honnef, Germany. It brought together more than 50 leading experts on the structure and dynamics of elementary matter. The aim was to present a synopsis of recent developments in this rapidly progressing field. These proceedings bear witness that this goal has been fulfilled. The scope of the conference has been broad, spanning a variety of topics at the interface of nuclear and elementary particle physics. In the low-energy domain the focus was on nuclear structure, in particular exotic and superheavy nuclei. The recent discovery of new elements and of new fission phenomena makes this a fascinating topic. As a second focus of attention the many facets of elementary matter at high energies were the subject of various talks. Heavy ion collisions are in wide use to probe hadronic matter under conditions of extreme temperature and high density. Several phase transitions are expected to occur, most notably the phase transition to the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Various speakers addressed the physics of dense hadronic matter, the nuclear equation of state, strangeness and antimatter production and many related subjects, both from the theoretical and the experimental perspective. Other talks reported on recent advances like color superconductivity as a new theoretical speculation, first results from the STAR experiment at RHIC, or the newest developments in cosmic ray physics. This high-level symposium was dedicated to the memory of a distinguished scientist. Michael Danos, who died on Aug. 30, 1999 in Washington, DC. He had spent most of his professional life as a researcher at NIST, the former National Bureau of Standards. Michael was a physicist of wide ranging interests who made various important contributions to theoretical nuclear physics, e.g. in the areas of photonuclear reactions, relativistic many-body physics, and high-energy heavy ion collisions. This symposium was meant as a token of appreciation for his life, his work and his personality by his friends and colleagues. Mike certainly would have enjoyed the fine talks, the lively discussions, the excursion to the Oelberg, and the hospitable setting at the DPG conference center. My special thanks go to the Wilhelm und Else Heraeus Stiftung for its generous support, which made this symposium possible. I want to express my gratitude to Johann Rafelski, Tucson, for his advice. Thanks are also due to Mathias Brandstetter for his assistance in organizing the conference and to Joachim Reinhardt for his help in preparing the proceedings. Finally, I acknowledge the agreeable collaboration with Istvan Lovas, editor-in-chief of Heavy Ion Physics. (author)

  2. WLC Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Josep M.; Sebé, Francesc

    Low-cost devices are the key component of several applications: RFID tags permit an automated supply chain management while smart cards are a secure means of storing cryptographic keys required for remote and secure authentication in e-commerce and e-government applications. These devices must be cheap in order to permit their cost-effective massive manufacturing and deployment. Unfortunately, their low cost limits their computational power. Other devices such as nodes of sensor networks suffer from an additional constraint, namely, their limited battery life. Secure applications designed for these devices cannot make use of classical cryptographic primitives designed for full-fledged computers.

  3. Pravastatin and endothelium dependent vasomotion after coronary angioplasty: the PREFACE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, H J; Schalij, M J; Kauer, B; Visser, R F; van Dijkman, P R; Jukema, J W; Zwinderman, A H; Bruschke, A V

    2001-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor pravastatin ameliorates endothelium mediated responses of dilated coronary segments: the PREFACE (pravastatin related effects following angioplasty on coronary endothelium) trial. A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled, multicentre study. Four hospitals in the Netherlands. 63 non-smoking, non-hypercholesterolaemic patients scheduled for elective balloon angioplasty (pravastatin 34, placebo 29). The effects of three months of pravastatin treatment (40 mg daily) on endothelium dependent vasomotor function were studied. Balloon angioplasty was undertaken one month after randomisation, and coronary vasomotor function tests using acetylcholine were performed two months after balloon angioplasty. The angiograms were analysed quantitatively. The efficacy measure was the acetylcholine induced change in mean arterial diameter, determined in the dilated segment and in an angiographically normal segment of an adjacent non-manipulated coronary artery. Increasing acetylcholine doses produced vasoconstriction in the dilated segments (p = 0.004) but not in the normal segments. Pravastatin did not affect the vascular response to acetylcholine in either the dilated segments (p = 0.09) or the non-dilated sites. Endothelium dependent vasomotion in normal segments was correlated with that in dilated segments (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). There were fewer procedure related events in the pravastatin group than in the placebo group (p < 0.05). Endothelium dependent vasomotion in normal segments is correlated with that in dilated segments. A significant beneficial effect of pravastatin on endothelial function could not be shown, but in the dilated segments there was a trend towards a beneficial treatment effect in the pravastatin group.

  4. Developing Space Weather products and services in Europe – Preface to the Special Issue on COST Action ES0803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belehaki Anna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available COST Action ES0803 “Developing Space Weather products and services in Europe” primarily aimed at forming an interdisciplinary network among European scientists dealing with different issues relevant to Geospace as well as warning system developers and operators in order to assess existing Space Weather products and recommend new ones. The work that has been implemented from 2008 to 2012 resulted in advances in modeling and predicting Space Weather, in recommendations for the validation of Space Weather models, in proposals for new Space Weather products and services, and in dissemination, training, and outreach activities. This preface summarizes the most important achievements of this European activity that are detailed in this special issue by the key scientists who participated in COST Action ES0803.

  5. FOREWORD Nanomaterials science Nanomaterials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Heinrich

    2010-10-01

    The nanometer regime covers the transition from condensed matter behavior to atomic and molecular properties and thus is a very rich but also very demanding area in materials science. Close to the condensed matter side, properties and functions might still very well be scalable, whereas close to the atomic and molecular side, the scalability is mostly lost. Properties and functions change qualitatively or quantitatively by orders of magnitude when the dimensions become smaller than a critical size in the nanometer range. Examples are the ballistic regime for electron or spin transport at dimensions below the mean free path, near-field effects in scanning near-field optical microscopy and quantum wells when the dimensions are below an appropriate wavelength, novel electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties when the number of bulk atoms becomes smaller than that of surface atoms, quantum conduction, and Coulomb blockade. Thus, by going below a certain size, an abundance of novel properties and functions are at one's disposal, or, in other words, we can functionalize materials simply by reducing their size to the nanoscale. The key to the future lies in the functions that we give to materials, not just in finding 'novel functional materials'. This catch expression in many materials science programs and initiatives of the past two decades sounds great, but it is not what really counts. All materials are functional in one way or another and, therefore, all new materials are 'novel functional materials'. Certainly, finding new materials is always an important part of progress, but we should also focus on the much larger domain of novel functions that we can give to existing or modified materials. A good example is semiconductors: they are fifty or more years old and their properties are very well known, but they were not of widespread interest and use until the transistor changed their destiny into being the central material in the information technology revolution. Interfaces gave them their functions, and shaping them into ever-smaller functional components made them indispensably omnipresent as transistors—produced in billions per person and per year—and they are no doubt the rulers of today's technical world. The semiconductor and transistor serve as an inspiring example of functionalizing materials. The developments of microelectronics profited very much from scalability, that is, the properties and functions do not change significantly with size. Therefore, every step toward smaller dimensions was a technical and commercial challenge with risks well under control. The transition to the nanoscale, however, is discontinuous. Examples of this transition are the local probe methods that exploit the mechanically controlled proximity to the object under consideration and that have become indispensable as microscopes and as measuring and modifying tools, the size of molecular components that are much smaller than the smallest possibly achievable transistor, the properties and functions of materials below a critical size as mentioned above, the continuum properties versus discrete ones, and novel concepts inspired by living nature. Those novel concepts include growing circuits first and building the active components at the nodes afterwards and measuring weak by weak, small by small, and many by many. It is these discontinuous steps that make the nanoscale different, not just smaller. They pose exciting challenges, open great opportunities and nearly unlimited possibilities, but they also carry serious technical, commercial, environmental, and health risks. The nanoscale is also a great opportunity for materials science in general. Materials science is interdisciplinary per se. A materials scientist should have a reasonable understanding of physics, chemistry, engineering, and more recently, also biology. Certainly one can always team up with representatives from other disciplines and forge collaborations. However, an effective team can only emerge from a common understanding of the respective languages and problems. The lack of such an understanding is the Achilles' heel of so many collaborations. Despite the intrinsic interdisciplinary nature, materials science has split into various segments according to the type of material, for example, metals, organic, inorganic, biological, molecular, and so on. Each of them leads an independent life with little understanding for the others. This segmentation has made materials science lose, to an undesirable extent, its all-embracing mission for science and technology. There are laudable efforts to reunite different branches of materials science into comprehensive institutions; examples are NIMS in Tsukuba and IMR at Tohoku University, but institutions alone do not make the day. The nanoscale provides an excellent opportunity for scientists. The nanoscale was the bifurcation point where disciplines split and developed their own disciplinary views and language. This was the necessary core for the tremendous developments of science. Technology always had to rely on broader views. Now, disciplines merge again at the nanoscale, which will hopefully bring back to materials science much of what was lost over recent decades. It is difficult to delimit the nanodomain using general criteria since everything consists of atoms that are roughly a third of a nanometer in size, as is their distance from each other in condensed matter. In most cases, the individual addressabilities of nanostructures, properties, and processes are important. Atoms emerged from the anonymity as members of an ensemble; they have become our partners as individuals. As upper limits for nano, we might agree on 100-200 nm in object size and 1-10 nm in accuracy for local positioning, measuring, modifying, and controlling processes. The lower limit is open; a hundredth of a nanometer in positioning and measuring is nothing extraordinary. As a reviewer, I would accept a very interesting and daring research proposal, even if it interprets 'nano' somewhat too generously. After all, we want to promote top-class research and not average research just for the sake of 'nano'. Interfaces, material growth at given nano positions, shaping materials to a given nanosize and form, and bistability are key elements for functionalizing materials. InterfacesThe role of interfaces is rapidly increasing in science and technology. The number of interfaces increases with the square of the number of phases of materials. Even if the majority of them are impractical or useless, they are still much more abundant than the materials themselves, and they are the key to new functions. Think of the simple 'mechanical' interface responsible for the lotus effect where wetting is prevented by the rapidly changing surface curvature due to nanoparticles. Think of all the connections of a nanometer-sized area between very different materials, for example, for electron or spin transport. Think of the delicate interfaces that protect nanofunctional units from the environment but allow for communication of various types with other nanocomponents or with the macroscopic world. The solid-liquid interface plays a special role here. For me, it is the interface of the future, both for local growth and removal of nm3 quantities and for working with biological specimens requiring a liquid environment. Interfaces are the 'faces of action' and nanoscale materials science will be, to a great extent, 'interface science'. There is no need to change the name; attentive awareness suffices. Material growth at given nano positionsThis is the second central challenge in nanoscale materials science, but maybe still a futuristic one. We have heard much about the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. They do a great job in certain applications, like tips of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopes or nanoinjection needles or as bundles for electron emission or electron transport. As single carbon nanotubes of various lengths in complex micro- and nano-electronic circuits, however, they have to be grown at given positions, which is still problematic. Another example concerns the assembly scenario for electronics, components like sensors, actuators, and nano-systems. Macromolecular chemistry is producing highly functional macromolecules, but, eventually, they have to be produced and assembled at given positions. Shaping materials to a given nanosize and formIn the field of micro- and nanoelectronics, shaping semiconductors, many oxides, and selected metals down to 20-100 nm dimensions is standard. In nanomechanics, however, other materials might be more appropriate and better suited for a given task. In other cases, finishing procedures might be impossible or too time-consuming for large numbers of them. Components for counting electrons—more elegant and smaller than today's single-electron transistors—or adjustable holes for counting atoms and molecules will eventually be badly needed because of the 1/√N fluctuations in the properties and measurements at a small N, for example, N dopants in nanosize transistors or N electrons in very short current pulses. Bistable componentsBistable components, which do not require electrical currents, are aimed at reducing local energy dissipation and faster startup of personal computers. Magnetoresistive and ferroelectric random access memory (MRAMS and FRAMS) devices are the first attempts to use them in circuits. I am not aware of reported switching times that are considerably faster than a few nanoseconds, as required in today's storage. This is too slow for memory and much too slow for possible logic devices based on two-terminal bistable components. Bistable molecules, a mechanical switch, might be a valid and sufficiently fast alternative, certainly with all the challenges mentioned above. I have mentioned just a few obvious examples of the involvement of materials science in the new world of nanodimensions. However, for materials scientists, the sky is the limit. The thoughts given above are partly reflected in the lectures that I have recently given in Japan. It is my pleasure to thank my colleagues for the mutual understanding and hospitality that I always experience in Japan.

  6. Foreword by the guest editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Stričević

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Libellarium includes papers from the invited speakers who gave lectures at the Summer School in User Studies (SSUS organized by the Department of Information Sciences and held at the University of Zadar, 11. - 14. April, 2012. The SSUS is associated with the Knowledge Society and Information Transfer PhD programme at the Department of Information Sciences at the University of Zadar. This programme is designed for Croatian and international doctoral students in the field of theories and studies of information needs and use, as well as the field of reading and learning concepts and strategies in digital environment. The main goal of the Summer School 2012 was to introduce the participants to the most recent research, the latest developments and the newly emerged concepts in the fields of users’ information behaviour, learning and education in the digital age, information literacy theories and concepts, as well as the reading paradigms. In the recent times the information society changes rapidly which influences processing and the approaches to information while it changes the existing paradigms of learning and education. New literacies emerge and reading, as the key competency necessary to access the information, changes its forms and practices. The SUSS organized the above mentioned issues in three segments: Users’ information behaviour, Literacy and reading in the digital environment, and Learning and education in the digital age. In the Users’ information behaviour segment this issue of Libellarium contains articles from two invited speakers and two doctoral students who discuss the subject from different viewpoints. Paul Sturges starts with the assumption that people are much more dependent than they realise on information and ideas that are acquired and processed by areas of the brain, not always immediately accessible to the conscious mind. Polona Vilar discusses information behaviour of scholars and scholarly practice influenced by increased accessibility of digital resources and tools. Doctoral students Dora Rubinić and Darko Lacović base their literature reviews on the specific context of university students’ information behaviour. The former review deals with information behavior of university students in general, while the latter one deals with university students’ information behaviour in relation to the role of academic libraries. Four invited speakers discuss literacy and reading in the digital environment. Livija Knaflič presents literacy as a complex phenomenon and focuses her work toward psychological aspects of literacy. Sonja Špiranec investigates information literacy in the context of Web 2.0 which transformed information environments into complex and unstructured places so the contexts of information literacy are being re-examined and reshaped respectively. Ivanka Kuić writes about the postmodern theoretical approaches to the reader and the validity of these approaches in the digital environment while emphasizing that existing concepts of the reader and reading adapt to electronic environment, because the electronic text deconstructs the printed one and it changes the way of reading. Vita Mozuraite discusses these rapid changes in the reading paradigm in the age of e-book to which the young readers are especially susceptible considering their frequent use of the internet. The changes in information environment influence learning. This fact demands careful consideration from education experts in order to achieve the maximal degree of the rich media environment contribution to the quality of education. Hence, Milan Matijević writes about the influence the e-environment has on the new curriculum paradigms. These papers are the starting point for the new directions of thought about the changes in the digital environment that reflect on information behaviour, learning and the related practices. The papers were received in 2012/2013 and were peer reviewed in 2013/2014. * Department of Information Sciences, University of Zadar, Croatia e-mail: istricev@unizd.hr

  7. FOREWORD: Materials metrology Materials metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Seton; Valdés, Joaquin

    2010-04-01

    It seems that so much of modern life is defined by the materials we use. From aircraft to architecture, from cars to communications, from microelectronics to medicine, the development of new materials and the innovative application of existing ones have underpinned the technological advances that have transformed the way we live, work and play. Recognizing the need for a sound technical basis for drafting codes of practice and specifications for advanced materials, the governments of countries of the Economic Summit (G7) and the European Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 1982 to establish the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS). This project supports international trade by enabling scientific collaboration as a precursor to the drafting of standards. The VAMAS participants recognized the importance of agreeing a reliable, universally accepted basis for the traceability of the measurements on which standards depend for their preparation and implementation. Seeing the need to involve the wider metrology community, VAMAS approached the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM). Following discussions with NMI Directors and a workshop at the BIPM in February 2005, the CIPM decided to establish an ad hoc Working Group on the metrology applicable to the measurement of material properties. The Working Group presented its conclusions to the CIPM in October 2007 and published its final report in 2008, leading to the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding between VAMAS and the BIPM. This MoU recognizes the work that is already going on in VAMAS as well as in the Consultative Committees of the CIPM and establishes a framework for an ongoing dialogue on issues of materials metrology. The question of what is meant by traceability in the metrology of the properties of materials is particularly vexed when the measurement results depend on a specified procedure. In these cases, confidence in results requires not only traceable calibration of the various instruments and standards used but also the reliable application of an accepted measurement procedure. Nowhere is this more evident than in the use of hardness scales, which are not directly traceable to the SI. This special issue of Metrologia includes a summary of the findings and conclusions of the Working Group and a further 14 papers covering the full range of properties of interest in science, engineering and standards making. It includes papers by authors at eight national measurement institutes and four other research centres. In addition to mechanical properties, there are papers addressing issues associated with the measurement of electromagnetic, acoustic and optical properties as well as those arising from the specific structural features of many new materials. As guest editors, we are extremely grateful to all the authors who have contributed to this special issue on the measurement of the properties of materials. We hope it will contribute to a wider appreciation of many of the associated issues and foster a growing understanding of the importance of ensuring that all such measurements are performed in accordance with accepted standards and procedures, with proper attention to the need to establish the traceability of the results. Only in this way can the performance, safety and fitness for purpose of products be guaranteed.

  8. FOREWORD: Special issue on density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kenichi

    2004-04-01

    This special issue on density was undertaken to provide readers with an overview of the present state of the density standards for solids, liquids and gases, as well as the technologies developed for measuring density. This issue also includes topics on the refractive index of gases and on techniques used for calibrating hydrometers so that almost all areas concerned with density standards are covered in four review articles and seven original articles, most of which describe current research being conducted at national metrology institutes (NMIs). A review article was invited from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum to highlight research on the magnetic suspension densimeters. In metrology, the determinations of the volume of a weight and the density of air are of primary importance in establishing a mass standard because the effect of the buoyancy force of air acting on the weight must be known accurately to determine the mass of the weight. A density standard has therefore been developed at many NMIs with a close relation to the mass standard. Hydrostatic weighing is widely used to measure the volume of a solid. The most conventional hydrostatic weighing method uses water as a primary density standard for measuring the volume of a solid. A brief history of the determination of the density of water is therefore given in a review article, as well as a recommended value for the density of water with a specified isotopic abundance. The most modern technique for hydrostatic weighing uses a solid density standard instead of water. For this purpose, optical interferometers for measuring the diameters of silicon spheres have been developed to convert the length standard into the volume standard with a small uncertainty. A review article is therefore dedicated to describing the state-of-the-art optical interferometers developed for silicon spheres. Relative combined standard uncertainties of several parts in 108 have been achieved today for measuring the volume and density of silicon spheres. These technologies are currently being used not only for establishing a solid density standard, but also for determining the Avogadro constant by the x-ray crystal density method, where the density, molar mass and lattice constant of a silicon crystal are measured based on the definition of the SI units. Considering that much of the present research on the Avogadro constant has been undertaken to replace the present definition of the kilogram with a new definition based on a number of atoms, it is satisfying to note that the most accurate density standard may contribute to a new definition of the kilogram. Differential density measurements by hydrostatic weighing and by the pressure of flotation method developed for measuring the density differences between silicon crystals and solids are given in a review article and three original articles, where combined standard uncertainties of a few parts in 108 have been achieved in measuring relative density differences. These technologies are being used not only for the determination of the Avogadro constant, but also for evaluating defects in silicon crystals used in the semiconductor industry. Another important liquid used in the density standard is mercury because the pressured standard determined from mercury column barometers, the molar gas constant determined from an acoustic resonator, and the Josephson constant determined from a mercury voltmeter are all dependent on the density of mercury. A review article is therefore dedicated to an overview of the history, recommended value and recent progress in the measurement of the density of mercury. This special issue also features the technologies developed for measuring the thermodynamic properties of fluids. New instruments with a magnetic suspension balance have substantially improved the uncertainty in measuring the density of fluids at elevated pressures and temperatures. Two review articles and an original article are therefore dedicated to describing the history, principle and recent progress in magnetic suspension densimeters. When the diamagnetic properties of organic liquids are taken into account, an unprecedented uncertainty of a few parts in 106 can be achieved for density measurements at high pressures. The papers collected in this special issue reflect the general trends in research on density standards. I hope that this special issue will stimulate new directions of research in the density standard, and also help to create more accurate, reliable and convenient methods for many applications. Thanks are addressed to all the authors who have contributed to this special issue on density, to the referees who have given their time, and also to the former editor Professor Martin and the present editor Dr~Williams for their support and useful suggestions in collecting the articles.

  9. Foreword: Biology/embodiment/desire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Jennifer; Willey, Angela

    2018-04-03

    The sexological roots of "lesbian" and the "queer" turn from biologized categories of sexual difference pose an exciting set of questions and tensions for thinking about queer feminism and biological meanings. This issue seeks to open space to explore how we might reconcile assumptions about "female same-sex sexuality" that often accompany "lesbian" with queer and trans-feminist treatments of science, embodiment, and desiring, while at the same time insisting on the importance of an undertheorized dyke legacy for thinking the at-once material and political nature of sexuality.

  10. Foreword/Prólogo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    "Bringing together 32 scholars contributing 27 chapters, this book, entitled 'Diaspora, Migration, Communication Technologies and Transnational Identities' delivers a fascinating cross-disciplinary insight into some of the current social and mediatized dynamics that inform identitary processes in...

  11. FOREWORD Applications of Data Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this age of BigData, there is increasing interest in analysing data emanating from heterogenous sources. Developing statistical and computational techniques for such data analysis problems is the focus of the emerging ... and Automation,.

  12. Foreword by the guest editors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The articles indicate, often tacitly, that a policy framework is the first step to the goal of social cohesion but if policies are not supported by interventions and political will, both at the macro and micro level, social cohesion will be nothing more than a theoretical concept. The pursuit of social cohesion can be seen as the ...

  13. A Foreword from the Editor

    OpenAIRE

    KAKİLLİ ACARAVCI, Songül

    2018-01-01

    It is my great pleasure to present the inaugural issue of Journal of Politics, Economy, and Management(JOPEM): an interdisciplinarypeer-reviewed academic journal of a new kind publishedbi-annually by the Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences in MustafaKemal University. The JOPEM providesa platform for academics, practitioners and policymakers to share theirresearch.Adouble-blind peer-review method is used in the acceptance of manuscripts, andcompilations, conceptual discussions, em...

  14. Multimedia content classification metrics for content adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Rui; Andrade, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia content consumption is very popular nowadays. However, not every content can be consumed in its original format: the combination of content, transport and access networks, consumption device and usage environment characteristics may all pose restrictions to that purpose. One way to provide the best possible quality to the user is to adapt the content according to these restrictions as well as user preferences. This adaptation stage can be best executed if knowledge about the conten...

  15. Multimedia content classification metrics for content adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Rui; Andrade, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia content consumption is very popular nowadays. However, not every content can be consumed in its original format: the combination of content, transport and access networks, consumption device and usage environment characteristics may all pose restrictions to that purpose. One way to provide the best possible quality to the user is to adapt the content according to these restrictions as well as user preferences. This adaptation stage can be best executed if knowledge about the conten...

  16. The preface by João Cabral de Melo Neto to Em Va Fer Joan Brossa: Theory and practice of realism in two poets from the post-war.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melcion Mateu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1951, the book Em va fer Joan Brossa [Joan Brossa  Made me] was published in Barcelona, with a preface by João Cabral de Melo Neto. It is a useful text to better understand Brossa as well as Cabral; it is a significant text in order to grasp the individual response of these poets to the problem of returning to realism for the early post-war period. A translation of João Cabral de Melo Neto's preface, previously unpublished in Portuguese, is presented here.

  17. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  18. Digital Content Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Halbheer, Daniel; Stahl, Florian; Koenigsberg, Oded; Lehmann, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies content strategies for online publishers of digital information goods. It examines sampling strategies and compares their performance to paid content and free content strategies. A sampling strategy, where some of the content is offered for free and consumers are charged for access to the rest, is known as a "metered model" in the newspaper industry. We analyze optimal decisions concerning the size of the sample and the price of the paid content when sampling serves the dua...

  19. Publishing and Revising Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editors and Webmasters can publish content without going through a workflow. Publishing times and dates can be set, and multiple pages can be published in bulk. Making an edit to published content created a revision.

  20. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    hospitality. It is my privilege and pleasure to welcome you all to the 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces here in Taipei. Tom Thomas Halmstad, 1st June 2013 Greetings from Chairman of Local Organizing CommitteeVictor Lin It is the great honor of Center for Measurement Standards (CMS), metrology group of Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), to host the 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013) from 17-21 June, 2013, in Taipei, Taiwan. In collaboration with four local universities, National Taiwan University (NTU), National Cheng-Kung University (NCKU), National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (NTST) and National Tsing-Hua University (NTHU), we have spent more than one year to prepare this Conference since the approval by the International Programme Committee (IPC). With the guidance from the IPC, we are able to go through the laborious, but important, process of paper selection and review from more than 100 submissions, and also to maintain the tradition in gathering the high quality and state-of-the-art papers. Finally, more than 65 full papers are collected in the programme (oral and poster), and over 120 surface metrologists from 17 countries (or economies) will attend the Conference. As stated in the preface by Professor Thomas, this series of conferences were founded by Tom and late Professor Ken Stout in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago. I was lucky to join Ken's research group in Birmingham, and to start my journey over surface metrology in 1989, under the financial support from ITRI. With the encouragement from Professor Liam Blunt and endeavors of my colleagues, we are able to hold the Conference first time in emerging Asia, and to ''carry on the heritage and pave the way to the future'' (a Chinese proverb) in surface metrology. Taiwan is also known as Formosa, from Portuguese Ilha Formosa, which means ''Beautiful Island

  1. Plasmaspheric electron content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, G.K.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the plasmaspheric electron content are reviewed with particular reference to the ATS-6 radio beacon experiment. From the review, it appears likely that measurement of the plasmaspheric electron content is the only one capable of monitoring electron fluxes continuously between L 1 and L 2. Some recent important results deduced from plasmaspheric electron content measurements are discussed

  2. Naturalising Representational Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out a view about the explanatory role of representational content and advocates one approach to naturalising content – to giving a naturalistic account of what makes an entity a representation and in virtue of what it has the content it does. It argues for pluralism about the metaphysics of content and suggests that a good strategy is to ask the content question with respect to a variety of predictively successful information processing models in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience; and hence that data from psychology and cognitive neuroscience should play a greater role in theorising about the nature of content. Finally, the contours of the view are illustrated by drawing out and defending a surprising consequence: that individuation of vehicles of content is partly externalist. PMID:24563661

  3. The minimum description length principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D. Grünwald (Peter)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe pdf file in the repository consists only if the preface, foreword and chapter 1; I am not allowed by the publisher to put the remainder of this book on the web. If you are a member of the CWI evaluation committee and yu read this: you are of course entitled to access the full

  4. Our Cosmic Origins: From the Big Bang to the Emergence of Life and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsemme, Armand H.; de Duve, Foreword by Christian

    2001-01-01

    Preface Christian de Duve; Foreword; 1. Locating man in the universe; 2. The race towards complexity; 3. The stellar alchemy of metals; 4. The formation of the planets; 5. Emergence of life; 6. History of life; 7. Awakening of intelligence; 8. The other worlds; 9. Perspectives; Appendices; Glossary; References; Name index; Subject index.

  5. Education and Work. Proceedings of the International Conference Linking Research and Practice (Toronto, Ontario, March 4-6, 1993). Volumes 1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, David, Ed.; Lawton, Stephen B., Ed.

    These two volumes comprise the proceedings of a conference on links between education and work and the power relationships in the wider culture and in its social order. Each volume begins with a "Foreword" (Ronald C. Morrison), "Preface" (Arthur Kruger), "Introduction" (David Corson), and author notes. Volume I…

  6. Coping with global environmental change, disasters and security: threats, challenges, vulnerabilities and risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauch, H.G.; Oswald Spring, Ú.; Mesjasz, C.; Grin, J.; Kameri-Mbote, P.; Chourou, B.; Dunay, P.; Birkmann, J.

    2011-01-01

    This policy-focused Global Environmental and Human Security Handbook for the Anthropo-cene (GEHSHA) addresses new security threats, challenges, vulnerabilities and risks posed by global environmental change and disasters. In 6 forewords, 5 preface essays 95 peer reviewed chapcountries analyse in 10

  7. PREFACE: Festschrift to mark the sixtieth birthday of Professor Jens Lothe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jøssang, Torstein; Barnett, David M.

    1992-01-01

    with their work. No doubt his warm personality, natural curiosity and willingness to promote and seize opportunities for collaboration across national boundaries is what has allowed great intellect stationed in a somewhat remote part of the scientific community to engender such a large international following, when other gifted men might have chosen to work in isolation under similar circumstances. Vladimir Alshits may have said it best during his visit to Oslo last April, namely, "There are three Norwegian names known to every Russian—Henrik Ibsen, Fridtjof Nansen and Jens Lothe". None of this is meant to imply that Jens has neglected or ignored his colleagues in Norway. Indeed, quite the contrary is true, but we believe the exposition on the development within the Solid State Group and the Cooperative Phenomena Program at the University of Oslo and at NTH in Trondheim in this symposium and its proceedings, presented by the local staff and present close associates addresses Jens Lothe's contribution on the home front far better than this preface would allow. We believe we speak for all the symposium attendees by extending to Jens the happiest greetings and our best wishes for continued health and happiness.

  8. Qualitative Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Mayring

    2000-01-01

    The article describes an approach of systematic, rule guided qualitative text analysis, which tries to preserve some methodological strengths of quantitative content analysis and widen them to a concept of qualitative procedure. First the development of content analysis is delineated and the basic principles are explained (units of analysis, step models, working with categories, validity and reliability). Then the central procedures of qualitative content analysis, inductive development of ca...

  9. Hydroponics: Content and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Busby, Joe R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology education has the means of becoming the catalyst for integrated content and curricula, especially in core academic areas, such as science and mathematics, where it has been found difficult to incorporate other subject matter. Technology is diverse enough in nature that it can be addressed by a variety of content areas, serving as a true…

  10. Branded content infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl RODRÍGUEZ-FERRÁNDIZ

    2017-01-01

    Reseña del libro Bajo la influencia del branded content. Efectos de los contenidos de marca en niños y jóvenes. Review of the book Bajo la influencia del branded content. Efectos de los contenidos de marca en niños y jóvenes.

  11. Branded content infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl RODRÍGUEZ-FERRÁNDIZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reseña del libro Bajo la influencia del branded content. Efectos de los contenidos de marca en niños y jóvenes. Review of the book Bajo la influencia del branded content. Efectos de los contenidos de marca en niños y jóvenes.

  12. Print advertising: vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.; Fransen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in

  13. Print advertising : Vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.H.H.J.; Fransen, M.L.

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in

  14. Qualitative Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Satu Elo; Maria Kääriäinen; Outi Kanste; Tarja Pölkki; Kati Utriainen; Helvi Kyngäs

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative content analysis is commonly used for analyzing qualitative data. However, few articles have examined the trustworthiness of its use in nursing science studies. The trustworthiness of qualitative content analysis is often presented by using terms such as credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability, and authenticity. This article focuses on trustworthiness based on a review of previous studie...

  15. Social video content delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Wenwu

    2016-01-01

    This brief presents new architecture and strategies for distribution of social video content. A primary framework for socially-aware video delivery and a thorough overview of the possible approaches is provided. The book identifies the unique characteristics of socially-aware video access and social content propagation, revealing the design and integration of individual modules that are aimed at enhancing user experience in the social network context. The change in video content generation, propagation, and consumption for online social networks, has significantly challenged the traditional video delivery paradigm. Given the massive amount of user-generated content shared in online social networks, users are now engaged as active participants in the social ecosystem rather than as passive receivers of media content. This revolution is being driven further by the deep penetration of 3G/4G wireless networks and smart mobile devices that are seamlessly integrated with online social networking and media-sharing s...

  16. Learning Content Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tache JURUBESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explains the evolution of e-Learning and related concepts and tools and its connection with other concepts such as Knowledge Management, Human Resources Management, Enterprise Resource Planning, and Information Technology. The paper also distinguished Learning Content Management Systems from Learning Management Systems and Content Management Systems used for general web-based content. The newest Learning Content Management System, very expensive and yet very little implemented is one of the best tools that helps us to cope with the realities of the 21st Century in what learning concerns. The debates over how beneficial one or another system is for an organization, can be driven by costs involved, efficiency envisaged, and availability of the product on the market.

  17. Building and Contents Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, William C.

    Insurance coverage of school buildings and contents is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain, and increases of 50 percent or more in the premium are not uncommon. Methods of reducing premium increases are outlined in this speech. (MLF)

  18. Selenium content of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijve, T

    1977-07-29

    The selenium contents of 83 species of wild mushrooms were determined by oxygen combustion of the sample, followed by conversion of selenite to bromopiazselenol and final estimation by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography. Selenium concentration were found to range from 0.012-20.0 mg/kg dry weight. Selenium content was species-dependent. High concentrations were found in Agaricaceae and in certain Boletaceae of the genus Tubiporus, whereas in Russulaceae, Amanitaceae and Cantharellaceae selenium-rich species were absent or rare. Ascomycetes and all mushrooms growing on wood had a very low selenium content. The highest selenium concentrations (up to 20 ppm) were found in Boletus (Tubiporus) edulis, a most popular edible mushroom. Analyses of various parts of carpophores of B. edulis, Suillus luteus and Amanita muscaria indicate that in all three species the stalk contains less selenium than the fleshy part of the cap. In Boletus and Suillus the highest selenium content was found in the tubes.

  19. METHODS OF CONTENTS CURATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kukharenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Content curated - a new activity (started in 2008 qualified network users with process large amounts of information to represent her social network users. To prepare content curators developed 7 weeks distance course, which examines the functions, methods and tools curator. Courses showed a significant relationship success learning on the availability of advanced personal learning environment and the ability to process and analyze information.

  20. Qualitative Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Elo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative content analysis is commonly used for analyzing qualitative data. However, few articles have examined the trustworthiness of its use in nursing science studies. The trustworthiness of qualitative content analysis is often presented by using terms such as credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability, and authenticity. This article focuses on trustworthiness based on a review of previous studies, our own experiences, and methodological textbooks. Trustworthiness was described for the main qualitative content analysis phases from data collection to reporting of the results. We concluded that it is important to scrutinize the trustworthiness of every phase of the analysis process, including the preparation, organization, and reporting of results. Together, these phases should give a reader a clear indication of the overall trustworthiness of the study. Based on our findings, we compiled a checklist for researchers attempting to improve the trustworthiness of a content analysis study. The discussion in this article helps to clarify how content analysis should be reported in a valid and understandable manner, which would be of particular benefit to reviewers of scientific articles. Furthermore, we discuss that it is often difficult to evaluate the trustworthiness of qualitative content analysis studies because of defective data collection method description and/or analysis description.

  1. Preface to the Special Issue on FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Mission Early Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chio-Zong (Frank Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Six identical micro-satellites comprising the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Formosa Satellite #3 and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate mission were successfully launched into a circular low-Earth orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California at 01:40 UTC on April 15, 2006. The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission is a collaborative project jointly carried out by the National Space Organization (NSPO in Taiwan and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR in USA, with the participation of many governmental, academic and private institutions. Each FORMOSAT-3 satellite carries three primary science instruments: a GPS Occultation Experiment (GOX payload, a Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP, and a Tri-Band Beacon (TBB payload. The GOX provides vertical sounding of atmospheric profiles around the globe and electron density profiles in the ionosphere. The TIP instrument is a narrow band far-ultraviolet radiometer; it operates in the 131.0 _{ 160.0 nm bandwidth with a focus wavelength at 135.6 nm to measure the line-of-sight total electron content. The TBB transmits phase coherent, continuous signals at three frequencies: VHF (150.012 MHz, UHF (400.032 MHz, and L-band (1066.752 MHz to provide ionospheric observations to ground-based receivers.

  2. Factors stimulating content marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to determine factors influencing on content marketing in banking industry. The study designs a questionnaire consists of 40 questions in Likert scale and distributes it among 550 randomly selected regular customers of Bank Mellat in city of Tehran, Iran and 400 properly filled questionnaires are collected. Cronbach alphas for all components of the survey are well above desirable level. Using principle component analysis with Varimax rotation, the study has determined six factors influencing the most on content marketing including organization, details, having new ideas, quality, sensitivity and power while the last component contains only two subcomponents and is removed from the study.

  3. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  4. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  5. PREFACE: XVIII International School on Nuclear Physics, Neutron Physics and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Chavdar; Janeva, Natalia

    2010-11-01

    This volume contains the lectures and short talks given at the XVIII International School on Nuclear Physics, Neutron Physics and Applications. The School was held from 21 to 27 September 2009 in Hotel 'Lilia' located on 'Golden Sands' (Zlatni Pyasaci) Resort Complex on the Black Sea coast, near Varna, Bulgaria. The School was organized by Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy of Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Co-organizer of the School was Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency. The event was sponsored by National Science Fund of Bulgaria. According to the long-standing tradition the School has taken place every second year since 1973. The School content has been restructured according to our new enlarged international links and today it is more similar to an international conference than to a classical nuclear physics school. This new image attracts a lot of young scientists and students from many countries. This year - 2009, we had the pleasure to welcome more than 50 distinguished scientists as lecturers. Additionally, 14 young colleagues received the opportunity to present a short contribution. The program ranges from recent achievements in nuclear structure and reactions to the hot problems of the application of nuclear methods, reactor physics and nuclear safety. The 94 participants enjoyed the scientific presentations and discussions as well as the relaxing atmosphere at the beach and the pleasant evenings. The main topics were the following: Nuclear excitations at various energies. Nuclei at high angular moments and temperature. Structure and reactions far from stability Symmetries and collective phenomena Methods for lifetime measurements Astrophysical aspects of nuclear structure Neutron nuclear physics Nuclear data Advanced methods in nuclear waste treatment Nuclear methods for applications Several colleagues contributed to the organization of the School. We would like to thank to them and especially to the Scientific Secretary of the School Dr

  6. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2013: FAIR NExt generation of ScientistS 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hannah; Destefanis, Marco; Galatyuk, Tetyana; Montes, Fernando; Nicmorus, Diana; Ratti, Claudia; Tolos, Laura; Vogel, Sascha

    2014-04-01

    FAIRNESS 2013 was the second edition in a series of workshops designed to bring together excellent international young scientists with research interests focused on physics at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) and was held on 16-21 September 2013 in Berlin, Germany. The topics of the workshop cover a wide range of aspects in both theoretical developments and current experimental status, concentrated around the four scientific pillars of FAIR. FAIR is a new accelerator complex with brand new experimental facilities, that is currently being built next to the existing GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Schwerionenforschung close to Darmstadt, Germany. The spirit of the conference is to bring together young scientists, e.g. advanced PhD students and postdocs and young researchers without permanent position to present their work, to foster active informal discussions and build up of networks. Every participant in the meeting with the exception of the organizers gives an oral presentation, and all sessions are followed by an hour long discussion period. During the talks, questions are anonymously collected in box to stimulate discussions. Since the physics program of FAIR is very broad, this is reflected in the wide range of topics covered at the Conference: Physics of hot and dense nuclear matter, QCD phase transitions and critical point Nuclear structure, astrophysics and reactions Hadron spectroscopy, Hadrons in matter and Hypernuclei Special emphasis is put on the experiments CBM, HADES, PANDA, NuSTAR, as well as NICA and the RHIC low beam energy scan New developments in atomic and plasma physics For all of these different areas one invited speaker was selected to give a longer introductory presentation. The write-ups of the talks presented at FAIRNESS 2013 are the content of this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and have been refereed according to the IOP standard for peer review. This issue constitutes therefore a collection of the forefront of

  7. Trustworthy content push

    OpenAIRE

    Kuntze, Nicolai; Schmidt, Andreas U.

    2006-01-01

    Delivery of content to mobile devices gains increasing importance in industrial environments to support employees in the field. An important application are e-mail push services like the fashionable Blackberry. These systems are facing security challenges regarding data transport to, and storage of the data on the end user equipment. The emerging Trusted Computing technology offers new answers to these open questions.

  8. LCS Content Document Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstadt, Jake

    2011-01-01

    My project at KSC during my spring 2011 internship was to develop a Ruby on Rails application to manage Content Documents..A Content Document is a collection of documents and information that describes what software is installed on a Launch Control System Computer. It's important for us to make sure the tools we use everyday are secure, up-to-date, and properly licensed. Previously, keeping track of the information was done by Excel and Word files between different personnel. The goal of the new application is to be able to manage and access the Content Documents through a single database backed web application. Our LCS team will benefit greatly with this app. Admin's will be able to login securely to keep track and update the software installed on each computer in a timely manner. We also included exportability such as attaching additional documents that can be downloaded from the web application. The finished application will ease the process of managing Content Documents while streamlining the procedure. Ruby on Rails is a very powerful programming language and I am grateful to have the opportunity to build this application.

  9. Tourist-created Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    study of social media sites and destination brands, relying on qualitative research methods, content analysis and field research. Findings – Tourists are largely contributing to destination image formation, while avoiding the use of the formal elements of the brands. The most popular strategies used...

  10. Loser Generated Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Mørk

    2008-01-01

    In this article [ 1 ] some of the critical aspects of Web 2.0 are mapped in relation to labor and the production of user generated content. For many years the Internet was considered an apt technology for subversion of capitalism by the Italian post–Marxists. What we have witnessed, however...

  11. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at New York University on 21- 25 May 2012. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the High Energy and Nuclear Physics community and related scientific and technical fields. The CHEP conference provides a forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18-month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, the Americas and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Taipei, Taiwan (2010); Prague, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, United States (2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000). CHEP 2012 was organized by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and co-sponsored by New York University. The organizational structure for CHEP consists of an International Advisory Committee (IAC) which sets the overall themes of the conference, a Program Organizing Committee (POC) that oversees the program content, and a Local Organizing Committee (LOC) that is responsible for local arrangements (lodging, transportation and social events) and conference logistics (registration, program scheduling, conference site selection and conference proceedings). There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 125 oral and 425 poster presentations and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Distributed Processing and Analysis on Grids and Clouds, Computer Facilities, Production Grids and Networking, Software Engineering, Data Stores and Databases and

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 18-22 October 2010. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18 month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, America and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Prauge, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, California(2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000) CHEP 2010 was organized by Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre. There was an International Advisory Committee (IAC) setting the overall themes of the conference, a Programme Committee (PC) responsible for the content, as well as Conference Secretariat responsible for the conference infrastructure. There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 260 oral and 200 poster presentations, and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases, Distributed Processing and Analysis, Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies, Grid and Cloud Middleware, and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to various attractions in Northern Taiwan, including Sanhsia Tsu Shih Temple, Yingko, Chiufen Village, the Northeast Coast National Scenic Area, Keelung, Yehliu Geopark, and Wulai Aboriginal Village

  13. Nursing leadership: a concise encyclopedia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feldman, Harriet R

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv...

  14. PREFACE: Astronomy at High Angular Resolution 2011: The central kiloparsec in galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserlohe, Christof; Karas, Vladimir; Krips, Melanie; Eckart, Andreas; Britzen, Silke; Fischer, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    University of Thessaloniki in Greece for giving the dinner talk on the most astounding ancient Antikythera mechanism. We would also like to thank Victor Gomer and the staff of the Physikzentrum of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft in Bad Honnef where the conference took place. Last but not least we would like to thank all unnamed helpers, without whom the organisation of this conference would not have been possible. Financial support for this conference was granted by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) Sonderforschungsbereich project number SFB 956. We also acknowledge support from the European Community Framework Programme 7, Advanced Radio Astronomy in Europe, grant agreement no. 227290. Christof Iserlohe, Vladimir Karas, Melanie Krips, Andreas Eckart, Silke Britzen and Sebastian Fischer The Editors Conference photograph Conference Group Photo, 1 September 2011 The PDF also contains additional photographs from the conference and the Contents of the Proceedings.

  15. PREFACE: Focus section on Hadronic Physics Focus section on Hadronic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Swanson, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Hadronic physics is the study of strongly interacting matter and its underlying theory, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The field had its beginnings after World War Two, when hadrons were discovered in ever increasing numbers. Today, it encompasses topics like the quark-gluon structure of hadrons at varying scales, the quark-gluon plasma and hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density; it also underpins nuclear physics and has significant impact on particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Among the goals of hadronic physics are to determine the parameters of QCD, understand the origin and characteristics of confinement, understand the dynamics and consequences of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, explore the role of quarks and gluons in nuclei and in matter under extreme conditions and understand the quark and gluon structure of hadrons. In general, the process is one of discerning the relevant degrees of freedom and relating these to the fundamental fields of QCD. The emphasis is on understanding QCD, rather than testing it. The papers gathered in this special focus section of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics attempt to cover this broad range of subjects. Alkofer and Greensite examine the issue of quark and gluon confinement with the focus on models of the QCD vacuum, lattice gauge theory investigations, and the relationship to the AdS/CFT correspondence postulate. Arrington et al. review nucleon form factors and their role in determining quark orbital momentum, the strangeness content of the nucleon, meson cloud effects, and the transition from nonperturbative to perturbative QCD dynamics. The physics associated with hadronic matter at high temperature and density and at low Bjorken-x at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the SPS at CERN, and at the future LHC is summarized by d'Enterria. The article of Lee and Smith examines experiment and theory associated with electromagnetic meson production from nucleons and

  16. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntorad, Jan; Lokajicek, Milos

    2010-11-01

    The 17th International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held on 21-27 March 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing experience and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. Recent conferences were held in Victoria, Canada 2007, Mumbai, India in 2006, Interlaken, Switzerland in 2004, San Diego, USA in 2003, Beijing, China in 2001, Padua, Italy in 2000. The CHEP'09 conference had 600 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited oral presentations, a number of parallel sessions comprising 200 oral and 300 poster presentations, and an industrial exhibition. We thanks all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Components, Tools and Databases, Hardware and Computing Fabrics, Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies, Distributed Processing and Analysis and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to Prague and other Czech cities and castles and a banquet held at the Zofin palace in Prague. The next CHEP conference will be held in Taipei, Taiwan on 18-22 October 2010. We would like thank the Ministry of Education Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic and the EU ACEOLE project for the conference support, further to commercial sponsors, the International Advisory Committee, the Local Organizing Committee members representing the five collaborating Czech institutions Jan Gruntorad (co-chair), CESNET, z.s.p.o., Prague Andrej Kugler, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR v.v.i., Rez Rupert Leitner, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and

  17. PREFACE: Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Eduardo; Kodama, Takeshi; Padula, Sandra; Takahashi, Jun

    2010-09-01

    The 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) was held in Brazil from 27 September to 2 October 2009 at Hotel Atlântico, Búzios, Rio de Janeiro. The conference was jointly organized by Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Universidade Estadual Paulista and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Over 120 scientists from Argentina, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, South Africa, Switzerland, the UK and the USA gathered at the meeting to discuss the physics of hot and dense matter through the signals of strangeness and also the behavior of heavy quarks. Group photograph The topics covered were strange and heavy quark production in nuclear collisions, strange and heavy quark production in elementary processes, bulk matter phenomena associated with strange and heavy quarks, and strangeness in astrophysics. In view of the LHC era and many other upcoming new machines, together with recent theoretical developments, sessions focused on `New developments and new facilities' and 'Open questions' were also included. A stimulating round-table discussion on 'Physics opportunities in the next decade in the view of strangeness and heavy flavor in matter' was chaired in a relaxed atmosphere by Grazyna Odyniec and conducted by P Braun-Munzinger, W Florkowski, K Redlich, K Šafařík and H Stöcker, We thank these colleagues for pointing out to young participants new physics directions to be pursued. We also thank J Dunlop and K Redlich for excellent introductory lectures given on the Sunday evening pre-conference session. In spite of the not-so-helpful weather, the beauty and charm of the town of Búzios helped to make the meeting successful. Nevertheless, the most important contributions were the excellent talks, whose contents are part of these proceedings, given

  18. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, H.; Bonacorsi, D.; Ueda, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    side of the intensity frontier, 2015 is also the start of Super-KEKB commissioning. Fixed-target experiments at CERN, Fermilab and J-PARC are growing bigger in size. In the field of nuclear physics, FAIR is under construction and RHIC well engaged into its Phase-II research program facing increased datasets and new challenges with precision physics. For the future, developments are progressing towards the construction of ILC. In all these projects, computing and software will be even more important than before. Beyond those examples, non-accelerator experiments reported on their search for novel computing models as their apparatus and operation become larger and more distributed. The CHEP edition in Okinawa explored the synergy of HEP experimental physicists and computer scientists with data engineers and data scientists even further. Many area of research are covered, and the techniques developed and adopted are presented in a richness and diversity never seen before. In numbers, CHEP 2015 attracted a very high number of oral and poster contribution, 535 in total, and hosted 450 participants from 28 countries. For the first time in the conference history, a system of 'keywords' at the abstracts submission time was set up and exploited to produce conference tracks depending on the topics covered in the proposed contributions. Authors were asked to select some 'application keywords' and/or 'technology keywords' to specify the content of their contribution. A bottom-up approach that was tried at CHEP 2015 in Okinawa for the first time in the history of this conference series, this encountered vast satisfaction both in the International Advisory Committee and among the conference attendees. This process created 8 topical tracks, well balanced in content, manageable in terms of number of contributions, and able to create the adequate discussion space for trend topics (e.g. cloud computing and virtualization). CHEP 2015 hosted contributions on online computing; offline

  19. Content Maps: A Teaching and Assessment Tool for Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Phillip; Lehwald, Harry; Lee, Yun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Developing content knowledge in teachers presents a constant challenge for teacher educators. This article introduces a teaching and assessment tool called a "content map," which allows teacher educators, teachers, and coaches to conceptualize the scope, sequence, and relational characteristics of the content being taught. Content maps…

  20. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    eminently important field of transport phenomena in proton conducting media. Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments contents Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane Anatoly Yu Smirnov, Lev G Mourokh and Franco Nori Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase Rowan M Henry, David Caplan, Elisa Fadda and Régis Pomès Proton diffusion along biological membranes E S Medvedev and A A Stuchebrukhov Ab initio molecular dynamics of proton networks in narrow polymer electrolyte pores Mehmet A Ilhan and Eckhard Spohr A simulation study of field-induced proton-conduction pathways in dry ionomers Elshad Allahyarov, Philip L Taylor and Hartmut Löwen Molecular structure and transport dynamics in perfluoro sulfonyl imide membranes Nagesh Idupulapati, Ram Devanathan and Michel Dupuis The kinetics of water sorption in Nafion membranes: a small-angle neutron scattering study Gérard Gebel, Sandrine Lyonnard, Hakima Mendil-Jakani and Arnaud Morin Using 2H labeling with neutron radiography for the study of solid polymer electrolyte water transport properties P Boillat, P Oberholzer, B C Seyfang, A Kästner, R Perego, G G Scherer, E H Lehmann and A Wokaun Spatial distribution and dynamics of proton conductivity in fuel cell membranes: potential and limitations of electrochemical atomic force microscopy measurements E Aleksandrova, S Hink, R Hiesgen and E Roduner A review on phosphate based, solid state, protonic conductors for intermediate temperature fuel cells O Paschos, J Kunze, U Stimming and F Maglia A structural study of the proton conducting B-site ordered perovskite Ba3Ca1.18Ta1.82O8.73 Maarten C Verbraeken, Hermenegildo A L Viana, Philip Wormald and John T S Irvine

  1. PREFACE: The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N.

    2012-07-01

    The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference (LMC8) was held at the Universität Wien from 6-10 September 2011. Initiated in 1990, the conferences of this series cover a broad range of highly interdisciplinary topics, ranging from simple liquids to soft matter and biophysical systems. The vast spectrum of scientific subjects presented and discussed at the LMC8 is reflected in the themes of the ten symposia: Ionic and quantum liquids, liquid metals Water, solutions and reaction dynamics Liquid crystals Polymers, polyelectrolytes, biopolymers Colloids Films, foams, surfactants, emulsions, aerosols Confined fluids, interfacial phenomena Supercooled liquids, glasses, gels Non-equilibrium systems, rheology, nanofluids Biofluids, active matter This special issue contains scientific papers, authored by participants of the LMC8, which provide a cross-section of the scientific activities in current liquid matter science, as discussed at the conference, and demonstrate the scientific as well as methodological progress made in this field over the past couple of years. The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference contents The Eighth Liquid Matter ConferenceChristoph Dellago, Gerhard Kahl and Christos N Likos Comparing light-induced colloidal quasicrystals with different rotational symmetriesMichael Schmiedeberg and Holger Stark Hydrogen bond network relaxation in aqueous polyelectrolyte solutions: the effect of temperatureS Sarti, D Truzzolillo and F Bordi Equilibrium concentration profiles and sedimentation kinetics of colloidal gels under gravitational stressS Buzzaccaro, E Secchi, G Brambilla, R Piazza and L Cipelletti The capillary interaction between two vertical cylindersHimantha Cooray, Pietro Cicuta and Dominic Vella Hydrodynamic and viscoelastic effects in polymer diffusionJ Farago, H Meyer, J Baschnagel and A N Semenov A density-functional theory study of microphase formation in binary Gaussian mixturesM Carta, D Pini, A Parola and L Reatto Microcanonical determination of the

  2. Content Documents Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, R.; Hochstadt, J.; Boelke J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Content Documents are created and managed under the System Software group with. Launch Control System (LCS) project. The System Software product group is lead by NASA Engineering Control and Data Systems branch (NEC3) at Kennedy Space Center. The team is working on creating Operating System Images (OSI) for different platforms (i.e. AIX, Linux, Solaris and Windows). Before the OSI can be created, the team must create a Content Document which provides the information of a workstation or server, with the list of all the software that is to be installed on it and also the set where the hardware belongs. This can be for example in the LDS, the ADS or the FR-l. The objective of this project is to create a User Interface Web application that can manage the information of the Content Documents, with all the correct validations and filters for administrator purposes. For this project we used one of the most excellent tools in agile development applications called Ruby on Rails. This tool helps pragmatic programmers develop Web applications with Rails framework and Ruby programming language. It is very amazing to see how a student can learn about OOP features with the Ruby language, manage the user interface with HTML and CSS, create associations and queries with gems, manage databases and run a server with MYSQL, run shell commands with command prompt and create Web frameworks with Rails. All of this in a real world project and in just fifteen weeks!

  3. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    vibrational spectra of clusters and carbon-based nanostructures, just to name a few of the low-dimensional systems addressed in this special issue, can be both accurately computed from first principles and measured experimentally. Even less computationally demanding semi-empirical simulations based on tight-binding or continuum models play a crucial role in assessing, for instance, the interplay between morphology, defects and the elastic properties of low-dimensional systems. The impressive amount of work and progress achieved in the past decade within the general theory and spectroscopy of the dynamics of low-dimensional systems is marked by several relevant trends that are exemplified by the contributions gathered together in this special issue. They span a wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical methods applied to the study of the dynamical properties of low-dimensional systems and new emerging phenomena at the nanoscale, such as the peculiar optical properties of ring shaped quantum dots, plasmon dynamics in metallic nanoclusters and the relaxation dynamics of nanomagnets. This issue is dedicated to our esteemed colleague Giorgio Benedek on the occasion of his 70th birthday. It collects together a number of papers written by authors from all over the world with a recognized reputation in the above mentioned fields where Giorgio Benedek has made important and fundamental contributions. Dynamics of low-dimensional systems contents Narratives Giorgio Benedek: an extraordinary universal scientist M Bernasconi, S Miret-Artés and J P Toennies Helium and carbon: two friends for life Giorgio Benedek Special Issue Papers Temperature dependence in atom-surface scattering Eli Pollak and J R Manson Density functional study of the decomposition pathways of SiH3 and GeH3 at the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces M Ceriotti, F Montalenti and M Bernasconi Comparative study of vibrations in submonolayer structures of potassium on Pt(111) G G Rusina, S V Eremeev, S D Borisova and E V

  4. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    forms of ordered phases such as antiferromagnetism and ferroelectricity. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who happily agreed to contribute their latest results to this special issue, and the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter staff for their help, patience and professionalism. In such a fast-moving field it is not possible to give a definitive account, and this special issue can be no more than a snapshot of the current state of knowledge regarding this topic. Nevertheless, we hope that this collection of papers is a useful resource for experienced workers in the field, forms a useful introduction to researchers early in their careers and inspires others in related areas of nanotechnology to enter into the study of domain dynamics in nanostructures. Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures contents Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motionA Yamaguchi, A Hirohata, T Ono and H Miyajima Magnetization reversal in magnetic nanostripes via Bloch wall formation M Zeisberger and R Mattheis Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowiresMi-Young Im, Lars Bocklage, Guido Meier and Peter Fischer Domain wall propagation in meso- and nanoscale ferroelectrics R G P McQuaid, M McMillen, L-W Chang, A Gruverman and J M Gregg Transverse and vortex domain wall structure in magnetic nanowires with uniaxial in-plane anisotropyM T Bryan, S Bance, J Dean, T Schrefl and D A Allwood The stochastic nature of the domain wall motion along high perpendicular anisotropy strips with surface roughness Eduardo Martinez Temperature-dependent dynamics of stochastic domain-wall depinning in nanowiresClemens Wuth, Peter Lendecke and Guido Meier Controlled pinning and depinning of domain walls in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropyTheo Gerhardt, André Drews and Guido Meier The interaction of transverse domain wallsBenjamin Krüger The increase of the

  5. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    clearly indicates that industry has advanced quite significantly. During the symposium, the Indian Vacuum Society honoured two distinguished personalities for their remarkable and significant contributions to the field of vacuum science and development of technology in the country. Awards were presented for both oral and poster papers during the symposium. A committee evaluated the scientific content and clarity of presentation of contributed papers. We believe that deliberations and discussions at the symposium will help gain a better understanding of the complicated and involved technology of vacuum science and be of benefit to scientists and technologists. Subimal Saha Convener Gautam Pal Co-Convener V S Pandit Secretary Surajit Pal Treasurer Conference photograph International Advisory Committee National Advisory Committee S BanerjeeDAE/IndiaR K Bhandari (Chairman)VECC Rockett AngusAVS/USAD L BandyopadhyayIVS A V Dadve CdrPfeiffer Vac /IndiaS B BhattIPR M Barma TIFR/IndiaK G BhushanBARC R K BhandariVECC/IndiaAlok ChakrabartiVECC R C BudhaniNPL, IndiaD P ChakravartyBARC Shekhar ChanderCEERI/IndiaTushar DesaiMumbai Univ S C ChetalIGCAR/IndiaR DeyVECC K L ChopraIIT Delhi/IndiaS C GadkariBARC Christian DayKIT/GermanyS K GuptaIUVSTA/India Kraemer DieterFAIR/GermanyShrikrishna GuptaBARC L M GantayatBARC/IndiaRajendra JatharAgilent Technologies R B GroverDAE, BARC/IndiaS N JoshiCEERI P D Gupta RRCAT/IndiaD KanjilalIUAC Szajman JakubVSA/AustraliaC MallikVECC R N JayarajNFC/IndiaS G MarkandeyaBRNS S KailasBARC/IndiaK C MittalBARC P K KawIPR/IndiaS NagarjunHHV Bangalore Lalit KumarMTRDC/IndiaK G M NairIGCAR Jean Larour Ecole/FranceGautam Pal (Co-convener)VECC Marminga LiaTRIUMF/CanadaSurajit Pal (Treasurer)VECC Shekhar MishraFermilab/USA V S Pandit (Secretary)VECC Ganapatirao MyneniJlab/USaR G PillayTIFR S V NarasaiahHHV/IndiaMohan PradeepNPL K RadhakrishnanISRO/IndiaY Ranga RaoVac Techniques A S Raja RaoIVS/IndiaR RanganathanSINP T RamasamiDST/IndiaSubimal Saha (Convener

  6. Content Marketing Practices in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Suuronen, Toni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to draw attention to increasingly important business phenomenon of content marketing. This paper defines content marketing, identifies its key elements and phases, and explores content marketing practices. The theorethical part is based on Pam Didner's 4P model that describes the stages of content marketing cycle: plan, produce, promote and perfect. The empirical part of the study is based on semi-structured interviews of seasoned content marketing professionals t...

  7. FOREWORD Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This section of the Special Issue carries selected articles from the Fluid Mechanics and Fluid. Power Conference held during 12–14 December 2013 at the National Institute of Technology,. Hamirpur (HP). The section includes three review articles and nine original research articles. These were selected on the basis of their ...

  8. Foreword: Surface Tensions: Between Explanation and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauvelt, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Introduces this issue of the journal, which is devoted to new perspectives on critical histories of graphic design. Notes that the essays in this issue offer examples of the variety of interpretative approaches available that serve to question both the previously unchallenged acceptance of historical explanations and the transcendent understanding…

  9. FOREWORD: Workshop on "Very Hot Astrophysical Plasmas"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch-Miramond, Lydie; Montemerie, Thierry

    1984-01-01

    A Workshop on "Very Hot Astrophysical Plasmas" was held in Nice, France, on 8-10 November 1982. Dedicated mostly to theoretical, observational, and experimental aspects of X-ray astronomy and related atomic physics, it was the first of its kind to be held in France. The Workshop was "European" in the sense that one of its goals (apart from pure science) was to gather the European astronomical community in view of the forthcoming presentation of the "X-80" project for final selection to be the next scientific satellite of the European Space Agency. We now know that the Infrared Space Observatory has been chosen instead, but the recent successful launch of EXOSAT still keeps X-ray astronomy alive, and should be able to transfer, at least for a time, the leadership in this field from the U.S. to Europe, keeping in mind the competitive level of our Japanese colleagues. (With respect to the selection of ISO, one should also keep in mind that observations in the infrared often bring material relevant to the study of X-ray sources!) On a longer time scale, the Workshop also put emphasis on several interesting projects for the late eighties-early nineties, showing the vitality of the field in Europe. Some proposals have already taken a good start, like XMM, the X-ray Multi-Mirror project, selected by ESA last December for an assessment study in 1983. The present proceedings contain most of the papers that were presented at the Workshop. Only the invited papers were presented orally, contributed papers being presented in the form of posters but summarized orally by rapporteurs. To make up this volume, the written versions of these papers were either cross-reviewed by the Invited Speakers, or refereed by the Rapporteurs (for contributed papers) and edited by us, when necessary. Note, however, that the conclusions of the Workshop, which were kindly presented by Richard McCray, have already appeared in the "News and Views" section of Nature (301, 372, 1983). Altogether, the present proceedings aim at giving an up-to-date overview of X-ray astronomy, and may be taken also as a kind of "status report" on European projects in the field. As such, it should hopefully be useful to the astronomical community at large. But it is certainly worthwhile to recall that the Workshop (hence, this volume) would not have been possible without the help of many people, especially on location, in the city of Nice. The organizers received a competent and dedicated help from the Observatoire de Nice (interesting absorption effects could be seen while ascending the Mont-Gros in the fog — and also during the lunch under the Grande Coupole!), from the "Mutuelle Générale de l'Education Nationale", which provided a convenient and modern building to hold the Workshop, and from the City of Nice, which arranged a magnificent — if rainy — cocktail party at the Villa Massha. Thanks are also due to all our sponsors for financial help. We want to thank more particularly Pr Raymond Michard, Director of the Observatoire de Nice, and several other people there: Françoise Bely-Dubau, Danièle Benotto, Renata Feldmann, Paul Faucher. In Saclay and during the Workshop, we all appreciated the efficient collaboration of Claudine Belin and Raymonde Boschiero, while after the Workshop, Nils Robert Nilsson was of great help as Manuscript Editor for these proceedings. In spite of the poor weather, already alluded to — and which turned out to be the worst over all France for decades — and thanks to the cooperation of all, we do think it was really...— a Nice Workshop.

  10. Guest Foreword from Michael Thomas CMG QC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available I am delighted to be invited to attend upon this launch of the International Review of Law, conceived and now delivered into the world by the College of Law of the University of Qatar under Dr. Jon Truby’s leadership. This new and most welcome contribution to global academic writing and contemporary legal criticism, should be of the greatest interest outside Qatar, if only for its provenance. The State of Qatar has become widely known and respected for its vision, its progressive outlook, and its determination to look beyond Arab culture and traditions for new ways of working with the rest of the world for the good of the region as a whole. It has made a bold commitment to engage with the accepted legal principles and processes that have served the needs of global mercantile and commercial activity so well over the last two centuries. his is demonstrated by the generous support given by His Highness the Emir to the Qatar Law Forum 2009, to be repeated in May this year, in which jurists and lawyers of great eminence are brought together in Doha to expound, explain and exchange ideas upon the importance of the rule of law, the universal key to principled and effective government, and the protection of individual freedom and dignity. One may also cite the recently established Civil and Commercial Court, served by appointed judges of international repute from many jurisdictions, that has opened its doors in Doha for dispute resolution and adjudication. I am privileged to chair the Regulatory Tribunal, an independent statuy body composed of lawyers from overseas with specialist experience in market regulation, to which incoming investors can appeal any disputes they make with Qatar Financial Centre (QFC Institutions such as the QFC Regulatory Authority and QFC Authority In the same way, the founding of Qatar University College of Law in 2006 has shown Qatar’s determination to train future generations of Qataris to build on the best of legal precedents and thought in a unique legal market in which ideas drawn from Islamic law, civil law and common law can intermingle and blend. It is not surprising therefore to see that this new publication will be dedicated to the subject of international law, both public and private. Its laudable aim is to promote legal discourse around the world, and to promote a wider international understanding of contemporary legal issues for the common benefit. As an open access, bilingual journal, addressing topics concerning any jurisdiction, I hope it will reach a wide audience, and fulfil its aim of promoting understanding between different cultures. I am sure that the journal will not only benefit Qatar’s legal community by advancing academic and practice-based legal discussion. I am also confident that it will stimulate thought in the global legal community at large. May I wish it every success and a long life. Michael Thomas CMG QC

  11. Foreword Special Issue on Electrokinetic remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loch, J.P.G.; Lima, A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Since the first symposium on Electro-remediation (EREM) in 1997 at the École des Mines d’Albi, in Albi, France, much international attention, interest and progress have been generated in the science and technology of electro-remediation of contaminated soils, sediments and construction

  12. Foreword from the Editor-in-Chief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon M. Truby

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available On behalf of all of our editorial team and contributors, I am proud to present the launch edition of the International Review of Law. In forming an open-access bilingual law journal devoted to articulating contemporary legal discourse in all fields of law, the objective of our efforts is to bring perspectives from around the world to developments in the law. The study and critique of modern legal issues, explored with differing opinions, advances global comprehension of legal problems and enables a collective solution-forming process. The bilingual nature and international context of this legal forum broadens the accessibility of its contributors and readership, providing an opportunity for explanation and mutual understanding of issues of common concern and enabling English and Arabic speakers to learn from one another’s experiences in developing jurisprudence in alternative legal systems, whilst integrating and expanding scholarly dialogue between cultures and legal principles. Every article’s abstract is published in both languages, and selected articles will in each edition be translated in full based upon anticipated readership interest in order to foster the mutual understanding between distinct legal systems. In creating a neutral platform bringing together lawyers and scholars with complete academic freedom, the journal intends to accommodate competing ideas and engage credible academic and practical discussion. We are delighted with the thought-provoking contributions from the highly distinguished authors of this edition who have demonstrated skill and originality in their analyses. The range of articles presented herein represents the international temperament of our journal, with authors from Europe, Australia, the USA, Asia and the Middle East. Furthermore, the wide distribution and accessibility of this journal will maximise its readership and broaden its reach. To ensure the credibility of the International Review of Law, academic quality has been at the forefront of every process. The peer-reviewing processes developed for the journal engages leading experts in each field of interest, and, working together with a robust editorial structure combining participators from various practices, ensures the highest quality and most original writing is processed to achieve academic excellence. Amongst a range of structures designed to ensure quality and continuation, the journal recognises that the support of its authors is of the vital importance to its success, and consequently ensures authors are kept up-to-date with the status of their submission throughout the review process. The local and international legal community has played an outstanding role in taking on responsibilities to assist in the development and running of this journal. In addition we are most obliged for the significant contributions of a number of highly eminent lawyers and leaders who have joined our Editorial Board and play a vital role in determining the vision for the journal’s future. The College of Law at Qatar University has been instrumental in the formation and running of this journal, both in providing all funding, and in focusing the enthusiastic efforts of its faculty members to partake in the editorial processes required of the Editorial Committee. The journal is grateful to Qatar University’s President Professor Sheikha Abdulla Al-Misnad, and Vice President Dr. Shaikha Bint Jabor Al Thani for their leadership and support of this project which has helped realise its potential. Additionally, we are obliged for the capable and conscientious assistance of Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation Journals/QScience throughout the launch of this project. As the journal grows to its global reach, it should be noted that the character of the publication as a platform accommodating the international community and advancing understanding is representative of the personality of the State of Qatar, and the journal is thankful to his Highness the Emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, for this vision. I am grateful to all of those involved in the production of this and future issues, and hope the demands of our readers are met. May the journal continue to be a success. Dr. Jon M. Truby Ph.D, Editor-in-Chief

  13. Foreword: Focus on Superconductivity in Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of superconductivity in diamond, much attention has been given to the issue of superconductivity in semiconductors. Because diamond has a large band gap of 5.5 eV, it is called a wide-gap semiconductor. Upon heavy boron doping over 3×1020 cm−3, diamond becomes metallic and demonstrates superconductivity at temperatures below 11.4 K. This discovery implies that a semiconductor can become a superconductor upon carrier doping. Recently, superconductivity was also discovered in boron-doped silicon and SiC semiconductors. The number of superconducting semiconductors has increased. In 2008 an Fe-based superconductor was discovered in a research project on carrier doping in a LaCuSeO wide-gap semiconductor. This discovery enhanced research activities in the field of superconductivity, where many scientists place particular importance on superconductivity in semiconductors.This focus issue features a variety of topics on superconductivity in semiconductors selected from the 2nd International Workshop on Superconductivity in Diamond and Related Materials (IWSDRM2008, which was held at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS, Tsukuba, Japan in July 2008. The 1st workshop was held in 2005 and was published as a special issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM in 2006 (Takano 2006 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 7 S1.The selection of papers describe many important experimental and theoretical studies on superconductivity in semiconductors. Topics on boron-doped diamond include isotope effects (Ekimov et al and the detailed structure of boron sites, and the relation between superconductivity and disorder induced by boron doping. Regarding other semiconductors, the superconducting properties of silicon and SiC (Kriener et al, Muranaka et al and Yanase et al are discussed, and In2O3 (Makise et al is presented as a new superconducting semiconductor. Iron-based superconductors are presented as a new series of high-TC superconductors (Tamegai et al, and the mechanism of superconductivity is discussed. Last but not least, a novel highest-density phase of boron is produced and characterized (Zarechnaya et al.We hope that this focus issue will help readers to understand the frontiers of superconductivity in semiconductors and assist in the application of new devices using a combination of superconductivity and semiconductivity.

  14. Foreword - Acid decomposition of borosilicate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    The elaboration and development of technology of processing of mineral raw materials have an important role for the industry of Tajikistan. The results of researches of the staff of Institute of Chemistry and Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency of the Republic of Tajikistan were considered in present monograph. The physicochemical and technological aspects of processing of borosilicate raw materials of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan were considered. The necessary conditions of acid decomposition of raw materials were defined. The flowsheets for the processing of boron raw materials were proposed.

  15. FOREWORD: Structural Health Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhishen; Fujino, Yozo

    2005-06-01

    This special issue collects together 19 papers that were originally presented at the First International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure (SHMII-1'2003), held in Tokyo, Japan, on 13-15 November 2003. This conference was organized by the Japan Society of Civil Engineers (JSCE) with partial financial support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology, Japan. Many related organizations supported the conference. A total of 16 keynote papers including six state-of-the-art reports from different counties, six invited papers and 154 contributed papers were presented at the conference. The conference was attended by a diverse group of about 300 people from a variety of disciplines in academia, industry and government from all over the world. Structural health monitoring (SHM) and intelligent materials, structures and systems have been the subject of intense research and development in the last two decades and, in recent years, an increasing range of applications in infrastructure have been discovered both for existing structures and for new constructions. SHMII-1'2003 addressed progress in the development of building, transportation, marine, underground and energy-generating structures, and other civilian infrastructures that are periodically, continuously and/or actively monitored where there is a need to optimize their performance. In order to focus the current needs on SHM and intelligent technologies, the conference theme was set as 'Structures/Infrastructures Sustainability'. We are pleased to have the privilege to edit this special issue on SHM and intelligent infrastructure based on SHMII-1'2003. We invited some of the presenters to submit a revised/extended version of their paper that was included in the SHMII-1'2003 proceedings for possible publication in the special issue. Each paper included in this special issue was edited with the same quality standards as for any paper in a regular issue. The papers cover a wide spectrum of topics including smart and effective sensing technologies, reliable approaches to signal processing, rational data gathering and interpretation methods, advanced damage characterization, modeling feature selection and diagnosis methods, and system integration technologies, etc. This special issue contains the most up-to-date achievements in SHM and intelligent technologies and provides information pertaining to their current and potential applications in infrastructure. It is our hope that this special issue makes a significant contribution in advancing awareness and acceptance of SHM and intelligent technologies for the maintenance and construction of different kinds of infrastructure. We would like to express our sincere thanks to Professor Varadan (Editor-in-Chief), Professor Matsuzaki (Regional Editor), the Editorial Assistants and the staff at Institute of Physics Publishing for their great support and advice in publishing this special issue. Special thanks are due to all the reviewers for their willingness to share their time and expertise. Final but important thanks go to Ms Suzhen Li (Doctorate Candidate at Ibaraki University) for her assistance in editing this special issue.

  16. FOREWORD: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Naftali; Hass, Michael; Paul, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The fifth edition of the bi-annual 'Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics (NPA)' conference series was held in Eilat, Israel on April 3-8, 2011. This Conference is also designated as the 24th Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the EPS. The main purpose of this conference, as that of the four previous ones in this series, is to deal with those aspects of nuclear physics that are directly related to astrophysics. The concept of such a meeting was conceived by the Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society in 1998. At that time, the idea of such a conference was quite new and it was decided that this meeting would be sponsored by the EPS. The first meeting, in January 2001, was planned and organized in Eilat, Israel. Due to international circumstances the conference was moved to Debrecen, Hungary. Subsequent conferences were held in Debrecen again, in Dresden, Germany, and in Frascati, Italy (moved from Gran Sasso due to the tragic earthquake that hit the L'Aquila region). After 10 years the conference finally returned to Eilat, the originally envisioned site. Eilat is a resort town located on the shore of the Gulf of Eilat, which connects Israel to the Red Sea and further south to the Indian Ocean. It commands spectacular views of the desert and mountains, offering unique touristic attractions. The local scientific backdrop of the conference is the fact that the Israeli scientific scene exhibits a wide variety of research activities in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics. A new accelerator, SARAF at Soreq Nuclear Research Center is presently undergoing final acceptance tests. SARAF will serve as a platform for production of radioactive ion beams and nuclear-astrophysics research in Israel. The meeting in Eilat was organized by four Israeli scientific institutions, Hebrew University, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Tel Aviv University and the Weizmann Institute of Science. The welcome reception and lectures were held at the King Solomon hotel and the conference dinner banquet at the Dan hotel. An excursion to the 'Red Canyon' in the Eilat Mountains on Wednesday afternoon was one of the social highlights of the conference. A total number of 140 scientists attended NPA5 and about 30 accompanying persons; about 25% of these were young participants (less than 36 years old). 23 participants were from Israel, and 27 were from outside of Europe (including two from Africa). The subjects covered at the conference in Eilat concentrated mainly on the spirit of the original idea - to probe experimental and theoretical activity in nuclear structure and reactions that is directly related to the physics of the Universe. There were also sessions of general interest in astrophysics, as well as a poster session on Tuesday evening featuring 40 posters. The topics included: Nuclear Structure - Theory and Experiment Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and Formation of First Stars Stellar Reactions and Solar Neutrinos Explosive Nucleosynthesis, Radioactive Beams and Exotic Nuclei-New Facilities and Future Possibilities for Astrophysics Neutrino Physics - the Low and High-Energy Frontiers Rare events, Dark Matter, Double beta-decay, Symmetries The conference started with an excellent exposé of the progress made in the discovery of super-heavy elements and the study of their properties. The progress in this field is enormous, and this subject should be communicated to more general audiences. The role of the nuclear equation of state and of the precise determination of nuclear masses in nucleosynthesis was emphasized in several talks. The role of neutrinos in astrophysics was discussed extensively in several sessions. One of the highlights of this was the presentation about the IceCube and DeepCore detectors operating deep in the Antarctic ice. These facilities are able to detect cosmogenic neutrinos in a wide energy range, from 10 GeV to 1010 GeV. The subject of solar neutrinos was discussed in a number of talks. Topics related to properties of neutrinos, such as double-beta decay and neutrino mixing were well represented at the conference. One of the central problems in modern cosmology and astrophysics is the search for dark matter. Several talks dealt with this subject and with methods to detect dark matter. Another intriguing and rather novel subject that was discussed at the meeting was time variation of fundamental physical constants. Two speakers have examined the sensitivity of Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis to the variation of the values of the fundamental constants. The role of some specific nuclei (such as Ni 56) in cosmology was pointed out. Many of the presentations at the conference described experimental studies of reactions relevant to nucleosynthesis at various stages of cosmic evolution. As reflected in the conference, these activities are widespread, encompassing many laboratories. Rare Isotope Beam (RIB) facilities are in the forefront of these studies. To understand the various processes of nucleosynthesis one has to have a good theory of nuclei far from the stability line. A number of presentations dealt with the description of such exotic nuclei. It is clear from the presentations that the future of experimental nuclear astrophysics looks promising as existing experimental facilities are being upgraded and new facilities are being built. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Bursts and cosmic explosions were the subject of several talks. A discussion of various experiments attempting to measure time-reversal violation was the subject of one lecture. The solution of the puzzle as to why the universe is asymmetric with respect to matter-antimatter requires knowledge of the limit of time-reversal conservation. The late John Bahcall was a great astrophysicist and a supporter of the conference series 'Nuclear physics in Astrophysics'. On the last day of the conference, following a talk by Neta Bahcall from Princeton University on dark matter in the Universe, a short commemoration for John was held. Detailed information about the NPA5 conference and its scientific program can be found at: www.weizmann.ac.il/conferences/NPA5/ Naftali Auerbach Michael Hass Michael Paul Editors Conference photograph Conference photograph The PDF also contains lists of the committees and participants.

  17. Digital Ethics Past, Present, Futures (Foreword)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ess, Charles

    2012-01-01

    I offer an overview of Digital Ethics (DE) as a field of enquiry that serves as the larger context for this volume and its constituent chapters. Along the way, I point out the trajectories and contributions of this volume and its constituent chapters to DE. To do so, I first take up four difficul......I offer an overview of Digital Ethics (DE) as a field of enquiry that serves as the larger context for this volume and its constituent chapters. Along the way, I point out the trajectories and contributions of this volume and its constituent chapters to DE. To do so, I first take up four...... difficulties facing efforts to develop a working definition of “digital ethics.” I then offer a taxonomy of the ethical issues that constitute much of the main foci of DE over the past five years, and indicate where these issues are further addressed in this volume. I conclude with some suggestions of emerging...... ethical domains and challenges that will likely become increasingly important components of DE, including one represented in this volume....

  18. Foreword to "Intelligence and Social Policy."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfredson, Linda S.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue bridges inquiry on intelligence and scholarship on social policy by exploring the constraints that differences in intelligence may impose in fashioning effective social policy. The authors discuss a range of behaviors, but focus primarily on the noneducational outcomes of crime, employment, poverty, and health. (SLD)

  19. Responsible innovation in the private sector : Foreword

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, V.E.; Blok, V.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible Innovation is an emerging concept concerning the governance of socio-ethical aspects of research and innovation practices. Von Schomberg for instance defines responsible innovation as a ‘transparent, interactive process by which societal actors and innovators become mutually responsive

  20. Foreword: Responsible Innovation in the Private Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, V.; Blok, V.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible Innovation is an emerging concept concerning the governance of socio-ethical aspects of research and innovation practices. Von Schomberg for instance defines responsible innovation as a ‘transparent, interactive process by which societal actors and innovators become mutually responsive

  1. Determining gold content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.G.; Wormald, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for determining the gold content of a material, comprises irradiating a body of the material with neutrons and determining the intensity of γ-rays having an energy of 279 keV arising from the reaction 179 Au(nn') 179 Au → 279 keV. The apparatus has means for conveying the materials past an assembly, which has a neutron source, which does not produce neutrons having sufficient energy to excite fast neutron reactions in non-auriferous constituents. (author)

  2. Personalized professional content recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  3. The global positioning system and ArcGIS

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Foreword to the First EditionForeword to the Second EditionPreface for the Instructor, Third EditionAcknowledgmentsAbout the AuthorIntroductionChapter 1: Basic Concepts OverviewWhere Are You?What Time Is It?GPS and GISAnatomy of the Term ""Global Positioning System""How We Know Where Something IsStep-by-StepDisclaimerFirst OffDifferent Receivers and Different SoftwarePreparationProject 1AUnderstanding the Screens and ControlsProject 1BProject 1CChapter 2: Automated Data CollectionOverviewHow'd They Do That?How It Works: Measuring Distance by Measuring TimeFactors Affecting When and How to Coll

  4. The role of content marketing in social media content communities

    OpenAIRE

    Charmaine du Plessis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Content marketing has become a leading marketing technique in digital marketing communication and uses the point of view of consumers to build relationships by creating and sharing engaging content in social media that enhance their daily lives. Existing research on social media communities has focused mainly on social media marketing and virtual brand community perspectives while content marketing’s valuable and unobtrusive role in social media content communities has largely bee...

  5. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], γlg cos θ = γsg - γsl (1) In modern terms, γ denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that θ may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., θ = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number of very specific and quantitative predictions were put forward which were aimed at direct experimental tests of the developed concepts [9]. Experimentally, wetting phenomena proved to be a rather difficult field of research. While contact angles seem quite easy to measure, deeper insight can only be gained by assessing the physical properties of minute amounts of material, as provided by the molecularly thin wetting layers. At the same time, the variations in the chemical potential relevant for studying wetting transitions are very small, such that system stability sometimes poses hard to solve practical problems. As a consequence, layering transitions in cryogenic systems were among the first to be thoroughly studied [10] experimentally, since they require comparably moderate stability. First-order wetting transitions were not observed experimentally before the early nineties, either in (cryogenic) quantum systems [11,12] or in binary liquid mixtures [13,14]. The first observation of critical wetting, a continuous wetting transition, in 1996 [15] was a major breakthrough [16]. In the meantime, a detailed seminal paper by Pierre Gilles de Gennes published in 1985 [17] had spurred a large number of new research projects which were directed to wetting phenomena other than those related to phase transitions. More attention was paid to non-equilibrium physics, as it is at work when oil spreads over a surface, or a liquid coating beads off (`dewets') from its support and forms a pattern of many individual droplets. This turned out to be an extremely fruitful field of research, and was more readily complemented by experimental efforts than was the case with wetting transitions. It was encouraging to find effects analogous to layering (as mentioned above) in more common systems such as oil films spreading on a solid support [18,19]. Long standing riddles such as the divergence of dissipation at a moving contact line were now addressed both theoretically and experimentally [20,21]. However, the requirements concerning resolution of the measurements, as well as the stability and cleanliness of the systems, were immense for the reasons mentioned above. The pronounced impact of impurities was already well-known from contact angle measurements, where one invariably observes quite significant hysteresis effects and history dependence of the measured angle due to minute substrate inhomogeneity. This is why pioneering work on characteristic patterns emerging upon dewetting of thin liquid films [22] opened a long lasting, and eventually very fruitful, controversy on the question whether the underlying mechanism was unstable surface waves [24] (which was unambiguously observed for the first time in 1996 [23]) or `just' nucleation from defects. By the mid-nineties, the physics of wetting had made its way into the canon of physical science topics in its full breadth. The number of fruitful aspects addressed by that time is far too widespread to be covered here with any ambition to completeness. The number of researchers turning to this field was continuously growing, and many problems had already been successfully resolved, and many questions answered. However, quite a number of fundamental problems remained, which obstinately resisted solution. Only a few shall be mentioned: There was no satisfactory explanation for triple point wetting [25], in particular for its ubiquity. The numerical values of contact line tensions in both theory and (very reproducible) experiments [26] were many orders of magnitude apart. In the particularly interesting field of structure formation, i.e., dewetting, there was no clear interpretation of many experimental results, and no possibility to distinguish with certainty between the different possible mechanisms. Furthermore, the impact of the rather strong non-linearities of the involved van der Waals forces was entirely unclear. In the more remote field of bionics, it was not clear how some plants manage to make liquids bead off so perfectly from their leaves. This list, which is of course far from complete, serves to illustrate the wide scope of open questions. At that time, research groups in Germany concerned with wetting phenomena gathered and finally applied for a priority programme on wetting and structure formation at interfaces, which obtained funding from the German Science Foundation [27]. This special issue is dedicated to the research carried out within this programme. It spans the period starting from spring 1998 until summer 2004, and is presented as a combination of review over that period and original presentation of the state-of-the-art at its end. Although only a very limited number of problems could be tackled within the programme, a few significant achievements could be attained. Some of these shall be highlighted: It could be shown that triple point wetting is a direct consequence of topographic substrate imperfection. By taking the bending energy of a solid slab on a rough substrate into account, accordance between theory [28] and experiment [29] was finally achieved. By applying scanning force microscopy to three phase contact lines, it could be shown that the `real' contact line tension is indeed much smaller than `observed' on macroscopic scale [39], and comes close to what is theoretically expected. In the field of structure formation by dewetting, unprecedented agreement between experiment [31], theory [32], and particularly careful simulations [33] was achieved. The underlying mechanisms could be clearly distinguished by means of Minkowski functionals. It could be shown both theoretically [34,35] and experimentally [36,37] that chemically patterned substrates give rise not only to a large variety of liquid morphologies, but that the latter can be manipulated and controlled in a precise manner. It was demonstrated that spherical (colloidal) beads may not only be used like surfactants as in Pickering emulsions, but that the resulting interface configurations may be applied to generate an amazing variety of well-controlled porous membranes, with a lot of potential applications [39]. This gives a flavour of the variety of topics addressed in the papers making up this issue. They are organized in five sections, each of which is opened with a short introduction explaining their mutual relation. For further access to the pertinent literature, the reader is referred to the references given in each article separately. References [1] Young T 1805 Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London 95 65 [2] Equation (1) is readily derived by demanding force balance at the contact line, where all three phases meet. [3] Lippmann G 1886 Anal. Chim. 48 776 [4] Cassie A B D and Baxter S 1944 Trans. Faraday Soc. 40 546 [5] Wenzel R N 1949 J. Phys. Chem. 53 1466 [6] Wilson K G 1971 Phys. Rev. B 4 3174 and 3184 [7] Cahn J W 1977 J. Chem. Phys. 66 3667 [8] See, for example Dietrich S and Schick M 1986 Phys. Rev. B 33 4952 [9] See, for example Cheng E et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 1007 [10] Dash J G and Ruvalds J (ed) 1980 Phase Transitions in Surface Films (NATO advanced study series vol B51) (New York: Plenum) [11] Nacher P J and Dupont-Roc J 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 2966 [12] Rutledge J E and Taborek P 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 937 [13] Bonn D, Kellay H and Wegdam G H 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 1975 [14] Bonn D, Kellay H and Wegdam G H 1993 J. Chem. Phys. 99 7115 [15] Ragil K et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 1532 [16] Findenegg G H and Herminghaus S 1997 Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 2 301 [17] de Gennes P G 1985 Rev. Mod. Phys. 57 827 [18] Heslot F, Fraysse N and Cazabat A M 1989 Nature 338 1289 [19] Fraysse N et al 1993 J. Colloid Int. Sci. 158 27 [20] Huh C and Scriven L E 1971 J. Colloid Int. Sci. 35 85 [21] Brochard F et al 1994 Langmuir 10 1566 [22] Reiter G 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 68 75 [23] Bischof J et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 1536 [24] Ruckenstein E and Jain R K 1974 J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. II 70 132 [25] Herminghaus S et al 1997 Annal. Phys. 6 425 [26] Li D and Neumann A W 1990 Colloids Surf. 43 195 [27] Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Schwerpunktprogramm 1052, `Benetzung und Strukturbildung an Grenzflächen' [28] Esztermann A and Löwen H 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S429 [29] Sohaili M et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S415 [30] Pompe T and Herminghaus S 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 1930 [31] Seemann R et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S267 [32] Herminghaus S et al 1998 Science 282 916 [33] Becker J and Gr\\"un G 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S291 [34] Lipowsky R \\etal 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S537 [35] Dietrich S et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S577 [36] Gau H et al 19999 Science 283 46 [37] Mugele F \\etal 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S559 [38] Pfohl T et al 2003 Chem. Phys. Chem. 4 1291 [39 Xu H et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S465

  6. PREFACE: Stimuli Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    Tributes are paid to Zhores Alferov by presenting personal anecdotes from the fields, where Alferov performed his pioneering research: masers, lasers, solar cells and heterojunctions. What a pleasure and honor to pay tribute to Zhores Alferov in this Festschrift. Member of a remarkable laboratory and originator of imaginative and useful ideas for semiconductor physics and technology; a happy birthday! I would like to use this opportunity to ramble a little about the physics of masers, lasers, heterojunctions, solar cells— all themes of such vital importance in Alferov's career—and also tangible in my own endeavors. I start out with an anecdote of a colloquium presentation in my youthful days at Göttingen. The Physics Colloquium at Göttingen University presented a serious weekly meeting. Werner Heisenberg and Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker attended, often Wolfgang Pauli visited from Zurich; Otto Hahn always sat in the first row, on the left corner— and he smoked his cigar. I had just obtained my doctorate [1]— it was 1958, and my boss Rudolf Hilsch ordered me to contribute a colloquium talk. He hoped that I would report on color centers in alkali halides or review experiments on quenched amorphous bismuth, a surprising superconductor [2], or on my own dissertation [1], all recent results of our team. I, however, being an avid reader of the latest American physics literature, begged to differ. The English language gave me no problems because I had in 1951/52 spent a year at the University of Kansas. This experience in the friendly American Midwest provided me with a definite linguistic advantage over most of my German fellow students. I was fascinated by those very first reports on the maser, this molecular amplifier using ammonia for stimulated emission, and therefore decided, quite to the chagrin of my boss Hilsch, to choose this particular topic for a report at the Colloquium. So I went to the rostrum in the small auditorium 'Hörsaal II' and delivered a well-rehearsed talk. The audience was intrigued by this new principle of stimulated coherent microwave radiation [3]. Friedrich Hund, famous for his 'rule' was then our theory professor, he sat in the second row. He was very surprised, and asked me in the discussion if he had understood correctly. If it were true what I had just suggested, then the maser coherence length would go from the Earth to the Moon. I paused a little, pondered and observed my microwave-conscious friends in the audience nodding encouragingly. 'Yes, sir; I think so!' 'I don't believe it', Hund retorted. How could a youngster react? I remained silent and obediently, quite imperceptibly shrugged my shoulders. After the talk, Professor Lamla, an editor of a science journal came to congratulate me and asked for a manuscript. I delivered [4]. This item on my early publication list may have contributed to the fact that I was hired in 1959 by William Shockley to join his fledgling company Shockley Transistor in this old apricot barn on 391 South San Antonio Road in Mountain View, California [5]. I knew that it would be extremely difficult to extend the frequency into the optical regime, you have to fight against the square of the frequency. Nevertheless, I refrained from making the statement in my paper that reaching an optical maser might be hopeless [4]. 'Never say never' is an appropriate adage, not only for seniors. A young colleague, who had also written a review paper, dared to support a more pessimistic view [6]. He anticipated in his very last sentence that stimulated emission would probably prevail merely in the microwave regime. This defeatist attitude seemed to have ruled throughout Germany, as already preached in the famous textbooks by Pohl [7], and also assumed by physics Professor Hellwege at Darmstadt, who was the leading expert regarding luminescence of materials such as ruby crystals; yet Maiman and others surpassed him [8]. Silicon came next for me, working, for example, with Shockley on the theory of maximal efficiency for solar cells, not really a topic regarding coherent radiation [9]. Once, however, a discussion evolved during one of those nearly dreaded hamburger lunches with Shockley at Kirk's charcoal restaurant on El Camino Real in Mountain View. Those frugal lunches ended with a demanding one-on-one interrogation, stricter and tougher than any doctoral oral examination. 'What, you do not know of Einstein's A and B coefficients?' Next afternoon I dutifully looked them up in the Stanford physics library. My first, rather indirect contacts with semiconductor heterojunctions occurred in this former apricot barn of Shockley's. Improving junction transistors required a maximum of the emitter efficiency. The emitter-to-base junction should carry only a forward current, no particles should flow from base to emitter [10]. This requirement can be met with a heterojunction: some other semiconductor material covering the silicon. Shockley had already contemplated this possibility while still at Bell Laboratories [11]. One day, a physicist by the name of Herbert Krömer visited us. This young man had also studied at Göttingen, especially with the memorable theoretician Richard Becker, whom we all admired. Krömer had in Princeton contributed to the theoretical understanding [12] of such wide-gap emitter/base junctions, and Shockley urgently wanted to hire him. But Herb preferred to join Varian Associates, just up the road in Palo Alto. Later, it was my great pleasure to attend the Nobel Festivities for Herb and Zhores Alferov in Stockholm. In the early sixties, I became a Member of Technical Staff at the Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Now, compound semiconductors, such as gallium arsenide, had to attract my interest. By the time of the mid-sixties, helium/neon-lasers were quite the vogue; Bell Labs actually established a little workshop with a production line to fabricate them and spread them throughout the departments. 'The solution in search of a problem', as sceptics joked about this new light source, was of vital interest to us because of the high frequencies to carry plenty of information channels. Transmission of laser light straight through the air, from Building 1 to Building 2 at Murray Hill, however, showed that the atmosphere was by far too unstable. We discussed silver-plated tubes and glass fibers, which eventually became so unbelievably pure that nowadays they provide a wealth of inexpensive communication channels. A gas laser did not appear to emerge into a viable, convenient engineering solution, nor did the ruby. A diode laser source had to be developed. I used laser-induced photoluminescence to search for more efficient GaAs materials, which resulted in detecting crystals with amphoteric silicon doping of very high output in the near-infrared [13]. This invention was patented in 37 countries and provided millions of diodes, such as for TV remote control devices. I had to sign off my inventor's reward for one US dollar, which I actually did not even receive. (In earlier years, patentors obtained one silver dollar; but not anymore!) Yet my little diodes, however efficient, could not be stimulated to emit coherent light, alas! Together with my colleagues and friends Morton Panish and Craig Casey, later famous textbook authors on diode lasers [14], we searched for solutions, although colleagues at the famed RCA Laboratories in Princeton had predicted that a laser diode was impossible [15]. I remember one morning when Mort told us of a talk he had just heard at a meeting in New York City, where our friendly competitors at the IBM Labs in Yorktown Heights, NY had suggested that heterojunctions could nicely confine and concentrate carriers, maybe also photons. Such heterojunctions were then tried in Panish's lab to be grown via liquid-phase epitaxy, Stan Sumski being the expert technician. At that time, the Leningraders, under leadership of Zhores Alferov were working hard and highly successfully with this crystal growth technique. We were very much impressed by the success in Leningrad. Liquid-phase epitaxy yields, in principle, exceedingly pure crystals, but we were unhappy about the principal lack of direct monitoring during this growth process, which we deemed absolutely necessary for obtaining reproducible heterojunctions with tightly controlled small dimensions. Ultrahigh-vacuum epitaxy seemed to be the inescapable solution. Delicate molecular beams had to be gently used and monitored! What a costly proposition! I clearly remember the day when Mort and I went to the Laboratory director John Galt. A little bit fearful and subdued, we explained our project. No, not expensive, rather a very expensive idea! We anxiously watched John with his usual stern demeanour; he paused and contemplated: 'All right, we do it—go ahead!' Construction for equipment needed for the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) began, and in Al Cho, an excellent new employee was hired for this task. A little later I left Bell Labs, this fabulous 'Mecca of Solid State' for a physics professorship at the Goethe University in Frankfurt-on-the-Main in Germany. Meanwhile, successful work on semiconductor lasers bore ample fruit worldwide. In Frankfurt, I used gas laser sources for photoluminescence diagnostics of elemental and compound semiconductors. With my astute doctoral student 'Teddy' Güttler, for example, we observed impurity photoluminescence in Au-doped silicon and concluded that doping of solar cells with deep impurities would not be beneficial for cell efficiency; just the opposite would happen because of increased carrier recombination [16]. In 1968, Western Germany experienced an ultra-left-wing student rebellion. Frankfurt students violently attacked me and accused me of war research since I used lasers, obviously a deadly weapon of mass destruction. Dieter Bimberg, our co-editor of this Festschrift, will undoubtedly remember those happenings when he was a doctoral candidate. In 1968, we all assembled in Moscow for the International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors; what a unique opportunity to meet so many Russian colleagues, including this intellectual elite from the most remarkable Joffe Institute, with Zhores Alferov a major player. In 1970, I became a founding director of the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research at Stuttgart, in the Southwest of Germany. There I eventually succeeded—against massive opposition—to establish a group for MBE, which became truly successful under the very capable leadership of Klaus Ploog [17], to whom was bestowed a prize of the Seibold-Foundation for Japan-Germany Science Cooperation. Klaus von Klitzing's group in our Max-Planck-Institute in Stuttgart relies on MBE to the present day for research on the quantum Hall effect [18]. Equally, my former doctoral student Horst Stormer had to utilize excellent MBE for his Nobel-Prize winning research on the fractional quantum Hall effect [18]. We fondly remember one congenial dinner party at our Stuttgart house, with Zhores Alferov and Helmut Lotsch as our valued guests; it must have been in the mid-seventies. My wife Inge had prepared a dessert in the shape of the title page of the Springer journal Applied Physics, with chocolate and orange cream. Herr Lotsch had won Alferov to become part of our board of editors, a most valuable connection to the excellence of Soviet semiconductor research! Many Japanese colleagues, especially from industrial electronics labs came to learn the tricks of MBE from us in Stuttgart; the German electronics industry, however, was reluctant and remained completely disinterested—but the French equipment maker RIBER was our staunch ally, and this company grew with the international acceptance of MBE for small, high-frequency devices. One diligent young visitor at my Stuttgart laboratories, Ozamu Kumagai from the SONY Corporation, did especially well. Back at home, he most cleverly devised novel technologies for efficient and low-cost production of laser diodes and thus earned a promotion to Vice Presidency. One of the most recent, gratifying encounters with Zhores Alferov happened to me in a cozy retreat in the forests near Madrid, with Antonio Luque being our gracious host for a solar cell symposium. We Stuttgarters had hoped to use multi-pair generation in perfected silicon solar cells [19], but a better chance to capture more photons from the solar spectrum exists most likely in multi-junction cells [20], with fancy tunnel-contacts interconnecting between heterojunctions. We shall see if this approach might eventually lead to more efficient, yet still economical solar energy conversion. Semiconductor heterojunctions for communications and consumers! Many of Alferov's present activities in St Petersburg and Berlin are governed by this magic modern prefix nano, which might one day also provide some applications in solar cells; but we have yet to carefully investigate [21]! References [1] Queisser H J 1958 Z.Physik 152 507 and 495 [2] Buckel W and Hilsch R 1956 Z. Physik 146 27 [3] Wittke J P 1957 Proc. IRE 45 291 with references to earlier work [4] Queisser H J 1959 Naturwiss. 46 394 [5] Queisser H J 1988 The Conquest of the Microchip (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press) [6] Wolf H C and Agnew Z 1958 Physik 10 480 [7] Pohl R W Optik (Heidelberg: Springer) [8] Yariv A 1968 Quantum Electronics (New York: Wiley) [9] Shockley W and Queisser H J 1961 J. Appl. Phys. 32 510 [10] For details, see Sze S M and Ng K K 2007 Physics of Semiconductor Devices 3rd edn (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley) [11] Shockley W 1951 US Patent Specification 2.569.347 [12] Krömer H 1957 Proc. IRE 45 1535 [13] Queisser H J 1966 J. Appl. Phys. 37 2909 (this paper was withheld internally for some time due to the patent application: US Pat.3.387.163) [14] Panish M B and Casey C H 1978 Heterostructure Lasers (New York: Academic) [15] Kressel H Private communications [16] Güttler G and Queisser H J 1996 J. Appl. Phys. 40 4994 [17] Ploog K and Graf K 1984 MBE of III-V Compounds (Berlin: Springer) [18] For recent coverage, see Chakraborty T and Pietiläinen P 1995 The Quantum Hall Effect (Berlin: Springer) [19] Werner J H, Kolodinski S and Queisser H J 1993 Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 3851 [20] Yamaguchi M 2002 Physica E 14 84 [21] Queisser H J 2002 Physica E 14 1 and many other contributions in this issue

  7. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and related fields were established in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Campinas, San Carlos, Recife, Belo Horizonte etc), Argentina (Buenos Aires), Chile (Santiago, Concepción, Antofagasta), Perú (Lima), Uruguay (Montevideo), Colombia (Bogotá), Venezuela (Caracas), Mexico (Mexico City, Puebla, Guadalajara), and—in spite of economical difficulties—several groups are doing experimental work, mainly in Brazil, Uruguay and Chile. One of the main goals of these series of conferences is to create strong links between these various groups, as well as to connect them with leading groups and figures working in the field in the rest of the world. The editors would like to thank the authors for providing their papers in time and acknowledge the following organisations who provided financial or other forms of support: Iniciativa Ciéntifica Milenio (Ministerio de Planificación, Chile ICM P02-049F), Universidad de Concepcion, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Universidad Católica del Norte, Consortium of the Americas for the Interdisciplinary Science, University of New Mexico, Centro Latinoamericano de Física. Miguel Orszag, Juan Carlos Retamal, Carlos Saavedra and Sascha Wallentowitz Santiago, September 24, 2007

  8. PREFACE: Kelvin and Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Raymond; McCartney, Mark; Whitaker, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Sir Joseph Larmor unveiling the Kelvin memorial in the Botanic Gardens, Belfast on a rainy day in 1913 Sir Joseph Larmor unveiling the Kelvin memorial in the Botanic Gardens, Belfast on a rainy day in 1913 © The Ulster Museum: Hogg collection William Thomson, later Lord Kelvin, was born in Belfast in 1824, and his family had lived near Ballynahinch in the north of Ireland, quite close to Belfast, from the seventeenth century. At the time of Kelvin's birth, James Thomson, his father, was Professor of Mathematics at the Belfast Royal Academical Institution (Inst). However, following the death of his wife in 1830, James took up a new position as Professor at the University of Glasgow, and he and his children moved there in 1832. Apart from three years studying at Cambridge, and a very brief period immediately afterwards travelling and teaching in Cambridge, Kelvin was to spend the rest of his life in Glasgow, where he occupied the Chair of Natural Philosophy (or Physics) for 53 years. The natural assumption might be that his birth in Ireland was irrelevant to Kelvin's life and work, and that the fine monument erected in his honour in Belfast's Botanic Gardens, which is pictured on the front cover of this volume, was more a demonstration of civic pride than a recognition of an aspect of Kelvin's life which was important to him. The purpose of the meeting was to demon strate that this was not the case, that, great Glaswegian as he undoubtedly became, Kelvin always delighted in the title of Irishman. The influence of his father, very much an Ulsterman, was immense, and Kelvin and his siblings were to follow his non-sectarian and reforming approach. Also important for Kelvin was his Christian upbringing, which began in Belfast, and his beliefs were to play a role of importance in his life and indeed in much of his most important work, in particular that on thermodynamics. Two of his siblings returned to Belfast and spent much of their lives there, and Kelvin was a frequent visitor. While the most celebrated example of his engineering work was his massive contribution to the Atlantic telegraph cable, and his maritime and other inventions were used throughout the world, he was especially pleased to contribute to two important technical accomplishments in the north of Ireland, the occulting Holywood lighthouse and the Giant's Causeway tramway. Kelvin's interest in Ireland came again to the fore in the Home Rule debate at the end of the nineteenth century; Kelvin was vehemently opposed to Home Rule and became a passionate member of the Liberal Unionist party, a crucial factor in his becoming a peer. Accounts of these aspects of Kelvin's involvement with Ireland are given in our first four papers. The fifth paper was particularly appropriate for the meeting. It describes how an important contribution of Kelvin on optimal packing has been improved in Ireland by the speaker, Denis Weaire, himself, and how the result has been seen by the whole world in Beijing. Finally there is a discussion of Kelvin's place in the story of Irish science. There have been many highly accomplished Irish scientists, and the meeting showed clearly that Kelvin certainly deserves to be included among the greatest. Acknowledgments The meeting was the second regional event of the Institute of Physics (IOP) in Ireland, the first being the meeting on John Desmond Bernal: Science and Society held in Limerick in June 2006 and published in the same series as this volume. The meeting also benefited from the support of many bodies and institutions. We would like to thank the committee of the IOP in Ireland for providing finance and also giving their full support. We would particularly mention Vincent Casey, the Chair, who also chaired the afternoon session, Emma Sokell, the Secretary, and Denise Gabuzda and Kevin McGuigan, past and present Treasurers. We would also thank Sheila Gilheany and Alison Hackett for general help and encouragement, including assisting the organisation on the day of the meeting. We also acknowledge financial support from the IOP in London, and in particular thank Susan Lippmann and John Brindley. We also thank Peter Ford, present Chair of the History of Physics Group at the IOP for general encouragement and helping us to obtain this finance. The meeting was also supported by Queen's University Belfast. We would thank Tom Millar, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science for arranging this support. We were supremely fortunate to be allowed to use the magnificent Great Hall, a highly suitable room for the meeting since among the portraits on the walls were many of those referred to in the talks, and even one of the speakers! Catering and audiovisual services were also very helpful. From the School of Mathematics and Physics at Queen's, we would acknowledge the considerable help of Angela Anderson and Margaret Hewitt. We would also thank Kevin Mulhern, who arranged for publicity, Lisa Mitchell who provided the publicity in a splendid way, and also Eugene McCusker and Claire Wilson. Juliet Chantler of Northern Visions prepared an enthralling TV programme around the event and we are very grateful to her also. Joe Millar of the Ulster Scots Agency also publicised the meeting and we thank him as well. David Livingstone gave general support and chaired the morning session, for which we are grateful, and of course we would like to thank all the speakers who were responsible for the meeting being interesting and enjoyable. We would mention Andrew Holmes who gave a very erudite paper at the meeting. Unfortunately, since his material is being published elsewhere, we have not been able to include his contribution here, but he has given helpful advice on the preparation of this volume. Finally we would like to thank Graham Douglas, the Publisher of Journal of Physics: Conference Series for his courtesy and helpfulness in the preparation of this volume.

  9. Preface: Veit 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Ghelev, Chavdar

    2014-05-01

    The International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron and Ion Technologies (VEIT) has been organized biennially since 1977, when the series of VEIT School was launched by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with the aim to act as a forum for exchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas on the latest developments in electron-, ion-, and plasma-assisted technologies. The organizers of the 2013 edition of the event were the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria and the the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. While the school has initially been providing a meeting place for researchers mainly from Eastern and Central European countries, its importance has grown issue by issue. The school is now a major scientific event and a meeting place for young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe involved in research and development associated with high-tech industries. Many former school participants have gone on to become leading scientists in research establishments and companies throughout the world. Leading international companies, such as High Voltage Engineering, Balzers, Varian, and Hauzer have used the VEIT forum to present their products through oral presentations, poster contributions or exhibits. The School Proceedings have been published in special issues of the international journals Vacuum, Plasma Processes and Polymers, and Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The eighteenth edition of VEIT was held in the Black Sea resort Sozopol, Bulgaria, on 7-11 October 2013. It was attended by 91 participants from 15 countries: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, The Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Ukraine and the UK. Following the tradition of publishing the VEIT Proceedings, a selection of papers presented at the event is published in this special issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, under the originality and quality criteria of acceptance by the journal, including peer reviewing. The school comprised of fifteen plenary and three poster sessions. At the plenary sessions, 21 invited talks of general interest were presented by highly renowned international experts in the field, as well as 10 progress reports by young scientists. In total, 66 contributed papers were presented during the poster sessions. There were several scientific highlights covering fundamentals of interaction of fast particles with solids and challenging practical applications ranging from novel techniques for creating hard coatings, optical/protective layers, biocompatible materials to nanosized structures produced by evaporation, sputtering or external irradiation. Latest results were presented on ion-beam synthesis and modification in both low-energy (deposition and film growth) and high-energy (sputtering, implantation) regimes, and processing of solid materials aiming at patterning the surface or at creating nanophase systems for electronic or tribological/wear resistant applications. Despite the busy scientific program, the atmosphere was relaxed and informal. The early afternoons of most conference days were free to stimulate both scientific and social interaction between participants, which often took place on the beach. The social program included a welcome party, an official dinner, and an outing to historical landmarks in old Sozopol. VEIT 2013 owes its success to many people. The International Advisory Committee shaped the scientific program and ensured high-quality plenary presentations by careful selection of invited speakers. The Local Committee bore the brunt of the organization both at the conference site and in dealing with correspondence, abstracts, and manuscripts for these proceedings. We are grateful to our sponsors, the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands, the companies AllData and Astel, and the Ministry of Education and Science of Republic of Bulgaria for their generosity, which enabled us to support the attendance of students and provided support to deal with mailing, printing, renting the conference site, etc. We are also grateful to the members of the International Advisory Committee — Th Czerwiec, M Dimitrova, G Dinescu, A Ehiasarian, N Guerassimov, I Katardjiev, H Kersten, D Mataras, W Möller, I Petrov, Z Petrovic, B Rauschenbach, M C M (Richard) van de Sanden and M Ürgen — for their continuous concern about the high scientific level and the future of the event, as well as for their contribution to the formation of a new generation of scientists and experts in the field. And, last but not least, we would also like to thank all authors for their valuable contributions to these proceedings and to the school, and all reviewers for their hard and tedious, but very important, work. The next conference in the series will be held in September 2015. M C M van de Sanden, Miglena Dimitrova and Chavdar Ghelev Guest Editors Conference photograph

  10. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior (IAVCEI), the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) through the Coordinación de la Investigación Científica, the Institute of Physics Publishing services, the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de Querétaro (CONCYTEQ). The workshop represented the key activity of the IAVCEI Commission on Collapse Calderas in 2008. We, the workshop organizers, would like to express our gratitude to all workshop participants, the staff of Misión La Muralla, the Centro de Geociencias of UNAM for administrative and logistic support, to Adelina Geyer for web support, to María Inés Rojano for organization of logistics, the Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí for logistics support, the Comisiòn Nacional de Electricidad for authorizing a visit to Los Azufres geothermal field, and to all sponsors that provided financial support. We expect these proceedings to stimulate further fruitful discussions, which we hope will be continued at a future meeting. Jo Gottsmann and Gerardo Aguirre-Diaz October 2008

  11. Communism and Hunger: Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    From the Guest Editors

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, researchers have made significant progress in studying the great political famines of the twentieth century. As a result of increased access to formerly closed archives and the collective efforts of the international scholarly community, we now have a rather accurate picture of the causes, dynamics, demographic impact, and consequences of the pan-Soviet famines of 1931-33, the Ukrainian Holodomor, the Kazakh great hunger, and the terrible famine of 1959-61 in China produced by the Great Leap Forward...

  12. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real devices, respectively, while the papers by Ledieu and Guo report the structural characterization of novel surface systems—quasicrystal surfaces and supramolecular monolayers, respectively. The final two papers, by Bennett and Smith, demonstrate the positive interplay between experimental measurements and theoretical modelling in the investigation of nanostructured surfaces. The examples discussed include, respectively, the growth of metal clusters on oxide surfaces and the deposition of fullerenes and energetic clusters from the gas phase. We note finally that the last six papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the Committee of the newly-formed Nanoscale Physics and Technology Group of the Institute of Physics. The Group shares with this special issue the aim of promoting and disseminating exciting advances in the flourishing field of nanoscale physics.