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Sample records for content redox potential

  1. Effects of moisture content and redox potential on in situ K d values for radioiodine in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, D.J.; Shaw, G.

    2006-01-01

    The soil solid-liquid distribution coefficient (K d ) value is of great significance in understanding and modelling the environmental behaviour of soil contaminants. For many years, the batch sorption technique has been used for the determination of such values. Here, we propose an alternative 'mini-column' approach in which somewhat more realistic soil conditions are maintained. In particular, this approach allows for determination of radionuclide K d values under realistic soil moisture contents and in a system in which time-dependent processes such as changes in redox potential can take place. Data obtained for radioactive iodine (a key radionuclide in the consideration of radioactive waste disposal) are presented and indicate that soil moisture content, particularly in conjunction with soil redox potential (through water-logging of the soil), has a marked effect on measured K d values. The results indicate the advantages and potential usefulness of the mini-column approach in assessing the environmental behaviour of radioactive, and other, soil contaminants

  2. Effects of soil type, moisture content, redox potential and methyl bromide fumigation on Kd values of radio-selenium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, D.J.; Moore, J.; Shaw, G.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the processes that determine the solid-liquid partitioning (K d value) of Se is of fundamental importance in assessing the risk associated with the disposal of radio-selenium-containing waste. Using a mini-column (rather than batch) approach, K d values for 75 Se were determined over time in relation to soil moisture content (field capacity or saturated), redox potential and methyl bromide fumigation (used to disrupt the soil microbial population) in three contrasting soil types: clay loam, organic and sandy loam. The K d values were generally in the range 50-500 L kg -1 , with mean soil K d increasing with increasing organic matter content. Saturation with water lowered the measured redox potentials in the soils. However, only in the sandy loam soil did redox potential become negative, and this led to an increase in 75 Se K d value in this soil. Comparison of the data with the Eh-pH stability diagram for Se suggested that such strong reduction may have been consistent with the formation of the insoluble Se species, selenide. These findings, coupled with the fact that methyl bromide fumigation had no discernible effect on 75 Se K d value in the sandy loam soil, suggest that geochemical, rather than microbial, processes controlled 75 Se partitioning. The inter-relations between soil moisture content, redox potential and Se speciation should be considered in the modelling and assessment of radioactive Se fate and transport in the environment

  3. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina Wedege; Emil Dražević; Denes Konya; Anders Bentien

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined ...

  4. Redox cycling of potential antitumor aziridinylquinones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusthof, Klaas J.; de Mol, Nicolaas J.; Richter, Wilma; Janssen, Lambert H.M.; Butler, John; Hoey, Brigid M.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    1992-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) during redox cycling of newly synthetized potential antitumor 2,5-bis (1-aziridinyl)-1,4-benzoquinone (BABQ) derivatives has been studied by assaying the production of ROI (superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide) by xanthine oxidase

  5. Radii of Redox Components from Absolute Redox Potentials Compared with Covalent and Aqueous Ionic Radii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2010), s. 903-907 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Absolute redox potentials * Radii of redox components Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  6. Measurement of Redox Potential in Nanoecotoxicological Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Tantra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO or cerium oxide (CeO2 dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe.

  7. Measurement of redox potential in nanoecotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; Cackett, Alex; Peck, Roger; Gohil, Dipak; Snowden, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO(2))) dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe.

  8. Redox behaviors of iron by absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong

    2010-02-01

    This work is performed to study the redox (reduction/oxidation) behaviors of iron in aqueous system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements. There are many doubts on redox potential measurements generally showing low accuracies and high uncertainties. In the present study, redox potentials are measured by utilizing various redox electrodes such as Pt, Au, Ag, and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Measured redox potentials are compared with calculated redox potentials based on the chemical oxidation speciation of iron and thermodynamic data by absorption spectroscopy, which provides one of the sensitive and selective spectroscopic methods for the chemical speciation of Fe(II/III). From the comparison analyses, redox potential values measured by the Ag redox electrode are fairly consistent with those calculated by the chemical aqueous speciation of iron in the whole system. In summary, the uncertainties of measured redox potentials are closely related with the total Fe concentration and affected by the formation of mixed potentials due to Fe(III) precipitates in the pH range of 6 ∼ 9 beyond the solubility of Fe(III), whilst being independent of the initially prepared concentration ratios between Fe(II) and Fe(III)

  9. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V. PMID:27966605

  10. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  11. [Determination of the redox potential of water saturated with hydrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskarev, I M; Ushkanov, V A; Aristova, N A; Likhachev, P P; Myslivets, T C

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that the redox potential of water saturated with hydrogen is -500--700 mV. The time of the establishment of the potential is 24 h. The potential somewhat increases with increasing volume of hydrogen introduced to a reservoir with water and practically does not depend on the presence of additions in water, provided these additions are not reduced by hydrogen. The pH value of water does not change after the addition of water. In a glass vessel with a metallic cover resting on the side, no decrease in potential during the 2.5-month storage was observed. In plastic bottles, the content of hydrogen decreased; on storage for more than two weeks, it disappeared almost completely, and as a result, the potential increased after storage for three to four weeks to a level near zero. In an open vessel, the potential remained negative for two days.

  12. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  13. Analytical redox reactions and redox potentials of tungsten and its concomitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, G.; Mintrop, L.; Tracht, U.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that tungsten can be more effectively determined by redox titrimetry than by gravimetry. In addition to its inherent greater simplicity the volumetric approach offers to determine several components of the sample from consecutive redox titrations. To provide the necessary information the conditional redox potentials of W, Mo, Fe, V, Ti, Sn, Cu, Cr in HCl, HCl + HF and HCl + H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ have been determined. Use of HF and/or H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ allows sample preparations without any precipitation of tungstic acid. The influence of these auxiliary complexing agents on the potentials and kinetics is discussed. The titrations can be performed reductimetrically or more conveniently oxidimetrically using potentiometric or amperometric indication. The use of strongly reducing agents restricts the tolerance interval to +-0.6%, so that the gravimetric determination of tungsten remains superior for high precision analyses.

  14. Analytical redox reactions and redox potentials of tungsten and its concomitants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuensch, G.; Mintrop, L.; Tracht, U.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that tungsten can be more effectively determined by redox titrimetry than by gravimetry. In addition to its inherent greater simplicity the volumetric approach offers to determine several components of the sample from consecutive redox titrations. To provide the necessary information the conditional redox potentials of W, Mo, Fe, V, Ti, Sn, Cu, Cr in HCl, HCl + HF and HCl + H 3 PO 4 have been determined. Use of HF and/or H 3 PO 4 allows sample preparations without any precipitation of tungstic acid. The influence of these auxiliary complexing agents on the potentials and kinetics is discussed. The titrations can be performed reductimetrically or more conveniently oxidimetrically using potentiometric or amperometric indication. The use of strongly reducing agents restricts the tolerance interval to +-0.6%, so that the gravimetric determination of tungsten remains superior for high precision analyses. (orig.) [de

  15. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD+ or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD+/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD+-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD+ and NADH contents and the NAD+/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD+, total NAD contents, and NAD+/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ. PMID:25730862

  16. Redox Potentials of Ligands and Complexes – a DFT Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    A review of the limited literature concerned with theoretical ways to predict experimentally measured redox potentials of ligands and ... electrode surface, over-potentials and high solvent resistance, ... A correlation coefficient of 0.969 in the linear relation with ... of E0' were performed in two steps, i.e. calculation of the free.

  17. Content of redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Bente L; Carlsen, Monica H; Phillips, Katherine M; Bøhn, Siv K; Holte, Kari; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2006-07-01

    Supplements containing ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, or beta-carotene do not protect against oxidative stress-related diseases in most randomized intervention trials. We suggest that other redox-active phytochemicals may be more effective and that a combination of different redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants or reductants) may be needed for proper protection against oxidative damage. We aimed to generate a ranked food table with values for total content of redox-active compounds to test this alternative antioxidant hypothesis. An assay that measures the total concentration of redox-active compounds above a certain cutoff reduction potential was used to analyze 1113 food samples obtained from the US Department of Agriculture National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. Large variations in the content of antioxidants were observed in different foods and food categories. The food groups spices and herbs, nuts and seeds, berries, and fruit and vegetables all contained foods with very high antioxidant contents. Most food categories also contained products almost devoid of antioxidants. Of the 50 food products highest in antioxidant concentrations, 13 were spices, 8 were in the fruit and vegetables category, 5 were berries, 5 were chocolate-based, 5 were breakfast cereals, and 4 were nuts or seeds. On the basis of typical serving sizes, blackberries, walnuts, strawberries, artichokes, cranberries, brewed coffee, raspberries, pecans, blueberries, ground cloves, grape juice, and unsweetened baking chocolate were at the top of the ranked list. This ranked antioxidant food table provides a useful tool for investigations into the possible health benefit of dietary antioxidants.

  18. Redox potentials of free radicals. III. Reevaluation of the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, P.S.; Hayon, E.

    1974-01-01

    A reevaluation of the method described in ref 1 and 2 to determine the redox potentials of free radicals (.RH) in water using the techniques of pulse radiolysis and absorption spectrophotometry is presented. This method is based on the dependence of the percentage efficiency for the one-electron oxidation (or reduction) of .RH radicals on the redox potentials E 01 of the electron acceptors, A. The reaction .RH + A → .A - + R + H + (kappa/sub ox/) is not reversible for most radicals under the experimental conditions used, and the derived potentials are, therefore, not thermodynamic values. A reinterpretation of the results is made on the basis of the kinetic competition between the above reaction and .RH + A → .RHA (kappa/sub add/) (radical adducts). Based on kappa/ sub ox/ and kappa/sub add/, it is concluded that the observed experimental ''titration'' curves do represent a measure of the redox property of the free radicals. From the midpoint on the curves, the kinetic potential, E/sub kappa/ 01 : of the free radicals can be derived based on the known two-electron redox potentials of the electron acceptors. These and other questions are discussed. (U.S.)

  19. Probing Fe (III)/Fe (II) redox potential in a clayey material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Chainet, Fabien; Betelu, Stephanie; Hadi, Jebril; Gaucher, Eric C.; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Charlet, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Redox is one of the main factors affecting the migration of redox-sensitive radionuclides. As a consequence reducing conditions are considered of strategic importance for the confinement properties of a clayey formation towards nuclear waste. A representative redox potential of clay formation such as Callovian- Oxfordian (COx) can be derived from thermodynamic calculations considering equilibrium between observed redox phases such as pyrite and siderite. However, there is little information on the reactivity of the different reservoirs of redox constituents in this type of complex material. The present study aims at investigating the reactivity of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple in the structure of clay minerals using different investigation methods: electrochemistry and O 2 reduction kinetic experiments. Clay modified electrodes were specifically designed to probe Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox potential in the structure of clay minerals. The clay fraction of a Callovian-Oxfordian argillite sample originating from the same level than ANDRA underground research laboratory was used after pre-treatment to remove organic matter and accessory minerals such as pyrite that could influence redox potential measurements. These electrodes were used to verify the validity of the model of Favre et al. (2006) that links the redox potential (E clay ) to the the Fe(II)/Fe tot ratio in the structure (m rel ), the pH and the sodium concentration in solution: equation 1. The good agreement between direct potential measurements and model prediction provides a strong evidence of the relevance of this model in our experimental conditions although the clay composition and its too low Fe content do not a priori fulfil the conditions set by Drits and Manceau (2000) for the calculation of K 0 parameter. Following the verification of the model, we tried to apply it to the specific case of a Callovian-Oxfordian sample that had been very well preserved

  20. Arteriovenous oscillations of the redox potential: Is the redox state influencing blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Mazurek, Tomasz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Gajewski, Zdzislaw; Paczek, Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Studies on the regulation of human blood flow revealed several modes of oscillations with frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 1 Hz. Several mechanisms were proposed that might influence these oscillations, such as the activity of vascular endothelium, the neurogenic activity of vessel wall, the intrinsic activity of vascular smooth muscle, respiration, and heartbeat. These studies relied typically on non-invasive techniques, for example, laser Doppler flowmetry. Oscillations of biochemical markers were rarely coupled to blood flow. The redox potential difference between the artery and the vein was measured by platinum electrodes placed in the parallel homonymous femoral artery and the femoral vein of ventilated anesthetized pigs. Continuous measurement at 5 Hz sampling rate using a digital nanovoltmeter revealed fluctuating signals with three basic modes of oscillations: ∼ 1, ∼ 0.1 and ∼ 0.01 Hz. These signals clearly overlap with reported modes of oscillations in blood flow, suggesting coupling of the redox potential and blood flow. The amplitude of the oscillations associated with heart action was significantly smaller than for the other two modes, despite the fact that heart action has the greatest influence on blood flow. This finding suggests that redox potential in blood might be not a derivative but either a mediator or an effector of the blood flow control system.

  1. The fairytale of the GSSG/GSH redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, Leopold

    2013-05-01

    The term GSSG/GSH redox potential is frequently used to explain redox regulation and other biological processes. The relevance of the GSSG/GSH redox potential as driving force of biological processes is critically discussed. It is recalled that the concentration ratio of GSSG and GSH reflects little else than a steady state, which overwhelmingly results from fast enzymatic processes utilizing, degrading or regenerating GSH. A biological GSSG/GSH redox potential, as calculated by the Nernst equation, is a deduced electrochemical parameter based on direct measurements of GSH and GSSG that are often complicated by poorly substantiated assumptions. It is considered irrelevant to the steering of any biological process. GSH-utilizing enzymes depend on the concentration of GSH, not on [GSH](2), as is predicted by the Nernst equation, and are typically not affected by GSSG. Regulatory processes involving oxidants and GSH are considered to make use of mechanistic principles known for thiol peroxidases which catalyze the oxidation of hydroperoxides by GSH by means of an enzyme substitution mechanism involving only bimolecular reaction steps. The negligibly small rate constants of related spontaneous reactions as compared with enzyme-catalyzed ones underscore the superiority of kinetic parameters over electrochemical or thermodynamic ones for an in-depth understanding of GSH-dependent biological phenomena. At best, the GSSG/GSH potential might be useful as an analytical tool to disclose disturbances in redox metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Cellular Functions of Glutathione. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal Coefficient of Redox Potential of Alkali Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Yuya; Hinuma, Yoyo; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2018-05-01

    The thermal coefficient (α) of redox potential (V) is a significant physical quantity that converts the thermal energy into electric energy. In this short note, we carefully determined α of alkali metals (A = Li and Na) against electrolyte solution. The obtained α is much larger than that expected from the specific heat (CpA) of solid A and depends on electrolyte solution. These observations indicate that the solvent has significant effect on α.

  3. Online monitoring of Mezcal fermentation based on redox potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante-Minakata, P; Ibarra-Junquera, V; Rosu, H C; De León-Rodríguez, A; González-García, R

    2009-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the continuous monitoring of the biomass and ethanol concentrations as well as the growth rate in the Mezcal fermentation process. The algorithm performs its task having available only the online measurements of the redox potential. The procedure combines an artificial neural network (ANN) that relates the redox potential to the ethanol and biomass concentrations with a nonlinear observer-based algorithm that uses the ANN biomass estimations to infer the growth rate of this fermentation process. The results show that the redox potential is a valuable indicator of the metabolic activity of the microorganisms during Mezcal fermentation. In addition, the estimated growth rate can be considered as a direct evidence of the presence of mixed culture growth in the process. Usually, mixtures of microorganisms could be intuitively clear in this kind of processes; however, the total biomass data do not provide definite evidence by themselves. In this paper, the detailed design of the software sensor as well as its experimental application is presented at the laboratory level.

  4. Glutathione redox potential in the mitochondrial intermembrane space is linked to the cytosol and impacts the Mia40 redox state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojer, Kerstin; Bien, Melanie; Gangel, Heike; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione is an important mediator and regulator of cellular redox processes. Detailed knowledge of local glutathione redox potential (EGSH) dynamics is critical to understand the network of redox processes and their influence on cellular function. Using dynamic oxidant recovery assays together with EGSH-specific fluorescent reporters, we investigate the glutathione pools of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space (IMS). We demonstrate that the glutathione pools of IMS and cytosol are dynamically interconnected via porins. In contrast, no appreciable communication was observed between the glutathione pools of the IMS and matrix. By modulating redox pathways in the cytosol and IMS, we find that the cytosolic glutathione reductase system is the major determinant of EGSH in the IMS, thus explaining a steady-state EGSH in the IMS which is similar to the cytosol. Moreover, we show that the local EGSH contributes to the partially reduced redox state of the IMS oxidoreductase Mia40 in vivo. Taken together, we provide a comprehensive mechanistic picture of the IMS redox milieu and define the redox influences on Mia40 in living cells. PMID:22705944

  5. Unacylated ghrelin does not alter mitochondrial function, redox state and triglyceride content in rat liver in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gortan Cappellari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in liver mitochondrial function with more oxidized redox state and enhanced inflammation may contribute to the onset of obesity- and insulin resistance-associated hepatic complications, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steato-hepatitis. Unacylated ghrelin (UnAG is a gastric hormone reported to be associated with lower oxidative stress in different cell types, but its potential effects on liver mitochondrial function, redox state and inflammation in vivo remains undetermined. We investigated the impact of chronic UnAG overexpression (Tg Myh6/Ghrl leading to systemic upregulation of circulating hormone on mitochondrial ATP production, redox state (oxidized-to-total glutathione and inflammation markers in lean mice. Compared to wild-type animals (wt, Tg Myh6/Ghrl had superimposable liver weight, triglyceride content and plasma lipid profile. Liver mitochondrial enzyme activities and ATP production as well as oxidized-to-total glutathione were also similar in the two groups. In addition, no differences were observed in tissue inflammation marker TNF-alpha between wild-type and Tg Myh6/Ghrl animals. Thus, chronic systemic UnAG upregulation does not alter liver triglyceride content, mitochondrial function, redox state and inflammation markers in lean mice. These findings do not support a major role of UnAG as a physiological modulator of in vivo liver oxidative-lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  6. Development of an investigation method for redox condition of rocks by self potential (SP) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Inohara, Yoshiki; Oyama, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues in subsurface disposal of low level radioactive wastes is that long term behaviors of sedimentary rocks can be affected by geochemical factors. Redox conditions can affect to corrosion of metal included in artificial barrier or wastes and adsorption characteristics of a nuclide. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the redox conditions around natural barrier at waste facilities. In general, geochemical properties are acquired by rock samples or water sampling at a borehole. However, there is a possibility not to acquire data we want to evaluate. If geophysical methods are applied, redox conditions can be evaluated widely and briefly. There is a possibility that self potential (SP) and redox conditions have a correlation. So we have conducted self potential method around test caverns where redox front can be observed at the Rokkasho site. The results demonstrated that self potential decreased around redox front. There was a positive correlation between self potential and pH. One of the factors of self potential change is difference of elevation, however, self potential change around redox front was larger than that expected from elevation difference. Zeta potential is one of the important factors for determination of self potential, and it had a correlation with self potential or pH. Therefore, there is a possibility that self potential change occurs by geochemical condition changes around redox front, and redox condition can be detected by self potential method. (author)

  7. Oxidative shift in tissue redox potential increases beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Profound changes in tissue redox potential occur in the heart under conditions of oxidative stress frequently associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Since beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is a good indicator of arrhythmia incidence, the aim of this work was to study the influence of redox changes on SV in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using a conventional microelectrode technique. The redox potential was shifted toward a reduced state using a reductive cocktail (containing dithiothreitol, glutathione, and ascorbic acid) while oxidative changes were initiated by superfusion with H2O2. Redox effects were evaluated as changes in "relative SV" determined by comparing SV changes with the concomitant APD changes. Exposure of myocytes to the reductive cocktail decreased SV significantly without any detectable effect on APD. Application of H2O2 increased both SV and APD, but the enhancement of SV was the greater, so relative SV increased. Longer exposure to H2O2 resulted in the development of early afterdepolarizations accompanied by tremendously increased SV. Pretreatment with the reductive cocktail prevented both elevation in relative SV and the development of afterdepolarizations. The results suggest that the increased beat-to-beat variability during an oxidative stress contributes to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  8. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  9. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: Atomistic battery discharge simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each ...

  10. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Roede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys, cystine (CySS, glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (Eh to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  11. Hourly and daily variation of sediment redox potential in tidal wetland sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, W. James

    1999-01-01

    Variation of electrochemical oxidation-reduction (redox) potential was examined in surface salt march sediments under conditions of flooding and tidal simulation in mesocosms and field sites. Time series were generated of redox potential measured in sediment profiles at 2-10 cm depth using combination Pt-Ag/AgCl (ORP) electrodes. Redox potential data were acquired at rapid rates (1-55 samples/h) over extended periods (3-104 days) along with similar times series of temperature (water, air, soil) and pH. It was found that redox potential vaired as a result of water level changes and was unrelated to diurnal changes in temperature or pH, the latter of which changed by 370 mV redox potential decrease in under 48 hours). Attenuatoin of microbial activity by [gamma] y-radiation and toxic chemicals elimintated this response. In tidal salt marsh mesocosms where the sediment-plant assemblages were exposed to a simulated diurnal tide, redox potenial oscillations of 40-300 mV amplitude were recoded that has the same periodicity as the flood-drain cycle. Periodic redoc potential time series were observed repeatedly in sediments receiving tidal pulsing but not in those sediments exposed to static hydrological conditions. Data collected over 12 days from a coastal marsh site experiencing diurnal tides showed similar fluctuations in redox potential. Data from the experimentents indicated that (a) redox potential can be a dynamic, nonlinear variable in coastal and estuarine wetland sediments over hourly and daily scales, and the designs of biogeochemical experiments should reflect this, (b) redox potential can change rapidly and signigicantly in coastal wetland sediments in response of flooding and draining, (c) microbial community processes are primarily determinants of the time course of redox potential in wetland sediments, and elimination of inhibition of microbial activity (e.g. by pollutants) can significantly alter that behavior, and (d) fast redox potential dynamics appear

  12. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: atomistic battery discharge simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, Wolf B; Müser, Martin H

    2013-08-14

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each atom. Along with exchanging partial charges across bonds, atoms can swap integer charges. With redoxSQE we study the discharge behavior of a nano-battery, and demonstrate that this reproduces the generic properties of a macroscopic battery qualitatively. Examples are the dependence of the battery's capacity on temperature and discharge rate, as well as performance degradation upon recharge.

  13. [Effect of the medium redox potential on the growth and metabolism of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilian, A; Trchunian, A

    2008-01-01

    Based on the available literature data on a decrease in the redox potential of medium to low negative values and a decrease in pH during the growth of sugar-fermenting anaerobic bacteria, it was concluded that these processes cannot be described by the theory of redox potential. A theory was developed according to which the regulation of bacterial metabolism is accomplished through changes in the redox potential. The theory considers the redox potential as a factor determining the growth of anaerobic bacteria, which is regulated by oxidizers and reducers. The assumption is put forward that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria are sensitive to changes in the redox potential and have a redox taxis. The effect of the redox potential on the transport of protons and other substances through membranes and the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, including the proton F1-F0-ATPase, whose mechanisms of action involve changes in the proton conductance of the membrane, the generation of proton-driving force, and dithiol-disulfide transitions in proteins was studied.

  14. Redox potential distribution of an organic-rich contaminated site obtained by the inversion of self-potential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.; Soueid Ahmed, A.; Revil, A.; Brigaud, L.; Bégassat, Ph.; Dupont, J. P.

    2017-11-01

    Mapping the redox potential of shallow aquifers impacted by hydrocarbon contaminant plumes is important for the characterization and remediation of such contaminated sites. The redox potential of groundwater is indicative of the biodegradation of hydrocarbons and is important in delineating the shapes of contaminant plumes. The self-potential method was used to reconstruct the redox potential of groundwater associated with an organic-rich contaminant plume in northern France. The self-potential technique is a passive technique consisting in recording the electrical potential distribution at the surface of the Earth. A self-potential map is essentially the sum of two contributions, one associated with groundwater flow referred to as the electrokinetic component, and one associated with redox potential anomalies referred to as the electroredox component (thermoelectric and diffusion potentials are generally negligible). A groundwater flow model was first used to remove the electrokinetic component from the observed self-potential data. Then, a residual self-potential map was obtained. The source current density generating the residual self-potential signals is assumed to be associated with the position of the water table, an interface characterized by a change in both the electrical conductivity and the redox potential. The source current density was obtained through an inverse problem by minimizing a cost function including a data misfit contribution and a regularizer. This inversion algorithm allows the determination of the vertical and horizontal components of the source current density taking into account the electrical conductivity distribution of the saturated and non-saturated zones obtained independently by electrical resistivity tomography. The redox potential distribution was finally determined from the inverted residual source current density. A redox map was successfully built and the estimated redox potential values correlated well with in

  15. Potential redox behaviour on industrial wastes treatment; Evolucion del potencial redox en tratamiento y depuracion industrial de aguas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Galvin, R.; rodriguez Mellado, J. M.; Ruiz Montoya, M.; Jimenez Gamero, C. [Departamento Quimica Fisica y Termodinamica aplicada, Facultad de ciencias, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    A study over the behaviour of redox potential in waters and wastewaters under industrial treatment processes has been carried out. In both cases, the potential-time curves obtained were in a logarithmical shape being more strongly distorted when the waters contained more dissolved and suspended compounds. Oxygen fundamentally leads the redox state in wastewaters, although ozone and chlorine almost oxygen lead the redox potential in raw waters intended to drinking water production. In this way, by increasing 210 m V the E{sub H} value of water or maintaining the rH>21.8 it can be industrially sterilized the drinking water. On the other hand, increases of 350 mV in the EH values from wastewaters influent to plant to the treated waters, allowed discarding 450 mg/l of DQO and 9 mg/l of NH{sub 3} from the former. Finally, the exploitation of the Wastewaters Treatment Plant by regulation of the E{sub H} values can suppose a good practice. (Author) 14 refs.

  16. Influence of redox condition in iron, silicon and hydrogen contents of leached glass surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manara, A.; Lanza, F.; Della Mea, G.; Rossi, C.; Salvagno, G.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analysis has been conducted on samples leached in a Sochlet apparatus at 100 0 C in the presence and in the absence of air. The XPS technique was applied to analyze the content of iron and silicon while the nuclear reaction method was utilized to analyze the content of hydrogen. Samples leached in argon atmosphere have shown a smaller content of iron and silicon with respect to the samples leached in air atmosphere. The H concentration has shown the same behavior. The results are discussed in terms of possible formation of iron compounds in the different redox condition and of their different stabilities and in terms of their efficiency in reducing exchange between Na + and H + ions. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  17. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Factors that affect leaf extracellular ascorbic acid content and redox status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkey, K.O.; Fiscus, E.L. [North Carolina State Univ., United States dept. og Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service and Dept. of Crop Science, Raleigh, NC (United States); Eason, G. [North Carolina, State Univ., United States Dept. of Plant Pathology, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Leaf ascorbic acid content and redox status were compared in ozone-tolerant (Provider) and ozone-sensitive (S156) genotypes of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Plants were grown in pots for 24 days under charcoal-filtered air (CF) conditions in open-top field chambers and then maintained as CF controls (29 nmol mol{sup 1} ozone) or exposed to elevated ozone (71 nmol mol{sup 1} ozone). Following a 10-day treatment, mature leaves of the same age were harvested early in the morning (06:00-08:00 h) or in the afternoon (13:00-15:00 h) for analysis of ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). Vacuum infiltration methods were used to separate leaf AA into apoplast and symplast fractions. The total ascorbate content [AA + DHA] of leaf tissue averaged 28% higher in Provider relative to S156, and Provider exhibited a greater capacity to maintain [AA + DHA] content under ozone stress. Apoplast [AA + DHA] content was 2-fold higher in tolerant Provider (360 nmol g{sup 1} FW maximum) relative to sensitive S156 (160 nmol g1 FW maximum) regardless of sampling period or treatment, supporting the hypothesis that extracellular AA is a factor in ozone tolerance. Apoplast [AA + DHA] levels were significantly higher in the afternoon than early morning for both genotypes, evidence for short-term regulation of extracellular ascorbate content. Total leaf ascorbate was primarily reduced with AA/[AA + DHA] ratios of 0.81-0.90. In contrast, apoplast AA/[AA + DHA] ratios were 0.01-0.60 and depended on genotype and ozone treatment. Provider exhibited a greater capacity to maintain extracellular AA/[AA + DHA] ratios under ozone stress, suggesting that ozone tolerance is associated with apoplast ascorbate redox status. (au)

  19. Redox protective potential of fruits and vegetables: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Tahir

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although oxidation reactions are crucial for life, they can also be damaging to cells and tissues, causing variety of chronic ailments like, aging, cancer, autoimmune problems, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders etc. Redox protective systems are present in body for general immunization against free radicals, which can be supported by antioxidants that we take in our daily diet. Natural antioxidants such as flavonoids, hydrolysable tannins, coumarins, xanthones, phenolics, terpenoids, ascorbic acid, carotenoids and proanthocyanins are found in various plant products, including fruits, leaves, seeds oils, and juices. This review gives a brief account of research reports on fruits and vegetables which provide free radical scavenging compounds to the body.

  20. Methods of simulating low redox potential (Eh) for a basalt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Basalt groundwaters have inherently low redox potentials, approximately -0.4V, which can be measured with platinum electrodes, but are difficult to reproduce during leaching experiments. In the presence of deionized water, crushed basalt reaches the measured Eh-pH values of a basalt repository. Other waste package components, such as iron, will interact with groundwater in different ways under oxic or anoxic conditions since the presence of any redox active solid will affect the groundwater Eh. 26 references, 4 figures

  1. Redox potentials and kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction and solubility of cerium sulfates in sulfuric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulenova, A.; Creager, S. E.; Navratil, J. D.; Wei, Y.

    Experimental work was performed with the aim of evaluating the Ce 4+/Ce 3+ redox couple in sulfuric acid electrolyte for use in redox flow battery (RFB) technology. The solubility of cerium sulfates in 0.1-4.0 M sulfuric acid at 20-60 °C was studied. A synergistic effect of both sulfuric acid concentration and temperature on the solubility of cerous sulfate was observed. The solubility of cerous sulfate significantly decreased with rising concentration of sulfuric acid and rising temperature, while the solubility of ceric sulfate goes through a significant maximum at 40 °C. Redox potentials and the kinetics of the cerous/ceric redox reaction were also studied under the same temperature-concentration conditions. The redox potentials were measured using the combined redox electrode (Pt-Ag/AgCl) in equimolar Ce 4+/Ce 3+ solutions (i.e.[Ce 3+]=[Ce 4+]) in sulfuric acid electrolyte. The Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox potentials significantly decrease (i.e. shift to more negative values) with rising sulfuric acid concentration; a small maximum is observed at 40 °C. Cyclic voltammetric experiments confirmed slow electrochemical kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on carbon glassy electrodes (CGEs) in sulfuric acid solutions. The observed dependencies of solubilities, the redox potentials and the kinetics of Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on sulfuric acid concentration are thought to be the result of inequivalent complexation of the two redox species by sulfate anions: the ceric ion is much more strongly bound to sulfate than is the cerous ion. The best temperature-concentration conditions for the RFB electrolytes appear to be 40 °C and 1 M sulfuric acid, where the relatively good solubility of both cerium species, the maximum of redox potentials, and the more or less satisfying stability of CGE s were found. Even so, the relatively low solubility of cerium salts in sulfuric acid media and slow redox kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction at carbon indicate that the Ce 3+/Ce

  2. Dynamic Reference Electrode development for redox potential measurements in fluoride molten salt at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Klie, Gabriela; Rodrigues, Davide; Delpech, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of redox potential in fluoride media is a major problem due to the difficulty to design a reference electrode with high stability, high mechanical resistance and high accuracy. In the frame of molten salt reactor studies, a dynamic reference electrode (DRE) is developed to measure redox potential in fluoride molten salt at high temperature. DRE is based on the in-situ generation of a transient redox system. The choice of the redox couple corresponds to the cathodic limit of the molten salt considered. As a preliminary step, the demonstration of feasibility of generating a DRE was done in LiF-NaF-KF (46.5–11.5–42 mol%) media at 500 °C. In this salt, the reference redox system generated by coulometry at applied current is KF/K, metallic potassium being electrodeposited on a tungsten wire electrode. The validation of the DRE response and the experimental optimization parameters for DRE generation were realized by following the NiF 2 /Ni redox potential evolution as a function of NiF 2 concentration in the fused salt. The current value applied for DRE generation was optimized. It depends on the amount of metallic cations contained in the fused salt and which can be electrochemically reduced simultaneously during the DRE generation. The current corresponding to the DRE generation has to be 4 times greater than the current corresponding to the reduction of the other elements.

  3. A High Redox Potential Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15: Potential Application for Dye Decolorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. R. L. Zimbardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Laccase production by Pycnoporus sanguineus RP15 grown in wheat bran and corncob under solid-state fermentation was optimized by response surface methodology using a Central Composite Rotational Design. A laccase (Lacps1 was purified and characterized and the potential of the pure Lacps1 and the crude culture extract for synthetic dye decolorization was evaluated. At optimal conditions (eight days, 26 °C, 18% (w/w milled corncob, 0.8% (w/w NH4Cl and 50 mmol·L−1 CuSO4, initial moisture 4.1 mL·g−1, the laccase activity reached 138.6 ± 13.2 U·g−1. Lacps1 was a monomeric glycoprotein (67 kDa, 24% carbohydrate. Optimum pH and temperature for the oxidation of 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS were 4.4 and 74.4 °C, respectively. Lacps1 was stable at pH 3.0–8.0, and after two hours at 55–60 °C, presenting high redox potential (0.747 V vs. NHE. ABTS was oxidized with an apparent affinity constant of 147.0 ± 6.4 μmol·L−1, maximum velocity of 413.4 ± 21.2 U·mg−1 and catalytic efficiency of 3140.1 ± 149.6 L·mmol−1·s−1. The maximum decolorization percentages of bromophenol blue (BPB, remazol brilliant blue R and reactive blue 4 (RB4, at 25 or 40 °C without redox mediators, reached 90%, 80% and 60%, respectively, using either pure Lacps1 or the crude extract. This is the first study of the decolorization of BPB and RB4 by a P. sanguineus laccase. The data suggested good potential for treatment of industrial dye-containing effluents.

  4. Topic-Specific Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TSPCK) in Redox and Electrochemistry of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephanie

    Topic specific pedagogical content knowledge (TSPCK) is the basis by which knowledge of subject matter of a particular topic is conveyed to students. This includes students' prior knowledge, curricular saliency, what makes a topic easy or difficult to teach, representations, and teaching strategies. The goal of this study is to assess the pedagogical content knowledge of chemistry teachers in a professional learning community in the areas of redox and electrochemistry, as this has been regarded in previous literature as conceptually challenging for students to learn. By acquiring information regarding the PCK development of experienced chemistry teachers, the education and practice of all science teachers can be advanced. This study builds upon previous research that developed validated instruments to evaluate TSPCK. The research questions sought to determine which components of TSPCK were evidenced by the instructional design decisions teachers made, what shared patterns and trends were evident, and how TSPCK related to student learning outcomes. To answer the research questions subjects completed a background questionnaire, a TSPCK assessment, and interview tasks to elicit information about pedagogical decision making and processes that influenced student learning in their classrooms. The TSPCK exam and interview responses were coded to align with thematic constructs. To determine the effect of TSPCK on student learning gains, pre/post-assessment data on redox and electrochemistry were compared to teachers' TSPCK. The chemistry teachers displayed varying levels of TSPCK in redox and electrochemistry, as evidenced by their knowledge of student learning obstacles, curricular saliency, and teaching methodologies. There was evidence of experienced teachers lacking in certain areas of TSPCK, such as the ability to identify student misconceptions, suggesting the need for programmatic improvements in pre-service and in-service training to address the needs of current

  5. [On the influence of local molecular environment on the redox potential of electron transfer cofactors in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, P M; Noks, P P; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of cryosolvents (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide) to a water solution containing bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers changes the redox potential of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, but does not affect the redox potential of the quinone primary acceptor. It has been shown that the change in redox potential can be produced by changes of the electrostatic interactions between cofactors and the local molecular environment modified by additives entered into the solution. The degree of influence of a solvent on the redox potential of various cofactors is determined by degree of availability of these cofactors for molecules of solvent, which depends on the arrangement of cofactors in the structure of reaction centers.

  6. REDOX POTENTIAL AND DYNAMICS OF PROTEIN AND FAT DESTRUCTION DURING STORAGE OF CANNED MEAT IN PIECES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Krylova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies on the dynamics of the redox potential of systems and its relationship with the processes of protein and fat destruction in canned foods during their storage are fragmented and not systemized, which highlight their topicality. The aim of the research was to obtain the experimental data on the Eh values and physico-chemical indicators of canned food quality during storage in order to establish their possible correlation. It was shown that the dynamics of Eh, the content of free amino acids and fatty acid fractions in the canned products from beef and pork was different during storage. For example, a decrease in the Eh value and free amino acid content in the canned products from beef had a smooth character, while in the canned products from pork several periods were observed, which differed in the character of the change in the quality indicators.A linear character of the changes in the proportion of fatty acid fractions during storage of the canned products from beef and pork was noticed. With that, both canned food items had an increase in the saturated fatty acid content at the concomitant decrease in the sum of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The value of an increase in the proportion of saturated fatty acids associated with the process of reduction of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids did not depend on the kind of meat in the canned foods and was on average 6%. A decrease in the proportion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the canned products from pork was about 4 times more intensive compared to the canned products from beef.

  7. Calculation of the redox potential of the protein azurin and some mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, M; Swart, M; Snijders, JG; Berendsen, HJC; Mark, AE; Oostenbrink, C; van Gunsteren, WF; Canters, GW

    Azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a small 128-residue, copper-containing protein. Its redox potential can be modified by mutating the protein. Free-energy calculations based on classical molecular-dynamics simulations of the protein and from mutants in aqueous solution at different pH values

  8. Catalytic Efficiency of Basidiomycete Laccases: Redox Potential versus Substrate-Binding Pocket Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Glazunova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are copper-containing oxidases that catalyze a one-electron abstraction from various phenolic and non-phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of molecular oxygen to water. It is well-known that laccases from various sources have different substrate specificities, but it is not completely clear what exactly provides these differences. The purpose of this work was to study the features of the substrate specificity of four laccases from basidiomycete fungi Trametes hirsuta, Coriolopsis caperata, Antrodiella faginea, and Steccherinum murashkinskyi, which have different redox potentials of the T1 copper center and a different structure of substrate-binding pockets. Enzyme activity toward 20 monophenolic substances and 4 phenolic dyes was measured spectrophotometrically. The kinetic parameters of oxidation of four lignans and lignan-like substrates were determined by monitoring of the oxygen consumption. For the oxidation of the high redox potential (>700 mV monophenolic substrates and almost all large substrates, such as phenolic dyes and lignans, the redox potential difference between the enzyme and the substrate (ΔE played the defining role. For the low redox potential monophenolic substrates, ΔE did not directly influence the laccase activity. Also, in the special cases, the structure of the large substrates, such as dyes and lignans, as well as some structural features of the laccases (flexibility of the substrate-binding pocket loops and some amino acid residues in the key positions affected the resulting catalytic efficiency.

  9. Relationship Between Redox Potential, Disinfectant, and pH in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work will examine the effects of pH and oxidant type (chlorine [Cl2], oxygen [O2], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], monochloramine [MCA], and potassium permanganate [KMnO4]) and concentration (mg/L) on the redox potential of buffered test water. Also, the effects of incrementing ir...

  10. Redox potential dynamics in a grassed swale used for storage and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorenhout, Michel; Boogaard, Floris Cornelis

    2016-04-01

    Treatment wetlands are used to remove pollutants from water. Most swales are designed to infiltrate stormwater into the subsurface. A combination of both functions can help to enhance water quality and reduce flooding risks in urban areas. The chemical forms and possible removal of pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals in wetlands are highly dependent on the redox conditions. The redox conditions are expected to be highly dynamic and dependent on water levels and flow. We studied the correlation between these factors in an urban grassed swale system, and show that more factors play a role in these systems than water levels alone. The study system is located in the World Heritage site "Bryggen" in the city of Bergen, Norway. It consists of a series of SUDS, a socalled treatment train. The system is fed by storm water, which is at first stored in a rain garden then led to grassed swales. Water infiltrates into the subsurface in the swales. The reason for implementation of the system at this site is the protection of the highly organic archaeological layers at the site, which requires reduced conditions. Swales 1 and 2 were equipped with pressure loggers and multi-level redox and temperature probes (-2, -5, -10 and -20cm from surface). Redox and temperature probes were connected to a HYPNOS system. Measurements were taken for more than 1 year at 15 minute interval. A weather station supplemented the dataset with precipitation measurements. The redox potential in the swales show a strong correlation with water level. The regularly flooded swale 2 shows frequent anoxic events (Eh < 200mV) where as swale 1 shows oxic conditions (Eh = 650mV) throughout the same measurement period. Swale 1 has fewer flooding events than Swale 2 and a more coarse soil with less organic matter than swale 2. These redox results are as expected given the local conditions, and show that redox conditions are localised phenomena that depend on local soil conditions. Analysis of the redox

  11. Temperature and ionic strength influences on actinide(VI)/(V) redox potentials for carbonate limiting complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, H.; Vitorge, P.

    1998-01-01

    Actinide behaviour was studied in two limiting aqueous solutions: acidic and carbonate. Cyclic voltametry was validated with well-known U redox system. SIT was used to account for I influence. Taylor's series expansions to the second order were used to account for T influence. Redox potentials of actinide couples had previously been measured in non complexing media. The above data treatments give standard values for redox potential E 0 , for the corresponding entropy ΔS 0 , enthalpy ΔH 0 and heat capacity ΔC p 0 changes, and also for the corresponding excess values (i.e. the variation of these thermodynamic constants with ionic strength). This methodology was here used in carbonate media to measure the potential of the redox couple PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- /PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- from 5 to 70 degC and from I = 0.5 to 4.5 M in Na 2 CO 3 , NaClO 4 media. Experimental details and full results are given for Pu. Only final results are given for Np. Previous and/or published data for U and Am are discussed. E and ΔS variations with T or I were enough to be measured. The values obtained for the fitted SIT coefficients Δε, and for ΔS and ΔCp are similar for U, Np and Pu redox reactions. Using this analogy for Am missing data is discussed. β 3 V /β 3 VI formation constant ratio of the carbonate limiting complexes were deduced from the potential shift from complexing to non complexing media for the Actinide(VI)/Actinide(V) redox couples. β 3 V (U and Pu) and β 3 VI (Np) were finally proposed using published β3 VI (U and Pu) and β 3 V (Np). For Am, this data treatment was used to discuss the AmO 2 2+ / AmO 2 + redox potential

  12. Real-time quantification of subcellular H2O2 and glutathione redox potential in living cardiovascular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panieri, Emiliano; Millia, Carlo; Santoro, Massimo M

    2017-08-01

    Detecting and measuring the dynamic redox events that occur in vivo is a prerequisite for understanding the impact of oxidants and redox events in normal and pathological conditions. These aspects are particularly relevant in cardiovascular tissues wherein alterations of the redox balance are associated with stroke, aging, and pharmacological intervention. An ambiguous aspect of redox biology is how redox events occur in subcellular organelles including mitochondria, and nuclei. Genetically-encoded Rogfp2 fluorescent probes have become powerful tools for real-time detection of redox events. These probes detect hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) levels and glutathione redox potential (E GSH ), both with high spatiotemporal resolution. By generating novel transgenic (Tg) zebrafish lines that express compartment-specific Rogfp2-Orp1 and Grx1-Rogfp2 sensors we analyzed cytosolic, mitochondrial, and the nuclear redox state of endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes of living zebrafish embryos. We provide evidence for the usefulness of these Tg lines for pharmacological compounds screening by addressing the blocking of pentose phosphate pathways (PPP) and glutathione synthesis, thus altering subcellular redox state in vivo. Rogfp2-based transgenic zebrafish lines represent valuable tools to characterize the impact of redox changes in living tissues and offer new opportunities for studying metabolic driven antioxidant response in biomedical research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Timing of developmental reduction in epithelial glutathione redox potential is associated with increased epithelial proliferation in the immature murine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Graham K; Berardinelli, Andrew J; Ray, Laurie; Jackson, Arena R; Neish, Andrew S; Hansen, Jason M; Denning, Patricia W

    2017-08-01

    BackgroundThe intracellular redox potential of the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) couple regulates cellular processes. In vitro studies indicate that a reduced GSH/GSSG redox potential favors proliferation, whereas a more oxidized redox potential favors differentiation. Intestinal growth depends upon an appropriate balance between the two. However, how the ontogeny of intestinal epithelial cellular (IEC) GSH/GSSG redox regulates these processes in the developing intestine has not been fully characterized in vivo.MethodsOntogeny of intestinal GSH redox potential and growth were measured in neonatal mice.ResultsWe show that IEC GSH/GSSG redox potential becomes increasingly reduced (primarily driven by increased GSH concentration) over the first 3 weeks of life. Increased intracellular GSH has been shown to drive proliferation through increased poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) activity. We show that increasing IEC poly-ADP-ribose chains can be measured over the first 3 weeks of life, indicating an increase in IEC PARP activity. These changes are accompanied by increased intestinal growth and IEC proliferation as assessed by villus height/crypt depth, intestinal length, and Ki67 staining.ConclusionUnderstanding how IEC GSH/GSSG redox potential is developmentally regulated may provide insight into how premature human intestinal redox states can be manipulated to optimize intestinal growth and adaptation.

  14. Seasonal profiles of leaf ascorbic acid content and redox state in ozone-sensitive wildflowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkey, Kent O.; Neufeld, Howard S.; Souza, Lara; Chappelka, Arthur H.; Davison, Alan W.

    2006-01-01

    Cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L.), crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis Walt.), and tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata L.) are wildflower species native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park (U.S.A.). Natural populations of each species were analyzed for leaf ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) to assess the role of ascorbate in protecting the plants from ozone stress. Tall milkweed contained greater quantities of AA (7-10 μmol g -1 fresh weight) than crown-beard (2-4 μmol g -1 fresh weight) or cutleaf coneflower (0.5-2 μmol g -1 fresh weight). DHA was elevated in crown-beard and cutleaf coneflower relative to tall milkweed suggesting a diminished capacity for converting DHA into AA. Tall milkweed accumulated AA in the leaf apoplast (30-100 nmol g -1 fresh weight) with individuals expressing ozone foliar injury symptoms late in the season having less apoplast AA. In contrast, AA was not present in the leaf apoplast of either crown-beard or cutleaf coneflower. Unidentified antioxidant compounds were present in the leaf apoplast of all three species. Overall, distinct differences in antioxidant metabolism were found in the wildflower species that corresponded with differences in ozone sensitivity. - Wildflower species exhibit differences in ascorbic acid content and redox status that affect ozone sensitivity

  15. Seasonal profiles of leaf ascorbic acid content and redox state in ozone-sensitive wildflowers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkey, Kent O. [Plant Science Research Unit, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University, 3127 Ligon Street, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States)]. E-mail: koburkey@unity.ncsu.edu; Neufeld, Howard S. [Appalachian State University, Boone, NC (United States); Souza, Lara [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Chappelka, Arthur H. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Davison, Alan W. [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-15

    Cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L.), crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis Walt.), and tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata L.) are wildflower species native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park (U.S.A.). Natural populations of each species were analyzed for leaf ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) to assess the role of ascorbate in protecting the plants from ozone stress. Tall milkweed contained greater quantities of AA (7-10 {mu}mol g{sup -1} fresh weight) than crown-beard (2-4 {mu}mol g{sup -1} fresh weight) or cutleaf coneflower (0.5-2 {mu}mol g{sup -1} fresh weight). DHA was elevated in crown-beard and cutleaf coneflower relative to tall milkweed suggesting a diminished capacity for converting DHA into AA. Tall milkweed accumulated AA in the leaf apoplast (30-100 nmol g{sup -1} fresh weight) with individuals expressing ozone foliar injury symptoms late in the season having less apoplast AA. In contrast, AA was not present in the leaf apoplast of either crown-beard or cutleaf coneflower. Unidentified antioxidant compounds were present in the leaf apoplast of all three species. Overall, distinct differences in antioxidant metabolism were found in the wildflower species that corresponded with differences in ozone sensitivity. - Wildflower species exhibit differences in ascorbic acid content and redox status that affect ozone sensitivity.

  16. Computational Redox Potential Predictions: Applications to Inorganic and Organic Aqueous Complexes, and Complexes Adsorbed to Mineral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Arumugam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of redox processes range over a number of scientific fields. This review article summarizes the theory behind the calculation of redox potentials in solution for species such as organic compounds, inorganic complexes, actinides, battery materials, and mineral surface-bound-species. Different computational approaches to predict and determine redox potentials of electron transitions are discussed along with their respective pros and cons for the prediction of redox potentials. Subsequently, recommendations are made for certain necessary computational settings required for accurate calculation of redox potentials. This article reviews the importance of computational parameters, such as basis sets, density functional theory (DFT functionals, and relativistic approaches and the role that physicochemical processes play on the shift of redox potentials, such as hydration or spin orbit coupling, and will aid in finding suitable combinations of approaches for different chemical and geochemical applications. Identifying cost-effective and credible computational approaches is essential to benchmark redox potential calculations against experiments. Once a good theoretical approach is found to model the chemistry and thermodynamics of the redox and electron transfer process, this knowledge can be incorporated into models of more complex reaction mechanisms that include diffusion in the solute, surface diffusion, and dehydration, to name a few. This knowledge is important to fully understand the nature of redox processes be it a geochemical process that dictates natural redox reactions or one that is being used for the optimization of a chemical process in industry. In addition, it will help identify materials that will be useful to design catalytic redox agents, to come up with materials to be used for batteries and photovoltaic processes, and to identify new and improved remediation strategies in environmental engineering, for example the

  17. Redox Regulation in Cancer: A Double-edged Sword with Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, implicated in the etiology of cancer, results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell’s own antioxidant defenses. ROS deregulate the redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating an aberrant induction of signaling networks that cause tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet (UV exposures, γ-radiation and other environmental carcinogens generate ROS in the cells, which can exert apoptosis in the tumors, thereby killing the malignant cells or induce the progression of the cancer growth by blocking cellular defense system. Cancer stem cells take the advantage of the aberrant redox system and spontaneously proliferate. Oxidative stress and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in the development of breast, prostate, pancreatic and colon cancer. Prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with several kinds of DNA damage. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. BRCA1, a tumor suppressor against hormone responsive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, plays a significant role in inhibiting ROS and estrogen mediated DNA damage; thereby regulate the redox homeostasis of the cells. Several transcription factors and tumor suppressors are involved during stress response such as Nrf2, NFκB and BRCA1. A promising strategy for targeting redox status of the cells is to use readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices. Many of the phytochemicals have already been identified to have chemopreventive potential, capable of intervening in carcinogenesis.

  18. A new synthesis route for Os-complex modified redox polymers for potential biofuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöller, Sascha; Beyl, Yvonne; Vivekananthan, Jeevanthi; Guschin, Dmitrii A; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    A new synthesis route for Os-complex modified redox polymers was developed. Instead of ligand exchange reactions for coordinative binding of suitable precursor Os-complexes at the polymer, Os-complexes already exhibiting the final ligand shell containing a suitable functional group were bound to the polymer via an epoxide opening reaction. By separation of the polymer synthesis from the ligand exchange reaction at the Os-complex, the modification of the same polymer backbone with different Os-complexes or the binding of the same Os-complex to a number of different polymer backbones becomes feasible. In addition, the Os-complex can be purified and characterized prior to its binding to the polymer. In order to further understand and optimize suitable enzyme/redox polymer systems concerning their potential application in biosensors or biofuel cells, a series of redox polymers was synthesized and used as immobilization matrix for Trametes hirsuta laccase. The properties of the obtained biofuel cell cathodes were compared with similar biocatalytic interfaces derived from redox polymers obtained via ligand exchange reaction of the parent Os-complex with a ligand integrated into the polymer backbone during the polymer synthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenolic acids potentiate colistin-mediated killing of Acinetobacter baumannii by inducing redox imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Taofeek O; Skiebe, Evelyn; Wilharm, Gottfried

    2018-05-01

    Phenolic acids with catechol groups are good prooxidants because of their low redox potential. In this study, we provided data showing that phenolic acids, caffeic acid, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid, enhanced colistin-mediated bacterial death by inducing redox imbalance. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of these phenolic acids against Acinetobacter baumannii AB5075 were considerably lowered for ΔsodB and ΔkatG mutants. Checkerboard assay shows synergistic interactions between colistin and phenolic acids. The phenolic acids exacerbated colistin-induced oxidative stress in A. baumannii AB5075 through increased superoxide anion generation, NAD + /NADH and ADP/ATP ratio. In parallel, the level of reduced glutathione was significantly lowered. We conclude that phenolic acids potentiate colistin-induced oxidative stress in A. baumannii AB5075 by increasing ROS generation, energy metabolism and electron transport chain activity with a concomitant decrease in glutathione. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. State of charge monitoring of vanadium redox flow batteries using half cell potentials and electrolyte density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Simon; Bill, Florian; Holtz, Lucas; Janshen, Niklas; Chica, Antonio; Flower, Thomas; Weidlich, Claudia; Struckmann, Thorsten

    2018-02-01

    The operation of vanadium redox flow batteries requires reliable in situ state of charge (SOC) monitoring. In this study, two SOC estimation approaches for the negative half cell are investigated. First, in situ open circuit potential measurements are combined with Coulomb counting in a one-step calibration of SOC and Nernst potential which doesn't need additional reference SOCs. In-sample and out-of-sample SOCs are estimated and analyzed, estimation errors ≤ 0.04 are obtained. In the second approach, temperature corrected in situ electrolyte density measurements are used for the first time in vanadium redox flow batteries for SOC estimation. In-sample and out-of-sample SOC estimation errors ≤ 0.04 demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Both methods allow recalibration during battery operation. The actual capacity obtained from SOC calibration can be used in a state of health model.

  1. Redox Probing Study of the Potential Dependence of Charge Transport Through Li2O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristian Bastholm; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2015-01-01

    -of-the-art Liion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li−O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous......In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li−O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state...... electron transfer exchange rate as a function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (∼depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing...

  2. Reactions of copper macrocycles with antioxidants and HOCl: potential for biological redox sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Rebecca J; Trotter, Katherine D; Dunbar, Lynsey; Craig, Gemma; Erdemli, Omer; Spickett, Corinne M; Reglinski, John

    2013-02-01

    A series of simple copper N(2)S(2) macrocycles were examined for their potential as biological redox sensors, following previous characterization of their redox potentials and crystal structures. The divalent species were reduced by glutathione or ascorbate at a biologically relevant pH in aqueous buffer. A less efficient reduction was also achieved by vitamin E in DMSO. Oxidation of the corresponding univalent copper species by sodium hypochlorite resulted in only partial (~65 %) recovery of the divalent form. This was concluded to be due to competition between metal oxidation and ligand oxidation, which is believed to contribute to macrocycle demetallation. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed that ligand oxidation had occurred. Moreover, the macrocyclic complexes could be demetallated by incubation with EDTA and bovine serum albumin, demonstrating that they would be inappropriate for use in biological systems. The susceptibility to oxidation and demetallation was hypothesized to be due to oxidation of the secondary amines. Consequently these were modified to incorporate additional oxygen donor atoms. This modification led to greater resistance to demetallation and ligand oxidation, providing a better platform for further development of copper macrocycles as redox sensors for use in biological systems.

  3. A new approach to design safe CNTs with an understanding of redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Shuji; Cassee, Flemming R; Castranova, Vincent

    2013-09-02

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being increasingly industrialized and applied for various products. As of today, although several toxicological evaluations of CNTs have been conducted, designing safer CNTs is not practiced because reaction kinetics of CNTs with bioactive species is not fully understood. The authors propose a kinetic mechanism to establish designing safe CNTs as a new goal. According to a literature search on the behavior of CNTs and the effects of impurities, it is found that chemical reactions on CNT surface are attributed to redox reactions involving metal impurities and carbon structures at the CNT surface. A new goal is proposed to design safer CNTs using the redox potential hypothesis. The value of this hypothesis must be practically investigated and proven through the further experiments.

  4. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Christine M. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  5. One-electron transfer equilibria and redox potentials of radicals studied by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, D.; Czapski, G.

    1975-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is utilized for measurements of the equilibrium constants for electron transfer between the durosemiquinone radical anion and oxygen, menadione, and indigodisulfonate. These equilibrium constants are in turn used for calculations of one-electron redox potentials for these systems. Each of these equilibrium constants was determined experimentally and independently and found to be self-consistent. Only for the reactions of the semiquinone radical ions with oxygen could the electron transfer reaction be followed directly. For the reactions between the various quinone-semiquinone systems substantial indirect evidence is presented that these equilibria are achieved rapidly. In those cases equilibrium constants were determined from studies of the effect of quinone concentrations on the relative yields of the semiquinones. A method for distinguishing between kinetic competition and equilibrium is outlined and its usefulness is emphasized. The DQ parallel DQ - (DQ = duroquinone) and IDS parallel IDS - (IDS = indigodisulfonate) systems were employed as reference couples as the redox potentials for those systems are either available in the literature (IDS parallel IDS - ) or may be calculated from available data (DQ parallel DQ - ). Taking E 7 1 , the redox potential for the first one-electron reduction step at pH 7, of DQ parallel DQ - as -0.235 V or of IDS parallelIDS - as -0.247 V both yield E 7 1 = -0.325 V for the O 2 parallel O 2 - system (1 atm of O 2 ) and E 2 1 = -0.20 V for the menadione system. (U.S.)

  6. The reaction of neuroglobin with potential redox protein partners cytochrome b5  and cytochrome c

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Mathews, A.J.; Moens, L.

    2006-01-01

    Previously identified, potentially neuroprotective reactions of neuroglobin require the existence of yet unknown redox partners. We show here that the reduction of ferric neuroglobin by cytochrome b5 is relatively slow (k=6×102M-1s-1 at pH 7.0) and thus is unlikely to be of physiological...... significance. In contrast, the reaction between ferrous neuroglobin and ferric cytochrome c is very rapid (k=2×107M-1s-1) with an apparent overall equilibrium constant of 1μM. Based on this data we propose that ferrous neuroglobin may well play a role in preventing apoptosis...

  7. Substituent effect on redox potential of nitrido technetium complexes with Schiff base ligand. Theoretical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, T.; Sekine, T.; Kudo, H.

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) were performed to understand the effect of substituents on the molecular and electronic structures of technetium nitrido complexes with salen type Schiff base ligands. Optimized structures of these complexes are square pyramidal. The electron density on a Tc atom of the complex with electron withdrawing substituents is lower than that of the complex with electron donating substituents. The HOMO energy is lower in the complex with electron withdrawing substituents than that in the complex with electron donating substituents. The charge on Tc atoms is a good measure that reflects the redox potential of [TcN(L)] complex. (author)

  8. Tuning the redox potential of vitamin K3 derivatives by oxidative functionalization using a Ag(i)/GO catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hout, S I; Suzuki, H; El-Sheikh, S M; Hassan, H M A; Harraz, F A; Ibrahim, I A; El-Sharkawy, E A; Tsujimura, S; Holzinger, M; Nishina, Y

    2017-08-03

    We propose herein initial results to develop optimum redox mediators by the combination of computational simulation and catalytic functionalization of the core structure of vitamin K 3 . We aim to correlate the calculated energy value of the LUMO of different vitamin K 3 derivatives with their actual redox potential. For this, we optimized the catalytic alkylation of 1,4-naphthoquinones with a designed Ag(i)/GO catalyst and synthesized a series of molecules.

  9. Development of a mathematical-statistical model for the analysis of sediments redox potential: An environmental pollution index; Sviluppo di un modello matematico-statistico per l`analisi del potenziale redox dei sedimenti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, G; Rizzo, V [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente; Bella, A; Picci, M [Rome Univ. La Sapienza (Italy). Dip. di Statistica e Probabilita` Applicata

    1996-07-01

    This work refers different depth redox potential measurement as well as a statistical analysis in Venice lagoon sediments. A mathematical model that links redox potential and detection depth has been carried out. From this model an inversion gradient has been determined. This parameter may been considered as different lagoon areas pollution index.

  10. Synthesis and Electrochemical Study of a TCAA Derivative – A potential bipolar redox-active material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, Tino; Winsberg, Jan; Wild, Andreas; Schubert, Ulrich S.

    2017-01-01

    The 2,3,7,8-tetracyano-1,4,5,6,9,10-hexazaanthracene (TCAA) derivatives represent an interesting substance class for future research on organic electronic devices, such as solar cells, organic batteries or redox-flow batteries (RFBs). Because of their multivalent redox behavior they are potentially “bipolar”, usable both as cathode and anode activ charge-storage materials. Furthermore, they show a strong absorption and fluorescence behavior both in solution and solid state, rendering them a promising emitter for electroluminescence devices, like lamps or displays. In order to evaluate a TCAA for electrochemical applications the derivative 2,3,7,8-tetracyano-5,10-diphenyl-5,10-dihydrodipyrazino[2,3-b:2′,3′-e] pyrazine (2) was synthesized in two straightforward synthesis steps. The electrochemical behavior of 2 was initially determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation and afterwards investigated via rotating disc electrode (RDE), UV–vis–NIR spectroelectrochemical as well as cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. It features a quasi-reversible oxidation and re-reduction at E ½ = 1.42 V vs. Fc + /Fc with a peak split of 96 mV and a quasi-reversible reduction and re-oxidation at E ½ = −1.49 V vs. Fc + /Fc with a peak split of 174 mV, which lead to a theoretical potential difference of 2.91 V.

  11. A low redox potential affects monoclonal antibody assembly and glycosylation in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Benjamin; Mishra, Neha; Butler, Michael

    2017-03-20

    Glycosylation and intracellular assembly of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is important for glycan profile consistency. To better understand how these factors may be influenced by a lower redox potential, an IgG1-producing NS0 cell line was grown in the presence of varying concentrations of dithiothreitol (DTT). Cultures were monitored for growth and culture redox potential (CRP) with glycan heterogeneity determined using a HILIC-HPLC method. Macroheterogeneity was unchanged in all conditions whereas the Galactosylation Index (GI) decreased by as much as 50% in cultures with lower CRP or higher dithiothreitol levels. This shift in GI is reflected in more agalactosylated and asialylated species being produced. The MAb assembly pathway was determined using radioactive isotope 35 S incorporated into nascent IgG1 molecules. The assembly pathway for this IgG1 was shown to progress via HC→HC 2 →HC 2 LC→HC 2 LC 2 in all conditions tested and autoradiographs highlighted that the ratio of heavy chain dimer to heavy chain monomer increased over time with increasing DTT concentrations. This increase and correspondingly lower GI values may be due to disruption of the disulfide bonds at higher levels of assembly. A change in the assembly pathway may alter the final IgG glycan pattern and lead to control mechanisms that influence glycan profiles of MAbs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Effects of Fiddler Crabs (Uca sp on C/N Ratio and Redox Potential of Soil in Mangrove Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyanto Mulyanto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has been done in Ketapang mangrove area of  Probolinggo city in months of September-November 2015. The objectives are to observe the fiddler crab community stucture and to analyze the effects of fiddler crabs on C/N ratio and redox potential of soil in mangrove ecosystems. The samples of fiddler crabs were taken during the low tides at 4 station (20 transects with sizes of 1 m2. Data of the fiddler crabs were measured from the soil digging insides the transect. The soil samples were taken from these crab holes wall (at the surface and at the depth of 20 cm, under the holes at the depth of 40 cm as well as from the locations that undwells by these animals at the same depth. The fiddler crab identified are U. Triangularis between 2 – 6 ind/m2, U paradussumieri 1 – 3 ind/m2, U perplexa 14 – 32 ind/m2, U dussumieri 12 – 27 ind/m2 and U. Tetragonon 3 – 6 ind/m2. The diversity is moderate (H = 1.7 and the dominance index was low (C = 0.37. C/N ratio soil were inhabited by fiddler crab between 6 – 14, the undwelled area were 14 – 20. Soil C/N ratio was inhabited by the fiddler crab at the surface and depth of 20 cm in average of 9 cm while at 40 cm in avergae of 12. The low of C/N ratio at surface and depth of 20 cm causing the organic matter turnover faster because the high nitorgen content. Soil potential redox (Eh the undwelled areas was found –0.647 mV, meanwhile the soil Eh in the dwelled areas was positive (0.68 till 0.87 mV. This mean, the decpmposition was occured during aerobic condition and will produce untoxic subtances.

  13. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Effect of Redox Potential on Changing of Binding Forms of Heavy Metals in Bottom Sediments of Anzali International Wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedi, M.; Fakhari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals are naturally presented in different chemical bonds within sediment. Different factors affect metals bonding in sediment. One of those factors is changing in Redox potential. Redox potential may change under oxic/anoxic conditions in the bottom sediments. In the present study the effect of redox potential on fractionation and bonding of metals within Anzali international wetland bottom sediment is investigated.Sediment samples of Anzali wetland were aerated for one month and redox potential and p H was measured at 0, 1, 7, 21, and 28th days. Subsamples of sediments at mentioned days of experiments were taken and analyzed for Cu, Zn, Ni, and Cr for deferent chemical bonds using sequential extraction analysis. Results revealed that majority of Cu were presented in the sulfidic/organic bonds while Zn was associated with Fe/Mn oxides. Nickel and Cr were mostly associated in hard residual bonds. At the end of aeration process, with increasing redox potential, 8-23% of metals were released from sediments into dissolved phase. They mainly released from sulfide/organic bonds.

  15. Redox potential characterization and soil greenhouse gas concentration across a hydrological gradient in a Gulf coast forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; Faulkner, S.P.; Patrick, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Soil redox potential (Eh), concentrations of oxygen (O2) and three greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) were measured in the soil profile of a coastal forest at ridge, transition, and swamp across a hydrological gradient. The results delineated a distinct boundary in soil Eh and O2 concentration between the ridge and swamp with essentially no overlap between the two locations. Critical soil Eh to initiate significant CH4 production under this field conditions was about +300 mV, much higher than in the homogenous soils (about -150 mV). The strength of CH4 source to the atmosphere was strong for the swamp, minor for the transition, and negligible or even negative (consumption) for the ridge. Maximum N2O concentration in the soils was found at about Eh +250 mV, and the soil N2O emission was estimated to account for less than 4% for the ridge and transition, and almost negligible for the swamp in the cumulative global warming potential (GWP) of these three gases. The dynamic nature of this study site in response to water table fluctuations across a hydrological gradient makes it an ideal model of impact of future sea level rise to coastal ecosystems. Soil carbon (C) sequestration potential due to increasing soil water content upon sea level rise and subsidence in this coastal forest was likely limited and temporal, and at the expense of increasing soil CH4 production and emission. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. REDOX AND REDUCTION POTENTIALS AS PARAMETERS TO PREDICT THE DEGRADATION PATHWAY OF CHLORINATED BENZENES IN ANAEROBIC ENVIRONMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOLFING, J; HARRISON, BK

    1993-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation pathway of hexachlorobenzene starts with a series of reductive dehalogenation steps. In the present paper it was evaluated whether the dehalogenation pathway observed in microbial ecosystems could be predicted by the redox potential and/or the reduction potential (the

  17. Low glutathione regulates gene expression and the redox potentials of the nucleus and cytosol in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaubelt, Daniel; Queval, Guillaume; Dong, Yingping; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Makgopa, Matome Eugene; Howell, Gareth; De Simone, Ambra; Bai, Juan; Hannah, Matthew A; Foyer, Christine H

    2015-02-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is considered to exert a strong influence on cellular redox homeostasis and to regulate gene expression, but these processes remain poorly characterized. Severe GSH depletion specifically inhibited root meristem development, while low root GSH levels decreased lateral root densities. The redox potential of the nucleus and cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana roots determined using roGFP probes was between -300 and -320 mV. Growth in the presence of the GSH-synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) increased the nuclear and cytosolic redox potentials to approximately -260 mV. GSH-responsive genes including transcription factors (SPATULA, MYB15, MYB75), proteins involved in cell division, redox regulation (glutaredoxinS17, thioredoxins, ACHT5 and TH8) and auxin signalling (HECATE), were identified in the GSH-deficient root meristemless 1-1 (rml1-1) mutant, and in other GSH-synthesis mutants (rax1-1, cad2-1, pad2-1) as well as in the wild type following the addition of BSO. Inhibition of auxin transport had no effect on organ GSH levels, but exogenous auxin decreased the root GSH pool. We conclude that GSH depletion significantly increases the redox potentials of the nucleus and cytosol, and causes arrest of the cell cycle in roots but not shoots, with accompanying transcript changes linked to altered hormone responses, but not oxidative stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Changes in the redox potential and pO2 in heat shock to Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktiabr'skiĭ, O N; Pshenichnov, R A

    1982-01-01

    When the growing culture of Escherichia coli was subjected to a temperature above 37 degrees C, the pO2 fell abruptly at 42 degrees C; a reversible decrease in the redox potential (ROP) down to the range of negative values was detected if the growth ceased at 46 degrees C. The drop in the ROP took from 6 to 10 min, with the maximal deviation of 42.5 mV. Such changes in the pO2 and ROP were not caused by a heat shock in the stationary cultures. The change in the ROP was not due to a change in the pH and pO2 of the medium. The authors believe that the effect should be attributed to an elimination of the ionic gradients and the electrochemical gradient delta muH+.

  19. [Redox-potential of blood and consistence of energoproviding defence system in cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhikiia, I V; Rizhvadze, M A; Dzhangidze, M A

    2006-05-01

    We have studied the relationship between the hypoxic change and mitochondrial redox-potential disturbances in the mechanism of pheto-placental insufficiency in pregnancy with cytomegalovirus infection (CMV), detected by the positive anti-CMV-IgG titer and more then 4-fold increase of low avid anti-CMV-IgG. It was shown, that chronic CMV infection induces production of active forms of oxygen, peroxidation of structures and concurrently damage of mitochondria with essential decrease of ATP level. Results of the study have shown the important diagnostic value of estimation of hypoxic-oxidative damage induced by CMV infection. The results also revealed important relationships between the activity of the CMV infection and intensity of mitochondrial damage. On the basis of our investigations we suggest the additional diagnostic test (the determination of citozol NADH dependent isocitratdehydrogenaze activity) to evaluate the depth of CMV induced metabolic disturbances.

  20. Tunable redox potential of nonmetal doped monolayer MoS{sub 2}: First principle calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, S. [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); Li, C., E-mail: canli1983@gmail.com [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); Zhao, Y.F.; Gong, Y.Y.; Niu, L.Y.; Liu, X.J. [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, China Jiliang University (China)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Both E{sub CBM} and E{sub VBM} values are affected by the chemical valences of dopants, which also affect the redox potentials of specimens. Compared to the pristine monolayer MoS{sub 2}, the nonmetal ions with odd chemical valences [monovalent (H{sup +}, F{sup –}, Cl{sup –}, Br{sup –} and I{sup –}), trivalent (N{sup 3–}, P{sup 3–} and As{sup 3–}) and pentavalence (B{sup 5–})] enhance the oxidation potential and reduce the reduction potential of specimens, but the nonmetal ions with even chemical valences [divalent (O{sup 2–}, Se{sup 2–} and Te{sup 2–}) and quadravalent (C{sup 4–} and Si{sup 4–})] have the opposite effects on the redox potentials. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The newly formed chemical bonds affect the electronic distribution around the dopants and the nearby Mo atoms. • Compared to pristine monolayer MoS{sub 2}, the nonmetal ions with odd (even) chemical valences enhance (reduce) the oxidation potential and reduce (enhance) the reduction potential of specimens. • The lone pair electrons in nonmetal ions with odd chemical valences extra interact with the Mo ions which reduces the E{sub CBM} and E{sub VBM} values of specimens. - Abstract: Doping is an effective method to alter the electronic behavior of materials by forming new chemical bonds and bringing bond relaxation. With this aid of first principle calculations, the crystal configuration and electronic properties of monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been modulated by the nonmetal (NM) dopants (H, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, Cl, As, Se, Br, Te and I), and the thermodynamic stability depending on the preparation conditions (Mo-rich and S-rich conditions) were discussed. Results shown that, the NM dopants substituted preferentially for S under Mo-rich condition, the electronic distribution around the dopants and the nearby Mo atoms are changed by the new formed Mo-NM bonds and bands relaxation. Compared to pristine monolayer MoS{sub 2}, the NM ions with odd

  1. Discharging a Li-S battery with ultra-high sulphur content cathode using a redox mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwi Ryong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Yu, Seung-Ho; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-08-30

    Lithium-sulphur batteries are under intense research due to the high specific capacity and low cost. However, several problems limit their commercialization. One of them is the insulating nature of sulphur, which necessitates a large amount of conductive agent and binder in the cathode, reducing the effective sulphur load as well as the energy density. Here we introduce a redox mediator, cobaltocene, which acts as an electron transfer agent between the conductive surface and the polysulphides in the electrolyte. We confirmed that cobaltocene could effectively convert polysulphides to Li2S using scanning electron microscope, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and in-situ X-ray diffraction studies. This redox mediator enabled excellent electrochemical performance in a cathode with ultra-high sulphur content (80 wt%). It delivered 400 mAh g(-1)cathode capacity after 50 cycles, which is equivalent to 800 mAh g(-1)S in a typical cathode with 50 wt% sulphur. Furthermore, the volumetric capacity was also dramatically improved.

  2. Using Electrochemical SERS to Measure the Redox Potential of Drug Molecules Bound to dsDNA—a Study of Mitoxantrone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghello, Marta; Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Ugo, Paolo; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction with DNA plays an important role in the biological activity of some anticancer drug molecules. In this paper we show that electrochemical surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy at sphere segment void gold electrodes can be used as a highly sensitive technique to measure the redox potential of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone bound to dsDNA. For this system we show that we can follow the redox reaction of the bound molecule and can extract the redox potential for the molecule bound to dsDNA by deconvolution of the SER spectra recorded as a function of electrode potential. We find that mitoxantrone bound to dsDNA undergoes a 2 electron, 1 proton reduction and that the redox potential (-0.87 V vs. Ag/AgCl at pH 7.2) is shifted approximately 0.12 V cathodic of the corresponding value at a glassy carbon electrode. Our results also show that the reduced form of mitoxantrone remains bound to dsDNA and we are able to use the deconvoluted SER spectra of the reduced mitoxantrone as a function of electrode potential to follow the electrochemically driven melting of the dsDNA at more negative potentials.

  3. Radon content in Danish till deposits: relationship with redox conditions and age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Roll Jakobsen, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents some results concerning the radon content and emanation rates in different Danish till deposits of Saalian and Weichselian age from a study carried out by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS). (LN)

  4. The effect of bicarbonate on menadione-induced redox cycling and cytotoxicity: potential involvement of the carbonate radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuhani, Naif; Michail, Karim; Karapetyan, Zubeida; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of NaHCO3 on menadione redox cycling and cytotoxicity. A cell-free system utilized menadione and ascorbic acid to catalyze a redox cycle, and we utilized murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells for in vitro experiments. Experiments were performed using low (2 mmol/L) and physiological (25 mmol/L) levels of NaHCO3 in buffer equilibrated to physiological pH. Using oximetry, ascorbic acid oxidation, and ascorbyl radical detection, we found that menadione redox cycling was enhanced by NaHCO3. Furthermore, Hepa 1c1c7 cells treated with menadione demonstrated cytotoxicity that was significantly increased with physiological concentrations of NaHCO3 in the media, compared with low levels of NaHCO3. Interestingly, the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) with 2 different metal chelators was associated with a protective effect against menadione cytotoxicity. Using isolated protein, we found a significant increase in protein carbonyls with menadione-ascorbate-SOD with physiological NaHCO3 levels; low NaHCO3 or SOD-free reactions produced lower levels of protein carbonyls. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the hydrogen peroxide generated by menadione redox cycling together with NaHCO3-CO2 are potential substrates for SOD peroxidase activity that can lead to carbonate-radical-enhanced cytotoxicity. These findings demonstrate the importance of NaHCO3 in menadione redox cycling and cytotoxicity.

  5. Characterization of apoplast phenolics: Invitro oxidation of acetosyringone results in a rapid prolonged increase in the redox potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a previous study we observed that if tobacco cell suspensions were inoculated with certain bacterial strains, several hours later the redox potential of the suspensions would increase (oxidative), as much as 100 mV, and in some cases last more than an hour. To discover possible contributors to t...

  6. Intracellular Redox State Revealed by In Vivo 31P MRS Measurement of NAD+ and NADH Contents in Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), in oxidized (NAD+) or reduced (NADH) form, plays key roles in cellular metabolism. Intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio represents the cellular redox state; however, it is difficult to measure in vivo. We report here a novel in vivo 31P MRS method for noninvasive measurement of intracellular NAD concentrations and NAD+/NADH ratio in the brain. Methods It uses a theoretical model to describe the NAD spectral patterns at a given field for quantification. Standard NAD solutions and independent cat brain measurements at 9.4 T and 16.4 T were used to evaluate this method. We also measured T1 values of brain NAD. Results Model simulation and studies of solutions and brains indicate that the proposed method can quantify submillimolar NAD concentrations with reasonable accuracy if adequate 31P MRS signal-to-noise ratio and linewidth were obtained. The NAD concentrations and NAD+/NADH ratio of cat brains measured at 16.4 T and 9.4 T were consistent despite the significantly different T1 values and NAD spectra patterns at two fields. Conclusion This newly established 31P MRS method makes it possible for the first time to noninvasively study the intracellular redox state and its roles in brain functions and diseases, and it can potentially be applied to other organs. PMID:23843330

  7. A way to limit the corrosion in the Molten Salt Reactor concept: the salt redox potential control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibilaro, M.; Massot, L.; Chamelot, P.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of controlling the salt redox potential thanks to a redox buffer in the Molten Salt Fast Reactor was investigated, the goal was to limit the oxidation of the reactor structural material. Tests were performed in LiF-CaF 2 at 850 °C on two different redox couples to fix the salt potential, Eu(III)/Eu(II) and U(IV)/U(III), where the first one was used as inactive system to validate the methodology to be applied on the uranium system. A metallic reducing agent (Gd plate for Eu, and U plate for U system) was inserted in the salt, leading to a spontaneous reaction: Eu(III) and U(IV) were then reduced. Eu(III) was fully converted into Eu(II) with metallic Gd, validating the approach. On the U system, the U(IV)/U(III) ratio has to be set between 10 and 100 to limit the core material oxidation: addition of metallic U decreased the concentration ratio from the infinite to 1, showing the feasibility of the salt redox potential control with the U system

  8. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (perchlorate in oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G Liebensteiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese- and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (perchlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (perchlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (perchlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (metagenome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (perchlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (perchlorate for bioremediation, souring control and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed.

  9. Potential Role of Amino Acid/Protein Nutrition and Exercise in Serum Albumin Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Wada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Albumin is the major protein in the serum of mammals. It is synthesized exclusively in the liver, before being secreted into the circulation. Similar to skeletal muscle protein, albumin synthesis is stimulated by dietary amino acids and proteins as well as exercise. Albumin has three isoforms based on the redox states of the free cysteine residue at position 34. The redox state of serum albumin has long been extensively investigated in terms of oxidative stress-related chronic diseases, with the redox state of serum albumin having been regarded as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. However, according to recent animal studies, the redox state of serum albumin is modulated by albumin turnover and may also reflect amino acid/protein nutritional status. Furthermore, as the redox state of serum albumin is modulated by exercise training, measuring the pre- and post-exercise redox states of serum albumin in athletes may be useful in assessing amino acid/protein nutritional status and exercise-induced oxidative stress, which are closely associated with skeletal muscle adaptive responses. This article extensively reviews serum albumin and the redox state of albumin in the context of amino acid/protein nutritional status and exercise training.

  10. Applying the Nernst equation to simulate redox potential variations for biological nitrification and denitrification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Nan; Cheng, Hong-Bang; Chao, Allen C

    2004-03-15

    In this paper, various forms of Nernst equations have been developed based on the real stoichiometric relationship of biological nitrification and denitrification reactions. Instead of using the Nernst equation based on a one-to-one stoichiometric relation for the oxidizing and the reducing species, the basic Nernst equation is modified into slightly different forms. Each is suitable for simulating the redox potential (ORP) variation of a specific biological nitrification or denitrification process. Using the data published in the literature, the validity of these developed Nernst equations has been verified by close fits of the measured ORP data with the calculated ORP curve. The simulation results also indicate that if the biological process is simulated using an incorrect form of Nernst equation, the calculated ORP curve will not fit the measured data. Using these Nernst equations, the ORP value that corresponds to a predetermined degree of completion for the biochemical reaction can be calculated. Thus, these Nernst equations will enable a more efficient on-line control of the biological process.

  11. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays.

  12. One electron transfer redox potentials of free radicals. I. The oxygen-superoxide system. Progress report, September 1, 1975--July 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilan, Y.A.; Czapski, G.; Meisel, D.

    1976-01-01

    The method of determination of Redox potentials of radicals, using the pulse radiolysis technique, is outlined. The method is based on the determination of equilibria constants of electron transfer reactions between the radicals and appropriate acceptors. The limitations of this technique are discussed. The redox potentials of several quinones--semi-quinones are calculated, as well as the standard redox potential of the peroxy radical. E 0 /sub O 2 /O 2 /sup -/ = -0.33 V and the redox oxidation properties of the peroxy radical in various systems and pH are discussed. The value determined for the redox potentials of O 2 /O 2 - is higher by more than 0.2 volts than earlier estimates, which has important implications on the possible role of O 2 - in biological processes of O 2 fixation

  13. Ca2+ dependence of gluconeogenesis stimulation by glucagon at different cytosolic NAD+-NADH redox potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques-da-Silva A.C.

    1997-01-01

    , stimulation caused by glucagon was much smaller than that found when Ca2+ was present. e The effects of glucagon on oxygen uptake in the presence of Ca2+ showed a parabolic relationship with the lactate to pyruvate ratios which was closely similar to that found in the case of gluconeogenesis; the only difference was that inhibition rather than stimulation of oxygen uptake was observed for a lactate to pyruvate ratio equal to 0.01; progressive stimulation was observed in the 0.1 to 100 range. f In the absence of Ca2+ the effects of glucagon on oxygen uptake were different; the dependence curve was sigmoidal at the onset, with a well-defined maximum at a lactate to pyruvate ratio equal to 1; this maximum was followed by a steady decline at higher ratios; at the ratios of 0.01 and 0.1 inhibition took place; oxygen uptake stimulation caused by glucagon was generally lower in the absence of Ca2+ except when the lactate to pyruvate ratio was equal to 1. The results of the present study demonstrate that stimulation of gluconeogenesis by glucagon depends on Ca2+. However, Ca2+ is only effective in helping gluconeogenesis stimulation by glucagon at highly negative redox potentials of the cytosolic NAD+-NADH system. The triple interdependence of glucagon-Ca2+-NAD+-NADH redox potential reveals highly complex interrelations that can only be partially understood at the present stage of knowledge

  14. Changing redox potential by controlling soil moisture and addition of inorganic oxidants to dissipate pentachlorophenol in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jiajiang; He Yan; Xu Jianming

    2012-01-01

    The potential for dissipation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was investigated in soils from four different sites in China. These were an umbraqualf (Soil 1), a Plinthudult (Soil 2), a Haplustalf (Soil 3) and an Argiustoll (Soil 4) which were either flooded, to produce anaerobic conditions, or incubated aerobically at 60% water-holding capacity (WHC). The dissipation of PCP in Soil 1 at 60% WHC was higher than under flooded condition, while the opposite occurred in the other three soils. Under flooded conditions, the redox potential decreased significantly in Soil 1 and Soil 4, where sulphate reduction was occurred and the dissipation of PCP was statistically significant (about 96% and 98%, respectively) at the end of incubation. After addition of inorganic oxidants, dissipation of PCP was significantly inhibited by FeCl 3 , while Na 2 SO 4 and NaNO 3 had different effects, depending upon the soil type. - Highlights: ► The extent of the aerobic/anaerobic interface depends upon the soil properties. ► The dissipation of PCP was accelerated in some soils due to the soil-water interface. ► The addition of oxidants inhibited the decrease in soil redox potential. ► Most external oxidants added under flooded condition inhibited PCP dechlorination. - The addition of inorganic oxidants limited the decrease in redox potential and inhibited the reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol.

  15. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  16. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103 near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  17. The met axial ligand determines the redox potential in Cu-A sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledesma, G.N.; Murgida, D.H.; Ly, H.K.

    2007-01-01

    The replacement of the axial methionine ligand in a native Cu-A protein rendered a series of stable mutants with spectroscopic features of a mixed valence center. The mutations resulted in minor perturbations of the electronic structure of this site but led to significant changes in the redox pot...

  18. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  19. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  20. Effect of the L499M mutation of the ascomycetous Botrytis aclada laccase on redox potential and catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, Evgeny; Polyakov, Konstantin; Kittl, Roman; Shleev, Sergey; Dorovatovsky, Pavel; Tikhonova, Tamara; Hann, Stephan; Ludwig, Roland; Popov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The structures of the ascomycetous B. aclada laccase and its L499M T1-site mutant have been solved at 1.7 Å resolution. The mutant enzyme shows a 140 mV lower redox potential of the type 1 copper and altered kinetic behaviour. The wild type and the mutant have very similar structures, which makes it possible to relate the changes in the redox potential to the L499M mutation Laccases are members of a large family of multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of organic and inorganic substrates accompanied by the reduction of dioxygen to water. These enzymes contain four Cu atoms per molecule organized into three sites: T1, T2 and T3. In all laccases, the T1 copper ion is coordinated by two histidines and one cysteine in the equatorial plane and is covered by the side chains of hydrophobic residues in the axial positions. The redox potential of the T1 copper ion influences the enzymatic reaction and is determined by the nature of the axial ligands and the structure of the second coordination sphere. In this work, the laccase from the ascomycete Botrytis aclada was studied, which contains conserved Ile491 and nonconserved Leu499 residues in the axial positions. The three-dimensional structures of the wild-type enzyme and the L499M mutant were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.7 Å resolution. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis could only be grown after deglycosylation. Both structures did not contain the T2 copper ion. The catalytic properties of the enzyme were characterized and the redox potentials of both enzyme forms were determined: E 0 = 720 and 580 mV for the wild-type enzyme and the mutant, respectively. Since the structures of the wild-type and mutant forms are very similar, the change in the redox potential can be related to the L499M mutation in the T1 site of the enzyme

  1. Redox potential and mobility of contaminant oxyanions (As, Sb, Cr) in argillaceous rock subjected to oxic and anoxic cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Electron transfer (redox) reactions are key processes in the biogeochemical functioning of natural systems. Redox reactions control the speciation and mobility of major elements (e.g., carbon, nitrogen, iron, and manganese) and environmentally important contaminants such as arsenic (As), antimony (Sb), and chromium (Cr). Nonetheless, the characterization of redox conditions and their effects on biogeochemical cycling and contaminant fate remain incompletely understood. The first part of this thesis focused on the interpretation of redox potential (EH) measurements using results obtained in synthetic biogeochemical systems of increasing complexity under dynamic, redox-oscillating conditions. By progressively combining inorganic solutes, an organic electron donor (lactate), an aqueous electron acceptor (nitrate), a metabolically versatile heterotrophic bacterium (Shewanella oneidensis), and a solid-state electron acceptor (goethite), a full redox cascade from +500 to -350 mV (pH ∼7.4) was reproduced in the laboratory. The experimental results revealed that a conventional Pt redox electrode responds to a variety of physical, chemical, and microbial factors. In particular, the presence of the bacteria always led to lower EH readings. In contrast, measurements of EH in argillaceous suspensions were insensitive to changes in chemical ratios of the redox-sensitive, but non-electro-active, couples, including O 2 /H 2 O, CrO 4 2- /Cr(OH) 3 , NO 3 - /NO 2 - /NH 4 + , HAsO 4 2- /H3AsO 3 , and Sb(OH) 6 - /Sb 2 O 3 . Therefore, EH measurements are shown to have limited usefulness in the natural systems depleted in electro-active redox couples, such as α-FeOOH(s)/Fe 2+ (aq). The second part of the thesis focused on the behavior of oxy-anion contaminants under redox-oscillating conditions in the argillaceous subsoil suspensions. Successive cycles of oxic and anoxic conditions were imposed on the argillaceous suspensions amended with a mixture of oxidized Cr(VI), As(V), Sb

  2. Very high gravity ethanol fermentation by flocculating yeast under redox potential-controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen-Guang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very high gravity (VHG fermentation using medium in excess of 250 g/L sugars for more than 15% (v ethanol can save energy consumption, not only for ethanol distillation, but also for distillage treatment; however, stuck fermentation with prolonged fermentation time and more sugars unfermented is the biggest challenge. Controlling redox potential (ORP during VHG fermentation benefits biomass accumulation and improvement of yeast cell viability that is affected by osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition, enhancing ethanol productivity and yield, the most important techno-economic aspect of fuel ethanol production. Results Batch fermentation was performed under different ORP conditions using the flocculating yeast and media containing glucose of 201 ± 3.1, 252 ± 2.9 and 298 ± 3.8 g/L. Compared with ethanol fermentation by non-flocculating yeast, different ORP profiles were observed with the flocculating yeast due to the morphological change associated with the flocculation of yeast cells. When ORP was controlled at −100 mV, ethanol fermentation with the high gravity (HG media containing glucose of 201 ± 3.1 and 252 ± 2.9 g/L was completed at 32 and 56 h, respectively, producing 93.0 ± 1.3 and 120.0 ± 1.8 g/L ethanol, correspondingly. In contrast, there were 24.0 ± 0.4 and 17.0 ± 0.3 g/L glucose remained unfermented without ORP control. As high as 131.0 ± 1.8 g/L ethanol was produced at 72 h when ORP was controlled at −150 mV for the VHG fermentation with medium containing 298 ± 3.8 g/L glucose, since yeast cell viability was improved more significantly. Conclusions No lag phase was observed during ethanol fermentation with the flocculating yeast, and the implementation of ORP control improved ethanol productivity and yield. When ORP was controlled at −150 mV, more reducing power was available for yeast cells to survive, which in turn improved their viability and VHG

  3. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio

    2007-01-01

    Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na+/H+ exchange and HC3 -/Cl- anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore dama...

  4. Redox potential monitoring as a method to control unwanted noble metal-catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid treatment of simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major nonradioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 - , and NO 2 - were used to study redox potential changes in reactions of formic acid at 90 C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase and a redox electrode to follow redox potential changes as a function of time. In the initial phase of formic acid addition to nitrite-containing feed simulants, the redox potential of the reaction mixture rises typically to +400 mV relative to the Al/AgCl electrode because of the generation of the moderately strongly oxidizing nitrous acid. No H 2 production occurs at this stage of the reaction as long as free nitrous acid is present. After all of the nitrous acid has been destroyed by reduction to N 2 O and NO and disproportionation to NO/NO 3 - , the redox potential of the reaction mixture becomes more negative than the Ag/AgCl electrode. The experiments outlined in this paper suggest the feasibility of controlling the production of H 2 by limiting the amount of formic acid used and monitoring the redox potential during formic acid treatment

  5. Monolayer to MTS: using SEM, HIM, TEM and SERS to compare morphology, nanosensor uptake and redox potential in MCF7 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, L. E.; Bell, A. P.; Harrison, D. J.; Campbell, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Cellular redox potential is important for the control and regulation of a vast number of processes occurring in cells. When the fine redox potential balance within cells is disturbed it can have serious consequences such as the initiation or progression of disease. It is thought that a redox gradient develops in cancer tumours where the peripheral regions are well oxygenated and internal regions, further from vascular blood supply, become starved of oxygen and hypoxic. This makes treatment of these areas more challenging as, for example, radiotherapy relies on the presence of oxygen. Currently techniques for quantitative analysis of redox gradients are limited. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors (NS) have been used to detect redox potential in a quantitative manner in monolayer cultured cells with many advantages over other techniques. This technique has considerable potential for use in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) - a three dimensional (3D) cell model which better mimics the tumour environment and gradients that develop. MTS are a more realistic model of the in vivo cellular morphology and environment and are becoming an increasingly popular in vitro model, replacing traditional monolayer culture. Imaging techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM) were used to investigate differences in morphology and NS uptake in monolayer culture compared to MTS. After confirming NS uptake, the first SERS measurements revealing quantitative information on redox potential in MTS were performed.

  6. Electrochemical and AFM characterization on gold and carbon electrodes of a high redox potential laccase from Fusarium proliferatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Arzola, K; Gimeno, Y; Arévalo, M C; Falcón, M A; Hernández Creus, A

    2010-08-01

    The redox potential of the T1 copper site of laccase from Fusarium proliferatum was determined by titration to be about 510 mV vs. SCE (750 mV vs. NHE), which makes it a high redox potential enzyme. Anaerobic electron transfer reactions between laccase and carbon and gold electrodes were detected, both in solution and when the enzyme was adsorbed on these surfaces. In solution, a single high-potential signal (660 mV vs. SCE) was recorded at the carbon surfaces, attributable to the T1 copper site of the enzyme. However, a well-defined oxidative process at about 660 mV and an anodic wave at 350 mV vs. SCE were recorded at the gold electrode, respectively associated with the T1 and T2 copper sites. Laccase-modified carbon electrodes behaved analogously when the enzyme was in solution, unlike laccase adsorbed on gold, which showed only a low-potential signal. Laccase molecules were successfully imaged by AFM; obtaining a thick compact stable film on Au(111), and large aggregates forming a complex network of small branches leaving voids on the HOPG surface. Laccase-modified carbon electrodes retained significant enzymatic activity, efficiently oxidising violuric acid and reducing molecular oxygen. Explanations are proposed for how protein-film organisation affects the electrode function. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-03

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Calibration of redox potential in sperm wash media and evaluation of oxidation-reduction potential values in various assisted reproductive technology culture media using MiOXSYS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panner Selvam, M K; Henkel, R; Sharma, R; Agarwal, A

    2018-03-01

    Oxidation-reduction potential describes the balance between the oxidants and antioxidants in fluids including semen. Various artificial culture media are used in andrology and IVF laboratories for sperm preparation and to support the development of fertilized oocytes under in vitro conditions. The composition and conditions of these media are vital for optimal functioning of the gametes. Currently, there are no data on the status of redox potential of sperm processing and assisted reproduction media. The purpose of this study was to compare the oxidation-reduction potential values of the different media and to calibrate the oxidation-reduction potential values of the sperm wash medium using oxidative stress inducer cumene hydroperoxide and antioxidant ascorbic acid. Redox potential was measured in 10 different media ranging from sperm wash media, freezing media and assisted reproductive technology one-step medium to sequential media. Oxidation-reduction potential values of the sequential culture medium and one-step culture medium were lower and significantly different (p value to identify the physiological range of oxidation-reduction potential that does not have any adverse effect on normal physiological sperm function. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  9. Determination of redox potentials for the Watson-Crick base pairs, DNA nucleosides, and relevant nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Hernandez, Carlos E; Close, David M; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-05-17

    Redox potentials for the DNA nucleobases and nucleosides, various relevant nucleoside analogues, Watson-Crick base pairs, and seven organic dyes are presented based on DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and B3YLP/6-311+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels of calculations. The values are determined from an experimentally calibrated set of equations that correlate the vertical ionization (electron affinity) energy of 20 organic molecules with their experimental reversible oxidation (reduction) potential. Our results are in good agreement with those estimated experimentally for the DNA nucleosides in acetonitrile solutions (Seidel et al. J. Phys. Chem. 1996, 100, 5541). We have found that nucleosides with anti conformation exhibit lower oxidation potentials than the corresponding syn conformers. The lowering in the oxidation potential is due to the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between the 5'-OH group of the sugar and the N3 of the purine bases or C2=O of the pyrimidine bases in the syn conformation. Pairing of adenine or guanine with its complementary pyrimidine base decreases its oxidation potential by 0.15 or 0.28 V, respectively. The calculated energy difference between the oxidation potential for the G.C base pair and that of the guanine base is in good agreement with the experimental value estimated recently (0.34 V: Caruso, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 15040). The complete and consistent set of reversible redox values determined in this work for the DNA constituents is expected to be of considerable value to those studying charge and electronic energy transfer in DNA.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-02

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of potential analytical methods for redox control of the vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate several analytical techniques to measure ferrous/ferric ratios in simulated and radioactive nuclear waste glasses for eventual redox control of the vitrification process. Redox control will minimize the melt foaming that occurs under highly oxidizing conditions and the metal precipitation that occurs under highly reducing conditions. The analytical method selected must have a rapid response for production problems with minimal complexity and analyst involvement. The wet-chemistry, Moessbauer spectroscopy, glass color analysis, and ion chromatography techniques were explored, with particular emphasis being placed on the Moessbauer technique. In general, all of these methods can be used for nonradioactive samples. The Moessbauer method can readily analyze glasses containing uranium and thorium. A shielded container was designed and built to analyze fully radioactive glasses with the Moessbauer spectrometer in a hot cell environment. However, analyses conducted with radioactive waste glasses containing 90 Sr and 137 Cs were unsuccessful, presumably due to background radiation problems caused by the samples. The color of glass powder can be used to analyze the ferrous/ferric ratio for low chromium glasses, but this method may not be as precise as the others. Ion chromatography was only tested on nonradioactive glasses, but this technique appears to have the required precision due to its analysis of both Fe +2 and Fe +3 and its anticipated adaptability for radioactivity samples. This development would be similar to procedures already in use for shielded inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP) spectrometry. Development of the ion chromatography method is therefore recommended; conventional wet-chemistry is recommended as a backup procedure

  12. The influence of land use on soil organic carbon and nitrogen content and redox potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusliene, Gedrime

    2010-01-01

    different farming systems (conventional and organic) as well as abandoned lands. We choose the plants of two botanical species (Poaceae and Fabaceae) in organic and conventional farming systems as well as abandoned lands. Experimental results show that the best soil organic matter status according...... to the investigated indexes is in the soils of conventional and orgaic farming systems occupied with mixtures of Poaceae and Fabaceae and the worst - in the soils of abandoned Poaceae meadowa. In the abandoned lands, Fabaceae (galega) had better influence on soil organic matter status than Poaceae....

  13. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  14. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Pan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  15. Humin as an electron donor for enhancement of multiple microbial reduction reactions with different redox potentials in a consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Xiao, Zhixing; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase humin, acting as an electron donor, was able to enhance multiple reductive biotransformations, including dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP), dissimilatory reduction of amorphous Fe (III) oxide (FeOOH), and reduction of nitrate, in a consortium. Humin that was chemically reduced by NaBH4 served as an electron donor for these microbial reducing reactions, with electron donating capacities of 0.013 mmol e(-)/g for PCP dechlorination, 0.15 mmol e(-)/g for iron reduction, and 0.30 mmol e(-)/g for nitrate reduction. Two pairs of oxidation and reduction peaks within the humin were detected by cyclic voltammetry analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based microbial community analysis of the consortium incubated with different terminal electron acceptors, suggested that Dehalobacter sp., Bacteroides sp., and Sulfurospirillum sp. were involved in the PCP dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, respectively. These findings suggested that humin functioned as a versatile redox mediator, donating electrons for multiple respiration reactions with different redox potentials. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors controlling the redox potential of ZnCe6 in an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Abdullah; Vassiliev, Serguei; Poddutoori, Prashanth K; van der Est, Art; Bruce, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis has the unique ability to photochemically oxidize water. Recently an engineered bacterioferritin photochemical 'reaction centre' (BFR-RC) using a zinc chlorin pigment (ZnCe6) in place of its native heme has been shown to photo-oxidize bound manganese ions through a tyrosine residue, thus mimicking two of the key reactions on the electron donor side of PSII. To understand the mechanism of tyrosine oxidation in BFR-RCs, and explore the possibility of water oxidation in such a system we have built an atomic-level model of the BFR-RC using ONIOM methodology. We studied the influence of axial ligands and carboxyl groups on the oxidation potential of ZnCe6 using DFT theory, and finally calculated the shift of the redox potential of ZnCe6 in the BFR-RC protein using the multi-conformational molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann approach. According to our calculations, the redox potential for the first oxidation of ZnCe6 in the BRF-RC protein is only 0.57 V, too low to oxidize tyrosine. We suggest that the observed tyrosine oxidation in BRF-RC could be driven by the ZnCe6 di-cation. In order to increase the efficiency of tyrosine oxidation, and ultimately oxidize water, the first potential of ZnCe6 would have to attain a value in excess of 0.8 V. We discuss the possibilities for modifying the BFR-RC to achieve this goal.

  17. Tuning cofactor redox potentials: the 2-methoxy dihedral angle generates a redox potential difference of >160 mV between the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) quinones of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; Mattis, Aidas J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2013-10-15

    Only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. (13)C hyperfine sublevel correlation measurements of the 2-methoxy in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with quantum mechanics calculations of the (13)C couplings as a function of the dihedral angle. X-ray structures support dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of ~180 mV. This is consistent with the failure of a ubiquinone analogue lacking the 2-methoxy to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ≈160-195 mV.

  18. Two oxidation sites for low redox potential substrates: a directed mutagenesis, kinetic, and crystallographic study on Pleurotus eryngii versatile peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María; Mate, María J; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2012-11-30

    Versatile peroxidase shares with manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase the ability to oxidize Mn(2+) and high redox potential aromatic compounds, respectively. Moreover, it is also able to oxidize phenols (and low redox potential dyes) at two catalytic sites, as shown by biphasic kinetics. A high efficiency site (with 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone catalytic efficiencies of ∼70 and ∼700 s(-1) mM(-1), respectively) was localized at the same exposed Trp-164 responsible for high redox potential substrate oxidation (as shown by activity loss in the W164S variant). The second site, characterized by low catalytic efficiency (∼3 and ∼50 s(-1) mM(-1) for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone, respectively) was localized at the main heme access channel. Steady-state and transient-state kinetics for oxidation of phenols and dyes at the latter site were improved when side chains of residues forming the heme channel edge were removed in single and multiple variants. Among them, the E140G/K176G, E140G/P141G/K176G, and E140G/W164S/K176G variants attained catalytic efficiencies for oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at the heme channel similar to those of the exposed tryptophan site. The heme channel enlargement shown by x-ray diffraction of the E140G, P141G, K176G, and E140G/K176G variants would allow a better substrate accommodation near the heme, as revealed by the up to 26-fold lower K(m) values (compared with native VP). The resulting interactions were shown by the x-ray structure of the E140G-guaiacol complex, which includes two H-bonds of the substrate with Arg-43 and Pro-139 in the distal heme pocket (at the end of the heme channel) and several hydrophobic interactions with other residues and the heme cofactor.

  19. Estimation of redox potentials of Fe(III)- gallic acid complexes at different pH by spectrophotometric titration with ascorbate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Tasneem, Z.; Kazmi, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Fe(III) is strongly chelated by Gallic acid. This equilibrium as well as the kinetics of reduction of the complex is strongly pH dependent. The complex was prepared in acetate buffers of pH 4.6, 5.0 and 5.6 and in Tris buffer of pH 7.0.The complex was reduced by ascorbate. The reduced absorbance was taken to be a measure of reaction. Nernst equation was then applied to determine the standard redox potentials of the complex taking the literature values of the redox potentials of ascorbate at different pH. The values of redox potentials of complex were found to be 0.197 V at pH 4.6. 0.181 V at pH 5.0 1.132 V at pH 5.6 and 0.092 V at pH 7.0. (author)

  20. Data Quality Objectives Workbook for Assessing Chemical Vulnerability Potential in REDOX and U Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R. G.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this data quality objective workbook is to present the rationale for selecting the sampling and characterization strategy that supports the assessment of the chemical vulnerabilities of the five tanks. Since characterization of the tanks' contents is likely to be expensive, a secondary goal was established to characterize the tank contents for proper waste designation and disposal at the same time the tanks are characterized for chemical vulnerability

  1. An experimental and theoretical method for determination of standard electrode potential for the redox couple diphenyl sulfone/diphenyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y. Z.; Wei, K. X.; Lv, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    DFT calculations were performed for diphenyl sulfide and diphenyl sulfone. The electrochemistry of diphenyl sulfide on the gold electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammety and the results show that standard electrode potential for redox couple diphenyl sulfone/diphenyl sulfide is 1.058 V, which is consistent with that of 1.057 calculated at B3LYP/6-31++G( d, p)-IEFPCM level. The front orbit theory and Mulliken charges of molecular explain well on the oxidation of diphenyl sulfide in oxidative desulfurization. According to equilibrium theory the experimental equilibrium constant in the oxidative desulfurization of H2O2, is 1.17 × 1048, which is consistent with the theoretical equilibrium constant is 2.18 × 1048 at B3LYP/6-31++G( d, p)-IEFPCM level.

  2. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Assessing Chemical Vulnerability Potential in REDOX and U Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludowise, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis instruction is to provide the sampling and analytical approach to be used to determine if the constituents that are present pose a threat to human health or the environment. A secondary purpose of this sampling effort is to gather analytical data that will be used to characterize the contents of each tank for waste characterization/disposal

  3. Redox fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.; McKinley, I.; Shea, M.; Smellie, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the investigations of redox fronts performed at the Osamu Utsumi mine. Results obtained by modelling groups on the rate of movement of the redox fronts and on the chemical reactions involved are discussed. Some of the most important rockwater interactions which occur at redox fronts can be modelled reasonably well but the complex redox chemistry of elements like sulphur is poorly simulated. The observed enrichment of many trace elements close to the redox fronts could be of significance for high-level waste repositories, but cannot be quantified by existing models. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. Neptunium redox behavior and sorption onto goethite and hematite in the presence of humic acids with different hydroquinone content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanova, A.B.; Kalmykov, St.N.; Perminova, I.V.; Clark, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of humic acids (HA) on neptunium redox behavior and sorption onto hematite, α-Fe 2 O 3 , and goethite, α-FeOOH, colloids was established in batch sorption experiments that were carried out in broad pH interval. The sorption isotherms were provided for two samples of HA: commercial sample of leonardite humic acid and its hydroquinone-enriched derivative obtained using formaldehyde copolycondensation. The distribution of Np fitted the distribution of hydroquinone-enriched HA at low pH values in case of both solids while the influence of parent HA on Np sorption was negligible. This is due to Np(V) reduction upon interaction with hydroquinone-enriched derivative having higher reducing capacity compared to the parent HA. The order of components addition was found to be significant for Np retention

  5. Equilibrium electrode U(4)-U and redox U(4)-U(3) potentials in molten alkali metal chlorides medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, M V; Kudyakov, V Ya; Komarov, V E; Salyulev, A B [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1979-02-01

    Conditional standard electrode potentials of uranium are determined for diluted solutions of its tetrachloride in alkali metal chloride melts (LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl) when using U(4) ion activity coefficient values experimentally found by the tensimetric method. These potentials shift to the electronegative side at the temperature decrease and alkali cation radius increase rsub(Msup(+)) according to the empiric ratio E*U(4)-U= -3.06+6.87x10/sup -4/ T-(1.67-10/sup -4/T-0.44) 1/rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.01. The temperature dependences of formal conditional redox potentials of the U(4)-U(3) system for above melted chlorides are estimated. The E*U(4)-U(3) value also becomes more electronegative in the series LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl. This alternation is satisfactorily described by the empiric expression E*U(4)-U(3)= -1.74+1.74x10/sup -4/T-(0.71x10/sup -4/T-0.20) 1rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.05. The calculated values Eu*(4)-U(3) are compared with those directly measured for the NaCl-KCl equimolar mixture and 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic mixture. A satisfactory confirmity has been observed.

  6. Equilibrium electrode U(4)-U and redox U(4)-U(3) potentials in molten alkali metal chlorides medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Komarov, V.E.; Salyulev, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    Conditional standard electrode potentials of uranium are determined for diluted solutions of its tetrachloride in alkali metal chloride melts (LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl) when using U(4) ion activity coefficient values experimentally found by the tensimetric method. These potentials shift to the electronegative side at the temperature decrease and alkali cation radius increase rsub(Msup(+)) according to the empiric ratio E*U(4)-U= -3.06+6.87x10 -4 T-(1.67-10 -4 T-0.44) 1/rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.01. The temperature dependences of formal conditional redox potentials of the U(4)-U(3) system for above melted chlorides are estimated. The E*U(4)-U(3) value also becomes more electronegative in the series LiCl, NaCl, NaCl-KCl, KCl, RbCl and CsCl. This alternation is satisfactorily described by the empiric expression E*U(4)-U(3)= -1.74+1.74x10 -4 T-(0.71x10 -4 T-0.20) 1rsub(Msup(+)) +-0.05. The calculated values Eu*(4)-U(3) are compared with those directly measured for the NaCl-KCl equimolar mixture and 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic mixture. A satisfactory confirmity has been observed

  7. Visualizing redox orbitals and their potentials in advanced lithium-ion battery materials using high-resolution x-ray Compton scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Suzuki, Kosuke; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Orikasa, Yuki; Callewaert, Vincent; Kaprzyk, Staszek; Itou, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yamada, Ryota; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Bansil, Arun

    2017-08-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions are the key processes that underlie the batteries powering smartphones, laptops, and electric cars. A redox process involves transfer of electrons between two species. For example, in a lithium-ion battery, current is generated when conduction electrons from the lithium anode are transferred to the redox orbitals of the cathode material. The ability to visualize or image the redox orbitals and how these orbitals evolve under lithiation and delithiation processes is thus of great fundamental and practical interest for understanding the workings of battery materials. We show that inelastic scattering spectroscopy using high-energy x-ray photons (Compton scattering) can yield faithful momentum space images of the redox orbitals by considering lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4 or LFP) as an exemplar cathode battery material. Our analysis reveals a new link between voltage and the localization of transition metal 3d orbitals and provides insight into the puzzling mechanism of potential shift and how it is connected to the modification of the bond between the transition metal and oxygen atoms. Our study thus opens a novel spectroscopic pathway for improving the performance of battery materials.

  8. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk and soft cheese by a redox potential measurement based method combined with real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdősi, Orsolya; Szakmár, Katalin; Reichart, Olivér; Szili, Zsuzsanna; László, Noémi; Székely Körmöczy, Péter; Laczay, Péter

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of outbreaks of foodborne listeriosis has indicated the need for a reliable and rapid detection of the microbe in different foodstuffs. A method combining redox potential measurement and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to detect Listeria monocytogenes in artificially contaminated raw milk and soft cheese. Food samples of 25 g or 25 ml were homogenised in 225 ml of Listeria Enrichment Broth (LEB) with Oxford supplement, and the redox potential measurement technique was applied. For Listeria species the measuring time was maximum 34 h. The absence of L. monocytogenes could reliably be proven by the redox potential measurement method, but Listeria innocua and Bacillus subtilis could not be differentiated from L. monocytogenes on the basis of the redox curves. The presence of L. monocytogenes had to be confirmed by real-time PCR. The combination of these two methods proved to detect < 10 cfu/g of L. monocytogenes in a cost- and time-effective manner. This method can potentially be used as an alternative to the standard nutrient method for the rapid detection of L. monocytogenes in food.

  9. Development of techniques and models for the determination of redox potentials of saline solutions; Entwicklung von Methoden und Modellen zur Bestimmung des Redoxpotentials salinarer Loesungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, Sven; Bischofer, Barbara; Scharge, Tina; Schoenwiese, Dagmar

    2014-03-15

    The mobility of radionuclides and heavy metals in aqueous systems depends significantly on their oxidation state. Under saline conditions the measurement of pH values and redox potential are distorted/falsified by solution-specific and hardly assessable ion diffusion effects at the reference electrode. The secure prognosis of redox properties is an essential prerequisite for the calculation of the expected heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations in case of a hypothetical solution ingress in an underground disposal facility. The evaluation of the existing data base shows that there are large uncertainties even for the solubility of widespread oxides and oxy-hydroxides like goethite or hematite. The redox properties of natural systems are determined by the solubility of metastable ferrous intermediate products like ferrihydrite, ''green rust'' or jarosite. The work is aimed to establish a consistent data base with information on these phases and ferrous solute species.

  10. Development of techniques and models for the determination of redox potentials of saline solutions; Entwicklung von Methoden und Modellen zur Bestimmung des Redoxpotentials salinarer Loesungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, Sven; Bischofer, Barbara; Scharge, Tina; Schoenwiese, Dagmar

    2014-03-15

    The mobility of radionuclides and heavy metals in aqueous systems depends significantly on their oxidation state. Under saline conditions the measurement of pH values and redox potential are distorted/falsified by solution-specific and hardly assessable ion diffusion effects at the reference electrode. The secure prognosis of redox properties is an essential prerequisite for the calculation of the expected heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations in case of a hypothetical solution ingress in an underground disposal facility. The evaluation of the existing data base shows that there are large uncertainties even for the solubility of widespread oxides and oxy-hydroxides like goethite or hematite. The redox properties of natural systems are determined by the solubility of metastable ferrous intermediate products like ferrihydrite, ''green rust'' or jarosite. The work is aimed to establish a consistent data base with information on these phases and ferrous solute species.

  11. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  12. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Method Combined with Hybrid All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Model: Theory and Application on Redox Potential Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2016-04-12

    We developed a new multiresolution method that spans three levels of resolution with quantum mechanical, atomistic molecular mechanical, and coarse-grained models. The resolution-adapted all-atom and coarse-grained water model, in which an all-atom structural description of the entire system is maintained during the simulations, is combined with the ab initio quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. We apply this model to calculate the redox potentials of the aqueous ruthenium and iron complexes by using the fractional number of electrons approach and thermodynamic integration simulations. The redox potentials are recovered in excellent accordance with the experimental data. The speed-up of the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model renders it computationally more attractive. The accuracy depends on the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model used in the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. We have used another multiresolution model, in which an atomic-level layer of water molecules around redox center is solvated in supramolecular coarse-grained waters for the redox potential calculations. Compared with the experimental data, this alternative multilayer model leads to less accurate results when used with the coarse-grained polarizable MARTINI water or big multipole water model for the coarse-grained layer.

  13. Improving Fructose Utilization and Butanol Production by Clostridium acetobutylicum via Extracellular Redox Potential Regulation and Intracellular Metabolite Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jie; Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2017-10-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (JA) can grow well in marginal lands with high biomass yield, and thus is a potential energy crop for biorefinery. The major biomass of JA is from tubers, which contain inulin that can be easily hydrolyzed into a mixture of fructose and glucose, but fructose utilization for producing butanol as an advanced biofuel is poor compared to glucose-based ABE fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. In this article, the impact of extracellular redox potential (ORP) on the process is studied using a mixture of fructose and glucose to simulate the hydrolysate of JA tubers. When the extracellular ORP is controlled above -460 mV, 13.2 g L -1 butanol is produced from 51.0 g L -1 total sugars (40.1 g L -1 fructose and 10.9 g L -1 glucose), leading to dramatically increased butanol yield and butanol/ABE ratio of 0.26 g g -1 and 0.67, respectively. Intracellular metabolite and q-PCR analysis further indicate that intracellular ATP and NADH availabilities are significantly improved together with the fructose-specific PTS expression at the lag phase, which consequently facilitate fructose transport, metabolic shift toward solventogenesis and carbon flux redistribution for butanol biosynthesis. Therefore, the extracellular ORP control can be an effective strategy to improve butanol production from fructose-based feedstock. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  15. Effect of dissolved oxygen on redox potential and milk acidification by lactic acid bacteria isolated from a DL-starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nadja; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-03-01

    Milk acidification by DL-starter cultures [cultures containing Lactococcus lactis diacetylactis (D) and Leuconostoc (L) species] depends on the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential in milk; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dissolved oxygen on acidification kinetics and redox potential during milk fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Fermentations were conducted by single strains isolated from mixed DL-starter culture, including Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris, by the DL-starter culture, and by the type strains. High and low levels of oxygen were produced by flushing milk with oxygen or nitrogen, respectively. The kinetics of milk acidification was characterized by the maximum rate and time of acidification (Vamax and Tamax), the maximum rate and time of reduction (Vrmax and Trmax), the minimum redox potential (Eh7 final), and time of reaching Eh7 final (Trfinal). Variations in kinetic parameters were observed at both the species and strain levels. Two of the Lc. lactis ssp. lactis strains were not able to lower redox potential to negative values. Kinetic parameters of the DL-starter culture were comparable with the best acidifying and reducing strains, indicating their additive effects. Acidification curves were mostly diauxic at all oxygen levels, displaying 2 maxima of acidification rate: before (aerobic maximum) and after (anaerobic maximum) oxygen depletion. The redox potential decreased concurrently with oxygen consumption and continued to decrease at slower rate until reaching the final values, indicating involvement of both oxygen and microbiological activity in the redox state of milk. Oxygen flushing had a negative effect on reduction and acidification capacity of tested LAB. Reduction was significantly delayed at high initial oxygen, exhibiting longer Trmax, Trfinal, or both

  16. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  17. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  18. Enhancement of acidogenic fermentation for volatile fatty acid production from food waste: Effect of redox potential and inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Yu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Yeer; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Long, Yuyang; Chen, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of redox potential (ORP) and inoculum on volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from food waste by acidogenic fermentation. Four experimental conditions with two ORP levels were tested: limited aeration conditions with ORP level of -100 to -200mV inoculating anaerobic sludge (LA+AnS) or aerobic sludge (LA+AeS), and anaerobic conditions with ORP level of -200 to -300mV inoculating anaerobic sludge with 2-bromoethanosulfophate (AN+BES) and without BES (AN). The maximal VFA yield (0.79g COD/g VS) was attained in LA+AnS reactor due to enhanced hydrolysis of substrates, especially proteins (degradation efficiency 78.3%). A higher frequency of phylum Firmicutes under limited aeration conditions (42.2-48.2%) was observed than that under anaerobic conditions (21.1%). The microbial community was more diverse in LA+AnS reactors than LA+AeS. We conclude that appropriate ORP level (from -100 to -200mV) and inoculum play essential roles in VFA production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro neuroprotective potential of lichen metabolite fumarprotocetraric acid via intracellular redox modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Crespo, Ana; Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The lichen-forming fungi Cetraria islandica has been largely used in folk medicines, and it has recently showed promising in vitro antioxidant effects in glial-like cells. Current work aimed at investigating the neuroprotective potential of its major isolated secondary metabolite: the depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid (FUM). H 2 O 2 was used herein to induce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated cytotoxicity in two models of neurons and astrocytes cells (SH-SY5Y and U373-MG cell lines). We found that a pre-treatment with FUM significantly enhanced cell viability compared to H 2 O 2 -treated cells, and we selected the optimal concentrations in each model (1 and 25 μg/ml, respectively) for assessing its cytoprotective mechanisms. FUM, which exerted effective peroxyl radical scavenging effect in the chemical oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay, alleviated the alterations in OS markers provoked by H 2 O 2 . It attenuated intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and GSH depletion. At mitochondrial level, FUM prevented from the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the increase in mitochondrial calcium, implying a protective role against oxidative damage in mitochondrial membrane. Similarly, FUM pre-treatment diminished H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis, as evidenced by the reduction in caspase-3 activity and expression; inmunoblot analysis also revealed a decrease in Bax and an increase in Bcl-2 proteins levels. Furthermore, FUM up-regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase-1, and hemeoxigenase-1. These findings and the activation of Nrf2 binding activity in nuclear extracts suggest a plausible involvement of Nrf2 signaling pathway in the cytoprotection by FUM. In conclusion, FUM emerges as a potential drug candidate in the therapy of OS-related diseases, such as the neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • FUM pre-treatment exerts significant cytoprotection against H 2 O 2 -mediated apoptosis. • ROS

  20. In vitro neuroprotective potential of lichen metabolite fumarprotocetraric acid via intracellular redox modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University Complutense of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Crespo, Ana [Department of Plant Biology II, Faculty of Pharmacy, University Complutense of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar, E-mail: pserra@ucm.es [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University Complutense of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-01

    The lichen-forming fungi Cetraria islandica has been largely used in folk medicines, and it has recently showed promising in vitro antioxidant effects in glial-like cells. Current work aimed at investigating the neuroprotective potential of its major isolated secondary metabolite: the depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid (FUM). H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was used herein to induce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated cytotoxicity in two models of neurons and astrocytes cells (SH-SY5Y and U373-MG cell lines). We found that a pre-treatment with FUM significantly enhanced cell viability compared to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, and we selected the optimal concentrations in each model (1 and 25 μg/ml, respectively) for assessing its cytoprotective mechanisms. FUM, which exerted effective peroxyl radical scavenging effect in the chemical oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay, alleviated the alterations in OS markers provoked by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It attenuated intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and GSH depletion. At mitochondrial level, FUM prevented from the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the increase in mitochondrial calcium, implying a protective role against oxidative damage in mitochondrial membrane. Similarly, FUM pre-treatment diminished H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis, as evidenced by the reduction in caspase-3 activity and expression; inmunoblot analysis also revealed a decrease in Bax and an increase in Bcl-2 proteins levels. Furthermore, FUM up-regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase-1, and hemeoxigenase-1. These findings and the activation of Nrf2 binding activity in nuclear extracts suggest a plausible involvement of Nrf2 signaling pathway in the cytoprotection by FUM. In conclusion, FUM emerges as a potential drug candidate in the therapy of OS-related diseases, such as the neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • FUM pre-treatment exerts significant cytoprotection against H

  1. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  2. Composition and Redox Potential of High-Grade Fluids: An Example from the Nilgiri Block, Southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, V. O.; Harlov, D. E.; Kwon, S.

    2017-12-01

    Composition and redox potential of fluids present during high-grade metamorphism exert an enormous influence on mineral textures and their regional trends within metamorphic complexes. We examine silicate, oxide, and sulfide trends in the Nilgiri Block, southern India. This terrain formed through subduction-related arc magmatic processes in the Neoarchean (ca. 2500 Ma). The Nilgiri highlands are characterized by granulite-facies metagabbro in the north, a two-pyroxene granulite transition zone, and tonalitic-granodioritic charnockites in the central and southern part. Garnet-orthopyroxene and orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene thermometry and garnet-orthopyroxene-plagioclase-quartz barometric results indicate a regional trend both in temperature ( 650 to 800 °C) and in pressure (700 to 1100 MPa) from SW to NE across the Nilgiri highlands. Regional trends are also seen in the oxide-sulfide mineralogy. The main oxide assemblage in the charnockites is rutile-ilmenite, whereas in the two-pyroxene granulites and metagabbros, hemo-ilmenite-magnetite dominates. The key sulfide mineral in the charnockites is pyrrhotite, with minor chalcopyrite. In the two-pyroxene granulites and metagabbros, the principle sulfide assemblage is pyrite +/- minor pyrrhotite. This reveals a regional oxidation trend. The metagabbros and two-pyroxene granulites are highly oxidized compared to the charnockites. Their higher oxidation state is proposed to be the result of highly oxidizing agents (probably as SO2) in low H2O activity fluids (most likely concentrated NaCl brines) during granulite-facies metamorphism of the metagabbros and two-pyroxene granulites. These agents were considerably more reducing (possibly as H2S) during granulite-facies metamorphism of the charnockites. This study emphasizes the potential role of oxidizing and reducing, low H2O activity fluids during granulite-facies metamorphism.

  3. Insights in the electronic structure and redox reaction energy in LiFePO4 battery material from an accurate Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Rafael B.; Almeida, J. de S; Ferreira da Silva, A.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of this paper are to investigate the accuracy of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential to predict the electronic structure of lithium iron phosphate and the related redox reaction energy with the lithium deintercalation process. The computed electronic structures show that the TB-mBJ method is able to partially localize Fe-3d electrons in LiFePO 4 and FePO 4 which usually is a problem for the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) due to the self interaction error. The energy band gap is also improved by the TB-mBJ calculations in comparison with the GGA results. It turned out, however, that the redox reaction energy evaluated by the TB-mBJ technique is not in good agreement with the measured one. It is speculated that this disagreement in the computed redox energy and the experimental value is due to the lack of a formal expression to evaluate the exchange and correlation energy. Therefore, the TB-mBJ is an efficient method to improve the prediction of the electronic structures coming form the standard GGA functional in LiFePO 4 and FePO 4 . However, it does not appear to have the same efficiency for evaluating the redox reaction energies for the investigated system

  4. Functions of NQO1 in Cellular Protection and CoQ10 Metabolism and its Potential Role as a Redox Sensitive Molecular Switch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ross

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available NQO1 is one of the two major quinone reductases in mammalian systems. It is highly inducible and plays multiple roles in cellular adaptation to stress. A prevalent polymorphic form of NQO1 results in an absence of NQO1 protein and activity so it is important to elucidate the specific cellular functions of NQO1. Established roles of NQO1 include its ability to prevent certain quinones from one electron redox cycling but its role in quinone detoxification is dependent on the redox stability of the hydroquinone generated by two-electron reduction. Other documented roles of NQO1 include its ability to function as a component of the plasma membrane redox system generating antioxidant forms of ubiquinone and vitamin E and at high levels, as a direct superoxide reductase. Emerging roles of NQO1 include its function as an efficient intracellular generator of NAD+ for enzymes including PARP and sirtuins which has gained particular attention with respect to metabolic syndrome. NQO1 interacts with a growing list of proteins, including intrinsically disordered proteins, protecting them from 20S proteasomal degradation. The interactions of NQO1 also extend to mRNA. Recent identification of NQO1 as a mRNA binding protein have been investigated in more detail using SERPIN1A1 (which encodes the serine protease inhibitor α-1-antitrypsin as a target mRNA and indicate a role of NQO1 in control of translation of α-1-antitrypsin, an important modulator of COPD and obesity related metabolic syndrome. NQO1 undergoes structural changes and alterations in its ability to bind other proteins as a result of the cellular reduced/oxidized pyridine nucleotide ratio. This suggests NQO1 may act as a cellular redox switch potentially altering its interactions with other proteins and mRNA as a result of the prevailing redox environment.

  5. Cleavage and synthesis function of high and low redox potential laccases towards 4-morpholinoaniline and aminated as well as chlorinated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Veronika; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2014-02-01

    Laccases are able to mediate both cleavage and synthesis processes. The basis for this dual reaction capability lies in the property of the enzyme laccase to oxidize phenolic, and to some extent non-phenolic substances, to reactive radicals which can undergo on the one hand separations of small substitutents or large molecule parts from the parent compound and on the other hand coupling reactions with other radicals or molecules which are not themselves oxidizable by laccase. The cleavage of the non-phenolic compound 4-morpholinoaniline as well as the deamination of 4-aminophenol and the dechlorination of 4-chlorophenol resulted in the formation of 1,4-hydroquinone which is immediately oxidized by laccase to 1,4-benzoquinone. The formation of the 1,4-hydroquinone/1,4-benzoquinone is the rate limiting step for the synthesis of the heteromolecular dimers and trimers composed of 1,4-benzoquinone and one or two molecules of morpholine. In addition to the synthesis of new compounds from the cleavage products, 4-morpholinoaniline polymerized probably via azo groups and C-N bonds to a homomolecular dimer and trimer. Similarities and differences in cleavage and synthesis reactions catalyzed by the low redox potential laccase of Myceliophthora thermophila (0.46 V) and the high redox potential laccase of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (0.79 V) were determined. In addition, the dependency of the cleavage and synthesis efficiencies on the (a) structure and redox potential of the laccase, (b) structure and redox potential of the substrate, (c) pH value of the buffer used, (d) incubation temperature, (e) solvent concentration, and (f) laccase activity is discussed in general.

  6. IRON DYNAMICS AND ITS RELATION TO SOIL REDOX POTENTIAL AND PLANT GROWTH IN ACID SULPHATE SOIL OF SOUTH KALIMANTAN, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahida Annisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter has a function to maintain reductive conditions and to chelate toxic elements in acid sulphate soils. The study aimed to assess the dynamics of ferrous iron (Fe2+ in acid sulphate soil and its correlation with soil redox potential (Eh and plant growth. The experiment was arranged in two factorial randomized block design with three replications. The first factor was two types of organic matter: (1 control (without organic matter, (2 rice straw and (3 rush weed (Eleocharis dulcis. The second factor was time of decomposition of organic matter: I1 = 2 weeks, I2 = 4 weeks, I3 = 8 weeks, and I4 = 12 weeks (farmer practice. The results showed that concentration of ferrous iron in the soil ranged from 782 to 1308 mg kg-1 during the rice growing season. The highest constant rate of iron reduction (k F2+ was observed on application of rice straw and rush weed with decomposition time of 8 weeks with the k Fe2+ value of 0.016 and 0.011 per day, respectively, while the ferrous iron formation without organic matter had the k Fe2+ value of 0.077 per day. The ferric iron (Fe3+ reduction served as a function of soil Eh as indicated by the negative correlation of ferrous iron and Eh (r = -0.856*. Organic matter decreased exchangeable iron due to chelating reaction. Iron concentration in roots was negatively correlated with soil soluble iron (r = -0.62*. Application of rice straw decomposed for 8 weeks increased the height of rice plant up to 105.67 cm. The score of Fe2+ toxicity at 8 weeks after planting ranged from 2 to 3, so rice crop did not show iron toxicity symptoms. 

  7. A Multi-Parametric Device with Innovative Solid Electrodes for Long-Term Monitoring of pH, Redox-Potential and Conductivity in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Daoudi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an innovative electrochemical probe for the monitoring of pH, redox potential and conductivity in near-field rocks of deep geological radioactive waste repositories. The probe is composed of a monocrystalline antimony electrode for pH sensing, four AgCl/Ag-based reference or Cl− selective electrodes, one Ag2S/Ag-based reference or S2− selective electrode, as well as four platinum electrodes, a gold electrode and a glassy-carbon electrode for redox potential measurements. Galvanostatic electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy using AgCl/Ag-based and platinum electrodes measure conductivity. The use of such a multi-parameter probe provides redundant information, based as it is on the simultaneous behaviour under identical conditions of different electrodes of the same material, as well as on that of electrodes made of different materials. This identifies the changes in physical and chemical parameters in a solution, as well as the redox reactions controlling the measured potential, both in the solution and/or at the electrode/solution interface. Understanding the electrochemical behaviour of selected materials thus is a key point of our research, as provides the basis for constructing the abacuses needed for developing robust and reliable field sensors.

  8. One electron transfer equilibria and redox potentials of radicals studies by pulse radiolysis. Progress report, September 1, 1975--July 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, D.; Czapski, G.

    1976-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is utilized for measurements of the equilibrium constants for electron transfer between the durosemiquinone radical anion and oxygen, menadione and indigo disulfonate. These equilibrium constants are in turn used for calculations of one-electron redox potentials for these systems. Each of these equilibrium constants was determined experimentally and independently and found to be self consistent. Only for the reactions of the semiquinones with oxygen could the electron transfer reaction be followed directly. For the reactions between the various quinone/semiquinone systems substantial indirect evidence is presented that these equilibria are achieved rapidly. In those cases equilibrium constants were determined from studies of the effect of quinone concentrations on the relative yields of the semiquinones. A method for distinguishing between kinetic competition and equilibrium is outlined and its usefulness is emphasized. The DQ/DQ - (DQ = duroquinone) and IDS/IDS - (IDS = indigo disulfonate) systems were employed as reference couples as the redox potentials for those systems are either available in the literature (IDS/IDS - ) or may be calculated from available data (DQ/DQ - ). Taking E 7 1 , the redox potential for the first one-electron reduction step at pH 7, of DQ/DQ - as -0.235 volts or of IDS/IDS - as -0.125 volts, both yield E 7 1 = -0.325 V for the O 2 /O 2 - system (1 atm O 2 ) and E 7 1 = -0.20 for the menadione system

  9. A Multi-Parametric Device with Innovative Solid Electrodes for Long-Term Monitoring of pH, Redox-Potential and Conductivity in a Nuclear Waste Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, Jordan; Betelu, Stephanie; Tzedakis, Theodore; Bertrand, Johan; Ignatiadis, Ioannis

    2017-06-13

    We present an innovative electrochemical probe for the monitoring of pH, redox potential and conductivity in near-field rocks of deep geological radioactive waste repositories. The probe is composed of a monocrystalline antimony electrode for pH sensing, four AgCl/Ag-based reference or Cl - selective electrodes, one Ag₂S/Ag-based reference or S 2- selective electrode, as well as four platinum electrodes, a gold electrode and a glassy-carbon electrode for redox potential measurements. Galvanostatic electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy using AgCl/Ag-based and platinum electrodes measure conductivity. The use of such a multi-parameter probe provides redundant information, based as it is on the simultaneous behaviour under identical conditions of different electrodes of the same material, as well as on that of electrodes made of different materials. This identifies the changes in physical and chemical parameters in a solution, as well as the redox reactions controlling the measured potential, both in the solution and/or at the electrode/solution interface. Understanding the electrochemical behaviour of selected materials thus is a key point of our research, as provides the basis for constructing the abacuses needed for developing robust and reliable field sensors.

  10. Near-infrared heat lamp therapeutic effect on paraoxonase 1 and myeloperoxidase as potential biomarkers of redox state changes induced by γ-irradiation in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Magied, N; Ahmed, A G; Shedid, S M

    2018-02-01

    Infrared radiation has a potential therapeutic effect in some diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate the therapeutic role of near infrared heat lamp (NIRHL) on the variations of the activity of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), in relation to lipid disorders, associated with oxidative stress in rats gamma-irradiated. In addition, study the effect of the duration of NIRHL treatment. Animals were divided into six groups. The results revealed that irradiated rats treated with NIRHL 20 min/once/day showed positive modulation of PON1 and MPO linked to significant improvement of lipid disorders evidenced by lower triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (oxLDL-C) and higher density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as well as significant amelioration of redox state, manifested by markedly increase of glutathione (GSH) content, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) associated with a noticeable decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines. (TNF-α, IL-1 beta and IL-6), nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOs), malondialdehyde (MDA), compared to irradiated rats. The results showed also that the NIRHL treatment for 20 min/twice/day had negative effects on the previous parameters and on the behavior of rats such as itching, irritability, dyspnea and death in normal as well as, irradiated rats. In conclusion, the results in this study show that NIRHL therapy for a short time can effectively prevent the lipid disorders induced by radiation through the positive modulation mechanism of PON1 and MPO enzymes and improvement of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  12. Potential use of gas sensors in beef manure nutrient content ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a gas sensor array to estimate the manure nutrient contents. Three metal-oxide gas sensors including methane, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide were used. Forty manure samples were collected from four beef operations in Southwest North Dakota. Manure samples were sent to be ...

  13. Effect of dissolved oxygen on redox potential and milk acidification by lactic acid bacteria isolated from a DL-starter culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2015-01-01

    potential to negative values. Kinetic parameters of the DL-starter culture were comparable with the best acidifying and reducing strains, indicating their additive effects. Acidification curves were mostly diauxic at all oxygen levels, displaying 2 maxima of acidification rate: before (aerobic maximum...... subspecies in DL-starter cultures. This knowledge is important for dairies to ensure optimized, fast, and controlled milk fermentations, leading to greater standardization of dairy products.......Milk acidification by DL-starter cultures [cultures containing Lactococcus lactis diacetylactis (D) and Leuconostoc (L) species] depends on the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential in milk; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely clear. The objective of this study...

  14. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters - Part 5: Modeling of complex redox effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Computerized thermodynamic computations are useful in predicting the sequence and products of redox reactions and in assessing process variations. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Continuous melter test results have been compared to this improved staged-thermodynamic model of redox behavior

  15. Redox Buffer Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  16. Postnatal exposure to trichloroethylene alters glutathione redox homeostasis, methylation potential, and neurotrophin expression in the mouse hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Melnyk, Stepan; Cooney, Craig A.; Gilbert, Kathleen M.; James, S. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that continuous exposure throughout gestation until the juvenile period to environmentally-relevant doses of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice promoted adverse behavior associated with glutathione depletion in the cerebellum indicating increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to extend our findings and further characterize the impact of TCE exposure on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus, a brain region prone to oxidative stress. Instead of a continuous exposure, the mice were exposed to water only or two environmentally relevant doses of TCE in the drinking water postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age. Biomarkers of plasma metabolites in the transsulfuration pathway and the transmethylation pathway of the methionine cycle were also examined. Gene expression of neurotrophins was examined to investigate a possible relationship between oxidative stress, redox imbalance and neurotrophic factor expression with TCE exposure. Our results show that hippocampi isolated from male mice exposed to TCE showed altered glutathione redox homeostasis indicating a more oxidized state. Also observed was a significant, dose dependent increase in glutathione precursors. Plasma from the TCE treated mice showed alterations in metabolites in the transsulfuration and transmethylation pathways indicating redox imbalance and altered methylation capacity. 3-Nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of protein oxidative stress, was also significantly higher in plasma and hippocampus of TCE-exposed mice compared to controls. In contrast, expression of key neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus (BDNF, NGF, and NT-3) was significantly reduced compared to controls. Our results demonstrate that low-level postnatal and early life TCE exposure modulates neurotrophin gene expression in the mouse hippocampus and may provide a mechanism for TCE-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:22421312

  17. The enhancement of tolerance to salt and cold stresses by modifying the redox state and salicylic acid content via the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene in transgenic apple plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Sun, Hong; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Tian-Yu; Jin, Zhong-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin; Yao, Yu-Xin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we characterized the role of an apple cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene (MdcyMDH) in the tolerance to salt and cold stresses and investigated its regulation mechanism in stress tolerance. The MdcyMDH transcript was induced by mild cold and salt treatments, and MdcyMDH-overexpressing apple plants possessed improved cold and salt tolerance compared to wild-type (WT) plants. A digital gene expression tag profiling analysis revealed that MdcyMDH overexpression largely altered some biological processes, including hormone signal transduction, photosynthesis, citrate cycle and oxidation-reduction. Further experiments verified that MdcyMDH overexpression modified the mitochondrial and chloroplast metabolisms and elevated the level of reducing power, primarily caused by increased ascorbate and glutathione, as well as the increased ratios of ascorbate/dehydroascorbate and glutathione/glutathione disulphide, under normal and especially stress conditions. Concurrently, the transgenic plants produced a high H2 O2 content, but a low O2·- production rate was observed compared to the WT plants. On the other hand, the transgenic plants accumulated more free and total salicylic acid (SA) than the WT plants under normal and stress conditions. Taken together, MdcyMDH conferred the transgenic apple plants a higher stress tolerance by producing more reductive redox states and increasing the SA level; MdcyMDH could serve as a target gene to genetically engineer salt- and cold-tolerant trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation

    KAUST Repository

    Rose, Nicholas D.; Regan, John M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP+, respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  19. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation

    KAUST Repository

    Rose, Nicholas D.

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP+, respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  20. nfluence of reducing and oxidizing compounds and of the redox potential of the medium on the biomass of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Turp. Breb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gumiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence was investigated of several concentrations of the reducing agents: cysteine, glutathione, ascorbic acid, pyracatechol and of the oxidizing agents: KMnO4, K4Cr2O7 and H2O2 on the total dry weight increment and that of protein with reference to redox potential changes of the medium in Scenedesmus quadricauda cultures. The culture was run in a photothermostat. It was found that the reducing compounds had as a rule a stimulating influence under 24-h illumdnation, whereas the oxidilzing agents gave the same effect when a period of 7-h darkness was applied within 24 h.

  1. Calculation of HNO2 concentration from redox potential in HNO3-H2O system as an aid to understanding the cathodic reaction of nitric acid corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masayuki; Whillock, G.O.H.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrous acid affects the corrosion of metals such as stainless steels in nitric acid. However nitrous acid is not particularly stable in nitric acid and the analytical methods available are quite involved. Accordingly, the calculation of nitrous acid concentration from redox potential was tested in the HNO 3 -H 2 O system as a convenient in situ analysis method. The calculation process is based on Nernst's equation and the required thermodynamic data were obtained from published values. The available thermodynamic data allow calculation of nitrous acid concentration from 273K to 373K for 0%-100% HNO 3 . The redox potential was 8 kmol·m -3 HNO 3 under NO bubbling and the nitrous acid concentration was determined by a Colourimetric method. The calculated data were compared with the measured data and a good agreement was found. It was found that the corrosion potential of stainless steel is influenced by nitrous acid concentration in nitric acid solution. The calculation process is useful for in-situ analysis of nitrous acid species in HNO 3 -H 2 O system and understanding the behavior of the cathodic reaction associated with nitric acid corrosion. (author)

  2. Geochemistry of Natural Redox Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1999-05-01

    Redox fronts are important geochemical boundaries which need to be considered in safety assessment of deep repositories for radioactive waste. In most cases, selected host-rock formations will be reducing due to the presence of ferrous minerals, sulphides, etc. During construction and operation of the repository, air will be introduced into the formation. After repository closure, oxidising conditions may persist locally until all oxygen is consumed. In the case of high-level waste, radiolysis of water may provide an additional source of oxidants. Oxidising conditions within a repository are thus possible and potentially have a strong influence on the mobility of many elements. The rate of movement of redox fronts, the boundary between oxidising and reducing environments, and their influence on migrating radionuclides are thus important factors influencing repository performance. The present report is a review of elemental behaviour at natural redox fronts, based on published information and work of the author. Redox fronts are geochemically and geometrically variable manifestations of a global interface between generally oxidising geochemical milieux in contact with the atmosphere and generally reducing milieux in contact with rocks containing ferrous iron, sulphide and/or organic carbon. A classification of redox fronts based on a subdivision into continental near-surface, marine near-surface, and deep environments is proposed. The global redox interface is often located close to the surface of rocks and sediments and, sometimes, within bodies of water. Temperature conditions are close to ambient. A deeper penetration of the global redox front to depths of several kilometres is found in basins containing oxidised sediments (red beds) and in some hydrothermal circulation systems. Temperatures at such deep redox fronts may reach 200 o C. Both near-surface and deep redox fronts are sites of formation of economic deposits of redox-sensitive elements, particularly of

  3. Practical improvements in soil redox potential (Eh) measurement for characterisation of soil properties. Application for comparison of conventional and conservation agriculture cropping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husson, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.husson@cirad.fr [CIRAD/PERSYST/UPR 115 AIDA and AfricaRice Centre, 01 BP 2031 Cotonou (Benin); Husson, Benoit, E-mail: bhusson@ideeaquaculture.com [IDEEAQUACULTURE, Parc Euromédecine 2, 39 Rue Jean Giroux, 34080 Montpellier (France); Brunet, Alexandre, E-mail: brunet.alexandre@outlook.com [CIRAD/US 49 Analyse, Avenue Agropolis, TA B-49/01, 34398 Montpellier Cedex (France); Babre, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.babre@cirad.fr [CIRAD/US 49 Analyse, Avenue Agropolis, TA B-49/01, 34398 Montpellier Cedex (France); Alary, Karine, E-mail: Karine.alary@cirad.fr [CIRAD/US 49 Analyse, Avenue Agropolis, TA B-49/01, 34398 Montpellier Cedex (France); Sarthou, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: sarthou@ensat.fr [ENSAT/INRA/INP UMR AGIR. BP 52627, Chemin de Borde Rouge, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex (France); Charpentier, Hubert, E-mail: Charpentier.hub@wanadoo.fr [La Boisfarderie, Brives 36100 (France); Durand, Michel, E-mail: earldeslacs@orange.fr [Le Cazals, Castanet 81 150 (France); Benada, Jaroslav, E-mail: benada@vukrom.cz [Agrotest fyto, Kromeriz Institute, Havlíckova 2787, 76701 Kromeriz (Czech Republic); Henry, Marc, E-mail: henry@unistra.fr [UMR CNRS/UdS 7140, Université de Strasbourg, Institut Le Bel, 4, rue Blaise Pascal, CS 90032, Strasbourg 67081 (France)

    2016-02-04

    The soil redox potential (Eh) can provide essential information to characterise soil conditions. In practice, however, numerous problems may arise regarding: (i) Eh determination in soils, especially aerobic soils, e.g. variations in the instrumentation and methodology for Eh measurement, high spatial and temporal Eh variability in soils, irreversibility of the redox reaction at the surface electrode, chemical disequilibrium; and (ii) measurement interpretation. This study aimed at developing a standardised method for redox potential measurement in soils, in order to use Eh as a soil quality indicator. This paper presents practical improvements in soil Eh measurement, especially regarding the control of electromagnetic perturbations, electrode choice and preparation, soil sample preparation (drying procedure) and soil:water extraction rate. The repeatability and reproducibility of the measurement method developed are highlighted. The use of Eh corrected at pH7, pe+pH or rH{sub 2}, which are equivalent notions, is proposed to facilitate interpretation of the results. The application of this Eh measurement method allows characterisation of soil conditions with sufficient repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy to demonstrate that conservation agriculture systems positively alter the protonic and electronic balance of soil as compared to conventional systems. - Highlights: • Electromagnetic fields can dramatically perturb soil Eh measurement. • Our method overcomes the main difficulties in soil Eh measurement. • Accurate and reproducible measurement of mean soil Eh are achieved. • Eh{sub pH7}, pe+pH and rH{sub 2} are equivalent notions characterising electron activity. • Agricultural practices alter soil protonic and electronic characteristics.

  4. Microprofiles of oxygen, redox potential, and pH, and microbial fermentation products in the highly alkaline gut of the saprophagous larva of Penthetria holosericea (Diptera: Bibionidae)

    KAUST Repository

    Šustr, Vladimír

    2014-08-01

    The saprophagous larvae of bibionid flies harbor bacteria in their alkaline intestinal tracts, but little is known about the contribution of the gut microbiota to the digestion of their recalcitrant diet. In this study, we measured oxygen and hydrogen partial pressure, redox potential and pH in the midgut, gastric caeca and hindgut of larvae of the bibionid fly Penthetria holosericea with Clark-type O2 and H2 microsensors, platinum redox microelectrodes, and LIX-type pH microelectrodes. The center of the midgut lumen was anoxic, whereas gastric caeca and hindgut were hypoxic. However, redox potential profiles indicated oxidizing conditions throughout the gut, with lowest values in the midgut (+20 to +60mV). Hydrogen production was not detected. The midgut was extremely alkaline (pH around 11), whereas hindgut and gastric caeca were neutral to slightly alkaline. While HPLC analysis showed high concentrations of glucose in the midgut (15mM) and gastric caeca (27mM), the concentrations of microbial fermentation products such as lactate (2-4mM), acetate (<1mM) and succinate (<0.5mM) were low in all gut regions, suggesting that the contribution of microorganisms to the digestive process, particularly in the alkaline midgut, is only of minor importance. We conclude that the digestive strategy of the saprophytic larva of P. holosericea, which feeds selectively on decomposed leaves and its own microbe-rich faeces, differs fundamentally from those of detritivorous and humivorous insects, which host a highly active, fermentative microbiota in their alkaline midgut or hindgut compartments. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Redox reaction studies by nanosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthy, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as intermediates in many chemical and biochemical reactions. An important type of reaction which they can undergo is a one electron or redox process. The direction and rate of such electron transfer reactions is governed by the relative redox potentials of the participating species. Because of the generally short lived nature of free radicals, evaluation of their redox potentials poses a number of problems. Two techniques are described for the experimental determination of the redox potentials of short lived species generated by either a nanosecond electron pulse or laser flash. In the first method, redox titration of the short lived species with stable molecules of known redox potential is carried out, employing the technique of fast kinetic spectrophotometry. Conversely, by the same method it is also possible to evaluate the one electron redox potentials of stable molecules by redox titration with free radicals of known redox potential produced as above. In the second method, electrochemical reduction or oxidation of the short lived species at an appropriate electrode (generally a mercury drop) is carried out at different fixed potentials, and the redox potential evaluated from the current-potential curves (polarograms). Full description of the experimental set up and theoretical considerations for interpretation of the raw data are given. The relative merits of the two methods and their practical applicability are discussed. (auth.)

  6. Visualizing redox orbitals and their potentials in advanced lithium-ion battery materials using high-resolution x-ray Compton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Suzuki, Kosuke; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Orikasa, Yuki; Callewaert, Vincent; Kaprzyk, Staszek; Itou, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yamada, Ryota; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Bansil, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions are the key processes that underlie the batteries powering smartphones, laptops, and electric cars. A redox process involves transfer of electrons between two species. For example, in a lithium-ion battery, current is generated when conduction electrons from the lithium anode are transferred to the redox orbitals of the cathode material. The ability to visualize or image the redox orbitals and how these orbitals evolve under lithiation and delit...

  7. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  8. Determination of formal redox potentials in aqueous solution of copper(II) complexes with ligands having nitrogen and oxygen donor atoms and comparison with their EPR and UV-Vis spectral features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbì, Giovanni; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Bonomo, Raffaele P

    2013-11-01

    Formal redox potentials in aqueous solution were determined for copper(II) complexes with ligands having oxygen and nitrogen as donor atoms. All the chosen copper(II) complexes have well-known stereochemistries (pseudo-octahedral, square planar, square-based pyramidal, trigonal bipyramidal or tetrahedral) as witnessed by their reported spectroscopic, EPR and UV-visible (UV-Vis) features, so that a rough correlation between the measured redox potential and the typical geometrical arrangement of the copper(II) complex could be established. Negative values have been obtained for copper(II) complexes in tetragonally elongated pseudo-octahedral geometries, when measured against Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Copper(II) complexes in tetrahedral environments (or flattened tetrahedral geometries) show positive redox potential values. There is a region, always in the field of negative redox potentials which groups the copper(II) complexes exhibiting square-based pyramidal arrangements. Therefore, it is suggested that a measurement of the formal redox potential could be of great help, when some ambiguities might appear in the interpretation of spectroscopic (EPR and UV-Vis) data. Unfortunately, when the comparison is made between copper(II) complexes in square-based pyramidal geometries and those in square planar environments (or a pseudo-octahedral) a little perturbed by an equatorial tetrahedral distortion, their redox potentials could fall in the same intermediate region. In this case spectroscopic data have to be handled with great care in order to have an answer about a copper complex geometrical characteristics. © 2013.

  9. Potentiometric chip-based multipumping flow system for the simultaneous determination of fluoride, chloride, pH, and redox potential in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chango, Gabriela; Palacio, Edwin; Cerdà, Víctor

    2018-08-15

    A simple potentiometric chip-based multipumping flow system (MPFS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of fluoride, chloride, pH, and redox potential in water samples. The proposed system was developed by using a poly(methyl methacrylate) chip microfluidic-conductor using the advantages of flow techniques with potentiometric detection. For this purpose, an automatic system has been designed and built by optimizing the variables involved in the process, such as: pH, ionic strength, stirring and sample volume. This system was applied successfully to water samples getting a versatile system with an analysis frequency of 12 samples per hour. Good correlation between chloride and fluoride concentration measured with ISE and ionic chromatography technique suggests satisfactory reliability of the system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  11. Microprofiles of oxygen, redox potential, and pH, and microbial fermentation products in the highly alkaline gut of the saprophagous larva of .i.Penthetria holosericea./i. (Diptera: Bibionidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustr, Vladimír; Stingl, U.; Brune, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, August (2014), s. 64-69 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB6066903 Grant - others:Deutsche forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SPP 1090 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dipteran larvae * gut pH * redox potential * oxygen partial pressure * hydrogen partial pressure Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.470, year: 2014

  12. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain information about the kinetics of electron transfer between proteins and about the dynamic behaviour of redox cofactors in proteins. This thesis describes the results of a study, initiated to get a ...

  13. Redox properties of iron-bearing clays and MX-80 bentonite – Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Th. B.; Sosedova, Y.; Gorski, C.; Voegelin, A.; Sander, M.

    2014-03-15

    The characterization of the redox properties of Fe-bearing minerals in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe{sup 2+} is of major relevance for the assessment of redox reactions in natural and engineered environments such as radioactive waste repositories. In this study, we developed an electrochemical approach based on the use of soluble organic electron transfer mediators, which enabled us to quantify the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals, MX- 80 bentonite and combinations of clay minerals, Fe oxides and dissolved Fe{sup 2+}. Using mediated electrochemical oxidation and reduction, we quantified the electron accepting and donating capacities of ferrous smectite SWa-1, Wyoming montmorillonite SWy-2 and MX-80 bentonite at pH 7.5. All structural Fe in clay minerals was redox-active in contrast to that present in other, not further defined phases of MX-80. The materials investigated were redoxactive over a very wide range of Eh-values, that is the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sub total} ratio of the minerals changed from 0 to 100 % between +600 and -600 mV (vs. SHE). Redox properties were highly path-dependent due to structural changes of the minerals as revealed from the study of native and redox-cycled clay minerals after repeated reduction and re-oxidation cycles. Irreversible alteration of the mineral structure, however, was less obvious for materials with lower total Fe content such as MX-80 bentonite and SWy-2. Systems containing native montmorillonites (SWy-2 or MX-80), goethite and dissolved Fe{sup 2+} were also able to buffer the reduction potential E{sub H} between 0 and -300 mV. Regardless of their Fe oxidation state, Fe-bearing minerals are redox-active over a wide potential range and therefore very relevant as redox buffers determining the fate of redox-active radionuclides and metals in waste repositories. (authors)

  14. Redox properties of iron-bearing clays and MX-80 bentonite – Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, Th. B.; Sosedova, Y.; Gorski, C.; Voegelin, A.; Sander, M.

    2014-03-01

    The characterization of the redox properties of Fe-bearing minerals in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe"2"+ is of major relevance for the assessment of redox reactions in natural and engineered environments such as radioactive waste repositories. In this study, we developed an electrochemical approach based on the use of soluble organic electron transfer mediators, which enabled us to quantify the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals, MX- 80 bentonite and combinations of clay minerals, Fe oxides and dissolved Fe"2"+. Using mediated electrochemical oxidation and reduction, we quantified the electron accepting and donating capacities of ferrous smectite SWa-1, Wyoming montmorillonite SWy-2 and MX-80 bentonite at pH 7.5. All structural Fe in clay minerals was redox-active in contrast to that present in other, not further defined phases of MX-80. The materials investigated were redoxactive over a very wide range of Eh-values, that is the Fe"2"+/Fe_t_o_t_a_l ratio of the minerals changed from 0 to 100 % between +600 and -600 mV (vs. SHE). Redox properties were highly path-dependent due to structural changes of the minerals as revealed from the study of native and redox-cycled clay minerals after repeated reduction and re-oxidation cycles. Irreversible alteration of the mineral structure, however, was less obvious for materials with lower total Fe content such as MX-80 bentonite and SWy-2. Systems containing native montmorillonites (SWy-2 or MX-80), goethite and dissolved Fe"2"+ were also able to buffer the reduction potential E_H between 0 and -300 mV. Regardless of their Fe oxidation state, Fe-bearing minerals are redox-active over a wide potential range and therefore very relevant as redox buffers determining the fate of redox-active radionuclides and metals in waste repositories. (authors)

  15. Laboratory Eh simulations in relation to the Redox conditions in natural granitic groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    Redox conditions are one of the prime parameters affecting the sorption of radionuclides released from a nuclear waste repository. The swedish granitic groundwaters are all reducing from a depth of approximately 100 m, the vast majority already from a depth of a few tens of metres. The contents of ferrous iron reaches a maximum at the same depth due to the weathering of iron rich minerals. At greater depths the iron content decreases while sulphide contents increases. The redox buffering capacity (in groundwater) lies mainly in the rock. The contents of iron, sulphide and manganese constitute the buffer in the groundwater. The redox potential (Eh) is controlled by the iron system in the groundwater and the rock. Sulphate is not involved in the groundwater redox processes. Laboratory simulations of the groundwater rock interactions with respect to the redox conditions have been realized, but there is still a difference compared to the natural system. This difference is due to the fact that traces of oxygen diffuses into the laboratory system causing a continuous oxidation. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  17. Search for Internal Cancers in Mice Tattooed with Inks of High Contents of Potential Carcinogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Lerche, Catharina M; Hutton Carlsen, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    on the Danish market due to the measured contents of potential carcinogens; benzo(a)pyrene and 2-anisidine, respectively. The mice were housed for 1 year after tattooing, and autopsy study on internal organs was performed. Tissue samples were systematically taken from major organs for screening of subclinical...

  18. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  19. Redox-based epigenetic status in drug addiction: a potential contributor to gene priming and a mechanistic rationale for metabolic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance, and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS). For example, under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY) to the trans sulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine, and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH)-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting SAM levels and DNA methylation status. Here, existing evidence is presented in a coherent manner to propose a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Further, we discuss how a "gene priming" phenomenon can contribute to the maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Additionally, a new mechanistic rationale for the use of metabolic interventions/redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol and other drug addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms is also provided. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction exemplified by the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse.

  20. Redox-based Epigenetic status in Drug Addiction: Potential mediator of drug-induced gene priming phenomenon and use of metabolic intervention for symptomatic treatment in drug addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malav Suchin Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is the major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. The levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS, for example; under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY to the transsulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting S-adenosylmethionine (SAM levels and DNA methylation status. In this discussion, we compile this and other existing evidence in a coherent manner to present a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Next, we also discuss how gene priming phenomenon can contribute to maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Lastly, based on our hypothesis and some preliminary evidence, we discuss a mechanistic explanation for use of metabolic interventions / redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction and we support this claim via exemplifying the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse.

  1. Polyalthia longifolia Methanolic Leaf Extracts (PLME) induce apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial potential depolarization by possibly modulating the redox status in hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayarathna, Soundararajan; Oon, Chern Ein; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2017-05-01

    Medicinal plants have been accepted as a gold mine, with respect to the diversity of their phytochemicals. Many medicinal plants extracts are potential anticancer agents. Polyalthia longifolia var. angustifolia Thw. (Annonaceae) is one of the most significant native medicinal plants and is found throughout Malaysia. Hence, the present study was intended to assess the anticancer properties of P. longifolia leaf methanolic extract (PLME) and its underlying mechanisms. The Annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis showed that PLME induces apoptosis in HeLa cells in dose-dependent manner whereas the PI flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle demonstrated the accumulation of cells at sub G0/G1, G0/G1 and G2/M phases. Investigation with JC-1 flow cytometry analysis indicated increase in mitochondria membrane potential depolarisation corresponding to increase in PLME concentrations. PLME was also shown to influence intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by exerting anti-oxidant (half IC 50 ) and pro-oxidant (IC 50 and double IC 50 ) affect against HeLa cells. PLME treatment also displayed DNA damage in HeLa cells in concentration depended fashion. The proteomic profiling array exposed the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins upon PLME treatment at IC 50 concentration in HeLa cells. Pro-apoptotic proteins; BAX, BAD, cytochrome c, caspase-3, p21, p27 and p53 were found to be significantly up-regulated while anti-apoptotic proteins; BCL-2 and BCL-w were found to be significantly down-regulated. This investigation postulated the role of p53 into mediating apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial potential depolarisation by modulating the redox status of HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain

  3. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  4. Are bioassays useful tools to assess redox processes and biodegradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Ludvigsen, L.

    2002-01-01

    sensitive hydrochemical or geochemical parameters, levels of hydrogen, and redox potential. However, all these approaches have to be evaluated against TEAP-bioassays as the most direct measure. We assessed successfully ongoing microbial-mediated redox processes by TEAP-bioassays in degradation studies...... of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic compounds in landfill leachate plumes, and of pesticides in aquifers with various redox conditions....

  5. The Redox Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P; Sies, Helmut

    2015-09-20

    The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O₂ and H₂O₂ contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine.

  6. Polyoxometalate active charge-transfer material for mediated redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Hudak, Nicholas; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2017-01-17

    Redox flow batteries including a half-cell electrode chamber coupled to a current collecting electrode are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a separator is coupled to the half-cell electrode chamber. The half-cell electrode chamber comprises a first redox-active mediator and a second redox-active mediator. The first redox-active mediator and the second redox-active mediator are circulated through the half-cell electrode chamber into an external container. The container includes an active charge-transfer material. The active charge-transfer material has a redox potential between a redox potential of the first redox-active mediator and a redox potential of the second redox-active mediator. The active charge-transfer material is a polyoxometalate or derivative thereof. The redox flow battery may be particularly useful in energy storage solutions for renewable energy sources and for providing sustained power to an electrical grid.

  7. Food acid content and erosive potential of sugar-free confections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, P; Walker, G D; Yuan, Y; Reynolds, C; Stacey, M A; Reynolds, E C

    2017-06-01

    Dental erosion is an increasingly prevalent problem associated with frequent consumption of acidic foods and beverages. The aim of this study was to measure the food acid content and the erosive potential of a variety of sugar-free confections. Thirty sugar-free confections were selected and extracts analysed to determine pH, titratable acidity, chemical composition and apparent degree of saturation with respect to apatite. The effect of the sugar-free confections in artificial saliva on human enamel was determined in an in vitro dental erosion assay using change in surface microhardness. The change in surface microhardness was used to categorize the confections as high, moderate or low erosive potential. Seventeen of the 30 sugar-free confections were found to contain high concentrations of food acids, exhibit low pH and high titratable acidity and have high erosive potential. Significant correlations were found between the dental erosive potential (change in enamel surface microhardness) and pH and titratable acidity of the confections. Ten of these high erosive potential confections displayed dental messages on the packaging suggesting they were safe for teeth. Many sugar-free confections, even some with 'Toothfriendly' messages on the product label, contain high contents of food acids and have erosive potential. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Content knowledge development in a chemistry teacher preparation program: A current potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiyanti, Tuszie; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Vishnumolakala, Venkat

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential facets in teacher education program is the development of the teachers' content knowledge and it has been suggested by many scholars that the study to analyse the process of content knowledge development in teacher education program is necessary. Regarding this, the aim of this research is to evaluate the existing program of developing pre-service chemistry teachers' content knowledge, especially in the topic about the particulate nature of matter. The curriculum of content knowledge development was analysed using the forms of the curriculum evaluation (Akker, 1998; Goodlad, Klein, and Tye (1979); Treagust, 1987). Within this framework, the curriculum was evaluated in several aspects including the vision and intention of the curriculum as mentioned in the curriculum documents (intended curriculum), the users' interpretation and perception about the curriculum (perceived curriculum), the actual process of curriculum implementation (implemented curriculum), and the outcomes of the curriculum (achieved curriculum). According to the framework used for this study, the research combined qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and the interpretation including document analysis, classroom observation, interviews, and two-tier diagnostic test. Through this research we examined the coherence among those aspects. The results reveal that although the content knowledge development is explicitly intended in a curriculum, its implementation and lecturers' perceptions give influence in the results as appear in pre-service teachers' achievements. In general, this research provides basic information about the effectiveness of the program including the challenges and the potentials for a reconsideration of the program in the future.

  9. Trace element content of vegetables grown in the victorian goldfields: characterization of a potential hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, G.; Dowling, K.; Waldron, H.; Garnett, D.

    2003-01-01

    Plants take-up trace elements essential to healthy growth, but if metal accumulation is excessive, harmful effects are noted in the plant and potentially in the organisms that feed on them. Central Victoria has a rich gold mining heritage, and as such, much of the landscape has been disturbed by the addition of mine waste material, providing an abundant source of metals in a mobile environment. A biogeochemical survey was conducted to evaluate the trace element content of backyard vegetable gardens in the gold field region and the trace element accumulation in commonly grown vegetables. Vegetable (n150) and soil (n59) samples were analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Results indicate that vegetables grown in the central Victorian goldfields have only slightly elevated trace element content. Some exceptions exist, specifically for silverbeet, but the hazard potential is minimal

  10. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  11. EMP and SIMS studies on Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca systematics in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian OMZ: a contribution to the identification of potential redox proxies and the impact of cleaning protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Glock, N.; Eisenhauer, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Hensen, C.; Nehrke, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present an initial dataset of Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios in tests of benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) determined with SIMS. These results are a contribution to a better understanding of the proxy potential of these elemental ratios for ambient redox conditions. Foraminiferal tests are often contaminated by diagenetic coatings, like Mn rich carbonate- or Fe and Mn rich (oxyhydr)oxide coatings. Thus, it is substantial to assure that...

  12. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs......In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  13. Redox Behavior of Fe2+/Fe3+ Redox Couple by Absorption Spectroscopy and Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J. Y.; Park, S.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Redox behavior has influences on speciation and other geochemical reactions of radionuclides such as sorption, solubility, and colloid formation, etc. It is one of the factors for evaluation of long-term safety assessment under high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal conditions. Accordingly, redox potential (Eh) measurement in aquatic system is important to investigate the redox conditions. Eh is usually measured with redox active electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon, etc.). Nevertheless, Eh measurements by general methods using electrodes provide low accuracy and high uncertainty problem. Therefore, Eh calculated from the concentration of redox active elements with a proper complexing reagent by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is progressed. Iron exists mostly as spent nuclear waste container material and in hydro-geologic minerals. In this system, iron controls the redox condition in near-field area and influences chemical behavior and speciation of radionuclides including redox sensitive actinides such as U, Np, and Pu. In the present work, we present the investigation on redox phenomena of iron in aquatic system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements

  14. Effect of processing on antioxidant potential and total phenolics content in beet (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorivaldo da Silva Raupp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant capacity of beet is associated with non-nutritive constituents, such as phenolic compounds. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of two different heat-processing techniques (drying and canned on the antioxidant potential (ABTS and phenolics content of beets. A forced air circulation dehydrator was used for the drying. Drying at high temperatures (100 + 90 °C/5.6 hours; 90 °C/6 hours increased the antioxidant potential of the processed products while mild drying conditions decreased it (80 °C/6 hours; 100 + 70 °C/6 hours or had no effect on it (70 °C/7 hours; 100 + 80 °C/6 hours. For the canned products, the antioxidant potential did not differ according to the pH (4.2 to 3.8 for any of the four acids tested. Some processing methods influenced the antioxidant potential of the processed products, and this was also dependent on changes in the total phenolics content.

  15. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  16. Bienzymatic sensor based on the use of redox enzymes and chitosan-MWCNT nanocomposite. Evaluation of total phenolic content in plant extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, M.; Litescu, S.C.; Radu, G.L.

    2011-01-01

    We are presenting a bienzymatic sensor for the determination of polyphenols. An ITO electrode was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and the enzymes laccase and tyrosinase were co-entrapped into a chitosan matrix. The resulting biosensor was calibrated at -50 mV (vs. the Ag/AgCl reference electrode) using rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid and gallic acid as the substrates. The new biosensor resulted in a 10.7-fold increase in response sensitivity and a considerable improvement of the detection limit (42 nM for rosmarinic acid). Fouling of the surface of the biosensor was prevented by applying the surfactant Tween 20. The data recorded in surfactant medium revealed a significant improvement of the operational stability and an enlarged linear concentration ranges (up to 12 μM for rosmarinic acid). The sensor was used to evaluate the total phenolic content from extracts of Salvia officinalis and cultures of Basilicum callus. (author)

  17. The Redox Proteome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation, and signaling during the life cycle and has a central role in the tolerance and adaptability to diet and environmental challenges. PMID:23861437

  18. Corrosion potential: influence of moisture, water-cement ratio, chloride content and concrete cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. F. Medeiros

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The method of measuring the corrosion potential is used as an electrochemical tool for helping the monitoring of the corrosion of reinforcements of concrete structures. As a criterion for evaluating results it is common to use intervals of corrosion potential and their correlation with corrosion probability, as precognizes ASTM C 876:2015. With this criterion, it is possible to establish an overview of the thermodynamic situation of corrosion in the structure or in the test specimen in laboratory. However, the method is influenced by several factors related with the concrete, the environment and with procedures adopted at the moment of executing the readings. Aiming to provide information to guide the technical and scientific environment regarding the right use of this type of non-destructive testing, the objective of this work is to evaluate some possible factors influencing the reading of corrosion potential, such as: moisture content of the concrete, water/cement ratio, thickness of the concrete cover and degree of contamination by chlorides. Results indicate that moisture and degree of contamination of the concrete by chloride ions had a tendency of making the corrosion potential more electronegative. Besides, it was verified that the influence of the cover is different for the case of contaminated concrete (1% of chlorides by mass of cement and not contaminated with chlorides: the influence of the thickness of the cover, in the case of concrete contaminated by chlorides, was inversely proportional, in other words, the greater the cover thickness is, the less electronegative the value of the corrosion potential will be. On the other hand, in cases of concretes without chlorides, the effect of the cover thickness in the readings or corrosion potential was irrelevant. All this information was proved with 95% of statistical significance.

  19. Redox signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  20. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas H.; Bjerg, Poul L.; Banwart, Steven A.; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2000-10-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial tools, such as MPN counts, PLFA biomarkers and redox bioassays. This paper reviews the principles behind the different approaches, summarizes methods used and evaluates the approaches based on the experience from the reported applications.

  1. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator......The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  2. Impact of uranium (U) on the cellular glutathione pool and resultant consequences for the redox status of U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehweger, Katrin; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert

    2011-12-01

    Uranium (U) as a redox-active heavy metal can cause various redox imbalances in plant cells. Measurements of the cellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) by HPLC after cellular U contact revealed an interference with this essential redox couple. The GSH content remained unaffected by 10 μM U whereas the GSSG level immediately increased. In contrast, higher U concentrations (50 μM) drastically raised both forms. Using the Nernst equation, it was possible to calculate the half-cell reduction potential of 2GSH/GSSG. In case of lower U contents the cellular redox environment shifted towards more oxidizing conditions whereas the opposite effect was obtained by higher U contents. This indicates that U contact causes a consumption of reduced redox equivalents. Artificial depletion of GSH by chlorodinitrobenzene and measuring the cellular reducing capacity by tetrazolium salt reduction underlined the strong requirement of reduced redox equivalents. An additional element of cellular U detoxification mechanisms is the complex formation between the heavy metal and carboxylic functionalities of GSH. Because two GSH molecules catalyze electron transfers each with one electron forming a dimer (GSSG) two UO(2) (2+) are reduced to each UO(2) (+) by unbound redox sensitive sulfhydryl moieties. UO(2) (+) subsequently disproportionates to UO(2) (2+) and U(4+). This explains that in vitro experiments revealed a reduction to U(IV) of only around 33% of initial U(VI). Cellular U(IV) was transiently detected with the highest level after 2 h of U contact. Hence, it can be proposed that these reducing processes are an important element of defense reactions induced by this heavy metal.

  3. Anticancer potential and content of fucoidan extracted from sporophyll of New Zealand Undaria pinnatifida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred eMak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Undaria pinnatifida is a species of brown seaweed known to contain rich amounts of fucoidan, a sulphated polysaccharide known to possess various biological activities. We isolated crude fucoidan (F0 from the sporophylls of U. pinnatifida grown in the Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand. Sulphate content, uronic acid content and molecular weight of F0 were 15.02%, 1.24% and >150 kDa, respectively. F0 was fractionated to yield three further fractions: F1, F2 and F3. Cytotoxicity of two major fractions was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The algal fucoidans specifically suppressed the proliferation of three cancer cell lines with less cytotoxicity against the normal cells. Selective cytotoxicity could relate to the distinctive structures of each fucoidan fraction. Results from this study provide evidence that fucoidan, especially from U. pinnatifida grown in New Zealand, possesses great potential to be used as a functional food to reduce cancer risk or supplement cancer treatment.

  4. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warut Poontawee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae, or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 and conventional solvents (ethanol, water. The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae, with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant.

  5. Evidence on dynamic effects in the water content – water potential relation of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    static and dynamic moisture storage data and the more pronounced was the corresponding dynamic hysteresis. The paper thus provides clear experimental evidence on dynamic effects in the water content – water potential relation of building materials. By that, data published by previous authors as Topp et......Hygrothermal simulation has become a widely applied tool for the design and assessment of building structures under possible indoor and outdoor climatic conditions. One of the most important prerequisites of such simulations is reliable material data. Different approaches exist here to derive...... the required material functions, i.e. the moisture storage characteristic and the liquid water conductivity, from measured basic properties. The current state of the art in material modelling as well as the corresponding transport theory implies that the moisture transport function is unique...

  6. Base voltammetric characterization of phenylazide modified deoxycytidine - the potential DNA redox label enabling its post-synthetic modifications by "click-reactions"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Trošanová, Zuzana; Balintová, Jana; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 140-141 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /65./. 09.09.2013-13.09.2013, Tatranské Matliare] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0019 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA redox label * click-reaction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  7. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  8. Redox regulation of cell proliferation: Bioinformatics and redox proteomics approaches to identify redox-sensitive cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Wilson, Michael H; Wright, Megan H

    2018-03-29

    Plant stem cells are the foundation of plant growth and development. The balance of quiescence and division is highly regulated, while ensuring that proliferating cells are protected from the adverse effects of environment fluctuations that may damage the genome. Redox regulation is important in both the activation of proliferation and arrest of the cell cycle upon perception of environmental stress. Within this context, reactive oxygen species serve as 'pro-life' signals with positive roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and survival. However, very little is known about the metabolic mechanisms and redox-sensitive proteins that influence cell cycle progression. We have identified cysteine residues on known cell cycle regulators in Arabidopsis that are potentially accessible, and could play a role in redox regulation, based on secondary structure and solvent accessibility likelihoods for each protein. We propose that redox regulation may function alongside other known posttranslational modifications to control the functions of core cell cycle regulators such as the retinoblastoma protein. Since our current understanding of how redox regulation is involved in cell cycle control is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding both which residues are important and how modification of those residues alters protein function, we discuss how critical redox modifications can be mapped at the molecular level. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenolic content, antioxidant potential and Aedes aegyptii ecological friend larvicidal activity of some selected Egyptian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hela, Atef A; Abdel-Hady, Nevein M; Dawoud, Gouda T M; Hamed, Abdo M; Morsy, Tosson A

    2013-04-01

    Polyphenols constitute a distinct group of natural compounds of medicinal importance exhibiting wide range of physiological activities as antioxidant, immunestimulant, antitumor and antiparasitic. Yellow fever and dengue fever are mosquito-borne infectious diseases transmitted by Aedes aegyptii, the presence of yellow fever in Sudan and dengue fever in Saudi Arabia are threats to Egypt with the reemerging of Ae. aegyptii in Southern Egypt, larvae control is feasible than flying adults. This work was conducted targeting estimation of the relative levels of total phenolic content, antioxidant potential and larvicidal activity of 110 selected Egyptian plants. The highest total phenolic contents were estimated in aqueous extracts of Coronilla scorpioides L., Forsskaolea tenacissima L., Crataegus sinaica Boiss., Pistacia khinjuk Boiss. and Loranthus acacia Benth.; they were 916.70 +/- 4.80, 813.70 +/- 4.16, 744.90 +/- 4.93, 549.00 +/- 3.93& 460.80 +/- 4.02 mg% while those of methanol extracts were estimated in Coronilla scorpioides, Forsskaolea tenacissima, Crataegus sinaica, Loranthus acacia and Pistacia khinjuk, they were 915.60-4.86, 664.60 +/- 4.16, 659.30 +/- 4.80, 590.80 +/- 4.49 & 588.00 +/- 3.85 mg% respectively. Investigation of the antioxidant potentials revealed that the most potent plants were Co-ronilla scorpioides, Forsskaolea tenacissima, Crataegus sinaica, Pistacia khinjuk and Loranthus acacia with calculated values of 454.80 +/- 4.83, 418.4 +/- 4.16, 399.10 +/- 4.90, 342.5 +/- 2.72 & 239.7 +/- 2.91% for aqueous extracts and 452.9 +/- 4.94, 389.6 +/- 4.6, 378.48 +/- 3.84, 352.3 +/- 3.06 & 346.5 +/- 2.98% for methanol extracts respectively while screening of larvicidal activity proved that Coronilla scorpioides, Forsskaolea tenacissima, Crataegus sinaica, Pistacia khinjuk and Loranthus acacia exhibited highest potency calculated as 22.53 +/- 2.01, 23.85 +/- 2.07, 28.17 +/- 2.06, 31.60 +/- 2.93 & 39.73 +/- 4.58 mg% aqueous extracts and 18.53 +/- 1.95, 18

  10. Development of pyridine-containing macrocyclic copper(II) complexes: potential role in the redox modulation of oxaliplatin toxicity in human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S; Costa, Judite; Gaspar, Jorge; Rueff, José; Cabral, M Fátima; Cipriano, Madalena; Castro, Matilde; Oliveira, Nuno G

    2012-09-01

    The unique redox and catalytic chemistry of Cu has justified the development of novel Cu complexes for different therapeutic uses including cancer therapy. In this work, four pyridine-containing aza-macrocyclic copper(II) complexes were prepared (CuL1-CuL4) varying in ring size and/or substituents and their superoxide scavenging activity evaluated. CuL3, the most active superoxide scavenger, was further studied as a modulator of the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin in epithelial breast MCF10A cells and in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Our results show that CuL3 enhances the therapeutic window of oxaliplatin, by both protecting non-tumour cells and increasing its cytotoxic effect in breast carcinoma cells. CuL3 is thus a promising complex to be further studied and to be used as a lead compound for the optimization of novel chemotherapy sensitizers.

  11. Virtual water content of temperate cereals and maize: Present and potential future patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Marianela; Rost, Stefanie; Müller, Christoph; Bondeau, Alberte; Gerten, Dieter

    2010-04-01

    SummaryKnowledge of the virtual water content (VWC) of crops and especially its possible future developments is helpful for improvements in water productivity and water management, which are necessary at global scale due to rising demand for food, the necessity to ease present and future water scarcity, and the reduction of poverty. Using a dynamic global vegetation and water balance model (LPJmL), this study quantifies the VWC of two of the most important crop types worldwide, temperate cereals and maize, at high spatial resolution (0.5°). We analyzed present conditions (1999-2003) and also for the first time also for scenarios of future climate and increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations (2041-2070; HadCM3, ECHAM5 and CCSM3 climate models, A2 emissions scenario). VWC presently differs significantly among regions: highest values are common in large parts of Africa (>2 m 3 kg -1), and lowest values were found e.g. for Central Europe (Europe, South Africa, Argentina, Australia and South East Asia—are projected to become less water efficient (higher VWC) for at least one of the crop types. CO 2 fertilisation was simulated to generally reduce VWC, though realisation of this effect in the field will depend, for example, on the intensity of nutrient management in the future. The potentially adverse future changes in VWC found here pose a challenge to water management efforts and eventually global trade policies.

  12. Cadmium content of commercial and contaminated rice, Oryza sativa, in Thailand and potential health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, R; Promsawad, A; Zwicker, B M; Laoharojanaphand, S

    2010-03-01

    Thailand is the number one global exporter and among the top five producers of rice in the world. A significant increase in anthropogenic contamination in agricultural soils over the past few decades has lead to concerns with cadmium and its uptake in rice. The cadmium levels in Thai rice from different sources/areas were determined and used to estimate the potential health risks to consumers. The cadmium concentration in the commercial rice samples ranged from below the detection limit to 0.016 mg/kg. The cadmium concentrations in the contaminated rice samples ranged from a low of 0.007 mg/kg to a high of 0.579 mg/kg. Five of the calculated values exceed the proposed PTWI, with one value almost three times higher and two values almost double. The three highly elevated values are certainly a concern from a health standpoint. Ultimately, action is required to address the health implications resulting from the cadmium contamination in agricultural soils used for rice production in a few select areas of Thailand. Overall, this study indicates that the vast majority of rice produced, consumed and exported by Thailand is safe pertaining to cadmium content.

  13. Redox potentials of PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/PuO{sub 2}{sup +} and Pu{sup 4+}/Pu{sup 3+} at different ionic strengths and temperatures; entropy and heat capacity; Potentiels Redox des couples PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/PuO{sub 2}{sup +} et Pu{sup 4+}/Pu{sup 3+} a force ionique et temperature variables. Entropie et capacite calorifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, H.; Vitorge, P.

    1994-05-01

    The reversible redox potentials of the Plutonium couples are measured by using cyclic voltammetry, in perchloric media at ionic strength, I from 0,5 M to 3M, and temperature, T, from 5 deg C to 65 deg C. At each T, experimental results, E(T,I), are extrapolated to I = O by applying the Specific Interaction Theory (S.I.T.) to get interaction coefficients, {Delta} is element of (T), and E(T,O) (e.g. standard potentials when T = 25 deg C). At T = 25 deg C the numerical values of the potentials of all the Pu couples are nearly the same. It is then not easy to detect a systematic error due to disproportionation or redox impurity. This can explain some discrepancy on numerical values already published. We finally propose ``recommended values`` of the reversible redox potentials. As a first approximation, the variations of these potentials seem to be quite linear versus temperature: entropy variation versus T is small. But taking into account heat capacity that is involved in the E(T,I) second order derivative, usually improves the fitting. A second order expansion of {epsilon}(T) and of the Debye Huckel term, D(T) are used to propose equations that account for simultaneous ionic strength and temperature influences on G, S, Cp, H, and lg K. These equations, in particular those modelling the ionic strength influence on {Delta}S, {Delta}Cp, and {Delta}H are first checked for published mean activity coefficients of HCI and NaCI. Small discrepancy between the numerical values of entropy changes of actinides redox couples, deduced from electrochemical and calorimetric techniques are discussed. (authors). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 10 figs.

  14. Effects of vine water status on dimethyl sulfur potential, ammonium, and amino acid contents in Grenache Noir grapes (Vitis vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Royer Dupré, N; Schneider, R; Payan, J C; Salançon, E; Razungles, A

    2014-04-02

    We studied the effect of vine water status on the dimethyl sulfur potential (DMSP), ammonium, and amino acid contents of the berry during the maturation of Grenache Noir grapes. Water deficit increased the accumulation of amino acids in berries and favored yeast assimilable amino nitrogen. Similarly, ammonium content was higher in berries from vines subjected to moderate water deficit. DMSP content followed the same trend as yeast assimilable amino acid content, with higher concentrations observed in the berries of vines subjected to water deficit. The high DMSP and yeast assimilable nitrogen contents of musts from vines subjected to water deficit resulted in a better preservation of DMSP during winemaking. The wines produced from these musts had a higher DMSP level and would therefore probably have a higher aroma shelf life, because the DMSP determines the rate of release of dimethyl sulfur during wine storage, and this compound enhances fruity notes.

  15. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  16. Radioactivity contents in dicalcium phosphate and the potential radiological risk to human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casacuberta, N.; Masque, P.; Garcia-Orellana, J.; Bruach, J.M.; Anguita, M.; Gasa, J.; Villa, M.; Hurtado, S.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2009-01-01

    Potentially harmful phosphate-based products derived from the wet acid digestion of phosphate rock represent one of the most serious problems facing the phosphate industry. This is particularly true for dicalcium phosphate (DCP), a food additive produced from either sulphuric acid or hydrochloric acid digestion of raw rock material. This study determined the natural occurring radionuclide concentrations of 12 DCP samples and 4 tricalcium phosphate (TCP) samples used for animal and human consumption, respectively. Metal concentrations (Al, Fe, Zn, Cd, Cr, As, Hg, Pb and Mg) were also determined. Samples were grouped into three different clusters (A, B, C) based on their radionuclide content. Whereas group A is characterized by high activities of 238 U, 234 U (∼10 3 Bq kg -1 ), 210 Pb (2 x 10 3 Bq kg -1 ) and 210 Po (∼800 Bq kg -1 ); group B presents high activities of 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th (∼10 3 Bq kg -1 ). Group C was characterized by very low activities of all radionuclides ( -1 ). Differences between the two groups of DCP samples for animal consumption (groups A and B) were related to the wet acid digestion method used, with group A samples produced from hydrochloric acid digestion, and group B samples produced using sulphuric acid. Group C includes more purified samples required for human consumption. High radionuclide concentrations in some DCP samples (reaching 2 x 10 3 and 10 3 Bq kg -1 of 210 Pb and 210 Po, respectively) may be of concern due to direct or indirect radiological exposure via ingestion. Our experimental results based on 210 Pb and 210 Po within poultry consumed by humans, suggest that the maximum radiological doses are 11 ± 2 μSv y -1 . While these results suggest that human health risks are small, additional testing should be conducted.

  17. Absolute proton hydration free energy, surface potential of water, and redox potential of the hydrogen electrode from first principles: QM/MM MD free-energy simulations of sodium and potassium hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2018-06-01

    The absolute intrinsic hydration free energy GH+,w a t ◦ of the proton, the surface electric potential jump χwa t ◦ upon entering bulk water, and the absolute redox potential VH+,w a t ◦ of the reference hydrogen electrode are cornerstone quantities for formulating single-ion thermodynamics on absolute scales. They can be easily calculated from each other but remain fundamentally elusive, i.e., they cannot be determined experimentally without invoking some extra-thermodynamic assumption (ETA). The Born model provides a natural framework to formulate such an assumption (Born ETA), as it automatically factors out the contribution of crossing the water surface from the hydration free energy. However, this model describes the short-range solvation inaccurately and relies on the choice of arbitrary ion-size parameters. In the present study, both shortcomings are alleviated by performing first-principle calculations of the hydration free energies of the sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) ions. The calculations rely on thermodynamic integration based on quantum-mechanical molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations involving the ion and 2000 water molecules. The ion and its first hydration shell are described using a correlated ab initio method, namely resolution-of-identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (RIMP2). The next hydration shells are described using the extended simple point charge water model (SPC/E). The hydration free energy is first calculated at the MM level and subsequently increased by a quantization term accounting for the transformation to a QM/MM description. It is also corrected for finite-size, approximate-electrostatics, and potential-summation errors, as well as standard-state definition. These computationally intensive simulations provide accurate first-principle estimates for GH+,w a t ◦, χwa t ◦, and VH+,w a t ◦, reported with statistical errors based on a confidence interval of 99%. The values obtained

  18. Characterization of Redox properties of humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of humic materials is the presence of stable free radicals as shown by the width of 1 H-NMR lines of humic acid in solution as well as ESR spectra of solid samples. Presumably, these are due to quinohdrone functional groups in the humic structure. These free radicals are assumed to be a source of the redox effects of humics in metal cations. Phenolic groups have also been proposed as a source of reduction potential in these substances. The reduction potential of humic material is 0.5-0.7 V (vs. the normal hydrogen electrode). In addition to this inherent redox property, humics undergo photolysis by sunlight in surface waters which results in the production of hydrogen peroxide. The latter can also result in redox reactions with metal cations. Such direct and indirect redox capability can have significant effects on the migration of reducible cations. Studies of the reduction of hexavalent actinide cations by humic acid showed the reactions Np O 2 2+ -> Np O 2 + (E 1/2 0 = 1.47 V) and Pu O 2 2+ -> Pu +4 (E 1/2 0 = 1.04 V) while U O 2 2+ was not reduced. The reduction of plutonium in sea water by humics is discussed. Evidence of the effects of redox by humic material on metal cations in natural waters and sediments are also reviewed. (authors). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Silver nanoparticle catalysed redox reaction: An electron relay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, Kaushik; Witcomb, Mike; Scurrell, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A silver cluster shows efficient catalytic activity in a redox reaction because the cluster acts as the electron relay centre behaving alternatively as an acceptor and as a donor of electrons. An effective transfer of electrons is possible when the redox potential of the cluster is intermediate between the electron donor and electron acceptor system

  20. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  1. Microbial activity in argillite waste storage cells for the deep geological disposal of French bituminous medium activity long lived nuclear waste: Impact on redox reaction kinetics and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Leone, L.; Charlet, L.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-organisms are ubiquitous and display remarkable capabilities to adapt and survive in the most extreme environmental conditions. It has been recognized that microorganisms can survive in nuclear waste disposal facilities if the required major (P, N, K) and trace elements, a carbon and energy source as well as water are present. The space constraint is of particular interest as it has been shown that bacteria do not prosper in compacted clay. An evaluation of the different types of French medium and high level waste, in a clay-rich host rock storage environment at a depth between 500 and 600 m, has shown that the bituminous waste is the most likely candidate to accommodate significant microbial activity. The waste consists of a mixture of bitumen (source of bio-available organic matter and H2 as a consequence of its degradation and radiolysis) and nitrates and sulphates kept in a stainless steel container. The assumption, that microbes only have an impact on reaction kinetics needs to be reassessed in the case where nitrates and sulphates are present since both are known not to react at low temperatures without bacterial catalysis. The additional impact of both oxy-anions and their reduced species on redox conditions, radionuclide speciation and mobility gives this evaluation their particular relevance. Storage architecture proposes four primary waste containers positioned into armoured cement over packs and placed with others into the waste storage cell itself composed of a cement mantle enforcing the argillite host rock, the latter being characterized by an excavation damaged zone constricted both in space and in time and a pristine part of 60 m thickness. Bacterial activity within the waste and within the pristine argillite is disregarded because of the low water activity (biofilms are within the interface zones. A major restriction for the initial development of microbial colonies is the high pH controlled by the cement solution. Archea are able to survive

  2. Redox active polymers and colloidal particles for flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Cheng, Kevin; Shen, Mei; Lichtenstein, Timothy

    2018-05-29

    The invention provides a redox flow battery comprising a microporous or nanoporous size-exclusion membrane, wherein one cell of the battery contains a redox-active polymer dissolved in the non-aqueous solvent or a redox-active colloidal particle dispersed in the non-aqueous solvent. The redox flow battery provides enhanced ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator and reduced redox-active species crossover, thereby improving the performance and enabling widespread utilization. Redox active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) and redox active colloidal particles (RACs) were prepared and were found to be highly effective redox species. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The high concentration attainable (>2.0 M) for RAPs in common non-aqueous battery solvents, their electrochemical and chemical reversibility, and their hindered transport across porous separators make them attractive materials for non-aqueous redox flow batteries based on size-selectivity.

  3. Redox proteomics of tomato in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmant, Kelly Mayrink; Parker, Jennifer; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mammals with adaptive immunity, plants rely on their innate immunity based on pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) for pathogen defense. Reactive oxygen species, known to play crucial roles in PTI and ETI, can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to changes of redox-sensitive proteins through modification of cysteine sulfhydryl groups. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, little is known about redox proteins and how they function in PTI and ETI. In this study, cysTMT proteomics technology was used to identify similarities and differences of protein redox modifications in tomato resistant (PtoR) and susceptible (prf3) genotypes in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) infection. In addition, the results of the redox changes were compared and corrected with the protein level changes. A total of 90 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, biosynthesis of cysteine, sucrose and brassinosteroid, cell wall biogenesis, polysaccharide/starch biosynthesis, cuticle development, lipid metabolism, proteolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, protein targeting to vacuole, and oxidation–reduction. This inventory of previously unknown protein redox switches in tomato pathogen defense lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the biological significance of protein redox modifications in plant defense responses. PMID:26504582

  4. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  5. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  6. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  7. Redox-flow battery of actinide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Np battery and U battery were developed. We suggested that Np redox-flow battery should be (-)|Np 3+ ,Np 4+ ||NpO 2 + ,NpO 2 2+ |(+), and U battery (-)|[U III T 2 ] - ,[U IV T 2 ] 0 ||[U V O 2 T] - ,[U VI O 2 T] 0 |(+). The electromotive force at 50 % charge of Np and U battery is 1.10 V and 1.04 V, respectively. The energy efficiency of 70 mA/cm 2 of Np and U battery shows 99 % and 98 %, respectively. V redox-flow battery, electrode reactions of An battery, Np battery, U battery and future of U battery are described. The concept of V redox-flow battery, comparison of energy efficiency of Np, U and V battery, oxidation state and ionic species of 3d transition metals and main An, Purbe diagram of Np and U aqueous solution, shift of redox potential of β-diketones by pKa, and specifications of three redox-flow batteries are reported. (S.Y.)

  8. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  9. Redox Reactivity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induces the Formation of Disulfide Bridges in Thiol-Containing Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin-Genetet, Françoise; Seidel, Caroline; Artells, Ester; Auffan, Mélanie; Thiéry, Alain; Vidaud, Claude

    2015-12-21

    The redox state of disulfide bonds is implicated in many redox control systems, such as the cysteine-cystine couple. Among proteins, ubiquitous cysteine-rich metallothioneins possess thiolate metal binding groups susceptible to metal exchange in detoxification processes. CeO2 NPs are commonly used in various industrial applications due to their redox properties. These redox properties that enable dual oxidation states (Ce(IV)/Ce(III)) to exist at their surface may act as oxidants for biomolecules. The interaction among metallothioneins, cysteine, and CeO2 NPs was investigated through various biophysical approaches to shed light on the potential effects of the Ce(4+)/Ce(3+) redox system on the thiol groups of these biomolecules. The possible reaction mechanisms include the formation of a disulfide bridge/Ce(III) complex resulting from the interaction between Ce(IV) and the thiol groups, leading to metal unloading from the MTs, depending on their metal content and cluster type. The formation of stable Ce(3+) disulfide complexes has been demonstrated via their fluorescence properties. This work provides the first evidence of thiol concentration-dependent catalytic oxidation mechanisms between pristine CeO2 NPs and thiol-containing biomolecules.

  10. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances. PMID:26917470

  11. Using a Simultaneous Prompting Procedure to Embed Core Content When Teaching a Potential Employment Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Belva C.; Terrell, Misty; Test, David W.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation used a multiple-probe-across-participants design to examine the effects of using a simultaneous prompting procedure to teach four secondary students with mild intellectual disabilities the employment task of caring for plants in a greenhouse. The instructor also embedded photosynthesis science content as nontargeted information…

  12. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  13. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubol, Simonetta; Silver, Whendee L.; Bellin, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N 2 O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N 2 O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O 2 ) supply, which feeds back on N 2 O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O 2 and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O 2 concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N 2 O, dissolved nitrate (NO 3 − ) and ammonium (NH 4 + ) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O 2 and redox potential. Hot spots of N 2 O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O 2 in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO 3 − reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O 2 and N 2 O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential and N cycling, and suggest that models working at a daily scale need to consider

  14. Information content analysis: the potential for methane isotopologue retrieval from GOSAT-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Edward; Yoshida, Yukio; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric methane is comprised of multiple isotopic molecules, with the most abundant being 12CH4 and 13CH4, making up 98 and 1.1 % of atmospheric methane respectively. It has been shown that is it possible to distinguish between sources of methane (biogenic methane, e.g. marshland, or abiogenic methane, e.g. fracking) via a ratio of these main methane isotopologues, otherwise known as the δ13C value. δ13C values typically range between -10 and -80 ‰, with abiogenic sources closer to zero and biogenic sources showing more negative values. Initially, we suggest that a δ13C difference of 10 ‰ is sufficient, in order to differentiate between methane source types, based on this we derive that a precision of 0.2 ppbv on 13CH4 retrievals may achieve the target δ13C variance. Using an application of the well-established information content analysis (ICA) technique for assumed clear-sky conditions, this paper shows that using a combination of the shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands on the planned Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT-2) mission, 13CH4 can be measured with sufficient information content to a precision of between 0.7 and 1.2 ppbv from a single sounding (assuming a total column average value of 19.14 ppbv), which can then be reduced to the target precision through spatial and temporal averaging techniques. We therefore suggest that GOSAT-2 can be used to differentiate between methane source types. We find that large unconstrained covariance matrices are required in order to achieve sufficient information content, while the solar zenith angle has limited impact on the information content.

  15. Information content analysis: the potential for methane isotopologue retrieval from GOSAT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Malina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric methane is comprised of multiple isotopic molecules, with the most abundant being 12CH4 and 13CH4, making up 98 and 1.1 % of atmospheric methane respectively. It has been shown that is it possible to distinguish between sources of methane (biogenic methane, e.g. marshland, or abiogenic methane, e.g. fracking via a ratio of these main methane isotopologues, otherwise known as the δ13C value. δ13C values typically range between −10 and −80 ‰, with abiogenic sources closer to zero and biogenic sources showing more negative values. Initially, we suggest that a δ13C difference of 10 ‰ is sufficient, in order to differentiate between methane source types, based on this we derive that a precision of 0.2 ppbv on 13CH4 retrievals may achieve the target δ13C variance. Using an application of the well-established information content analysis (ICA technique for assumed clear-sky conditions, this paper shows that using a combination of the shortwave infrared (SWIR bands on the planned Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT-2 mission, 13CH4 can be measured with sufficient information content to a precision of between 0.7 and 1.2 ppbv from a single sounding (assuming a total column average value of 19.14 ppbv, which can then be reduced to the target precision through spatial and temporal averaging techniques. We therefore suggest that GOSAT-2 can be used to differentiate between methane source types. We find that large unconstrained covariance matrices are required in order to achieve sufficient information content, while the solar zenith angle has limited impact on the information content.

  16. Redox-Based Regulation of Bacterial Development and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Abigail J; Kahl, Lisa J; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2017-06-20

    Severe changes in the environmental redox potential, and resulting alterations in the oxidation states of intracellular metabolites and enzymes, have historically been considered negative stressors, requiring responses that are strictly defensive. However, recent work in diverse organisms has revealed that more subtle changes in the intracellular redox state can act as signals, eliciting responses with benefits beyond defense and detoxification. Changes in redox state have been shown to influence or trigger chromosome segregation, sporulation, aerotaxis, and social behaviors, including luminescence as well as biofilm establishment and dispersal. Connections between redox state and complex behavior allow bacteria to link developmental choices with metabolic state and coordinate appropriate responses. Promising future directions for this area of study include metabolomic analysis of species- and condition-dependent changes in metabolite oxidation states and elucidation of the mechanisms whereby the redox state influences circadian regulation.

  17. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  18. Aqueous liquid redox desulfurisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reicher, M.; Niemiec, B.; Katona, T.

    1999-12-01

    The LO-CAT II process is an aqueous liquid redox process which uses ferric and ferrous iron catalysts to oxidise hydrogen sulfide (from sour gas) to elemental sulfur: the relevant chemical equations are given. Chelating agents keep the iron in solution. The system is described under the headings of (i) LO-CAT chemistry, (ii) design parameters, (iii) startup challenges, (iv) present situation and (v) anticipated future conditions. Further improvements to the system are anticipated.

  19. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  20. Total Content of Carotenoids in Corn Landraces and Their Potential Health Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stăncuța Scrob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The research was designed to quantify the carotenoid compounds from the experimental variability of the corn genotypes. The experimental material for the present investigation consisted of 19 corn hybrids from Agricultural Research and Development Station (ARDSTurda, Romania. The experiment was carried out during two seasons 2011 and 2012. Corn hybrids Turda 215, Mold Turda 188, Turda 200, Turda SU 181 and HS 105 were noticed by the fact that in the year of culture 2012, they showed a beginning of accumulation of total content of carotenoids more than 27 µg/g DW as compared to 15 µg/g DW corresponding to the year o culture 2011 due to soil and climate conditions favoring the accumulation of carotenoid compounds. According to our study, the highest concentration of TC was recorded in light yellow, dark yellow and orange hybrids.

  1. Lowering the milk lactose content in vivo: potential interests, strategies and physiological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    Lactose is the major sugar present in milk and an important osmotic regulator of lactation. It is digested by intestinal lactase, an enzyme expressed in new-borns. Its activity declines following weaning. As a result, adult mammals are normally lactose-intolerant and more than 75% of the human adult population suffers from lactase deficiency. A reduction in milk lactose content could be beneficial for nutritional but also agricultural and industrial purposes (less volume to transport, better milk coagulation, less effluent production). Several attempts to create transgenic mice producing milk with modified carbohydrate compositions have recently been described. Depending on whether these modifications resulted from an alteration of lactose synthesis or from lactose hydrolysis, striking physiological differences are observed.

  2. Addiction Potential of Cigarettes With Reduced Nicotine Content in Populations With Psychiatric Disorders and Other Vulnerabilities to Tobacco Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephen T; Heil, Sarah H; Sigmon, Stacey C; Tidey, Jennifer W; Gaalema, Diann E; Hughes, John R; Stitzer, Maxine L; Durand, Hanna; Bunn, Janice Y; Priest, Jeff S; Arger, Christopher A; Miller, Mollie E; Bergeria, Cecilia L; Davis, Danielle R; Streck, Joanna M; Reed, Derek D; Skelly, Joan M; Tursi, Lauren

    2017-10-01

    A national policy is under consideration to reduce the nicotine content of cigarettes to lower nicotine addiction potential in the United States. To examine how smokers with psychiatric disorders and other vulnerabilities to tobacco addiction respond to cigarettes with reduced nicotine content. A multisite, double-blind, within-participant assessment of acute response to research cigarettes with nicotine content ranging from levels below a hypothesized addiction threshold to those representative of commercial cigarettes (0.4, 2.3, 5.2, and 15.8 mg/g of tobacco) at 3 academic sites included 169 daily smokers from the following 3 vulnerable populations: individuals with affective disorders (n = 56) or opioid dependence (n = 60) and socioeconomically disadvantaged women (n = 53). Data were collected from March 23, 2015, through April 25, 2016. After a brief smoking abstinence, participants were exposed to the cigarettes with varying nicotine doses across fourteen 2- to 4-hour outpatient sessions. Addiction potential of the cigarettes was assessed using concurrent choice testing, the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT), and validated measures of subjective effects, such as the Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale. Among the 169 daily smokers included in the analysis (120 women [71.0%] and 49 men [29.0%]; mean [SD] age, 35.6 [11.4] years), reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes decreased the relative reinforcing effects of smoking in all 3 populations. Across populations, the 0.4-mg/g dose was chosen significantly less than the 15.8-mg/g dose in concurrent choice testing (mean [SEM] 30% [0.04%] vs 70% [0.04%]; Cohen d = 0.40; P vulnerable to tobacco addiction. Smokers with psychiatric conditions and socioeconomic disadvantage are more addicted and less likely to quit and experience greater adverse health impacts. Policies to reduce these disparities are needed; reducing the nicotine content in cigarettes should be a policy focus.

  3. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  4. Nitric oxide-releasing prodrug triggers cancer cell death through deregulation of cellular redox balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Maciag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available JS-K is a nitric oxide (NO-releasing prodrug of the O2-arylated diazeniumdiolate family that has demonstrated pronounced cytotoxicity and antitumor properties in a variety of cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. The current study of the metabolic actions of JS-K was undertaken to investigate mechanisms of its cytotoxicity. Consistent with model chemical reactions, the activating step in the metabolism of JS-K in the cell is the dearylation of the diazeniumdiolate by glutathione (GSH via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The resulting product (CEP/NO anion spontaneously hydrolyzes, releasing two equivalents of NO. The GSH/GSSG redox couple is considered to be the major redox buffer of the cell, helping maintain a reducing environment under basal conditions. We have quantified the effects of JS-K on cellular GSH content, and show that JS-K markedly depletes GSH, due to JS-K's rapid uptake and cascading release of NO and reactive nitrogen species. The depletion of GSH results in alterations in the redox potential of the cellular environment, initiating MAPK stress signaling pathways, and inducing apoptosis. Microarray analysis confirmed signaling gene changes at the transcriptional level and revealed alteration in the expression of several genes crucial for maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis, as well as cell proliferation and survival, including MYC. Pre-treating cells with the known GSH precursor and nucleophilic reducing agent N-acetylcysteine prevented the signaling events that lead to apoptosis. These data indicate that multiplicative depletion of the reduced glutathione pool and deregulation of intracellular redox balance are important initial steps in the mechanism of JS-K's cytotoxic action.

  5. The reactive content of the proton-nucleus impulse - approximation Dirac optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.V.; Isidro Filho, M.P.; Hussein, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The total reaction cross sections for intermediate energy proton scattering on 40 Ca and 208 Pb are calculated within the Dirac-Eikonal formalism. Comparison with data indicate that the recently proposed impulse-approximation Dirac optical potential for nucleon-nucleus scattering, is not absorptive enough. (Author) [pt

  6. The potential of a high protein-low carbohydrate diet to preserve intrahepatic triglyceride content in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Eveline A; Gatta-Cherifi, Blandine; Gonnissen, Hanne K; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2014-01-01

    Protein supplementation has been shown to reduce the increases in intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content induced by acute hypercaloric high-fat and high-fructose diets in humans. To assess the effect of a 12-wk iso-energetic high protein-low carbohydrate (HPLC) diet compared with an iso-energetic high carbohydrate-low protein (HCLP) diet on IHTG content in healthy non-obese subjects, at a constant body weight. Seven men and nine women [mean ± SD age: 24 ± 5 y; BMI: 22.9 ± 2.1 kg/m2] were randomly allocated to a HPLC [30/35/35% of energy (En%) from protein/carbohydrate/fat] or a HCLP (5/60/35 En%) diet by stratification on sex, age and BMI. Dietary guidelines were prescribed based on individual daily energy requirements. IHTG content was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after the dietary intervention. IHTG content changed in different directions with the HPLC (CH2H2O: 0.23 ± 0.17 to 0.20 ± 0.10; IHTG%: 0.25 ± 0.20% to 0.22 ± 0.11%) compared with the HCLP diet (CH2H2O: 0.34 ± 0.20 vs. 0.38 ± 0.21; IHTG%: 0.38 ± 0.22% vs. 0.43 ± 0.24%), which resulted in a lower IHTG content in the HPLC compared with the HCLP diet group after 12 weeks, which almost reached statistical significance (P = 0.055). A HPLC vs. a HCLP diet has the potential to preserve vs. enlarge IHTG content in healthy non-obese subjects at a constant body weight. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01551238.

  7. The potential of a high protein-low carbohydrate diet to preserve intrahepatic triglyceride content in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline A Martens

    Full Text Available Protein supplementation has been shown to reduce the increases in intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG content induced by acute hypercaloric high-fat and high-fructose diets in humans.To assess the effect of a 12-wk iso-energetic high protein-low carbohydrate (HPLC diet compared with an iso-energetic high carbohydrate-low protein (HCLP diet on IHTG content in healthy non-obese subjects, at a constant body weight.Seven men and nine women [mean ± SD age: 24 ± 5 y; BMI: 22.9 ± 2.1 kg/m2] were randomly allocated to a HPLC [30/35/35% of energy (En% from protein/carbohydrate/fat] or a HCLP (5/60/35 En% diet by stratification on sex, age and BMI. Dietary guidelines were prescribed based on individual daily energy requirements. IHTG content was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after the dietary intervention.IHTG content changed in different directions with the HPLC (CH2H2O: 0.23 ± 0.17 to 0.20 ± 0.10; IHTG%: 0.25 ± 0.20% to 0.22 ± 0.11% compared with the HCLP diet (CH2H2O: 0.34 ± 0.20 vs. 0.38 ± 0.21; IHTG%: 0.38 ± 0.22% vs. 0.43 ± 0.24%, which resulted in a lower IHTG content in the HPLC compared with the HCLP diet group after 12 weeks, which almost reached statistical significance (P = 0.055.A HPLC vs. a HCLP diet has the potential to preserve vs. enlarge IHTG content in healthy non-obese subjects at a constant body weight.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01551238.

  8. Potential risk and sodium content of children's ready-to-eat foods distributed at major amusement parks in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N-Y; Park, S-Y; Lee, Y-M; Choi, S-Y; Jeong, S-H; Chung, M-S; Chang, Y-S; Choi, S-H; Bae, D-H; Ha, S-D

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to help better understand the current sodium intake of Korean children and to establish children's good eating habits through investigation of the sodium content of ready-to-eat foods collected from nine major amusement parks in Korea. The sodium content of a total of 322 products was analysed by using ICP and then the potential risk based on the recommended daily intake of sodium as described in the Korean dietary reference intakes was determined. The results showed that sodium content was the lowest in muffins (245 mg/100 g) and the highest in seasoned dried filefish (1825 mg/100 g). The average amounts of sodium per serving of seasoned dried filefish, tteokbokki and fish paste were 1150, 1248 and 1097 mg, respectively. The values were above 50% of the daily intake of sodium recommended by the Korean dietary reference intake. The ready-to-eat foods were also classified into high, medium and low sodium content on the basis of standards recommended by the Korean Food and Drug Administration. Most snacks were classified as high sodium foods because they exceeded "300 mg (84.5% of the total daily allowance)". Furthermore, the meal substitution foods such as kimbab, tteokbokki, mandus, sandwiches and hamburgers exceeded "600 mg (90.3% of the total daily allowance)" and were also classified as high sodium foods. In addition, ready-to-eat foods in amusement parks are similar to foods eaten on streets and foods around school zones, which contain high sodium content; thus, the intake frequency might be high, which would induce high risk to children health. Koreans already consume a high amount of sodium daily via their usual diets. So, the sodium content in snacks and substitution foods needs to be reduced. Consequently, this study noted that parents and guardians should carefully consider their children's consumption of ready-to-eat foods from Korean amusement parks.

  9. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayer, A.; Fellermeier, S.; Fife, C.; Li, S.S.; Smits, G.; Meyer, A.J.; Dawes, I.W.; Perrone, G.G.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a

  10. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, V.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  11. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C.; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart, E-mail: s.t.wagland@cranfield.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Samples from multiple core drills were obtained from 4× landfill sites in the UK. • Each sample analysed for rare earth elements, critical metals and valuable metals. • Two stage microwave digestion method ensuring high yield. • High quantities of copper and aluminium were observed in the soil layers of landfill. • Across 4× landfills aluminium and copper present has a value of around $400 million. - Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58 ± 6 mg kg{sup −1} for REEs comprising 44 ± 8 mg kg{sup −1} for light REEs, 11 ± 2 mg kg{sup −1} for heavy REEs and 3 ± 1 mg kg{sup −1} for Scandium (Sc) and 3 ± 1.0 mg kg{sup −1} of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are

  12. Long-term potentiation expands information content of hippocampal dentate gyrus synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromer, Cailey; Bartol, Thomas M; Bowden, Jared B; Hubbard, Dusten D; Hanka, Dakota C; Gonzalez, Paola V; Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Parker, Patrick H; Abraham, Wickliffe C; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Harris, Kristen M

    2018-03-06

    An approach combining signal detection theory and precise 3D reconstructions from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM) was used to investigate synaptic plasticity and information storage capacity at medial perforant path synapses in adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in vivo. Induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) markedly increased the frequencies of both small and large spines measured 30 minutes later. This bidirectional expansion resulted in heterosynaptic counterbalancing of total synaptic area per unit length of granule cell dendrite. Control hemispheres exhibited 6.5 distinct spine sizes for 2.7 bits of storage capacity while LTP resulted in 12.9 distinct spine sizes (3.7 bits). In contrast, control hippocampal CA1 synapses exhibited 4.7 bits with much greater synaptic precision than either control or potentiated dentate gyrus synapses. Thus, synaptic plasticity altered total capacity, yet hippocampal subregions differed dramatically in their synaptic information storage capacity, reflecting their diverse functions and activation histories.

  13. Potential of microalgae in the bioremediation of water with chloride content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, M E; Vélez, Y H; Rendón, L; Alzate, E

    2017-10-23

    In this work it was carried out the bioremediation of water containing chlorides with native microalgae (MCA) provided by the Centre for study and research in biotechnology (CIBIOT) at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. Microalgae presented an adaptation to the water and so the conditions evaluated reaching a production of CO2 in mg L-1 of 53.0, 26.6, 56.0, 16.0 and 30.0 and chloride removal efficiencies of 16.37, 26.03, 40.04, 25.96 and 20.25% for microalgae1, microalgae2, microalgae3, microalgae4 and microalgae5 respectively. Water bioremediation process was carried out with content of chlorides in fed batch system with an initial concentration of chlorides of 20585 mg L-1 every 2 days. The Manipulated variables were: the flow of MCA3 (10% inoculum) for test one; NPK flow for test two, and flow of flow of MCA3+0.5 g L-1 NPK. Chloride removal efficiencies were 66.88%, 63.41% and 66.98% for test one, two and three respectively, for a total bioprocess time of 55 days.

  14. Potential of microalgae in the bioremediation of water with chloride content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Ramírez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work it was carried out the bioremediation of water containing chlorides with native microalgae (MCA provided by the Centre for study and research in biotechnology (CIBIOT at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. Microalgae presented an adaptation to the water and so the conditions evaluated reaching a production of CO2 in mg L-1 of 53.0, 26.6, 56.0, 16.0 and 30.0 and chloride removal efficiencies of 16.37, 26.03, 40.04, 25.96 and 20.25% for microalgae1, microalgae2, microalgae3, microalgae4 and microalgae5 respectively. Water bioremediation process was carried out with content of chlorides in fed batch system with an initial concentration of chlorides of 20585 mg L-1 every 2 days. The Manipulated variables were: the flow of MCA3 (10% inoculum for test one; NPK flow for test two, and flow of flow of MCA3+0.5 g L-1 NPK. Chloride removal efficiencies were 66.88%, 63.41% and 66.98% for test one, two and three respectively, for a total bioprocess time of 55 days.

  15. Lipid content and composition of oocytes from five coral species: potential implications for future cryopreservation efforts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiahsin Lin

    Full Text Available Given the previously documented importance of lipid concentration and composition in the successful cryopreservation of gorgonian corals, these parameters were assessed in oocytes of five species of scleractinian coral; Platygyra daedalea, Echinopora gemmacea, Echinophyllia aspera, Oxypora lacera and Astreopora expansa. Wax esters, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and fatty acids were all measured at detectable levels, and the latter were produced at significantly elevated quantities in E. gemmacea, E. aspera, and O. lacera. On the other hand, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and wax ester were found at significantly higher concentrations in A. expansa oocytes. Triacylglycerol was not present in any species. Interestingly, the total lipid content of oocytes from all five scleractinians was significantly lower than that of oocytes of two gorgonian species, Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis. As higher total lipid concentrations may be correlated with greater degrees of cellular membrane fluidity at lower temperatures, it stands to reason that gorgonian coral oocytes may be more likely to survive the cryopreservation process than oocytes of scleractinian corals.

  16. Facile synthesis of cellulose-based carbon with tunable N content for potential supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehong; Peng, Xinwen; Zhang, Xiaoting; Jing, Shuangshuang; Zhong, Linxin; Sun, Runcang

    2017-08-15

    Producing hierarchical porous N-doped carbon from renewable biomass is an essential and sustainable way for future electrochemical energy storage. Herein we cost-efficiently synthesized N-doped porous carbon from renewable cellulose by using urea as a low-cost N source, without any activation process. The as-prepared N-doped porous carbon (N-doped PC) had a hierarchical porous structure with abundant macropores, mesopores and micropores. The doping N resulted in more disordered structure, and the doping N content in N-doped PC could be easily tunable (0.68-7.64%). The doping N functionalities could significantly improve the supercapacitance of porous carbon, and even a little amount of doping N (e.g. 0.68%) could remarkably improve the supercapacitance. The as-prepared N-doped PC with a specific surface area of 471.7m 2 g -1 exhibited a high specific capacitance of 193Fg -1 and a better rate capability, as well as an outstanding cycling stability with a capacitance retention of 107% after 5000 cycles. Moreover, the N-doped porous carbon had a high energy density of 17.1Whkg -1 at a power density of 400Wkg -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-01-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power...

  18. Redox processes in radiation biology and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Free-radical intermediates, particularly the activated oxygen species OH, O - 2 , and 1 O 2 , are implicated in many types of radiation damage to biological systems. In addition, these same species may be formed, either directly or indirectly through biochemical redox reactions, in both essential and aberrant metabolic processes. Cell survival and adaptation to an environment containing ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical carcinogens ultimately depend upon the cell's ability to maintain optimal function in response to free-radical damage at the chemical level. Many of these feedback control mechanisms are redox controlled. Radiation chemical techniques using selective radical scavengers, such as product analysis and pulse radiolysis, enable us to generate, observe, and characterize individually the nature and reactivity of potentially damaging free radicals. From an analysis of the chemical kinetics of free-radical involvement in biological damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, its protection and sensitization, and the role of free radicals in radiation and chemical carcinogenesis

  19. Evaluation of the Histamine Content and Potential Toxicity of Some of Consumable food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zarei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background & aim: Consuming high amounts of histamine with food causes histamine poisoning among its consumers. Much information about the content of histamine in various food products is not available in the country. In the present study, the amount of histamine in food samples consumed in human diet which are based on existing data sources can contain histamine were measured. Methods: In the present study, 240 samples of 16 different types of food consumed in the human diet were examined. Histamine was extracted with 75 % ethanol- 0.4 N HCl in fresh and canned fish samples and extracted in other samples with  0.1 N HCl. After passing the extracts through ion exchange chromatography, the fluorescence derivative of histamine which was generated by O-phthaldialdehyde and the amount of fluorescent light was measured at excitation wavelength of 350 nm and emission wavelength of 444 nm respectively. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Spinach, fresh fish, canned fish and aubergine samples showed the high level of histamine with the mean levels of 5.04, 3.83, 2.77 and 2.64 mg/100g respectively. All samples tested contains histamine but 53.3, 20.0, 13.3 and 13.3 percent of the samples of these foods contains higher amounts histamine (5mg/100gr  respectively.Low levels of histamine was observed in a number of samples including tomato, pickles, nuts, bananas, oranges, melons, cheese, curd, yogurt and dough but no detectable histamine was found  olive and tea. Conclusion: In addition to confirming the fact that fish and seafood products have a high risk of histamine poisoning, but it showed that the risk of histamine poisoning in humans after consumption of fish and its products will not be less than spinach and aubergine.

  20. Ciprofloxacin provokes SOS-dependent changes in respiration and membrane potential and causes alterations in the redox status of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Galina V; Tyulenev, Aleksey V; Muzyka, Nadezda G; Peters, Mikhail A; Oktyabrsky, Oleg N

    2017-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of the physiological response of bacteria to antibiotic-induced stress is needed for development of new approaches to combatting microbial infections. Fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin causes phase alterations in Escherichia coli respiration and membrane potential that strongly depend on its concentration. Concentrations lower than the optimal bactericidal concentration (OBC) do not inhibit respiration during the first phase. A dose higher than the OBC provokes immediate SOS-independent inhibition of respiration and growth that can contribute to a decreased SOS response and lowered susceptibility to high concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Cells retain their metabolic activity, membrane potential and accelerated K + uptake and produce low levels of superoxide and H 2 O 2 during the first phase. The time before initiation of the second phase is inversely correlated with the ciprofloxacin concentration. The second phase is SOS-dependent and characterized by respiratory inhibition, membrane depolarization, K + and glutathione leakage and cessation of glucose consumption and may be considered as cell death. atpA, gshA and kefBkefC knockouts, which perturb fluxes of protons and K + , can modify the degree and duration of respiratory inhibition and potassium retention. Loss of K + efflux channels KefB and KefC enhances the susceptibility of E. coli to ciprofloxacin. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissociating the Influence of Affective Word Content and Cognitive Processing Demands on the Late Positive Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowparast Rostami, Hadiseh; Ouyang, Guang; Bayer, Mareike; Schacht, Annekathrin; Zhou, Changsong; Sommer, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The late positive potential (LPP) elicited by affective stimuli in the event-related brain potential (ERP) is often assumed to be a member of the P3 family. The present study addresses the relationship of the LPP to the classic P3b in a published data set, using a non-parametric permutation test for topographical comparisons, and residue iteration decomposition to assess the temporal features of the LPP and the P3b by decomposing the ERP into several component clusters according to their latency variability. The experiment orthogonally manipulated arousal and valence of words, which were either read or judged for lexicality. High-arousing and positive valenced words induced a larger LPP than low-arousing and negative valenced words, respectively, and the LDT elicited a larger P3b than reading. The experimental manipulation of arousal, valence, and task yielded main effects without any interactions on ERP amplitude in the LPP/P3b time range. The arousal and valence effects partially differed from the task effect in scalp topography; in addition, whereas the late positive component elicited by affective stimuli, defined as LPP, was stimulus-locked, the late positive component elicited by task demand, defined as P3b, was mainly latency-variable. Therefore LPP and P3b manifest different subcomponents.

  2. Study to establish cost projections for production of Redox chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. F.; Greco, C. C.; Rusinko, R. N.; Wadsworth, A. L., III

    1982-01-01

    A cost study of four proposed manufacturing processes for redox chemicals for the NASA REDOX Energy Storage System yielded favorable selling prices in the range $0.99 to $1.91/kg of chromic chloride, anhydrous basis, including ferrous chloride. The prices corresponded to specific energy storage costs from under $9 to $17/kWh. A refined and expanded cost analysis of the most favored process yielded a price estimate corresponding to a storage cost of $11/kWh. The findings supported the potential economic viability of the NASA REDOX system.

  3. Phorbol esters seed content and distribution in Latin American provenances of Jatropha curcas L.: potential for biopesticide, food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueso, Francisco; Sosa, Italo; Chun, Roldan; Pineda, Renan

    2016-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Jatropha) is believed to have originated from Mexico and Central America. So far, characterization efforts have focused on Asia, Africa and Mexico. Non-toxic, low phorbol ester (PE) varieties have been found only in Mexico. Differences in PE content in seeds and its structural components, crude oil and cake from Jatropha provenances cultivated in Central and South America were evaluated. Seeds were dehulled, and kernels were separated into tegmen, cotyledons and embryo for PE quantitation by RP-HPLC. Crude oil and cake PE content was also measured. No phenotypic departures in seed size and structure were observed among Jatropha cultivated in Central and South America compared to provenances from Mexico, Asia and Africa. Cotyledons comprised 96.2-97.5 %, tegmen 1.6-2.4 % and embryo represented 0.9-1.4 % of dehulled kernel. Total PE content of all nine provenances categorized them as toxic. Significant differences in kernel PE content were observed among provenances from Mexico, Central and South America (P 95 % of PEs concentrated in cotyledons, 0.5-3 % in the tegmen and 0.5-1 % in the embryo. Over 60 % of total PE in dehulled kernels accumulated in the crude oil, while 35-40 % remained in the cake after extraction. Low phenotypic variability in seed physical, structural traits and PE content was observed among provenances from Latin America. Very high-PE provenances with potential as biopesticide were found in Central America. No PE-free, edible Jatropha was found among provenances currently cultivated in Central America and Brazil that could be used for human consumption and feedstock. Furthermore, dehulled kernel structural parts as well as its crude oil and cake contained toxic PE levels.

  4. Changes in sedimentary redox associated with mussel (Mytilus edulis L. farms on the west-coast of Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Wilding

    Full Text Available Aquaculture is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. Mussel (family Mytilidae production has doubled over the last decade and currently stands at 1.5 million tones production per annum. Mussels produce organic biodeposits which are dispersed around the production site and, potentially, impact the receiving environment in a number of inter-linked ways. The reported benthic impacts that occur, primarily through the accumulation of these biodeposits and associated organic enrichment, vary widely between studies. The objectives of this research were to determine the nature of the relationship between sediment redox (a proxy for oxygenation and farm-proximity and covariables whilst accounting for, and quantifying, differences in redox between sites. Sediment cores (N = 159 were taken remotely around a random sample of mussel farms, redox was measured at 10 mm sediment depth and linked to farm-distance and sediment organic/shell content and particle size, using an additive, mixed, weighted regression model. Redox varied considerably between sites and there was a highly significant reduction (50 mV in redox adjacent to the mussel lines. Redox increased non-linearly with distance, rising rapidly at >7 m from the farm edge. The modest reduction in sediment oxygenation in close proximity to mussel farms reported here suggests that farms located over sediments characterised by pre-existing oxygen stress are likely to exacerbate benthic species impoverishment associated with reducing sedimentary conditions whilst those located over highly oxygenated sediments are likely to increase benthic productivity.

  5. Television advertising of foodstuffs potentially detrimental to oral health--a content analysis and comparison of children's and primetime broadcasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnutt, I G; Ashraf, F J

    2002-06-01

    The study aimed to examine the nature, content and duration of advertisements broadcast during children's television; determine the proportion of advertisements promoting food; identify the potential of the food advertised to be detrimental to oral health; and to compare the nature and content of advertisements aimed at children with those transmitted during evening 'primetime' television. Children's and primetime television, broadcast on a main independent terrestrial channel in South Wales were video recorded, 237 and 42 hours being analysed in total. Analysis of the recording resulted in a total of 3,236 commercials, of which 2,345 were broadcast during children's television and 891 in primetime. During children's TV, 62.5% of advertising time was devoted to foodstuffs, significantly greater (Padvertising foods during primetime. Of the time spent advertising foods, during children's television 73.4% was devoted to products deemed potentially detrimental to oral health (primarily high in sugar), compared to 18.6% similarly categorised during evening television. Commercials for products which have the potential to adversely affect oral health constitute a large proportion of advertising time during children's television. Current codes of the Independent Television Commission governing advertising directed at children should be reviewed.

  6. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic potential of respirable bentonite particles with different quartz contents and chemical modifications in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geh, Stefan; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Dopp, Elke [University Hospital, Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Essen (Germany); Yuecel, Raif [University Hospital, Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), Essen (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Edinburgh, ELEGI COLT Lab, Scotland (United Kingdom); Albrecht, Catrin; Borm, Paul J.A. [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); Armbruster, Lorenz [Verein fuer Technische Sicherheit und Umweltschutz e.V., Gotha (Germany); Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bruening, Thomas [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, Eik [University of Rostock, Institute of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biosystems Technology, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Considering the biological reactivity of pure quartz in lung cells, there is a strong interest to clarify the cellular effects of respirable siliceous dusts, like bentonites. In the present study, we investigated the cellular uptake and the cytotoxic potential of bentonite particles (Oe< 10 {mu}m) with an {alpha}-quartz content of up to 6% and different chemical modifications (activation: alkaline, acidic, organic) in human lung fibroblasts (IMR90). Additionally, the ability of the particles to induce apoptosis in IMR90-cells and the hemolytic activity was tested. All bentonite samples were tested for endotoxins with the in vitro-Pyrogen test and were found to be negative. Cellular uptake of particles by IMR90-cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was analyzed in IMR90-cells by determination of viable cells using flow cytometry and by measuring of the cell respiratory activity. Induced apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/Propidiumiodide-staining and gel electrophoresis. Our results demonstrate that activated bentonite particles are better taken up by IMR90-cells than untreated (native) bentonite particles. Also, activated bentonite particles with a quartz content of 5-6% were more cytotoxic than untreated bentonites or bentonites with a quartz content lower than 4%. The bentonite samples induced necrotic as well as apoptotic cell death. In general, bentonites showed a high membrane-damaging potential shown as hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. We conclude that cellular effects of bentonite particles in human lung cells are enhanced after chemical treatment of the particles. The cytotoxic potential of the different bentonites is primarily characterized by a strong lysis of the cell membrane. (orig.)

  7. Facebook as communication support for persons with potential mild acquired cognitive impairment: A content and social network analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghdam, Aboozar; Hamidi, Ulrika; Bartfai, Aniko; Koch, Sabine

    2018-01-01

    Social media has the potential to increase social participation and support for the well-being of individuals with chronic medical conditions. To date, Facebook is the most popular social medium for different types of communication. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the potential use of Facebook as a means of communication for persons with potential Mild Acquired Cognitive Impairment (MACI), a non-progressive mild cognitive impairment after an acquired brain injury. The aim of this study was to explore how persons with potential MACI, specifically persons with perceived brain fatigue after brain injury, communicate through Facebook, to classify the content of the communication and to visualize the frequency and types of interactions. A social network analysis of the interactions between members' and a qualitative content analysis of a whole year's communication of a public Facebook group for Swedish speaking persons (1310 members) with perceived brain fatigue after an illness or injury to the brain were performed. The results showed how members use social media technology and Facebook as a means for communication and support for their condition. Individual group members showed very different patterns of communication and interactions. However, for the group as a whole, the most frequent topics in their communication were related to informational support and banter in posts, and socialization in comments. The findings also showed that the majority of members only communicated with few other members and had few direct communications. The most used communication feature of Facebook was likes in form of "thumbs-up". This study indicated that social media and in this case Facebook is used for communication and social support by persons with potential MACI, and revealed that their communication behavior is similar to the healthy population. Further studies relating specific cognitive problems of the participants to the use of social media would provide more

  8. Facebook as communication support for persons with potential mild acquired cognitive impairment: A content and social network analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Ulrika; Bartfai, Aniko; Koch, Sabine

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Social media has the potential to increase social participation and support for the well-being of individuals with chronic medical conditions. To date, Facebook is the most popular social medium for different types of communication. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the potential use of Facebook as a means of communication for persons with potential Mild Acquired Cognitive Impairment (MACI), a non-progressive mild cognitive impairment after an acquired brain injury. The aim of this study was to explore how persons with potential MACI, specifically persons with perceived brain fatigue after brain injury, communicate through Facebook, to classify the content of the communication and to visualize the frequency and types of interactions. Methods and materials A social network analysis of the interactions between members’ and a qualitative content analysis of a whole year’s communication of a public Facebook group for Swedish speaking persons (1310 members) with perceived brain fatigue after an illness or injury to the brain were performed. Results The results showed how members use social media technology and Facebook as a means for communication and support for their condition. Individual group members showed very different patterns of communication and interactions. However, for the group as a whole, the most frequent topics in their communication were related to informational support and banter in posts, and socialization in comments. The findings also showed that the majority of members only communicated with few other members and had few direct communications. The most used communication feature of Facebook was likes in form of “thumbs-up”. Conclusions This study indicated that social media and in this case Facebook is used for communication and social support by persons with potential MACI, and revealed that their communication behavior is similar to the healthy population. Further studies relating specific cognitive problems of the

  9. Redox imbalance and mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Although the lung is one of the least studied organs in diabetes, increasing evidence indicates that it is an inevitable target of diabetic complications. Nevertheless, the underlying biochemical mechanisms of lung injury in diabetes remain largely unexplored. Given that redox imbalance, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic tissue injury, we set out to investigate mechanisms of lung injury in diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate NADH/NAD + redox status, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung. Using STZ induced diabetes in rat as a model, we measured redox-imbalance related parameters including aldose reductase activity, level of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PAPR-1), NAD + content, NADPH content, reduced form of glutathione (GSH), and glucose 6-phophate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. For assessment of mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung, we measured the activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I to IV and complex V as well as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) content and activity. We also measured the protein content of NAD + dependent enzymes such as sirtuin3 (sirt3) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Our results demonstrate that NADH/NAD + redox imbalance occurs in the diabetic lung. This redox imbalance upregulates the activities of complexes I to IV, but not complex V; and this upregulation is likely the source of increased mitochondrial ROS production, oxidative stress, and cell death in the diabetic lung. These results, together with the findings that the protein contents of DLDH, sirt3, and NQO1 all are decreased in the diabetic lung, demonstrate that redox imbalance, mitochondrial abnormality, and oxidative stress contribute to lung injury in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Metal contents in common edible fish species and evaluation of potential health risks to consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa Farag Soliman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a health risk assessment of some heavy metals attributed to consumption of common edible fish species available for consumers. Methods: Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn were determined in muscles, gills, livers, bones and skins of six common edible fish species, namely Oreochromis niloticus, Mugil cephalus, Sardinella aurita, Mullus barbatus, Boops boops, Pagrus pagrus. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer and expressed as µg/g of wet tissue. Results: Results showed that iron and zinc were the most abundant among all fish tissues under investigation. The data obtained in the present work were compared well with the counterpart data reported internationally. The estimated values of all metals in muscles of fish in this study were below the permissible limits. Moreover, the potential health risks of metals to human via consumption of seafood were assessed by estimating daily intake and target heath quotient. Generally, risk values for the measured metals do not pose unacceptable risks at mean ingestion rate for muscles. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the investigated metals in edible parts of the examined species have no health problems for consumers.

  11. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  12. Therapeutic Potential of a Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor FG-4592 for Parkinson’s Diseases in Vitro and in Vivo: Regulation of Redox Biology and Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular responses to hypoxia, Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. HIF-1α is normally degraded through ubiquitination after hydroxylation by prolyl hydroxylases (PHD. Emerging evidence has suggested that HIF PHD inhibitors (HIF-PHI may have neuroprotective effects on PD through increasing HIF-1α levels. However, the therapeutic benefit of HIF-PHI for PD remains poorly explored due to the lack of proper clinical compounds and understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we examined the therapeutic benefit of a new HIF-PHI, FG-4592, which is currently in phase 3 clinical trials to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD in PD models. FG-4592 attenuates MPP+ -induced apoptosis and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH in SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with FG-4592 mitigates MPP+-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and ATP. Furthermore, FG-4592 counterbalances the oxidative stress through up-regulating nuclear factor erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf-2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2. FG-4592 treatment also induces the expression of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α through increasing the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. In MPTP-treated mice, FG-4592 protects against MPTP-induced loss of TH-positive neurons of substantia nigra and attenuates behavioral impairments. Collectively, our study demonstrates that FG-4592 is a promising therapeutic strategy for PD through improving the mitochondrial function under oxidative stress.

  13. In vitro evaluation of the antioxidant potential, phenolic and flavonoid contents of the stem bark ethanol extract of Anogeissus leiocarpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugbami, J O; Gbadegesin, M A; Odunola, O A

    2014-09-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants with free radical scavenging activities can be relevant as chemopreventive agents against the numerous diseases associated with free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Some phytoconstituents possess antioxidant activities in biological systems. On this basis, we evaluated the antioxidant potential, and determined the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the e thanol e xtract of the s tem bark of A nogeissus l eiocarpus [ EESAL ]. Antioxidant assays carried out include: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, phosphomolybdate, β-carotene bleaching, ferric reducing, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities. Results of DPPH assay showed no significant difference ( p antioxidant capacity of 190.00 ± 70.53 µg butylated hydroxytoluene equivalents [BHTE]/mg dry extract, while β-carotene bleaching assay gave percent antioxidant activities of both EESAL and BHT as 81.46±1.62 and 80.90±1.39 respectively. Ferric reducing abilities of both EESAL and ascorbic acid increased in a concentration-dependent manner with EESAL displaying a significantly ( p concentration with no significant difference at the highest concentration. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of EESAL were obtained as 608.10 ± 2.12 µg GAE/mg and 78.96 ± 3.37 µg QE/mg respectively. Taken together, the free radical scavenging and antioxidant activity of EESAL is likely due to its high phenolic content with complementary effects of the flavonoid components.

  14. An index for estimating the potential impact on the environment of the pollutant content in aquatic populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar RAVERA

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The so-called "Concentration factor" (C.F. should express a direct positive relationship between the concentration of a pollutant (e.g. metals, radioisotopes in an organism and the concentration of the same pollutant in the water. While this index is very useful in some cases, it cannot give any information on the influence of the biota on its environment, an important topic in research on biogeochemical cycles. A new index (the Influence index has consequently been developed to quantify the potential influence of the pollutant content in the population biomass on the habitat in which the population lives. The value of this index is calculated as the ratio between the pollutant content in the population biomass per sediment surface unit (e.g. m2 and the concentration of the same pollutant in the water, and is expressed as water volume with the same pollutant concentration as in the water of the population habitat. The value increases with the increase of the pollutant content in the population biomass and the decrease of the pollutant concentration in the water. As an example, some applications of the index to heavy metal contaminations of a freshwater mussel (Unio pictorum mancus population are described.

  15. Problems in Teaching the Topic of Redox Reactions: Actions and Conceptions of Chemistry Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Onno; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of problems that can occur when teaching the topic of redox reactions to grade-11 students. Concludes that the teachers' scientific expertise is an important source of difficulties when teaching redox reactions. Discusses implications for improvement of current chemistry classroom practice and content-related teacher…

  16. Unusual thiol-based redox metabolism of parasitic flukes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Timir; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-08-01

    Parasitic flukes are exposed to free radicals and, to a greater extent, reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their life cycle. Despite being relentlessly exposed to ROS released by activated immune cells, these parasites can survive for many years in the host. Cellular thiol-based redox metabolism plays a crucial role in parasite survival within their hosts. Evidence shows that oxidative stress and redox homeostasis maintenance are important clinical and pathobiochemical as well as effective therapeutic principles in various diseases. The characterization of redox and antioxidant enzymes is likely to yield good target candidates for novel drugs and vaccines. The absence of active catalase in fluke parasites offers great potential for the development of chemotherapeutic agents that act by perturbing the redox equilibrium of the cell. One of the redox-sensitive enzymes, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), has been accepted as a drug target against blood fluke infections, and related clinical trials are in progress. TGR is the sole enzyme responsible for Trx and GSH reduction in parasitic flukes. The availability of helminth genomes has accelerated the research on redox metabolism of flukes; however, significant achievements have yet to be attained. The present review summarizes current knowledge on the redox and antioxidant system of the parasitic flukes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of emotional content on brain activation and the late positive potential in a word n-back task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Kopf

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is mounting evidence for the influence of emotional content on working memory performance. This is particularly important in light of the emotion processing that needs to take place when emotional content interferes with executive functions. In this study, we used emotional words of different valence but with similar arousal levels in an n-back task. METHODS: We examined the effects on activation in the prefrontal cortex by means of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and on the late positive potential (LPP. FNIRS and LPP data were examined in 30 healthy subjects. RESULTS: BEHAVIORAL RESULTS SHOW AN INFLUENCE OF VALENCE ON THE ERROR RATE DEPENDING ON THE DIFFICULTY OF THE TASK: more errors were made when the valence was negative and the task difficult. Brain activation was dependent both on the difficulty of the task and on the valence: negative valence of a word diminished the increase in activation, whereas positive valence did not influence the increase in activation, while difficulty levels increased. The LPP also differentiated between the different valences, and in addition was influenced by the task difficulty, the more difficult the task, the less differentiation could be observed. CONCLUSIONS: Summarized, this study shows the influence of valence on a verbal working memory task. When a word contained a negative valence, the emotional content seemed to take precedence in contrast to words containing a positive valence. Working memory and emotion processing sites seemed to overlap and compete for resources even when words are carriers of the emotional content.

  18. Control by substrate of the cytochrome p450-dependent redox machinery: mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavica, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Based on initial studies with bacterial CYP101A1, a popular concept emerged predicting that substrate-induced low-to-high spin conversion of P450s is universally associated with shifts of the midpoint potential to a more positive value to maximize rates of electron transfer and metabolic turnover. However, evaluation of the plethora of observations with pro- and eukaryotic hemoproteins suggests a caveat as to generalization of this principle. Thus, some P450s are inherently high-spin, so that there is no need for a supportive substrate-triggered impulse to electron flow. With other enzymes, high-spin content is not consonant with reductive activity, and spin transition as such is not essential to sustaining substrate oxidation. Also, with certain proteins the low-spin conformer is reduced as swift as the high-spin entity. Moreover, there is not regularly a linear relationship between high-spin level and anodic shift of the reduction potential. Similarly, in given cases turnover may proceed despite insignificant or even lacking substrate-provoked alterations in the redox behaviour. Thus, folding of the disparate and sometimes conflicting data into a harmonized overall picture is a lingering problem. Apart from direct perturbation of the electrochemical properties, substrate docking may entail changes in enzyme conformation such as to favour productive complexation with redox partners or modulate electron transfer conduits within preformed donor/acceptor adducts, resulting in elevated ease of flow of reducing equivalents. Substrate-steered ordering of the oligomeric aggregation state of P450s is likely to impose steric constraints on heterodimers, causing one component to more readily align with electron carriers. Careful uncovering of electrochemical mechanisms in these systems will be fruitful to tailoring of novel bioenergetic machines and redox chains via redox-inspired protein engineering or molecular Lego, capable of generating products of interest or degrading

  19. Content and evolution of potential furfural compounds in commercial milk-based infant formula powder after opening the packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Servín, Jorge L; de la Torre Carbot, Karina; García-Gasca, Teresa; Castellote, Ana I; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Potential furfural compounds were examined by RP-HPLC-DAD in 20 commercial milk-based powdered infant formula (IF) brands from local markets from Paris, France; DF, Mexico; Copenhagen, Denmark; England, UK; and Barcelona, Spain. We traced the evolution of these compounds after the packets had been opened at 0, 30 and 70 days of storage at room temperature (≈25 °C; minimum 23 °C and maximum 25.5 °C). All formula brands were analysed during the first 3-5 months of their shelf life. The mean values of all IFs for potential 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF)+2-furaldehyde (F) were 1115.2 μg/100 g (just opened), 1157.6 μg/100 g (30 days) and 1344.5 μg/100 g of product (70 days). In general, slight increases of potential furfural contents were observed in most of the studied IFs, which suggests that the Maillard reaction increases after opening the packets. The main furfural compound found was HMF, as expected. The range of potential HMF consumed for an infant about 6 months old feeding only on formula was estimated between 0.63 mg and 3.25 mg per day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubol, Simonetta; Silver, Whendee L; Bellin, Alberto

    2012-08-15

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N(2)O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N(2)O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O(2)) supply, which feeds back on N(2)O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O(2) and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O(2) concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N(2)O, dissolved nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O(2) and redox potential. Hot spots of N(2)O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O(2) in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO(3)(-) reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O(2) and N(2)O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential and N cycling, and suggest that models working at a daily scale need to

  1. Nitrogen-doped carbon monolith for alkaline supercapacitors and understanding nitrogen-induced redox transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Feng; Yin, Li-Chang; Lu, Xu; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Gentle, Ian R; Lu, Gao Qing; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-04-23

    A nitrogen-doped porous carbon monolith was synthesized as a pseudo-capacitive electrode for use in alkaline supercapacitors. Ammonia-assisted carbonization was used to dope the surface with nitrogen heteroatoms in a way that replaced carbon atoms but kept the oxygen content constant. Ammonia treatment expanded the micropore size-distributions and increased the specific surface area from 383 m(2) g(-1) to 679 m(2) g(-1). The nitrogen-containing porous carbon material showed a higher capacitance (246 F g(-1)) in comparison with the nitrogen-free one (186 F g(-1)). Ex situ electrochemical spectroscopy was used to investigate the evolution of the nitrogen-containing functional groups on the surface of the N-doped carbon electrodes in a three-electrode cell. In addition, first-principles calculations were explored regarding the electronic structures of different nitrogen groups to determine their relative redox potentials. We proposed possible redox reaction pathways based on the calculated redox affinity of different groups and surface analysis, which involved the reversible attachment/detachment of hydroxy groups between pyridone and pyridine. The oxidation of nitrogen atoms in pyridine was also suggested as a possible reaction pathway. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Chen, Zonghai; Wang, Qingzheng

    2010-12-14

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. The redox shuttles are capable of thousands hours of overcharge tolerance and have a redox potential at about 3-5.5 V vs. Li and particularly about 4.4-4.8 V vs. Li. Accordingly, in one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising an alkali metal salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive that is an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring with four or more electronegative substituents, two or more oxygen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring, and no hydrogen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  3. Exercise-intensity dependent alterations in plasma redox status do not reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Trewin, Adam; Levinger, Itamar; Shaw, Christopher S; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-04-01

    Redox homeostasis and redox-sensitive protein signaling play a role in exercise-induced adaptation. The effects of sprint-interval exercise (SIE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE), on post-exercise plasma redox status are unclear. Furthermore, whether post-exercise plasma redox status reflects skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling is unknown. In a randomized crossover design, eight healthy adults performed a cycling session of HIIE (5×4min at 75% W max ), SIE (4×30s Wingate's), and CMIE work-matched to HIIE (30min at 50% of W max ). Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and catalase activity were measured immediately post, 1h, 2h and 3h post-exercise. Plasma redox status biomarkers were correlated with phosphorylation of skeletal muscle p38-MAPK, JNK, NF-κB, and IκBα protein content immediately and 3h post-exercise. Plasma catalase activity was greater with SIE (56.6±3.8Uml -1 ) compared to CMIE (42.7±3.2, pexercise plasma TBARS and SOD activity significantly (pexercise protocol. A significant positive correlation was detected between plasma catalase activity and skeletal muscle p38-MAPK phosphorylation 3h post-exercise (r=0.40, p=0.04). No other correlations were detected (all p>0.05). Low-volume SIE elicited greater post-exercise plasma catalase activity compared to HIIE and CMIE, and greater H 2 O 2 compared to CMIE. Plasma redox status did not, however, adequately reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of protein, lipid and mineral contents in common Norwegian seaweeds and evaluation of their potential as food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehre, Hanne K; Malde, Marian K; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Elvevoll, Edel O

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine protein and amino acid composition, lipid and fatty acid composition, along with a range of essential minerals in common Norwegian seaweed species representing the red (Palmaria palmata and Vertebrata lanosa), green (Cladophora rupestris, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Ulva lactuca) and brown (Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea, Fucus vesiculosus and Pelvetia canaliculata) classes and assess their potential as alternatives to cereals in food and feed. As macroalgae accumulate heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium and mercury were also analyzed. Proteins ranged from 34 to 123 g kg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the essential amino acid levels may cover both human and salmonid requirements. Lipids were low (6-58 g kg(-1) DW), but the red algae had high relative content of long-chained omega-3 fatty acids (32-34 % of the fatty acids). Iodine contents were particularly high in the Laminaria species. Of the heavy metals only arsenic levels may be of concern. In total, the red alga P. palmata was regarded as the best alternative to cereals in food and feed. For several of the other species, single-component extraction for the ingredients market may be better than using the whole product. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Hydrologic influence on redox dynamics in estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Kim, K. H.; Guimond, J. A.; Heiss, J.; Ullman, W. J.; Seyfferth, A.

    2017-12-01

    Redox conditions in coastal aquifers control reactions that impact nutrient cycling, contaminant release, and carbon budgets, with implications for water resources and ecosystem health. Hydrologic changes can shift redox boundaries and inputs of reactants, especially in dynamic coastal systems subject to fluctuations on tidal, lunar, and longer timescales. We present two examples of redox shifts in estuarine systems in Delaware, USA: a beach aquifer and a saltmarsh. Beach aquifers are biogeochemical hot spots due to mixing between fresh groundwater and infiltrating seawater. At Cape Henlopen, DE, geochemical measurements identified reactions in the intertidal aquifer that include cycling of carbon, nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Measurements and modeling illustrate that redox potential as well as the locations of redox reactions shift on tidal to seasonal timescales and in response to changing beach and aquifer properties, impacting overall rates of reactions such as denitrification that reduces N loads to coastal waters. In the St. Jones National Estuarine Research Reserve, tidal fluctuations in channels cause periodic groundwater-surface water exchange, water table movement, and intermittent flooding that varies spatially across the saltmarsh. These changes create shifts in redox potential that are greatest near channels and in the top 20 cm of sediments. The magnitude of redox change depends on hydrologic setting (near channels or in marsh interior), hydrologic conditions (tidal stage, seasonal shifts), as well as prevalence of macropores created by crab burrows that change seasonally with crab activity. These shifts correspond to changes in porewater chemistry that have implications for nutrient cycling and carbon export to the ocean. Understanding hydrologic influence on redox geochemistry is critical for predicting how these systems and their ecosystem services may change in the future in response to anthropogenic and climate change.

  6. Mesoporous tungsten oxynitride as electrocatalyst for promoting redox reactions of vanadium redox couple and performance of vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmi; Jo, Changshin; Youk, Sol; Shin, Hun Yong; Lee, Jinwoo; Chung, Yongjin; Kwon, Yongchai

    2018-01-01

    For enhancing the performance of vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB), a sluggish reaction rate issue of V2+/V3+ redox couple evaluated as the rate determining reaction should be addressed. For doing that, mesoporous tungsten oxide (m-WO3) and oxyniride (m-WON) structures are proposed as the novel catalysts, while m-WON is gained by NH3 heat treatment of m-WO3. Their specific surface area, crystal structure, surface morphology and component analysis are measured using BET, XRD, TEM and XPS, while their catalytic activity for V2+/V3+ redox reaction is electrochemically examined. As a result, the m-WON shows higher peak current, smaller peak potential difference, higher electron transfer rate constant and lower charge transfer resistance than other catalysts, like the m-WO3, WO3 nanoparticle and mesoporous carbon, proving that it is superior catalyst. Regarding the charge-discharge curve tests, the VRFB single cell employing the m-WON demonstrates high voltage and energy efficiencies, high specific capacity and low capacity loss rate. The excellent results of m-WON are due to the reasons like (i) reduced energy band gap, (ii) reaction familiar surface functional groups and (ii) greater electronegativity.

  7. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Teshima, Norio; Maqsood, Syed Raashid; Akhoon, Showket Ahmad; Peerzada, Ghulam Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III) redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated...

  8. Potential use of multispectral imaging technology to identify moisture content and water-holding capacity in cooked pork sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Wu; Li, Peijun; Niu, Xiangli; Chen, Conggui; Zheng, Lei

    2018-03-01

    The traditional detection methods for moisture content (MC) and water-holding capacity (WHC) in cooked pork sausages (CPS) are destructive, time consuming, require skilled personnel and are not suitable for online industry applications. The goal of this work was to explore the potential of multispectral imaging (MSI) in combination with multivariate analysis for the identification of MC and WHC in CPS. Spectra and textures of 156 CPS treated by six salt concentrations (0-2.5%) were analyzed using different calibration models to find the most optimal results of predicting MC and WHC in CPS. By using the fused data of spectra and textures, partial least squares regression models performed well for determining the MC and WHC, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.949 and 0.832, respectively. Additionally, their spatial distribution in CPS could be visualized via applying prediction equations to transfer each pixel in the image. Results of satisfactory detection and visualization of the MC and WHC showed that MSI has the potential to serve as a rapid and non-destructive method for use in sausage industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of the potential of tree-ring cellulose content as a novel supplementary proxy in dendroclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziehmer, Malin M.; Nicolussi, Kurt; Schlüchter, Christian; Leuenberger, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Cellulose content (CC (%)) in tree rings is usually utilised as a tool to control the quality of the α-cellulose extraction from tree rings in the preparation of stable-isotope analysis in wooden tissues. Reported amounts of CC (%) are often limited to mean values per tree. For the first time, CC (%) series from two high-Alpine species, Larix decidua Mill. (European Larch, LADE) and Pinus cembra L. (Swiss stone pine, PICE) are investigated in modern wood samples and Holocene wood remains from the Early and mid-Holocene. Modern CC (%) series reveal a species-specific low-frequency trend independent of their sampling site over the past 150 years. Climate-cellulose relationships illustrate the ability of CC (%) to record temperature in both species but for slightly different periods within the growing season. The Holocene CC (%) series illustrate diverging low-frequency trends in both species, independent of sampling site characteristics (latitude, longitude and elevation). Moreover, potential age trends are not apparent in the two coniferous species. The arithmetic mean of CC (%) series in the Early and mid-Holocene indicate low CC (%) succeeding cold events. In conclusion, CC (%) in tree rings show high potential to be established as novel supplementary proxy in dendroclimatology.

  10. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome.

  11. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.H.; Cheng, J.; Xun, Y.; Ma, P.H.; Yang, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O 2 ), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm -2 . Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes

  12. The changes in redox status of ascorbate in stem tissue cells during Scots pine tree growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Antonova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The contents of ascorbate (AsA and dehydroascorbate (DHA and their ratio, showing cellular redox state of AsA, were studied in the cells of the separate tissues at different levels of Pinus sylvestris L. stem during early- and latewood formation. Morphological status of the cells in the tissues and the content of soluble carbohydrates were also estimated. The cellular redox potential of AsA has been found to depend on the type of tissue, cell development degree, the level of stem and the type of forming wood. The content of AsA and AsA/DHA ratio in the cells of non-conducting phloem along the stem were higher than in mature xylem and less during earlywood than latewood formation. The cells of conducting phloem and forming xylem, as the principal tissues taking part in annual ring wood formation, differed in the content of acids in the course of early and late xylem formation. Along the stem, the content of AsA decreased in conducting phloem cells and increased in the cells of forming xylem during both early- and latewood formation. The AsA/DHA of conducting phloem during earlywood formation was greatest below the stem and diminished to the top of the tree, while in the course of latewood development it was similar at all levels. In forming xylem AsA/DHA increased to the top of tree during the early xylem formation and decreased in late xylem that indicates the differences in oxidation-reduction reactions into the cells of two type of forming wood. The data are discussed according to morphological development of cells and the content of carbohydrates.

  13. The Analgesic Acetaminophen and the Antipsychotic Clozapine Can Each Redox-Cycle with Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temoçin, Zülfikar; Kim, Eunkyoung; Li, Jinyang; Panzella, Lucia; Alfieri, Maria Laura; Napolitano, Alessandra; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-20

    Melanins are ubiquitous but their complexity and insolubility has hindered characterization of their structures and functions. We are developing electrochemical reverse engineering methodologies that focus on properties and especially on redox properties. Previous studies have shown that melanins (i) are redox-active and can rapidly and repeatedly exchange electrons with diffusible oxidants and reductants, and (ii) have redox potentials in midregion of the physiological range. These properties suggest the functional activities of melanins will depend on their redox context. The brain has a complex redox context with steep local gradients in O 2 that can promote redox-cycling between melanin and diffusible redox-active chemical species. Here, we performed in vitro reverse engineering studies and report that melanins can redox-cycle with two common redox-active drugs. Experimentally, we used two melanin models: a convenient natural melanin derived from cuttlefish (Sepia melanin) and a synthetic cysteinyldopamine-dopamine core-shell model of neuromelanin. One drug, acetaminophen (APAP), has been used clinically for over a century, and recent studies suggest that low doses of APAP can protect the brain from oxidative-stress-induced toxicity and neurodegeneration, while higher doses can have toxic effects in the brain. The second drug, clozapine (CLZ), is a second generation antipsychotic with polypharmacological activities that remain incompletely understood. These in vitro observations suggest that the redox activities of drugs may be relevant to their modes-of-action, and that melanins may interact with drugs in ways that affect their activities, metabolism, and toxicities.

  14. Redox Fluctuations Increase the Contribution of Lignin to Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.; Timokhin, V.; Hammel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin mineralization represents a critical flux in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, yet little is known about mechanisms and environmental factors controlling lignin breakdown in mineral soils. Hypoxia has long been thought to suppress lignin decomposition, yet variation in oxygen (O2) availability in surface soils accompanying moisture fluctuations could potentially stimulate this process by generating reactive oxygen species via coupled biotic and abiotic iron (Fe) redox cycling. Here, we tested the impact of redox fluctuations on lignin breakdown in humid tropical forest soils during ten-week laboratory incubations. We used synthetic lignins labeled with 13C in either of two positions (aromatic methoxyl and propyl Cβ) to provide highly sensitive and specific measures of lignin mineralization not previously employed in soils. Four-day redox fluctuations increased the percent contribution of methoxyl C to soil respiration, and cumulative methoxyl C mineralization was equivalent under static aerobic and fluctuating redox conditions despite lower total C mineralization in the latter treatment. Contributions of the highly stable Cβ to mineralization were also equivalent in static aerobic and fluctuating redox treatments during periods of O2 exposure, and nearly doubled in the fluctuating treatment after normalizing to cumulative O2 exposure. Oxygen fluctuations drove substantial net Fe reduction and oxidation, implying that reactive oxygen species generated during abiotic Fe oxidation likely contributed to the elevated contribution of lignin to C mineralization. Iron redox cycling provides a mechanism for lignin breakdown in soils that experience conditions unfavorable for canonical lignin-degrading organisms, and provides a potential mechanism for lignin depletion in soil organic matter during late-stage decomposition. Thus, close couplings between soil moisture, redox fluctuations, and lignin breakdown provide potential a link between climate variability and

  15. Nrf2 and Redox Status in Prediabetic and Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica S. Jiménez-Osorio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The redox status associated with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 was evaluated in prediabetic and diabetic subjects. Total antioxidant status (TAS in plasma and erythrocytes, glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA content and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured as redox status markers in 259 controls, 111 prediabetics and 186 diabetic type 2 subjects. Nrf2 was measured in nuclear extract fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Nrf2 levels were lower in prediabetic and diabetic patients. TAS, GSH and activity of glutamate cysteine ligase were lower in diabetic subjects. An increase of MDA and superoxide dismutase activity was found in diabetic subjects. These results suggest that low levels of Nrf2 are involved in the development of oxidative stress and redox status disbalance in diabetic patients.

  16. Evaluation of Phenolic Content Variability along with Antioxidant, Antimicrobial, and Cytotoxic Potential of Selected Traditional Medicinal Plants from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Garima; Passsari, Ajit K; Leo, Vincent V; Mishra, Vineet K; Subbarayan, Sarathbabu; Singh, Bhim P; Kumar, Brijesh; Kumar, Sunil; Gupta, Vijai K; Lalhlenmawia, Hauzel; Nachimuthu, Senthil K

    2016-01-01

    Plants have been used since ancient times as an important source of biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phytochemical constituents (flavonoids and phenolics), antioxidant potential, cytotoxicity against HepG2 (human hepato carcinoma) cancer cell lines, and the antimicrobial activity of the methanol extract of selected traditional medicinal plants collected from Mizoram, India. A number of phenolic compounds were detected using HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF-MS, mainly Luteolin, Kaempferol, Myricetin, Gallic Acid, Quercetin and Rutin, some of which have been described for the first time in the selected plants. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents showed high variation ranging from 4.44 to 181.91 μg of Gallic Acid equivalent per milligram DW (GAE/mg DW) and 3.17 to 102.2 μg of Quercetin/mg, respectively. The antioxidant capacity was determined by DPPH (IC50 values ranges from 34.22 to 131.4 μg/mL), ABTS (IC50 values ranges from 24.08 to 513.4 μg/mL), and reducing power assays. Antimicrobial activity was assayed against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and yeast (Candida albicans) demonstrating that the methanol extracts of some plants were efficacious antimicrobial agents. Additionally, cytotoxicity was assessed on human hepato carcinoma (HepG2) cancer cell lines and found that the extracts of Albizia lebbeck, Dillenia indica, and Bombax ceiba significantly decreased the cell viability at low concentrations with IC50 values of 24.03, 25.09, and 29.66 μg/mL, respectively. This is the first report of detection of phenolic compounds along with antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic potential of selected medicinal plants from India, which indicates that these plants might be valuable source for human and animal health.

  17. Evaluation of phenolic content variability, antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic potential of selected traditional medicinal plants from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima eSingh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been used since ancient times as an important source of biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phytochemical constituents (flavonoids and phenolics, antioxidant potential, cytotoxicity against HepG2 (human hepato carcinoma cancer cell lines and the antimicrobial activity of the methanol extract of selected traditional medicinal plants collected from Mizoram, India. A number of phenolic compounds were detected using HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF-MS, mainly Luteolin, Kaempferol, Myricetin, Gallic Acid, Quercetin and Rutin, some of which have been described for the first time in the selected plants. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents showed high variation ranging from 4.44 to 181.91 µg of Gallic Acid equivalent per milligram DW (GAE/mg DW and 3.17 to 102.2 µg of Quercetin/mg, respectively. The antioxidant capacity was determined by DPPH (IC50 values ranges from 34.22 to 131.4 µg/mL, ABTS (IC50 values ranges from 24.08 to 513.4 µg/mL and reducing power assays. Antimicrobial activity was assayed against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus, gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and yeast (Candida albicans demonstrating that the methanol extracts of some plants were efficacious antimicrobial agents. Additionally, cytotoxicity was assessed on human hepato carcinoma (HepG2 cancer cell lines and found that the extracts of Albizia lebbeck, Dillenia indica and Bombax ceiba significantly decreased the cell viability at low concentrations with IC50 values of 24.03, 25.09 and 29.66 µg/mL, respectively. This is the first report of detection of phenolic compounds along with antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic potential of selected medicinal plants from India, which indicates that these plants might be valuable source for human and animal health.

  18. Vascular remodeling: A redox-modulated mechanism of vessel caliber regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2017-08-01

    Vascular remodeling, i.e. whole-vessel structural reshaping, determines lumen caliber in (patho)physiology. Here we review mechanisms underlying vessel remodeling, with emphasis in redox regulation. First, we discuss confusing terminology and focus on strictu sensu remodeling. Second, we propose a mechanobiological remodeling paradigm based on the concept of tensional homeostasis as a setpoint regulator. We first focus on shear-mediated models as prototypes of remodeling closely dominated by highly redox-sensitive endothelial function. More detailed discussions focus on mechanosensors, integrins, extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton and inflammatory pathways as potential of mechanisms potentially coupling tensional homeostasis to redox regulation. Further discussion of remodeling associated with atherosclerosis and injury repair highlights important aspects of redox vascular responses. While neointima formation has not shown consistent responsiveness to antioxidants, vessel remodeling has been more clearly responsive, indicating that despite the multilevel redox signaling pathways, there is a coordinated response of the whole vessel. Among mechanisms that may orchestrate redox pathways, we discuss roles of superoxide dismutase activity and extracellular protein disulfide isomerase. We then discuss redox modulation of aneurysms, a special case of expansive remodeling. We propose that the redox modulation of vascular remodeling may reflect (1) remodeling pathophysiology is dominated by a particularly redox-sensitive cell type, e.g., endothelial cells (2) redox pathways are temporospatially coordinated at an organ level across distinct cellular and acellular structures or (3) the tensional homeostasis setpoint is closely connected to redox signaling. The mechanobiological/redox model discussed here can be a basis for improved understanding of remodeling and helps clarifying mechanisms underlying prevalent hard-to-treat diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Characterisation of the Redox Sensitive NMDA Receptor

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Ohood

    2016-05-01

    Glucose entry into the brain and its subsequent metabolism to L-lactate, regulated by astrocytes, plays a major role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. A recent study has shown that L-lactate produced by the brain upon stimulation of glycolysis, and glycogen-derived L-lactate from astrocytes and its transport into neurons, is crucial for memory formation. A recent study revealed the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of L-lactate in neuronal plasticity and long-term memory formation. L-lactate was shown to induce a cascade of molecular events via modulation of redox-sensitive N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity that was mimicked by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH) co-enzyme. This indicated that changes in cellular redox state, following L-lactate transport inside the cells and its subsequent metabolism, production of NADH, and favouring a reduced state are the key effects of L-lactate. Therefore, we are investigating the role of L-lactate in modulating NMDA receptor function via redox modulatory sites. Accordingly, crucial redox-sensitive cysteine residues, Cys320 and Cys87, of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit are mutated using site-directed mutation, transfected, and expressed in HEK293 cells. This cellular system will then be used to characterise and monitor its activity upon Llactate stimulation, compared to the wild type. This will be achieved by calcium imaging, using fluorescent microscopy. Our data shows that L-lactate potentiated NMDA receptor activity and increased intracellular calcium influx in NR1/NR2A wild type compared to the control condition (WT NR1/NR2A perfused with (1μM) glutamate and (1μM) glycine agonist only), showing faster response initiation and slower decay rate of the calcium signal to the baseline. Additionally, stimulating with L-lactate associated with greater numbers of cells having high fluorescent intensity (peak amplitude) compared to the control. Furthermore, L-lactate rescued the

  20. Redox regulation of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-09-20

    We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context.

  1. Redox tuning of cytochrome b562 through facile metal porphyrin substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Elliott, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The biologically and nanotechnologically important heme protein cytochrome b562 was reconstructed with zinc and copper porphyrins, leading to significant changes in the spectral, redox and electron transfer properties. The Cu form shifts the redox potential by +300 mV and exhibits high electron t...

  2. Redox reactions in flooded uranium mines caused by natural wood degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, A.; Baraniak, L.; Bernhard, G.

    2002-01-01

    Answering the question whether U(VI) and As(V) will be reduced and precipitated as U(OH) 4 and As 2 S 3 in mine water as a result of natural wood degradation. Redox equilibria were calculated, depending on the decreasing redox potential. (orig.)

  3. Redox Cycling Realized in Paper-Based Biochemical Sensor for Selective Detection of Reversible Redox Molecules Without Micro/Nano Fabrication Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, So; Uno, Shigeyasu

    2018-02-28

    This paper describes a paper-based biochemical sensor that realizes redox cycling with close interelectrode distance. Two electrodes, the generator and collector electrodes, can detect steady-state oxidation and reduction currents when suitable potential is held at each electrode. The sensor has two gold plates on both sides of a piece of chromatography paper and defines the interelectrode distance by the thickness of the paper (180 μm) without any micro-fabrication processes. Our proposed sensor geometry has successfully exhibited signatures of redox cycling. As a result, the concentration of ferrocyanide as reversible redox molecules was successfully quantified under the interference by ascorbic acid as a strong irreversible reducing agent. This was possible because the ascorbic acids are completely consumed by the irreversible reaction, while maintaining redox cycling of reversible ferrocyanide. This suggests that a sensor based on the redox cycling method will be suitable for detecting target molecules at low concentration.

  4. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized

  5. Redox substoichiometry in isotope dilution analysis Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambara, T.; Suzuki, J.; Yoshioka, H.; Nakajima, N.

    1978-01-01

    Isotope dilution analysis using the redox substoichiometric principle has been applied to the determination of antimony content in metallic zinc. As the substoichiometric reaction, the oxidation of trivalent to pentavalent antimony with potassium permanganate was used, followed by separation of these species by the BHPA extraction of trivalent antimony. Determination of antimony contents less than 0.5 μg was found to be possible with good accuracy, without separation of zinc ions. The antimony content in a metallic zinc sample was determined to be 19.7+-0.8 ppm, in good agreement with the results obtained by the other analytical methods. (author)

  6. Role of sulfur redox cycling on arsenic mobilization in aquifers of Datong Basin, northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun; Ma, Teng; Su, Chunli; Liu, Yaqing

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur redox cycling potentially exerts important influences on arsenic (As) fate in shallow groundwater systems. Hydrochemical and sediment geochemical analysis combined with thermodynamic modeling study were conducted at Datong Basin to elaborate the effects of sulfur redox cycling on As speciation and mobilization under a strongly reducing environment. Dissolved As and sulfide concentration in 32 groundwater samples with depths of 19–40 m below the land surface varied from 8 to 2700 μg/L and from <5 to 490 μg/L, respectively, while dissolved Fe(II) was relatively low ranging from <20 to 280 μg/L. The apparent co-increase in dissolved sulfide and As concentration, especially for samples with As content larger than 500 μg/L, indicates that sulfidogenesis may significantly contribute to the mobilization of As via sulfide-induced reduction of both As-bearing Fe(III) oxide minerals and As(V). Thermodynamic calculations indicate that groundwater As might be also thiolated in the presence of high-level sulfide, particularly to a large extent for As(V) speciation, instead of sequestration by As-sulfide precipitates. Results of sequential extraction and scanning electron microscopy array on sediments indicate the presence of Fe(II) sulfide mineral phases and an appreciable amount of co-existent As in the sediments, suggesting the precipitation of Fe(II) sulfides can restrict the build-up of dissolved Fe(II) and sequester As from groundwater, but not strongly enough, thereby lowering down As to a moderate level of about 500 μg/L. Thus, redox processes involving As, S and Fe species under sulfidic conditions as observed in Datong Basin not only facilitate the enrichment of As(III) species and As(V) potentially existing as thiolated species, but also the depletion of Fe(II) concentration in groundwater due to Fe(II) sulfide formation. - Highlights: • Effects of sulfur redox cycling on As enrichment were clarified in Datong. • Co-increase in aqueous As and

  7. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubol, Simonetta, E-mail: rubols@ing.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Universita di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I 38123 Trento (Italy); Silver, Whendee L. [Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 130 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Bellin, Alberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Universita di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N{sub 2}O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N{sub 2}O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O{sub 2}) supply, which feeds back on N{sub 2}O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O{sub 2} and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O{sub 2} concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N{sub 2}O, dissolved nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O{sub 2} and redox potential. Hot spots of N{sub 2}O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O{sub 2} in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential

  8. LOW CONTENT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND PRODUCTION AS A RATIONALE FOR DEVELOPMENT OF RECREATIONAL POTENTIAL OF NORTHERN BUKOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia OMEL’CHENKO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on food products contamination by Cesium-137 and Strontium-90, detection of content of natural radionuclides (Radium-226, Thorium-232, Potassium-40 in raw materials and finished products of building industry, monitoring of some radionuclides content in soils of mountainous area of Northern Bukovina was carried out. All the results were analyzed and discussed in view of the life safety position. Data on radionuclides content in surrounding natural environment as well as in building and food industry production confirm Northern Bukovina territory’s attractiveness and safety for recreation areas development.

  9. Lignin decomposition and microbial community in paddy soils: effects of alternating redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerli, Chiara; Liu, Qin; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils are characterised by interchanging cycles of anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Such fluctuations cause continuous changes in soil solution chemistry as well as in the composition and physiological responses of the microbial community. Temporary deficiency in oxygen creates conditions favourable to facultative or obligates anaerobic bacteria, while aerobic communities can thrive in the period of water absence. These alterations can strongly affect soil processes, in particular organic matter (OM) accumulation and mineralization. In submerged soils, lignin generally constitutes a major portion of the total OM because of hampered degradation under anoxic conditions. The alternating redox cycles resulting from paddy soil management might promote both degradation and preservation of lignin, affecting the overall composition and reactivity of total and dissolved OM. We sampled soils subjected to cycles of anoxic (rice growing period) and oxic (harvest and growth of other crops) conditions since 700 and 2000 years. We incubated suspended Ap material, sampled from the two paddy plus two corresponding non-paddy control soils under oxic and anoxic condition, for 3 months, interrupted by a short period of three weeks (from day 21 to day 43) with reversed redox conditions. At each sampling time (day 2, 21, 42, 63, 84), we determined lignin-derived phenols (by CuO oxidation) as well as phospholipids fatty acids contents and composition. We aimed to highlight changes in lignin decomposition as related to the potential rapid changes in microbial community composition. Since the studied paddy soils had a long history of wet rice cultivation, the microbial community should be well adapted to interchanging oxic and anoxic cycles, therefore fully expressing its activity at both conditions. In non-paddy soil changes in redox conditions caused modification of quantity and composition of the microbial community. On the contrary, in well-established paddy soils the microbial

  10. The movement of a redox front downstream from a repository for nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1982-01-01

    In a final repository for nuclear waste it is envisaged that the waste will eventually come in contact with water. When this happens the α-radiation will radiolyse water. The main products will be hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen is fairly nonreactive and will be transported away by diffusion and convection. The hydrogen peroxide is a strong oxidizing agent and will oxidize any ferrous iron it encounters to ferric iron. This will change the electrochemical potential of the water in the region, from reducing to oxidizing conditions. In oxidizing waters many of the potentially hazardeous radionuclides - actinides and technetium - will have a high solubility and low sorption compared to conditions. The movement of the redox front along the fissures downstream of a repository has been investigated theoretically. The rock is modelled as having parallel fissures where the water flows. The rock matrix has a connected porosity into which the hydrogen peroxide diffuses and quickly reacts with the minerals containing ferrous iron. The movements of the sharp boundary between oxidizing and reducing conditions in the fissures as well as in the matrix of the rock is described mathematically. A calculated example based on expected flowrate of water, rate of α-radiolysis, fissure spacing and measured values of matrix diffusivity and ferrous iron content of the bedrock is made. The results indicate that under some conditions the redox front may move tens of meters downstraem during 10 6 years in fairly good rock, poor in ferrous iron. It is conceivable that the extension of the redox front is larger as well as shorter because many of the importhat factors governing teh front movement may vary considerably. (Author)

  11. Practical and theoretical basis for performing redox-measurements in compacted bentonite. A literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A.

    2008-12-01

    This report reviews the state-of-the-art with regard to redox measurements, especially in compacted water saturated bentonite, but also in natural systems like sediments and ground waters. Both theoretical and practical aspects of redox measurements are discussed, as well as some basic concepts like terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) and oxidative capacity (OXC). The problems associated with the interpretation of measured electrode potentials are treated. Despite many practical and theoretical difficulties, redox measurements continue to be carried out by researchers all over the world. The over-all conclusion from the literature survey is that fruitful redox-measurements can be performed in compacted bentonite. Irrespective of whether the measured redox potentials are absolute or not, the use of electrodes provide a valuable tool for studying, e.g., long-term changes in the pore water of compacted bentonite and/or the diffusion of oxygen into a bentonite. (orig.)

  12. Redox regulation in photosynthetic organisms: signaling, acclimation, and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2009-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have multifaceted roles in the orchestration of plant gene expression and gene-product regulation. Cellular redox homeostasis is considered to be an "integrator" of information from metabolism and the environment controlling plant growth and acclimation responses, as well as cell suicide events. The different ROS forms influence gene expression in specific and sometimes antagonistic ways. Low molecular antioxidants (e.g., ascorbate, glutathione) serve not only to limit the lifetime of the ROS signals but also to participate in an extensive range of other redox signaling and regulatory functions. In contrast to the low molecular weight antioxidants, the "redox" states of components involved in photosynthesis such as plastoquinone show rapid and often transient shifts in response to changes in light and other environmental signals. Whereas both types of "redox regulation" are intimately linked through the thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, and pyridine nucleotide pools, they also act independently of each other to achieve overall energy balance between energy-producing and energy-utilizing pathways. This review focuses on current knowledge of the pathways of redox regulation, with discussion of the somewhat juxtaposed hypotheses of "oxidative damage" versus "oxidative signaling," within the wider context of physiological function, from plant cell biology to potential applications.

  13. Liquid Quinones for Solvent-Free Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Akihiro; Takenaka, Keisuke; Handa, Naoyuki; Nokami, Toshiki; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Jun-Ichi

    2017-11-01

    Liquid benzoquinone and naphthoquinone having diethylene glycol monomethyl ether groups are designed and synthesized as redox active materials that dissolve supporting electrolytes. The Li-ion batteries based on the liquid quinones using LiBF 4 /PC show good performance in terms of voltage, capacity, energy efficiency, and cyclability in both static and flow modes. A battery is constructed without using intentionally added organic solvent, and its high energy density (264 W h L -1 ) demonstrates the potential of solvent-free organic redox flow batteries using liquid active materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Chemical Principles Revisited. Redox Reactions and the Electropotential Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper suggests a nontraditional pedagogic approach to the subject of redox reactions and electrode potentials suitable for freshman chemistry. Presented is a method for the representation of galvanic cells without the introduction of the symbology and notation of conventional cell diagrams. (CW)

  15. The iodine/iodide redox couple at a platinum electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, L.M.; Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    The I/iodide redox couple was studied on Pt in 0.5M H2SO4 by measuring the impedance as a function of frequency. From these measurements, the exchange c.d. j0 was derived according to Sluyters. The dependence of j0 on the reversible potential and the I and the iodide concns. was established. By

  16. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  17. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  18. Redox Conditions in Selected Principal Aquifers of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, P.B.; Cowdery, T.K.; Chapelle, F.H.; Jurgens, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) processes affect the quality of groundwater in all aquifer systems. Redox processes can alternately mobilize or immobilize potentially toxic metals associated with naturally occurring aquifer materials, contribute to the degradation or preservation of anthropogenic contami-nants, and generate undesirable byproducts, such as dissolved manganese (Mn2+), ferrous iron (Fe2+), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Determining the kinds of redox processes that occur in an aquifer system, documenting their spatial distribution, and understanding how they affect concentrations of natural or anthropogenic contaminants are central to assessing and predicting the chemical quality of groundwater. This Fact Sheet extends the analysis of U.S. Geological Survey authors to additional principal aquifer systems by applying a framework developed by the USGS to a larger set of water-quality data from the USGS national water databases. For a detailed explanation, see the 'Introduction' in the Fact Sheet.

  19. Degree of glutathione deficiency and redox imbalance depend on subtype of mitochondrial disease and clinical status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Enns

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders are associated with decreased energy production and redox imbalance. Glutathione plays a central role in redox signaling and protecting cells from oxidative damage. In order to understand the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction on in vivo redox status, and to determine how this varies by mitochondrial disease subtype and clinical severity, we used a sensitive tandem mass spectrometry assay to precisely quantify whole blood reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione levels in a large cohort of mitochondrial disorder patients. Glutathione redox potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. Compared to healthy controls (n = 59, mitochondrial disease patients (n = 58 as a group showed significant redox imbalance (redox potential -251 mV ± 9.7, p<0.0001 with an increased level of oxidation by ∼ 9 mV compared to controls (-260 mV ± 6.4. Underlying this abnormality were significantly lower whole blood GSH levels (p = 0.0008 and GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.0002, and significantly higher GSSG levels (p<0.0001 in mitochondrial disease patients compared to controls. Redox potential was significantly more oxidized in all mitochondrial disease subgroups including Leigh syndrome (n = 15, electron transport chain abnormalities (n = 10, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (n = 8, mtDNA deletion syndrome (n = 7, mtDNA depletion syndrome (n = 7, and miscellaneous other mitochondrial disorders (n = 11. Patients hospitalized in metabolic crisis (n = 7 showed the greatest degree of redox imbalance at -242 mV ± 7. Peripheral whole blood GSH and GSSG levels are promising biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction, and may give insights into the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of the various mitochondrial disorders. In particular, evaluation of redox potential may be useful in monitoring of clinical status or response to redox-modulating therapies in clinical trials.

  20. THE STUDY OF REDOX CONDITIONS IN THE DNIESTER RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Gladchi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The work presented in the paper discusses the contribution of the Novodnestrovsc water system to the formation of redox conditions in the lower Dniester. The conclusions were drawn on the basis of a long-term protocol of analyses that included the analysis of the oxygen regime, evaluation of the content of hydrogen peroxide, rH2, biological oxygen demand as well as other additional parameters.

  1. Sedimentary cobalt concentrations track marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Planavsky, Noah; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Jamie; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen production by photosynthesis drove the redox evolution of the atmosphere and ocean. Primary productivity by oxygenic photosynthesizers in the modern surface ocean is limited by trace nutrients such as iron, but previous studies have also observed high Co uptake associated with natural cyanobacterial populations. Constraining the size and variation of the oceanic reservoir of Co through time will help to understand the regulation of primary productivity and hence oxygenation through time. In this study, Co concentrations from iron formations (IF), shales and marine pyrites deposited over nearly 4 billion years of Earth's history are utilized to reconstruct secular changes in the mechanisms of Co removal from the oceanic reservoir. The Co reservoir prior to ~2 Ga was dominated by hydrothermal inputs and Fe(III)oxyhydroxides were likely involved in the removal of Co from the water column. Fe(II) oxidation in the water column resulted in the deposition of IF in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic, and the Co inventory of IF records a large oceanic reservoir of Co during this time. Lower Co concentrations in sediments during the Middle Proterozoic signify a decrease in the oceanic reservoir due to the expansion euxinic environments, corresponding to the results of previous studies. A transition to an oxidized deep ocean in the Phanerozoic is evidenced by correlation between Co and manganese (Mn) concentrations in hydrothermal and exhalative deposits, and in marine pyrites. This relationship between Co and Mn, signifying deposition of Co in association with Mn(IV)oxides, does not occur in the Precambrian. Mn(II) oxidation occurs at higher redox potentials than that required for Fe(II) oxidation, and the extent of Mn redox cycling prior to full ventilation of the oceans at the end of the Neoproterozoic was likely limited to spatially restricted oxic surface waters. In this regard, Co is another valuable redox proxy for tracking the growth and decline in oxygenated

  2. Comparative study for the effect of biofertilizers and chemical fertilizers on soybean oil content and its potential for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosheen, A.; Bano, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study makes comparative evaluation of biofertilizers (brands Biopower and Biozote) and chemical fertilizers (urea and diamonium phosphate (DAP)) on yield and the quality of soybean cv.NARC-1. Significant increase in number of pods per plant, seed oil content and specific gravity of oil was observed in case of chemical fertilizer treatment. All the treatments decreased the acid value and free fatty acid (oleic acid) content of oil, maximum reduction being in the case of Biopower treatment. Biopower treated plant seed oil exhibited higher refractive index and maximum conversion to methyl esters/biodiesel. (author)

  3. Vanadium and Chromium Redox Behavior in borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeown, D.; Muller, I.; Gan, H.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; Pegg, I.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterize vanadium (V) and chromium (Cr) environments in low activity nuclear waste (LAW) glasses synthesized under a variety of redox conditions. V 2 O 5 was added to the melt to improve sulfur incorporation from the waste; however, at sufficiently high concentrations, V increased melt foaming, which lowered melt processing rates. Foaming may be reduced by varying the redox conditions of the melt, while small amounts of Cr are added to reduce melter refractory corrosion. Three parent glasses were studied, where CO-CO 2 mixtures were bubbled through the corresponding melt for increasing time intervals so that a series of redox-adjusted-glasses was synthesized from each parent glass. XAS data indicated that V and Cr behaviors are significantly different in these glasses with respect to the cumulative gas bubbling times: V 4+ /V total ranges from 8 to 35%, while Cr 3+ /Cr total can range from 15 to 100% and even to population distributions including Cr 2+ . As Na-content decreased, V, and especially, Cr became more reduced, when comparing equivalent glasses within a series. The Na-poor glass series show possible redox coupling between V and Cr, where V 4+ populations increase after initial bubbling, but as bubbling time increases, V 4+ populations drop to near the level of the parent glass, while Cr becomes more reduced to the point of having increasing Cr 2+ populations.

  4. The redox properties of the natural iron-bearing clay mineral ferruginous smectite SWA-1: a combined electrochemical and spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, Christopher A.; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Iron-bearing clay minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and clay-mineral-based materials have been proposed to be part of backfill material in nuclear waste repositories. Laboratory and field studies have confirmed that structural iron (Fe) in clay minerals participates in redox reactions with organic pollutants, metals, and radionuclides, thus influencing their transport and reactivity. Knowledge of the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals is therefore essential for understanding and predicting the fate, mobility, and bioavailability subsurface contaminants. A quantitative understanding of clay mineral redox behavior remains lacking, however, due to constraints in previous experimental approaches and the complex structural changes that accompany changes in the Fe oxidation state. This work provides a quantitative means for measuring the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals, which can be applied to both field and laboratory studies tracking radionuclide-clay mineral redox reactions. Here we use mediated electrochemical reduction and oxidation to determine the electron accepting and donating capacities of several natural Fe-bearing clay minerals with different structural Fe content (2.3 to 21 wt-%) and varied redox histories. Results indicate that the fraction of redox-active Fe in clay minerals is mineral-dependent, and is linked to the thermodynamics of reduction and oxidation as well as to the ability of clay minerals to conduct electrons and facilitate structural re-arrangements required to maintain charge balance. The reduction potential (E H ) characteristics of a natural ferruginous smectite (SWa-1) were further characterized as a function of solution conditions and repeated Fe reduction and oxidation cycles. SWa-1 samples were analyzed with Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to link observed redox potential behavior to structural properties and changes

  5. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Pablo de, J.; Rovira, M.

    1998-01-01

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO 2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO 2 -matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO 2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO 2 . (Author)

  6. Appraisal of Total Phenol, Flavonoid Contents, and Antioxidant Potential of Folkloric Lannea coromandelica Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekeshwar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impending antioxidant properties of different extracts of crude methanolic extract (CME of leaves of Lannea coromandelica (L. coromandelica and its two ethyl acetate (EAF and aqueous (AqF subfractions by employing various established in vitro systems and estimation of total phenolic and flavonoid content. The results showed that extract and fractions possessed strong antioxidant activity in vitro and among them, EAF had the strongest antioxidant activity. EAF was confirmed for its highest phenolic content, total flavonoid contents, and total antioxidant capacity. The EAF was found to show remarkable scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH (EC50 63.9 ± 0.64 µg/mL, superoxide radical (EC50 8.2 ± 0.12 mg/mL, and Fe2+ chelating activity (EC50 6.2 ± 0.09 mg/mL. Based on our in vitro results, EAF was investigated for in vivo antioxidant assay. Intragastric administration of the EAF can significantly increase levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione (GSH, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px levels, and decrease malondialdehyde (MDA content in the liver and kidney of CCl4-intoxicated rats. These new evidences show that L. coromandelica bared antioxidant activity.

  7. Two-Region Model for Soil Water Repellency as a Function of Matric Potential and Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2010-01-01

    by the so-called Dexter index) is useful for predicting if soils are likely to exhibit WR. Expression of soil water repellency depends on soil water content; however, only a limited amount of predictive description is available to date. In this study, based on experimental data, a simple two-region model...

  8. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Waghe, Prashantkumar; Gupta, Priyanka; Choudhury, Soumen; Kannan, Kandasamy; Pillai, Ayyappan Harikrishna; Harikumar, Sankaran Kutty; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  9. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Waghe, Prashantkumar; Gupta, Priyanka; Choudhury, Soumen; Kannan, Kandasamy [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Pillai, Ayyappan Harikrishna [Division of Animal Biochemistry, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Harikumar, Sankaran Kutty; Mishra, Santosh Kumar [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sarkar, Souvendra Nath, E-mail: snsarkar1911@rediffmail.com [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2014-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  10. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (pcancerous tissues than in the normal ones (pcancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  11. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  12. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Metcalfe, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Murakami, Y.; Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure

  13. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, H. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: dora@num.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Metcalfe, R. [Quintessa Japan, Queen' s Tower A7-707, Minatomirai, Yokohama 220-6007 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Murakami, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tono Geoscience Centre (Japan); Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T. [Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-4-4 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Asahi University, Department of Dental Pharmacology, Hozumi, Gifu (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure.

  14. Albumin-bound fatty acids but not albumin itself alter redox balance in tubular epithelial cells and induce a peroxide-mediated redox-sensitive apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Christine; Elks, Carrie M.; Kruger, Claudia; Cleland, Ellen; Addison, Kaity; Noland, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is associated with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. It correlates with the progression of chronic kidney disease, particularly with tubular atrophy. The fatty acid load on albumin significantly increases in obesity, presenting a proinflammatory environment to the proximal tubules. However, little is known about changes in the redox milieu during fatty acid overload and how redox-sensitive mechanisms mediate cell death. Here, we show that albumin with fatty acid impurities or conjugated with palmitate but not albumin itself compromised mitochondrial and cell viability, membrane potential and respiration. Fatty acid overload led to a redox imbalance which deactivated the antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin 2 and caused a peroxide-mediated apoptosis through the redox-sensitive pJNK/caspase-3 pathway. Transfection of tubular cells with peroxiredoxin 2 was protective and mitigated apoptosis. Mitochondrial fatty acid entry and ceramide synthesis modulators suggested that mitochondrial β oxidation but not ceramide synthesis may modulate lipotoxic effects on tubular cell survival. These results suggest that albumin overloaded with fatty acids but not albumin itself changes the redox environment in the tubules, inducing a peroxide-mediated redox-sensitive apoptosis. Thus, mitigating circulating fatty acid levels may be an important factor in both preserving redox balance and preventing tubular cell damage in proteinuric diseases. PMID:24500687

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  16. Quantitative redox imaging biomarkers for studying tissue metabolic state and its heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He N. Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available NAD+/NADH redox state has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer and diabetes as well as in the regulation of embryonic development and aging. To fluorimetrically assess the mitochondrial redox state, Dr. Chance and co-workers measured the fluorescence of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including flavin–adenine–dinucleotide (FAD and demonstrated their ratio (i.e. the redox ratio is a sensitive indicator of the mitochondrial redox states. The Chance redox scanner was built to simultaneously measure NADH and Fp in tissue at submillimeter scale in 3D using the freeze-trap protocol. This paper summarizes our recent research experience, development and new applications of the redox scanning technique in collaboration with Dr. Chance beginning in 2005. Dr. Chance initiated or actively involved in many of the projects during the last several years of his life. We advanced the redox scanning technique by measuring the nominal concentrations (in reference to the frozen solution standards of the endogenous fluorescent analytes, i.e., [NADH] and [Fp] to quantify the redox ratios in various biological tissues. The advancement has enabled us to identify an array of the redox indices as quantitative imaging biomarkers (including [NADH], [Fp], [Fp]/([NADH]+[Fp], [NADH]/[Fp], and their standard deviations for studying some important biological questions on cancer and normal tissue metabolism. We found that the redox indices were associated or changed with (1 tumorigenesis (cancer versus non-cancer of human breast tissue biopsies; (2 tumor metastatic potential; (3 tumor glucose uptake; (4 tumor p53 status; (5 PI3K pathway activation in pre-malignant tissue; (6 therapeutic effects on tumors; (7 embryonic stem cell differentiation; (8 the heart under fasting. Together, our work demonstrated that the tissue redox indices obtained from the redox scanning technique may provide useful information about tissue metabolism and physiology status in normal

  17. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  18. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  19. Redox conditions effect on flow accelerated corrosion: Influence of hydrazine and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvier, O. de [EDF, R and D Div., Moret sur Loing (France); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF, Engineering and Service Div., Villeurbanne (France); Fruzzetti, K. [EPRI, Science and Technology Div., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steels has been studied world-wide for more than twenty years and is now fairly well understood. The influence of several parameters like water chemistry (i.e. pH and oxygen content), temperature, hydrodynamic or mass transfer conditions (i.e. flow velocity, geometry, steam quality..) and steel composition on the corrosion kinetics has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. However, the effect of a reducing environment and variable redox conditions have not yet been fully explored. It's well known that a reducing environment is effective in increasing the resistance of steam generator tubing to intergranular attack / stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) and pitting. In that way, secondary water chemistry specifications have been modified from low hydrazine to high hydrazine chemistry in the steam-water circuit. Nevertheless, increasing hydrazine levels up to 200 {mu}g/kg could have a detrimental effect by potentially enhancing the FAC process. Moreover, in order to have a complete understanding of the possible impact of the water chemistry environment it is also important to consider the impact of redox conditions during shutdowns (cold and/or hot shutdowns) and start up periods when aerated water injections are made to maintain a constant water level in the Steam Generators from the auxiliary feedwater circuit. Therefore, a common EDF and EPRI R and D effort has been recently carried out to study the effects of hydrazine and oxygen on FAC. The results are presented as follows. (authors)

  20. Water-activated graphite felt as a high-performance electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabtamu, Daniel Manaye; Chen, Jian-Yu; Chang, Yu-Chung; Wang, Chen-Hao

    2017-02-01

    A simple, green, novel, time-efficient, and potentially cost-effective water activation method was employed to enhance the electrochemical activity of graphite felt (GF) electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The GF electrode prepared with a water vapor injection time of 5 min at 700 °C exhibits the highest electrochemical activity for the VO2+/VO2+ couple among all the tested electrodes. This is attributed to the small, controlled amount of water vapor that was introduced producing high contents of oxygen-containing functional groups, such as sbnd OH groups, on the surface of the GF fibers, which are known to be electrochemically active sites for vanadium redox reactions. Charge-discharge tests further confirm that only 5 min of GF water activation is required to improve the efficiency of the VRFB cell. The average coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency, and energy efficiency are 95.06%, 87.42%, and 83.10%, respectively, at a current density of 50 mA cm-2. These voltage and energy efficiencies are determined to be considerably higher than those of VRFB cells assembled using heat-treated GF electrodes without water activation and pristine GF electrodes.

  1. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naudet

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potential method (SP and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have been applied to the contaminant plume associated with the Entressen landfill in south-east France. The self-potential depends on groundwater flow (electrokinetic contribution and redox conditions ('electro-redox' contribution. Using the variation of the piezometric head in the aquifer, the electrokinetic contribution is removed from the SP signals. A good linear correlation (R2=0.85 is obtained between the residual SP data and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. This relationship is used to draw a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. The electrical conductivity of the subsoil is obtained from 3D-ERT analysis. A good linear correlation (R2=0.91 is observed between the electrical conductivity of the aquifer determined from the 3D-ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. This indicates that the formation factor is nearly homogeneous in the shallow aquifer at the scale of the ERT. From this correlation, a map of the pore water conductivity of the aquifer is obtained. Keywords: self-potential, redox potential, electrical resistivity tomography, fluid conductivity, contaminant plume

  2. Dissecting Redox Biology Using Fluorescent Protein Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Meyer, Andreas J; Morgan, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent protein sensors have revitalized the field of redox biology by revolutionizing the study of redox processes in living cells and organisms. Within one decade, a set of fundamental new insights has been gained, driven by the rapid technical development of in vivo redox sensing. Redox-sensitive yellow and green fluorescent protein variants (rxYFP and roGFPs) have been the central players. Although widely used as an established standard tool, important questions remain surrounding their meaningful use in vivo. We review the growing range of thiol redox sensor variants and their application in different cells, tissues, and organisms. We highlight five key findings where in vivo sensing has been instrumental in changing our understanding of redox biology, critically assess the interpretation of in vivo redox data, and discuss technical and biological limitations of current redox sensors and sensing approaches. We explore how novel sensor variants may further add to the current momentum toward a novel mechanistic and integrated understanding of redox biology in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 680-712.

  3. The effect of zinc (Zn) content to cell potential value and efficiency aluminium sacrificial anode in 0.2 M sulphuric acid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akranata, Ahmad Ridho; Sulistijono, Awali, Jatmoko

    2018-04-01

    Sacrificial anode is sacirifial component that used to protect steel from corrosion. Generally, the component are made of aluminium and zinc in water environment. Sacrificial anode change the protected metal structure become cathodic with giving current. The advantages of aluminium is corrosion resistance, non toxicity and easy forming. Zinc generally used for coating in steel to prevent steel from corrosion. This research was conducted to analyze the effect of zinc content to the value of cell potential and efficiency aluminium sacrificial anode with sand casting method in 0.2 M sulphuric acid environment. The sacrificial anode fabrication made with alloying aluminium and zinc metals with variation composition of alloy with pure Al, Al-3Zn, Al-6Zn, and Al-9Zn with open die sand casting process. The component installed with ASTM A36 steel. After the research has been done the result showed that addition of zinc content increase the cell potential, protection efficiency, and anode efficiency from steel plate. Cell potential value measurement and weight loss measurement showed that addition of zinc content increase the cell potential value into more positive that can protected the ASTM A36 steel more efficiently that showed in weight loss measurement where the protection efficiency and anodic efficiency of Al-9Zn sacrificial anode is better than protection efficiency and anodic efficiency of pure Al. The highest protection efficiency gotten by Al-9Zn alloy

  4. The ways of improvement of content and pedagogical conditions of preparation of master of preschool education in the context of development of creative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra Iemchyk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of changes in the process of professional preparation of master of preschool education, which is caused by insufficient preparation of graduates to solve problems in this field, low level of creative potential and, as the consequence, unavailability to realization creative pedagogical activity is outlined in the article. The main ways of improvement of content and pedagogical conditions of development of creative potential of master of preschool education in the process of professional preparation are presented: the improvement of content of scientific theoretical preparation of master, studying of progressive pedagogical experience; learning of professional pedagogical disciplines with the reliance to creative tasks with problem search nature; implementation to the educational process of magistracy of institution of higher education on the specialty “Preschool education” of special course “The foundations of development of creative potential of pedagogue”; attraction of students to the creative pedagogical practice; organization and management of students creative process from the side of teachers. There are also identified the perspectives of solution of the problem of development of creative abilities of personality of pedagogue during the professional preparation in the institution of higher education. The implementation of these ways to the educational process will contribute the increasing the readiness of graduates of institutions of higher education to realize pedagogical activity on the creative level, selfdevelopment and self-improvement of their personality.Key words: creative potential of master of preschool education, the professional preparation, the ways of improvement of content of professional preparation.

  5. Cost-driven materials selection criteria for redox flow battery electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmello, Rylan; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Smith, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Redox flow batteries show promise for grid-scale energy storage applications but are presently too expensive for widespread adoption. Electrolyte material costs constitute a sizeable fraction of the redox flow battery price. As such, this work develops a techno-economic model for redox flow batteries that accounts for redox-active material, salt, and solvent contributions to the electrolyte cost. Benchmark values for electrolyte constituent costs guide identification of design constraints. Nonaqueous battery design is sensitive to all electrolyte component costs, cell voltage, and area-specific resistance. Design challenges for nonaqueous batteries include minimizing salt content and dropping redox-active species concentration requirements. Aqueous battery design is sensitive to only redox-active material cost and cell voltage, due to low area-specific resistance and supporting electrolyte costs. Increasing cell voltage and decreasing redox-active material cost present major materials selection challenges for aqueous batteries. This work minimizes cost-constraining variables by mapping the battery design space with the techno-economic model, through which we highlight pathways towards low price and moderate concentration. Furthermore, the techno-economic model calculates quantitative iterations of battery designs to achieve the Department of Energy battery price target of 100 per kWh and highlights cost cutting strategies to drive battery prices down further.

  6. Chemistry and Redox Biology of Mycothiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Aníbal M; Pedre, Brandán; De Armas, María Inés; Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Radi, Rafael; Messens, Joris; Trujillo, Madia

    2018-02-20

    Mycothiol (MSH, AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the main low-molecular weight (LMW) thiol of most Actinomycetes, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis that affects millions of people worldwide. Strains with decreased MSH content show increased susceptibilities to hydroperoxides and electrophilic compounds. In M. tuberculosis, MSH modulates the response to several antituberculosis drugs. Enzymatic routes involving MSH could provide clues for specific drug design. Recent Advances: Physicochemical data argue against a rapid, nonenzymatic reaction of MSH with oxidants, disulfides, or electrophiles. Moreover, exposure of the bacteria to high concentrations of two-electron oxidants resulted in protein mycothiolation. The recently described glutaredoxin-like protein mycoredoxin-1 (Mrx-1) provides a route for catalytic reduction of mycothiolated proteins, protecting critical cysteines from irreversible oxidation. The description of MSH/Mrx-1-dependent activities of peroxidases helped to explain the higher susceptibility to oxidants observed in Actinomycetes lacking MSH. Moreover, the first mycothiol-S-transferase, member of the DinB superfamily of proteins, was described. In Corynebacterium, both the MSH/Mrx-1 and the thioredoxin pathways reduce methionine sulfoxide reductase A. A novel tool for in vivo imaging of the MSH/mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) status allows following changes in the mycothiol redox state during macrophage infection and its relationship with antibiotic sensitivity. Redundancy of MSH with other LMW thiols is starting to be unraveled and could help to rationalize the differences in the reported importance of MSH synthesis observed in vitro versus in animal infection models. Future work should be directed to establish the structural bases of the specificity of MSH-dependent enzymes, thus facilitating drug developments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 487-504.

  7. Redox zonation for different groundwater flow paths during bank filtration: a case study at Liao River, Shenyang, northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaosi; Lu, Shuai; Yuan, Wenzhen; Woo, Nam Chil; Dai, Zhenxue; Dong, Weihong; Du, Shanghai; Zhang, Xinyue

    2018-03-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of redox zones in an aquifer is important when designing groundwater supply systems. Redox zonation can have direct or indirect control of the biological and chemical reactions and mobility of pollutants. In this study, redox conditions are characterized by interpreting the hydrogeological conditions and water chemistry in groundwater during bank infiltration at a site in Shenyang, northeast China. The relevant redox processes and zonal differences in a shallow flow path and deeper flow path at the field scale were revealed by monitoring the redox parameters and chemistry of groundwater near the Liao River. The results show obvious horizontal and vertical components of redox zones during bank filtration. Variations in the horizontal extent of the redox zone were controlled by the different permeabilities of the riverbed sediments and aquifer with depth. Horizontally, the redox zone was situated within 17 m of the riverbank for the shallow flow path and within 200 m for the deep flow path. The vertical extent of the redox zone was affected by precipitation and seasonal river floods and extended to 10 m below the surface. During bank filtration, iron and manganese oxides or hydroxides were reductively dissolved, and arsenic that was adsorbed onto the medium surface or coprecipitated is released into the groundwater. This leads to increased arsenic content in groundwater, which poses a serious threat to water supply security.

  8. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  9. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-01

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  10. Redox imbalance due to the loss of mitochondrial NAD(P)-transhydrogenase markedly aggravates high fat diet-induced fatty liver disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Claudia D C; Figueira, Tiago R; Francisco, Annelise; Dal'Bó, Genoefa A; Ronchi, Juliana A; Rovani, Juliana C; Escanhoela, Cecilia A F; Oliveira, Helena C F; Castilho, Roger F; Vercesi, Anibal E

    2017-12-01

    The mechanisms by which a high fat diet (HFD) promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) appear to involve liver mitochondrial dysfunctions and redox imbalance. We hypothesized that a HFD would increase mitochondrial reliance on NAD(P)-transhydrogenase (NNT) as the source of NADPH for antioxidant systems that counteract NAFLD development. Therefore, we studied HFD-induced liver mitochondrial dysfunctions and NAFLD in C57Unib.B6 congenic mice with (Nnt +/+ ) or without (Nnt -/- ) NNT activity; the spontaneously mutated allele (Nnt -/- ) was inherited from the C57BL/6J mouse substrain. After 20 weeks on a HFD, Nnt -/- mice exhibited a higher prevalence of steatohepatitis and content of liver triglycerides compared to Nnt +/+ mice on an identical diet. Under a HFD, the aggravated NAFLD phenotype in the Nnt -/- mice was accompanied by an increased H 2 O 2 release rate from mitochondria, decreased aconitase activity (a redox-sensitive mitochondrial enzyme) and higher susceptibility to Ca 2+ -induced mitochondrial permeability transition. In addition, HFD led to the phosphorylation (inhibition) of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and markedly reduced the ability of liver mitochondria to remove peroxide in Nnt -/- mice. Bypass or pharmacological reactivation of PDH by dichloroacetate restored the peroxide removal capability of mitochondria from Nnt -/- mice on a HFD. Noteworthy, compared to mice that were chow-fed, the HFD did not impair peroxide removal nor elicit redox imbalance in mitochondria from Nnt +/+ mice. Therefore, HFD interacted with Nnt mutation to generate PDH inhibition and further suppression of peroxide removal. We conclude that NNT plays a critical role in counteracting mitochondrial redox imbalance, PDH inhibition and advancement of NAFLD in mice fed a HFD. The present study provide seminal experimental evidence that redox imbalance in liver mitochondria potentiates the progression from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis following a HFD. Copyright

  11. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  12. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts indicative of active facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes in earthworm gut contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2011-09-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H(2) production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H(2) producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content.

  13. Studies on meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin Ping; Feng, Ding Yuan; Xiao, Juan; Wu, Fan; He, Xiao Jun; Xia, Min Hao; Dong, Tao; Liu, Yi Hua; Tan, Hui Ze; Zou, Shi Geng; Zheng, Tao; Ou, Xian Hua; Zuo, Jian Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective This experiment investigated meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and expression of genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages. Methods Sixty 4-week-old Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 6 replicate groups, each containing 10 pigs. One pig from each group was sacrificed at day 35, 63, 98, and 161 to isolate longissimus dorsi and triceps muscles. Results Meat color scores were higher in pigs at 35 d than those at 63 d and 98 d (pMeat color scores were correlated to the proportion of oxymyoglobin (r = 0.59, pmeat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential varied at different stages. PMID:28728400

  14. Comparison of total polyphenols content and antioxidant potential of wines from ‘Welschriesling’ and ‘Sauvignon Blanc’ varieties during ageing on fine lees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Lužar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are key components of wine, since they contribute to wine characteristics such as colour, astringency and bitterness. They also act like antioxidants, with mechanisms involving free-radical scavenging that could prevent cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The aim of the present work was to compare the obtained results of total polyphenols content and antioxidant potential (AOP of several white wines (welschriesling and sauvignon blanc during ageing on fine lees. The total polyphenols content decreased in average for 16.1 % in welschriesling wines and for 18.7 % in sauvignon blanc wines in the period of three months of wine ageing on lees. In the same period AOP of wines decreased in average for 16.0 % in welschriesling wines and for 8.0 % in sauvignon blanc wines. Expectedly, the samples with added oak chips in grape must had higher antioxidant potential than others.

  15. Inflammatory and redox reactions in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Tina; Biasi, Fiorella; Calfapietra, Simone; Nano, Mario; Poli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    It has been established that there is a relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer development. The constant colonic inflammation typical of inflammatory bowel diseases is now considered a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. The inflammatory network of signaling molecules is also required during the late phases of carcinogenesis, to enable cancer cells to survive and to metastasize. Oxidative reactions are an integral part of the inflammatory response, and are generally associated with CRC development. However, when the malignant phenotype is acquired, increased oxidative status induces antioxidant defenses in cancer cells, favoring their aggressiveness. This contradictory behavior of cancer cells toward redox status is of great significance for potential anticancer therapies. This paper summarizes the essential background information relating to the molecules involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation during carcinogenesis. Understanding more of their function in CRC stages might provide the foundation for future developments in CRC treatment. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of iron redox ratio in borosilicate glasses and melts from Raman spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochain, B. [SCDV-Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex05 (France); Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex05 (France); Henderson, G.S. [Dept of Geology, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto (Canada); Pinet, O. [SCDV-Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    A method is presented to determine the redox ratio of iron in borosilicate glasses and melts relevant to nuclear waste storage from an analysis of Raman spectra recorded at room or high temperature. The basis of this method is the strong variation of the spectral feature observed between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, in which it is possible to assign a band to vibrational modes involving ferric iron in tetrahedral coordination whose intensity increases with iron content and iron oxidation. After baseline correction and normalization, fits to the Raman spectra made with Gaussian bands enable us to determine the proportion of ferric iron provided the redox ratio is known independently for at least two redox states for a given glass composition. This method is particularly useful for in situ determinations of the kinetics and mechanisms of redox reactions. (authors)

  18. Determination of iron redox ratio in borosilicate glasses and melts from Raman spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.; Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P.; Henderson, G.S.; Pinet, O.

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented to determine the redox ratio of iron in borosilicate glasses and melts relevant to nuclear waste storage from an analysis of Raman spectra recorded at room or high temperature. The basis of this method is the strong variation of the spectral feature observed between 800 and 1200 cm -1 , in which it is possible to assign a band to vibrational modes involving ferric iron in tetrahedral coordination whose intensity increases with iron content and iron oxidation. After baseline correction and normalization, fits to the Raman spectra made with Gaussian bands enable us to determine the proportion of ferric iron provided the redox ratio is known independently for at least two redox states for a given glass composition. This method is particularly useful for in situ determinations of the kinetics and mechanisms of redox reactions. (authors)

  19. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9.

  20. Redox flow batteries having multiple electroactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Nie, Zimin

    2018-05-01

    Introducing multiple redox reactions with a suitable voltage range can improve the energy density of redox flow battery (RFB) systems. One example includes RFB systems utilizing multiple redox pairs in the positive half cell, the negative half cell, or in both. Such RFB systems can have a negative electrolyte, a positive electrolyte, and a membrane between the negative electrolyte and the positive electrolyte, in which at least two electrochemically active elements exist in the negative electrolyte, the positive electrolyte, or both.

  1. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  2. Redox control of electric melters with complex feed compositions. Part I: analytical methods and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Diemer, R.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The redox state of glass from electric melters with complex feed compositions is determined by balance between gases above the melt, and transition metals and organic compounds in the feed. Part I discusses experimental and computational methods of relating flowrates and other melter operating conditions to the redox state of glass, and composition of the melter offgas. Computerized thermodynamic computational methods are useful in predicting the sequence and products of redox reactions and in assessing individual process variations. Melter redox state can be predicted by combining monitoring of melter operating conditions, redox measurement of fused melter feed samples, and periodic redox measurement of product. Mossbauer spectroscopy, and other methods which measure Fe(II)/Fe(III) in glass, can be used to measure melter redox state. Part II develops preliminary operating limits for the vitrification of High-Level Radioactive Waste. Limits on reducing potential to preclude the accumulation of combustible gases, accumulation of sulfides and selenides, and degradation of melter components are the most critical. Problems associated with excessively oxidizing conditions, such as glass foaming and potential ruthenium volatility, are controlled when sufficient formic acid is added to adjust melter feed rheology

  3. Organic chemical degradation by remote study of the redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, P. M.; Revil, A.; Binley, A. M.; Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the natural (and enhanced) degradation of organic contaminants is essential for managing groundwater quality in many parts of the world. Contaminated sites often have limited access, hence non-intrusive methods for studying redox processes, which drive the degradation of organic compounds, are required. One example is the degradation of de-icing chemicals (glycols and organic salts) released to the soil near airport runways during winter. This issue has been broadly studied at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway using intrusive and non-intrusive methods. Here, we report on laboratory experiments that aim to study the potential of using a self-potential, DCresistivity, and time-domain induced polarization for geochemical characterization of the degradation of Propylene Glycol (PG). PG is completely miscible in water, does not adsorb to soil particles and does not contribute to the electrical conductivity of the soil water. When the contaminant is in the unsaturated zone near the water table, the oxygen is quickly consumed and the gas exchange with the surface is insufficient to ensure aerobic degradation, which is faster than anaerobic degradation. Since biodegradation of PG is highly oxygen demanding, anaerobic pockets can exist causing iron and manganese reduction. It is hypothesised that nitrate would boost the degradation rate under such conditions. In our experiment, we study PG degradation in a sand tank. We provide the system with an electron highway to bridge zones with different redox potential. This geo-battery system is characterized by self-potential, resistivity and induced polarization anomalies. An example of preliminary results with self-potential at two different times of the experiment can be seen in the illustration. These will be supplemented with more direct information on the redox chemistry: in-situ water sampling, pH, redox potential and electrical conductivity measurements. In parallel, a series of batch experiments have been

  4. Preservation of organic matter in nontronite against iron redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally believed that clay minerals can protect organic matter from degradation in redox active environments, but both biotic and abiotic factors can influence the redox process and thus potentially change the clay-organic associations. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain poorly understood. In this study, a model organic compound, 12-Aminolauric acid (ALA) was selected to intercalate into the structural interlayer of nontronite (an iron-rich smectite, NAu-2) to form an ALA-intercalated NAu-2 composite (ALA-NAu-2). Shawanella putrefaciens CN32 and sodium dithionite were used to reduce structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) in NAu-2 and ALA-NAu-2. The bioreduced ALA-NAu-2 was subsequently re-oxidized by air. The rates and extents of bioreduction and air re-oxidation were determined with wet chemistry methods. ALA release from ALA-NAu-2 via redox process was monitored. Mineralogical changes after iron redox cycle were investigated with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At the beginning stage of bioreduction, S. putrefaciens CN32 reduced Fe(III) from the edges of nontronite and preferentially reduced and dissolved small and poorly crystalline particles, and released ALA, resulting a positive correlation between ALA release and iron reduction extent (80%). Because bacteria are the principal agent for mediating redox process in natural environments, our results demonstrated that the structural interlayer of smectite can serve as a potential shelter to protect organic matter from oxidation.

  5. Connecting Biology to Electronics: Molecular Communication via Redox Modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Jinyang; Tschirhart, Tanya; Terrell, Jessica L; Kim, Eunkyoung; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-01

    Biology and electronics are both expert at for accessing, analyzing, and responding to information. Biology uses ions, small molecules, and macromolecules to receive, analyze, store, and transmit information, whereas electronic devices receive input in the form of electromagnetic radiation, process the information using electrons, and then transmit output as electromagnetic waves. Generating the capabilities to connect biology-electronic modalities offers exciting opportunities to shape the future of biosensors, point-of-care medicine, and wearable/implantable devices. Redox reactions offer unique opportunities for bio-device communication that spans the molecular modalities of biology and electrical modality of devices. Here, an approach to search for redox information through an interactive electrochemical probing that is analogous to sonar is adopted. The capabilities of this approach to access global chemical information as well as information of specific redox-active chemical entities are illustrated using recent examples. An example of the use of synthetic biology to recognize external molecular information, process this information through intracellular signal transduction pathways, and generate output responses that can be detected by electrical modalities is also provided. Finally, exciting results in the use of redox reactions to actuate biology are provided to illustrate that synthetic biology offers the potential to guide biological response through electrical cues. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Regulatory redox state in tree seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Ratajczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prx are important regulators of the redox status of tree seeds during maturation and long-term storage. Thioredoxins (Trx are redox transmitters and thereby regulate Prx activity. Current research is focused on the association of Trx with Prx in tree seeds differing in the tolerance to desiccation. The results will allow for better understanding the regulation of the redox status in orthodox, recalcitrant, and intermediate seeds. The findings will also elucidate the role of the redox status during the loss of viability of sensitive seeds during drying and long-term storage.

  7. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  8. Contents and risks of potentially toxic elements in wastewater-fed food production systems in Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Helle

    , fish, soil and sediment from wastewater-fed production systems in Hanoi and Phnom Penh. Another aim was to assess the food safety risks of water spinach and fish with respect to PTEs. The third aim was to assess PTE retention capacity of river sediment in Hanoi and the governing retention mechanisms...... the concentration range observed for water spinach grown at agricultural soil not exposed to wastewater in Malaysia. Water spinach grown at sites of high and low wastewater exposure did not show a significantly higher accumulation of PTEs compared to sites without wastewater exposure. In Phnom Penh, water spinach...... than 11% of the tolerable intake for each element. The PTE content of water spinach in Hanoi and Cheung Ek Lake in Phnom Penh constituted low food safety risks for consumers. Arsenic, Cd and Pb concentrations in muscle, skin and liver of fish grown in wastewater-fed systems in Hanoi and Phnom were low...

  9. Optimization of Protein Extraction from Spirulina platensis to Generate a Potential Co-Product and a Biofuel Feedstock with Reduced Nitrogen Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parimi, Naga Sirisha; Singh, Manjinder; Kastner, James R.; Das, Keshav C., E-mail: kdas@engr.uga.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Forsberg, Lennart S.; Azadi, Parastoo [Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-06-23

    The current work reports protein extraction from Spirulina platensis cyanobacterial biomass in order to simultaneously generate a potential co-product and a biofuel feedstock with reduced nitrogen content. S. platensis cells were subjected to cell disruption by high-pressure homogenization and subsequent protein isolation by solubilization at alkaline pH followed by precipitation at acidic pH. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the process parameters – pH, extraction (solubilization/precipitation) time and biomass concentration for obtaining maximum protein yield. The optimized process conditions were found to be pH 11.38, solubilization time of 35 min and biomass concentration of 3.6% (w/w) solids for the solubilization step, and pH 4.01 and precipitation time of 60 min for the precipitation step. At the optimized conditions, a high protein yield of 60.7% (w/w) was obtained. The protein isolate (co-product) had a higher protein content [80.6% (w/w)], lower ash [1.9% (w/w)] and mineral content and was enriched in essential amino acids, the nutritious γ-linolenic acid and other high-value unsaturated fatty acids compared to the original biomass. The residual biomass obtained after protein extraction had lower nitrogen content and higher total non-protein content than the original biomass. The loss of about 50% of the total lipids from this fraction did not impact its composition significantly owing to the low lipid content of S. platensis (8.03%).

  10. Optimization of Protein Extraction from Spirulina platensis to Generate a Potential Co-Product and a Biofuel Feedstock with Reduced Nitrogen Content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parimi, Naga Sirisha; Singh, Manjinder; Kastner, James R.; Das, Keshav C.; Forsberg, Lennart S.; Azadi, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    The current work reports protein extraction from Spirulina platensis cyanobacterial biomass in order to simultaneously generate a potential co-product and a biofuel feedstock with reduced nitrogen content. S. platensis cells were subjected to cell disruption by high-pressure homogenization and subsequent protein isolation by solubilization at alkaline pH followed by precipitation at acidic pH. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the process parameters – pH, extraction (solubilization/precipitation) time and biomass concentration for obtaining maximum protein yield. The optimized process conditions were found to be pH 11.38, solubilization time of 35 min and biomass concentration of 3.6% (w/w) solids for the solubilization step, and pH 4.01 and precipitation time of 60 min for the precipitation step. At the optimized conditions, a high protein yield of 60.7% (w/w) was obtained. The protein isolate (co-product) had a higher protein content [80.6% (w/w)], lower ash [1.9% (w/w)] and mineral content and was enriched in essential amino acids, the nutritious γ-linolenic acid and other high-value unsaturated fatty acids compared to the original biomass. The residual biomass obtained after protein extraction had lower nitrogen content and higher total non-protein content than the original biomass. The loss of about 50% of the total lipids from this fraction did not impact its composition significantly owing to the low lipid content of S. platensis (8.03%).

  11. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...... and this contributes to the diversity in flavor, color, texture, and shelf life. The review concludes that these reactions are still only incompletely understood and that they represent an interesting area for fundamental research and also represent a fertile field for product development through a more conscious use...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures....

  12. Method for producing redox shuttles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupek, Krzysztof Z.; Dzwiniel, Trevor L.; Krumdick, Gregory K.

    2015-03-03

    A single step method for producing a redox shuttle having the formula 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-phenylene tetraethyl bis(phosphate) is provided, the method comprising phosphorylating tert butyl hydroquinone with a phosphate-containing reagent. Also provided is method for producing 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-phenylene tetraethyl bis(phosphate), the method comprising solubilizing tert-butyl hydroquinone and tetrabutylammonium bromide with methyltetrahydrofuran to create a mixture; heating the mixture while adding base to the mixture in an amount to turn the mixture orange; and adding diethyl chlorophosphate to the orange mixture in an amount to phosphorylate the hydroquinone.

  13. Molecular analysis of Ku redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatilla Andrea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can occur in response to ionizing radiation (IR, radiomimetic agents and from endogenous DNA-damaging reactive oxygen metabolites. Unrepaired or improperly repaired DSBs are potentially the most lethal form of DNA damage and can result in chromosomal translocations and contribute to the development of cancer. The principal mechanism for the repair of DSBs in humans is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Ku is a key member of the NHEJ pathway and plays an important role in the recognition step when it binds to free DNA termini. Ku then stimulates the assembly and activation of other NHEJ components. DNA binding of Ku is regulated by redox conditions and evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that Ku undergoes structural changes when oxidized that results in a reduction in DNA binding activity. The C-terminal domain and cysteine 493 of Ku80 were investigated for their contribution to redox regulation of Ku. Results We effectively removed the C-terminal domain of Ku80 generating a truncation mutant and co-expressed this variant with wild type Ku70 in an insect cell system to create a Ku70/80ΔC heterodimer. We also generated two single amino acid variants of Cys493, replacing this amino acid with either an alanine (C493A or a serine (C493S, and over-expressed the variant proteins in SF9 insect cells in complex with wild type Ku70. Neither the truncation nor the amino acid substitutions alters protein expression or stability as determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We show that the C493 mutations do not alter the ability of Ku to bind duplex DNA in vitro under reduced conditions while truncation of the Ku80 C-terminus slightly reduced DNA binding affinity. Diamide oxidation of cysteines was shown to inhibit DNA binding similarly for both the wild-type and all variant proteins. Interestingly, differential DNA binding activity following re-reduction was observed for the Ku70/80

  14. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  15. Biocompatible Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with high-Zr-content: compositional optimization for potential biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Nengbin; Huang, Lu; Chen, Wenzhe; He, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The present study designs and prepares Ni-free Zr60+xTi2.5Al10Fe12.5-xCu10Ag5 (at.%, x=0, 2.5, 5) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by copper mold casting for potential biomedical application. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility of the Zr-based BMGs are evaluated by investigating mechanical properties, bio-corrosion behavior, and cellular responses. It is found that increasing the content of Zr is favorable for the mechanical compatibility with a combination of low Young's modulus, large plasticity, and high notch toughness. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the Zr-based BMGs are corrosion resistant in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The bio-corrosion resistance of BMGs is improved with the increase in Zr content, which is attributed to the enrichment in Zr and decrease in Al concentration in the surface passive film of alloys. Regular cell responses of mouse MC3T3-E1 cells, including cell adhesion and proliferation, are observed on the Zr-Ti-Al-Fe-Cu-Ag BMGs, which reveals their general biosafety. The high-Zr-based BMGs exhibit a higher cell proliferation activity in comparison with that of pure Zr and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility can be used to guide the future design of biocompatible Zr-based BMGs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutrient and energy content, in vitro ruminal fermentation characteristics and methanogenic potential of alpine forage plant species during early summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanegara, Anuraga; Marquardt, Svenja; Kreuzer, Michael; Leiber, Florian

    2011-08-15

    Plants growing on alpine meadows are reported to be rich in phenols. Such compounds may affect ruminal fermentation and reduce the plants' methanogenic potential, making alpine grazing advantageous in this respect. The objective of this study was to quantify nutrients and phenols in Alpine forage grasses, herbs and trees collected over 2 years and, in a 24 h in vitro incubation, their effects on ruminal fermentation parameters. The highest in vitro gas production, resulting in metabolisable energy values around 10 MJ kg⁻¹, were found with Alchemilla xanthochlora and Crepis aurea (herbaceous species) and with Sambucus nigra leaves and flowers (tree species). Related to the amount of total gas production, methane formation was highest with Nardus stricta, and lowest with S. nigra and A. xanthochlora. In addition, Castanea sativa leaves led to an exceptional low methane production, but this was accompanied by severely impaired ruminal fermentation. When the data were analysed by principal component analysis, phenol concentrations were negatively related with methane proportion in total gas. Variation in methane production potential across the investigated forages was small. The two goals of limited methane production potential and high nutritive value for ruminants were met best by A. xanthochlora and S. nigra. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Reduced content of chloroatranol and atranol in oak moss absolute significantly reduces the elicitation potential of this fragrance material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Flemming; Andersen, Kirsten H; Bernois, Armand; Brault, Christophe; Bruze, Magnus; Eudes, Hervé; Gadras, Catherine; Signoret, Anne-Cécile J; Mose, Kristian F; Müller, Boris P; Toulemonde, Bernard; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2015-02-01

    Oak moss absolute, an extract from the lichen Evernia prunastri, is a valued perfume ingredient but contains extreme allergens. To compare the elicitation properties of two preparations of oak moss absolute: 'classic oak moss', the historically used preparation, and 'new oak moss', with reduced contents of the major allergens atranol and chloroatranol. The two preparations were compared in randomized double-blinded repeated open application tests and serial dilution patch tests in 30 oak moss-sensitive volunteers and 30 non-allergic control subjects. In both test models, new oak moss elicited significantly less allergic contact dermatitis in oak moss-sensitive subjects than classic oak moss. The control subjects did not react to either of the preparations. New oak moss is still a fragrance allergen, but elicits less allergic contact dermatitis in previously oak moss-sensitized individuals, suggesting that new oak moss is less allergenic to non-sensitized individuals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Heavy metal content and potential health risk of geophagic white clay from the Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Asantewah Nkansah

    Full Text Available Geophagia is the craving for non-food substances and commonly practiced among pregnant women and children. Consumption of geophagic clay samples can have serious implications on the health of the consumers as a result of the presence of toxic metals such as Pb, As, Hg and Cd. This study sought to determine the levels of heavy metals in the studied geophagic clay samples and to determine the potential risks of heavy metals as cumulative carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks to the health of the consumers via oral (ingestion and dermal exposure routes. A total of thirty (30 white clay samples were analysed using Niton Thermo scientific XRF Analyser (Mobile Test S, NDTr-XL3t-86956, com 24. The clay samples were found to contain essential elements such as Ca, Fe, K and Zn as well as toxic metals such as As and Pb. There were isolated cases of the presence of Hg and all samples had Cd levels below detection. Health risk indices such as hazard quotient and cancer risk were calculated and the results indicated that consumers are likely to suffer from cancer through ingestion of geophagic clay. Bioaccessibility studies were done on zinc and it did not indicate any potential toxicity due to zincs essential nature. The levels of heavy metals in some of the geophagic clay consumed by some residents in the Kumasi were high compared to the Permitted Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake (PMTDI by (WHO/FAO and may pose potential health threat over time. Keywords: Geophagia, White clay, Heavy metals, Health risk assessment, Permitted maximum tolerable daily intake

  20. PHREEQC, Modeling of Geochemical Reactions, Calculation of pH, Redox Potential. PHREEQCI, Windows Interactive Version of PHREEQC. PHRQCGRF, code to create graphs from the data generated by PHREEQC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhust, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Description of program or function: PHREEQC is a computer program written in the C programming language that is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations. PHREEQC is based on an ion-association aqueous model and has capabilities for (1) speciation and saturation-index calculations, (2) reaction-path and advective-transport calculations involving specified irreversible reactions, mixing of solutions, mineral and gas equilibria, surface- complexation reactions, and ion-exchange reactions, and (3) inverse modeling, which finds sets of mineral and gas mole transfers that account for composition differences between waters, within specified compositional uncertainties. PHREEQC is derived from the Fortran program PHREEQE, but it has been completely rewritten in C with the addition of many new capabilities. New features include the capabilities to use redox couples to distribute redox elements among their valence states in speciation calculations; to model ion-exchange and surface-complexation reactions; to model reactions with a fixed-pressure, multicomponent gas phase (that is, a gas bubble); to calculate the mass of water in the aqueous phase during reaction and transport calculations; to keep track of the moles of minerals present in the solid phases and determine automatically the thermodynamically stable phase assemblage; to simulate advective transport in combination with PHREEQC's reaction-modeling capability; and to make inverse modeling calculations that allow for uncertainties in the analytical data. The user interface is improved through the use of a simplified approach to redox reactions, which includes explicit mole-balance equations for hydrogen and oxygen; the use of a revised input that is modular and completely free format; and the use of mineral names and standard chemical symbolism rather than index numbers. The use of C eliminates nearly all limitations on array sizes, including numbers of elements, aqueous species

  1. Potential effect of physical activity based menu labels on the calorie content of selected fast food meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowray, Sunaina; Swartz, Jonas J; Braxton, Danielle; Viera, Anthony J

    2013-03-01

    In this study we examined the effect of physical activity based labels on the calorie content of meals selected from a sample fast food menu. Using a web-based survey, participants were randomly assigned to one of four menus which differed only in their labeling schemes (n=802): (1) a menu with no nutritional information, (2) a menu with calorie information, (3) a menu with calorie information and minutes to walk to burn those calories, or (4) a menu with calorie information and miles to walk to burn those calories. There was a significant difference in the mean number of calories ordered based on menu type (p=0.02), with an average of 1020 calories ordered from a menu with no nutritional information, 927 calories ordered from a menu with only calorie information, 916 calories ordered from a menu with both calorie information and minutes to walk to burn those calories, and 826 calories ordered from the menu with calorie information and the number of miles to walk to burn those calories. The menu with calories and the number of miles to walk to burn those calories appeared the most effective in influencing the selection of lower calorie meals (p=0.0007) when compared to the menu with no nutritional information provided. The majority of participants (82%) reported a preference for physical activity based menu labels over labels with calorie information alone and no nutritional information. Whether these labels are effective in real-life scenarios remains to be tested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The three-spinned stickleback (Gasterosteus Aguleatus) as potential biomonitor of 210Po content at two sampling sites of coastal area of the Gulf of Gdansk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goral, M.; Bojanowski, R.; Szefer, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of presented study was to evaluate the three-spinned stickleback (Gasterosteus Aguleatus) as potential biomonitor of 210 Po content in the vicinity of mouth of the Vistula River and yacht port in Gdynia. The three-spinned stickleback was collected from the above areas. Fish was caught, samples were weighted and their total lengths was measured. The fish age was determined using sagittal otoliths. The 210 Po content was determined by α-spectrometry, following radiochemical separation. The U Mann-Whitney's test showed insignificant differences in 210 Po activity in samples originated from two various geographic regions. Based on the results of both U Mann-Whitney's test Spearman's rank correlations it seems that stickleback could be useful tool for monitoring because of the lack of the sex- and age-dependent influence on polonium concentration in the fish analysed

  3. Electrical switching and memory phenomena observed in redox-gradient dendrimer sandwich devices

    OpenAIRE

    Li, JianChang; Blackstock, Silas C.; Szulczewski, Greg J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of dendrimer sandwich devices with electrical switching and memory properties. The storage media is consisted of a redox-gradient dendrimer layer sandwiched in organic barrier thin films. The dendrimer layer acts as potential well where redox-state changes and consequent electrical transitions of the embedded dendrimer molecules are expected to be effectively triggered and retained, respectively. Experimental results indicated that electrical switching could be re...

  4. New insights into redox regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fenglian; Wang, Kui; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Jingwen; Nice, Edouard Collins; Huang, Canhua

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), the natural byproducts of aerobic metabolism, are precisely orchestrated to evoke diverse signaling pathways. To date, studies have focused mainly on the detrimental effects of ROS in stem cells. Recently, accumulating evidence has suggested that ROS also function as second messengers that modulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by regulating intricate signaling networks. Although many efforts have been made to clarify the general effects of ROS on signal transduction in stem cells, less is known about the initial and direct executors of ROS signaling, which are known as 'redox sensors'. Modifications of cysteine residues in redox sensors are of significant importance in the modulation of protein function in response to different redox conditions. Intriguingly, most key molecules in ROS signaling and cell cycle regulation (including transcriptional factors and kinases) that are crucial in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation have the potential to be redox sensors. We highlight herein the importance of redox regulation of these key regulators in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms of redox regulation in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation will open exciting new perspectives for stem cell biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J; Rudenko, Gabby

    2017-11-02

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a 'redox switch' centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the 'OFF' state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J.; Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED); (Icahn)

    2017-09-07

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a ‘redox switch’ centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the ‘OFF’ state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins.

  7. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  8. Redox properties of small semiconductor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver, N.; Nitzan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The size dependence of electrical and thermodynamic quantities of intermediate-sized semiconductor particles in an electrolyte solution with a given redox pair are studied. The equilibrium constant for this system is then derived based on the relationship of the electrolytic redox components to the size, charges, and concentration of the semiconductor particles. 25 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  9. Potential of cultivar and crop management to affect phytochemical content in winter-grown sprouting broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kim; Valverde, Juan; Finn, Leo; Rai, Dilip K; Brunton, Nigel; Sorensen, Jens C; Sorensen, Hilmer; Gaffney, Michael

    2014-01-30

    Variety and crop management strategies affect the content of bioactive compounds (phenolics, flavonoids and glucosinolates) in green broccoli (calabrese) types, which are cultivated during summer and autumn in temperate European climates. Sprouting broccoli types are morphologically distinct and are grown over the winter season and harvested until early spring. Thus they show considerable potential for development as an import substitution crop for growers and consumers during the 'hungry gap' of early spring. The present study investigated the effect of variety and management practices on phytochemical content in a range of sprouting broccoli varieties. Yields were significantly higher in white sprouting broccoli varieties. Levels of phenolics and flavonoids were in the range 81.64-297.65 and 16.95-104.80 mg 100 g⁻¹ fresh weight, respectively, depending on year and cultivar, and were highest in variety 'TZ 5052' in both years. In-row spacing did not affect flavonoid content. Phenolic and flavonoid content generally increased with increasing floret maturity and levels were high in edible portions of the crop. Crop wastes (leaf and flower) contained 145.9-239.3 and 21.5-116.6 mg 100 g⁻¹ fresh weight total phenolics and flavonoids, respectively, depending on cultivar, tissue and year. Climatic factors had a significant effect on phenolic and flavonoid content. Levels of total and some individual glucosinolates were higher in sprouting broccoli than in the green broccoli variety 'Ironman'. Levels of total phenolics, flavonoids and glucosinolates are higher in sprouting than green broccoli types. Sprouting broccoli represents an excellent source of dietary bioactive compounds. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Elements of product service systems as a potential to achieve a sustainable development: bibliometry and content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ariente Neto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of product-service systems (PSS is presented as an innovative strategy when offering products and services. It aims at for minimizing environmental impacts through sustainable business models. This study aims to identify which potentialities can be explored with regard to the elements of a PSS in a configuration that favor to offer answers on sustainable issues. To do so, the literature was analyzed by a structured process of bibliographic review. Among the results, three aspects are highlighted: (i the wideness of product concept to add services through PSS life-cycle, (ii the configuration of infra-structure to support a PSS by establishing the necessary communication relatively to logistics services. Finally, the net of actors should be explored to obtain organizational proposals that contribute to PSS performance.

  11. Methane content and potential of biogas' production by manure of pigs fed with corn or sorghum-based diets in different phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Adelia Pereira; Lucas Junior, Jorge de; Thomaz, Maria Cristina; Fukayama, Ellen Hatsumi [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this trial was to value the methane content and potential of biogas' production by manure of pigs fed with corn or sorghum-based diets (energy's source) in different phases. The manures were daily collected, diluted in water and homogeneous. Were used 267 mL of influent with 6% total solids concentration for supply of continuous-flow laboratory anaerobic digesters, with 30 days of detention time (DT) and temperature of 35 deg C. The experiment was completely randomized design with 2 treatments (corn or sorghum) and 3 phases of growth (initial x growing x finishing) in 10 replications (anaerobic digesters). The methane contents by manure of pigs fed with corn were greater (p<0.01) than pigs fed with sorghum (65.19 and 67.32%) on the phases of growing and finishing, respectively. The most potential of biogas' production (0.181, 0.138 and 0.162 m{sup 3}/kg of manure) was with manure of pigs fed with corn on the phases of initial, growing and finishing, respectively (p<0.01). Considering all the phases, the most potential of biogas' production (p<0.01) was observed in the initial phase, in both treatments. (author)

  12. Redox Proteomics and Platelet Activation: Understanding the Redox Proteome to Improve Platelet Quality for Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Giona; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Blood banks use pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies to increase the safety of platelet concentrates (PCs). The characteristics of PI-treated PCs slightly differ from those of untreated PCs, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. One possible cause is the generation of oxidative stress during the PI process. This is of great interest since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers in platelet functions. Furthermore, there are links between protein oxidation and phosphorylation, another mechanism that is critical for cell regulation. Current research efforts focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and identifying new target proteins. Proteomics technologies represent powerful tools for investigating signaling pathways involving ROS and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, while quantitative techniques enable the comparison of the platelet resting state versus the stimulated state. In particular, redox cysteine is a key player in platelet activation upon stimulation by different agonists. This review highlights the experiments that have provided insights into the roles of ROS in platelet function and the implications for platelet transfusion, and potentially in diseases such as inflammation and platelet hyperactivity. The review also describes the implication of redox mechanism in platelet storage considerations. PMID:28208668

  13. A Sustainable Redox-Flow Battery with an Aluminum-Based, Deep-Eutectic-Solvent Anolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changkun; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Leyuan; Wang, Xuelan; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Guihua

    2017-06-19

    Nonaqueous redox-flow batteries are an emerging energy storage technology for grid storage systems, but the development of anolytes has lagged far behind that of catholytes due to the major limitations of the redox species, which exhibit relatively low solubility and inadequate redox potentials. Herein, an aluminum-based deep-eutectic-solvent is investigated as an anolyte for redox-flow batteries. The aluminum-based deep-eutectic solvent demonstrated a significantly enhanced concentration of circa 3.2 m in the anolyte and a relatively low redox potential of 2.2 V vs. Li + /Li. The electrochemical measurements highlight that a reversible volumetric capacity of 145 Ah L -1 and an energy density of 189 Wh L -1 or 165 Wh kg -1 have been achieved when coupled with a I 3 - /I - catholyte. The prototype cell has also been extended to the use of a Br 2 -based catholyte, exhibiting a higher cell voltage with a theoretical energy density of over 200 Wh L -1 . The synergy of highly abundant, dendrite-free, multi-electron-reaction aluminum anodes and environmentally benign deep-eutectic-solvent anolytes reveals great potential towards cost-effective, sustainable redox-flow batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The potential application of rice bran wax oleogel to replace solid fat and enhance unsaturated fat content in ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulim Botega, Daniele C; Marangoni, Alejandro G; Smith, Alexandra K; Goff, H Douglas

    2013-09-01

    The development of structure in ice cream, characterized by its smooth texture and resistance to collapse during melting, depends, in part, on the presence of solid fat during the whipping and freezing steps. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential application of 10% rice bran wax (RBW) oleogel, comprised 90% high-oleic sunflower oil and 10% RBW, to replace solid fat in ice cream. A commercial blend of 80% saturated mono- and diglycerides and 20% polysorbate 80 was used as the emulsifier. Standard ice cream measurements, cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to evaluate the formation of structure in ice cream. RBW oleogel produced higher levels of overrun when compared to a liquid oil ice cream sample, creating a lighter sample with good texture and appearance. However, those results were not associated with higher meltdown resistance. Microscopy revealed larger aggregation of RBW oleogel fat droplets at the air cell interface and distortion of the shape of air cells and fat droplets. Although the RBW oleogel did not develop sufficient structure in ice cream to maintain shape during meltdown when a mono- and diglycerides and polysorbate 80 blend was used as the emulsifier, micro- and ultrastructure investigations suggested that RBW oleogel did induce formation of a fat globule network in ice cream, suggesting that further optimization could lead to an alternative to saturated fat sources for ice cream applications. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. High-throughput BioSorter quantification of relative mitochondrial content and membrane potential in living Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young Joon; Guha, Sujay; Tuluc, Florin; Falk, Marni J

    2018-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disease is caused by a wide range of individually rare genetic disorders that impair cellular energy metabolism. While fluorescence microscopy analysis of nematodes fed MitoTracker Green (MTG) and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) can reliably quantify relative mitochondrial density and membrane potential, respectively, in C. elegans models of mitochondrial dysfunction, it is a tedious process with limitations in the number and age of animals that can be studied. A novel, large particle, flow cytometry-based method reported here accelerates and automates the relative quantitation of mitochondrial physiology in nematode populations. Relative fluorescence profiles of nematode populations co-labeled with MTG and TMRE were obtained and analyzed by BioSorter (Union Biometrica). Variables tested included genetic mutation (wild-type N2 Bristol versus nuclear-encoded respiratory chain complex I mutant gas-1(fc21) worms), animal age (day 1 versus day 4 adults), classical respiratory chain inhibitor and uncoupler effects (oligomycin, FCCP), and pharmacologic therapy duration (24h versus 96h treatments with glucose or nicotinic acid). A custom MATLAB script, which can be run on any computer with MATLAB runtime, was written to automatically quantify and analyze results in large animal populations. BioSorter analysis independently validated relative MTG and TMRE changes that we had previously performed by fluorescence microscopy in a variety of experimental conditions, with notably greater animal population sizes and substantially reduced experimental time. Older, fragile animal populations that are difficult to study by microscopy approaches were readily amenable to analysis with the BioSorter method. Overall, this high-throughput method enables efficient relative quantitation of in vivo mitochondrial physiology over time in a living animal in response to gene mutations and candidate therapies, which can be used to accelerate the

  16. Assessing the Quality and Potential Efficacy of Commercial Extracts of Rhodiola rosea L. by Analyzing the Salidroside and Rosavin Content and the Electrophysiological Activity in Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation, a Synaptic Model of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Dimpfel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea L. roots and rhizome extracts are active ingredients in adaptogenic herbal medicinal products (HMP and dietary supplements for temporary relief of symptoms of stress, such as fatigue and weakness. R. rosea extract has a stimulating effect on the CNS, suggesting potential benefits on cognitive functions, memory, learning, and attention. The reproducible efficacy and quality of preparations of the underground parts of R. rosea depend on the highly variable content of the active markers, salidroside and rosavin, which affect the quality of HMP and dietary supplements. However, it is not clear which analytical markers are important for assessing the efficacy of R. rosea preparations intended for use in aging-induced mild cognitive disorders, such as attenuated memory, attention, and learning. Furthermore, the activity of various commercial R. rosea extracts has not been correlated with their content. Here, the biological activities of salidroside, rosavin, and seven commercial extracts of underground parts of R. rosea were assessed using a synaptic model of memory: long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission in hippocampus slices. A high degree of variation in the content of all active markers was observed. One extract from China lacked rosavin, and there was even variation in the extracts from the Altai geographic region. In vitro, rosavin, salidroside and all tested R. rosea extracts potentiated electric stimulation of an intra-hippocampal electric circuit, which resulted in higher responses of the pyramidal cells in isolated hippocampus slices. Rosavin was more active at higher concentrations than salidroside; while, salidroside was more effective at lower concentrations. The highest content of both active markers was found in the extracts that were active at the lowest concentrations tested; while, some extracts contained some other compounds that presumably reduced the efficacy due to antagonistic interactions

  17. Redox substoichiometry in isotope dilution analysis Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambara, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Ugai, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The oxidation reaction of antimony(III) with potassium dichromate has been investigated radiometrically. The quantitative oxidation of antimony(III) was found to be not disturbed even in large amounts of tin(IV). On the basis of these results the redox substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis using potassium dichromate as the oxidizing agent was proposed for the determination of antimony in metallic tin. An antimony content of 1.22+-0.05 μg in metallic tin (10 mg) was determined without separation of the matrix element. (author)

  18. Evaluation of iron content in a potential fodder crop oat (avena sativa l.) grown on soil treated with sugarcane filter cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.I.; Ahmad, K.; Kashaf, S.; Fardous, A.; Gondal, S.; Ejaz, A.; Ashraf, M.; Danish, M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different doses of sugarcane filter cake (SFC) on iron concentrations in the leaves of varying age of a potential fodder crop oat (Avena sativa L.) are reported in this study. Nine different treatments of SFC used were: 0 (control), 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 kg/ha applied to soil as full doses before sowing, and 600, 900, 1200, and 1500 applied as two equal splits, first before sowing and the second before flower initiation. Samples of soil were taken just after mixing the appropriate dose of SFC, whereas those of leaves were taken at the vegetative stage (45 days after sowing; hereafter they are referred as early leaves) and at the grain filling stage (hereafter referred to as late leaves). Iron (Fe) concentrations in soil and leaf samples (early and late) were determined unconnectedly. Soil Fe content increased significantly due to soil amendment with filter cake and it was well above the known critical level (2.5 mg/kg). In contrast, although soil amended with SFC improved the Fe content of both early and late leaves, their Fe content was well below the normal requirement of grazing animals. Thus, the ruminants feeding on this fodder species growing on soils amended with SFC are prone to experience Fe deficiency. Mineral supplementations containing reasonable amount of Fe sources are recommended to prevent complications caused by Fe deficiency as well as to achieve an optimal animal production of ruminants being reared on the pasture. (author)

  19. Biocompatible Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with high-Zr-content: Compositional optimization for potential biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Nengbin, E-mail: flower1982cn@126.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian University of Technology, 350118 Fuzhou (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, 350116 Fuzhou (China); Huang, Lu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Chen, Wenzhe [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian University of Technology, 350118 Fuzhou (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, 350116 Fuzhou (China); He, Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); Zhang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 100191 Beijing (China)

    2014-11-01

    The present study designs and prepares Ni-free Zr{sub 60+x}Ti{sub 2.5}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 12.5−x}Cu{sub 10}Ag{sub 5} (at.%, x = 0, 2.5, 5) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by copper mold casting for potential biomedical application. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility of the Zr-based BMGs are evaluated by investigating mechanical properties, bio-corrosion behavior, and cellular responses. It is found that increasing the content of Zr is favorable for the mechanical compatibility with a combination of low Young's modulus, large plasticity, and high notch toughness. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the Zr-based BMGs are corrosion resistant in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The bio-corrosion resistance of BMGs is improved with the increase in Zr content, which is attributed to the enrichment in Zr and decrease in Al concentration in the surface passive film of alloys. Regular cell responses of mouse MC3T3-E1 cells, including cell adhesion and proliferation, are observed on the Zr–Ti–Al–Fe–Cu–Ag BMGs, which reveals their general biosafety. The high-Zr-based BMGs exhibit a higher cell proliferation activity in comparison with that of pure Zr and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility can be used to guide the future design of biocompatible Zr-based BMGs. - Highlights: • Ni-free Zr{sub 60+x}Ti{sub 2.5}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 12.5−x}Cu{sub 10}Ag{sub 5} (at.%, x = 0, 2.5, 5) BMGs were fabricated. • Plasticity and notch toughness of BMGs are enhanced by high-Zr-content. • The high-Zr-based BMGs exhibit excellent bio-corrosion resistance in PBS solution. • The biosafety of BMGs is revealed by regular cell adhesion and proliferation. • High-Zr-bearing BMGs are favorable for potential applications as biomaterials.

  20. Potential benefits and harms of a peer support social network service on the internet for people with depressive tendencies: qualitative content analysis and social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Uchida, Chiyoko; Miyaki, Koichi; Sakai, Michi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nakayama, Takeo

    2009-07-23

    Internet peer support groups for depression are becoming popular and could be affected by an increasing number of social network services (SNSs). However, little is known about participant characteristics, social relationships in SNSs, and the reasons for usage. In addition, the effects of SNS participation on people with depression are rather unknown. The aim was to explore the potential benefits and harms of an SNS for depression based on a concurrent triangulation design of mixed methods strategy, including qualitative content analysis and social network analysis. A cross-sectional Internet survey of participants, which involved the collection of SNS log files and a questionnaire, was conducted in an SNS for people with self-reported depressive tendencies in Japan in 2007. Quantitative data, which included user demographics, depressive state, and assessment of the SNS (positive vs not positive), were statistically analyzed. Descriptive contents of responses to open-ended questions concerning advantages and disadvantages of SNS participation were analyzed using the inductive approach of qualitative content analysis. Contents were organized into codes, concepts, categories, and a storyline based on the grounded theory approach. Social relationships, derived from data of "friends," were analyzed using social network analysis, in which network measures and the extent of interpersonal association were calculated based on the social network theory. Each analysis and integration of results were performed through a concurrent triangulation design of mixed methods strategy. There were 105 participants. Median age was 36 years, and 51% (36/71) were male. There were 37 valid respondents; their number of friends and frequency of accessing the SNS were significantly higher than for invalid/nonrespondents (P = .008 and P = .003). Among respondents, 90% (28/31) were mildly, moderately, or severely depressed. Assessment of the SNS was performed by determining the access

  1. Nutrient content, in vitro ruminal fermentation characteristics and methane reduction potential of tropical tannin-containing leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Raghavendra; Saravanan, Mani; Baruah, Luna; Sampath, Koratekere T

    2012-12-01

    potential to suppress methanogenesis. Therefore tannins contained in these plants could be of interest in the development of new additives in ruminant nutrition. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Deep groundwater redox reactions in the Palmottu uranium deposit: The role of uranium and iron in these processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Duro, L.; Ahonen, L.

    1996-12-01

    The reduction oxidation properties of the deep bedrock and groundwater are important geochemical factors with respect to the chemical stability of the multibarrier system, which isolates the disposed nuclear fuel from biosphere. In the report are described the results of the redox experiments carried out in the field using the natural groundwaters of Palmottu, in Nummi-Pusula, Finland. The experiments include (1) measurements of natural water redox potential values during four to eight hours continuous pumping; (2) monitoring of the redox-potential response to an artificial change of pH of the groundwater. Separate tests were made in iron and uranium-rich groundwaters, respectively. The data of the field experiments were used in the redox-modelling of the iron and uranium systems. In accordance with earlier knowledge, it was showed that dissolved iron is an important redox electrolyte in natural waters, at least at concentration levels of milligrams per liter. However, a striking observation was that in the absence of dissolved iron dissolved uranium (in concentrations of about 200 nM or more) seems to be able to give nernstian response on platinum electrode in acid/base titrations. The effective redox properties of the bedrock-groundwater system depend on the availability and reactivity of solid phases able to exchange electrons with dissolved redox electrolytes. The present results indicate that, in the bedrock/groundwater system of the Palmottu uranium mineralization, uranium minerals are important redox buffers. (orig.) (refs.)

  3. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific Interaction between Redox Phospholipid Polymers and Plastoquinone in Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenya; Kaneko, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Masahito; Kato, Souichiro; Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2017-04-19

    Redox phospholipid polymers added in culture media are known to be capable of extracting electrons from living photosynthetic cells across bacterial cell membranes with high cytocompatibility. In the present study, we identify the intracellular redox species that transfers electrons to the polymers. The open-circuit electrochemical potential of an electrolyte containing the redox polymer and extracted thylakoid membranes shift to positive (or negative) under light irradiation, when an electron transport inhibitor specific to plastoquinone is added upstream (or downstream) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The same trend is also observed for a medium containing living photosynthetic cells of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. These results clearly indicate that the phospholipid redox polymers extract photosynthetic electrons mainly from plastoquinone. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. [Conception and Content Validation of a Questionnaire Relating to the Potential Need for Information of Visually Impaired Persons with Regard to Services and Contact Persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, U; Hechler, T; Witt, U; Krummenauer, F

    2015-12-01

    A questionnaire was drafted to identify the needs of visually impaired persons and to optimize their access to non-medical support and services. Subjects had to rate a list of 15 everyday activities that are typically affected by visual impairment (for example, being able to orient themselves in the home environment), by indicating the degree to which they perceive each activity to be affected, using a four-stage scale. They had to evaluate these aspects by means of a relevance assessment. The needs profile derived from this is then correlated with individualized information for assistance and support. The questionnaire shall be made available for use by subjects through advisers in some ophthalmic practices and via the internet. The validity of the content of the proposed tool was evaluated on the basis of a survey of 59 experts in the fields of medical, optical and psychological care and of persons involved in training initiatives. The experts were asked to rate the activities by relevance and clarity of the wording and to propose methods to further develop and optimize the content. The validity of the content was quantified according to a process adopted in the literature, based on the parameters Interrater Agreement (IRA) and Content Validity Index (CVI). The results of all responses (n = 19) and the sub-group analysis suggest that the questionnaire adequately reflects the potential needs profile of visually impaired persons. Overall, there was at least 80% agreement among the 19 experts for 93% of the proposed parameterisation of the activities relating to the relevance and clarity of the wording. Individual proposals for optimization of the design of the questionnaire were adopted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Determination of the phenolic content and antioxidant potential of crude extracts and isolated compounds from leaves of Cordia multispicata and Tournefortia bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Da Silva, Thiago B; Souza, Vivian Karoline T; Da Silva, Ana Paula F; Lyra Lemos, Rosangela P; Conserva, Lucia M

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of extracts and four flavonoids isolated from leaves of two Boraginaceae species (Cordia multispicata Cham. and Tournefortia bicolor Sw.) were evaluated using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, DPPH free radical scavenging and inhibition of peroxidation of linoleic acid by FTC method. For comparison, ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and BHT were used. In general, extracts from T. bicolor (68.8 +/- 0.001 to > 1000 mg/g) showed higher phenolic content than C. multispicata (66.1 +/- 0.009 to 231 +/- 0.07 mg/g), and also scavenged radicals (IC(50) 12.8 +/- 2.5 to 437 +/- 3.5 mg/L) and inhibited lipid peroxide formation (IC(50) 51.2 +/- 2.29 to 89 +/- 0.59 mg/L). For these extracts a good correlation between the phenolic content and antioxidant activity was observed, suggesting that T. bicolor is richer in phenolic compounds and that it could serve as a new source of natural antioxidants or nutraceuticals with potential applications. Chromatographic procedures monitored by antioxidant assays afforded seven compounds, which were identified by spectral analyses (IR, MS and 1D and 2D NMR) and comparison with reported data as being trans-phytol (1), taraxerol (2), 3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (3), 5,3'-dihydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (4), quercetin (5), tiliroside (6), and rutin (7). Compounds (4-7) were also evaluated and were effective as DPPH quenching (IC(50) 7.7 +/- 3.6 to 79.3 +/- 3.4 mg/L) and as inhibition of lipid peroxidation (IC(50) 80.1 +/- 0.98 to 88.7 +/- 3.62 mg/L). This is the first report on the total phenolic content, radical-scavenging and antioxidant activities of these species.

  7. The NASA Redox Storage System Development project, 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    The technical accomplishments pertaining to the development of Redox systems and related technology are outlined in terms of the task elements: prototype systems development, application analyses, and supporting technology. Prototype systems development provides for a major procurement to develop an industrial capability to take the current NASA Lewis technology and go on to the design, development, and commercialization of iron-chromium Redox storage systems. Application analyses provides for the definition of application concepts and technology requirements, specific definition studies, and the identification of market sectors and their penetration potential. Supporting technology includes both in house and contractual efforts that encompass implementation of technology improvements in membranes, electrodes, reactant processing, and system design. The status of all elements is discussed.

  8. Studies on meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ping Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective This experiment investigated meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and expression of genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages. Methods Sixty 4-week-old Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 6 replicate groups, each containing 10 pigs. One pig from each group was sacrificed at day 35, 63, 98, and 161 to isolate longissimus dorsi and triceps muscles. Results Meat color scores were higher in pigs at 35 d than those at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05, and those at 98 d were lower than those at 161 d (p<0.05. The total myoglobin was higher on 161 d compared with those at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05. Increase in the proportions of metmyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin and a decrease in oxymyoglobin were observed between days 35 and 161 (p<0.05. Meat color scores were correlated to the proportion of oxymyoglobin (r = 0.59, p<0.01, and negatively correlated with deoxymyoglobin and metmyoglobin content (r = −0.48 and −0.62, p<0.05. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH activity at 35 d and 98 d was higher than that at 161 d (p<0.05. The highest lactate dehydrogenase/MDH ratio was achieved at 161 d (p<0.05. Calcineurin mRNA expression decreased at 35 d compared to that at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05. Myocyte enhancer factor 2 mRNA results indicated a higher expression at 161 d than that at 63 d and 98 d (p<0.05. Conclusion Porcine meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential varied at different stages.

  9. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  10. New lab scale approaches for quantification of redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, P. M.; Dathe, A.; Nadeem, S.; Bakken, L. R.; Bloem, E.; French, H. K.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Degradation of organic chemicals in the unsaturated zone is a process highly relevant for developing remediation techniques for protecting groundwater. Degradation causes changes in chemical composition of the water phase and gas releases. These changes can potentially be mapped with electrical resistivity measurements in the bulk soil and gas measurements at the soil surface. The redox potential combined with the local geological conditions determines the composition of available electron acceptors as well as microbial degradation pathways and how the soil system is affected in the long term. After oxygen and nitrate are depleted, manganese and iron should be reduced. However, in experiments conducted in the unsaturated zone at Gardermoen airport, Norway, it was found that for the degradation of the de-icing agent propylene glycol (PG), manganese and iron were preferred over nitrate as electron acceptor. A key hypothesis for the work presented is that for a designated soil, the redox potential affects gas releases and soil solution composition profoundly. As the redox potential decreases, the reactants of the degradation change and therefore the composition of the soil-water system changes. These changes can be quantified dynamically by gas measurements and changes in electrical conductivity of the pore water and electrical resistivity of the bulk soil. Batch experiments were conducted to examine whether nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor over iron and manganese oxides as described in classical redox reaction theory. Gas releases during PG and glutamate degradation were measured in a sandy pristine soil with and without nitrate under anaerobic condition during two weeks of incubation. Chemical reactions were quantified with the modelling tool ORCHESTRA. We are currently investigating whether dynamical measurements of electrical conductivity and bulk resistivity are suited to trace which electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese or iron) are being reduced. First

  11. Inhibitors of nuclease and redox activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laev, Sergey S; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Lavrik, Olga I

    2017-05-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein which is essential in the base excision repair (BER) pathway of DNA lesions caused by oxidation and alkylation. This protein hydrolyzes DNA adjacent to the 5'-end of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site to produce a nick with a 3'-hydroxyl group and a 5'-deoxyribose phosphate moiety or activates the DNA-binding activity of certain transcription factors through its redox function. Studies have indicated a role for APE1/Ref-1 in the pathogenesis of cancer and in resistance to DNA-interactive drugs. Thus, this protein has potential as a target in cancer treatment. As a result, major efforts have been directed to identify small molecule inhibitors against APE1/Ref-1 activities. These agents have the potential to become anticancer drugs. The aim of this review is to present recent progress in studies of all published small molecule APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors. The structures and activities of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors, that target both DNA repair and redox activities, are presented and discussed. To date, there is an urgent need for further development of the design and synthesis of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors due to high importance of this protein target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Redox sensor proteins for highly sensitive direct imaging of intracellular redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kazunori; Nagai, Takeharu; Nakano, Masahiro; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-02-13

    Intracellular redox state is a critical factor for fundamental cellular functions, including regulation of the activities of various metabolic enzymes as well as ROS production and elimination. Genetically-encoded fluorescent redox sensors, such as roGFP (Hanson, G. T., et al. (2004)) and Redoxfluor (Yano, T., et al. (2010)), have been developed to investigate the redox state of living cells. However, these sensors are not useful in cells that contain, for example, other colored pigments. We therefore intended to obtain simpler redox sensor proteins, and have developed oxidation-sensitive fluorescent proteins called Oba-Q (oxidation balance sensed quenching) proteins. Our sensor proteins derived from CFP and Sirius can be used to monitor the intracellular redox state as their fluorescence is drastically quenched upon oxidation. These blue-shifted spectra of the Oba-Q proteins enable us to monitor various redox states in conjunction with other sensor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efecto del potencial rédox sobre los parámetros del cultivo de Trypanosoma cruzi desarrollado en medio líquido agitado Effect of redox potential on culture parameters of Trypanosoma cruzi developed in liquid stirred media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Martínez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El potencial rédox (Eh es una propiedad fisicoquímica que presentan los solutos capaces de intercambiar electrones con un electrodo inerte. El potencial rédox influye en el crecimiento bacteriano en forma independiente del oxígeno disuelto. Es escasa la información disponible en relación a cultivos in vitro de protozoarios, en particular de Trypanosoma cruzi. Para determinar el efecto del Eh sobre los parámetros de cultivos, se empleó la cepa Tulahuén 0, desarrollada en medio CIEN líquido en agitación y se ensayaron valores de Eh entre 310 mV (testigo y 110 mV en 11 réplicas diferentes y duplicadas. Se determinaron pH, velocidad específica de desarrollo (µ, Eh, rH, velocidad de consumo de glucosa y rendimiento. Los resultados muestran que µ varía en forma directa con el Eh. Se establece una alta correlación (r = 0,93; P The redox potential (Eh is a physico-chemical property presented by solutes able to interchange electrons with an inert electrode. The redox potential influences bacterial growth in an independent way from dissolved oxygen. The available information about protozoaries in vitro grown is scarce, being Trypanosoma cruzi main example. T. cruzi Tulahuén 0 strain, developed in CIEN liquid stirred media, was used to determine the Eh effect on growth parameters. Eh values between 310 mV (reference and 110 mV were measured in 11 different samples and by duplicate. pH, m, Eh, rH, consume glucose rate and efficiency were determined. Results show that specific rate of development (µ varies in a direct way with Eh. A high correlation (r = 0.93; P < 0.01 between rH (rH = Eh(V+ 0.06 pH and µ was established, even when dissolved oxygen concentration remained constant. Other parameters in the growing medium showed no significant variations. It is concluded that changes on Eh in the medium significantly affect of T. cruzi's growth being a variable to take into account when potential trypanocide substances are analyzed.

  14. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  15. A Bacterial Biosensor for Oxidative Stress Using the Constitutively Expressed Redox-Sensitive Protein roGFP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Arias-Barreiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly specific, high throughput-amenable bacterial biosensor for chemically induced cellular oxidation was developed using constitutively expressed redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein roGFP2 in E. coli (E. coli-roGFP2. Disulfide formation between two key cysteine residues of roGFP2 was assessed using a double-wavelength ratiometric approach. This study demonstrates that only a few minutes were required to detect oxidation using E. coli-roGFP2, in contrast to conventional bacterial oxidative stress sensors. Cellular oxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide, menadione, sodium selenite, zinc pyrithione, triphenyltin and naphthalene became detectable after 10 seconds and reached the maxima between 80 to 210 seconds, contrary to Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+ and sodium arsenite, which induced the oxidation maximum immediately. The lowest observable effect concentrations (in ppm were determined as 1.0 x 10−7 (arsenite, 1.0 x 10−4 (naphthalene, 1.0 x 10−4 (Cu2+, 3.8 x 10−4 (H2O2, 1.0 x 10−3 (Cd2+, 1.0 x 10−3 (Zn2+, 1.0 x 10−2 (menadione, 1.0 (triphenyltin, 1.56 (zinc pyrithione, 3.1 (selenite and 6.3 (Pb2+, respectively. Heavy metal-induced oxidation showed unclear response patterns, whereas concentration-dependent sigmoid curves were observed for other compounds. In vivo GSH content and in vitro roGFP2 oxidation assays together with E. coli-roGFP2 results suggest that roGFP2 is sensitive to redox potential change and thiol modification induced by environmental stressors. Based on redox-sensitive technology, E. coli-roGFP2 provides a fast comprehensive detection system for toxicants that induce cellular oxidation.

  16. A molecular theory of chemically modified electrodes with self-assembled redox polyelectrolye thin films: Reversible cyclic voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J. [INQUIMAE, DQIAyQF Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Szleifer, Igal [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    A molecular theory of chemically modified electrodes is applied to study redox polyelectroyte modified electrodes. The molecular approach explicitly includes the size, shape, charge distribution, and conformations of all of the molecular species in the system as well as the chemical equilibria (redox and acid-base) and intermolecular interactions. An osmium pyridine-bipyridine complex covalently bound to poly(allyl-amine) backbone (PAH-Os) adsorbed onto mercapto-propane sulfonate (MPS) thiolated gold electrode is described. The potential and electrolyte composition dependent redox and nonredox capacitance can be calculated with the molecular theory in very good agreement with voltammetric experiments under reversible conditions without the use of freely adjustable parameter. Unlike existing phenomenological models the theory links the electrochemical behavior with the structure of the polymer layer. The theory predicts a highly inhomogeneous distribution of acid-base and redox states that strongly couples with the spatial arrangement of the molecular species in the nanometric redox film. (author)

  17. Protein Redox Dynamics During Light-to-Dark Transitions in Cyanobacteria and Impacts Due to Nutrient Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified 300 putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations, including carbon and nitrogen limitations, contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to a high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and suggest potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  18. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed.

  19. Electron flow in multicenter enzymes: theory, applications, and consequences on the natural design of redox chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Christophe; Lederer, Florence; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick

    2006-01-11

    In protein film voltammetry, a redox enzyme is directly connected to an electrode; in the presence of substrate and when the driving force provided by the electrode is appropriate, a current flow reveals the steady-state turnover. We show that, in the case of a multicenter enzyme, this signal reports on the energetics and kinetics of electron transfer (ET) along the redox chain that wires the active site to the electrode, and this provides a new strategy for studying intramolecular ET. We propose a model which takes into account all the enzyme's redox microstates, and we prove it useful to interpret data for various enzymes. Several general ideas emerge from this analysis. Considering the reversibility of ET is a requirement: the usual picture, where ET is depicted as a series of irreversible steps, is oversimplified and lacks the important features that we emphasize. We give justification to the concept of apparent reduction potential on the time scale of turnover and we explain how the value of this potential relates to the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. When intramolecular ET does not limit turnover, the redox chain merely mediates the driving force provided by the electrode or the soluble redox partner, whereas when intramolecular ET is slow, the enzyme behaves as if its active active site had apparent redox properties which depend on the reduction potentials of the relays. This suggests an alternative to the idea that redox chains are optimized in terms of speed: evolutionary pressure may have resulted in slowing down intramolecular ET in order to tune the enzyme's "operating potential".

  20. Thermodynamic and redox properties of graphene oxides for lithium-ion battery applications: a first principles density functional theory modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Kim, Ki Chul; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Seung Soon

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the thermodynamic stability and redox properties of oxygen functional groups on graphene is critical to systematically design stable graphene-based positive electrode materials with high potential for lithium-ion battery applications. In this work, we study the thermodynamic and redox properties of graphene functionalized with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups, and the evolution of these properties with the number, types and distribution of functional groups by employing the density functional theory method. It is found that the redox potential of the functionalized graphene is sensitive to the types, number, and distribution of oxygen functional groups. First, the carbonyl group induces higher redox potential than the hydroxyl group. Second, more carbonyl groups would result in higher redox potential. Lastly, the locally concentrated distribution of the carbonyl group is more beneficial to have higher redox potential compared to the uniformly dispersed distribution. In contrast, the distribution of the hydroxyl group does not affect the redox potential significantly. Thermodynamic investigation demonstrates that the incorporation of carbonyl groups at the edge of graphene is a promising strategy for designing thermodynamically stable positive electrode materials with high redox potentials.

  1. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  2. Symproportionation versus Disproportionation in Bromine Redox Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toporek, Marcin; Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M.; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • The disproportionation and symproportionation of bromine in different media is presented. • All the redox systems are elaborated according to the principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic redox systems (GATES/GEB). • All physicochemical knowledge is involved in the algorithm applied for this purpose. • The graphical representation of the systems is the basis of gaining the detailed physicochemical knowledge on the systems in question. -- Abstract: The paper refers to dynamic (titration) redox systems where symproportionation or disproportionation of bromine species occur. The related systems are modeled according to principles assumed in the Generalized Approach to Electrolytic Redox Systems (GATES), with Generalized Electron Balance (GEB) concept involved in the GATES/GEB software. The results obtained from calculations made with use of iterative computer programs prepared according to MATLAB computational software, are presented graphically, as 2D and 3D graphs

  3. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic cytoplasm has long been regarded as a cellular compartment in which the reduced state of protein cysteines is largely favored. Under normal conditions, the cytosolic low-molecular weight redox buffer, comprising primarily of glutathione, is highly reducing and reactive oxygen species...... (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...... organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the combination of genetic and biochemical approaches has brought us furthest in understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular redox regulation. It has been shown in yeast that, in addition to the enzyme glutathione reductase, other mechanisms may exist...

  4. Profiling bacterial communities associated with sediment-based aquaculture bioremediation systems under contrasting redox regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgina; Caldwell, Gary S.; Wade, Matthew J.; Free, Andrew; Jones, Clifford L. W.; Stead, Selina M.

    2016-12-01

    Deposit-feeding invertebrates are proposed bioremediators in microbial-driven sediment-based aquaculture effluent treatment systems. We elucidate the role of the sediment reduction-oxidation (redox) regime in structuring benthic bacterial communities, having direct implications for bioremediation potential and deposit-feeder nutrition. The sea cucumber Holothuria scabra was cultured on sediments under contrasting redox regimes; fully oxygenated (oxic) and redox stratified (oxic-anoxic). Taxonomically, metabolically and functionally distinct bacterial communities developed between the redox treatments with the oxic treatment supporting the greater diversity; redox regime and dissolved oxygen levels were the main environmental drivers. Oxic sediments were colonised by nitrifying bacteria with the potential to remediate nitrogenous wastes. Percolation of oxygenated water prevented the proliferation of anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria, which were prevalent in the oxic-anoxic sediments. At the predictive functional level, bacteria within the oxic treatment were enriched with genes associated with xenobiotics metabolism. Oxic sediments showed the greater bioremediation potential; however, the oxic-anoxic sediments supported a greater sea cucumber biomass. Overall, the results indicate that bacterial communities present in fully oxic sediments may enhance the metabolic capacity and bioremediation potential of deposit-feeder microbial systems. This study highlights the benefits of incorporating deposit-feeding invertebrates into effluent treatment systems, particularly when the sediment is oxygenated.

  5. Thioredoxins, Glutaredoxins, and Peroxiredoxins—Molecular Mechanisms and Health Significance: from Cofactors to Antioxidants to Redox Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Godoy, José Rodrigo; Berndt, Carsten; Hudemann, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thioredoxins (Trxs), glutaredoxins (Grxs), and peroxiredoxins (Prxs) have been characterized as electron donors, guards of the intracellular redox state, and “antioxidants”. Today, these redox catalysts are increasingly recognized for their specific role in redox signaling. The number of publications published on the functions of these proteins continues to increase exponentially. The field is experiencing an exciting transformation, from looking at a general redox homeostasis and the pathological oxidative stress model to realizing redox changes as a part of localized, rapid, specific, and reversible redox-regulated signaling events. This review summarizes the almost 50 years of research on these proteins, focusing primarily on data from vertebrates and mammals. The role of Trx fold proteins in redox signaling is discussed by looking at reaction mechanisms, reversible oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins, and characterized interaction partners. On the basis of this analysis, the specific regulatory functions are exemplified for the cellular processes of apoptosis, proliferation, and iron metabolism. The importance of Trxs, Grxs, and Prxs for human health is addressed in the second part of this review, that is, their potential impact and functions in different cell types, tissues, and various pathological conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1539–1605. PMID:23397885

  6. Aligning HIV/AIDS communication with the oral tradition of Africans: a theory-based content analysis of songs' potential in prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekalu, Mesfin Awoke; Eggermont, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing recognition of songs as a useful HIV/AIDS campaign strategy, little research has investigated their potential and/or actual impact. In this study, through a theory-based content analysis, we have assessed the prevention domains covered and the health-relevant constructs promoted by 23 AIDS songs widely used to aid prevention efforts in Ethiopia. To identify the health-relevant constructs and reveal their potential to facilitate or inhibit positive changes, the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) has been used. The findings revealed that the songs cover most of the prevention domains that constitute the current agenda of behavior change communication in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, although all the EPPM variables have been found in almost every song, there were significantly more efficacy messages than threat messages. This suggests that although the songs may lead to positive changes in HIV/AIDS-related outcomes among audiences who have already perceived the threat posed by HIV/AIDS, they are less likely to motivate and thereby generate responses from audiences who have less or no threat perceptions. It is argued that given their potential as a culturally appropriate strategy in Sub-Saharan Africa where oral channels of communication play significant roles, songs could be harnessed for better outcomes through a theory-based design.

  7. Modelling sulfamethoxazole degradation under different redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; Rodriguez-Escales, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a low adsorptive, polar, sulfonamide antibiotic, widely present in aquatic environments. Degradation of SMX in subsurface porous media is spatially and temporally variable, depending on various environmental factors such as in situ redox potential, availability of nutrients, local soil characteristics, and temperature. It has been reported that SMX is better degraded under anoxic conditions and by co-metabolism processes. In this work, we first develop a conceptual model of degradation of SMX under different redox conditions (denitrification and iron reducing conditions), and second, we construct a mathematical model that allows reproducing different experiments of SMX degradation reported in the literature. The conceptual model focuses on the molecular behavior and contemplates the formation of different metabolites. The model was validated using the experimental data from Barbieri et al. (2012) and Mohatt et al. (2011). It adequately reproduces the reversible degradation of SMX under the presence of nitrite as an intermediate product of denitrification. In those experiments degradation was mediated by the transient formation of a diazonium cation, which was considered responsible of the substitution of the amine radical by a nitro radical, forming the 4-nitro-SMX. The formation of this metabolite is a reversible process, so that once the concentration of nitrite was back to zero due to further advancement of denitrification, the concentration of SMX was fully recovered. The forward reaction, formation of 4-nitro SMX, was modeled considering a kinetic of second order, whereas the backward reaction, dissociation of 4-nitro-SMX back to the original compound, could be modeled with a first order degradation reaction. Regarding the iron conditions, SMX was degraded due to the oxidation of iron (Fe2+), which was previously oxidized from goethite due to the degradation of a pool of labile organic carbon. As the oxidation of iron occurred on the

  8. Root yield and reserpine content of Rauvolfia serpentina Benth. on media under the plant with potential allelopathic effect by nutrient addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SULANDJARI

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The root of Rauvolfia serpentina Benth (pule pandak contains more than 50 kinds of alkaloid which is useful to treat many kinds of diseases and reserpine is ones to treat of hypertension. Eucalyptus deglupta and Acacia mangium have become release an allelochemy to ecosystem that are can reduce the growth of the plant association. The purpose of this research is to know about the influence of nutrient and media under the plant with potential allelopathic effect to root yield and reserpine content. The research was arranged in Complete Random Block Design. Nutrient was nested on media. Media are: under Tectona grandis, A. mangium, and E. deglupta. Nutrient is 30 t ha-1 organic fertilizers, 200 ha-1 inorganic (NPK fertilizers and control. Polybag with 30 cmx30 cm plant densities and 20% of shading. The result are that beside under the T. grandis, pule pandak was capable to growth under the A. mangium and E. deglupta. Thirty ton per hectare organic fertilizers was increased of growth and yield more than 200 ha-1 inorganic (NPK fertilizers. Allelocemy from A. mangium and E. deglupta was decreased dry root yield but was not effect to reserpine content.

  9. Chemical composition, fatty acid content and antioxidant potential of meat from goats supplemented with Moringa (Moringa oleifera) leaves, sunflower cake and grass hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qwele, K; Hugo, A; Oyedemi, S O; Moyo, B; Masika, P J; Muchenje, V

    2013-03-01

    The present study determined the chemical composition, fatty acid (FA) content and antioxidant capacity of meat from goats supplemented with Moringa oleifera leaves (MOL) or sunflower cake (SC) or grass hay (GH). The meat from goat supplemented with MOL had higher concentrations of total phenolic content (10.62±0.27 mg tannic acid equivalent E/g). The MOL significantly scavenged 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic-acid (ABTS) radical to 93.51±0.19% (93.51±0.19%) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical to 58.95±0.3% than other supplements. The antioxidative effect of MOL supplemented meat on catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid oxidation (LO) was significantly (Pmeat from goat feed on grass hay or those supplemented with sunflower seed cake. The present study indicated that the anti-oxidative potential of MOL may play a role in improving meat quality (chemical composition, colour and lipid stability). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Total Phenol Content and In Vitro Antioxidant Potential of Helicanthus elastica (Desr. Danser-A Less-explored Indian Mango Mistletoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppala Narayana Sunil Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are an important source of antioxidant molecules like tannins, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, etc., Helicanthus elastica (Desr. Danser (Loranthaceae is one such plant belonging to the category of mistletoe, and grows commonly on the mango trees in India. In the present study, an attempt has been made to assess the antioxidant properties of the plant. Ethanol extract of H. elastica growing on mango tree was studied using different in vitro models. Shade-dried whole plant material was extracted with ethanol by cold percolation. Fifty milligrams of the alcohol extract of H. elastica was weighed and dissolved in 10 ml of methanol. The resultant 5 mg/ml solution was suitably diluted to obtain different concentrations. Total phenol content, reducing power assay, and scavenging of free radicals like nitric oxide, hydroxyl, hydrogen peroxide, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl were studied by standardized in vitro chemical methods using ascorbic acid as the standard. The total phenol content of the plant was found to be 1.89% w/w. The extract showed good reducing power as well as scavenging of free radicals (nitric oxide, hydroxyl, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide at concentrations ranging from 5 to 100 μg/ml. The study revealed the antioxidant potential of H. elastica.

  11. Investigation of phytochemical contents, in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial behavior and in vivo anti-inflammatory potential of Ecballium elaterium methanol fruits extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir FELHI

    Full Text Available Abstract Ecballium elaterium species are mostly used as therapeutic agents and food ingredient. The current work was designed to investigate phytochemical contents, antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties of methanol fruits extract of Ecballium elaterium. Good antioxidant activity was observed with IC50 values of 156 ± 4 and 377 ± 6 μg/mL for DPPH and ABTS, respectively, and EC50 of 126 ± 4 µg/mL for FRAP assays, which is related with their richness in total phenolic, flavonoid and condensed tannins contents. The results of antibacterial activity showed the effectiveness of methanol extract against Bacillus cereus with value of inhibition zone diameter of 15 ± 0 mm and a MIC and MBC values of 6 ± 0 and 12 ± 0 mg/mL, respectively. The in vivo anti-inflammatory effects have been also studied by carrageenan induced rat paw edema assay and the results revealed that a dose of 75 mg/kg induced a significant inhibition of 66.4% at 2 h. FT-IR spectral data justified the presence of biological functional groups such as ─OH, C─H, C─O, C─C and C=O. These results highlighted the potential using of Ecballium elaterium fruits extract as natural antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents for food applications and for the pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  13. Redox Regulation of Endothelial Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are present throughout blood vessels and have variable roles in both physiological and pathological settings. EC fate is altered and regulated by several key factors in physiological or pathological conditions. Reactive nitrogen species and reactive oxygen species derived from NAD(P)H oxidases, mitochondria, or nitric oxide-producing enzymes are not only cytotoxic but also compose a signaling network in the redox system. The formation, actions, key molecular interactions, and physiological and pathological relevance of redox signals in ECs remain unclear. We review the identities, sources, and biological actions of oxidants and reductants produced during EC function or dysfunction. Further, we discuss how ECs shape key redox sensors and examine the biological functions, transcriptional responses, and post-translational modifications evoked by the redox system in ECs. We summarize recent findings regarding the mechanisms by which redox signals regulate the fate of ECs and address the outcome of altered EC fate in health and disease. Future studies will examine if the redox biology of ECs can be targeted in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24633153

  14. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  15. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  16. Redox-induced reversible luminescence switching of cerium-doped upconversion nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanan [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xiao, Qingbo, E-mail: qbxiao2011@sinano.ac.cn [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jian [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xi, Yonglan [Laboratory for Agricultural Wastes Treatment and Recycling Institute of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Science, Nanjing 210014 (China); Li, Fujin [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Feng, Yamin [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Shi, Liyi [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lin, Hongzhen, E-mail: hzlin2010@sinano.ac.cn [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Smart upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) that can be reversibly switched between two or more luminescent states by certain external stimuli have attracted considerable attention due to their great potential in biological applications. Here we report for the first time a type of redox-switchable UCNPs by codoping NaGdF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanorods with the redox-active Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ion pairs. A reversible switching of their UC luminescence intensity was observed upon the variation of the surrounding redox environments. We show solid proof that the luminescence switching is caused by the tailoring of the NaGdF{sub 4} host crystal structure in response to changing redox state of the codoped cerium ions. A proof-of-concept example is further demonstrated by using these UCNPs for probing the dynamical variation of redox environments in biological tissues. - Highlights: • Synthesis of upconversion nanoparticles doped with Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ions. • The precise and reversible modification of crystal structure by redox reactions. • Tuning the upconversion luminescence by tailoring the crystal structure.

  17. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  18. Model creation of moving redox reaction boundary in agarose gel electrophoresis by traditional potassium permanganate method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hai-Yang; Liu, Qian; Li, Jia-Hao; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-02-21

    A novel moving redox reaction boundary (MRRB) model was developed for studying electrophoretic behaviors of analytes involving redox reaction on the principle of moving reaction boundary (MRB). Traditional potassium permanganate method was used to create the boundary model in agarose gel electrophoresis because of the rapid reaction rate associated with MnO(4)(-) ions and Fe(2+) ions. MRB velocity equation was proposed to describe the general functional relationship between velocity of moving redox reaction boundary (V(MRRB)) and concentration of reactant, and can be extrapolated to similar MRB techniques. Parameters affecting the redox reaction boundary were investigated in detail. Under the selected conditions, good linear relationship between boundary movement distance and time were obtained. The potential application of MRRB in electromigration redox reaction titration was performed in two different concentration levels. The precision of the V(MRRB) was studied and the relative standard deviations were below 8.1%, illustrating the good repeatability achieved in this experiment. The proposed MRRB model enriches the MRB theory and also provides a feasible realization of manual control of redox reaction process in electrophoretic analysis.

  19. Uranium redox transition pathways in acetate-amended sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Campbell, Kate M.; Long, Philip E.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Suvorova, Elenal I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Alessi, Daniel S.; Stylo, Malgorzata; Webb, Samuel M.; Davis, James A.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Blue, Lisa Y.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2013-01-01

    Redox transitions of uranium [from U(VI) to U(IV)] in low-temperature sediments govern the mobility of uranium in the environment and the accumulation of uranium in ore bodies, and inform our understanding of Earth’s geochemical history. The molecular-scale mechanistic pathways of these transitions determine the U(IV) products formed, thus influencing uranium isotope fractionation, reoxidation, and transport in sediments. Studies that improve our understanding of these pathways have the potential to substantially advance process understanding across a number of earth sciences disciplines. Detailed mechanistic information regarding uranium redox transitions in field sediments is largely nonexistent, owing to the difficulty of directly observing molecular-scale processes in the subsurface and the compositional/physical complexity of subsurface systems. Here, we present results from an in situ study of uranium redox transitions occurring in aquifer sediments under sulfate-reducing conditions. Based on molecular-scale spectroscopic, pore-scale geochemical, and macroscale aqueous evidence, we propose a biotic–abiotic transition pathway in which biomass-hosted mackinawite (FeS) is an electron source to reduce U(VI) to U(IV), which subsequently reacts with biomass to produce monomeric U(IV) species. A species resembling nanoscale uraninite is also present, implying the operation of at least two redox transition pathways. The presence of multiple pathways in low-temperature sediments unifies apparently contrasting prior observations and helps to explain sustained uranium reduction under disparate biogeochemical conditions. These findings have direct implications for our understanding of uranium bioremediation, ore formation, and global geochemical processes.

  20. The economic potential of some pegmatites from the Kenhardt area in relation to the trace-element content of their border zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Forty-one samples collected from the border zones of pegmatites were analysed for their lithium, beryllium, niobium, tantalum, uranium, thorium, bismuth, and tin contents. A technique developed previously was used in an attempt to classify the pegmatites as containing economically significant quantities of these rare elements or as barren. Twenty-one of the samples were collected from pegmatites that were known (from previous attempts to mine them) to be either economically significant or barren, and were used as a control group; 75 per cent of these samples were classified correctly. Of twenty samples from pegmatites of unknown economic potential, two were classified as economically significant. However, in view of the low rate of success of classification of the control group, it is considered that further refinement of the technique is necessary before classification of a pegmatite as containing economically significant amounts of minerals can be considered to be conclusive

  1. Improving metabolic efficiency of the reverse beta-oxidation cycle by balancing redox cofactor requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Xia; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jiaying; Xia, Xiudong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ziyu; Chen, Yue; Liu, Yinghao; Dong, Mingsheng

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have made many exciting achievements on pushing the functional reversal of beta-oxidation cycle (r-BOX) to more widespread adoption for synthesis of a wide variety of fuels and chemicals. However, the redox cofactor requirement for the efficient operation of r-BOX remains unclear. In this work, the metabolic efficiency of r-BOX for medium-chain fatty acid (C 6 -C 10 , MCFA) production was optimized by redox cofactor engineering. Stoichiometric analysis of the r-BOX pathway and further experimental examination identified NADH as a crucial determinant of r-BOX process yield. Furthermore, the introduction of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii using fermentative inhibitor byproduct formate as a redox NADH sink improved MCFA titer from initial 1.2g/L to 3.1g/L. Moreover, coupling of increasing the supply of acetyl-CoA with NADH to achieve fermentative redox balance enabled product synthesis at maximum titers. To this end, the acetate re-assimilation pathway was further optimized to increase acetyl-CoA availability associated with the new supply of NADH. It was found that the acetyl-CoA synthetase activity and intracellular ATP levels constrained the activity of acetate re-assimilation pathway, and 4.7g/L of MCFA titer was finally achieved after alleviating these two limiting factors. To the best of our knowledge, this represented the highest titer reported to date. These results demonstrated that the key constraint of r-BOX was redox imbalance and redox engineering could further unleash the lipogenic potential of this cycle. The redox engineering strategies could be applied to acetyl-CoA-derived products or other bio-products requiring multiple redox cofactors for biosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Redox-controlled release dynamics of thallium in periodically flooded arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić-Mladenović, Svetlana; Frohne, Tina; Kresović, Mirjana; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Savić, Dubravka; Ličina, Vlado; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first work to mechanistically study the impact of the redox potential (E H ) and principal factors, such as pH, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), chlorides (Cl - ) and sulfates (SO 4 2- ), on the release dynamics of thallium (Tl) in periodically flooded soil. We simulated flooding using an automated biogeochemical microcosm system that allows for systematical control of pre-defined redox windows. The E H value was increased mechanistically at intervals of approximately 100 mV from reducing (-211 mV) to oxidizing (475 mV) conditions. Soluble Tl levels (0.02-0.28 μg L -1 ) increased significantly with increases in E H (r = 0.80, p Thallium mobilization was found to be related to several simultaneous processes involving the gradual oxidation of Tl-bearing sulfides, reductive dissolution of Fe-Mn oxides and desorption from mineral sorbents. Manganese oxides did not appear to have a considerable effect on Tl retention under oxidizing conditions. Before conducting the microcosm experiment, Tl geochemical fractionation was assessed using the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure. The BCR revealed a majority of Tl in the residual fraction (77.7%), followed by reducible (13.3%) and oxidizable fractions (5.9%). By generating high levels of Tl toxicity at low doses, Tl released under oxidizing conditions may pose an environmental threat. In the future, similar studies should be conducted on various soils along with a determination of the Tl species and monitoring of the Tl content in plants to achieve more detailed insight into soluble Tl behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Redox front penetration in the fractured Toki Granite, central Japan: An analogue for redox reactions and redox buffering in fractured crystalline host rocks for repositories of long-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koshi; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Akagawa, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Shoji; Metcalfe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep redox front developed in orogenic granitic rock have been studied. • The process was controlled by the buffering capacity of minerals. • This is an analogue of redox front penetration into HLW repositories in Japan. - Abstract: Redox buffering is one important factor to be considered when assessing the barrier function of potential host rocks for a deep geological repository for long-lived radioactive waste. If such a repository is to be sited in fractured crystalline host rock it must be demonstrated that waste will be emplaced deeper than the maximum depth to which oxidizing waters can penetrate from the earth’s surface via fractures, during the assessment timeframe (typically 1 Ma). An analogue for penetration of such oxidizing water occurs in the Cretaceous Toki Granite of central Japan. Here, a deep redox front is developed along water-conducting fractures at a depth of 210 m below the ground surface. Detailed petrographical studies and geochemical analyses were carried out on drill core specimens of this redox front. The aim was to determine the buffering processes and behavior of major and minor elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), during redox front development. The results are compared with analytical data from an oxidized zone found along shallow fractures (up to 20 m from the surface) in the same granitic rock, in order to understand differences in elemental migration according to the depth below the ground surface of redox-front formation. Geochemical analyses by XRF and ICP-MS of the oxidized zone at 210 m depth reveal clear changes in Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratios and Ca depletion across the front, while Fe concentrations vary little. In contrast, the redox front identified along shallow fractures shows strong enrichments of Fe, Mn and trace elements in the oxidized zone compared with the fresh rock matrix. The difference can be ascribed to the changing Eh and pH of groundwater as it flows downwards in the granite, due to

  4. Some redox chemistry of HPO2-. and .PO32- radicals. A pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, J.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The HO . radical oxidises hypophosphite and phosphite anions to HPO 2 -. and . PO 3 2- respectively, but Br 2 -. and N 3 . do not. The rates of oxidation of HPO 2 -. by a series of oxidising agents of known one electron redox potentials decrease with decreasing potential while the corresponding rates for oxidation of . PO 3 2- remain close to the diffusion controlled limit. . PO 3 2- will oxidise cysteine but HPO 2 -. does not. . PO 3 2- did not oxidise ABTS, ascorbate, or the anion of the vitamin E analogue, trolox. It reduced traces of TMPD +. in TMPD rather than oxidising the substrate. The one electron redox potentials for oxidation and reduction of . PO 3 2- are calculated in light of recently published redox data on penicillamine. (author)

  5. Garlic, from Remedy to Stimulant: Evaluation of Antifungal Potential Reveals Diversity in Phytoalexin Allicin Content among Garlic Cultivars; Allicin Containing Aqueous Garlic Extracts Trigger Antioxidants in Cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Sikandar; Cheng, Zhihui; Ahmad, Husain; Ali, Muhammad; Chen, Xuejin; Wang, Mengyi

    2016-01-01

    Garlic has the charisma of a potent remedy and holds its repute of a therapeutic panacea since the dawn of civilization. An integrated approach was adopted to evaluate the genetic diversity among Chinese garlic cultivars for their antifungal potency as well as allicin content distribution and, furthermore; a bioassay was performed to study the bio-stimulation mechanism of aqueous garlic extracts (AGE) in the growth and physiology of cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Initially, 28 garlic cultivars were evaluated against four kinds of phytopathogenic fungi; Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, Verticillium dahliae and Phytophthora capsici, respectively. A capricious antifungal potential among the selected garlic cultivars was observed. HPLC fingerprinting and quantification confirmed diversity in allicin abundance among the selected cultivars. Cultivar G025, G064, and G074 had the highest allicin content of 3.98, 3.7, and 3.66 mg g-1, respectively, whereas G110 was found to have lowest allicin content of 0.66 mg g-1. Cluster analysis revealed three groups on the basis of antifungal activity and allicin content among the garlic cultivars. Cultivar G025, G2011-4, and G110 were further evaluated to authenticate the findings through different solvents and shelf life duration and G025 had the strongest antifungal activity in all conditions. minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of Allicin aqueous standard (AAS) and AGE showed significant role of allicin as primary antifungal substance of AGE. Leaf disk bioassay against P. capsici and V. dahliae to comparatively study direct action of AGE and AAS during infection process employing eggplant and pepper leaves showed a significant reduction in infection percentage. To study the bioactivity of AGE, a bioassay was performed using cucumber seedlings and results revealed that AGE is biologically active inside cucumber seedlings and alters the defense mechanism of the plant probably activating reactive

  6. Potential Benefits and Harms of a Peer Support Social Network Service on the Internet for People With Depressive Tendencies: Qualitative Content Analysis and Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Uchida, Chiyoko; Miyaki, Koichi; Sakai, Michi; Shimbo, Takuro

    2009-01-01

    Background Internet peer support groups for depression are becoming popular and could be affected by an increasing number of social network services (SNSs). However, little is known about participant characteristics, social relationships in SNSs, and the reasons for usage. In addition, the effects of SNS participation on people with depression are rather unknown. Objective The aim was to explore the potential benefits and harms of an SNS for depression based on a concurrent triangulation design of mixed methods strategy, including qualitative content analysis and social network analysis. Methods A cross-sectional Internet survey of participants, which involved the collection of SNS log files and a questionnaire, was conducted in an SNS for people with self-reported depressive tendencies in Japan in 2007. Quantitative data, which included user demographics, depressive state, and assessment of the SNS (positive vs not positive), were statistically analyzed. Descriptive contents of responses to open-ended questions concerning advantages and disadvantages of SNS participation were analyzed using the inductive approach of qualitative content analysis. Contents were organized into codes, concepts, categories, and a storyline based on the grounded theory approach. Social relationships, derived from data of “friends,” were analyzed using social network analysis, in which network measures and the extent of interpersonal association were calculated based on the social network theory. Each analysis and integration of results were performed through a concurrent triangulation design of mixed methods strategy. Results There were 105 participants. Median age was 36 years, and 51% (36/71) were male. There were 37 valid respondents; their number of friends and frequency of accessing the SNS were significantly higher than for invalid/nonrespondents (P = .008 and P = .003). Among respondents, 90% (28/31) were mildly, moderately, or severely depressed. Assessment of the SNS was

  7. Direct voltammetric determination of redox-active iron in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-01

    With the advances in nanotechnology over the past decade, consumer products are increasingly being incorporated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). As the harmful effects of CNTs are suggested to be primarily due to the bioavailable amounts of metallic impurities, it is vital to detect and quantify these species using sensitive and facile methods. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the possibility of quantifying the amount of redox-available iron-containing impurities in CNTs with voltammetric techniques such as cyclic voltammetry. We examined the electrochemistry of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles in phosphate buffer solution and discovered that its electrochemical behavior could be affected by pH of the electrolyte. By utilizing the unique redox reaction between the iron and phosphate species, the redox available iron content in CNTs was determined successfully using voltammetry. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. pH and redox effects of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Sloot, H.A.; Van Zomeren, A.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; De Nie, D.S.

    2007-11-01

    The application of relatively fine grained industrial slags as fill material in industrial terrains and parking lots has led to unacceptably elevated pH values and imposed reducing conditions in ground- and surface water. Based on the Dutch Building Materials Decree the materials applied were classified as category 1 materials (free use). There are no limits set to pH and redox in this regulation. In itself a lower or higher pH and a low redox potential are not necessarily critical. Only when the buffer capacity of the surroundings is exceeded, undesirable situations may develop. In this work, the release of alkaline and reducing substances has been studied to assess if regulatory controls are needed and how such controls could be implemented practically. Both pH and redox potential are unsuitable properties for this purpose as it is the buffer capacity of the releasing material and the buffer capacity of the receiving soil and water bodies that determine whether unacceptable conditions develop. As pH and redox are also affected by gas reactions (O2 and CO2), the evaluation becomes relatively complex. Using the chemical speciation-transport model ORCHESTRA, a scenario description has been developed to assess the release of alkaline and reducing species from slag by infiltration under unsaturated conditions. Proper acid neutralization and redox buffering data for the materials were determined. Based on the sophisticated model results, a simplified model description was applied to link observations to impact. Decision schemes for applications above groundwater and in surface water have been developed based on the buffer capacity and particle size distribution of the material to be used, the infiltration rate, the degree of exposure to O2 and CO2 from the atmosphere or from soil air and the dimensions of the application. This has led to a preliminary guidance on implementing rules for acceptance of materials in specific applications. The modeled release predictions

  9. Effect of reducing groundwater on the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose TP

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laboratory batch sorption experiments were used to investigate variations in the retardation behavior of redox-sensitive radionuclides. Water-rock compositions were designed to simulate subsurface conditions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS, where a suite of radionuclides were deposited as a result of underground nuclear testing. Experimental redox conditions were controlled by varying the oxygen content inside an enclosed glove box and by adding reductants into the testing solutions. Under atmospheric (oxidizing conditions, radionuclide distribution coefficients varied with the mineralogic composition of the sorbent and the water chemistry. Under reducing conditions, distribution coefficients showed marked increases for 99Tc (from 1.22 at oxidizing to 378 mL/g at mildly reducing conditions and 237Np (an increase from 4.6 to 930 mL/g in devitrified tuff, but much smaller variations in alluvium, carbonate rock, and zeolitic tuff. This effect was particularly important for 99Tc, which tends to be mobile under oxidizing conditions. A review of the literature suggests that iodine sorption should decrease under reducing conditions when I- is the predominant species; this was not consistently observed in batch tests. Overall, sorption of U to alluvium, devitrified tuff, and zeolitic tuff under atmospheric conditions was less than in the glove-box tests. However, the mildly reducing conditions achieved here were not likely to result in substantial U(VI reduction to U(IV. Sorption of Pu was not affected by the decreasing Eh conditions achieved in this study, as the predominant sorbed Pu species in all conditions was expected to be the low-solubility and strongly sorbing Pu(OH4. Depending on the aquifer lithology, the occurrence of reducing conditions along a groundwater flowpath could potentially contribute to the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides 99Tc and 237Np, which are commonly identified as long-term dose contributors in the risk

  10. Redox behavior of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) in the presence of nitrilotriacetic acid: a surrogate study for An(IV)/An(III) redox behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nankawa, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Using cyclic voltammetry, we investigated the redox behavior of Ce(IV)/Ce(III), which is a surrogate for An(IV)/An(III) (An = actinides), in a solution of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) at 25 C. The cyclic voltammogram of Ce in a 0.1 M NTA solution at pH 6 showed a reversible one-electron redox reaction for Ce(IV)/Ce(III) at 0.51 V vs. Ag/AgCl. This redox potential was much lower than that obtained in 1 M nitric acid, indicating that Ce(IV) was preferentially stabilized by complexation with NTA. The redox potential in the NTA solution was independent of the Ce concentration from 2 to 20 mM, NTA concentration from 5 to 200 mM and pH between 3 and 7. These results indicated that no polymerization and no additional coordination of NTA and OH to the Ce(III)-NTA complex took place during the redox reaction. As the speciation calculation of Ce(III) in the NTA solution showed that the predominant species was Ce III (nta) 2 3 (H 3 nta = NTA), the redox reaction of the Ce-NTA complex was expressed by the following: Ce IV (nta) 2 2- + e - ↔ Ce III (nta) 2 3 . The logarithm of the stability constant of Ce IV (nta) 2 2- was calculated to be 38.6 ± 0.8 for I = 0 from the redox potential shift of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) in the NTA solution. The value was in good accordance with the stability constant of the Np IV (nta) 2 2- complex, demonstrating that the aqueous coordination chemistry of Ce(IV) with NTA is quite similar to that of An(IV). These results strongly suggest that a negative shift of the Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox potential in the NTA solution should make Pu(IV) more stable than Pu(III) even in a reducing environment. (orig.)

  11. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  12. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  13. Analysis of redox additive-based overcharge protection for rechargeable lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Surampudi, S.; Attia, A. I.; Bankston, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    The overcharge condition in secondary lithium batteries employing redox additives for overcharge protection, has been theoretically analyzed in terms of a finite linear diffusion model. The analysis leads to expressions relating the steady-state overcharge current density and cell voltage to the concentration, diffusion coefficient, standard reduction potential of the redox couple, and interelectrode distance. The model permits the estimation of the maximum permissible overcharge rate for any chosen set of system conditions. Digital simulation of the overcharge experiment leads to numerical representation of the potential transients, and estimate of the influence of diffusion coefficient and interelectrode distance on the transient attainment of the steady state during overcharge. The model has been experimentally verified using 1,1-prime-dimethyl ferrocene as a redox additive. The analysis of the experimental results in terms of the theory allows the calculation of the diffusion coefficient and the formal potential of the redox couple. The model and the theoretical results may be exploited in the design and optimization of overcharge protection by the redox additive approach.

  14. CHOP THERAPY INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE ALTERATION IN NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA XENOGRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. N. XU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We are interested in investigating whether cancer therapy may alter the mitochondrial redox state in cancer cells to inhibit their growth and survival. The redox state can be imaged by the redox scanner that collects the fluorescence signals from both the oxidized-flavoproteins (Fp and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH in snap-frozen tissues and has been previously employed to study tumor aggressiveness and treatment responses. Here, with the redox scanner we investigated the effects of chemotherapy on mouse xenografts of a human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line (DLCL2. The mice were treated with CHOP therapy, i.e., cyclophosphamide (C + hydroxydoxorubicin (H + Oncovin (O + prednisone (P with CHO administration on day 1 and prednisone administration on days 1–5. The Fp content of the treated group was significantly decreased (p = 0.033 on day 5, and the mitochondrial redox state of the treated group was slightly more reduced than that of the control group (p = 0.048. The decrease of the Fp heterogeneity (measured by the mean standard deviation had a border-line statistical significance (p = 0.071. The result suggests that the mitochondrial metabolism of lymphoma cells was slightly suppressed and the lymphomas became less aggressive after the CHOP therapy.

  15. Spatial distribution and potential biological risk of some metals in relation to granulometric content in core sediments from Chilika Lake, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Saroja K; Muduli, Pradipta R; Mohanty, Bita; Rath, Prasanta; Samanta, Srikanta

    2018-01-01

    The article presents first systematic report on the concentration of selected major elements [iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn)] and minor elements [zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co)] from the core sediment of Chilika Lake, India. The analyzed samples revealed higher content of Pb than the background levels in the entire study area. The extent of contamination from minor and major elements is expressed by assessing (i) the metal enrichments in the sediment through the calculations of anthropogenic factor (AF), pollution load index (PLI), Enrichment factor (EF), and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and (ii) potential biological risks by the use of sediment quality guidelines like effect range median (ERM) and effect range low (ERL) benchmarks. The estimated indices indicated that sediment is enriched with Pb, Ni, Cr, Cu and Co. The enrichment of these elements seems to be due to the fine granulometric characteristics of the sediment with Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides being the main metal carriers and fishing boats using low grade paints, fuel, and fishing technology using lead beads fixed to fishing nets. Trace element input to the Chilika lake needs to be monitored with due emphasis on Cr and Pb contaminations since the ERM and ERL benchmarks indicated potential biological risk with these metals.

  16. Oxygen in human health from life to death – An approach to teaching redox biology and signaling to graduate and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M. Briehl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of oxygen human life is measured in minutes. In the presence of oxygen, normal metabolism generates reactive species (ROS that have the potential to cause cell injury contributing to human aging and disease. Between these extremes, organisms have developed means for sensing oxygen and ROS and regulating their cellular processes in response. Redox signaling contributes to the control of cell proliferation and death. Aberrant redox signaling underlies many human diseases. The attributes acquired by altered redox homeostasis in cancer cells illustrate this particularly well. This teaching review and the accompanying illustrations provide an introduction to redox biology and signaling aimed at instructors of graduate and medical students.

  17. Redox buffered hydrofluoric acid etchant for the reduction of galvanic attack during release etching of MEMS devices having noble material films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-10-06

    Etchant solutions comprising a redox buffer can be used during the release etch step to reduce damage to the structural layers of a MEMS device that has noble material films. A preferred redox buffer comprises a soluble thiophosphoric acid, ester, or salt that maintains the electrochemical potential of the etchant solution at a level that prevents oxidation of the structural material. Therefore, the redox buffer preferentially oxidizes in place of the structural material. The sacrificial redox buffer thereby protects the exposed structural layers while permitting the dissolution of sacrificial oxide layers during the release etch.

  18. Reverse Engineering Applied to Red Human Hair Pheomelanin Reveals Redox-Buffering as a Pro-Oxidant Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Panzella, Lucia; Micillo, Raffaella; Bentley, William E.; Napolitano, Alessandra; Payne, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Pheomelanin has been implicated in the increased susceptibility to UV-induced melanoma for people with light skin and red hair. Recent studies identified a UV-independent pathway to melanoma carcinogenesis and implicated pheomelanin’s pro-oxidant properties that act through the generation of reactive oxygen species and/or the depletion of cellular antioxidants. Here, we applied an electrochemically-based reverse engineering methodology to compare the redox properties of human hair pheomelanin with model synthetic pigments and natural eumelanin. This methodology exposes the insoluble melanin samples to complex potential (voltage) inputs and measures output response characteristics to assess redox activities. The results demonstrate that both eumelanin and pheomelanin are redox-active, they can rapidly (sec-min) and repeatedly redox-cycle between oxidized and reduced states, and pheomelanin possesses a more oxidative redox potential. This study suggests that pheomelanin’s redox-based pro-oxidant activity may contribute to sustaining a chronic oxidative stress condition through a redox-buffering mechanism. PMID:26669666

  19. Monitoring thioredoxin redox with a genetically encoded red fluorescent biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yichong; Makar, Merna; Wang, Michael X; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2017-09-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is one of the two major thiol antioxidants, playing essential roles in redox homeostasis and signaling. Despite its importance, there is a lack of methods for monitoring Trx redox dynamics in live cells, hindering a better understanding of physiological and pathological roles of the Trx redox system. In this work, we developed the first genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for Trx redox by engineering a redox relay between the active-site cysteines of human Trx1 and rxRFP1, a redox-sensitive red fluorescent protein. We used the resultant biosensor-TrxRFP1-to selectively monitor perturbations of Trx redox in various mammalian cell lines. We subcellularly localized TrxRFP1 to image compartmentalized Trx redox changes. We further combined TrxRFP1 with a green fluorescent Grx1-roGFP2 biosensor to simultaneously monitor Trx and glutathione redox dynamics in live cells in response to chemical and physiologically relevant stimuli.

  20. NQO1-dependent redox cycling of idebenone: effects on cellular redox potential and energy levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman H Haefeli

    Full Text Available Short-chain quinones are described as potent antioxidants and in the case of idebenone have already been under clinical investigation for the treatment of neuromuscular disorders. Due to their analogy to coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, a long-chain quinone, they are widely regarded as a substitute for CoQ10. However, apart from their antioxidant function, this provides no clear rationale for their use in disorders with normal CoQ10 levels. Using recombinant NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO enzymes, we observed that contrary to CoQ10 short-chain quinones such as idebenone are good substrates for both NQO1 and NQO2. Furthermore, the reduction of short-chain quinones by NQOs enabled an antimycin A-sensitive transfer of electrons from cytosolic NAD(PH to the mitochondrial respiratory chain in both human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes. Consistent with the substrate selectivity of NQOs, both idebenone and CoQ1, but not CoQ10, partially restored cellular ATP levels under conditions of impaired complex I function. The observed cytosolic-mitochondrial shuttling of idebenone and CoQ1 was also associated with reduced lactate production by cybrid cells from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS patients. Thus, the observed activities separate the effectiveness of short-chain quinones from the related long-chain CoQ10 and provide the rationale for the use of short-chain quinones such as idebenone for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders.

  1. Sediment phosphorus speciation and mobility under dynamic redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Chris T.; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; O'Connell, David W.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment has caused phosphorus (P) accumulation in many freshwater sediments, raising concerns that internal loading from legacy P may delay the recovery of aquatic ecosystems suffering from eutrophication. Benthic recycling of P strongly depends on the redox regime within surficial sediment. In many shallow environments, redox conditions tend to be highly dynamic as a result of, among others, bioturbation by macrofauna, root activity, sediment resuspension and seasonal variations in bottom-water oxygen (O2) concentrations. To gain insight into the mobility and biogeochemistry of P under fluctuating redox conditions, a suspension of sediment from a hypereutrophic freshwater marsh was exposed to alternating 7-day periods of purging with air and nitrogen gas (N2), for a total duration of 74 days, in a bioreactor system. We present comprehensive data time series of bulk aqueous- and solid-phase chemistry, solid-phase phosphorus speciation and hydrolytic enzyme activities demonstrating the mass balanced redistribution of P in sediment during redox cycling. Aqueous phosphate concentrations remained low ( ˜ 2.5 µM) under oxic conditions due to sorption to iron(III) oxyhydroxides. During anoxic periods, once nitrate was depleted, the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides released P. However, only 4.5 % of the released P accumulated in solution while the rest was redistributed between the MgCl2 and NaHCO3 extractable fractions of the solid phase. Thus, under the short redox fluctuations imposed in the experiments, P remobilization to the aqueous phase remained relatively limited. Orthophosphate predominated at all times during the experiment in both the solid and aqueous phase. Combined P monoesters and diesters accounted for between 9 and 16 % of sediment particulate P. Phosphatase activities up to 2.4 mmol h-1 kg-1 indicated the potential for rapid mineralization of organic P (Po), in particular during periods of aeration when the

  2. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kehr

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  3. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodegradation of NSO-compounds under different redox-conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyreborg, S.; Arvin, E.; Broholm, K.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the potential of groundwater microorganisms to degrade selected heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing nitrogen, sulphur, or oxygen (NSO-compounds) under four redox-conditions over a period of 846 days. Eight compounds (pyrrole, 1...... anaerobic conditions, even though the microorganisms present in the anaerobic microcosms were active throughout the incubation period. A high variability in the lag period among the NSO-compounds was observed under aerobic conditions. While quinoline, indole, and carbazole were degraded with a lag period...

  5. Redox behaviour of molybdenum in aqueous medium : a potentiometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagi, S.R.; Mohan Rao, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the two forms; of Mo(III) cationic-aquomolybdenum(III) (green) and anionic-chloromolybdate(III) (orange-red) has been investigated using various oxidants in hydrochloric acid mdeium, the oxidation steps being detected using a potentiometric method. The two species behave differently towards the various oxidants. The green form is a better reducing agent giving large breaks in potentials during redox titrations. The existence of the intermediate oxidation states Mosup(3.5) and Mosup(4.5) reported earlier has also been confirmed. (author)

  6. Systems and methods for rebalancing redox