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Sample records for content image cytometry

  1. Quantitative Functional Morphology by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjev, Ivan A; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes advantages and limitations of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) based on Imagestream instrumentation using a hybrid approach of morphometric measurement and quantitation of multiparametric fluorescent intensities' distribution in cells and particles. Brief comparison is given of IFC with conventional flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Some future directions of the IFC technology are described and discussed.

  2. Dictionary-enhanced imaging cytometry

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    Orth, Antony; Schaak, Diane; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2017-02-01

    State-of-the-art high-throughput microscopes are now capable of recording image data at a phenomenal rate, imaging entire microscope slides in minutes. In this paper we investigate how a large image set can be used to perform automated cell classification and denoising. To this end, we acquire an image library consisting of over one quarter-million white blood cell (WBC) nuclei together with CD15/CD16 protein expression for each cell. We show that the WBC nucleus images alone can be used to replicate CD expression-based gating, even in the presence of significant imaging noise. We also demonstrate that accurate estimates of white blood cell images can be recovered from extremely noisy images by comparing with a reference dictionary. This has implications for dose-limited imaging when samples belong to a highly restricted class such as a well-studied cell type. Furthermore, large image libraries may endow microscopes with capabilities beyond their hardware specifications in terms of sensitivity and resolution. We call for researchers to crowd source large image libraries of common cell lines to explore this possibility.

  3. A high content imaging flow cytometry approach to study mitochondria in T cells: MitoTracker Green FM dye concentration optimization.

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    Gautam, Namrata; Sankaran, Shvetha; Yason, John A; Tan, Kevin S W; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J

    2018-02-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, are known to remodel their membrane structures through the process of fusion or fission. Studies have indicated that T cells adopt different energy metabolic phenotypes, namely oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis depending on whether they are naïve, effector and memory T cells. It has recently been shown that changes in mitochondrial morphology dictate T cell fate via regulation of their metabolism. Our keen interest in T cell function and metabolism led us to explore and establish a method to study mitochondria in live T cells through a novel high content approach called Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC). The focus of our current study was on developing a protocol to standardize the concentration of MitoTracker Green FM dye to observe mitochondria in live T cells using IFC. We began the study by using widefield microscopy to confirm the localisation of MitoTracker Green FM labelled mitochondria in live T cells. This was followed by testing various concentrations of the dye to achieve a similar labelling pattern using IFC while eliminating false positive or negative staining. The optimization of the method used to label the mitochondria by IFC for analysis included standardisation of a number of important parameters such as dye concentration, voltage, fluorescence intensity values for acquisition and processing. IFC could potentially be a powerful method to study T cells in a relatively high throughput manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Flow cytometry and integrated imaging

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    V. Kachel

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available It is a serious problem to relate the results of a flow cytometric analysis of a marine sample to different species. Images of particles selectively triggered by the flow cytometric analysis and picked out from the flowing stream give a valuable additional information on the analyzed organisms. The technical principles and problems of triggered imaging in flow are discussed, as well as the positioning of the particles in the plane of focus, freezing the motion of the quickly moving objects and what kinds of light sources are suitable for pulsed illumination. The images have to be stored either by film or electronically. The features of camera targets and the memory requirements for storing the image data and the conditions for the triggering device are shown. A brief explanation of the features of three realized flow cytometric imaging (FCI systems is given: the Macro Flow Planktometer built within the EUROMAR MAROPT project, the Imaging Module of the European Plankton Analysis System, supported by the MAST II EurOPA project and the most recently developed FLUVO VI universal flow cytometer including HBO 100- and laser excitation for fluorescence and scatter, Coulter sizing as well as bright field and and phase contrast FCI.

  5. Analysis of Erythropoiesis Using Imaging Flow Cytometry.

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    Kalfa, Theodosia; McGrath, Kathleen E

    2018-01-01

    Erythroid maturation has been classically defined based on the remarkable changes visualized through microscopy. These involve the decrease in cell size, nuclear condensation and organelle loss, and include the final unique asymmetric division creating the short-lived nucleated pyrenocyte and the enucleate reticulocyte that matures into the red blood cell. Understanding the regulation of these processes has been challenging due to the difficulty in obtaining sufficient numbers of cells, particularly of rare intermediates, to study by microscopy. While flow cytometry can provide quantitative analysis of high cell numbers as well as critical tools for assaying processes like cell cycle, apoptosis and cell signaling, it cannot analyze or categorize cells based on morphology. Imaging flow cytometry (IFC) combines microscopy and flow cytometry by capturing brightfield and fluorescent images of large numbers of cells, which can be quantitated for both morphometric and fluorescent characteristics. Over the past 10 years, this approach has been increasingly used to study aspects of erythropoiesis. This chapter describes how to utilize IFC to enumerate multiple specific stages of erythropoiesis from primary tissue, as well as how to culture primary progenitors to enrich for the rare late stage enucleating cells in order to examine intracellular proteins involved in enucleation. These methods demonstrate the approaches and strength of IFC as a tool to bridge the power of microscopy and flow cytometry to more fully interrogate erythropoiesis.

  6. Cellometer image cytometry as a complementary tool to flow cytometry for verifying gated cell populations.

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    Kuksin, Dmitry; Kuksin, Christina Arieta; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-15

    Traditionally, many cell-based assays that analyze cell populations and functionalities have been performed using flow cytometry. However, flow cytometers remain relatively expensive and require highly trained operators for routine maintenance and data analysis. Recently, an image cytometry system has been developed by Nexcelom Bioscience (Lawrence, MA, USA) for automated cell concentration and viability measurement using bright-field and fluorescent imaging methods. Image cytometry is analogous to flow cytometry in that gating operations can be performed on the cell population based on size and fluorescent intensity. In addition, the image cytometer is capable of capturing bright-field and fluorescent images, allowing for the measurement of cellular size and fluorescence intensity data. In this study, we labeled a population of cells with an enzymatic vitality stain (calcein-AM) and a cell viability dye (propidium iodide) and compared the data generated by flow and image cytometry. We report that measuring vitality and viability using the image cytometer is as effective as flow cytometric assays and allows for visual confirmation of the sample to exclude cellular debris. Image cytometry offers a direct method for performing fluorescent cell-based assays but also may be used as a complementary tool to flow cytometers for aiding the analysis of more complex samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Flow cytometry what you see matters: Enhanced clinical detection using image-based flow cytometry.

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    McFarlin, Brian K; Gary, Melody A

    2017-01-01

    Image-based flow cytometry combines the throughput of traditional flow cytometry with the ability to visually confirm findings and collect novel data that would not be possible otherwise. Since image-based flow cytometry borrows measurement parameters and analysis techniques from microscopy, it is possible to collect unique measures (i.e. nuclear translocation, co-localization, cellular synapse, cellular endocytosis, etc.) that would not be possible with traditional flow cytometry. The ability to collect unique outcomes has led many researchers to develop novel assays for the monitoring and detection of a variety of clinical conditions and diseases. In many cases, investigators have innovated and expanded classical assays to provide new insight regarding clinical conditions and chronic disease. Beyond human clinical applications, image-based flow cytometry has been used to monitor marine biology changes, nano-particles for solar cell production, and particle quality in pharmaceuticals. This review article summarizes work from the major scientists working in the field of image-based flow cytometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging Cytometry of Human Leukocytes with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

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    Wu, Cheng-Ham; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Huang, Shih-Hung; Lin, Jong-Wei; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Wu, Yao-Ming; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Based on third-harmonic-generation (THG) microscopy and a k-means clustering algorithm, we developed a label-free imaging cytometry method to differentiate and determine the types of human leukocytes. According to the size and average intensity of cells in THG images, in a two-dimensional scatter plot, the neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in peripheral blood samples from healthy volunteers were clustered into three differentiable groups. Using these features in THG images, we could count the number of each of the three leukocyte types both in vitro and in vivo. The THG imaging-based counting results agreed well with conventional blood count results. In the future, we believe that the combination of this THG microscopy-based imaging cytometry approach with advanced texture analysis of sub-cellular features can differentiate and count more types of blood cells with smaller quantities of blood.

  9. Validation of image cytometry for sperm concentration measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg Palme, Dorte L; Johannsen, Trine Holm; Petersen, Jørgen Holm

    2017-01-01

    Sperm concentration is an essential parameter in the diagnostic evaluation of men from infertile couples. It is usually determined by manual counting using a hemocytometer, and is therefore both laborious and subjective. We have earlier shown that a newly developed image cytometry (IC) method may...

  10. Prognostic value of DNA image cytometry in colorectal carcinoma.

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    Sampedro, A; Urdiales, G; Martínez-Nistal, A; Riera, J; Hardisson, D

    1996-06-01

    To investigate the diagnostic sensitivity and prognosis predicting of DNA image cytometry in colorectal carcinoma. We studied the ploidy status and other DNA cytometric parameters in 68 patients with colorectal carcinoma. In addition, clinical-histologic and follow-up information was collected for at least five years. DNA histograms were available in all cases, showing a diploid DNA distribution pattern in 6 (8.8%), tetraploid in 21 (30.9%), hyperdiploid in 20 (29.4%) and hypertetraploid in 21 (30.9%). The differences in the correlation study between cytometric parameters and pathologic features were not statistically significant. Ploidy status and DNA malignancy grade were individually related to five-year survival (P < .005 and P < .05). The data show that DNA image cytometry can provide valuable prognostic information on colorectal carcinomas and may prove useful in guiding adjuvant therapy in these patients.

  11. Imaging cytometry in a plastic ultra-mobile system

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    Martínez Vázquez, R.; Trotta, G.; Paturzo, M.; Volpe, A.; Bernava, G.; Basile, V.; Ancona, A.; Ferraro, P.; Fassi, I.; Osellame, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a cost-effective and highly-portable plastic prototype that can be interfaced with a cell phone to implement an optofluidic imaging cytometry platform. It is based on a PMMA microfluidic chip that fits inside an opto-mechanical platform fabricated by a 3D printer. The fluorescence excitation and imaging is performed using the LED and the CMOS from the cell phone increasing the compactness of the system. A custom developed application is used to analyze the images and provide a value of particle concentration.

  12. Optofluidic fluorescent imaging cytometry on a cell phone.

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    Zhu, Hongying; Mavandadi, Sam; Coskun, Ahmet F; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-09-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical sciences. Cost-effective translation of these technologies to remote and resource-limited environments could create new opportunities especially for telemedicine applications. Toward this direction, here we demonstrate the integration of imaging cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using a compact, lightweight, and cost-effective optofluidic attachment. In this cell-phone-based optofluidic imaging cytometry platform, fluorescently labeled particles or cells of interest are continuously delivered to our imaging volume through a disposable microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. The same microfluidic device also acts as a multilayered optofluidic waveguide and efficiently guides our excitation light, which is butt-coupled from the side facets of our microfluidic channel using inexpensive light-emitting diodes. Since the excitation of the sample volume occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to the detection path, our cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the specimens as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the target solution of interest. We tested the performance of our cell-phone-based imaging cytometer by measuring the density of white blood cells in human blood samples, which provided a decent match to a commercially available hematology analyzer. We further characterized the imaging quality of the same platform to demonstrate a spatial resolution of ~2 μm. This cell-phone-enabled optofluidic imaging flow cytometer could especially be useful for rapid and sensitive imaging of bodily fluids for conducting various cell counts (e.g., toward monitoring of HIV+ patients) or rare cell analysis as well as for screening of water quality in

  13. Utilization of imaging flow cytometry to define intermediates of megakaryopoiesis in vivo and in vitro.

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    McGrath, Kathleen E

    2015-08-01

    Imaging flow cytometry is a particularly powerful analytical approach for the study of megakaryopoiesis. It can utilize well-defined immunophenotypic markers as well as assess maturation of megakaryocytes by their increasing ploidy as they endoreplicate. Imaging flow cytometry can also assess morphometric cell characteristics of size and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, which are informative indications of maturation. However, megakaryopoiesis is challenging for flow cytometric analysis, particularly in vivo, because megakaryocytes are very rare in the bone marrow and their odd shape, high DNA content and cell size are similar to clumps of cells. Additionally, both megakaryocytes and immunophenotypically similar platelets are frequently found associated with other cells. Due to these challenges, imaging flow cytometry of megakaryopoiesis exemplifies several strengths of this approach in utilizing fluorescent signal's shape, texture and overlap with other fluorescent signals to distinguish megakaryocytes from a variety of contaminants and to restrict analysis to megakaryocytes, even when associated with other cells. Presented here is a strategy for imaging flow cytometric analysis of rare murine megakaryocytes directly from the bone marrow as well those grown in vitro and analyzed as live cells, or after fixation and permeabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Feature Set for Cytometry on Digitized Microscopic Images

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    Karsten Rodenacker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction is a crucial step in most cytometry studies. In this paper a systematic approach to feature extraction is presented. The feature sets that have been developed and used for quantitative cytology at the Laboratory for Biomedical Image Analysis of the GSF as well as at the Center for Image Analysis in Uppsala over the last 25 years are described and illustrated. The feature sets described are divided into morphometric, densitometric, textural and structural features. The latter group is used to describe the eu‐ and hetero‐chromatin in a way complementing the textural methods. The main goal of the paper is to bring attention to the need of a common and well defined description of features used in cyto‐ and histometrical studies. The application of the sets of features is shown in an overview of projects from different fields. Finally some rules of thumb for the design of studies in this field are proposed. Colour figures can be viewed on http://www.esacp.org/acp/2003/25‐1/rodenacker.htm.

  15. Adaptation of image cytometry methodology for DNA ploidy analysis of cervical epithelium samples: A pilot study

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    Christiane Eliza Motta Duarte

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Image cytometry of the cervical specimens revealed DNA aneuploidy, most probably resulting from chromosomal alterations and appearing as precancerous lesions in 65% of the cases. The adaptations implemented in this study, enabled the DNA-image cytometry to become more accessible, enhancing its extended use as an adjuvant strategy for the early screening of the cervical epithelium samples during routine analyses.

  16. Determining the contents and cell origins of apoptotic bodies by flow cytometry.

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    Jiang, Lanzhou; Paone, Stephanie; Caruso, Sarah; Atkin-Smith, Georgia K; Phan, Thanh Kha; Hulett, Mark D; Poon, Ivan K H

    2017-10-31

    Over 200 billion cells undergo apoptosis every day in the human body in order to maintain tissue homeostasis. Increased apoptosis can also occur under pathological conditions including infection and autoimmune disease. During apoptosis, cells can fragment into subcellular membrane-bound vesicles known as apoptotic bodies (ApoBDs). We recently developed a flow cytometry-based method to accurately differentiate ApoBDs from other particles (e.g. cells and debris). In the present study, we aim to further characterize subsets of ApoBDs based on intracellular contents and cell type-specific surface markers. Utilizing a flow cytometry-based approach, we demonstrated that intracellular contents including nuclear materials and mitochondria are distributed to some, but not all ApoBDs. Interestingly, the mechanism of ApoBD formation could affect the distribution of intracellular contents into ApoBDs. Furthermore, we also showed that ApoBDs share the same surface markers as their cell of origin, which can be used to distinguish cell type-specific ApoBDs from a mixed culture. These studies demonstrate that ApoBDs are not homogeneous and can be divided into specific subclasses based on intracellular contents and cell surface markers. The described flow cytometry-based method to study ApoBDs could be used in future studies to better understand the function of ApoBDs.

  17. Gross genomic damage measured by DNA image cytometry independently predicts gastric cancer patient survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, J.A.M.; Buffart, T.E.; Gill, A.; Broeckaert, M.A.M.; Quirke, P.; Meijer, G.A.; Grabsch, H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA aneuploidy reflects gross genomic changes. It can be measured by flow cytometry (FCM-DNA) or image cytometry (ICM-DNA). In gastric cancer, the prevalence of DNA aneuploidy has been reported to range from 27 to 100%, with conflicting associations with clinicopathological variables.

  18. An open-source solution for advanced imaging flow cytometry data analysis using machine learning.

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    Hennig, Holger; Rees, Paul; Blasi, Thomas; Kamentsky, Lee; Hung, Jane; Dao, David; Carpenter, Anne E; Filby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry (IFC) enables the high throughput collection of morphological and spatial information from hundreds of thousands of single cells. This high content, information rich image data can in theory resolve important biological differences among complex, often heterogeneous biological samples. However, data analysis is often performed in a highly manual and subjective manner using very limited image analysis techniques in combination with conventional flow cytometry gating strategies. This approach is not scalable to the hundreds of available image-based features per cell and thus makes use of only a fraction of the spatial and morphometric information. As a result, the quality, reproducibility and rigour of results are limited by the skill, experience and ingenuity of the data analyst. Here, we describe a pipeline using open-source software that leverages the rich information in digital imagery using machine learning algorithms. Compensated and corrected raw image files (.rif) data files from an imaging flow cytometer (the proprietary .cif file format) are imported into the open-source software CellProfiler, where an image processing pipeline identifies cells and subcellular compartments allowing hundreds of morphological features to be measured. This high-dimensional data can then be analysed using cutting-edge machine learning and clustering approaches using "user-friendly" platforms such as CellProfiler Analyst. Researchers can train an automated cell classifier to recognize different cell types, cell cycle phases, drug treatment/control conditions, etc., using supervised machine learning. This workflow should enable the scientific community to leverage the full analytical power of IFC-derived data sets. It will help to reveal otherwise unappreciated populations of cells based on features that may be hidden to the human eye that include subtle measured differences in label free detection channels such as bright-field and dark-field imagery

  19. Applications of imaging flow cytometry in the diagnostic assessment of acute leukaemia.

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    Grimwade, Lizz F; Fuller, Kathryn A; Erber, Wendy N

    2017-01-01

    Automated imaging flow cytometry integrates flow cytometry with digital microscopy to produce high-resolution digital imaging with quantitative analysis. This enables cell identification based on morphology (cell size, shape), antigen expression, quantification of fluorescence signal intensity and localisation of detected signals (i.e. surface, cytoplasm, nuclear). We describe applications of imaging flow cytometry for the diagnostic assessment of acute leukaemia. These bone marrow malignancies are traditionally diagnosed and classified by cell morphology, phenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities. Traditionally morphology is assessed by light microscopy, phenotyping by conventional flow cytometry and genetics by karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) on interphase nuclei/metaphase spreads of cells on slides. Imaging flow cytometry adds a new dimension to the diagnostic assessment of these neoplasms. We describe three specific applications: From this we conclude that imaging flow cytometry offers benefits over conventional diagnostic methods. Specifically the ability to visualise the cells of interest, the pattern and localisation of expressed antigens and assess cytogenetic abnormalities in one integrated automated high-throughput test. Imaging flow cytometry presents a new paradigm for the diagnostic assessment of leukaemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantification of heterotypic granule fusion in human neutrophils by imaging flow cytometry

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    Halla Björnsdottir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human neutrophils are filled with intracellular storage organelles, called granules and secretory vesicles, which differ in their content of soluble matrix proteins and membrane-bound molecules. To date, at least four distinct granule/vesicle subsets have been identified. These organelles may secrete their content extracellularly following mobilization to and fusion with the plasma membrane, but some of them may also fuse with internal membrane-enclosed organelles, typically a plasma membrane-derived phagosome. There are also instances where different granules appear to fuse with one another, a process that would enable mixing of their matrix and membrane components. Such granule fusion enables e.g., myeloperoxidase-processing of intragranular oxygen radicals, a key event in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (Björnsdottir et al., 2015 [1]. Described herein are data that show the quantification of such heterotypic granule–granule fusion by the use of imaging flow cytometry, a technique that combines flow cytometry with microscopy. The analysis described is based on immunofluorescent staining of established granule markers (lactoferrin and/or NGAL for one granule subset; the specific granules, and CD63 for another granule subset, the azurophil granules and calculation of a colocalization score for resting and PMA-stimulated neutrophils.

  1. Imaging flow cytometry for the study of erythroid cell biology and pathology.

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    Samsel, Leigh; McCoy, J Philip

    2015-08-01

    Erythroid cell maturation and diseases affecting erythrocytes are frequently accompanied by morphologic and immunophenotypic changes to these cells. In the past, these changes have been assessed primarily through the use of manual microscopy, which substantially limits the statistical rigor, throughput, and objectivity of these studies. Imaging flow cytometry provides a technology to examine both the morphology of cells as well as to quantify the staining intensity and signal distribution of numerous fluorescent markers on a cell-by-cell basis with high throughput in a statistically robust manner, and thus is ideally suited to studying erythroid cell biology. To date imaging flow cytometry has been used to study erythrocytes in three areas: 1) erythroid cell maturation, 2) sickle cell disease, and 3) infectious diseases such as malaria. In the maturation studies, imaging flow cytometry can closely recapitulate known stages of maturation and has led to the identification of a new population of erythroid cell precursors. In sickle cell disease, imaging flow cytometry provides a robust method to quantify sickled erythrocytes and to identify cellular aggregates linked to morbidities, and in malaria, imaging flow cytometry has been used to screen for new chemotherapeutic agents. These studies have demonstrated the value of imaging flow cytometry for investigations of erythrocyte biology and pathology. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A Flow Cytometry Protocol to Estimate DNA Content in the Yellowtail Tetra Astyanax altiparanae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Pedro L P; Senhorini, José A; Pereira-Santos, Matheus; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Shimoda, Eduardo; Silva, Luciano A; Dos Santos, Silvio A; Yasui, George S

    2017-01-01

    The production of triploid yellowtail tetra Astyanax altiparanae is a key factor to obtain permanently sterile individuals by chromosome set manipulation. Flow cytometric analysis is the main tool for confirmation of the resultant triploids individuals, but very few protocols are specific for A. altiparanae species. The current study has developed a protocol to estimate DNA content in this species. Furthermore, a protocol for long-term storage of dorsal fins used for flow cytometry analysis was established. The combination of five solutions with three detergents (Nonidet P-40 Substitute, Tween 20, and Triton X-100) at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% concentration was evaluated. Using the best solution from this first experiment, the addition of trypsin (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%) and sucrose (74 mM) and the effects of increased concentrations of the detergents at 0.6 and 1.2% concentration were also evaluated. After adjustment of the protocol for flow cytometry, preservation of somatic tissue or isolated nuclei was also evaluated by freezing (at -20°C) and fixation in saturated NaCl solution, acetic methanol (1:3), ethanol, and formalin at 10% for 30 or 60 days of storage at 25°C. Flow cytometry analysis in yellowtail tetra species was optimized using the following conditions: lysis solution: 9.53 mM MgCl2.7H20; 47.67 mM KCl; 15 mM Tris; 74 mM sucrose, 0.6% Triton X-100, pH 8.0; staining solution: Dulbecco's PBS with DAPI 1 μg mL(-1); preservation procedure: somatic cells (dorsal fin samples) frozen at -20°C. Using this protocol, samples may be stored up to 60 days with good accuracy for flow cytometry analysis.

  3. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  4. Nuclear DNA content of the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum Sw. with the analysis of flow cytometry

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    Upatham Meesawat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear DNA content for the adult plants grown in a greenhouse and in vitro young plantlets of the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum Sw. was analyzed using flow cytometry. The resulting 2C DNA values ranged from 2.30±0.14 pgto 2.43±0.06 pg. However, nuclear DNA ploidy levels of long-term in vitro plantlets were found to be triploid and tetraploid.These ploidy levels were confirmed by chromosome counting. Tetraploid individuals (2n = 4x = 76 had approximately two times DNA content than diploid (2n = 2x = 38 individuals. This variation may be due to prolonged cultivation and thepresence of exogenous plant growth regulators.

  5. Image cytometry: protocols for 2D and 3D quantification in microscopic images.

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    Chieco, Pasquale; Jonker, Ard; De Boer, Bouke A; Ruijter, Jan M; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2013-01-01

    Microscopy-based imaging is booming and the need for tools to retrieve quantitative data from images is urgent. This book provides simple but reliable tools to generate valid quantitative gene expression data, at the mRNA, protein and activity level, from microscopic images in relation to structures in cells, tissues and organs in 2D and 3D. Volumes, areas, lengths and numbers of cells and tissues can be calculated and related to these gene expression data while preserving the 2D and 3D morphology. Image cytometry thus provides a comprehensive toolkit to study molecular processes and structural changes at the level of cells and tissues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

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    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  7. Detection and Characterization of Rare Circulating Endothelial Cells by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

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    Samsel, Leigh; McCoy, J Philip

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are angiogenic cells that appear in increased numbers in the peripheral circulation either as a result of vascular injury or in response to angiogenic stimuli. Elevated levels of CECs have been correlated with various disease states, indicating the use of CECs as a biomarker of disease. Flow cytometry is a widely accepted method for detecting and quantitating CECs. Flow cytometry provides statistical information on large numbers of cells but no information on morphological characteristics. Imaging flow cytometry combines traditional flow cytometry and microscopy, providing a streamlined, multiparameter approach to characterize the biological properties and morphology of large numbers of cells, and is particularly amenable for rare event analysis such as CECs. This approach for identifying and characterizing CECs allows the morphological characterization of large numbers of live, nucleated, single CECs, and alleviates the need for prior enrichment.

  8. Visualization of pulmonary clearance mechanisms via noninvasive optical imaging validated by near-infrared flow cytometry.

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    Zhou, Haiying; Gunsten, Sean P; Zhegalova, Natalia G; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel; Christopher Holley, J; Schweppe, Daniel; Akers, Walter; Brody, Steven L; Eades, William C; Berezin, Mikhail Y

    2015-05-01

    In vivo optical imaging with near-infrared (NIR) probes is an established method of diagnostics in preclinical and clinical studies. However, the specificities of these probes are difficult to validate ex vivo due to the lack of NIR flow cytometry. To address this limitation, we modified a flow cytometer to include an additional NIR channel using a 752 nm laser line. The flow cytometry system was tested using NIR microspheres and cell lines labeled with a combination of visible range and NIR fluorescent dyes. The approach was verified in vivo in mice evaluated for immune response in lungs after intratracheal delivery of the NIR contrast agent. Flow cytometry of cells obtained from the lung bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated that the NIR dye was taken up by pulmonary macrophages as early as 4-h post-injection. This combination of optical imaging with NIR flow cytometry extends the capability of imaging and enables complementation of in vivo imaging with cell-specific studies. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  9. Seeing the Whole Elephant: Imaging Flow Cytometry Reveals Extensive Morphological Diversity within Blastocystis Isolates

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    Yason, John Anthony; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common protist isolated in humans and many animals. The parasite is a species complex composed of 19 subtypes, 9 of which have been found in humans. There are biological and molecular differences between Blastocystis subtypes although microscopy alone is unable to distinguish between these subtypes. Blastocystis isolates also display various morphological forms. Several of these forms, however, have not been properly evaluated on whether or not these play significant functions in the organism's biology. In this study, we used imaging flow cytometry to analyze morphological features of Blastocystis isolates representing 3 subtypes (ST1, ST4 and ST7). We also employed fluorescence dyes to discover new cellular features. The profiles from each of the subtypes exhibit considerable differences with the others in terms of shape, size and granularity. We confirmed that the classical vacuolar form comprises the majority in all three subtypes. We have also evaluated other morphotypes on whether these represent distinct life stages in the parasite. Irregularly-shaped cells were identified but all of them were found to be dying cells in one isolate. Granular forms were present as a continuum in both viable and non-viable populations, with non-viable forms displaying higher granularity. By analyzing the images, rare morphotypes such as multinucleated cells could be easily observed and quantified. These cells had low granularity and lower DNA content. Small structures containing nucleic acid were also identified. We discuss the possible biological implications of these unusual forms. PMID:26618361

  10. Application of Digital Image Analysis and Flow Cytometry To Enumerate Marine Viruses Stained with SYBR Gold†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Lu, Jing-rang; Binder, Brian J.; Liu, Ying-chun; Hodson, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    A novel nucleic acid stain, SYBR Gold, was used to stain marine viral particles in various types of samples. Viral particles stained with SYBR Gold yielded bright and stable fluorescent signals that could be detected by a cooled charge-coupled device camera or by flow cytometry. The fluorescent signal strength of SYBR Gold-stained viruses was about twice that of SYBR Green I-stained viruses. Digital images of SYBR Gold-stained viral particles were processed to enumerate the concentration of viral particles by using digital image analysis software. Estimates of viral concentration based on digitized images were 1.3 times higher than those based on direct counting by epifluorescence microscopy. Direct epifluorescence counts of SYBR Gold-stained viral particles were in turn about 1.34 times higher than those estimated by the transmission electron microscope method. Bacteriophage lysates stained with SYBR Gold formed a distinct population in flow cytometric signatures. Flow cytometric analysis revealed at least four viral subpopulations for a Lake Erie sample and two subpopulations for a Georgia coastal sample. Flow cytometry-based viral counts for various types of samples averaged 1.1 times higher than direct epifluorescence microscopic counts. The potential application of digital image analysis and flow cytometry for rapid and accurate measurement of viral abundance in aquatic environments is discussed. PMID:11157214

  11. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  12. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A; Majid, Aneeka A; Powless, Amy J; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min(-1) with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels(-1).

  13. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J., E-mail: tmuldoon@uark.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 120 Engineering Hall, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.

  14. A Novel Method for Assessment of Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Using Image Cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas S Somanchi

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to the innate arm of the immune system and though activated NK cells can modulate immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, their primary effector function is through target cell lysis. Accordingly, cytotoxicity assays are central to studying NK cell function. The 51Chromium release assay, is the "gold standard" for cytotoxicity assay, however, due to concerns over toxicity associated with the use and disposal of radioactive compounds there is a significant interest in non-radioactive methods. We have previously used the calcein release assay as a non-radioactive alternative for studying NK cell cytotoxicity. In this study, we show that the calcein release assay varies in its dynamic range for different tumor targets, and that the entrapped calcein could remain unreleased within apoptotic bodies of lysed tumor targets or incompletely released resulting in underestimation of percent specific lysis. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel cytotoxicity assay using the Cellometer Vision Image Cytometer and compared this method to standard calcein release assay for measuring NK cell cytotoxicity. Using tumor lines K562, 721.221, and Jurkat, we demonstrate here that image cytometry shows significantly higher percent specific lysis of the target cells compared to the standard calcein release assay within the same experimental setup. Image cytometry is able to accurately analyze live target cells by excluding dimmer cells and smaller apoptotic bodies from viable target cell counts. The image cytometry-based cytotoxicity assay is a simple, direct and sensitive method and is an appealing option for routine cytotoxicity assay.

  15. Advanced contrast nanoagents for photoacoustic molecular imaging, cytometry, blood test and photothermal theranostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Zerda, Adam; Kim, Jin-Woo; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Various nanoparticles have raised significant interest over the past decades for their unique physical and optical properties and biological utilities. Here we summarize the vast applications of advanced nanoparticles with a focus on carbon nanotube (CNT)-based or CNT-catalyzed contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging, cytometry and theranostics applications based on the photothermal (PT) effect. We briefly review the safety and potential toxicity of the PA/PT contrast nanoagents, while showing how the physical properties as well as multiple biological coatings change their toxicity profiles and contrasts. We provide general guidelines needed for the validation of a new molecular imaging agent in living subjects, and exemplify these guidelines with single-walled CNTs targeted to αvβ3, an integrin associated with tumor angiogenesis, and golden carbon nanotubes targeted to LYVE-1, endothelial lymphatic receptors. An extensive review of the potential applications of advanced contrast agents is provided, including imaging of static targets such as tumor angiogenesis receptors, in vivo cytometry of dynamic targets such as circulating tumor cells and nanoparticles in blood, lymph, bones and plants, methods to enhance the PA and PT effects with transient and stationary bubble conjugates, PT/PA Raman imaging and multispectral histology. Finally, theranostic applications are reviewed, including the nanophotothermolysis of individual tumor cells and bacteria with clustered nanoparticles, nanothrombolysis of blood clots, detection and purging metastasis in sentinel lymph nodes, spectral hole burning and multiplex therapy with ultrasharp rainbow nanoparticles. PMID:22025336

  16. Quantification of natural killer cell polarization and visualization of synaptic granule externalization by imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Dixita I; Mace, Emily M; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Orange, Jordan S

    2017-04-01

    Defining immunological mechanisms underlying NK cell biology is crucial for the treatment and prevention of immune deficiency and malignancy. The limited availability of human biological specimens presents a challenge to the study of human immunobiology. The use of high throughput, multi-parametric assays will not only aid in the definition and diagnosis of complex human immune disorders affecting NK cell function but also advance NK cell biology through population-based assessment of molecular signaling. In an effort to garner the most information from limited numbers of human cells, we designed a quantitative method to study NK cell function using imaging flow cytometry (IFC), which combines multiparametric flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Specifically, we developed IFC as a tool to measure polarization and secretion of lytic granules at the immunological synapse formed between an NK cell and a susceptible target. We have further validated our approach through quantitative comparison with high-resolution confocal microscopy. We show that IFC can be used as a quantitative, high throughput measure of NK cell biological function possessing greater dimensionality than standard flow cytometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  18. Automated quantification of budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel image cytometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Daniel J; Kury, Alexandria L; Kuksin, Dmitry; Pirani, Alnoor; Flanagan, Kevin; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The measurements of concentration, viability, and budding percentages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are performed on a routine basis in the brewing and biofuel industries. Generation of these parameters is of great importance in a manufacturing setting, where they can aid in the estimation of product quality, quantity, and fermentation time of the manufacturing process. Specifically, budding percentages can be used to estimate the reproduction rate of yeast populations, which directly correlates with metabolism of polysaccharides and bioethanol production, and can be monitored to maximize production of bioethanol during fermentation. The traditional method involves manual counting using a hemacytometer, but this is time-consuming and prone to human error. In this study, we developed a novel automated method for the quantification of yeast budding percentages using Cellometer image cytometry. The automated method utilizes a dual-fluorescent nucleic acid dye to specifically stain live cells for imaging analysis of unique morphological characteristics of budding yeast. In addition, cell cycle analysis is performed as an alternative method for budding analysis. We were able to show comparable yeast budding percentages between manual and automated counting, as well as cell cycle analysis. The automated image cytometry method is used to analyze and characterize corn mash samples directly from fermenters during standard fermentation. Since concentration, viability, and budding percentages can be obtained simultaneously, the automated method can be integrated into the fermentation quality assurance protocol, which may improve the quality and efficiency of beer and bioethanol production processes.

  19. MRT letter: light sheet based imaging flow cytometry on a microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Raju; Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha P

    2013-11-01

    We propose a light sheet based imaging flow cytometry technique for simultaneous counting and imaging of cells on a microfluidic platform. Light sheet covers the entire microfluidic channel and thus omits the necessity of flow focusing and point scanning based technology. Another advantage lies in the orthogonal detection geometry that totally cuts-off the incident light, thereby substantially reducing the background in the detection. Compared to the existing state-of-art techniques the proposed technique shows marked improvement. Using fluorescently-coated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells we have recorded cell counting with throughput as high as 2,090 cells/min in the low flow rate regime and were able to image the individual cells on-the-go. Overall, the proposed system is cost-effective and simple in channel geometry with the advantage of efficient counting in operational regime of low laminar flow. This technique may advance the emerging field of microfluidic based cytometry for applications in nanomedicine and point of care diagnostics. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Imaging Flow Cytometry for Morphologic and Phenotypic Characterization of Rare Circulating Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Leigh; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Seamon, Catherine; Kato, Gregory J.; McCoy, J Philip

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells in the peripheral circulation are rare events that require technically rigorous approaches for detection by flow cytometry. Visualization of these cells has been even more demanding, as this has historically required extensive enrichment and processing prior to attempting imaging. As a result, few, if any, examples exist of images of peripheral blood CECs that include verification of the cell lineage both phenotypically and genomically. In the present study, we have devised a method whereby CECs can be directly visualized after lysis of red blood cells and staining, without pre-enrichment or additional processing. Peripheral blood is stained with CD45, CD146, CD3, Hoechst, and dapi to permit identification of CD146 positive, non-leukocyte, nucleated and live cells that fit the description of CECs. These cells are imaged using the Amnis ImagestreamX, an imaging flow cytometer. Genomic verification of the endothelial nature of these cells is accomplished by using an aliquot of the same stained samples for sorting CECs using similar gating strategies. This proof of principle of direct imaging of CECs by imaging flow cytometry (IFC) will permit studies to be conducted heretofore not possible, as the ImagestreamX has the capability of detecting additional fluorochromes other than those used to identify the CECs. Such potential investigations include antigen colocalization or capping, autophagy and apoptosis, morphologic changes in response to therapy, as well as many others. Thus, this method will enable a broad range of novel studies to be conducted using CECs as surrogates of the endothelium. PMID:23554273

  1. An imaging flow cytometry method to assess ricin trafficking in A549 human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Dominic; Chong, Damien; Walker, Nicola; Green, A Christopher

    2018-02-01

    The endocytosis and trafficking of ricin in mammalian cells is an important area of research for those producing ricin anti-toxins and other ricin therapeutics. Ricin trafficking is usually observed by fluorescence microscopy techniques. This gives good resolution and leads to a detailed understanding of the internal movement of ricin within cells. However, microscopy techniques are often hampered by complex analysis and quantification techniques, and the inability to look at ricin trafficking in large populations of cells. In these studies we have directly labelled ricin and assessed if its trafficking can be observed using Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC) both to the cytoplasmic region of cells and specifically to the Golgi apparatus. Using IDEAS® data analysis software the specific fluorescence location of the ricin within the cells was analysed. Then, using cytoplasmic masking techniques to quantify the number of cells with endocytosed cytoplasmic ricin or cells with Golgi-associated ricin, kinetic endocytosis curves were generated. Here we present, to the authors' knowledge, the first example of using imaging flow cytometry for evaluating the subcellular transport of protein cargo, using the trafficking of ricin toxin in lung cells as a model. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FlowCam: Quantification and Classification of Phytoplankton by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Nicole J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to enumerate, classify, and determine biomass of phytoplankton from environmental samples is essential for determining ecosystem function and their role in the aquatic community and microbial food web. Traditional micro-phytoplankton quantification methods using microscopic techniques require preservation and are slow, tedious and very laborious. The availability of more automated imaging microscopy platforms has revolutionized the way particles and cells are detected within their natural environment. The ability to examine cells unaltered and without preservation is key to providing more accurate cell concentration estimates and overall phytoplankton biomass. The FlowCam(®) is an imaging cytometry tool that was originally developed for use in aquatic sciences and provides a more rapid and unbiased method for enumerating and classifying phytoplankton within diverse aquatic environments.

  3. High-throughput label-free image cytometry and image-based classification of live Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Ugawa, Masashi; Nozawa, Taisuke; Iwata, Osamu; Maki, Masanori; Okada, Genki; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Sun, Xinlei; Tiamsak, Pimsiri; Tsumura, Norimichi; Suzuki, Kengo; Di Carlo, Dino; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate high-throughput label-free single-cell image cytometry and image-based classification of Euglena gracilis (a microalgal species) under different culture conditions. We perform it with our high-throughput optofluidic image cytometer composed of a time-stretch microscope with 780-nm resolution and 75-Hz line rate, and an inertial-focusing microfluidic device. By analyzing a large number of single-cell images from the image cytometer, we identify differences in morphological and intracellular phenotypes between E. gracilis cell groups and statistically classify them under various culture conditions including nitrogen deficiency for lipid induction. Our method holds promise for real-time evaluation of culture techniques for E. gracilis and possibly other microalgae in a non-invasive manner. PMID:27446699

  4. A method for simultaneous quantification of monoclonal antibody Ki-67 and DNA content by flow cytometry. Application to breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorisse, M C; Venteo, L; Pluot, M

    1999-02-01

    To seek a method assessing Ki-67 immunostaining and DNA content by flow cytometry simultaneously. The murine monoclonal antibody Ki-67 (Ki) identifies a nuclear protein complex expressed by all nonquiescent tumor cells. Since the antigen detected by Ki is quite labile in most fixation and embedding protocols, a new method for simultaneous quantification of nuclear Ki immunofluorescence and DNA content by flow cytometry was developed. Unfixed, solid tumor cells are permeabilized only with saponin to preserve Ki antigen. The percentage of Ki-positive cell subpopulations calculated by subtraction of the related aspecific fixation histogram gives optimal results more rapidly than by cytogram analysis. Application to breast carcinoma shows the feasibility of the method. Significant correlations between Ki staining and the S-phase fraction were observed. Mean Ki labelling rates of aneuploid tumors were significantly higher than those of the diploid tumors, and significant differences between histologic types were found. This technique can be considered a fast, sensitive and optimal method to evaluate the proliferative activity of breast carcinomas and possibly of other solid tumors in a department of pathology.

  5. Combined analysis of cervical smears. Cytopathology, image cytometry and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H; Bruder, E; Elit, L

    1993-01-01

    This study was an attempt to correlate the Bethesda System of Papanicolaou smear classification with DNA content by image analysis and the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) as determined by in situ hybridization. DNA histograms were classified as normal diploid, diploid proliferative....... HPV infection correlated with DNA polyploidy but was seen in 15 of 29 smears classified as cytologically normal. Morphologically abnormal Papanicolaou smears correlated with aneuploid DNA content. Smears classified as intraepithelial neoplasia correlated with aneuploid DNA content in all 12 cases...

  6. Characterization of functional variables in epididymal alpaca (Vicugna pacos) sperm using imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiani, Alexei; Ugarelli, Alejandra; Evangelista-Vargas, Shirley

    2016-10-01

    Epididymal alpaca sperm represent an alternative model for the study of alpaca semen. The objective of this study was to characterize the normal values of some functional variables in epididymal alpaca sperm using imaging flow cytometry. Alpaca testicles (n=150) were processed and sperm were recovered from the cauda epididymides. Only 76 samples with acceptable motility and sperm count were considered for assessment by imaging flow cytometry. Acrosome integrity and integrity/viability were assessed by FITC-PSA/PI and FITC-PNA/PI. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was assessed by MitoTracker CMXRos and MitoTracker Deep Red FM. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated using BODIPY 581/591 C11. Results show that the mean values for acrosome-intact sperm were 95.03±6.39% and 93.34±7.96%, using FITC-PSA and FITC-PNA, respectively. The mean values for acrosome-intact viable sperm were 60.58±12.12% with FITC-PSA/PI and 58.81±12.94% with FITC-PNA/PI. Greater MMP was detected in 65.03±15.92% and 59.52±19.19%, using MitoTracker CMXRos and MitoTracker Deep Red FM, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was 0.84±0.95%. Evaluation of acrosome-intact and acrosome-intact viable sperm with FITC-PSA/PI compared with. FITC-PNA/PI or MMP with MitoTracker CMXRos compared with MitoTracker Deep Red FM were correlated (Psperm motility (r=0.3979). This report provides a basis for future research related to alpaca semen using the epididymal sperm model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of two new fluorochromes, TOTO and YOYO, for DNA content analysis in cells and chromosomes by flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirons, G.T.; Crissman, H.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The fluorochromes TOTO and YOYO were evaluated for their effectiveness in staining for DNA content analysis by flow cytometry (FCM). The dyes are dimers of thiazole orange (TO) and yellow oxazole (YO), respectively (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR), and both have a very high quantum efficiency. Spectrofluorometric analysis showed that TOTO and YOYO had little fluorescence until bound to DNA or RNA. YOYO, the brighter of the two dyes, had an emission peak at [approximately]510 nm and TOTO at [approximately]530 nm. Analysis by flow cytometry indicated that cells stained with either dye at a concentration of [approximately]4.0 [mu]M could be preferentially excited at either 457 or 488 nm. Unfixed nuclei and fixed cells both treated with RNase, stained with either TOTO or YOYO, and analyzed by FCM yielded coefficients of variation (CV) comparable to CVs obtained for the same samples stained with mithramycin (MI) when excited at 457 nm and propidium iodide (PI) when excited at 488 nm. Both TOTO and YOYO are also being evaluated for their effectiveness in staining Chinese hamster embryo chromosomes; these results are being compared with results obtained with PI stained chromosomes.

  8. Error image aware content restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Lee, Moonsik; Jung, Byunghee

    2015-12-01

    As the resolution of TV significantly increased, content consumers have become increasingly sensitive to the subtlest defect in TV contents. This rising standard in quality demanded by consumers has posed a new challenge in today's context where the tape-based process has transitioned to the file-based process: the transition necessitated digitalizing old archives, a process which inevitably produces errors such as disordered pixel blocks, scattered white noise, or totally missing pixels. Unsurprisingly, detecting and fixing such errors require a substantial amount of time and human labor to meet the standard demanded by today's consumers. In this paper, we introduce a novel, automated error restoration algorithm which can be applied to different types of classic errors by utilizing adjacent images while preserving the undamaged parts of an error image as much as possible. We tested our method to error images detected from our quality check system in KBS(Korean Broadcasting System) video archive. We are also implementing the algorithm as a plugin of well-known NLE(Non-linear editing system), which is a familiar tool for quality control agent.

  9. Metadata for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Sterca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image retrieval technique that combines content based image retrieval with pre-computed metadata-based image retrieval. The resulting system will have the advantages of both approaches: the speed/efficiency of metadata-based image retrieval and the accuracy/power of content-based image retrieval.

  10. An Imaging Flow Cytometry-based approach to analyse the fission yeast cell cycle in fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James O; Swaffer, Matthew; Filby, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is an excellent model organism for studying eukaryotic cell division because many of the underlying principles and key regulators of cell cycle biology are conserved from yeast to humans. As such it can be employed as tool for understanding complex human diseases that arise from dis-regulation in cell cycle controls, including cancers. Conventional Flow Cytometry (CFC) is a high-throughput, multi-parameter, fluorescence-based single cell analysis technology. It is widely used for studying the mammalian cell cycle both in the context of the normal and disease states by measuring changes in DNA content during the transition through G1, S and G2/M using fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Unfortunately analysis of the fission yeast cell cycle by CFC is not straightforward because, unlike mammalian cells, cytokinesis occurs after S-phase meaning that bi-nucleated G1 cells have the same DNA content as mono-nucleated G2 cells and cannot be distinguished using total integrated fluorescence (pulse area). It has been elegantly shown that the width of the DNA pulse can be used to distinguish G2 cells with a single 2C foci versus G1 cells with two 1C foci, however the accuracy of this measurement is dependent on the orientation of the cell as it traverses the laser beam. To this end we sought to improve the accuracy of the fission yeast cell cycle analysis and have developed an Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC)-based method that is able to preserve the high throughput, objective analysis afforded by CFC in combination with the spatial and morphometric information provide by microscopy. We have been able to derive an analysis framework for subdividing the yeast cell cycle that is based on intensiometric and morphometric measurements and is thus robust against orientation-based miss-classification. In addition we can employ image-based metrics to define populations of septated/bi-nucleated cells and measure cellular dimensions. To our knowledge

  11. Application of image flow cytometry for the characterization of red blood cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Sebastian, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael; Chang, Tim C.; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) stored in hypothermic environments for the purpose of transfusion have been documented to undergo structural and functional changes over time. One sign of the so-called RBC storage lesion is irreversible damage to the cell membrane. Consequently, RBCs undergo a morphological transformation from regular, deformable biconcave discocytes to rigid spheroechinocytes. The spherically shaped RBCs lack the deformability to efficiently enter microvasculature, thereby reducing the capacity of RBCs to oxygenate tissue. Blood banks currently rely on microscope techniques that include fixing, staining and cell counting in order to morphologically characterize RBC samples; these methods are labor intensive and highly subjective. This study presents a novel, high-throughput RBC morphology characterization technique using image flow cytometry (IFC). An image segmentation template was developed to process 100,000 images acquired from the IFC system and output the relative spheroechinocyte percentage. The technique was applied on samples extracted from two blood bags to monitor the morphological changes of the RBCs during in vitro hypothermic storage. The study found that, for a given sample of RBCs, the IFC method was twice as fast in data acquisition, and analyzed 250-350 times more RBCs than the conventional method. Over the lifespan of the blood bags, the mean spheroechinocyte population increased by 37%. Future work will focus on expanding the template to segregate RBC images into more subpopulations for the validation of the IFC method against conventional techniques; the expanded template will aid in establishing quantitative links between spheroechinocyte increase and other RBC storage lesion characteristics.

  12. A novel concentration and viability detection method for Brettanomyces using the Cellometer image cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniak, Brian; Bolton, Jason; Kuksin, Dmitry; Shahin, Suzanne M; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Cellometer image cytometry method can improve efficiency and eliminate operator-dependent variations of cell counting compared with the traditional methods, which can potentially improve the quality of beverage products employing Brettanomyces yeasts.

  13. [Application of DNA-image cytometry in the diagnosis of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W; Li, J; Cheng, L L

    2016-02-01

    To explore the value of DNA-image cytometry (DNA-ICM) in diagnosis of lung cancer. 532 cases of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and (or) bronchial brushing cytology (216 cases from lung cancer patients and 209 cases from benign lung disease patients) were detected by DNA-ICM and liquid-based cytology (LBC), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the two methods were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of DNA-ICM were 69.2% and 100.0%, and which of LBC were 46.7% and 97.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of DNA-ICM was significantly higher than that of LBC method in the diagnosis of lung cancer (Plung cancers, the sensitivity of squamous carcinoma was higher that of adenocarcinoma. DNA-ICM has great application value in the diagnosis of lung cancer. DNA-ICM in combination with LBC can increase the detection rate of lung cancer. DNA-ICM of BALF is worthy of application in clinical practice.

  14. Imaging flow cytometry assays for quantifying pigment grade titanium dioxide particle internalization and interactions with immune cells in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Rachel E; Vis, Bradley; Pele, Laetitia C; Faria, Nuno; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-10-01

    Pigment grade titanium dioxide is composed of sub-micron sized particles, including a nanofraction, and is widely utilized in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries. Oral exposure to pigment grade titanium dioxide results in at least some material entering the circulation in humans, although subsequent interactions with blood immune cells are unknown. Pigment grade titanium dioxide is employed for its strong light scattering properties, and this work exploited that attribute to determine whether single cell-particle associations could be determined in immune cells of human whole blood at "real life" concentrations. In vitro assays, initially using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, identified titanium dioxide associated with the surface of, and within, immune cells by darkfield reflectance in imaging flow cytometry. This was confirmed at the population level by side scatter measurements using conventional flow cytometry. Next, it was demonstrated that imaging flow cytometry could quantify titanium dioxide particle-bearing cells, within the immune cell populations of fresh whole blood, down to titanium dioxide levels of 10 parts per billion, which is in the range anticipated for human blood following titanium dioxide ingestion. Moreover, surface association and internal localization of titanium dioxide particles could be discriminated in the assays. Overall, results showed that in addition to the anticipated activity of blood monocytes internalizing titanium dioxide particles, neutrophil internalization and cell membrane adhesion also occurred, the latter for both phagocytic and nonphagocytic cell types. What happens in vivo and whether this contributes to activation of one or more of these different cells types in blood merits further attention. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. A shared standard for cytometry and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.

    2013-02-01

    Introduction: The development of cytometry standards is complicated by their being relevant to pathology and biological science, which already have standards. CytometryML, the cytometry markup language, is an XML standard for flow and image cytometry, which includes both objects and their relationships, and is based upon existing standards: the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry ( ISAC) FCS, Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine ( DICOM), and International Digital Publishing Forum (EPUB). Methods: The CytometryML schemas are written in XML Schema Definition (XSD1.1). Object-oriented methodology was employed to create the CytometryML schemas, which were tested by translating specific XSD elements into XML and filling in the values. The attribute based syntax description of relationships in the Resource Description Framework (RDF) has been replaced by an XSD element based implementation. The ISAC Archival Cytometry Standard (ACS) concept of a zipped data container file was further refined to be a EPUB file. Since Table of Contents information is present in an EPUB container, it was minimized in the Relations schema, which replaced the ToC schema of the ACS and includes a modified and extended version of the ToC RDF capabilities. Results: An XML based system that includes the DICOM specified separation of series and instances and includes relationships has been created. Conclusions: CytometryML and EPUB could be used for the transmission of research and medical data and be extension some of the pathology part of DICOM. The CytometryML version of RDF in XSD could be extended to provide XSD with full RDF capabilities.

  16. Measurement of Low-Abundance Intracellular mRNA Using Amplified FISH Staining and Image-Based Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Andrea L; Sampson, Jill N Best; McFarlin, Brian Keith

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in instrument design and reagent development have enabled the rapid progression in available measurement techniques in the field of flow cytometry. In particular, image-based flow cytometry extends the analysis capacity found in traditional flow cytometry. Until recently, it was not possible to measure intracellular mRNA in specific phenotypes of cells by flow cytometry. In this protocol, a method of completing simultaneous intracellular measurement of mRNA and protein for PPAR-gamma in peripheral blood monocytes, which have been exposed in vitro to modified LDL, is described. The process of PPAR-gamma activation following uptake of modified LDL is believed to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. PPAR-gamma mRNA measurement was made possible using an amplified FISH technique (PrimeFlow RNA Assay) that allowed for detection of low-abundant intracellular mRNA expression. This protocol represents a continued effort by the authors' laboratory to establish and validate new techniques to assess the role of the immune system in chronic disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Interfacing Lab-on-a-Chip Embryo Technology with High-Definition Imaging Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Hall, Christopher J; Crosier, Philip S; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-08-01

    To spearhead deployment of zebrafish embryo biotests in large-scale drug discovery studies, automated platforms are needed to integrate embryo in-test positioning and immobilization (suitable for high-content imaging) with fluidic modules for continuous drug and medium delivery under microperfusion to developing embryos. In this work, we present an innovative design of a high-throughput three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip-based device for automated immobilization and culture and time-lapse imaging of developing zebrafish embryos under continuous microperfusion. The 3D Lab-on-a-Chip array was fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining, while the off-chip interfaces were fabricated using additive manufacturing processes (fused deposition modelling and stereolithography). The system's design facilitated rapid loading and immobilization of a large number of embryos in predefined clusters of traps during continuous microperfusion of drugs/toxins. It was conceptually designed to seamlessly interface with both upright and inverted fluorescent imaging systems and also to directly interface with conventional microtiter plate readers that accept 96-well plates. Compared with the conventional Petri dish assays, the chip-based bioassay was much more convenient and efficient as only small amounts of drug solutions were required for the whole perfusion system running continuously over 72 h. Embryos were spatially separated in the traps that assisted tracing single embryos, preventing interembryo contamination and improving imaging accessibility.

  18. Building high dimensional imaging database for content based image search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinpei; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    In medical imaging informatics, content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques are employed to aid radiologists in the retrieval of images with similar image contents. CBIR uses visual contents, normally called as image features, to search images from large scale image databases according to users' requests in the form of a query image. However, most of current CBIR systems require a distance computation of image character feature vectors to perform query, and the distance computations can be time consuming when the number of image character features grows large, and thus this limits the usability of the systems. In this presentation, we propose a novel framework which uses a high dimensional database to index the image character features to improve the accuracy and retrieval speed of a CBIR in integrated RIS/PACS.

  19. Fully Automated On-Chip Imaging Flow Cytometry System with Disposable Contamination-Free Plastic Re-Cultivation Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kaneko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel imaging cytometry system using a poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA based microfluidic chip. The system was contamination-free, because sample suspensions contacted only with a flammable PMMA chip and no other component of the system. The transparency and low-fluorescence of PMMA was suitable for microscopic imaging of cells flowing through microchannels on the chip. Sample particles flowing through microchannels on the chip were discriminated by an image-recognition unit with a high-speed camera in real time at the rate of 200 event/s, e.g., microparticles 2.5 μm and 3.0 μm in diameter were differentiated with an error rate of less than 2%. Desired cells were separated automatically from other cells by electrophoretic or dielectrophoretic force one by one with a separation efficiency of 90%. Cells in suspension with fluorescent dye were separated using the same kind of microfluidic chip. Sample of 5 μL with 1 × 106 particle/mL was processed within 40 min. Separated cells could be cultured on the microfluidic chip without contamination. The whole operation of sample handling was automated using 3D micropipetting system. These results showed that the novel imaging flow cytometry system is practically applicable for biological research and clinical diagnostics.

  20. Morphological analysis of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum using flow cytometry-the fast alternative to microscopic image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehgartner, Daniela; Herwig, Christoph; Fricke, Jens

    2017-10-01

    An important parameter in filamentous bioreactor cultivations is the morphology of the fungi, due to its interlink to productivity and its dependency on process conditions. Filamentous fungi show a large variety of morphological forms in submerged cultures. These range from dispersed hyphae, to interwoven mycelial aggregates, to denser hyphal aggregates, the so-called pellets. Depending on the objective function of the bioprocess, different characteristics of the morphology are favorable and need to be quantified accurately. The most common method to quantitatively characterize morphology is image analysis based on microscopy. This method is work intensive and time consuming. Therefore, we developed a faster, at-line applicable, alternative method based on flow cytometry. Within this contribution, this novel method is compared to microscopy for a penicillin production process. Both methods yielded in comparable distinction of morphological sub-populations and described their morphology in more detail. In addition to the appropriate quantification of size parameters and the description of the hyphal region around pellets, the flow cytometry method even revealed a novel compactness parameter for fungal pellets which is not accessible via light microscopy. Hence, the here presented flow cytometry method for morphological analysis is a fast and reliable alternative to common tools with some new insights in the pellet morphology, enabling at-line use in production environments.

  1. Flow cytometry imaging identifies rare T(H)2 cells expressing thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor in a "proallergic" milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reefer, Amanda J; Hulse, Kathryn E; Lannigan, Josephine A; Solga, Michael D; Wright, Paul W; Kelly, Libby A; Patrie, James; Chapman, Martin D; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2010-11-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is expressed at sites of allergic inflammation, including eczematous skin. This cytokine has been reported to exert its T(H)2-inducing properties through dendritic cells. Expression of TSLP receptor on the surface of activated T(H)2 cells could amplify T(H)2 responses at inflamed sites through the direct actions of TSLP. To test rigorously whether T(H)2 cells induced by "proallergic" factors express TSLP receptor and characterize these cells using an experimental platform that combines flow cytometry with microscopic capabilities. CD4(+) T cells isolated from patients with atopic dermatitis or normal healthy controls were cocultured with autologous dendritic cells in the presence of T(H)2-promoting stimuli (TSLP ± allergen and staphylococcal enterotoxin B ± TSLP). Surface expression of TSLP receptor was analyzed by image-based flow cytometry, and responsiveness of purified T cells to TSLP was assessed by phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 and cytokine secretion. T(H)2-promoting stimuli induced a robust population of activated T(H)2 cells (CD25(+)IL-4(+)). Regardless of the nature of the stimulus, flow cytometry imaging confirmed that T cells expressing TSLP receptor were rare, constituting a minor fraction of the IL-4(+) T cell pool; however, TSLP responsiveness was nonetheless detectable. Analysis of cell size and nuclear morphology revealed preferential expression of TSLP receptor on IL-4-expressing cells undergoing mitosis. Analysis of lesional skin in atopic dermatitis supported the view that rare IL-4(+) T cells expressing TSLP receptor are present at inflamed sites. In a "proallergic" milieu, TSLP receptor is preferentially expressed on rare actively dividing T(H)2 cells. The direct action of TSLP on T cells could amplify T(H)2 responses at sites of allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Flow Cytometry Imaging Identifies Rare Th2 Cells Expressing TSLP Receptor in a “Pro-Allergic” Milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reefer, Amanda J.; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Lannigan, Josephine A.; Solga, Michael D.; Wright, Paul W.; Kelly, Libby A.; Patrie, James; Chapman, Martin D.; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Background TSLP is expressed at sites of allergic inflammation, including eczematous skin. This cytokine has been reported to exert its Th2-inducing properties through dendritic cells. Expression of TSLP receptor on the surface of activated Th2 cells could amplify Th2 responses at inflamed sites through the direct actions of TSLP. Objective To rigorously test whether Th2 cells induced by “pro-allergic” factors express TSLP receptor and characterize these cells using an experimental platform that combines flow cytometry with microscopic capabilities. Methods CD4+ T cells isolated from patients with atopic dermatitis or normal healthy controls were co-cultured with autologous dendritic cells in the presence of Th2-promoting stimuli (TSLP±allergen and staphylococcal enterotoxin B±TSLP). Surface expression of TSLP receptor was analyzed by image-based flow cytometry and responsiveness of purified T cells to TSLP was assessed by phosphorylation of STAT5 and cytokine secretion. Results Th2-promoting stimuli induced a robust population of activated Th2 cells (CD25+IL-4+). Regardless of the nature of the stimulus, flow cytometry imaging confirmed that T cells expressing TSLP receptor were rare, constituting a minor fraction of the IL-4+ T cell pool; however, TSLP-responsiveness was nonetheless detectable. Analysis of cell size and nuclear morphology revealed preferential expression of TSLP receptor on IL-4-expressing cells undergoing mitosis. Analysis of lesional skin in atopic dermatitis supported the view that rare IL-4+ T cells expressing TSLP receptor are present at inflamed sites. Conclusion In a “pro-allergic” milieu, TSLP receptor is preferentially expressed on rare actively dividing Th2 cells. The direct action of TSLP on T cells could amplify Th2 responses at sites of allergic inflammation. PMID:20888036

  3. Prognostic Impact of DNA-Image-Cytometry in Neuroendocrine (Carcinoid Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Raatz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing prognosis proves particularly difficult with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs as a benign looking histology can be associated with a malignant behaviour. In order to identify prognostic factors we examined 44 gastrointestinal and pulmonary, paraffin‐embedded NETs histologically and immunohistochemically. DNA‐image‐cytometry was used to examine 40 of these. We found that poor differentiation (corresponding to a Soga and Tazawa type D and infiltrative growth correlated with a poorer prognosis. Moreover, parameters determined by diagnostic DNA cytometry like the 5c‐exceeding rate, the 2c‐deviation index, DNA‐grade of malignancy, DNA‐entropy and the type of DNA histogram were found to be of prognostic relevance. Morphometric parameters like the form factor and the mean nuclear area were relevant for survival, tumour recurrence and metastasis. However, in the multivariate analysis the only independent risk factor was the histological differentiation. The 5c‐exceeding rate is a good objective risk factor, which can be used particularly in cases in which only a fine needle biopsie is available. Direct comparison of the histology and the 5c‐exceeding rate in the multivariate analysis suggests that the 5c‐exceeding rate taken as sole prognostic factor might be of higher prognostic relevance than the histology but larger studies are needed to confirm this.

  4. Application of imaging flow cytometry for characterization of acute inflammation in non-classical animal model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More Bayona, Juan A; Karuppannan, Anbu K; Trites, Michael J; Barreda, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Phagocytes display marked heterogeneity in their capacity to induce and control acute inflammation. This has a significant impact on the effectiveness of antimicrobial immune responses at different tissue sites as well as their predisposition for inflammation-associated pathology. Imaging flow cytometry provides novel opportunities for characterization of these phagocyte populations through high spatial resolution, statistical robustness, and a broad range of quantitative morphometric cell analysis tools. This study highlights an integrative approach that brings together new tools in imaging flow cytometry with conventional methodologies for characterization of phagocyte responses during acute inflammation. We focus on a comparative avian in vivo challenge model to showcase the added depth gained through these novel quantitative multiparametric approaches even in the absence of antibody-based cellular markers. Our characterization of acute inflammation in this model shows significant conservation of phagocytic capacity among avian phagocytes compared to other animal models. However, it also highlights evolutionary divergence with regards to phagocyte inflammation control mechanisms based on the internalization of apoptotic cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Content-based image and video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xun; Li, Honglin; Ahalt, Stanley C.

    2002-08-01

    The term Content-Based appears often in applications for which MPEG-7 is expected to play a significant role. MPEG-7 standardizes descriptors of multimedia content, and while compression is not the primary focus of MPEG-7, the descriptors defined by MPEG-7 can be used to reconstruct a rough representation of an original multimedia source. In contrast, current image and video compression standards such as JPEG and MPEG are not designed to encode at the very low bit-rates that could be accomplished with MPEG-7 using descriptors. In this paper we show that content-based mechanisms can be introduced into compression algorithms to improve the scalability and functionality of current compression methods such as JPEG and MPEG. This is the fundamental idea behind Content-Based Compression (CBC). Our definition of CBC is a compression method that effectively encodes a sufficient description of the content of an image or a video in order to ensure that the recipient is able to reconstruct the image or video to some degree of accuracy. The degree of accuracy can be, for example, the classification error rate of the encoded objects, since in MPEG-7 the classification error rate measures the performance of the content descriptors. We argue that the major difference between a content-based compression algorithm and conventional block-based or object-based compression algorithms is that content-based compression replaces the quantizer with a more sophisticated classifier, or with a quantizer which minimizes classification error. Compared to conventional image and video compression methods such as JPEG and MPEG, our results show that content-based compression is able to achieve more efficient image and video coding by suppressing the background while leaving the objects of interest nearly intact.

  6. MXS-Chaining: A Highly Efficient Cloning Platform for Imaging and Flow Cytometry Approaches in Mammalian Systems.

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    Hanna L Sladitschek

    Full Text Available The continuous improvement of imaging technologies has driven the development of sophisticated reporters to monitor biological processes. Such constructs should ideally be assembled in a flexible enough way to allow for their optimization. Here we describe a highly reliable cloning method to efficiently assemble constructs for imaging or flow cytometry applications in mammalian cell culture systems. We bioinformatically identified a list of restriction enzymes whose sites are rarely found in human and mouse cDNA libraries. From the best candidates, we chose an enzyme combination (MluI, XhoI and SalI: MXS that enables iterative chaining of individual building blocks. The ligation scar resulting from the compatible XhoI- and SalI-sticky ends can be translated and hence enables easy in-frame cloning of coding sequences. The robustness of the MXS-chaining approach was validated by assembling constructs up to 20 kb long and comprising up to 34 individual building blocks. By assessing the success rate of 400 ligation reactions, we determined cloning efficiency to be 90% on average. Large polycistronic constructs for single-cell imaging or flow cytometry applications were generated to demonstrate the versatility of the MXS-chaining approach. We devised several constructs that fluorescently label subcellular structures, an adapted version of FUCCI (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator optimized to visualize cell cycle progression in mouse embryonic stem cells and an array of artificial promoters enabling dosage of doxycyline-inducible transgene expression. We made publicly available through the Addgene repository a comprehensive set of MXS-building blocks comprising custom vectors, a set of fluorescent proteins, constitutive promoters, polyadenylation signals, selection cassettes and tools for inducible gene expression. Finally, detailed guidelines describe how to chain together prebuilt MXS-building blocks and how to generate new

  7. Interobserver Reproducibility of Dna-Image-Cytometry in Ascus or Higher Cervical Cytology

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    Vu Quoc Huy Nguyen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the aim has been to investigate the interobserver reproducibility of DNA‐image‐cytometry (DNA‐ICM applied to routine Pap smears classified as Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance (ASCUS or higher lesions (ASCUS+. 202 Pap smears diagnosed as ASCUS or higher were included in the study. After cytological assessment, smears underwent restaining according to Feulgen. First measurements were performed as routine workup. The second measurements were blinded to the result of the first and consecutively performed. DNA‐ICM met the consensus statements of the European Society of Analytical Cellular Pathology (ESACP. Interobserver agreement was assessed by calculating Kappa statistics. The diagnosis of DNA‐aneuploidy in the first measurements was confirmed in all cases. Second measurement detected 12 additional cases with aneuploidy. Nine out of these cases were classified as aneuploidy by detection of 9c Exceeding Events (9cEE. In three cases stemline‐aneuploidy was disclosed. The overall proportion of observed agreement was 94.1%, κ=0.87, 95% CI=0.74–0.99. Our study shows a good interobserver reproducibility of DNA‐ICM performed on cervical smears with ASCUS or higher lesions. DNA‐ICM thus represents a highly reproducible diagnostic procedure.

  8. Image content authentication based on channel coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Lei

    2008-03-01

    The content authentication determines whether an image has been tampered or not, and if necessary, locate malicious alterations made on the image. Authentication on a still image or a video are motivated by recipient's interest, and its principle is that a receiver must be able to identify the source of this document reliably. Several techniques and concepts based on data hiding or steganography designed as a means for the image authentication. This paper presents a color image authentication algorithm based on convolution coding. The high bits of color digital image are coded by the convolution codes for the tamper detection and localization. The authentication messages are hidden in the low bits of image in order to keep the invisibility of authentication. All communications channels are subject to errors introduced because of additive Gaussian noise in their environment. Data perturbations cannot be eliminated but their effect can be minimized by the use of Forward Error Correction (FEC) techniques in the transmitted data stream and decoders in the receiving system that detect and correct bits in error. This paper presents a color image authentication algorithm based on convolution coding. The message of each pixel is convolution encoded with the encoder. After the process of parity check and block interleaving, the redundant bits are embedded in the image offset. The tamper can be detected and restored need not accessing the original image.

  9. Assessment of β-carotene content, cell physiology and morphology of the yellow yeast Rhodotorula glutinis mutant 400A15 using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutzu, Raffaela; Clemente, Ana; Reis, Alberto; Nobre, Beatriz; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Roseiro, José; Lopes da Silva, Teresa

    2013-08-01

    Flow cytometry was used to assess β-carotene content, cell membrane permeability, cell size and granularity in Rhodotorula glutinis mutant 400A15 grown under different oxygen transfer coefficients (k L a) and carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N). A Doehlert distribution was used in order to select the best conditions that induced the highest carotenoids production. The highest β-carotene content (0.79 mg g(-1) DCW) at the lowest k L a and C/N (5 × 10(-3) s(-1) and 11.3 respectively). Under these conditions, the biomass concentration attained 18.60 g L(-1). The highest ratio of cells with permeabilised membranes (2.6 %), and the highest cell size and granularity were also obtained under these conditions. It was observed that C/N showed a stronger influence than the k L a on the measured cell parameters.

  10. A light sheet confocal microscope for image cytometry with a variable linear slit detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Khan, Foysal Z.; Powless, Amy J.; Benson, Devin; Hunter, Courtney; Fritsch, Ingrid; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    We present a light sheet confocal microscope (LSCM) capable of high-resolution imaging of cell suspensions in a microfluidic environment. In lieu of conventional pressure-driven flow or mechanical translation of the samples, we have employed a novel method of fluid transport, redox-magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD). This method achieves fluid motion by inducing a small current into the suspension in the presence of a magnetic field via electrodes patterned onto a silicon chip. This on-chip transportation requires no moving parts, and is coupled to the remainder of the imaging system. The microscopy system comprises a 450 nm diode 20 mW laser coupled to a single mode fiber and a cylindrical lens that converges the light sheet into the back aperture of a 10x, 0.3 NA objective lens in an epi-illumination configuration. The emission pathway contains a 150 mm tube lens that focuses the light onto the linear sensor at the conjugate image plane. The linear sensor (ELiiXA+ 8k/4k) has three lateral binning modes which enables variable detection aperture widths between 5, 10, or 20 μm, which can be used to vary axial resolution. We have demonstrated redox-MHD-enabled light sheet microscopy in suspension of fluorescent polystyrene beads. This approach has potential as a high-throughput image cytometer with myriad cellular diagnostic applications.

  11. Image-based cytometry reveals three distinct subsets of activated granulocytes based on phagocytosis and oxidative burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Brian K; Williams, Randall R; Venable, Adam S; Dwyer, Karen C; Haviland, David L

    2013-08-01

    Granulocytes play a key role in innate immunity and the most common functional assays are phagocytosis and oxidative burst. The purpose of this technical note is to use image-based flow cytometry to divide activated granulocytes into unique subsets based on their degree of phagocytosis and oxidative burst in response to different experimental incubations. Prior to the experiments, all reagents were titered to determine the lowest dose that resulted in an acceptable signal to noise ratio. Heparinized, whole blood (100 µl) was mixed with one of two bioparticles (E. coli and S. aureus) and DHE (10 µg/ml) and incubated for 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 min in a 37°C water bath. An additional tube kept on ice was used as a negative control. All subsequent processing steps were completed on ice in the dark to minimize additional activation of cells. After the 37°C incubation, N-ethylmaleimide (15 mM) was added to halt phagocytosis, preventing the uptake of additional microparticles. Suspensions were labeled with CD66b-APC and CD45-APCeFluor780 for 60 min and a fix/lyse solution was added. Prior to acquisition, 7AAD was added to stain nuclear DNA. A minimum of 5,000 granulocyte (CD66b+) events were acquired using a Millipore-Amnis FlowSight equipped with blue (488 nm, 60 mW), red (642 nm, 100 mW), and side scatter (785 nm, 12 mW) lasers. Samples were compensated and analyzed using Amnis IDEAS software (v.5.0.983.0). Image-based analysis allowed us to divide activated granulocytes into three distinct subsets, whose relative abundance changed as a function of both bioparticle type and incubation length. The method described in this technical note represents a potential novel adaptation to common methods of assessing granulocyte function. More research is needed to test and validate our image-based method in clinical conditions that impair granulocyte function. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. High throughput image cytometry micronucleus assay to investigate the presence or absence of mutagenic effects of cold physical plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeschus, Sander; Schmidt, Anke; Kramer, Axel; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Adler, Frank; von Woedtke, Thomas; Niessner, Felix; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Wende, Kristian

    2018-02-08

    Promising cold physical plasma sources have been developed in the field of plasma medicine. An important prerequisite to their clinical use is lack of genotoxic effects in cells. During optimization of one or even different plasma sources for a specific application, large numbers of samples need to be analyzed. There are soft and easy-to-assess markers for genotoxic stress such as phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) but only few tests are accredited by the OECD with regard to mutagenicity detection. The micronucleus (MN) assay is among them but often requires manual counting of many thousands of cells per sample under the microscope. A high-throughput MN assay is presented using image flow cytometry and image analysis software. A human lymphocyte cell line was treated with plasma generated with ten different feed gas conditions corresponding to distinct reactive species patterns that were investigated for their genotoxic potential. Several millions of cells were automatically analyzed by a MN quantification strategy outlined in detail in this work. Our data demonstrates the absence of newly formed MN in any feed gas condition using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet kINPen. As positive control, ionizing radiation gave a significant 5-fold increase in micronucleus frequency. Thus, this assay is suitable to assess the genotoxic potential in large sample sets of cells exposed chemical or physical agents including plasmas in an efficient, reliable, and semiautomated manner. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mercury effects on Thalassiosira weissflogii: Applications of two-photon excitation chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging and flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yun [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zeng Yan; Qu, Jianan Y. [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2012-04-15

    The toxic effects of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and methylmercury (MeHg) on the photosynthesis and population growth in a marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii were investigated using two methods: two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and flow cytometry (FCM). For photosynthesis, Hg(II) exposure increased the average chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime, whereas such increment was not found under MeHg stress. This may be caused by the inhibitory effect of Hg(II) instead of MeHg on the electron transport chain. For population growth, modeled specific growth rate data showed that the reduction in population growth by Hg(II) mainly resulted from an increased number of injured cells, while the live cells divided at the normal rates. However, MeHg inhibitory effects on population growth were contributed by the reduced division rates of all cells. Furthermore, the cell images and the FCM data reflected the morphological changes of diatom cells under Hg(II)/MeHg exposure vividly and quantitatively. Our results demonstrated that the toxigenicity mechanisms between Hg(II) and MeHg were different in the algal cells.

  14. Evaluation of ploidy status using DNA-image cytometry of exfoliated mucosal cells in oral lichen planus

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    Ravi Teja Chitturi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP is one of the potentially malignant disorders (PMDs with a malignancy rate of 0.2-2%. Aneuploidy is considered to be one of the important markers for malignant transformation and DNA-image cytometry (DIC has been successfully employed in oral mucosal PMDs and also in tumors of the cervix, lung and biliary tract. Aims: In this study, we intend to assess the ploidy status of exfoliated cells in OLP using DIC. Materials and Methods: Exfoliated cells from 48 patients with different subtypes of OLP (reticular, plaque type, erosive and atrophic and 10 controls were stained using Feulgen reaction and assessed for integrated optical density using image analysis software and the ploidy status was assessed. Results: All the patients in the control group and most of the patients (93.5% who had reticular or plaque type of OLP (29 out of 31 exhibited diploid nuclei in the smears, whereas 11 patients who had erosive or atrophic types of OLP showed aneuploid nuclei. Conclusions: The patients with erosive or atrophic types of OLP are at more risk and assessment of ploidy status by exfoliative cytology can be used as an adjuvant for diagnosis.

  15. Quality Assurance System Using Statistical Process Control: An Implementation for Image Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chiu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Optical technologies have shown some promise for improving the care of cervical neoplasia. We are currently evaluating fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy and quantitative cyto‐histopathology for cervical neoplasia screening and diagnosis. Here we describe the establishment and application of a quality assurance (QA system for detecting system malfunctions and assessing the comparability of four image cytometers used in a multicenter clinical trial. Methods: Our QA system involves three levels of evaluation based on the periodicity and complexity of the measurements. We implemented our QA system at three image cytometers at the British Columbia Cancer Agency and one at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The measurements or tasks were performed daily, monthly, and semi‐annually. The current and voltage of the lamp, the calibration image characteristics, and the room temperature were checked daily. Long‐term stability over time, short‐term variability over time, and spatial response field uniformity were evaluated monthly. Camera linearity was measured semi‐annually. Control charts based on statistical process control techniques were used to detect when the system did not perform optimally. Results: Daily measurements have shown good consistency in room temperature, lamp and calibration behaviour. Monthly measurements have shown small coefficients of variation between and within the four devices. There have been greater differences between sessions than within sessions. Comparability among the four systems is reasonably good. Semi‐annual measurements have shown stable camera linearity. QA events were detected using the QA system. Multiple examples of event detection leading to correction of system malfunction are described in this report. Conclusions: QA programs are critical for ensuring data integrity and therefore for the conduct of multicenter clinical trials.

  16. Characterization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis defects by clinical features, flow cytometry, and automated image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaus, Alexej; Pantel, Jean Tori; Pendziwiat, Manuela

    2018-01-01

    . In contrast, it was facial recognition software that achieved the highest accuracy in predicting the disease-causing gene in a GPIBD. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the overlapping clinical spectrum of both HPMRS and MCAHS in the majority of affected individuals, the elevation of AP and the reduced surface levels of GPI...... individuals with a GPIBD, respectively. On the phenotypic level, we evaluated the frequency of occurrence of clinical symptoms and analyzed the performance of computer-assisted image analysis of the facial gestalt in 91 individuals. RESULTS: We found that certain malformations such as Morbus Hirschsprung...

  17. Application of image cytometry to characterize heterologous lipid flippases in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Theorin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    flow cytometric evaluation of lipid-labeled cells. In addition, we demonstrated that expression of fluorescently tagged flippase complexes can be directly co-related with fluorescent lipid uptake using the image-based cell counter system. The method extends the number of techniques available......Lipid flippases are integral membrane proteins that play a central role in moving lipids across cellular membranes. Some of these transporters are ATPases that couple lipid translocation to ATP hydrolysis, whereas others function without any discernible metabolic energy input. A growing number...

  18. High-Frequency Observations of Phytoplankton Spring Bloom Dynamics in Baffin Bay Using Imaging Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, P. L.; Ferland, J.; Karp-Boss, L.; Babin, M.

    2016-02-01

    The FlowCytobot (IFCB) is a high-frequency submersible imaging flow cytometer that allows a detailed characterization of phytoplankton community composition. The IFCB was used to study the under-ice spring bloom dynamics at a fixed station (67˚28.774N, 63˚47.398W) in Baffin Bay from April 22nd until July 10th 2015. Seawater and sea-ice samples were collected every second day, at six different depths in water and at the bottom of ice cores. Preliminary analyses show an increase in algae abundance in sea-ice from the end of April to mid-June, reaching ca. 3000 cells mL-1. As spring sets in, the abundance decreased rapidly to 250 cells mL-1. Visual inspection of images showed the dominance of pennate diatoms such as Nitzschia frigida, Entomoneis spp. and Navicula spp. in the sea-ice biota from April to mid-June. Concurrently, we observed an abrupt increase in ice related algae abundance in the water column (ca. 25 to ca. 225 cells mL-1). This suggests a "flushing" of sympagic algae from sea ice. Inspection of images from the seawater samples supports this idea by showing the same community, with a substantial proportion of pennate diatoms debris. Data also shows the onset of a phytoplankton bloom at the beginning of July, with a maximum abundance near surface deepening over time. The data suggest a shift towards a phytoplankton community, largely dominated by Thalassiosira spp. and Chaetoceros spp., with limited occurrences of <10µm flagellates and dinoflagellates. Results match commonly used algal biomass proxies like chl a concentration as shown by a strong correlation with cell abundance from the IFCB. Further comparisons with irradiance, water masses properties, sea-ice cover and algal pigments will improve our understanding of the under-ice spring bloom dynamics. Together with automated classification of images, this new method allows reduced sampling costs, time effective species identification and real-time visualisation of phytoplankton communities

  19. Characterization of extracellular vesicles in whole blood: Influence of pre-analytical parameters and visualization of vesicle-cell interactions using imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendl, Birgit; Weiss, René; Fischer, Michael B; Spittler, Andreas; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-09-09

    Extracellular vesicles are central players in intercellular communication and are released from the plasma membrane under tightly regulated conditions, depending on the physiological and pathophysiological state of the producing cell. Their heterogeneity requires a spectrum of methods for isolation and characterization, where pre-analytical parameters have profound impact on vesicle analysis, particularly in blood, since sampling, addition of anticoagulants, as well as post-sampling vesicle generation may influence the outcome. Here, we characterized microvesicles directly in whole blood using a combination of flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry. We assessed the influence of sample agitation, anticoagulation, and temperature on post-sampling vesicle generation, and show that vesicle counts remained stable over time in samples stored without agitation. Storage with gentle rolling mimicking agitation, in contrast, resulted in strong release of platelet-derived vesicles in blood anticoagulated with citrate or heparin, whereas vesicle counts remained stable upon anticoagulation with EDTA. Using imaging flow cytometry, we could visualize microvesicles adhering to blood cells and revealed an anticoagulant-dependent increase in vesicle-cell aggregates over time. We demonstrate that vesicles adhere preferentially to monocytes and granulocytes in whole blood, while no microvesicles could be visualized on lymphocytes. Our data underscore the relevance of pre-analytical parameters in vesicle analysis and demonstrate that imaging flow cytometry is a suitable tool to study the interaction of extracellular vesicles with their target cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CMOS based image cytometry for detection of phytoplankton in ballast water

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, J M; Martínez, P; Yáñez, M A; Catalan, V; Parker, A; Veldhuis, M; Pruneri, V

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an image cytometer (I-CYT) for the analysis of phytoplankton in fresh and marine water environments. A linear quantification of cell numbers was observed covering several orders of magnitude using cultures of Tetraselmis and Nannochloropsis measured by autofluorescence in a laboratory environment. We assessed the functionality of the system outside the laboratory by phytoplankton quantification of samples taken from a marine water environment (Dutch Wadden Sea, The Netherlands) and a fresh water environment (Lake Ijssel, The Netherlands). The I-CYT was also employed to study the effects of two ballast water treatment systems (BWTS), based on chlorine electrolysis and UV sterilization, with the analysis including the vitality of the phytoplankton. For comparative study and benchmarking of the I-CYT, a standard flow cytometer was used. Our results prove a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 cells/ml with an accuracy between 0.7 and 0.5 log, and a correlation of 88.29% in quantification and 96.21% in vit...

  1. Oscillatory dynamics of cell cycle proteins in single yeast cells analyzed by imaging cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Ball

    Full Text Available Progression through the cell division cycle is orchestrated by a complex network of interacting genes and proteins. Some of these proteins are known to fluctuate periodically during the cell cycle, but a systematic study of the fluctuations of a broad sample of cell-cycle proteins has not been made until now. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, we profiled 16 strains of budding yeast, each containing GFP fused to a single gene involved in cell cycle regulation. The dynamics of protein abundance and localization were characterized by extracting the amplitude, period, and other indicators from a series of images. Oscillations of protein abundance could clearly be identified for Cdc15, Clb2, Cln1, Cln2, Mcm1, Net1, Sic1, and Whi5. The period of oscillation of the fluorescently tagged proteins is generally in good agreement with the inter-bud time. The very strong oscillations of Net1 and Mcm1 expression are remarkable since little is known about the temporal expression of these genes. By collecting data from large samples of single cells, we quantified some aspects of cell-to-cell variability due presumably to intrinsic and extrinsic noise affecting the cell cycle.

  2. Interfacing 3D magnetic twisting cytometry with confocal fluorescence microscopy to image force responses in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Jia, Qiong; Chen, Junjian; Chen, Junwei; Luo, Junyu; Yao, Wenting; Zhou, Wenwen; Huang, Wei; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Ning

    2017-07-01

    Cells and tissues can undergo a variety of biological and structural changes in response to mechanical forces. Only a few existing techniques are available for quantification of structural changes at high resolution in response to forces applied along different directions. 3D-magnetic twisting cytometry (3D-MTC) is a technique for applying local mechanical stresses to living cells. Here we describe a protocol for interfacing 3D-MTC with confocal fluorescence microscopy. In 3D-MTC, ferromagnetic beads are bound to the cell surface via surface receptors, followed by their magnetization in any desired direction. A magnetic twisting field in a different direction is then applied to generate rotational shear stresses in any desired direction. This protocol describes how to combine magnetic-field-induced mechanical stimulation with confocal fluorescence microscopy and provides an optional extension for super-resolution imaging using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy. This technology allows for rapid real-time acquisition of a living cell's mechanical responses to forces via specific receptors and for quantifying structural and biochemical changes in the same cell using confocal fluorescence microscopy or STED. The integrated 3D-MTC-microscopy platform takes ∼20 d to construct, and the experimental procedures require ∼4 d when carried out by a life sciences graduate student.

  3. Optimized automated data analysis for the cytokinesis‐block micronucleus assay using imaging flow cytometry for high throughput radiation biodosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. A.; Probst, C. E.; Beaton‐Green, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cytokinesis‐block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a well‐established technique that can be employed in triage radiation biodosimetry to estimate whole body doses of radiation to potentially exposed individuals through quantitation of the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in binucleated lymphocyte cells (BNCs). The assay has been partially automated using traditional microscope‐based methods and most recently has been modified for application on the ImageStreamX (ISX) imaging flow cytometer. This modification has allowed for a similar number of BNCs to be automatically scored as compared to traditional microscopy in a much shorter time period. However, the MN frequency measured was much lower than both manual and automated slide‐based methods of performing the assay. This work describes the optimized analysis template which implements newly developed functions in the IDEAS® data analysis software for the ISX that enhances specificity for BNCs and increases the frequency of scored MN. A new dose response calibration curve is presented in which the average rate of MN per BNC is of similar magnitude to those presented in the literature using automated CBMN slide scoring methods. In addition, dose estimates were generated for nine irradiated, blinded samples and were found to be within ±0.5 Gy of the delivered dose. Results demonstrate that the improved identification accuracy for MN and BNCs in the ISX‐based version of the CBMN assay will translate to increased accuracy when estimating unknown radiation doses received by exposed individuals following large‐scale radiological or nuclear emergencies. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of ISAC PMID:27272602

  4. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induction in DNA double strand break repair defective human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourton, Emma C; Plowman, Piers N; Zahir, Sheba Adam; Senguloglu, Gonul Ulus; Serrai, Hiba; Bottley, Graham; Parris, Christopher N

    2012-02-01

    The measurement of γ-H2AX foci induction in cells provides a sensitive and reliable method for the quantitation of DNA damage responses in a variety of cell types. Accurate and rapid methods to conduct such observations are desirable. In this study, we have employed the novel technique of multispectral imaging flow cytometry to compare the induction and repair of γ-H2AX foci in three human cell types with different capacities for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). A repair normal fibroblast cell line MRC5-SV1, a DSB repair defective ataxia telangiectasia (AT5BIVA) cell line, and a DNA-PKcs deficient cell line XP14BRneo17 were exposed to 2 Gy gamma radiation from a (60)Cobalt source. Thirty minutes following exposure, we observed a dramatic induction of foci in the nuclei of these cells. After 24 hrs, there was a predictable reduction on the number of foci in the MRC5-SV1 cells, consistent with the repair of DNA DSB. In the AT5BIVA cells, persistence of the foci over a 24-hr period was due to the failure in the repair of DNA DSB. However, in the DNA-PKcs defective cells (XP14BRneo17), we observed an intermediate retention of foci in the nuclei indicative of partial repair of DNA DSB. In summary, the application of imaging flow cytometry has permitted an evaluation of foci in a large number of cells (20,000) for each cell line at each time point. This provides a novel method to determine differences in repair kinetics between different cell types. We propose that imaging flow cytometry provides an alternative platform for accurate automated high through-put analysis of foci induction in a variety of cell types. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Perceptual Quality Assessment of Screen Content Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Fang, Yuming; Lin, Weisi

    2015-11-01

    Research on screen content images (SCIs) becomes important as they are increasingly used in multi-device communication applications. In this paper, we present a study on perceptual quality assessment of distorted SCIs subjectively and objectively. We construct a large-scale screen image quality assessment database (SIQAD) consisting of 20 source and 980 distorted SCIs. In order to get the subjective quality scores and investigate, which part (text or picture) contributes more to the overall visual quality, the single stimulus methodology with 11 point numerical scale is employed to obtain three kinds of subjective scores corresponding to the entire, textual, and pictorial regions, respectively. According to the analysis of subjective data, we propose a weighting strategy to account for the correlation among these three kinds of subjective scores. Furthermore, we design an objective metric to measure the visual quality of distorted SCIs by considering the visual difference of textual and pictorial regions. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SCI perceptual quality assessment scheme, consisting of the objective metric and the weighting strategy, can achieve better performance than 11 state-of-the-art IQA methods. To the best of our knowledge, the SIQAD is the first large-scale database published for quality evaluation of SCIs, and this research is the first attempt to explore the perceptual quality assessment of distorted SCIs.

  6. A novel method for measuring cellular antibody uptake using imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct uptake rates for two different monoclonal antibodies targeting L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazin, John; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Altevogt, Peter; Brady, Nathan R

    2015-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have emerged as a promising tool for cancer therapy. Differing approaches utilize mAbs to either deliver a drug to the tumor cells or to modulate the host's immune system to mediate tumor kill. The rate by which a therapeutic antibody is being internalized by tumor cells is a decisive feature for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. We herein present a novel method to effectively quantitate antibody uptake of tumor cells by using image-based flow cytometry, which combines image analysis with high throughput of sample numbers and sample size. The use of this method is established by determining uptake rate of an anti-EpCAM antibody (HEA125), from single cell measurements of plasma membrane versus internalized antibody, in conjunction with inhibitors of endocytosis. The method is then applied to two mAbs (L1-9.3, L1-OV52.24) targeting the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) at two different epitopes. Based on median cell population responses, we find that mAb L1-OV52.24 is rapidly internalized by the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip while L1 mAb 9.3 is mainly retained at the cell surface. These findings suggest the L1 mAb OV52.24 as a candidate to be further developed for drug-delivery to cancer cells, while L1-9.3 may be optimized to tag the tumor cells and stimulate immunogenic cancer cell killing. Furthermore, when analyzing cell-to-cell variability, we observed L1 mAb OV52.24 rapidly transition into a subpopulation with high-internalization capacity. In summary, this novel high-content method for measuring antibody internalization rate provides a high level of accuracy and sensitivity for cell population measurements and reveals further biologically relevant information when taking into account cellular heterogeneity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. World Wide Web Based Image Search Engine Using Text and Image Content Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bo; Wang, Xiaogang; Tang, Xiaoou

    2003-01-01

    Using both text and image content features, a hybrid image retrieval system for Word Wide Web is developed in this paper. We first use a text-based image meta-search engine to retrieve images from the Web based on the text information on the image host pages to provide an initial image set. Because of the high-speed and low cost nature of the text-based approach, we can easily retrieve a broad coverage of images with a high recall rate and a relatively low precision. An image content based ordering is then performed on the initial image set. All the images are clustered into different folders based on the image content features. In addition, the images can be re-ranked by the content features according to the user feedback. Such a design makes it truly practical to use both text and image content for image retrieval over the Internet. Experimental results confirm the efficiency of the system.

  8. Survey paper on Sketch Based and Content Based Image Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Gaidhani, Prachi A.; Bagal, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This survey paper presents an overview of development of Sketch Based Image Retrieval (SBIR) and Content based image retrieval (CBIR) in the past few years. There is awful growth in bulk of images as well as the far-flung application in too many fields. The main attributes to represent as well index the images are color, shape, texture, spatial layout. These features of images are extracted to check similarity among the images. Generation of special query is the main p...

  9. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  10. Semi-automatized segmentation method using image-based flow cytometry to study sperm physiology: the case of capacitation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros-Volante, Arturo; Moreno-Irusta, Ayelen; Torres-Rodriguez, Paulina; Giojalas, Laura; Gervasi, María G; Visconti, Pablo E; Treviño, Claudia L

    2017-11-25

    Is image-based flow cytometry a useful tool to study intracellular events in human sperm such as protein tyrosine phosphorylation or signaling processes? Image-based flow cytometry is a powerful tool to study intracellular events in a relevant number of sperm cells, which enables a robust statistical analysis providing spatial resolution in terms of the specific subcellular localization of the labeling. Sperm capacitation is required for fertilization. During this process, spermatozoa undergo numerous physiological changes, via activation of different signaling pathways, which are not completely understood. Classical approaches for studying sperm physiology include conventional microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting. These techniques present disadvantages for obtaining detailed subcellular information of signaling pathways in a relevant number of cells. This work describes a new semi-automatized analysis using image-based flow cytometry which enables the study, at the subcellular and population levels, of different sperm parameters associated with signaling. The increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation is presented as an example. Sperm cells were isolated from seminal plasma by the swim-up technique. We evaluated the intensity and distribution of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated in non-capacitation and capacitation supporting media for 1 and 18 hours under different experimental conditions. We used an antibody against FER kinase and the pharmacological inhibitors in an attempt to identify the kinases involved in protein tyrosine phosphorylation during human sperm capacitation. Semen samples from normospermic donors were obtained by masturbation after 2-3 days of sexual abstinence. We used the innovative technique image-based flow cytometry and image analysis tools to segment individual images of spermatozoa. We evaluated and quantified the regions of sperm where protein tyrosine phosphorylation takes place at

  11. Using High-Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation at International Conference on Toxicological Alternatives & Translational Toxicology (ICTATT) held in China and Discussing the possibility of using High Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points Slide Presentation at International Conference on Toxicological Alternatives & Translational Toxicology (ICTATT) held in China and Discussing the possibility of using High Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points

  12. Practical flow cytometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Howard M. (Howard Maurice)

    2003-01-01

    ... ... Conflict: Resolution ... 1.3 Problem Number One: Finding The Cell(s) ... Flow Cytometry: Quick on the Trigger ... The Main Event ... The Pulse Quickens, the Plot Thickens ... 1.4 Flow Cytometry: ...

  13. Content-Based Image Retrial Based on Hadoop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DongSheng Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, time complexity of algorithms for content-based image retrial is extremely high. In order to retrieve images on large-scale databases efficiently, a new way for retrieving based on Hadoop distributed framework is proposed. Firstly, a database of images features is built by using Speeded Up Robust Features algorithm and Locality-Sensitive Hashing and then perform the search on Hadoop platform in a parallel way specially designed. Considerable experimental results show that it is able to retrieve images based on content on large-scale cluster and image sets effectively.

  14. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2012-08-01

    Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible.

  15. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  16. System refinement for content based satellite image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NourElDin Laban

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a large increase in satellite generated data especially in the form of images. Hence intelligent processing of the huge amount of data received by dozens of earth observing satellites, with specific satellite image oriented approaches, presents itself as a pressing need. Content based satellite image retrieval (CBSIR approaches have mainly been driven so far by approaches dealing with traditional images. In this paper we introduce a novel approach that refines image retrieval process using the unique properties to satellite images. Our approach uses a Query by polygon (QBP paradigm for the content of interest instead of using the more conventional rectangular query by image approach. First, we extract features from the satellite images using multiple tiling sizes. Accordingly the system uses these multilevel features within a multilevel retrieval system that refines the retrieval process. Our multilevel refinement approach has been experimentally validated against the conventional one yielding enhanced precision and recall rates.

  17. WISE: a content-based Web image search engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoping; Palmer, R. D.

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype of a Web Image Search Engine (WISE), which allows users to search for images on the WWW by image examples, in a similar fashion to current search engines that allow users to find related Web pages using text matching on keywords. The system takes an image specified by the user and finds similar images available on the WWW by comparing the image contents using low level image features. The current version of the WISE system consists of a graphical user interface (GUI), an autonomous Web agent, an image comparison program and a query processing program. The users specify the URL of a target image and the URL of the starting Web page from where the program will 'crawl' the Web, finding images along the way and retrieve those satisfying a certain constraints. The program then computes the visual features of the retrieved images and performs content-based comparison with the target image. The results of the comparison are then sorted according to a certain similarity measure, which along with thumbnails and information associated with the images, such as the URLs; image size, etc. are then written to an HTML page. The resultant page is stored on a Web server and is outputted onto the user's Web browser once the search process is complete. A unique feature of the current version of WISE is its image content comparison algorithm. It is based on the comparison of image palettes and it therefore very efficient in retrieving one of the two universally accepted image formats on the Web, 'gif.' In gif images, the color palette is contained in its header and therefore it is only necessary to retrieve the header information rather than the whole images, thus making it very efficient.

  18. Content dependent selection of image enhancement parameters for mobile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Gyoo; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Ka-Hee; Kim, Choon-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Mobile devices such as cellular phones and portable multimedia player with capability of playing terrestrial digital multimedia broadcasting (T-DMB) contents have been introduced into consumer market. In this paper, content dependent image quality enhancement method for sharpness and colorfulness and noise reduction is presented to improve perceived image quality on mobile displays. Human visual experiments are performed to analyze viewers' preference. Relationship between the objective measures and the optimal values of image control parameters are modeled by simple lookup tables based on the results of human visual experiments. Content dependent values of image control parameters are determined based on the calculated measures and predetermined lookup tables. Experimental results indicate that dynamic selection of image control parameters yields better image quality.

  19. ?Fitspiration? on Social Media: A Content Analysis of Gendered Images

    OpenAIRE

    Carrotte, Elise Rose; Prichard, Ivanka; Lim, Megan SC

    2017-01-01

    Background ?Fitspiration? (also known as ?fitspo?) aims to inspire individuals to exercise and be healthy, but emerging research indicates exposure can negatively impact female body image. Fitspiration is frequently accessed on social media; however, it is currently unclear the degree to which messages about body image and exercise differ by gender of the subject. Objective The aim of our study was to conduct a content analysis to identify the characteristics of fitspiration content posted ac...

  20. Content-based image retrieval in homomorphic encryption domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellafqira, Reda; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Bouslimi, Dalel; Quellec, Gwenole

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a secure implementation of a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) method that makes possible diagnosis aid systems to work in externalized environment and with outsourced data as in cloud computing. This one works with homomorphic encrypted images from which it extracts wavelet based image features next used for subsequent image comparison. By doing so, our system allows a physician to retrieve the most similar images to a query image in an outsourced database while preserving data confidentiality. Our Secure CBIR is the first one that proposes to work with global image features extracted from encrypted images and does not induce extra communications in-between the client and the server. Experimental results show it achieves retrieval performance as good as if images were processed non-encrypted.

  1. Automated diagnosis of retinopathy by content-based image retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaum, Edward; Karnowski, Thomas P; Govindasamy, V Priya; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Tobin, Kenneth W

    2008-01-01

    To describe a novel computer-based image analysis method that is being developed to assist and automate the diagnosis of retinal disease. Content-based image retrieval is the process of retrieving related images from large database collections using their pictorial content. The content feature list becomes the index for storage, search, and retrieval of related images from a library based upon specific visual characteristics. Low-level analyses use feature description models and higher-level analyses use perceptual organization and spatial relationships, including clinical metadata, to extract semantic information. We defined, extracted, and tested a large number of region- and lesion-based features from a dataset of 395 retinal images. Using a statistical hold-one-out method, independent queries for each image were submitted to the system and a diagnostic prediction was formulated. The diagnostic sensitivity for all stratified levels of age-related macular degeneration ranged from 75% to 100%. Similarly, the sensitivity of detection and accuracy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy ranged from 75% to 91.7% and for nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, ranged from 75% to 94.7%. The overall purity of the diagnosis (specificity) for all disease states in the dataset was 91.3%. The probabilistic nature of content-based image retrieval permits us to make statistically relevant predictions regarding the presence, severity, and manifestations of common retinal diseases from digital images in an automated and deterministic manner.

  2. Enhancing Image Retrieval System Using Content Based Search ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this work is to design and implement a software that enhances the retrieval of image using the image content base as the criteria. As the size of multimedia databases and other repositories continues to grow, the difficulty of finding multimedia information increases, it becomes practically impossible to depend ...

  3. Teleconsultations using content-based retrieval of parametric images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminski, J

    2004-01-01

    The problem of medical teleconsultations with intelligent computer system rather than with a human expert is analyzed. System for content-based retrieval of images is described and presented as a use case of a passive teleconsultation. Selected features, crucial for retrieval quality, are introduced including: synthesis of parametric images, regions of interest detection and extraction, definition of content-based features, generation of descriptors, query algebra, system architecture and performance. Additionally, electronic business pattern is proposed to generalize teleconsultation services like content-based retrieval systems.

  4. A Far-Red Fluorescent Probe for Flow Cytometry and Image-Based Functional Studies of Xenobiotic Sequestering Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Rahul K.; Yoon, Gi Sang; Sud, Sudha; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2015-01-01

    Clofazimine (CFZ) is an optically active, red-colored chemotherapeutic agent that is FDA – approved for the treatment of leprosy and is on the World Health Organization's list of essential medications. Interestingly, CFZ massively accumulates in macrophages where it forms crystal–like–drug inclusions (CLDIs) following oral administration of the drug in animals and humans. Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of CLDIs formed by resident tissue macrophages revealed that CFZ, when accumulated as CLDIs, undergoes a red shift in fluorescence excitation (from Ex:540-570 nm to Ex:560-600 nm) and emission (Em: 560-580 nm to Em: 640-700 nm) signal relative to the soluble and free-base crystal forms of CFZ. Using epifluorescence microscopy, CLDI(+) cells could be identified, relative to CLDI(−) cells, based on a >3-fold increment in mean fluorescence signal at excitation 640 nm and emission at 670 nm. Similarly, CLDI(+) cells could be identified by flow cytometry, based on a >100-fold increment in mean fluorescence signal using excitation lasers at 640 nm and emission detectors >600 nm. CLDI's fluorescence excitation and emission was orthogonal to that of cell viability dyes such as propidium iodide and DAPI, cellular staining dyes such as Hoechst 33342 (nucleus) and FM 1-43 (plasma membrane), as well as many other fluorescently-tagged antibodies used for immunophenotyping analyses. In vivo, >85% of CLDI(+) cells in the peritoneal exudate were F4/80(+) macrophages and >97% of CLDI(+) cells in the alveolar exudate were CD11c(+). Most importantly, the viability of cells was minimally affected by the presence of CLDIs. Accordingly, these results establish that CFZ fluorescence in CLDIs is suitable for quantitative flow cytometric phenotyping analysis and functional studies of xenobiotic sequestering macrophages. PMID:26109497

  5. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  6. The Use of QBIC Content-Based Image Retrieval System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Wu

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The fast increase in digital images has caught increasing attention on the development of image retrieval technologies. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR has become an important approach in retrieving image data from a large collection. This article reports our results on the use and users study of a CBIR system. Thirty-eight students majored in art and design were invited to use the IBM’s OBIC (Query by Image Content system through the Internet. Data from their information needs, behaviors, and retrieval strategies were collected through an in-depth interview, observation, and self-described think-aloud process. Important conclusions are:(1)There are four types of information needs for image data: implicit, inspirational, ever-changing, and purposive. The types of needs may change during the retrieval process. (2)CBIR is suitable for the example-type query, text retrieval is suitable for the scenario-type query, and image browsing is suitable for the symbolic query. (3)Different from text retrieval, detailed description of the query condition may lead to retrieval failure more easily. (4)CBIR is suitable for the domain-specific image collection, not for the images on the Word-Wide Web.[Article content in Chinese

  7. Retrieval Architecture with Classified Query for Content Based Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rik Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumer behavior has been observed to be largely influenced by image data with increasing familiarity of smart phones and World Wide Web. Traditional technique of browsing through product varieties in the Internet with text keywords has been gradually replaced by the easy accessible image data. The importance of image data has portrayed a steady growth in application orientation for business domain with the advent of different image capturing devices and social media. The paper has described a methodology of feature extraction by image binarization technique for enhancing identification and retrieval of information using content based image recognition. The proposed algorithm was tested on two public datasets, namely, Wang dataset and Oliva and Torralba (OT-Scene dataset with 3688 images on the whole. It has outclassed the state-of-the-art techniques in performance measure and has shown statistical significance.

  8. Information management for high content live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High content live cell imaging experiments are able to track the cellular localisation of labelled proteins in multiple live cells over a time course. Experiments using high content live cell imaging will generate multiple large datasets that are often stored in an ad-hoc manner. This hinders identification of previously gathered data that may be relevant to current analyses. Whilst solutions exist for managing image data, they are primarily concerned with storage and retrieval of the images themselves and not the data derived from the images. There is therefore a requirement for an information management solution that facilitates the indexing of experimental metadata and results of high content live cell imaging experiments. Results We have designed and implemented a data model and information management solution for the data gathered through high content live cell imaging experiments. Many of the experiments to be stored measure the translocation of fluorescently labelled proteins from cytoplasm to nucleus in individual cells. The functionality of this database has been enhanced by the addition of an algorithm that automatically annotates results of these experiments with the timings of translocations and periods of any oscillatory translocations as they are uploaded to the repository. Testing has shown the algorithm to perform well with a variety of previously unseen data. Conclusion Our repository is a fully functional example of how high throughput imaging data may be effectively indexed and managed to address the requirements of end users. By implementing the automated analysis of experimental results, we have provided a clear impetus for individuals to ensure that their data forms part of that which is stored in the repository. Although focused on imaging, the solution provided is sufficiently generic to be applied to other functional proteomics and genomics experiments. The software is available from: fhttp://code.google.com/p/livecellim/

  9. Information management for high content live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Daniel; Turner, David A; Ankers, John; Kennedy, Stephnie; Ryan, Sheila; Swainston, Neil; Griffiths, Tony; Spiller, David G; Oliver, Stephen G; White, Michael RH; Kell, Douglas B; Paton, Norman W

    2009-01-01

    Background High content live cell imaging experiments are able to track the cellular localisation of labelled proteins in multiple live cells over a time course. Experiments using high content live cell imaging will generate multiple large datasets that are often stored in an ad-hoc manner. This hinders identification of previously gathered data that may be relevant to current analyses. Whilst solutions exist for managing image data, they are primarily concerned with storage and retrieval of the images themselves and not the data derived from the images. There is therefore a requirement for an information management solution that facilitates the indexing of experimental metadata and results of high content live cell imaging experiments. Results We have designed and implemented a data model and information management solution for the data gathered through high content live cell imaging experiments. Many of the experiments to be stored measure the translocation of fluorescently labelled proteins from cytoplasm to nucleus in individual cells. The functionality of this database has been enhanced by the addition of an algorithm that automatically annotates results of these experiments with the timings of translocations and periods of any oscillatory translocations as they are uploaded to the repository. Testing has shown the algorithm to perform well with a variety of previously unseen data. Conclusion Our repository is a fully functional example of how high throughput imaging data may be effectively indexed and managed to address the requirements of end users. By implementing the automated analysis of experimental results, we have provided a clear impetus for individuals to ensure that their data forms part of that which is stored in the repository. Although focused on imaging, the solution provided is sufficiently generic to be applied to other functional proteomics and genomics experiments. The software is available from: PMID:19622144

  10. High-Throughput 3D Tumor Spheroid Screening Method for Cancer Drug Discovery Using Celigo Image Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Déry, Olivier; Kuksin, Dmitry; Sincoff, Eric; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-08-01

    Oncologists have investigated the effect of protein or chemical-based compounds on cancer cells to identify potential drug candidates. Traditionally, the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of the drugs are first measured in 2D in vitro models, and then further tested in 3D xenograft in vivo models. Although the drug candidates can demonstrate promising inhibitory or cytotoxicity results in a 2D environment, similar effects may not be observed under a 3D environment. In this work, we developed an image-based high-throughput screening method for 3D tumor spheroids using the Celigo image cytometer. First, optimal seeding density for tumor spheroid formation was determined by investigating the cell seeding density of U87MG, a human glioblastoma cell line. Next, the dose-response effects of 17-AAG with respect to spheroid size and viability were measured to determine the IC50 value. Finally, the developed high-throughput method was used to measure the dose response of four drugs (17-AAG, paclitaxel, TMZ, and doxorubicin) with respect to the spheroid size and viability. Each experiment was performed simultaneously in the 2D model for comparison. This detection method allowed for a more efficient process to identify highly qualified drug candidates, which may reduce the overall time required to bring a drug to clinical trial.

  11. Content-Based Image Retrieval: Color-selection exploited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, Marie-Francine; van den Broek, Egon; Vuurpijl, L.G.; de Brusser, Rik; Kisters, P.M.F.; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Kraaij, Wessel; von Schmid, J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    This research presents a new color selection interface that facilitates query-by-color in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR). Existing CBIR color selection interfaces, are being judged as non-intuitive and difficult to use. Our interface copes with these problems of usability. It is based on 11

  12. Content-based document image retrieval in complex document collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, G.; Argamon, S.; Frieder, O.; Grossman, D.; Lewis, D.

    2007-01-01

    We address the problem of content-based image retrieval in the context of complex document images. Complex documents typically start out on paper and are then electronically scanned. These documents have rich internal structure and might only be available in image form. Additionally, they may have been produced by a combination of printing technologies (or by handwriting); and include diagrams, graphics, tables and other non-textual elements. Large collections of such complex documents are commonly found in legal and security investigations. The indexing and analysis of large document collections is currently limited to textual features based OCR data and ignore the structural context of the document as well as important non-textual elements such as signatures, logos, stamps, tables, diagrams, and images. Handwritten comments are also normally ignored due to the inherent complexity of offline handwriting recognition. We address important research issues concerning content-based document image retrieval and describe a prototype for integrated retrieval and aggregation of diverse information contained in scanned paper documents we are developing. Such complex document information processing combines several forms of image processing together with textual/linguistic processing to enable effective analysis of complex document collections, a necessity for a wide range of applications. Our prototype automatically generates rich metadata about a complex document and then applies query tools to integrate the metadata with text search. To ensure a thorough evaluation of the effectiveness of our prototype, we are developing a test collection containing millions of document images.

  13. Semantic sparse recoding of visual content for image applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwu; Han, Peng; Wang, Liwei; Wen, Ji-Rong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new semantic sparse recoding method to generate more descriptive and robust representation of visual content for image applications. Although the visual bag-of-words (BOW) representation has been reported to achieve promising results in different image applications, its visual codebook is completely learnt from low-level visual features using quantization techniques and thus the so-called semantic gap remains unbridgeable. To handle such challenging issue, we utilize the annotations (predicted by algorithms or shared by users) of all the images to improve the original visual BOW representation. This is further formulated as a sparse coding problem so that the noise issue induced by the inaccurate quantization of visual features can also be handled to some extent. By developing an efficient sparse coding algorithm, we successfully generate a new visual BOW representation for image applications. Since such sparse coding has actually incorporated the high-level semantic information into the original visual codebook, we thus consider it as semantic sparse recoding of the visual content. Finally, we apply our semantic sparse recoding method to automatic image annotation and social image classification. The experimental results on several benchmark datasets show the promising performance of our semantic sparse recoding method in these two image applications.

  14. [Content-based automatic retinal image recognition and retrieval system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiumei; Du, Jianjun; Cheng, Xia; Cao, Hongliang

    2013-04-01

    This paper is aimed to fulfill a prototype system used to classify and retrieve retinal image automatically. With the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) technology, a method to represent the retinal characteristics mixing the fundus image color (gray) histogram with bright, dark region features and other local comprehensive information was proposed. The method uses kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to further extract nonlinear features and dimensionality reduced. It also puts forward a measurement method using support vector machine (SVM) on KPCA weighted distance in similarity measure aspect. Testing 300 samples with this prototype system randomly, we obtained the total image number of wrong retrieved 32, and the retrieval rate 89.33%. It showed that the identification rate of the system for retinal image was high.

  15. Flow Cytometry Section

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary goal of the Flow Cytometry Section is to provide the services of state-of-the-art multi-parameter cellular analysis and cell sorting for researchers and...

  16. Toward Content Based Image Retrieval with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Judah E S; Plassard, Andrew J; Fabbri, Daniel; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-19

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers the potential to identify similar case histories, understand rare disorders, and eventually, improve patient care. Recent advances in database capacity, algorithm efficiency, and deep Convolutional Neural Networks (dCNN), a machine learning technique, have enabled great CBIR success for general photographic images. Here, we investigate applying the leading ImageNet CBIR technique to clinically acquired medical images captured by the Vanderbilt Medical Center. Briefly, we (1) constructed a dCNN with four hidden layers, reducing dimensionality of an input scaled to 128×128 to an output encoded layer of 4×384, (2) trained the network using back-propagation 1 million random magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, (3) labeled an independent set of 2100 images, and (4) evaluated classifiers on the projection of the labeled images into manifold space. Quantitative results were disappointing (averaging a true positive rate of only 20%); however, the data suggest that improvements would be possible with more evenly distributed sampling across labels and potential re-grouping of label structures. This prelimainry effort at automated classification of medical images with ImageNet is promising, but shows that more work is needed beyond direct adaptation of existing techniques.

  17. Content based image retrieval using unclean positive examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Ye, Lei

    2009-10-01

    Conventional content-based image retrieval (CBIR) schemes employing relevance feedback may suffer from some problems in the practical applications. First, most ordinary users would like to complete their search in a single interaction especially on the web. Second, it is time consuming and difficult to label a lot of negative examples with sufficient variety. Third, ordinary users may introduce some noisy examples into the query. This correspondence explores solutions to a new issue that image retrieval using unclean positive examples. In the proposed scheme, multiple feature distances are combined to obtain image similarity using classification technology. To handle the noisy positive examples, a new two-step strategy is proposed by incorporating the methods of data cleaning and noise tolerant classifier. The extensive experiments carried out on two different real image collections validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  18. Image Segmentation Method Using Thresholds Automatically Determined from Picture Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Been Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation has become an indispensable task in many image and video applications. This work develops an image segmentation method based on the modified edge-following scheme where different thresholds are automatically determined according to areas with varied contents in a picture, thus yielding suitable segmentation results in different areas. First, the iterative threshold selection technique is modified to calculate the initial-point threshold of the whole image or a particular block. Second, the quad-tree decomposition that starts from the whole image employs gray-level gradient characteristics of the currently-processed block to decide further decomposition or not. After the quad-tree decomposition, the initial-point threshold in each decomposed block is adopted to determine initial points. Additionally, the contour threshold is determined based on the histogram of gradients in each decomposed block. Particularly, contour thresholds could eliminate inappropriate contours to increase the accuracy of the search and minimize the required searching time. Finally, the edge-following method is modified and then conducted based on initial points and contour thresholds to find contours precisely and rapidly. By using the Berkeley segmentation data set with realistic images, the proposed method is demonstrated to take the least computational time for achieving fairly good segmentation performance in various image types.

  19. Multiparameter Conventional Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Katherine M

    2018-01-01

    Multicolor flow cytometry is a useful technique when examining mixed populations of cells, such as blood and tissue cells in human and animal samples. The ability to use multiple fluorescent markers simultaneously allows for the identification of multiple cell types, as well as functional markers that further characterize each sample. The introduction of instruments capable of measuring 12-plus colors and new reagents has made this type of flow cytometry both popular and problematic. Adapting a typical staining panel from 4 to 6 color tubes to more than 12 colors is not simply a matter of "plug and play", but must be approached in a systematic manner to achieve a successful multi-parameter staining panel. This chapter will examine the considerations and methods needed to successfully perform multicolor flow cytometry.

  20. Guidelines for Microplate Selection in High Content Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Oscar J

    2018-01-01

    Since the inception of commercialized automated high content screening (HCS) imaging devices in the mid to late 1990s, the adoption of media vessels typically used to house and contain biological specimens for interrogation has transitioned from microscope slides and petri dishes into multi-well microtiter plates called microplates. The early 96- and 384-well microplates commonly used in other high-throughput screening (HTS) technology applications were often not designed for optical imaging. Since then, modifications and the use of next-generation materials with improved optical clarity have enhanced the quality of captured images, reduced autofocusing failures, and empowered the use of higher power magnification objectives to resolve fine detailed measurements at the subcellular pixel level. The plethora of microplates and their applications requires practitioners of high content imaging (HCI) to be especially diligent in the selection and adoption of the best plates for running longitudinal studies or larger screening campaigns. While the highest priority in experimental design is the selection of the biological model, the choice of microplate can alter the biological response and ultimately may change the experimental outcome. This chapter will provide readers with background, troubleshooting guidelines, and considerations for choosing an appropriate microplate.

  1. "Fitspiration" on Social Media: A Content Analysis of Gendered Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrotte, Elise Rose; Prichard, Ivanka; Lim, Megan Su Cheng

    2017-03-29

    "Fitspiration" (also known as "fitspo") aims to inspire individuals to exercise and be healthy, but emerging research indicates exposure can negatively impact female body image. Fitspiration is frequently accessed on social media; however, it is currently unclear the degree to which messages about body image and exercise differ by gender of the subject. The aim of our study was to conduct a content analysis to identify the characteristics of fitspiration content posted across social media and whether this differs according to subject gender. Content tagged with #fitspo across Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr was extracted over a composite 30-minute period. All posts were analyzed by 2 independent coders according to a codebook. Of the 415/476 (87.2%) relevant posts extracted, most posts were on Instagram (360/415, 86.8%). Most posts (308/415, 74.2%) related thematically to exercise, and 81/415 (19.6%) related thematically to food. In total, 151 (36.4%) posts depicted only female subjects and 114/415 (27.5%) depicted only male subjects. Female subjects were typically thin but toned; male subjects were often muscular or hypermuscular. Within the images, female subjects were significantly more likely to be aged under 25 years (P<.001) than the male subjects, to have their full body visible (P=.001), and to have their buttocks emphasized (P<.001). Male subjects were more likely to have their face visible in the post (P=.005) than the female subjects. Female subjects were more likely to be sexualized than the male subjects (P=.002). Female #fitspo subjects typically adhered to the thin or athletic ideal, and male subjects typically adhered to the muscular ideal. Future research and interventional efforts should consider the potential objectifying messages in fitspiration, as it relates to both female and male body image.

  2. Biased discriminant euclidean embedding for content-based image retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wei; Tao, Dacheng

    2010-02-01

    With many potential multimedia applications, content-based image retrieval (CBIR) has recently gained more attention for image management and web search. A wide variety of relevance feedback (RF) algorithms have been developed in recent years to improve the performance of CBIR systems. These RF algorithms capture user's preferences and bridge the semantic gap. However, there is still a big room to further the RF performance, because the popular RF algorithms ignore the manifold structure of image low-level visual features. In this paper, we propose the biased discriminative Euclidean embedding (BDEE) which parameterises samples in the original high-dimensional ambient space to discover the intrinsic coordinate of image low-level visual features. BDEE precisely models both the intraclass geometry and interclass discrimination and never meets the undersampled problem. To consider unlabelled samples, a manifold regularization-based item is introduced and combined with BDEE to form the semi-supervised BDEE, or semi-BDEE for short. To justify the effectiveness of the proposed BDEE and semi-BDEE, we compare them against the conventional RF algorithms and show a significant improvement in terms of accuracy and stability based on a subset of the Corel image gallery.

  3. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha G. Panchal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  4. Content-based histopathological image retrieval for whole slide image database using binary codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yushan; Jiang, Zhiguo; Ma, Yibing; Zhang, Haopeng; Xie, Fengying; Shi, Huaqiang; Zhao, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) has been widely researched for medical images. In application of histo- pathological images, there are two issues that need to be carefully considered. The one is that the digital slide is stored in a spatially continuous image with a size of more than 10K x 10K pixels. The other is that the size of query image varies in a large range according to different diagnostic conditions. It is a challenging work to retrieve the eligible regions for the query image from the database that consists of whole slide images (WSIs). In this paper, we proposed a CBIR framework for the WSI database and size-scalable query images. Each WSI in the database is encoded and stored in a matrix of binary codes. When retrieving, the query image is first encoded into a set of binary codes and analyzed to pre-choose a set of regions from database using hashing method. Then a multi-binary-code-based similarity measurement based on hamming distance is designed to rank proposal regions. Finally, the top relevant regions and their locations in the WSIs along with the diagnostic information are returned to assist pathologists in diagnoses. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated in a fine-annotated WSIs database of epithelial breast tumors. The experimental results show that proposed framework is both effective and efficiency for content-based whole slide image retrieval.

  5. Content-addressable read/write memories for image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W. E.; Savage, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    The commonly encountered image analysis problems of region labeling and clustering are found to be cases of search-and-rename problem which can be solved in parallel by a system architecture that is inherently suitable for VLSI implementation. This architecture is a novel form of content-addressable memory (CAM) which provides parallel search and update functions, allowing speed reductions down to constant time per operation. It has been proposed in related investigations by Hall (1981) that, with VLSI, CAM-based structures with enhanced instruction sets for general purpose processing will be feasible.

  6. Tools to Measure Autophagy Using High Content Imaging and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, Nick J; Samson, Brent A; Chambers, Kevin M; Janes, Michael S; Mandavilli, Bhaskar S

    2018-01-01

    Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a predominately pro-survival catabolic process responsible for the degradation of long-lived or aggregated proteins, invading microorganisms and damaged or redundant intracellular organelles. Removal of these entities is achieved through encompassment of the target by the autophagosome and subsequent delivery to the lysosome. The use of fluorescence microscopy is a common method to investigate autophagy through monitoring the spatial and temporal recruitment both of autophagosomal markers and cargo to the autophagosome. In this section, we will discuss the use of high content imaging (HCI) and analysis in the study of autophagy with reference to commonly used markers of autophagosomal formation.

  7. Relevance Feedback in Content Based Image Retrieval: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manesh B. Kokare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the technical achievements in the research area of relevance feedback (RF in content-based image retrieval (CBIR. Relevance feedback is a powerful technique in CBIR systems, in order to improve the performance of CBIR effectively. It is an open research area to the researcher to reduce the semantic gap between low-level features and high level concepts. The paper covers the current state of art of the research in relevance feedback in CBIR, various relevance feedback techniques and issues in relevance feedback are discussed in detail.

  8. Image decomposition: separation of texture from piecewise smooth content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Jean-Luc; Elad, Mikael; Donoho, David L.

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method for separating images into texture and piecewise smooth parts. The proposed approach is based on a combination of the Basis Pursuit Denoising (BPDN) algorithm and the Total-Variation (TV) regularization scheme. The basic idea promoted in this paper is the use of two appropriate dictionaries, one for the representation of textures, and the other for the natural scene parts. Each dictionary is designed for sparse representation of a particular type of image-content (either texture or piecewise smooth). The use of BPDN with the two augmented dictionaries leads to the desired separation, along with noise removal as a by-product. As the need to choose a proper dictionary for natural scene is very hard, a TV regularization is employed to better direct the separation process. Experimental results validate the algorithm's performance.

  9. Disability in physical education textbooks: an analysis of image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táboas-Pais, María Inés; Rey-Cao, Ana

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how images of disability are portrayed in physical education textbooks for secondary schools in Spain. The sample was composed of 3,316 images published in 36 textbooks by 10 publishing houses. A content analysis was carried out using a coding scheme based on categories employed in other similar studies and adapted to the requirements of this study with additional categories. The variables were camera angle, gender, type of physical activity, field of practice, space, and level. Univariate and bivariate descriptive analyses were also carried out. The Pearson chi-square statistic was used to identify associations between the variables. Results showed a noticeable imbalance between people with disabilities and people without disabilities, and women with disabilities were less frequently represented than men with disabilities. People with disabilities were depicted as participating in a very limited variety of segregated, competitive, and elite sports activities.

  10. Deeply learnt hashing forests for content based image retrieval in prostate MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit; Conjeti, Sailesh; Navab, Nassir; Katouzian, Amin

    2016-03-01

    Deluge in the size and heterogeneity of medical image databases necessitates the need for content based retrieval systems for their efficient organization. In this paper, we propose such a system to retrieve prostate MR images which share similarities in appearance and content with a query image. We introduce deeply learnt hashing forests (DL-HF) for this image retrieval task. DL-HF effectively leverages the semantic descriptiveness of deep learnt Convolutional Neural Networks. This is used in conjunction with hashing forests which are unsupervised random forests. DL-HF hierarchically parses the deep-learnt feature space to encode subspaces with compact binary code words. We propose a similarity preserving feature descriptor called Parts Histogram which is derived from DL-HF. Correlation defined on this descriptor is used as a similarity metric for retrieval from the database. Validations on publicly available multi-center prostate MR image database established the validity of the proposed approach. The proposed method is fully-automated without any user-interaction and is not dependent on any external image standardization like image normalization and registration. This image retrieval method is generalizable and is well-suited for retrieval in heterogeneous databases other imaging modalities and anatomies.

  11. Content Based Medical Image Retrieval for Histopathological, CT and MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnambiga AYYACHAMY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A content based approach is followed for medical images. The purpose of this study is to access the stability of these methods for medical image retrieval. The methods used in color based retrieval for histopathological images are color co-occurrence matrix (CCM and histogram with meta features. For texture based retrieval GLCM (gray level co-occurrence matrix and local binary pattern (LBP were used. For shape based retrieval canny edge detection and otsu‘s method with multivariable threshold were used. Texture and shape based retrieval were implemented using MRI (magnetic resonance images. The most remarkable characteristics of the article are its content based approach for each medical imaging modality. Our efforts were focused on the initial visual search. From our experiment, histogram with meta features in color based retrieval for histopathological images shows a precision of 60 % and recall of 30 %. Whereas GLCM in texture based retrieval for MRI images shows a precision of 70 % and recall of 20 %. Shape based retrieval for MRI images shows a precision of 50% and recall of 25 %. The retrieval results shows that this simple approach is successful.

  12. Using deep learning for content-based medical image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinpei; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Zhiming; Zhang, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Content-Based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) is been highly active research area from past few years. The retrieval performance of a CBMIR system crucially depends on the feature representation, which have been extensively studied by researchers for decades. Although a variety of techniques have been proposed, it remains one of the most challenging problems in current CBMIR research, which is mainly due to the well-known "semantic gap" issue that exists between low-level image pixels captured by machines and high-level semantic concepts perceived by human[1]. Recent years have witnessed some important advances of new techniques in machine learning. One important breakthrough technique is known as "deep learning". Unlike conventional machine learning methods that are often using "shallow" architectures, deep learning mimics the human brain that is organized in a deep architecture and processes information through multiple stages of transformation and representation. This means that we do not need to spend enormous energy to extract features manually. In this presentation, we propose a novel framework which uses deep learning to retrieval the medical image to improve the accuracy and speed of a CBIR in integrated RIS/PACS.

  13. Plankton Analysis by Automated Submersible Imaging Flow Cytometry: Transforming a Specialized Research Instrument into a Broadly Accessible Tool and Extending its Target Size Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    marine applications of flow cytometry, and had sold several slightly-modified instruments (called Influx Marina ) to oceanographic institutions for...and we have begun the transfer of technology by having McLane engineers observing Olson during the construction of the next redesigned IFCB beta unit...3 WORK COMPLETED We have essentially achieved our design goals (the new instrument has already been deployed from the WHOI pier for

  14. CytometryML: a markup language for analytical cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.; Leif, Suzanne B.

    2003-06-01

    Cytometry Markup Language, CytometryML, is a proposed new analytical cytology data standard. CytometryML is a set of XML schemas for encoding both flow cytometry and digital microscopy text based data types. CytometryML schemas reference both DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) codes and FCS keywords. These schemas provide representations for the keywords in FCS 3.0 and will soon include DICOM microscopic image data. Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) list-mode has been mapped to the DICOM Waveform Information Object. A preliminary version of a list mode binary data type, which does not presently exist in DICOM, has been designed. This binary type is required to enhance the storage and transmission of flow cytometry and digital microscopy data. Index files based on Waveform indices will be used to rapidly locate the cells present in individual subsets. DICOM has the advantage of employing standard file types, TIF and JPEG, for Digital Microscopy. Using an XML schema based representation means that standard commercial software packages such as Excel and MathCad can be used to analyze, display, and store analytical cytometry data. Furthermore, by providing one standard for both DICOM data and analytical cytology data, it eliminates the need to create and maintain special purpose interfaces for analytical cytology data thereby integrating the data into the larger DICOM and other clinical communities. A draft version of CytometryML is available at www.newportinstruments.com.

  15. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  16. ESIM: Edge Similarity for Screen Content Image Quality Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhangkai; Ma, Lin; Zeng, Huanqiang; Chen, Jing; Cai, Canhui; Ma, Kai-Kuang

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, an accurate full-reference image quality assessment (IQA) model developed for assessing screen content images (SCIs), called the edge similarity (ESIM), is proposed. It is inspired by the fact that the human visual system (HVS) is highly sensitive to edges that are often encountered in SCIs; therefore, essential edge features are extracted and exploited for conducting IQA for the SCIs. The key novelty of the proposed ESIM lies in the extraction and use of three salient edge features-i.e., edge contrast, edge width, and edge direction. The first two attributes are simultaneously generated from the input SCI based on a parametric edge model, while the last one is derived directly from the input SCI. The extraction of these three features will be performed for the reference SCI and the distorted SCI, individually. The degree of similarity measured for each above-mentioned edge attribute is then computed independently, followed by combining them together using our proposed edge-width pooling strategy to generate the final ESIM score. To conduct the performance evaluation of our proposed ESIM model, a new and the largest SCI database (denoted as SCID) is established in our work and made to the public for download. Our database contains 1800 distorted SCIs that are generated from 40 reference SCIs. For each SCI, nine distortion types are investigated, and five degradation levels are produced for each distortion type. Extensive simulation results have clearly shown that the proposed ESIM model is more consistent with the perception of the HVS on the evaluation of distorted SCIs than the multiple state-of-the-art IQA methods.

  17. Full-parallax virtual view image synthesis using image-based rendering for light-field content generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngsoo; Shin, Hong-chang; Lee, Gwangsoon; Cheong, Won-sik; Hur, Namho

    2017-05-01

    Light-field content is required to provide full-parallax 3D view with dense angular resolution. However, it is very hard to directly capture such dense full-parallax view images using a camera system because it requires specialised micro-lens arrays or a heavy camera-array system. Therefore, we present an algorithm to synthesise full-parallax virtual view images using image-based rendering appropriate for light-field content generation. The proposed algorithm consists of four-directional image warping, view image blending using the nearest view image priority selection and the sum of the weighted inverse Euclidean distance, and hole filling. Experimental results show that dense full-parallax virtual view images can be generated from sparse full-parallax view images with fewer image artefacts. Finally, it is confirmed that the proposed full-parallax view synthesis algorithm can be used for light-field content generation without a dense camera array system.

  18. A picture tells a thousand words: A content analysis of concussion-related images online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osman H; Lee, Hopin; Struik, Laura L

    2016-09-01

    Recently image-sharing social media platforms have become a popular medium for sharing health-related images and associated information. However within the field of sports medicine, and more specifically sports related concussion, the content of images and meta-data shared through these popular platforms have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyse the content of concussion-related images and its accompanying meta-data on image-sharing social media platforms. We retrieved 300 images from Pinterest, Instagram and Flickr by using a standardised search strategy. All images were screened and duplicate images were removed. We excluded images if they were: non-static images; illustrations; animations; or screenshots. The content and characteristics of each image was evaluated using a customised coding scheme to determine major content themes, and images were referenced to the current international concussion management guidelines. From 300 potentially relevant images, 176 images were included for analysis; 70 from Pinterest, 63 from Flickr, and 43 from Instagram. Most images were of another person or a scene (64%), with the primary content depicting injured individuals (39%). The primary purposes of the images were to share a concussion-related incident (33%) and to dispense education (19%). For those images where it could be evaluated, the majority (91%) were found to reflect the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3) guidelines. The ability to rapidly disseminate rich information though photos, images, and infographics to a wide-reaching audience suggests that image-sharing social media platforms could be used as an effective communication tool for sports concussion. Public health strategies could direct educative content to targeted populations via the use of image-sharing platforms. Further research is required to understand how image-sharing platforms can be used to effectively relay evidence-based information to patients and sports medicine

  19. Design of Content Based Image Retrieval Scheme for Diabetic Retinopathy Images using Harmony Search Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakamasundari, J; Natarajan, V

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a disorder that affects the structure of retinal blood vessels due to long-standing diabetes mellitus. Automated segmentation of blood vessel is vital for periodic screening and timely diagnosis. An attempt has been made to generate continuous retinal vasculature for the design of Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) application. The typical normal and abnormal retinal images are preprocessed to improve the vessel contrast. The blood vessels are segmented using evolutionary based Harmony Search Algorithm (HSA) combined with Otsu Multilevel Thresholding (MLT) method by best objective functions. The segmentation results are validated with corresponding ground truth images using binary similarity measures. The statistical, textural and structural features are obtained from the segmented images of normal and DR affected retina and are analyzed. CBIR in medical image retrieval applications are used to assist physicians in clinical decision-support techniques and research fields. A CBIR system is developed using HSA based Otsu MLT segmentation technique and the features obtained from the segmented images. Similarity matching is carried out between the features of query and database images using Euclidean Distance measure. Similar images are ranked and retrieved. The retrieval performance of CBIR system is evaluated in terms of precision and recall. The CBIR systems developed using HSA based Otsu MLT and conventional Otsu MLT methods are compared. The retrieval performance such as precision and recall are found to be 96% and 58% for CBIR system using HSA based Otsu MLT segmentation. This automated CBIR system could be recommended for use in computer assisted diagnosis for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  20. Using High-Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points (ICTATT meeting China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation at International Conference on Toxicological Alternatives & Translational Toxicology (ICTATT) held in China and Discussing the possibility of using High Content Imaging to Analyze Toxicological Tipping Points

  1. Bread Water Content Measurement Based on Hyperspectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhi; Møller, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Water content is one of the most important properties of the bread for tasting assesment or store monitoring. Traditional bread water content measurement methods mostly are processed manually, which is destructive and time consuming. This paper proposes an automated water content measurement...

  2. Content-based image recognition for digital radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Luo, Jiebo

    2008-03-01

    Before a radiographic image is sent to a picture archiving and communications system (PACS), its projection information needs to be correctly identified at capture modalities to facilitate image archive and retrieval. Currently, annotating radiographic images is manually performed by technologists. It is labor intensive and cost ineffective. Moreover, man-made annotation errors occur frequently during image acquisition. To address this issue, an automatic image recognition method is developed. It first extracts a set of visual features from the most indicative region in a radiograph for image recognition, and then uses a family of classifiers, each of which is trained for a specific projection to determine the most appropriate projection for the image. The method has been tested on a large number of clinical images and has shown excellent robustness and efficiency.

  3. Application of scanning cytometry and confocal-microscopy-based image analysis for investigation the role of cytoskeletal elements during equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection of primary murine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słońska, A; Cymerys, J; Godlewski, M M; Bańbura, M W

    2016-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), a member of Alphaherpesvirinae, has a broad host range in vitro, allowing for study of the mechanisms of productive viral infection, including intracellular transport in various cell cultures. In the current study, quantitative methods (scanning cytometry and real-time PCR) and confocal-microscopy-based image analysis were used to investigate the contribution of microtubules and neurofilaments in the transport of virus in primary murine neurons separately infected with two EHV-1 strains. Confocal-microscopy analysis revealed that viral antigen co-localized with the β-tubulin fibres within the neurites of infected cells. Alterations in β-tubulin and neurofilaments were evaluated by confocal microscopy and scanning cytometry. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that inhibitor-induced (nocodazole, EHNA) disruption of microtubules and dynein significantly reduced EHV-1 replication in neurons. Our results suggest that microtubules together with the motor protein - dynein, are involved in EHV-1 replication process in neurons. Moreover, the data presented here and our earlier results support the hypothesis that microtubules and actin filaments play an important role in the EHV-1 transport in primary murine neurons, and that both cytoskeletal structures complement each-other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Near infrared lasers in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G

    2015-07-01

    Technology development in flow cytometry has closely tracked laser technology, the light source that flow cytometers almost exclusively use to excite fluorescent probes. The original flow cytometers from the 1970s and 1980s used large water-cooled lasers to produce only one or two laser lines at a time. Modern cytometers can take advantage of the revolution in solid state laser technology to use almost any laser wavelength ranging from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Commercial cytometers can now be equipped with many small solid state lasers, providing almost any wavelength needed for cellular analysis. Flow cytometers are now equipped to analyze 20 or more fluorescent probes simultaneously, requiring multiple laser wavelengths. Instrument developers are now trying to increase this number by designing fluorescent probes that can be excited by laser wavelength at the "edges" of the visible light range, in the near ultraviolet and near-infrared region. A variety of fluorescent probes have been developed that excite with violet and long wavelength ultraviolet light; however, the near-infrared range (660-800 nm) has yet seen only exploitation in flow cytometry. Fortunately, near-infrared laser diodes and other solid state laser technologies appropriate for flow cytometry have been in existence for some time, and can be readily incorporated into flow cytometers to accelerate fluorescent probe development. The near infrared region represents one of the last "frontiers" to maximize the number of fluorescent probes that can be analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, near infrared fluorescent probes used in biomedical tracking and imaging could also be employed for flow cytometry with the correct laser wavelengths. This review describes the available technology, including lasers, fluorescent probes and detector technology optimal for near infrared signal detection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Basics of flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, G; Jaroszeski, M J

    1998-01-01

    In summary, a beginner requires fundamental knowledge about flow cytometric instrumentation in order to effectively use this technology. It is important to remember that flow cytometers are very complex instruments that are composed of four closely related systems. The fluidic system transports particles from a suspension through the cytometer for interrogation by an illumination system. The resulting light scattering and fluorescence is collected, filtered, and converted into electrical signals by the optical and electronics system. The data storage and computer control system saves acquired data and is also the user interface for controlling most instrument functions. These four systems provide a very unique and powerful analytical tool for researchers and clinicians. This is because they analyze the properties of individual particles, and thousands of particles can be analyzed in a matter of seconds. Thus, data for a flow cytometric sample are a collection of many measurements instead of a single bulk measurement. Basic knowledge of instrumentation is a tremendous aid to designing experiments that can be successfully analyzed using flow cytometry. For example, it is important to know the emission wavelength of the laser in the instrument that will be used for analysis. This wavelength is critical knowledge for selecting probes. It is also important to understand that a different range of wavelengths is detected for each fluorescent channel. This will aid selection of probes that are compatible with the flow cytometer. Understanding the complication that emission spectra overlap contributes to detection can be used to guide fluorochrome selections for multicolor analysis. All of these experiment design considerations that rely on knowledge of how flow cytometers work are a very practical and effective means of avoiding wasted time, energy, and costly reagents. Data analysis is a paramount issue in flow cytometry. Analysis includes interpreting as well as

  6. Content based image retrieval using local binary pattern operator and data mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatamanu, Oana Astrid; Frandeş, Mirela; Lungeanu, Diana; Mihalaş, Gheorghe-Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Content based image retrieval (CBIR) concerns the retrieval of similar images from image databases, using feature vectors extracted from images. These feature vectors globally define the visual content present in an image, defined by e.g., texture, colour, shape, and spatial relations between vectors. Herein, we propose the definition of feature vectors using the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) operator. A study was performed in order to determine the optimum LBP variant for the general definition of image feature vectors. The chosen LBP variant is then subsequently used to build an ultrasound image database, and a database with images obtained from Wireless Capsule Endoscopy. The image indexing process is optimized using data clustering techniques for images belonging to the same class. Finally, the proposed indexing method is compared to the classical indexing technique, which is nowadays widely used.

  7. Visible Light Image-Based Method for Sugar Content Classification of Citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Chunyan; Hirafuji, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Visible light imaging of citrus fruit from Mie Prefecture of Japan was performed to determine whether an algorithm could be developed to predict the sugar content. This nondestructive classification showed that the accurate segmentation of different images can be realized by a correlation analysis based on the threshold value of the coefficient of determination. There is an obvious correlation between the sugar content of citrus fruit and certain parameters of the color images. The selected image parameters were connected by addition algorithm. The sugar content of citrus fruit can be predicted by the dummy variable method. The results showed that the small but orange citrus fruits often have a high sugar content. The study shows that it is possible to predict the sugar content of citrus fruit and to perform a classification of the sugar content using light in the visible spectrum and without the need for an additional light source. PMID:26811935

  8. Quantifying the margin sharpness of lesions on radiological images for content-based image retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jiajing; Napel, Sandy; Greenspan, Hayit; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Agrawal, Neeraj; Rubin, Daniel [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    . Equivalence across deformations was assessed using Schuirmann's paired two one-sided tests. Results: In simulated images, the concordance correlation between measured gradient and actual gradient was 0.994. The mean (s.d.) and standard deviation NDCG score for the retrieval of K images, K = 5, 10, and 15, were 84% (8%), 85% (7%), and 85% (7%) for CT images containing liver lesions, and 82% (7%), 84% (6%), and 85% (4%) for CT images containing lung nodules, respectively. The authors' proposed method outperformed the two existing margin characterization methods in average NDCG scores over all K, by 1.5% and 3% in datasets containing liver lesion, and 4.5% and 5% in datasets containing lung nodules. Equivalence testing showed that the authors' feature is more robust across all margin deformations (p < 0.05) than the two existing methods for margin sharpness characterization in both simulated and clinical datasets. Conclusions: The authors have described a new image feature to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions. It has strong correlation with known margin sharpness in simulated images and in clinical CT images containing liver lesions and lung nodules. This image feature has excellent performance for retrieving images with similar margin characteristics, suggesting potential utility, in conjunction with other lesion features, for content-based image retrieval applications.

  9. User-Generated Contents in Facebook, Functional and Hedonic Brand Image and Purchase Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Adetunji Raji Ridwan; Sabrina Mohd Rashid; Sobhi Ishak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    User-Generated Contents is a type of brand-related communications on social media platforms. User-Generated Contents (UGC) offers consumers the opportunity of sharing their experiences, contribute their opinion and communicate with other. This implies that brand managers no longer have solitary control in managing the brand images of their brands. Therefore, this study set out to examine the effect of user-generated contents on hedonic brand image and functional brand. Also, the study determi...

  10. Photoacoustic flow cytometry for nanomaterial research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Nedosekin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventional flow cytometry is a versatile tool for drug research and cell characterization. However, it is poorly suited for quantification of non-fluorescent proteins and artificial nanomaterials without the use of additional labeling. The rapid growth of biomedical applications for small non-fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs for drug delivery, image contrast and therapy enhancement, as well as research focused on natural cell pigments and chromophores, demands high-throughput quantification methods for the non-fluorescent components. In this work, we present an advanced novel photoacoustic (PA fluorescence flow cytometry (PAFFC platform that integrates NP quantification though PA detection with conventional sample characterization using fluorescence labeling. PAFFC simplifies high-throughput analysis of cell-NP interactions, optimization of targeted nanodrugs, and NP toxicity assessment by providing a direct correlation between NP uptake and characterization of toxicity markers for every cell.

  11. Design Guidelines for a Content-Based Image Retrieval Color-Selection Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, Berry; van den Broek, Egon; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Kisters, Peter M.F.; Willems, Rob; Vuurpijl, Louis G.

    2004-01-01

    In Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) two query-methods exist: query-by-example and query-by-memory. The user either selects an example image or selects image features retrieved from memory (such as color, texture, spatial attributes, and shape) to define his query. Hitherto, research on CBIR

  12. Comparison of color representations for content-based image retrieval in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, Hedde H.W.J.; Petkov, Nicolai; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    Background/purpose: We compare the effectiveness of 10 different color representations in a content-based image retrieval task for dermatology. Methods: As features, we use the average colors of healthy and lesion skin in an image. The extracted features are used to retrieve similar images from a

  13. Multiplex immunoassay for persistent organic pollutants in tilapia: Comparison of imaging- and flow cytometry-based platforms using spectrally encoded paramagnetic microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent developments in spectrally encoded microspheres (SEMs)-based technologies provide high multiplexing possibilities. Most SEMs-based assays required a flow cytometer with sophisticated fluidics and optics. The new imaging superparamagnetic SEMs-based platform transports SEMs with considerably ...

  14. Quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Chung, Bob M. F.; Tsang, Kwok Yeung; Chan, Antony C. S.; Wei, Xiaoming; Wong, Kenneth K.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Shum, Anderson H. C.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the interferometric or holographic approaches, recent QPM techniques provide quantitative-phase information, e.g cell volume, dry mass and optical scattering properties for label-free cellular physical phenotyping. These approaches generally rely on iterative phase-retrieval algorithms to obtain quantitative-phase information, which are computationally intensive. Moreover, current QPM techniques can only offer limited image acquisition rate by using CMOS/CCD image sensors, these two limitations hinder QPM for high-throughput quantitative image-based single-cell analysis in real-time. To this end, we demonstrate an interferometry-free quantitative phase microscopy developed on a new generation of time-stretch microscopy, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which is coined quantitative ATOM (Q-ATOM) - featuring an unprecedented cell measurement throughput together with the assorted intrinsic optical phenotypes (e.g. angular light scattering profile) and the derived physical properties of the cells (e.g. cell size, dry mass density etc.). Based on a similar concept to Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM retrieves quantitative-phase information through multiple off-axis light-beam detection at a line-scan rate of throughput equivalent to ~100,000 cells/sec without image blur. This technique shows a great potential for ultrahigh throughput label-free image-based single-cell biophysical phentotyping.

  15. A Novel Technique for Shape Feature Extraction Using Content Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanoa Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of technology and multimedia information, digital images are increasing very quickly. Various techniques are being developed to retrieve/search digital information or data contained in the image. Traditional Text Based Image Retrieval System is not plentiful. Since it is time consuming as it require manual image annotation. Also, the image annotation differs with different peoples. An alternate to this is Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR system. It retrieves/search for image using its contents rather the text, keywords etc. A lot of exploration has been compassed in the range of Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR with various feature extraction techniques. Shape is a significant image feature as it reflects the human perception. Moreover, Shape is quite simple to use by the user to define object in an image as compared to other features such as Color, texture etc. Over and above, if applied alone, no descriptor will give fruitful results. Further, by combining it with an improved classifier, one can use the positive features of both the descriptor and classifier. So, a tryout will be made to establish an algorithm for accurate feature (Shape extraction in Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR. The main objectives of this project are: (a To propose an algorithm for shape feature extraction using CBIR, (b To evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm and (c To compare the proposed algorithm with state of art techniques.

  16. User-Generated Contents in Facebook, Functional and Hedonic Brand Image and Purchase Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji Raji Ridwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available User-Generated Contents is a type of brand-related communications on social media platforms. User-Generated Contents (UGC offers consumers the opportunity of sharing their experiences, contribute their opinion and communicate with other. This implies that brand managers no longer have solitary control in managing the brand images of their brands. Therefore, this study set out to examine the effect of user-generated contents on hedonic brand image and functional brand. Also, the study determines how hedonic and functional brand image influence brand purchase intention. 114 followers of fan pages of Malaysian automotive brands were surveyed. The hypotheses formulated were tested using PLS-SEM. The findings revealed that, UGC have significant and positive impact on both functional and hedonic brand image. Furthermore, functional and hedonic brand image have significant impact on purchase intention. This study provides insight on the importance of UGC, functional and hedonic brand image to brand managers.

  17. Content Analysis of Science Teacher Representations in Google Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Teacher images can impact numerous perceptions in educational settings, as well as through popular media. The portrayal of effective science teaching is especially challenging to specify, given the complex nature of science inquiry and other standards-based practices. The present study examined the litany of representations of science teachers…

  18. Patterns of semantic relations to improve image content search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, L.; Schreiber, A.T.; Wielinga, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to explore how semantic relations can be used to expand a query for objects in an image. The study is part of a project with the overall objective to provide semantic annotation and search facilities for a virtual collection of art resources. In this study we used

  19. Images of older workers : Content, causes, and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Older workers experience unequal treatment in the workplace, a problem that has been ascribed to an image problem faced by this group. The central aim of this dissertation is to provide an in-depth understanding of media’s role in reinforcing beliefs of older workers and trace its consequences. More

  20. Two-Photon Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhog, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Myc, Andrzej; Cao, Zhengyl; Bielinska, Anna; Thomas, Thommey; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique for obtaining quantitative information from fluorescence in cells. Quantitation is achieved by assuring a high degree of uniformity in the optical excitation and detection, generally by using a highly controlled flow such as is obtained via hydrodynamic focusing. In this work, we demonstrate a two-beam, two- channel detection and two-photon excitation flow cytometry (T(sup 3)FC) system that enables multi-dye analysis to be performed very simply, with greatly relaxed requirements on the fluid flow. Two-photon excitation using a femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser has the advantages that it enables simultaneous excitation of multiple dyes and achieves very high signal-to-noise ratio through simplified filtering and fluorescence background reduction. By matching the excitation volume to the size of a cell, single-cell detection is ensured. Labeling of cells by targeted nanoparticles with multiple fluorophores enables normalization of the fluorescence signal and thus ratiometric measurements under nonuniform excitation. Quantitative size measurements can also be done even under conditions of nonuniform flow via a two-beam layout. This innovative detection scheme not only considerably simplifies the fluid flow system and the excitation and collection optics, it opens the way to quantitative cytometry in simple and compact microfluidics systems, or in vivo. Real-time detection of fluorescent microbeads in the vasculature of mouse ear demonstrates the ability to do flow cytometry in vivo. The conditions required to perform quantitative in vivo cytometry on labeled cells will be presented.

  1. Application of the Progressive Wavelet Correlation to Content-Based Image Retrieving

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovic, Igor; Kraljevski, Ivan; Chungurski, Slavco

    2010-01-01

    The following study presents a method for search and retrieval of images from massive image collections. The method consists of two phases. The first phase uses well-known methods of image searching by descriptors based on the content of the searched image. In the second phase the progressive wavelet correlation method is applied on the small number of image candidates selected in previous search phase. The final search result is the wanted image, if it is in the data base. Experiments are pe...

  2. Hierarchical content-based image retrieval by dynamic indexing and guided search

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jane; Cheung, King H.; Liu, James; Guo, Linong

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to content-based image retrieval by using dynamic indexing and guided search in a hierarchical structure, and extending data mining and data warehousing techniques. The proposed algorithms include: a wavelet-based scheme for multiple image feature extraction, the extension of a conventional data warehouse and an image database to an image data warehouse for dynamic image indexing, an image data schema for hierarchical image representation and dynamic image indexing, a statistically based feature selection scheme to achieve flexible similarity measures, and a feature component code to facilitate query processing and guide the search for the best matching. A series of case studies are reported, which include a wavelet-based image color hierarchy, classification of satellite images, tropical cyclone pattern recognition, and personal identification using multi-level palmprint and face features.

  3. Quantitative radial imaging of porous particles beds with varying water contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B P; Babonneau, F

    1994-01-01

    Radial imaging protocols suitable for monitoring water transport in biopolymer and food materials during processes such as drying and rehydration are developed and tested on a well-characterized model sample. This model consisted of a randomly packed bed of Sephadex beads with varying water content. The results are interpreted with theoretical models for the dependence of the initial water magnetization, transverse relaxation, and diffusive attenuation on water content for two slice-selective radial imaging pulse sequences. It is shown that volume shrinkage and changes in packing density complicate the dependence of the initial magnetization on water content, so that the transverse relaxation rate provides the most reliable monitor of water content. Radial imaging is shown to offer many advantages over conventional two-dimensional imaging whenever the sample can be made with cylindrical symmetry.

  4. VISUAL CONTENT LIKE IMAGE SENTIMENT ANALYSIS IN SOCIAL MEDIA: REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh Shafi Shadulla *, Tayade Pooja Mahendra

    2017-01-01

    In today’s social media everything is online. People express themselves very openly and convey their message, opinion, emotion, sentiments, and attitudes towards entities such as products, services, organizations, , individuals, issues, events, topics, and their attributes. To express on social media there is not only text message available but also you now can use images, emoticons, videos, likes and dislikes, graphics, stickers etc. As it becoming easier to click or capture and handle photo...

  5. Plankton Analysis by Automated Submersible Imaging Flow Cytometry: Transforming a Specialized Research Instrument into a Broadly Accessible Tool and Extending its Target Size Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    distribution of the phytoplankton community, for example, help determine the flow of carbon and nutrients through an ecosystem and can be important...researchers with instruments to continuously monitor phytoplankton community structure and investigate questions about the world’s ocean ecosystems...version of Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), reproducing its functions via a series of modular components whose integration would result in a simple and

  6. Analyzing the Tumor Microenvironment by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Yoon Kow; Bolt, Alicia M; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Mann, Koren K

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an essential tool for studying the tumor microenvironment. It allows us to quickly quantify and identify multiple cell types in a heterogeneous sample. A brief overview of flow cytometry instrumentation and the appropriate considerations and steps in building a good flow cytometry staining panel are discussed. In addition, a lymphoid tissue and solid tumor leukocyte infiltrate flow cytometry staining protocol and an example of flow cytometry data analysis are presented.

  7. Quantification of virtual slides: Approaches to analysis of content-based image information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kayser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual microscopy, which is the diagnostic work on completely digitized histological and cytological slides as well as blood smears, is at the stage to be implemented in routine diagnostic surgical pathology (tissue-based diagnosis in the near future, once it has been accepted by the US Food and Drug Administration. The principle of content-based image information, its mandatory prerequisites to obtain reproducible and stable image information as well as the different compartments that contribute to image information are described in detail. Automated extraction of content-based image information requires shading correction, constant maximum of grey values, and standardized grey value histograms. The different compartments to evaluate image information include objects, structure, and texture. Identification of objects and derived structure depend on segmentation accuracy and applied procedures; textures contain pixel-based image information only. All together, these image compartments posses the discrimination power to distinguish between object space and background, and, in addition, to reproducibly define regions of interest (ROIs. ROIs are image areas which display the information that is of preferable interest to the viewing pathologist. They contribute to the derived diagnosis to a higher level when compared with other image areas. The implementation of content-based image information algorithms to be applied for predictive tissue-based diagnoses is described in detail.

  8. Spatial assessment of soluble solid contents on apple slices using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    A partial least squares regression (PLSR) model to map internal soluble solids content (SSC) of apples using visible/near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging was developed. The reflectance spectra of sliced apples were extracted from hyperspectral absorbance images obtained in the 400e1000 nm rang...

  9. Learning effective color features for content based image retrieval in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, Kerstin; Biehl, Michael; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Petkov, Nicolai

    We investigate the extraction of effective color features for a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) application in dermatology. Effectiveness is measured by the rate of correct retrieval of images from four color classes of skin lesions. We employ and compare two different methods to learn

  10. 'Strong is the new skinny': A content analysis of #fitspiration images on Instagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Marika; Zaccardo, Mia

    2016-03-01

    'Fitspiration' is an online trend designed to inspire viewers towards a healthier lifestyle by promoting exercise and healthy food. This study provides a content analysis of fitspiration imagery on the social networking site Instagram. A set of 600 images were coded for body type, activity, objectification and textual elements. Results showed that the majority of images of women contained only one body type: thin and toned. In addition, most images contained objectifying elements. Accordingly, while fitspiration images may be inspirational for viewers, they also contain a number of elements likely to have negative effects on the viewer's body image.

  11. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...... a theoretical approach, which takes complexity as fundamental premise for modern society (Luhmann, 1985, 2002). In educational situations conditionally valuable content generally will exceed what can actually be taught within the frames of an education. In pedagogy this situation is often referred...... to as ‘abundance of material’, and in many cases it is not obvious, how the line between actually chosen and conditionally relevant content can be draw. Difficulties in drawing the line between actual educational content and conditionally relevant content can be handled in different way. One way, quite efficient...

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  13. High-resolution image cytometry on smears of normal oral mucosa: a possible approach for the early detection of laryngopharyngeal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Andreas; Ofner, Günter; Appenroth, Elisabeth; Gschwendtner, Andreas

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of identifying laryngopharyngeal cancers by nuclear chromatin texture feature analysis of cell nuclei from mucosal scrapings obtained from clinically and cytologically noncancerous areas of the soft palate in patients with cancer. The collective consisted of 68 controls and 77 cases of laryngopharyngeal carcinomas. After Feulgen staining, 3000 cell nuclei were automatically measured using a high-resolution image analyser (CytoSavant Oncometrics, Vancouver, BC, Canada). Texture features were extracted for calculation of a discriminant function, which allows the two groups to be distinguished. Two parameters allowed the two populations to be distinguished. The classifier reached an overall performance of 72.7% sensitivity, 82.4% specificity, a positive predictive value of 80.5%, a negative predictive value of 75.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.7754. Our work shows that subtle changes in the chromatin distribution in cell nuclei from ostensibly normal cells in the vicinity of carcinomas are demonstrable in the oral cavity of patients suffering from laryngopharyngeal cancers. It may be possible to develop this method into a valuable clinical tool to reduce the high rate of delayed diagnosis of oral and laryngopharyngeal cancers. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cell cycle profiling by image and flow cytometry: The optimised protocol for the detection of replicational activity using 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligasová, Anna; Konečný, Petr; Frydrych, Ivo; Koberna, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The approach for the detection of replicational activity in cells using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, a low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III is presented in the study. The described method was optimised with the aim to provide a fast and robust tool for the detection of DNA synthesis with minimal impact on the cellular structures using image and flow cytometry. The approach is based on the introduction of breaks into the DNA by the low concentration of hydrochloric acid followed by the subsequent enzymatic extension of these breaks using exonuclease III. Our data showed that the method has only a minimal effect on the tested protein localisations and is applicable both for formaldehyde- and ethanol-fixed cells. The approach partially also preserves the fluorescence of the fluorescent proteins in the HeLa cells expressing Fluorescent Ubiquitin Cell Cycle Indicator. In the case of the short labelling pulses that disabled the use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine because of the low specific signal, the described method provided a bright signal enabling reliable recognition of replicating cells. The optimized protocol was also successfully tested for the detection of trifluridine, the nucleoside used as an antiviral drug and in combination with tipiracil also for the treatment of some types of cancer.

  15. Image cytometer method for automated assessment of human spermatozoa concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, D L; Kjaerulff, S; Hansen, C

    2013-01-01

    to investigator bias. Here we show that image cytometry can be used to accurately measure the sperm concentration of human semen samples with great ease and reproducibility. The impact of several factors (pipetting, mixing, round cell content, sperm concentration), which can influence the read-out as well...... as inter-operator and -cytometer variation on two different image cytometers (NC-3000 and SP-100) were evaluated. Furthermore, 725 semen samples were assessed both by manual assessment (WHO recommended method) and by image cytometry and tight correlations between the measured concentrations were shown....... Moreover, by evaluation of repeated measurements it appeared that image cytometry produced more consistent and accurate measurements than manual counting of human spermatozoa concentration. In conclusion, image cytometry provides an appealing substitute of manual counting by providing reliable, robust...

  16. Content Based Image Retrieval by Using Color Descriptor and Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Rehan; Ahmed, Mudassar; Jabbar, Sohail; Khalid, Shehzad; Ahmad, Awais; Din, Sadia; Jeon, Gwangil

    2018-01-25

    Due to recent development in technology, the complexity of multimedia is significantly increased and the retrieval of similar multimedia content is a open research problem. Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) is a process that provides a framework for image search and low-level visual features are commonly used to retrieve the images from the image database. The basic requirement in any image retrieval process is to sort the images with a close similarity in term of visually appearance. The color, shape and texture are the examples of low-level image features. The feature plays a significant role in image processing. The powerful representation of an image is known as feature vector and feature extraction techniques are applied to get features that will be useful in classifying and recognition of images. As features define the behavior of an image, they show its place in terms of storage taken, efficiency in classification and obviously in time consumption also. In this paper, we are going to discuss various types of features, feature extraction techniques and explaining in what scenario, which features extraction technique will be better. The effectiveness of the CBIR approach is fundamentally based on feature extraction. In image processing errands like object recognition and image retrieval feature descriptor is an immense among the most essential step. The main idea of CBIR is that it can search related images to an image passed as query from a dataset got by using distance metrics. The proposed method is explained for image retrieval constructed on YCbCr color with canny edge histogram and discrete wavelet transform. The combination of edge of histogram and discrete wavelet transform increase the performance of image retrieval framework for content based search. The execution of different wavelets is additionally contrasted with discover the suitability of specific wavelet work for image retrieval. The proposed algorithm is prepared and tried to implement for

  17. Improving performance of content based image retrieval system with color features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hladnik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Content based image retrieval (CBIR encompasses a variety of techniques with a goal to solve the problem of searching for digital images in a large database by their visual content. Applications where the retrieval of similar images plays a crucial role include personal photo and art collections, medical imaging, multimedia publications and video surveillance. Main objective of our study was to try to improve the performance of the query-by-example image retrieval system based on texture features – Gabor wavelet and wavelet transform – by augmenting it with color information about the images, in particular color histogram, color autocorrelogram and color moments. Wang image database comprising 1000 natural color images grouped into 10 categories with 100 images was used for testing individual algorithms. Each image in the database served as a query image and the retrieval performance was evaluated by means of the precision and recall. e number of retrieved images ranged from 10 to 80. e best CBIR performance was obtained when implementing a combination of all 190 texture- and color features. Only slightly worse were the average precision and recall for the texture- and color histogram-based system. is result was somewhat surprising, since color histogram features provide no color spatial informa- tion. We observed a 23% increase in average precision when comparing the system containing a combination of texture- and all color features with the one consisting of exclusively texture descriptors when using Euclidean distance measure and 20 retrieved images. Addition of the color autocorrelogram features to the texture de- scriptors had virtually no e ect on the performance, while only minor improvement was detected when adding rst two color moments – the mean and the standard deviation. Similar to what was found in the previous studies with the same image database, average precision was very high in case of dinosaurs and owers and very low

  18. The Study on the Attenuation of X-ray and Imaging Quality by Contents in Stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Kyung Rae; Ji, Youn Sang; Kim, Chang Bok; Choi, Seong Kwan; Moon, Sang In [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dieter, Kevin [Dept. of Physical Therapy, Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study examined the change in the attenuation of X-rays with the ROI (Region of Interest) in DR (Digital Radiography) according to the stomach contents by manufacturing a tissue equivalent material phantom to simulate real stomach tissue based on the assumption that there is some attenuation of X-rays and a difference in imaging quality according to the stomach contents. The transit dosage by the attenuation of X-rays decreased with increasing protein thickness, which altered the average ROI values in the film and DR images. A comparison of the change in average ROI values of the film and DR image showed that the image in film caused larger density changes with varying thickness of protein than the image by DR. The results indicate that NPO (nothing by mouth) is more important in film system than in DR system.

  19. A SYSTEM FOR ACCESSING A COLLECTION OF HISTOLOGY IMAGES USING CONTENT-BASED STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camargo J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Histology images are an important resource for research, education and medical practice. The availability of image collections with reference purposes is limited to printed formats such as books and specialized journals. When histology image sets are published in digital formats, they are composed of some tens of images that do not represent the wide diversity of biological structures that can be found in fundamental tissues. Making a complete histology image collection available to the general public having a great impact on research and education in different areas such as medicine, biology and natural sciences. This work presents the acquisition process of a histology image collection with 20,000 samples in digital format, from tissue processing to digital image capturing. The main purpose of collecting these images is to make them available as reference material to the academic comunity. In addition, this paper presents the design and architecture of a system to query and explore the image collection, using content-based image retrieval tools and text-based search on the annotations provided by experts. The system also offers novel image visualization methods to allow easy identification of interesting images among hundreds of possible pictures. The system has been developed using a service-oriented architecture and allows web-based access in http://www.informed.unal.edu.co

  20. A SYSTEM FOR ACCESSING A COLLECTION OF HISTOLOGY IMAGES USING CONTENT-BASED STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F González

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Histology images are an important resource for research, education and medical practice. The availability of image collections with reference purposes is limited to printed formats such as books and specialized journals. When histology image sets are published in digital formats, they are composed of some tens of images that do not represent the wide diversity of biological structures that can be found in fundamental tissues. Making a complete histology image collection available to the general public having a great impact on research and education in different areas such as medicine, biology and natural sciences. This work presents the acquisition process of a histology image collection with 20,000 samples in digital format, from tissue processing to digital image capturing. The main purpose of collecting these images is to make them available as reference material to the academic comunity. In addition, this paper presents the design and architecture of a system to query and explore the image collection, using content-based image retrieval tools and text-based search on the annotations provided by experts. The system also offers novel image visualization methods to allow easy identification of interesting images among hundreds of possible pictures. The system has been developed using a service-oriented architecture and allows web-based access in http://www.informed.unal.edu.co

  1. Teaching Phagocytosis Using Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Boothby

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigative microbiology on protists in a basic teaching laboratory environment is limited by student skill level, ease of microbial culture and manipulation, instrumentation, and time. The flow cytometer is gaining use as a mainstream instrument in research and clinical laboratories, but has had minimal application in teaching laboratories. Although the cost of a flow cytometer is currently prohibitive for many microbiology teaching environments and the number of trained instructors and teaching materials is limited, in many ways the flow cytometer is an ideal instrument for teaching basic microbiology. We report here on a laboratory module to study phagocytosis in Tetrahymena sp. using flow cytometry in a basic microbiology teaching laboratory. Students and instructors found the flow cytometry data analysis program, Paint-A-GatePRO-TM, to be very intuitive and easy to learn within a short period of time. Assessment of student learning about Tetrahymena sp., phagocytosis, flow cytometry, and investigative microbiology using an inquiry-based format demonstrated an overall positive response from students.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging detection of decayed honey peaches based on their chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Wang, Yihang; Xiao, Hui; Gu, Xinzhe; Pan, Leiqing; Tu, Kang

    2017-11-15

    Honey peach is a very common but highly perishable market fruit. When pathogens infect fruit, chlorophyll as one of the important components related to fruit quality, decreased significantly. Here, the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging to determine the chlorophyll content thus distinguishing diseased peaches was investigated. Three optimal wavelengths (617nm, 675nm, and 818nm) were selected according to chlorophyll content via successive projections algorithm. Partial least square regression models were established to determine chlorophyll content. Three band ratios were obtained using these optimal wavelengths, which improved spatial details, but also integrates the information of chemical composition from spectral characteristics. The band ratio values were suitable to classify the diseased peaches with 98.75% accuracy and clearly show the spatial distribution of diseased parts. This study provides a new perspective for the selection of optimal wavelengths of hyperspectral imaging via chlorophyll content, thus enabling the detection of fungal diseases in peaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using an image-extended relational database to support content-based image retrieval in a PACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Caetano; Traina, Agma J M; Araújo, Myrian R B; Bueno, Josiane M; Chino, Fabio J T; Razente, Humberto; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo M

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), called cbPACS, which has content-based image retrieval capabilities. The cbPACS answers range and k-nearest- neighbor similarity queries, employing a relational database manager extended to support images. The images are compared through their features, which are extracted by an image-processing module and stored in the extended relational database. The database extensions were developed aiming at efficiently answering similarity queries by taking advantage of specialized indexing methods. The main concept supporting the extensions is the definition, inside the relational manager, of distance functions based on features extracted from the images. An extension to the SQL language enables the construction of an interpreter that intercepts the extended commands and translates them to standard SQL, allowing any relational database server to be used. By now, the system implemented works on features based on color distribution of the images through normalized histograms as well as metric histograms. Metric histograms are invariant regarding scale, translation and rotation of images and also to brightness transformations. The cbPACS is prepared to integrate new image features, based on texture and shape of the main objects in the image.

  4. An Analysis of Images of Contention and Violence in Dagara and Akan Proverbial Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kyiileyang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proverbial expressions have typical linguistic and figurative features. These are normally captivating to the listener. The expressive culture of the Dagara and Akan societies is embellished by these proverbial expressions. Most African proverbs, express various images depicting both pleasant and unpleasant situations in life. Unpleasant language normally depicts several terrifying images particularly when threats, insults and other forms of abuse are traded vehemently. Dagara and Akan proverbs are no exceptions to this phenomenon. This paper seeks to examine images of contention and violence depicted in Akan and Dagara proverbial expressions. To achieve this, a variety of proverbs from Akan and Dagara were analysed for their meanings using Yankah’s and Honeck’s Theories. The result revealed that structurally, as with many proverbs, the Akan and Dagara proverbial expressions are pithy and terse. The most dominant images of contention and violence in these expressions expose negative values and perceptions about the people who speak these languages.

  5. Workflow and metrics for image quality control in large-scale high-content screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Fraser, Adam N; Hasaka, Thomas P; Carpenter, Anne E

    2012-02-01

    Automated microscopes have enabled the unprecedented collection of images at a rate that precludes visual inspection. Automated image analysis is required to identify interesting samples and extract quantitative information for high-content screening (HCS). However, researchers are impeded by the lack of metrics and software tools to identify image-based aberrations that pollute data, limiting experiment quality. The authors have developed and validated approaches to identify those image acquisition artifacts that prevent optimal extraction of knowledge from high-content microscopy experiments. They have implemented these as a versatile, open-source toolbox of algorithms and metrics readily usable by biologists to improve data quality in a wide variety of biological experiments.

  6. General Staining and Segmentation Procedures for High Content Imaging and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kevin M; Mandavilli, Bhaskar S; Dolman, Nick J; Janes, Michael S

    2018-01-01

    Automated quantitative fluorescence microscopy, also known as high content imaging (HCI), is a rapidly growing analytical approach in cell biology. Because automated image analysis relies heavily on robust demarcation of cells and subcellular regions, reliable methods for labeling cells is a critical component of the HCI workflow. Labeling of cells for image segmentation is typically performed with fluorescent probes that bind DNA for nuclear-based cell demarcation or with those which react with proteins for image analysis based on whole cell staining. These reagents, along with instrument and software settings, play an important role in the successful segmentation of cells in a population for automated and quantitative image analysis. In this chapter, we describe standard procedures for labeling and image segmentation in both live and fixed cell samples. The chapter will also provide troubleshooting guidelines for some of the common problems associated with these aspects of HCI.

  7. Viewing television shows containing ideal and neutral body images while exercising: does type of body image content influence exercise performance and body image in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E; Baird, Seanna A; Gilbert, Danielle N; Miller, Paul C; Bixby, Walter R

    2011-09-01

    This study examined how exposure to media containing different body image content while exercising influenced exercise performance and feelings concerning appearance. 41 females completed two sessions of cycling (30 minutes). During exercise, participants viewed a television show that contained either media-portrayed ideal or neutral female body images. There were no differences in exercise performance between conditions. Physical appearance state anxiety (PASA) decreased post-exercise. After viewing ideal bodies, participants scored higher on appearance and comparison processing. The high internalization group scored higher on appearance and comparison processing and PASA increased following ideal body image content while the low internalization group decreased.

  8. Experimental study on water content detection of traditional masonry based on infrared thermal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoqing; Lei, Zukang

    2017-10-01

    Based on infrared thermal imaging technology for seepage test of two kinds of brick masonry, find out the relationship between the distribution of one-dimensional two brick surface temperature distribution and one-dimensional surface moisture content were determined after seepage brick masonry minimum temperature zone and water content determination method of the highest point of the regression equation, the relationship between temperature and moisture content of the brick masonry reflected the quantitative and establish the initial wet masonry building disease analysis method, then the infrared technology is applied to the protection of historic buildings in.

  9. A rapid automatic analyzer and its methodology for effective bentonite content based on image recognition technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Long

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast and accurate determination of effective bentonite content in used clay bonded sand is very important for selecting the correct mixing ratio and mixing process to obtain high-performance molding sand. Currently, the effective bentonite content is determined by testing the ethylene blue absorbed in used clay bonded sand, which is usually a manual operation with some disadvantages including complicated process, long testing time and low accuracy. A rapid automatic analyzer of the effective bentonite content in used clay bonded sand was developed based on image recognition technology. The instrument consists of auto stirring, auto liquid removal, auto titration, step-rotation and image acquisition components, and processor. The principle of the image recognition method is first to decompose the color images into three-channel gray images based on the photosensitive degree difference of the light blue and dark blue in the three channels of red, green and blue, then to make the gray values subtraction calculation and gray level transformation of the gray images, and finally, to extract the outer circle light blue halo and the inner circle blue spot and calculate their area ratio. The titration process can be judged to reach the end-point while the area ratio is higher than the setting value.

  10. Visual analytics for semantic queries of TerraSAR-X image content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Molina, Daniela; Alonso, Kevin; Datcu, Mihai

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous image product acquisition of satellite missions, the size of the image archives is considerably increasing every day as well as the variety and complexity of their content, surpassing the end-user capacity to analyse and exploit them. Advances in the image retrieval field have contributed to the development of tools for interactive exploration and extraction of the images from huge archives using different parameters like metadata, key-words, and basic image descriptors. Even though we count on more powerful tools for automated image retrieval and data analysis, we still face the problem of understanding and analyzing the results. Thus, a systematic computational analysis of these results is required in order to provide to the end-user a summary of the archive content in comprehensible terms. In this context, visual analytics combines automated analysis with interactive visualizations analysis techniques for an effective understanding, reasoning and decision making on the basis of very large and complex datasets. Moreover, currently several researches are focused on associating the content of the images with semantic definitions for describing the data in a format to be easily understood by the end-user. In this paper, we present our approach for computing visual analytics and semantically querying the TerraSAR-X archive. Our approach is mainly composed of four steps: 1) the generation of a data model that explains the information contained in a TerraSAR-X product. The model is formed by primitive descriptors and metadata entries, 2) the storage of this model in a database system, 3) the semantic definition of the image content based on machine learning algorithms and relevance feedback, and 4) querying the image archive using semantic descriptors as query parameters and computing the statistical analysis of the query results. The experimental results shows that with the help of visual analytics and semantic definitions we are able to explain

  11. Using high-content imaging data from ToxCast to analyze toxicological tipping points (TDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Translating results obtained from high-throughput screening to risk assessment is vital for reducing dependence on animal testing. We studied the effects of 976 chemicals (ToxCast Phase I and II) in HepG2 cells using high-content imaging (HCI) to measure dose and time-depende...

  12. 20161116 - Toxicological Tipping Points: Learning Boolean Networks from High-Content Imaging Data. (BOSC meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this work is to elucidate biological networks underlying cellular tipping points using time-course data. We discretized the high-content imaging (HCI) data and inferred Boolean networks (BNs) that could accurately predict dynamic cellular trajectories. We found t...

  13. A picture is worth a thousand words : content-based image retrieval techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomée, Bart

    2010-01-01

    In my dissertation I investigate techniques for improving the state of the art in content-based image retrieval. To place my work into context, I highlight the current trends and challenges in my field by analyzing over 200 recent articles. Next, I propose a novel paradigm called ‘artificial

  14. The utilization of human color categorization for content-based image retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Kisters, Peter M.F.; Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.; Vuurpijl, Louis G.

    2004-01-01

    We present the concept of intelligent Content-Based Image Retrieval (iCBIR), which incorporates knowledge concerning human cognition in system development. The present research focuses on the utilization of color categories (or focal colors) for CBIR purposes, in particularly considered to be useful

  15. Finding Toxicological Tipping Points from High-Content Imaging Data (WC10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key challenge to using in vitro data in risk assessment is differentiating between chemical-induced adaptive versus adverse cellular responses. To further investigate this issue, we studied the effects of hundreds of chemicals in HepG2 cells using high-content imaging (HCI). HC...

  16. Content-Based Image Retrieval Benchmarking: Utilizing color categories and color distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Kisters, Peter M.F.; Vuurpijl, Louis G.

    From a human centered perspective three ingredients for Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) were developed. First, with their existence confirmed by experimental data, 11 color categories were utilized for CBIR and used as input for a new color space segmentation technique. The complete HSI color

  17. A Novel Optimization-Based Approach for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Content-based image retrieval is nowadays one of the possible and promising solutions to manage image databases effectively. However, with the large number of images, there still exists a great discrepancy between the users’ expectations (accuracy and efficiency and the real performance in image retrieval. In this work, new optimization strategies are proposed on vocabulary tree building, retrieval, and matching methods. More precisely, a new clustering strategy combining classification and conventional K-Means method is firstly redefined. Then a new matching technique is built to eliminate the error caused by large-scaled scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT. Additionally, a new unit mechanism is proposed to reduce the cost of indexing time. Finally, the numerical results show that excellent performances are obtained in both accuracy and efficiency based on the proposed improvements for image retrieval.

  18. Click Chemistry for Analysis of Cell Proliferation in Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Scott T; Calderon, Veronica; Bradford, Jolene A

    2017-10-02

    The measurement of cellular proliferation is fundamental to the assessment of cellular health, genotoxicity, and the evaluation of drug efficacy. Labeling, detection, and quantification of cells in the synthesis phase of cell cycle progression are not only important for characterizing basic biology, but also in defining cellular responses to drug treatments. Changes in DNA replication during S-phase can provide valuable insights into mechanisms of cell growth, cell cycle kinetics, and cytotoxicity. A common method for detection of cell proliferation is the incorporation of a thymidine analog during DNA synthesis. This chapter presents a pulse labeling method using the thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), with subsequent detection by click chemistry. EdU detection using click chemistry is bio-orthogonal to most living systems and does not non-specifically label other biomolecules. Live cells are first pulsed with EdU. After antibody labeling cell surface markers, fixation, and permeabilization, the incorporated EdU is covalently labeled using click chemistry thereby identifying proliferating cells. Improvements in click chemistry allow for labeling in the presence of fluorescent proteins and phycobiliproteins without quenching due to copper. Measuring DNA replication during cell cycle progression has cell health applications in flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and high content imaging. This protocol has been developed and optimized for research use only and is not suitable for use in diagnostic procedures. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Exploring access to scientific literature using content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Antani, Sameer; Long, Rodney

    2007-03-01

    The number of articles published in the scientific medical literature is continuously increasing, and Web access to the journals is becoming common. Databases such as SPIE Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, indices such as PubMed, and search engines such as Google provide the user with sophisticated full-text search capabilities. However, information in images and graphs within these articles is entirely disregarded. In this paper, we quantify the potential impact of using content-based image retrieval (CBIR) to access this non-text data. Based on the Journal Citations Report (JCR), the journal Radiology was selected for this study. In 2005, 734 articles were published electronically in this journal. This included 2,587 figures, which yields a rate of 3.52 figures per article. Furthermore, 56.4% of these figures are composed of several individual panels, i.e. the figure combines different images and/or graphs. According to the Image Cross-Language Evaluation Forum (ImageCLEF), the error rate of automatic identification of medical images is about 15%. Therefore, it is expected that, by applying ImageCLEF-like techniques, already 95.5% of articles could be retrieved by means of CBIR. The challenge for CBIR in scientific literature, however, is the use of local texture properties to analyze individual image panels in composite illustrations. Using local features for content-based image representation, 8.81 images per article are available, and the predicted correctness rate may increase to 98.3%. From this study, we conclude that CBIR may have a high impact in medical literature research and suggest that additional research in this area is warranted.

  20. Image-Based High Content Screening: Automating the Quantification Process for DNA Damage-Induced Foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yi Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Visual inspection of cellular activities based on conventional fluorescence microscope is a fundamental tool to study the role of DNA damage response (DDR). In the context of drug discovery where the capture of thousands of images is required across parallel experiments, this presents a challenge to data collection and analysis. Manual scoring is laborious and often reliant on trained personnel to intuit biological meaning through visual reasoning. On the other hand, high content screening combines the automation of microscopy image acquisition and analysis in a single platform to quantify cellular events of interests. The data generated is rapid and accurate, lessening the bias of human interpretation. Herein, this chapter will describe an image-based high content screen approach and the data analysis of Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) DNA damage-induced foci.

  1. The content of social media's shared images about Ebola: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, E K; Jean, N S; Kramer-Golinkoff, E; Asch, D A; Merchant, R M

    2015-09-01

    Social media have strongly influenced awareness and perceptions of public health emergencies, but a considerable amount of social media content is now carried through images, rather than just text. This study's objective is to explore how image-sharing platforms are used for information dissemination in public health emergencies. Retrospective review of images posted on two popular image-sharing platforms to characterize public discourse about Ebola. Using the keyword '#ebola' we identified a 1% sample of images posted on Instagram and Flickr across two sequential weeks in November 2014. Images from both platforms were independently coded by two reviewers and characterized by themes. We reviewed 1217 images posted on Instagram and Flickr and identified themes. Nine distinct themes were identified. These included: images of health care workers and professionals [308 (25%)], West Africa [75 (6%)], the Ebola virus [59 (5%)], and artistic renderings of Ebola [64 (5%)]. Also identified were images with accompanying embedded text related to Ebola and associated: facts [68 (6%)], fears [40 (3%)], politics [46 (4%)], and jokes [284 (23%)]. Several [273 (22%)] images were unrelated to Ebola or its sequelae. Instagram images were primarily coded as jokes [255 (42%)] or unrelated [219 (36%)], while Flickr images primarily depicted health care workers and other professionals [281 (46%)] providing care or other services for prevention or treatment. Image sharing platforms are being used for information exchange about public health crises, like Ebola. Use differs by platform and discerning these differences can help inform future uses for health care professionals and researchers seeking to assess public fears and misinformation or provide targeted education/awareness interventions. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Institute of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  2. Competition for attentional resources between low spatial frequency content of emotional images and a foreground task in early visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias M; Gundlach, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Low spatial frequency (LSF) image content has been proposed to play a superior functional role in emotional content extraction via the magnocellular pathway biasing attentional resources toward emotional content in visual cortex. We investigated whether emotionally unpleasant complex images that were presented either unfiltered or with LSF content only in the background while subjects performed a foreground task will withdraw more attentional resources from the task compared to unemotional, neutral images (distraction paradigm). We measured steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) driven by flickering stimuli of a foreground task. Unfiltered unpleasant images resulted in a significant reduction of SSVEP amplitude compared to neutral images. No statistically significant differences were found with LSF background images. In a behavioral control experiment, we found no significant differences for complexity ratings between unfiltered and LSF pictures. Content identification was possible for unfiltered and LSF picture (correct responses > 74%). An additional EEG study examined typical emotion-related components for complex images presented either as unfiltered, LSF, or high spatial frequency (HSF, as an additional control) filtered, unpleasant, and neutral images. We found a significant main effect of emotional valence in the early posterior negativity. Late positive potential differences were only found for unfiltered and HSF images. Results suggest that, while LSF content is sufficient to allow for content and emotional cue extraction when images were presented alone, LSF content is not salient enough to serve as emotional distractor that withdraws attentional resources from a foreground task in early visual cortex. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Toward content-based image retrieval with deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Judah E. S.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Fabbri, Daniel; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers the potential to identify similar case histories, understand rare disorders, and eventually, improve patient care. Recent advances in database capacity, algorithm efficiency, and deep Convolutional Neural Networks (dCNN), a machine learning technique, have enabled great CBIR success for general photographic images. Here, we investigate applying the leading ImageNet CBIR technique to clinically acquired medical images captured by the Vanderbilt Medical Center. Briefly, we (1) constructed a dCNN with four hidden layers, reducing dimensionality of an input scaled to 128x128 to an output encoded layer of 4x384, (2) trained the network using back-propagation 1 million random magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, (3) labeled an independent set of 2100 images, and (4) evaluated classifiers on the projection of the labeled images into manifold space. Quantitative results were disappointing (averaging a true positive rate of only 20%); however, the data suggest that improvements would be possible with more evenly distributed sampling across labels and potential re-grouping of label structures. This preliminary effort at automated classification of medical images with ImageNet is promising, but shows that more work is needed beyond direct adaptation of existing techniques.

  4. Combining semantic technologies with a content-based image retrieval system - Preliminary considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, P.; Ganzha, M.; Jaworska, T.; Paprzycki, M.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, as a part of systematic growth of volume, and variety, of information that can be found on the Internet, we observe also dramatic increase in sizes of available image collections. There are many ways to help users browsing / selecting images of interest. One of popular approaches are Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems, which allow users to search for images that match their interests, expressed in the form of images (query by example). However, we believe that image search and retrieval could take advantage of semantic technologies. We have decided to test this hypothesis. Specifically, on the basis of knowledge captured in the CBIR, we have developed a domain ontology of residential real estate (detached houses, in particular). This allows us to semantically represent each image (and its constitutive architectural elements) represented within the CBIR. The proposed ontology was extended to capture not only the elements resulting from image segmentation, but also "spatial relations" between them. As a result, a new approach to querying the image database (semantic querying) has materialized, thus extending capabilities of the developed system.

  5. A novel content-based medical image retrieval method based on query topic dependent image features (QTDIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Qiu, Bo; Tian, Qi; Mueller, Henning; Xu, Changsheng

    2005-04-01

    Medical image retrieval is still mainly a research domain with a large variety of applications and techniques. With the ImageCLEF 2004 benchmark, an evaluation framework has been created that includes a database, query topics and ground truth data. Eleven systems (with a total of more than 50 runs) compared their performance in various configurations. The results show that there is not any one feature that performs well on all query tasks. Key to successful retrieval is rather the selection of features and feature weights based on a specific set of input features, thus on the query task. In this paper we propose a novel method based on query topic dependent image features (QTDIF) for content-based medical image retrieval. These feature sets are designed to capture both inter-category and intra-category statistical variations to achieve good retrieval performance in terms of recall and precision. We have used Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) and blob representation to model medical images and construct the proposed novel QTDIF for CBIR. Finally, trained multi-class support vector machines (SVM) are used for image similarity ranking. The proposed methods have been tested over the Casimage database with around 9000 images, for the given 26 image topics, used for imageCLEF 2004. The retrieval performance has been compared with the medGIFT system, which is based on the GNU Image Finding Tool (GIFT). The experimental results show that the proposed QTDIF-based CBIR can provide significantly better performance than systems based general features only.

  6. Fluorescent Proteins for Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Teresa S; Hawley, Robert G; Telford, William G

    2017-04-03

    Fluorescent proteins have become standard tools for cell and molecular biologists. The color palette of fluorescent proteins spans the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectrum. Utility of fluorescent proteins has been greatly facilitated by the availability of compact and affordable solid state lasers capable of providing various excitation wavelengths. In theory, the plethora of fluorescent proteins and lasers make it easy to detect multiple fluorescent proteins simultaneously. However, in practice, heavy spectral overlap due to broad excitation and emission spectra presents a challenge. In conventional flow cytometry, careful selection of excitation wavelengths and detection filters is necessary. Spectral flow cytometry, an emerging methodology that is not confined by the "one color, one detector" paradigm, shows promise in the facile detection of multiple fluorescent proteins. This chapter provides a synopsis of fluorescent protein development, a list of commonly used fluorescent proteins, some practical considerations and strategies for detection, and examples of applications. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. An investigation of content and media images in gay men's magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Jason A; Caron, Sandra L

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an analysis of gay men's magazines, examining both the content and advertisements. Four magazine titles were selected, including The Advocate, Genre, Instinct, and Out, each targeting gay men as its target audience. These magazines were coded for both article content and advertisement content. In the advertisement analysis, both the type of advertisement and characteristics of the men depicted within the advertisement when present. The results mirror previous research findings relating to the portrayal of women, including the objectification of specific body parts and the high community standards set by the images depicted. These findings were reinforced by both the advertisements and content analyzed to include a high degree of importance being placed on having the right body type. Implications for further research are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of shape indexing methods for content-based retrieval of x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.; Lee, Dah-Jye

    2003-01-01

    Efficient content-based image retrieval of biomedical images is a challenging problem of growing research interest. Feature representation algorithms used in indexing medical images on the pathology of interest have to address conflicting goals of reducing feature dimensionality while retaining important and often subtle biomedical features. At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a R&D division of the National Library of Medicine, we are developing a content-based image retrieval system for digitized images of a collection of 17,000 cervical and lumbar x-rays taken as a part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). Shape is the only feature that effectively describes various pathologies identified by medical experts as being consistently and reliably found in the image collection. In order to determine if the state of the art in shape representation methods is suitable for this application, we have evaluated representative algorithms selected from the literature. The algorithms were tested on a subset of 250 vertebral shapes. In this paper we present the requirements of an ideal algorithm, define the evaluation criteria, and present the results and our analysis of the evaluation. We observe that while the shape methods perform well on visual inspection of the overall shape boundaries, they fall short in meeting the needs of determining similarity between the vertebral shapes based on the pathology.

  9. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  10. Content-based image retrieval of digitized histopathology in boosted spectrally embedded spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Akshay; Doyle, Scott; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems allow for retrieval of images from within a database that are similar in visual content to a query image. This is useful for digital pathology, where text-based descriptors alone might be inadequate to accurately describe image content. By representing images via a set of quantitative image descriptors, the similarity between a query image with respect to archived, annotated images in a database can be computed and the most similar images retrieved. Recently, non-linear dimensionality reduction methods have become popular for embedding high-dimensional data into a reduced-dimensional space while preserving local object adjacencies, thereby allowing for object similarity to be determined more accurately in the reduced-dimensional space. However, most dimensionality reduction methods implicitly assume, in computing the reduced-dimensional representation, that all features are equally important. In this paper we present boosted spectral embedding(BoSE), which utilizes a boosted distance metric to selectively weight individual features (based on training data) to subsequently map the data into a reduced-dimensional space. BoSE is evaluated against spectral embedding (SE) (which employs equal feature weighting) in the context of CBIR of digitized prostate and breast cancer histopathology images. The following datasets, which were comprised of a total of 154 hematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology images, were used: (1) Prostate cancer histopathology (benign vs. malignant), (2) estrogen receptor (ER) + breast cancer histopathology (low vs. high grade), and (3) HER2+ breast cancer histopathology (low vs. high levels of lymphocytic infiltration). We plotted and calculated the area under precision-recall curves (AUPRC) and calculated classification accuracy using the Random Forest classifier. BoSE outperformed SE both in terms of CBIR-based (area under the precision-recall curve) and classifier-based (classification accuracy

  11. Method of content-based image retrieval for a spinal x-ray image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Daniel M.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2002-05-01

    The Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) maintains a digital archive of 17,000 cervical and lumbar spine images collected in the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Classification of the images for the osteoarthritis research community has been a long-standing goal of researchers at the NLM, collaborators at NCHS, and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and capability to retrieve images based on geometric characteristics of the vertebral bodies is of interest to the vertebral morphometry community. Automated or computer-assisted classification and retrieval methods are highly desirable to offset the high cost of manual classification and manipulation by medical experts. We implemented a prototype system for a database of 118 spine x-rays and health survey text data related to these x-rays. The system supports conventional text retrieval, as well as retrieval based on shape similarity to a user-supplied vertebral image or sketch.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the mineral content of sound and carious primary dentine using BSE imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angker, Linny; Nockolds, Clive; Swain, Michael V; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2004-02-01

    Backscattered electron-scanning electron microscope (BSE-SEM) imaging has been recommended as a reliable tool to quantify the mineralisation state of calcified tissues and is commonly used in bone studies. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of BSE imaging to quantitatively analyse the mineral content of sound and carious dentine. Eight primary molars with untreated carious dentine were embedded in resin, axially sectioned and fine polished for this study. The BSE images were from a solid-state detector in an SEM operating at 1.5Torr gas pressure. BSE images of a number of different elements and compounds with atomic number ranged from 4 to 26 were analysed prior to the test to calibrate the experimental conditions and an enamel-carbon block. The mineral analysis was based on the change in BSE intensity (measured in graylevels). The results showed that variation in graylevels accurately represented difference in the atomic number and BSE coefficient of the test materials. The mineral content of sound primary dentine in the most regions was 59.3+/-5.5 wt.%, but it decreased gradually to be just 41.82+/-6.74 wt.% adjacent to the pulp. The carious dentine showed a marked reduction in mineral content which proceeded progressively toward the cavity floor, in which the minimum value of less than 10 wt.% was normally found in the outer layer of the lesion. The results show that BSE imaging is a simple and reliable technique that can be used to quantify the mineral content of sound and carious dentine. More importantly the variable pressure SEM offers an approach to minimize the impact of dehydration on carious dentine specimens.

  13. Plant Leaf Chlorophyll Content Retrieval Based on a Field Imaging Spectroscopy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A field imaging spectrometer system (FISS; 380–870 nm and 344 bands was designed for agriculture applications. In this study, FISS was used to gather spectral information from soybean leaves. The chlorophyll content was retrieved using a multiple linear regression (MLR, partial least squares (PLS regression and support vector machine (SVM regression. Our objective was to verify the performance of FISS in a quantitative spectral analysis through the estimation of chlorophyll content and to determine a proper quantitative spectral analysis method for processing FISS data. The results revealed that the derivative reflectance was a more sensitive indicator of chlorophyll content and could extract content information more efficiently than the spectral reflectance, which is more significant for FISS data compared to ASD (analytical spectral devices data, reducing the corresponding RMSE (root mean squared error by 3.3%–35.6%. Compared with the spectral features, the regression methods had smaller effects on the retrieval accuracy. A multivariate linear model could be the ideal model to retrieve chlorophyll information with a small number of significant wavelengths used. The smallest RMSE of the chlorophyll content retrieved using FISS data was 0.201 mg/g, a relative reduction of more than 30% compared with the RMSE based on a non-imaging ASD spectrometer, which represents a high estimation accuracy compared with the mean chlorophyll content of the sampled leaves (4.05 mg/g. Our study indicates that FISS could obtain both spectral and spatial detailed information of high quality. Its image-spectrum-in-one merit promotes the good performance of FISS in quantitative spectral analyses, and it can potentially be widely used in the agricultural sector.

  14. A computer vision approach to rare cell in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Stacey; Li, Binlong; Pera, Vivian; Sznaier, Mario; Camps, Octavia; Niedre, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive enumeration of rare circulating cell populations in small animals is of great importance in many areas of biomedical research. In this work, we describe a macroscopic fluorescence imaging system and automated computer vision algorithm that allows in vivo detection, enumeration and tracking of circulating fluorescently-labeled cells from multiple large blood vessels in the ear of a mouse. This imaging system uses a 660 nm laser and a high sensitivity electron-multiplied charge coupled device camera (EMCCD) to acquire fluorescence image sequences from relatively large (∼5 × 5 mm(2) ) imaging areas. The primary technical challenge was developing an automated method for identifying and tracking rare cell events in image sequences with substantial autofluorescence and noise content. To achieve this, we developed a two-step image analysis algorithm that first identified cell candidates in individual frames, and then merged cell candidates into tracks by dynamic analysis of image sequences. The second step was critical since it allowed rejection of >97% of false positive cell counts. Overall, our computer vision IVFC (CV-IVFC) approach allows single-cell detection sensitivity at estimated concentrations of 20 cells/mL of peripheral blood. In addition to simple enumeration, the technique recovers the cell's trajectory, which in the future could be used to automatically identify, for example, in vivo homing and docking events. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. Comparing features sets for content-based image retrieval in a medical-case database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Henning; Rosset, Antoine; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2004-04-01

    Content-based image retrieval systems (CBIRSs) have frequently been proposed for the use in medical image databases and PACS. Still, only few systems were developed and used in a real clinical environment. It rather seems that medical professionals define their needs and computer scientists develop systems based on data sets they receive with little or no interaction between the two groups. A first study on the diagnostic use of medical image retrieval also shows an improvement in diagnostics when using CBIRSs which underlines the potential importance of this technique. This article explains the use of an open source image retrieval system (GIFT - GNU Image Finding Tool) for the retrieval of medical images in the medical case database system CasImage that is used in daily, clinical routine in the university hospitals of Geneva. Although the base system of GIFT shows an unsatisfactory performance, already little changes in the feature space show to significantly improve the retrieval results. The performance of variations in feature space with respect to color (gray level) quantizations and changes in texture analysis (Gabor filters) is compared. Whereas stock photography relies mainly on colors for retrieval, medical images need a large number of gray levels for successful retrieval, especially when executing feedback queries. The results also show that a too fine granularity in the gray levels lowers the retrieval quality, especially with single-image queries. For the evaluation of the retrieval peformance, a subset of the entire case database of more than 40,000 images is taken with a total of 3752 images. Ground truth was generated by a user who defined the expected query result of a perfect system by selecting images relevant to a given query image. The results show that a smaller number of gray levels (32 - 64) leads to a better retrieval performance, especially when using relevance feedback. The use of more scales and directions for the Gabor filters in the

  16. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative Chemical Measurements of Vesicular Transmitters with Electrochemical Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchan; Dunevall, Johan; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-10-18

    Electrochemical cytometry adds a new dimension to our ability to study the chemistry and chemical storage of transmitter molecules stored in nanometer vesicles. The approach involves the adsorption and subsequent rupture of vesicles on an electrode surface during which the electroactive contents are quantitatively oxidized (or reduced). The measured current allows us to count the number of molecules in the vesicles using Faraday's law and to correlate this to the amount of molecules released when single exocytosis events take place at communicating cells. The original format for this method involved a capillary electrophoresis separation step to singly address each vesicle, but we have more recently discovered that cellular vesicles tend to adsorb to carbon electrodes and spontaneously as well as stochastically rupture to give mostly single vesicle events. This approach, called impact electrochemical cytometry, even though the impact is perhaps not the important part of this process, has been studied and the vesicle rupture appears to be at the interface between the vesicle and the electrode and is probably driven by electroporation. The pore size and rate of content electrolysis are a function of the pore diameter and the presence of a protein core in the vesicles. In model liposomes with no protein, events appear extremely rapidly as the soft nanoparticles impact the electrode and the contents are oxidized. It appears that the proteins decorating the surface of the vesicle are important in maintaining a gap from the electrode and when this gap is closed electroporation takes place. Models of the event response times suggest the pores formed are small enough so we can carry out these measurements at nanotip electrodes and we have used this to quantify the vesicle content in living cells in a mode we call intracellular impact electrochemical cytometry. The development of electrochemical cytometry allows comparison between vesicle content and vesicular release and

  18. Automated and effective content-based image retrieval for digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vibhav Prakash; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, huge number of mammograms has been generated in hospitals for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) can contribute more reliable diagnosis by classifying the query mammograms and retrieving similar mammograms already annotated by diagnostic descriptions and treatment results. Since labels, artifacts, and pectoral muscles present in mammograms can bias the retrieval procedures, automated detection and exclusion of these image noise patterns and/or non-breast regions is an essential pre-processing step. In this study, an efficient and automated CBIR system of mammograms was developed and tested. First, the pre-processing steps including automatic labelling-artifact suppression, automatic pectoral muscle removal, and image enhancement using the adaptive median filter were applied. Next, pre-processed images were segmented using the co-occurrence thresholds based seeded region growing algorithm. Furthermore, a set of image features including shape, histogram based statistical, Gabor, wavelet, and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) features, was computed from the segmented region. In order to select the optimal features, a minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) feature selection method was then applied. Finally, similar images were retrieved using Euclidean distance similarity measure. The comparative experiments conducted with reference to benchmark mammographic images analysis society (MIAS) database confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed work concerning average precision of 72% and 61.30% for normal & abnormal classes of mammograms, respectively.

  19. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content with changing postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Jalil; Pope, Malcolm H; Graveling, Richard A

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to evaluate spinal loading in vivo are limited and a large majority of studies on the mechanical functions of the spine have been in vitro cadaveric studies and/or models based on many assumptions that are difficult to validate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content measurements with changing postures. MRI studies were conducted on 25 healthy males with no history of low back pain (age 20-38). The L1 to S1 intradiscal levels were imaged in supine, sitting and standing postures using an upright 0.6 Tesla magnet, where a set of H2O: D2O7 phantoms were mounted on the back of the subjects. A calibration curve, provided from these phantoms, was applied to the absolute proton density image, yielding a pixel-by-pixel map of the water content of the NP. The NP at all levels showed a highly significant water loss (pNP in different postures are in agreement with those determined from published invasive disc pressure measurements. The result of study demonstrates the feasibility of using MRI to determine the water content of the NP with changing postures and to use these data to evaluate spinal loading in these postures. This measurement method of water content by quantitative MR imaging could become a powerful tool for both clinical and ergonomic applications. The proposed methodology does not require invasive pressure measurement techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Huang

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor. Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images.

  1. Lanthanide-Coordinated Semiconducting Polymer Dots Used for Flow Cytometry and Mass Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; DeGottardi, Quinn; Wu, I-Che; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, Li; Ye, Fangmao; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Kwok, William W; Chiu, Daniel T

    2017-11-20

    Simultaneous monitoring of biomarkers as well as single-cell analyses based on flow cytometry and mass cytometry are important for investigations of disease mechanisms, drug discovery, and signaling-network studies. Flow cytometry and mass cytometry are complementary to each other; however, probes that can satisfy all the requirements for these two advanced technologies are limited. In this study, we report a probe of lanthanide-coordinated semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots), which possess fluorescence and mass signals. We demonstrated the usage of this dual-functionality probe for both flow cytometry and mass cytometry in a mimetic cell mixture and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as model systems. The probes not only offer high fluorescence signal for use in flow cytometry, but also show better performance in mass cytometry than the commercially available counterparts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Metabolic imaging of human kidney triglyceride content: reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Hammer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantification of triglyceride content and to compare spectral quality and reproducibility without and with respiratory motion compensation in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Review Board of our institution approved the study protocol, and written informed consent was obtained. After technical optimization, a total of 20 healthy volunteers underwent renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the renal cortex both without and with respiratory motion compensation and volume tracking. After the first session the subjects were repositioned and the protocol was repeated to assess reproducibility. Spectral quality (linewidth of the water signal and triglyceride content were quantified. Bland-Altman analyses and a test by Pitman were performed. RESULTS: Linewidth changed from 11.5±0.4 Hz to 10.7±0.4 Hz (all data pooled, p<0.05, without and with respiratory motion compensation respectively. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session without respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.58±0.12% and 0.51±0.14% (P = NS. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session with respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.44±0.10% and 0.43±0.10% (P = NS between sessions and P = NS compared to measurements with respiratory motion compensation. Bland-Altman analyses showed narrower limits of agreement and a significant difference in the correlated variances (correlation of -0.59, P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Metabolic imaging of the human kidney using renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a feasible tool to assess cortical triglyceride content in humans in vivo and the use of respiratory motion compensation significantly improves spectral quality and reproducibility. Therefore, respiratory motion compensation seems a necessity for metabolic imaging of renal triglyceride content in vivo.

  3. Antarctic moss stress assessment based on chlorophyll content and leaf density retrieved from imaging spectroscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovský, Zbyněk; Turnbull, Johanna D; Lucieer, Arko; Robinson, Sharon A

    2015-10-01

    The health of several East Antarctic moss-beds is declining as liquid water availability is reduced due to recent environmental changes. Consequently, a noninvasive and spatially explicit method is needed to assess the vigour of mosses spread throughout rocky Antarctic landscapes. Here, we explore the possibility of using near-distance imaging spectroscopy for spatial assessment of moss-bed health. Turf chlorophyll a and b, water content and leaf density were selected as quantitative stress indicators. Reflectance of three dominant Antarctic mosses Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Ceratodon purpureus and Schistidium antarctici was measured during a drought-stress and recovery laboratory experiment and also with an imaging spectrometer outdoors on water-deficient (stressed) and well-watered (unstressed) moss test sites. The stress-indicating moss traits were derived from visible and near infrared turf reflectance using a nonlinear support vector regression. Laboratory estimates of chlorophyll content and leaf density were achieved with the lowest systematic/unsystematic root mean square errors of 38.0/235.2 nmol g(-1) DW and 0.8/1.6 leaves mm(-1) , respectively. Subsequent combination of these indicators retrieved from field hyperspectral images produced small-scale maps indicating relative moss vigour. Once applied and validated on remotely sensed airborne spectral images, this methodology could provide quantitative maps suitable for long-term monitoring of Antarctic moss-bed health. © 2015 The Authors New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Content-based image retrieval for interstitial lung diseases using classification confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Jatindra Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Prabhakar, Nidhi; Garg, Mandeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) system could exploit the wealth of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) data stored in the archive by finding similar images to assist radiologists for self learning and differential diagnosis of Interstitial Lung Diseases (ILDs). HRCT findings of ILDs are classified into several categories (e.g. consolidation, emphysema, ground glass, nodular etc.) based on their texture like appearances. Therefore, analysis of ILDs is considered as a texture analysis problem. Many approaches have been proposed for CBIR of lung images using texture as primitive visual content. This paper presents a new approach to CBIR for ILDs. The proposed approach makes use of a trained neural network (NN) to find the output class label of query image. The degree of confidence of the NN classifier is analyzed using Naive Bayes classifier that dynamically takes a decision on the size of the search space to be used for retrieval. The proposed approach is compared with three simple distance based and one classifier based texture retrieval approaches. Experimental results show that the proposed technique achieved highest average percentage precision of 92.60% with lowest standard deviation of 20.82%.

  5. A multi-functional imaging approach to high-content protein interaction screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Matthews

    Full Text Available Functional imaging can provide a level of quantification that is not possible in what might be termed traditional high-content screening. This is due to the fact that the current state-of-the-art high-content screening systems take the approach of scaling-up single cell assays, and are therefore based on essentially pictorial measures as assay indicators. Such phenotypic analyses have become extremely sophisticated, advancing screening enormously, but this approach can still be somewhat subjective. We describe the development, and validation, of a prototype high-content screening platform that combines steady-state fluorescence anisotropy imaging with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. This functional approach allows objective, quantitative screening of small molecule libraries in protein-protein interaction assays. We discuss the development of the instrumentation, the process by which information on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET can be extracted from wide-field, acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging and cross-checking of this modality using lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting. Imaging of cells expressing protein constructs where eGFP and mRFP1 are linked with amino-acid chains of various lengths (7, 19 and 32 amino acids shows the two methodologies to be highly correlated. We validate our approach using a small-scale inhibitor screen of a Cdc42 FRET biosensor probe expressed in epidermoid cancer cells (A431 in a 96 microwell-plate format. We also show that acceptor fluorescence anisotropy can be used to measure variations in hetero-FRET in protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate this using a screen of inhibitors of internalization of the transmembrane receptor, CXCR4. These assays enable us to demonstrate all the capabilities of the instrument, image processing and analytical techniques that have been developed. Direct correlation between acceptor anisotropy and donor FLIM is observed for FRET

  6. An efficient similarity measure for content based image retrieval using memetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem K. Alsmadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Content based image retrieval (CBIR systems work by retrieving images which are related to the query image (QI from huge databases. The available CBIR systems extract limited feature sets which confine the retrieval efficacy. In this work, extensive robust and important features were extracted from the images database and then stored in the feature repository. This feature set is composed of color signature with the shape and color texture features. Where, features are extracted from the given QI in the similar fashion. Consequently, a novel similarity evaluation using a meta-heuristic algorithm called a memetic algorithm (genetic algorithm with great deluge is achieved between the features of the QI and the features of the database images. Our proposed CBIR system is assessed by inquiring number of images (from the test dataset and the efficiency of the system is evaluated by calculating precision-recall value for the results. The results were superior to other state-of-the-art CBIR systems in regard to precision.

  7. A multi-scale convolutional neural network for phenotyping high-content cellular images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, William J; Hossain, Imtiaz; Lazic, Stanley E; Davies, John W; Zhang, Xian

    2017-07-01

    Identifying phenotypes based on high-content cellular images is challenging. Conventional image analysis pipelines for phenotype identification comprise multiple independent steps, with each step requiring method customization and adjustment of multiple parameters. Here, we present an approach based on a multi-scale convolutional neural network (M-CNN) that classifies, in a single cohesive step, cellular images into phenotypes by using directly and solely the images' pixel intensity values. The only parameters in the approach are the weights of the neural network, which are automatically optimized based on training images. The approach requires no a priori knowledge or manual customization, and is applicable to single- or multi-channel images displaying single or multiple cells. We evaluated the classification performance of the approach on eight diverse benchmark datasets. The approach yielded overall a higher classification accuracy compared with state-of-the-art results, including those of other deep CNN architectures. In addition to using the network to simply obtain a yes-or-no prediction for a given phenotype, we use the probability outputs calculated by the network to quantitatively describe the phenotypes. This study shows that these probability values correlate with chemical treatment concentrations. This finding validates further our approach and enables chemical treatment potency estimation via CNNs. The network specifications and solver definitions are provided in Supplementary Software 1. william_jose.godinez_navarro@novartis.com or xian-1.zhang@novartis.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Using Sentinel-1 and Landsat 8 satellite images to estimate surface soil moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexis, Philippos-Dimitrios; Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the potential for more accurate assessment of Soil Moisture (SM) content exploiting Earth Observation (EO) technology, by exploring the use of synergistic approaches among a variety of EO instruments has emerged. This study is the first to investigate the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) (Sentinel-1) and optical (Landsat 8) images in combination with ground measurements to estimate volumetric SM content in support of water management and agricultural practices. SAR and optical data are downloaded and corrected in terms of atmospheric, geometric and radiometric corrections. SAR images are also corrected in terms of roughness and vegetation with the synergistic use of Oh and Topp models using a dataset consisting of backscattering coefficients and corresponding direct measurements of ground parameters (moisture, roughness). Following, various vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, EVI, etc.) are estimated to record diachronically the vegetation regime within the study area and as auxiliary data in the final modeling. Furthermore, thermal images from optical data are corrected and incorporated to the overall approach. The basic principle of Thermal InfraRed (TIR) method is that Land Surface Temperature (LST) is sensitive to surface SM content due to its impact on surface heating process (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) under bare soil or sparse vegetation cover conditions. Ground truth data are collected from a Time-domain reflectometer (TRD) gauge network established in western Crete, Greece, during 2015. Sophisticated algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) approaches are used to explore the statistical relationship between backscattering measurements and SM content. Results highlight the potential of SAR and optical satellite images to contribute to effective SM content detection in support of water resources management and precision agriculture. Keywords: Sentinel-1, Landsat 8, Soil

  9. High content live cell imaging for the discovery of new antimalarial marine natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Serena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human malaria parasite remains a burden in developing nations. It is responsible for up to one million deaths a year, a number that could rise due to increasing multi-drug resistance to all antimalarial drugs currently available. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new drug therapies. Recently, our laboratory developed a simple one-step fluorescence-based live cell-imaging assay to integrate the complex biology of the human malaria parasite into drug discovery. Here we used our newly developed live cell-imaging platform to discover novel marine natural products and their cellular phenotypic effects against the most lethal malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Methods A high content live cell imaging platform was used to screen marine extracts effects on malaria. Parasites were grown in vitro in the presence of extracts, stained with RNA sensitive dye, and imaged at timed intervals with the BD Pathway HT automated confocal microscope. Results Image analysis validated our new methodology at a larger scale level and revealed potential antimalarial activity of selected extracts with a minimal cytotoxic effect on host red blood cells. To further validate our assay, we investigated parasite's phenotypes when incubated with the purified bioactive natural product bromophycolide A. We show that bromophycolide A has a strong and specific morphological effect on parasites, similar to the ones observed from the initial extracts. Conclusion Collectively, our results show that high-content live cell-imaging (HCLCI can be used to screen chemical libraries and identify parasite specific inhibitors with limited host cytotoxic effects. All together we provide new leads for the discovery of novel antimalarials.

  10. High content live cell imaging for the discovery of new antimalarial marine natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Serena; Stout, Paige E; Prudhomme, Jacques; Engel, Sebastian; Bruton, Matthew; Cervantes, Michael; Carter, David; Tae-Chang, Young; Hay, Mark E; Aalbersberg, William; Kubanek, Julia; Le Roch, Karine G

    2012-01-03

    The human malaria parasite remains a burden in developing nations. It is responsible for up to one million deaths a year, a number that could rise due to increasing multi-drug resistance to all antimalarial drugs currently available. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new drug therapies. Recently, our laboratory developed a simple one-step fluorescence-based live cell-imaging assay to integrate the complex biology of the human malaria parasite into drug discovery. Here we used our newly developed live cell-imaging platform to discover novel marine natural products and their cellular phenotypic effects against the most lethal malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. A high content live cell imaging platform was used to screen marine extracts effects on malaria. Parasites were grown in vitro in the presence of extracts, stained with RNA sensitive dye, and imaged at timed intervals with the BD Pathway HT automated confocal microscope. Image analysis validated our new methodology at a larger scale level and revealed potential antimalarial activity of selected extracts with a minimal cytotoxic effect on host red blood cells. To further validate our assay, we investigated parasite's phenotypes when incubated with the purified bioactive natural product bromophycolide A. We show that bromophycolide A has a strong and specific morphological effect on parasites, similar to the ones observed from the initial extracts. Collectively, our results show that high-content live cell-imaging (HCLCI) can be used to screen chemical libraries and identify parasite specific inhibitors with limited host cytotoxic effects. All together we provide new leads for the discovery of novel antimalarials. © 2011 Cervantes et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  11. Optimizing T1-weighted imaging of cortical myelin content at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Nicholas A; Hashim, Eyesha; Janik, Rafal; Konyer, Norman B; Weiss, Marcel; Stanisz, Greg J; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-15

    With increases in the sensitivity and resolution of anatomical MRI for the brain, methods for mapping the organization of the cerebral cortex by imaging its myelin content have emerged. This identifies major sensory and motor regions and could be used in studies of cortical organization, particularly if patterns of myelination can be visualized over the cortical surface robustly in individual subjects. The imaging problem is difficult, however, because of the relative thinness of the cerebral cortex and the low intracortical tissue contrast. In this paper, we optimize the contrast of T(1)-weighted MRI to help better visualize patterns of myelination. We measure a small but statistically significant difference in T(1) of 171 ± 40 ms between cortical regions with low and high myelin contents in the human cortex at 3T, and then perform simulations to choose parameters for an inversion-recovery pulse sequence that utilizes this T(1) difference to increase contrast within the cortex. We show that lengthening the delay between signal acquisition and the next inversion pulse in the sequence increases intracortical contrast more effectively than does image averaging. Using the optimized sequence, we show that major myelinated regions that are relatively thick, such as the primary motor and auditory regions, can be visualized well in individuals at 3T using whole-cortex 3D images made at 1mm isotropic resolution, while thinner regions, such as the primary visual cortex, can be visualized using targeted 3D images made at 0.5mm isotropic resolution. Our findings demonstrate that patterns of myelination can be better visualized in individual subjects when the imaging is optimized to highlight intracortical contrast and can help to pave the way for the creation of matched maps of microanatomy and function in the cortex of living individual humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immuno flow cytometry in marine phytoplankton research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peperzak, L; Vrieling, EG; Sandee, B; Rutten, T

    The developments in the combination of flow cytometry and immunology as a tool to identify, count and examine marine phytoplankton cells are reviewed. The concepts of immunology and now cytometry are described. A distinction is made between quantitative and qualitative immunofluorescence.

  13. Detecting fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed; Berkowicz, Adela

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the area of detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry.......The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the area of detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry....

  14. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and multivariate regression for prediction of proteoglycan content of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Rieppo

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has been earlier applied for the spatial estimation of the collagen and the proteoglycan (PG contents of articular cartilage (AC. However, earlier studies have been limited to the use of univariate analysis techniques. Current analysis methods lack the needed specificity for collagen and PGs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of partial least squares regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR methods for the analysis of the PG content of AC. Multivariate regression models were compared with earlier used univariate methods and tested with a sample material consisting of healthy and enzymatically degraded steer AC. Chondroitinase ABC enzyme was used to increase the variation in PG content levels as compared to intact AC. Digital densitometric measurements of Safranin O-stained sections provided the reference for PG content. The results showed that multivariate regression models predict PG content of AC significantly better than earlier used absorbance spectrum (i.e. the area of carbohydrate region with or without amide I normalization or second derivative spectrum univariate parameters. Increased molecular specificity favours the use of multivariate regression models, but they require more knowledge of chemometric analysis and extended laboratory resources for gathering reference data for establishing the models. When true molecular specificity is required, the multivariate models should be used.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the water content and transport in rat lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobretsov, Egor A; Snytnikova, Olga A; Koptyug, Igor V; Kaptein, Robert; Tsentalovich, Yuri P

    2013-08-01

    NMR micro-imaging technique has been used for the measurement of the water content distribution in lenses of senescence-accelerated OXYS rats and age-matched Wistar rats, as well as for the study of water and phosphate transport in rat lenses. The water content in the lens cortex is significantly higher than in the nucleus; the spatial gradient of the water content becomes steeper with age. No difference in the water content distribution has been found between Wistar and OXYS rat lenses of matching ages, although cataract onset in the OXYS rat lens occurs much earlier due to the enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species associated with oxidative stress. This finding implies that cataract development does not lead to significant changes in water content distribution inside the lens. The water transport in rat lenses slows down with age, and in OXYS lenses it is somewhat faster than in lenses of Wistar rats, probably due to the compensatory response to oxidative stress. The application of (31)P MRI for the monitoring of phosphate penetration into a lens has been performed for the first time. It is found that phosphate transport in a lens is significantly slower than that of water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Flow cytometry: basic principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Alizada, Günel; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf; Nalbant, Ayten

    2017-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a sophisticated instrument measuring multiple physical characteristics of a single cell such as size and granularity simultaneously as the cell flows in suspension through a measuring device. Its working depends on the light scattering features of the cells under investigation, which may be derived from dyes or monoclonal antibodies targeting either extracellular molecules located on the surface or intracellular molecules inside the cell. This approach makes flow cytometry a powerful tool for detailed analysis of complex populations in a short period of time. This review covers the general principles and selected applications of flow cytometry such as immunophenotyping of peripheral blood cells, analysis of apoptosis and detection of cytokines. Additionally, this report provides a basic understanding of flow cytometry technology essential for all users as well as the methods used to analyze and interpret the data. Moreover, recent progresses in flow cytometry have been discussed in order to give an opinion about the future importance of this technology.

  17. “Fitspiration” on Social Media: A Content Analysis of Gendered Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Ivanka; Lim, Megan Su Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Background “Fitspiration” (also known as “fitspo”) aims to inspire individuals to exercise and be healthy, but emerging research indicates exposure can negatively impact female body image. Fitspiration is frequently accessed on social media; however, it is currently unclear the degree to which messages about body image and exercise differ by gender of the subject. Objective The aim of our study was to conduct a content analysis to identify the characteristics of fitspiration content posted across social media and whether this differs according to subject gender. Methods Content tagged with #fitspo across Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr was extracted over a composite 30-minute period. All posts were analyzed by 2 independent coders according to a codebook. Results Of the 415/476 (87.2%) relevant posts extracted, most posts were on Instagram (360/415, 86.8%). Most posts (308/415, 74.2%) related thematically to exercise, and 81/415 (19.6%) related thematically to food. In total, 151 (36.4%) posts depicted only female subjects and 114/415 (27.5%) depicted only male subjects. Female subjects were typically thin but toned; male subjects were often muscular or hypermuscular. Within the images, female subjects were significantly more likely to be aged under 25 years (Ppost (P=.005) than the female subjects. Female subjects were more likely to be sexualized than the male subjects (P=.002). Conclusions Female #fitspo subjects typically adhered to the thin or athletic ideal, and male subjects typically adhered to the muscular ideal. Future research and interventional efforts should consider the potential objectifying messages in fitspiration, as it relates to both female and male body image. PMID:28356239

  18. Flow Cytometry of Nonhematopoietic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Vinodh; Dorfman, David M

    2016-01-01

    Many epithelial neoplasms can be analyzed by flow cytometry (FC), particularly from serous cavity effusion samples, using EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on most normal epithelial cells and expressed at a higher level in most epithelial neoplasms. A simple 3-color flow cytometric panel can provide a high sensitivity and specificity compared to cytomorphology. FC provides more rapid immunophenotyping than conventional immunohistochemical staining, can identify rare malignant cells that could be missed by a cytological exam alone, and can be utilized to evaluate limited samples such as cerebrospinal fluid or fine-needle aspiration samples. Flow cytometric analysis for epithelial antigens can be combined with DNA ploidy analysis or assessment of the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio. Panels of flow cytometric markers are useful for the assessment of pediatric nonhematopoietic neoplasms, including neuroblastomas, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, Wilms' tumor, rhabdomyosarcomas, germ cell tumors, and hemangiopericytomas, as well as small-round-blue-cell tumors in adults, including small-cell carcinomas. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A web-accessible content-based cervicographic image retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer; Jeronimo, Jose; Thoma, George R.

    2008-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is the process of retrieving images by directly using image visual characteristics. In this paper, we present a prototype system implemented for CBIR for a uterine cervix image (cervigram) database. This cervigram database is a part of data collected in a multi-year longitudinal effort by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and archived by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), for the study of the origins of, and factors related to, cervical precancer/cancer. Users may access the system with any Web browser. The system is built with a distributed architecture which is modular and expandable; the user interface is decoupled from the core indexing and retrieving algorithms, and uses open communication standards and open source software. The system tries to bridge the gap between a user's semantic understanding and image feature representation, by incorporating the user's knowledge. Given a user-specified query region, the system returns the most similar regions from the database, with respect to attributes of color, texture, and size. Experimental evaluation of the retrieval performance of the system on "groundtruth" test data illustrates its feasibility to serve as a possible research tool to aid the study of the visual characteristics of cervical neoplasia.

  20. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze

    2017-04-24

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  1. Review on Semi-Fragile Watermarking Algorithms for Content Authentication of Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Yu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the popularity of network and the continuous development of multimedia technology, saving of network bandwidth and copyright protection of multimedia content have gradually attracted people’s attention. The fragile watermark for integrity authentication of image data and protection of copyright has become a hotspot. In the storage and transmission process, image data must be compressed to save network bandwidth. As a result, semi-fragile watermarking techniques, which can be used to distinguish common image processing operations from malicious tampering, are emerging. In this paper, semi-fragile watermarking algorithms for image authentication are surveyed. The basic principles and characteristics about semi-fragile watermarking algorithms are introduced, and several kinds of attack behaviors are also included. Aiming at several typical image-authentication algorithms, advantages and disadvantages are analyzed, and evaluation indexes of various algorithms are compared. Finally, we analyze the key points and difficulties in the study on semi-fragile watermarking algorithms, and the direction about future development is prospected.

  2. Feasibility of using hyperspectral imaging to predict moisture content of porcine meat during salting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Sun, Da-Wen; Qu, Jiahuan; Zeng, Xin-An; Pu, Hongbin; Ma, Ji

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of using hyperspectral imaging technique (1000-2500 nm) for predicting moisture content (MC) during the salting process of porcine meat was assessed. Different spectral profiles including reflectance spectra (RS), absorbance spectra (AS) and Kubelka-Munk spectra (KMS) were examined to investigate the influence of spectroscopic transformations on predicting moisture content of salted pork slice. The best full-wavelength partial least squares regression (PLSR) models were acquired based on reflectance spectra (Rc(2)=0.969, RMSEC=0.921%; Rc(2)=0.941, RMSEP=1.23%). On the basis of the optimal wavelengths identified using the regression coefficient, two calibration models of PLSR and multiple linear regression (MLR) were compared. The optimal RS-MLR model was considered to be the best for determining the moisture content of salted pork, with a Rc(2) of 0.917 and RMSEP of 1.48%. Visualisation of moisture distribution in each pixel of the hyperspectral image using the prediction model display moisture evolution and migration in pork slices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility in multispectral imaging for predicting the content of bioactive compounds in intact tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhong; Liu, Wei; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-04-15

    Tomato is an important health-stimulating fruit because of the antioxidant properties of its main bioactive compounds, dominantly lycopene and phenolic compounds. Nowadays, product differentiation in the fruit market requires an accurate evaluation of these value-added compounds. An experiment was conducted to simultaneously and non-destructively measure lycopene and phenolic compounds content in intact tomatoes using multispectral imaging combined with chemometric methods. Partial least squares (PLS), least squares-support vector machines (LS-SVM) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) were applied to develop quantitative models. Compared with PLS and LS-SVM, BPNN model considerably improved the performance with coefficient of determination in prediction (RP(2))=0.938 and 0.965, residual predictive deviation (RPD)=4.590 and 9.335 for lycopene and total phenolics content prediction, respectively. It is concluded that multispectral imaging is an attractive alternative to the standard methods for determination of bioactive compounds content in intact tomatoes, providing a useful platform for infield fruit sorting/grading. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear Cytometry: Analysis of the Patterns of DNA Synthesis and Transcription Using Flow Cytometry, Confocal Microscopy, and RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, David W; Sliwinska, Elwira; Samadder, Partha

    2018-01-01

    Eukaryotes are defined by cells that contain a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles. Cytometric analysis in situ, utilizing imaging, provides a useful understanding of the structure and function of the various subcellular components, particularly when combined with methods that preserve the living state. In terms of information provided by the observation of eukaryotic nuclei, imaging has provided a wealth of information about cellular multiplication. When organisms are present in multicellular form (tissues and organs), this property does not generally confound imaging cytometry. Multicellular eukaryotic species present immediate problems when being considered for analysis using flow cytometry which requires suspensions of single particles. Although some eukaryotic cell types exist as natural single cell suspensions (cf. the erythropoietic system), for other tissues and organs, strategies are required to produce single particle suspensions. This chapter illustrates the application of flow cytometry combined with confocal microscopy to analyze complex organs, focusing on properties of the plant nucleus, and then goes on to describe how suspensions of nuclei can be prepared from tissues and organs, and used for flow cytometric analysis of cellular and transcriptional states. The application of these techniques to animal species is also discussed with the implication that this strategy is universally applicable for the characterization of nuclei within tissues that cannot readily be converted into suspensions of cells.

  5. Profiling stem cell states in three-dimensional biomaterial niches using high content image informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Anandika; Brenner, Matthew; Wolujewicz, Paul; Zhang, Zheng; Mao, Yong; Batish, Mona; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2016-11-01

    A predictive framework for the evolution of stem cell biology in 3-D is currently lacking. In this study we propose deep image informatics of the nuclear biology of stem cells to elucidate how 3-D biomaterials steer stem cell lineage phenotypes. The approach is based on high content imaging informatics to capture minute variations in the 3-D spatial organization of splicing factor SC-35 in the nucleoplasm as a marker to classify emergent cell phenotypes of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were cultured in varied 3-D culture systems including hydrogels, electrospun mats and salt leached scaffolds. The approach encompasses high resolution 3-D imaging of SC-35 domains and high content image analysis (HCIA) to compute quantitative 3-D nuclear metrics for SC-35 organization in single cells in concert with machine learning approaches to construct a predictive cell-state classification model. Our findings indicate that hMSCs cultured in collagen hydrogels and induced to differentiate into osteogenic or adipogenic lineages could be classified into the three lineages (stem, adipogenic, osteogenic) with ⩾80% precision and sensitivity, within 72h. Using this framework, the augmentation of osteogenesis by scaffold design exerted by porogen leached scaffolds was also profiled within 72h with ∼80% high sensitivity. Furthermore, by employing 3-D SC-35 organizational metrics, differential osteogenesis induced by novel electrospun fibrous polymer mats incorporating decellularized matrix could also be elucidated and predictably modeled at just 3days with high precision. We demonstrate that 3-D SC-35 organizational metrics can be applied to model the stem cell state in 3-D scaffolds. We propose that this methodology can robustly discern minute changes in stem cell states within complex 3-D architectures and map single cell biological readouts that are critical to assessing population level cell heterogeneity. The sustained development and validation of bioactive

  6. Improving uptake and engagement with child body image interventions delivered to mothers: Understanding mother and daughter preferences for intervention content

    OpenAIRE

    Garbett, K. M.; Diedrichs, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mothers are a key influence on adolescent girls’ body image. This study aimed to improve understanding of mothers’ and daughters’ preferences for content in body image interventions designed to assist mothers to promote positive body image among their daughters. British mother-daughter dyads (N=190) viewed descriptions of five evidence-based influences on body image (family, friends and relationships; appearance-based teasing; media and celebrities; appearance conversations; body acceptance a...

  7. Project SEMACODE : a scale-invariant object recognition system for content-based queries in image databases

    OpenAIRE

    Brause, Rüdiger W.; Arlt, Björn; Tratar, Erwin

    1999-01-01

    For the efficient management of large image databases, the automated characterization of images and the usage of that characterization for searching and ordering tasks is highly desirable. The purpose of the project SEMACODE is to combine the still unsolved problem of content-oriented characterization of images with scale-invariant object recognition and modelbased compression methods. To achieve this goal, existing techniques as well as new concepts related to pattern matching, image encodin...

  8. Determination of Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen (TVB-N Content in Beef by Hyperspectral Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Shanmei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive determination of TVB-N content in beef using hyperspectral imaging (HSI technique was evaluated. In order to create a robust model to predict the TVB-N content in beef, partition of sample set, spectral pretreatment, and the optimum wavelength selection were discussed. After the beef sample set was parted by concentration gradient (CG algortithm, and the spectra of beef samples were preprocessed by standard normalized variate (SNV combined with auto scale(AS, the partial least square regression (PLSR model was established using the full spectral range, which had the best prediction abilities with Rcv2 of 0.9124, Rp2 of 0.8816, RMSECV of 1.5889, and RMSEP of 1.7719, respectively. After the optimum wavelengths which is closely related to the TVB-N content of beef samples was obtained using the competitive adaptive re-weighted (CARS algorithm, a new PLSR model was established using the optimum wavelengths, which had outstanding prediction abilities with Rcv2 of 0.9235, Rp2 of 0.9241, RMSECV of 1.4881, and RMSEP of 1.4882, respectively.The study showed that HSI is a powerful technique to predict the TVB-N content in beef by a nondestructive way.

  9. Metal-Containing Polystyrene Beads as Standards for Mass Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Kinach, Robert; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C; Tanner, Scott; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the suitability of metal-containing polystyrene beads for the calibration of a mass cytometer instrument, a single particle analyser based on an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a time of flight mass spectrometer. These metal-containing beads are also verified for their use as internal standards for this instrument. These beads were synthesized by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with acrylic acid as a comonomer. Acrylic acid acts as a ligand to anchor the metal ions within the interior of the beads. Mass cytometry enabled the bead-by-bead measurement of the metal-content and determination of the metal-content distribution. Beads synthesized by dispersion polymerization that involved three stages were shown to have narrower bead-to-bead variation in their lanthanide content than beads synthesized by 2-stage dispersion polymerization. The beads exhibited insignificant release of their lanthanide content to aqueous solutions of different pHs over a period of six months. When mixed with KG1a or U937 cell lines, metal-containing polymer beads were shown not to affect the mass cytometry response to the metal content of element-tagged antibodies specifically attached to these cells.

  10. A roughly mapped terra incognita: Image of the child in adult-oriented media contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korać Nada M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzes the image of the child in the media contents intended for adult audiences in Serbia, considering the importance of the role media play in shaping public opinion on children, as well as the influence of such public opinion on adults' attitudes, decisions and actions concerning children. The study focuses on visibility and portrayal of children in the media, in order to determine to what extent children are present in them, and in what way. Relevant data were collected for three media - press, radio and television - mostly covering the entire territory of Serbia, over two consecutive months (April - May 2001. Content analysis revealed that children are not only underrepresented, but also misrepresented, in Serbian media.

  11. Flow Cytometry: Impact On Early Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Modern flow cytometers can make optical measurements of 10 or more parameters per cell at tens-of-thousands of cells per second and over five orders of magnitude dynamic range. Although flow cytometry is used in most drug discovery stages, “sip-and-spit” sampling technology has restricted it to low sample throughput applications. The advent of HyperCyt sampling technology has recently made possible primary screening applications in which tens-of-thousands of compounds are analyzed per day. Target-multiplexing methodologies in combination with extended multi-parameter analyses enable profiling of lead candidates early in the discovery process, when the greatest numbers of candidates are available for evaluation. The ability to sample small volumes with negligible waste reduces reagent costs, compound usage and consumption of cells. Improved compound library formatting strategies can further extend primary screening opportunities when samples are scarce. Dozens of targets have been screened in 384- and 1536-well assay formats, predominantly in academic screening lab settings. In concert with commercial platform evolution and trending drug discovery strategies, HyperCyt-based systems are now finding their way into mainstream screening labs. Recent advances in flow-based imaging, mass spectrometry and parallel sample processing promise dramatically expanded single cell profiling capabilities to bolster systems level approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25805180

  12. Evolutionary and Modern Image Content Differentially Influence the Processing of Emotional Pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Dhum

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available From an evolutionary perspective, environmental threats relevant for survival constantly challenged human beings. Current research suggests the evolution of a fear processing module in the brain to cope with these threats. Recently, humans increasingly encountered modern threats (e.g., guns or car accidents in addition to evolutionary threats (e.g., snakes or predators which presumably required an adaptation of perception and behavior. However, the neural processes underlying the perception of these different threats remain to be elucidated. We investigated the effect of image content (i.e., evolutionary vs. modern threats on the activation of neural networks of emotion processing. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI 41 participants watched affective pictures displaying evolutionary-threatening, modern-threatening, evolutionary-neutral and modern-neutral content. Evolutionary-threatening stimuli evoked stronger activations than modern-threatening stimuli in left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus, right middle frontal gyrus and parietal regions as well as bilaterally in parietal regions, fusiform gyrus and bilateral amygdala. We observed the opposite effect, i.e., higher activity for modern-threatening than for evolutionary-threatening stimuli, bilaterally in the posterior cingulate and the parahippocampal gyrus. We found no differences in subjective arousal ratings between the two threatening conditions. On the valence scale though, subjects rated modern-threatening pictures significantly more negative than evolutionary-threatening pictures, indicating a higher level of perceived threat. The majority of previous studies show a positive relationship between arousal rating and amygdala activity. However, comparing fMRI results with behavioral findings we provide evidence that neural activity in fear processing areas is not only driven by arousal or valence, but presumably also by the evolutionary content of the stimulus. This has

  13. Evolutionary and Modern Image Content Differentially Influence the Processing of Emotional Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhum, Matthias; Herwig, Uwe; Opialla, Sarah; Siegrist, Michael; Brühl, Annette B

    2017-01-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, environmental threats relevant for survival constantly challenged human beings. Current research suggests the evolution of a fear processing module in the brain to cope with these threats. Recently, humans increasingly encountered modern threats (e.g., guns or car accidents) in addition to evolutionary threats (e.g., snakes or predators) which presumably required an adaptation of perception and behavior. However, the neural processes underlying the perception of these different threats remain to be elucidated. We investigated the effect of image content (i.e., evolutionary vs. modern threats) on the activation of neural networks of emotion processing. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) 41 participants watched affective pictures displaying evolutionary-threatening, modern-threatening, evolutionary-neutral and modern-neutral content. Evolutionary-threatening stimuli evoked stronger activations than modern-threatening stimuli in left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus, right middle frontal gyrus and parietal regions as well as bilaterally in parietal regions, fusiform gyrus and bilateral amygdala. We observed the opposite effect, i.e., higher activity for modern-threatening than for evolutionary-threatening stimuli, bilaterally in the posterior cingulate and the parahippocampal gyrus. We found no differences in subjective arousal ratings between the two threatening conditions. On the valence scale though, subjects rated modern-threatening pictures significantly more negative than evolutionary-threatening pictures, indicating a higher level of perceived threat. The majority of previous studies show a positive relationship between arousal rating and amygdala activity. However, comparing fMRI results with behavioral findings we provide evidence that neural activity in fear processing areas is not only driven by arousal or valence, but presumably also by the evolutionary content of the stimulus. This has also fundamental

  14. Aspirin content determination with control systems by image processing technology. Gazo shori gijutsu wo katsuyoshita jozai aspirin kensa sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K. (Lion Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    An inspection apparatus for aspirin tablets utilizing image processing technology was developed. One side of a tablet consists of aspirin layer and another side consists of alkiline layer. The alkaline layer is opaque at all but the aspirin layer is translucent. Image of overall configuration of the tablet is taken in CCD camera by illumination from all surrounding sides. The area is measured by using these images. Then, when switching off the surrounding illumination and illuminating the aspirin side, only aspirin side layer shines. The area is determined by taking the image in CCD. Aspirin content is calculated by the ratio of overall images to aspirin image and the predetermined tablet weight. Tablets of different aspirin content were prepared, and the content determined by this method and the chemically determined contents were compared. High correlation was found between both contents, indicating the validity of the image processing method. When the aspirin content is out of 330 {plus minus} 10mg, the controlling mechanism works, by which unmanned operation will be possible. 8 figs.

  15. Reducing input data via image categorization to improve the speed of copyright content management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2015-02-01

    An optical correlator has the advantage of high data transfer speed and parallel operation. However, in copyright content management systems (CCMSs), the numerous video files that need to be downloaded from the Internet and input to the optical correlator constitute a bottleneck. This paper proposes an image categorization method for CCMSs that uses the difference in the color features between animation and live-action images to remove this bottleneck and increase the speed of CCMSs. The results of experiments conducted indicate that the proposed method achieves a live-action video true rejection rate of 86.7 % and an animation video false rejection rate of 13.3 %. This indicates that the proposed method can improve the overall speed of a CCMS more than twice the original speed.

  16. An Image Content Description Technique for the Inspection of Specular Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bourennane

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed an image content description method within the context of specular surface inspection. Such a method is based on a preliminary research concerning the generation of specific stripe patterns for the visual enhancement of defective surface parts of cylindrical specular objects. The goal of this paper is to address the stripe pattern interpretation within a general approach. For this purpose, different pattern recognition processes, consisting not only of the combination of different image segmentation, feature retrieval, and classification, but also of feature combination and selection, will be considered. Three top-down and one bottom-up approaches are evaluated for retrieving the most appropriate feature sets in terms of highest classification rates. It will be demonstrated that following a combination and appropriate selection of these feature sets, even better rates can be reached. With only half of the initial features, an increase of more than 2% is observable.

  17. Keyframes Global Map Establishing Method for Robot Localization through Content-Based Image Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-localization and mapping are important for indoor mobile robot. We report a robust algorithm for map building and subsequent localization especially suited for indoor floor-cleaning robots. Common methods, for example, SLAM, can easily be kidnapped by colliding or disturbed by similar objects. Therefore, keyframes global map establishing method for robot localization in multiple rooms and corridors is needed. Content-based image matching is the core of this method. It is designed for the situation, by establishing keyframes containing both floor and distorted wall images. Image distortion, caused by robot view angle and movement, is analyzed and deduced. And an image matching solution is presented, consisting of extraction of overlap regions of keyframes extraction and overlap region rebuild through subblocks matching. For improving accuracy, ceiling points detecting and mismatching subblocks checking methods are incorporated. This matching method can process environment video effectively. In experiments, less than 5% frames are extracted as keyframes to build global map, which have large space distance and overlap each other. Through this method, robot can localize itself by matching its real-time vision frames with our keyframes map. Even with many similar objects/background in the environment or kidnapping robot, robot localization is achieved with position RMSE <0.5 m.

  18. Multiparametric flow cytometry profiling of neoplastic plasma cells in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bøgsted, Martin; Klausen, Tobias W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The clinical impact of multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) in multiple myeloma (MM) is still unclear and under evaluation. Further progress relies on multiparametric profiling of the neoplastic plasma cell (PC) compartment to provide an accurate image of the stage......, prognostic, and predictive information useful in clinical practice, which will be prospectively validated within the European Myeloma Network (EMN). © 2010 International Clinical Cytometry Society....

  19. Flow cytometry, fluorescent probes, and flashing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.

    2002-01-01


    Key words: fluorescent probes, flow cytometry, CSLM, viability, survival, microbial physiology, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis , Lactobacillus plantarum , cheese, milk,

  20. High-Content Imaging Reveals Expansion of the Endosomal Compartment during Coxiella burnetii Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Charles L; Heinzen, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human Q fever. Replication of the bacterium within a large parasitophorous vacuole (PV) resembling a host phagolysosome is required for pathogenesis. PV biogenesis is a pathogen driven process that requires engagement of several host cell vesicular trafficking pathways to acquire vacuole components. The goal of this study was to determine if infection by C. burnetii modulates endolysosomal flux to potentially benefit PV formation. HeLa cells, infected with C. burnetii or left uninfected, were incubated with fluorescent transferrin (Tf) for 0-30 min, and the amount of Tf internalized by cells quantitated by high-content imaging. At 3 and 5 days, but not 1 day post-infection, the maximal amounts of fluorescent Tf internalized by infected cells were significantly greater than uninfected cells. The rates of Tf uptake and recycling were the same for infected and uninfected cells; however, residual Tf persisted in EEA.1 positive compartments adjacent to large PV after 30 min of recycling in the absence of labeled Tf. On average, C. burnetii-infected cells contained significantly more CD63-positive endosomes than uninfected cells. In contrast, cells containing large vacuoles generated by Chlamydia trachomatis exhibited increased rates of Tf internalization without increased CD63 expression. Our results suggest that C. burnetii infection expands the endosomal system to increase capacity for endocytic material. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the power of high-content imaging for measurement of cellular responses to infection by intracellular pathogens.

  1. Implementation of Accurate and Fast DNA Cytometry by Confocal Microscopy in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennert S. Ploeger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA cytometry is a powerful method for measuring genomic instability. Standard approaches that measure DNA content of isolated cells may induce selection bias and do not allow interpretation of genomic instability in the context of the tissue. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM provides the opportunity to perform 3D DNA content measurements on intact cells in thick histological sections. Because the technique is technically challenging and time consuming, only a small number of usually manually selected nuclei were analyzed in different studies, not allowing wide clinical evaluation. The aim of this study was to describe the conditions for accurate and fast 3D CLSM cytometry with a minimum of user interaction to arrive at sufficient throughput for pilot clinical applications. Methods: Nuclear DNA was stained in 14 μm thick tissue sections of normal liver and adrenal stained with either YOYO-1 iodide or TO-PRO-3 iodide. Different pre-treatment strategies were evaluated: boiling in citrate buffer (pH 6.0 followed by RNase application for 1 or 18 hours, or hydrolysis. The image stacks obtained with CLSM at microscope magnifications of ×40 or ×100 were analyzed off-line using in-house developed software for semi-automated 3D fluorescence quantitation. To avoid sectioned nuclei, the top and bottom of the stacks were identified from ZX and YZ projections. As a measure of histogram quality, the coefficient of variation (CV of the diploid peak was assessed. Results: The lowest CV (10.3% was achieved with a protocol without boiling, with 1 hour RNase treatment and TO-PRO-3 iodide staining, and a final image recording at ×60 or ×100 magnifications. A sample size of 300 nuclei was generally achievable. By filtering the set of automatically segmented nuclei based on volume, size and shape, followed by interactive removal of the few remaining faulty objects, a single measurement was completely analyzed in approximately 3 hours

  2. A thematic content analysis of #cheatmeal images on social media: Characterizing an emerging dietary trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila, Eva; Mond, Jonathan M; Griffiths, Scott; Mitchison, Deborah; Murray, Stuart B

    2017-06-01

    Despite the pervasive social endorsement of "cheat meals" within pro-muscularity online communities, there is an absence of empirical work examining this dietary phenomenon. The present study aimed to characterize cheat meals, and explore the meaning ascribed to engagement in this practice. Thematic content analysis was employed to code the photographic and textual elements of a sample (n = 600) that was extracted from over 1.6 million images marked with the #cheatmeal tag on the social networking site, Instagram. Analysis of the volume and type of food revealed the presence of very large quantities (54.5%) of calorie-dense foods (71.3%) that was rated to qualify as an objective binge episode. Photographic content of people commonly portrayed highly-muscular bodies (60.7%) in the act of intentional body exposure (40.0%). Meanwhile, textual content exemplified the idealization of overconsumption, a strict commitment to fitness, and a reward-based framework around diet and fitness. Collectively, these findings position cheat meals as goal-oriented dietary practices in the pursuit of physique-ideals, thus underscoring the potential clinical repercussions of this socially-endorsed dietary phenomenon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (∼100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia.

  4. Time lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Robert, Tanguy; Hermans, Thomas; Garré, Sarah; Nguyen, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity (Δρ/ρ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Δρ/ρ can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Δρ/ρ or relative changes of water content Δθ/θ (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie's law exponent "m"). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity (ρ¬w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of Δθ/θ signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content (Δθ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event (Δθ= Δθ/θ* θ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes (Δθ=k*m√(ρw) ; where "m" is the Archie's law exponent

  5. Capture of Fluorescence Decay Times by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naivar, Mark A.; Jenkins, Patrick; Freyer, James P.

    2012-01-01

    In flow cytometry, the fluorescence decay time of an excitable species has been largely underutilized and is not likely found as a standard parameter on any imaging cytometer, sorting, or analyzing system. Most cytometers lack fluorescence lifetime hardware mainly owing to two central issues. Foremost, research and development with lifetime techniques has lacked proper exploitation of modern laser systems, data acquisition boards, and signal processing techniques. Secondly, a lack of enthusiasm for fluorescence lifetime applications in cells and with bead-based assays has persisted among the greater cytometry community. In this unit, we describe new approaches that address these issues and demonstrate the simplicity of digitally acquiring fluorescence relaxation rates in flow. The unit is divided into protocol and commentary sections in order to provide a most comprehensive discourse on acquiring the fluorescence lifetime with frequency-domain methods. The unit covers (i) standard fluorescence lifetime acquisition (protocol-based) with frequency-modulated laser excitation, (ii) digital frequency-domain cytometry analyses, and (iii) interfacing fluorescence lifetime measurements onto sorting systems. Within the unit is also a discussion on how digital methods are used for aliasing in order to harness higher frequency ranges. Also, a final discussion is provided on heterodyning and processing of waveforms for multi-exponential decay extraction. PMID:25419263

  6. Sociological Evaluation of Neighbour Countries’ Images as Perceived by Russian Students: Methodological and Content Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N P Narbut

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies the methodological peculiarities and the results of the Sociology laboratory (PFUR “measurement” of stable stereotypes in the mass youth consciousness regarding those neighbor countries which are the closest to our country in the geopolitical context. Understanding and recognizing the arbitrariness and schematic nature of the applied instruments and the resulting content constructions, the authors, nevertheless, believe that the suggested “measurement” model may become a perfect basis in developing and implementing projects on a larger scale in terms of the questionnaire volume and sample stratification structure, the projects being aimed at the study of social representations and image-country comparisons, including other socio-cultural contexts.

  7. PROTOTYPE CONTENT BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL UNTUK DETEKSI PEN YAKIT KULIT DENGAN METODE EDGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dokter spesialis kulit melakukan pemeriksa secara visual objek mata, capture objek dengan kamera digital dan menanyakan riwayat perjalanan penyakit pasien, tanpa melakukan perbandingan terhadap gejala dan tanda yang ada sebelummnya. Sehingga pemeriksaan dan perkiraan jenis penyakit kulit. Pengolahan data citra dalam bentuk digital khususnya citra medis sudah sangat dibutuhkan dengan pra-processing. Banyak pasien yang dilayani di rumah sakit masih menggunakan data citra analog. Data analog ini membutuhkan ruangan khusus untuk menyimpan guna menghindarkan kerusakan mekanis. Uraian mengatasi permasalahan ini, citra medis dibuat dalam bentuk digital dan disimpan dalam sistem database dan dapat melihat kesamaan citra kulit yang baru. Citra akan dapat ditampilkan dengan pra- processing dengan identifikasi kesamaan dengan Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR bekerja dengan cara mengukur kemiripan citra query dengan semua citra yang ada dalam database sehingga query cost berbanding lurus dengan jumlah citra dalam database.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of water content across the Nafion membrane in an operational PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Martin, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Haijiang; Promislow, Keith; Balcom, Bruce J

    2008-08-01

    Water management is critical to optimize the operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. At present, numerical models are employed to guide water management in such fuel cells. Accurate measurements of water content variation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are required to validate these models and to optimize fuel cell behavior. We report a direct water content measurement across the Nafion membrane in an operational polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, employing double half k-space spin echo single point imaging techniques. The MRI measurements with T2 mapping were undertaken with a parallel plate resonator to avoid the effects of RF screening. The parallel plate resonator employs the electrodes inherent to the fuel cell to create a resonant circuit at RF frequencies for MR excitation and detection, while still operating as a conventional fuel cell at DC. Three stages of fuel cell operation were investigated: activation, operation and dehydration. Each profile was acquired in 6 min, with 6 microm nominal resolution and a SNR of better than 15.

  9. High Content Image Based Analysis Identifies Cell Cycle Inhibitors as Regulators of Ebola Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Bavari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses modulate a number of host biological responses including the cell cycle to favor their replication. In this study, we developed a high-content imaging (HCI assay to measure DNA content and identify different phases of the cell cycle. We then investigated the potential effects of cell cycle arrest on Ebola virus (EBOV infection. Cells arrested in G1 phase by serum starvation or G1/S phase using aphidicolin or G2/M phase using nocodazole showed much reduced EBOV infection compared to the untreated control. Release of cells from serum starvation or aphidicolin block resulted in a time-dependent increase in the percentage of EBOV infected cells. The effect of EBOV infection on cell cycle progression was found to be cell-type dependent. Infection of asynchronous MCF-10A cells with EBOV resulted in a reduced number of cells in G2/M phase with concomitant increase of cells in G1 phase. However, these effects were not observed in HeLa or A549 cells. Together, our studies suggest that EBOV requires actively proliferating cells for efficient replication. Furthermore, multiplexing of HCI based assays to detect viral infection, cell cycle status and other phenotypic changes in a single cell population will provide useful information during screening campaigns using siRNA and small molecule therapeutics.

  10. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C.; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Tate, Edward W.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.

    2017-01-01

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set. PMID:28190060

  11. Human-Derived Neurons and Neural Progenitor Cells in High Content Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrill, Joshua A

    2018-01-01

    Due to advances in the fields of stem cell biology and cellular engineering, a variety of commercially available human-derived neurons and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are now available for use in research applications, including small molecule efficacy or toxicity screening. The use of human-derived neural cells is anticipated to address some of the uncertainties associated with the use of nonhuman culture models or transformed cell lines derived from human tissues. Many of the human-derived neurons and NPCs currently available from commercial sources recapitulate critical process of nervous system development including NPC proliferation, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and calcium signaling, each of which can be evaluated using high content image analysis (HCA). Human-derived neurons and NPCs are also amenable to culture in multiwell plate formats and thus may be adapted for use in HCA-based screening applications. This article reviews various types of HCA-based assays that have been used in conjunction with human-derived neurons and NPC cultures. This article also highlights instances where lower throughput analysis of neurodevelopmental processes has been performed and which demonstrate a potential for adaptation to higher-throughout imaging methods. Finally, a generic protocol for evaluating neurite outgrowth in human-derived neurons using a combination of immunocytochemistry and HCA is presented. The information provided in this article is intended to serve as a resource for cell model and assay selection for those interested in evaluating neurodevelopmental processes in human-derived cells.

  12. MetaSEEk: a content-based metasearch engine for images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Mandis; Benitez, Ana B.; Chang, Shih-Fu

    1997-12-01

    Search engines are the most powerful resources for finding information on the rapidly expanding World Wide Web (WWW). Finding the desired search engines and learning how to use them, however, can be very time consuming. The integration of such search tools enables the users to access information across the world in a transparent and efficient manner. These systems are called meta-search engines. The recent emergence of visual information retrieval (VIR) search engines on the web is leading to the same efficiency problem. This paper describes and evaluates MetaSEEk, a content-based meta-search engine used for finding images on the Web based on their visual information. MetaSEEk is designed to intelligently select and interface with multiple on-line image search engines by ranking their performance for different classes of user queries. User feedback is also integrated in the ranking refinement. We compare MetaSEEk with a base line version of meta-search engine, which does not use the past performance of the different search engines in recommending target search engines for future queries.

  13. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  14. Assessing the Content of YouTube Videos in Educating Patients Regarding Common Imaging Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Won, Eugene; Doshi, Ankur M

    2016-12-01

    To assess the content of currently available YouTube videos seeking to educate patients regarding commonly performed imaging examinations. After initial testing of possible search terms, the first two pages of YouTube search results for "CT scan," "MRI," "ultrasound patient," "PET scan," and "mammogram" were reviewed to identify educational patient videos created by health organizations. Sixty-three included videos were viewed and assessed for a range of features. Average views per video were highest for MRI (293,362) and mammography (151,664). Twenty-seven percent of videos used a nontraditional format (eg, animation, song, humor). All videos (100.0%) depicted a patient undergoing the examination, 84.1% a technologist, and 20.6% a radiologist; 69.8% mentioned examination lengths, 65.1% potential pain/discomfort, 41.3% potential radiation, 36.5% a radiology report/results, 27.0% the radiologist's role in interpretation, and 13.3% laboratory work. For CT, 68.8% mentioned intravenous contrast and 37.5% mentioned contrast safety. For MRI, 93.8% mentioned claustrophobia, 87.5% noise, 75.0% need to sit still, 68.8% metal safety, 50.0% intravenous contrast, and 0.0% contrast safety. For ultrasound, 85.7% mentioned use of gel. For PET, 92.3% mentioned radiotracer injection, 61.5% fasting, and 46.2% diabetic precautions. For mammography, unrobing, avoiding deodorant, and possible additional images were all mentioned by 63.6%; dense breasts were mentioned by 0.0%. Educational patient videos on YouTube regarding common imaging examinations received high public interest and may provide a valuable patient resource. Videos most consistently provided information detailing the examination experience and less consistently provided safety information or described the presence and role of the radiologist. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Brush Biopsy and DNA Cytometry for Prevention, Diagnosis, Therapy, and Followup Care of Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Böcking

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late diagnosis resulting in late treatment and locoregional failure after surgery are the main causes of death in patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs. Actually, exfoliative cytology is increasingly used for early detection of oral cancer and has been the subject of intense research over the last five years. Significant advances have been made both in relation to screening and evaluation of precursor lesions. As this noninvasive procedure is well tolerated by patients, more lesions may be screened and thus more oral cancers may be found in early, curable stages. Moreover, the additional use of DNA image cytometry is a reasonable tool for the assessment of the resection margins of SCC. DNA image cytometry could help to find the appropriate treatment option for the patients. Finally, diagnostic DNA image cytometry is an accurate method and has internationally been standardized. In conclusion, DNA image cytometry has increasing impact on the prevention, diagnostic, and therapeutical considerations in head and neck SCC.

  16. Determination of total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) content in pork meat using hyperspectral imaging technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Oh, Mirae; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) content is one of the important factors to measure the quality of meat. However, conventional chemical analysis methods for measuring TVB-N contents are time-consuming and labor-intensive, and are destructive procedures. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of fluorescence hyperspectral imaging techniques for determination of total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) in beef meat. High intensity LED lights at 365 nm and 405 nm were used as the excitation for acquiring fluorescence images. Prediction algorithms based on simple band-ratio, partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) have been developed. This study shows that fluorescence hyperspectral imaging system has a good potential for rapid measurement of TVB-N content in meat.

  17. Cloud-based application for rice moisture content measurement using image processing technique and perceptron neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Febus Reidj G.; Padilla, Dionis A.; Hortinela, Carlos C.; Bucog, Krissel C.; Sarto, Mildred C.; Sia, Nirlu Sebastian A.; Chung, Wen-Yaw

    2017-02-01

    This study is about the determination of moisture content of milled rice using image processing technique and perceptron neural network algorithm. The algorithm involves several inputs that produces an output which is the moisture content of the milled rice. Several types of milled rice are used in this study, namely: Jasmine, Kokuyu, 5-Star, Ifugao, Malagkit, and NFA rice. The captured images are processed using MATLAB R2013a software. There is a USB dongle connected to the router which provided internet connection for online web access. The GizDuino IOT-644 is used for handling the temperature and humidity sensor, and for sending and receiving of data from computer to the cloud storage. The result is compared to the actual moisture content range using a moisture tester for milled rice. Based on results, this study provided accurate data in determining the moisture content of the milled rice.

  18. Towards case-based medical learning in radiological decision making using content-based image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Rolf W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiologists' training is based on intensive practice and can be improved with the use of diagnostic training systems. However, existing systems typically require laboriously prepared training cases and lack integration into the clinical environment with a proper learning scenario. Consequently, diagnostic training systems advancing decision-making skills are not well established in radiological education. Methods We investigated didactic concepts and appraised methods appropriate to the radiology domain, as follows: (i Adult learning theories stress the importance of work-related practice gained in a team of problem-solvers; (ii Case-based reasoning (CBR parallels the human problem-solving process; (iii Content-based image retrieval (CBIR can be useful for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD. To overcome the known drawbacks of existing learning systems, we developed the concept of image-based case retrieval for radiological education (IBCR-RE. The IBCR-RE diagnostic training is embedded into a didactic framework based on the Seven Jump approach, which is well established in problem-based learning (PBL. In order to provide a learning environment that is as similar as possible to radiological practice, we have analysed the radiological workflow and environment. Results We mapped the IBCR-RE diagnostic training approach into the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA framework, resulting in the proposed concept of the IRMAdiag training application. IRMAdiag makes use of the modular structure of IRMA and comprises (i the IRMA core, i.e., the IRMA CBIR engine; and (ii the IRMAcon viewer. We propose embedding IRMAdiag into hospital information technology (IT infrastructure using the standard protocols Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM and Health Level Seven (HL7. Furthermore, we present a case description and a scheme of planned evaluations to comprehensively assess the system. Conclusions The IBCR-RE paradigm

  19. A Visual Analytics Approach Using the Exploration of Multidimensional Feature Spaces for Content-Based Medical Image Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashnil; Nette, Falk; Klein, Karsten; Fulham, Michael; Kim, Jinman

    2015-09-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is a search technique based on the similarity of visual features and has demonstrated potential benefits for medical diagnosis, education, and research. However, clinical adoption of CBIR is partially hindered by the difference between the computed image similarity and the user's search intent, the semantic gap, with the end result that relevant images with outlier features may not be retrieved. Furthermore, most CBIR algorithms do not provide intuitive explanations as to why the retrieved images were considered similar to the query (e.g., which subset of features were similar), hence, it is difficult for users to verify if relevant images, with a small subset of outlier features, were missed. Users, therefore, resort to examining irrelevant images and there are limited opportunities to discover these "missed" images. In this paper, we propose a new approach to medical CBIR by enabling a guided visual exploration of the search space through a tool, called visual analytics for medical image retrieval (VAMIR). The visual analytics approach facilitates interactive exploration of the entire dataset using the query image as a point-of-reference. We conducted a user study and several case studies to demonstrate the capabilities of VAMIR in the retrieval of computed tomography images and multimodality positron emission tomography and computed tomography images.

  20. Flow Cytometry Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Flow Cytometry Core (Flow Core) of the Cancer & Inflammation Program (CIP) is a service core which supports the research efforts of the CCR by providing expertise in the field of flow cytometry (fluorescence cell sorting) with the goal of gaining a more thorough understanding of the biology of cancer and cancer cells. The Flow Core provides service to 12-15 CIP laboratories and more than 22 non-CIP laboratories. Flow core staff provide technical advice on the experimental design of applications, which include immunological phenotyping, cell function assays, and cell cycle analysis. Work is performed per customer requirements, and no independent research is involved. The Flow Cytometry Technician will be responsible for: Monitor performance of and maintain high dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Operate high dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Monitoring lab supply levels and order lab supplies, perform various record keeping responsibilities Assist in the training of scientific end users on the use of flow cytometry in their research, as well as how to operate and troubleshoot the bench-top analyzer instruments Experience with sterile technique and tissue culture

  1. immunophenotyping of acute leukaemias by flow cytometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... cells. This is especially useful in detecting small numbers of leakaemic cell in the bone marrow, as a way of assessing the minimal residual disease after treatment of leukaemias. The major limitations of flow cytometry are the high costs of instruments and reagents, specialised skills and experience required ...

  2. Time-Lapse Monitoring of Soil Water Content Using Electromagnetic Conductivity Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafilis, J.; Huang, J.

    2016-12-01

    The volumetric soil water content (θ) is fundamental to agriculture because its spatio-temporal variation in soil affects plant growth. The universally accepted thermogravimetric method for estimating θ is labour intensive and time-consuming to use for field-scale monitoring. Electromagnetic (EM) induction has proven useful in mapping spatio-temporal variation of θ. However, depth-specific variation, which is important for irrigation management has been little explored. In this study we develop a relationship between θ and estimates of true electrical conductivity (σ) and use this to develop time-lapse images of θ beneath a center-pivot irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) field in San Jacinto, California, USA. We measure the bulk apparent electrical conductivity (ECa - mS/m) using a DUALEM-421 over a period of 12 days after an irrigation event (i.e., days 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12). We use EM4Soil to generate electromagnetic conductivity images (EMCI). Testing the scenario where no soil information is available, we used a 3-parameter exponential model to relate θ to σ and then to map θ along the transect on different days. The results allow us to monitor the spatio-temporal variations of θ over the 12-day period. In this regard we were able to map the soil close to field capacity (0.27 cm3/cm3) and approaching permanent wilting point (0.03 cm3/cm3). The time-lapse θ monitoring approach, has implications for soil and water-use and management and allows farmers to identify inefficiencies in water application rates and use. It can also be used as a research tool to potentially assist precision irrigation practices and to test the efficacy of different methods of irrigation in terms of water delivery and efficiency in water use in near real-time.

  3. Measurement of lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via flow cytometry and liquid-state ¹H NMR spectroscopy for development of an NMR-traceable flow cytometry protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Bono

    Full Text Available In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols.

  4. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  5. Measurement of lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via flow cytometry and liquid-state ¹H NMR spectroscopy for development of an NMR-traceable flow cytometry protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Michael S; Garcia, Ravi D; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V; Ahner, Beth A; Kirby, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols.

  6. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  7. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-12-14

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology.

  8. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  9. Effects of Issue-Image Strategies, Attack and Support Appeals, Music, and Visual Content in Political Commercials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Esther; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzed four characteristics of political commercials to determine their impact on television viewers' reactions: (1) issue versus image strategies; (2) attack versus support appeals; (3) presence and absence of music; and (4) visual content, either with families or in professional campaign settings. Memory measures and attitudes are…

  10. Brix, pH and anthocyanin content determination in whole Port wine grape berries by hyperspectral imaging and neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Armando M.; Franco, Camilo; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of measuring pH, sugars, and anthocyanin content of whole grape berries. The spectrum of each sample, composed of six whole grape berries, was collected using hyperspectral imaging in reflectance mode from 380 to 1028 nm. The spectra were converted to enological par...

  11. Developing a NIR multispectral imaging for prediction and visualization of peanut protein content using variable selection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun-Hu; Jin, Huali; Liu, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a multispectral imaging method using important wavelengths from hyperspectral images selected by genetic algorithm (GA), successive projection algorithm (SPA) and regression coefficient (RC) methods for modeling and predicting protein content in peanut kernel was investigated for the first time. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) calibration model was established between the spectral data from the selected optimal wavelengths and the reference measured protein content ranged from 23.46% to 28.43%. The RC-PLSR model established using eight key wavelengths (1153, 1567, 1972, 2143, 2288, 2339, 2389 and 2446 nm) showed the best predictive results with the coefficient of determination of prediction (R2P) of 0.901, and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.108 and residual predictive deviation (RPD) of 2.32. Based on the obtained best model and image processing algorithms, the distribution maps of protein content were generated. The overall results of this study indicated that developing a rapid and online multispectral imaging system using the feature wavelengths and PLSR analysis is potential and feasible for determination of the protein content in peanut kernels.

  12. Adaptive image content-based exposure control for scanning applications in radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulerud, H.; Thielemann, J.; Kirkhus, T.; Kaspersen, K.; Østby, J.M.; Metaxas, M.G.; Royle, G.J.; Griffiths, J.; Cook, E.; Esbrand, C.; Pani, S.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Li, G.; Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Speller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    I-ImaS (Intelligent Imaging Sensors) is a European project which has designed and developed a new adaptive X-ray imaging system using on-line exposure control, to create locally optimized images. The I-ImaS system allows for real-time image analysis during acquisition, thus enabling real-time

  13. Political leaders and the media. Can we measure political leadership images in newspapers using computer-assisted content analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaldering, Loes; Vliegenthart, Rens

    Despite the large amount of research into both media coverage of politics as well as political leadership, surprisingly little research has been devoted to the ways political leaders are discussed in the media. This paper studies whether computer-aided content analysis can be applied in examining political leadership images in Dutch newspaper articles. It, firstly, provides a conceptualization of political leader character traits that integrates different perspectives in the literature. Moreover, this paper measures twelve political leadership images in media coverage, based on a large-scale computer-assisted content analysis of Dutch media coverage (including almost 150.000 newspaper articles), and systematically tests the quality of the employed measurement instrument by assessing the relationship between the images, the variance in the measurement, the over-time development of images for two party leaders and by comparing the computer results with manual coding. We conclude that the computerized content analysis provides a valid measurement for the leadership images in Dutch newspapers. Moreover, we find that the dimensions political craftsmanship, vigorousness, integrity, communicative performances and consistency are regularly applied in discussing party leaders, but that portrayal of party leaders in terms of responsiveness is almost completely absent in Dutch newspapers.

  14. Flow Cytometry Techniques in Radiation Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    FORCES RAOIOSIOLOGY Toxicology Letters, 43 (1988) 219-233 RESEARCH IMSTITUTE 219Elsevier SCIENTIFIC REPORTSR88-42 TXL 02046 Flow cytometry techniques ...in radiation biology Kenneth F. McCarthy and Martha L. Hale Radiation Biochemistry Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda...marrow hematopoietic cells [2,31. In the past, ef- forts to isolate the HSC used physical techniques such as density gradient centrifugation in isotonic

  15. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  16. Detection of platelet vesicles by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P; Jones, Jennifer C

    2017-05-01

    The composition and function of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in health and in disease are a major topic of investigation in biomedical research. However, efforts to delineate specific molecular repertoires and roles for different types of EVs in the circulation are limited not only by the lack of flow cytometers capable of analyzing submicron- and nano-materials across the full size spectrum of plasma EVs, but also by the lack of standardized methods and reference materials that would permit inter-laboratory reproducibility for these analyses. In this review, we summarize the flow cytometry of EVs, with a focus on platelet vesicles in plasma. In addition to delineating the basic principles that govern what precautions must be considered when using flow cytometry for the analysis of platelet vesicles, we provide an overview for how to standardize, control, annotate, and report EV flow cytometry data reproducibly, while looking forward to a next generation of high sensitivity instruments for the analysis of EVs and other submicron biomaterials in the circulation.

  17. Highly multiparametric analysis by mass cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A; Tanner, Scott

    2010-09-30

    This review paper describes a new technology, mass cytometry, that addresses applications typically run by flow cytometer analyzers, but extends the capability to highly multiparametric analysis. The detection technology is based on atomic mass spectrometry. It offers quantitation, specificity and dynamic range of mass spectrometry in a format that is familiar to flow cytometry practitioners. The mass cytometer does not require compensation, allowing the application of statistical techniques; this has been impossible given the constraints of fluorescence noise with traditional cytometry instruments. Instead of "colors" the mass cytometer "reads" the stable isotope tags attached to antibodies using metal-chelating labeling reagents. Because there are many available stable isotopes, and the mass spectrometer provides exquisite resolution between detection channels, many parameters can be measured as easily as one. For example, in a single tube the technique allows for the ready detection and characterization of the major cell subsets in blood or bone marrow. Here we describe mass cytometric immunophenotyping of human leukemia cell lines and leukemia patient samples, differential cell analysis of normal peripheral and umbilical cord blood; intracellular protein identification and metal-encoded bead arrays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Multinode acoustic focusing for parallel flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyasena, Menake E.; Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson P. Austin; Applegate, Robert W.; Goumas, Andrew M.; Woods, Travis A.; López, Gabriel P.; Graves, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry can simultaneously measure and analyze multiple properties of single cells or particles with high sensitivity and precision. Yet, conventional flow cytometers have fundamental limitations with regards to analyzing particles larger than about 70 microns, analyzing at flow rates greater than a few hundred microliters per minute, and providing analysis rates greater than 50,000 per second. To overcome these limits, we have developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles (as small as a red blood cell and as large as 107 microns in diameter) into as many as 37 parallel flow streams. We demonstrate the potential of such flow cells for the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers by precision focusing of flow cytometry alignment microspheres, red blood cells, and the analysis of CD4+ cellular immunophenotyping assay. This approach will have significant impact towards the creation of high throughput flow cytometers for rare cell detection applications (e.g. circulating tumor cells), applications requiring large particle analysis, and high volume flow cytometry. PMID:22239072

  19. Confocal Microscopy and Flow Cytometry System Performance: Assessment of QA Parameters that affect data Quanitification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flow and image cytometers can provide useful quantitative fluorescence data. We have devised QA tests to be used on both a flow cytometer and a confocal microscope to assure that the data is accurate, reproducible and precise. Flow Cytometry: We have provided two simple perform...

  20. Content-Based High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Retrieval via Unsupervised Feature Learning and Collaborative Affinity Metric Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansheng Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the urgent demand for automatic management of large numbers of high-resolution remote sensing images, content-based high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval (CB-HRRS-IR has attracted much research interest. Accordingly, this paper proposes a novel high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval approach via multiple feature representation and collaborative affinity metric fusion (IRMFRCAMF. In IRMFRCAMF, we design four unsupervised convolutional neural networks with different layers to generate four types of unsupervised features from the fine level to the coarse level. In addition to these four types of unsupervised features, we also implement four traditional feature descriptors, including local binary pattern (LBP, gray level co-occurrence (GLCM, maximal response 8 (MR8, and scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT. In order to fully incorporate the complementary information among multiple features of one image and the mutual information across auxiliary images in the image dataset, this paper advocates collaborative affinity metric fusion to measure the similarity between images. The performance evaluation of high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval is implemented on two public datasets, the UC Merced (UCM dataset and the Wuhan University (WH dataset. Large numbers of experiments show that our proposed IRMFRCAMF can significantly outperform the state-of-the-art approaches.

  1. Fruit-related terms and images on food packages and advertisements affect children's perceptions of foods' fruit content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Rebecca; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Berhaupt-Glickstein, Amanda; Quick, Virginia; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether food label information and advertisements for foods containing no fruit cause children to have a false impression of the foods' fruit content. In the food label condition, a trained researcher showed each child sixteen different food label photographs depicting front-of-food label packages that varied with regard to fruit content (i.e. real fruit v. sham fruit) and label elements. In the food advertisement condition, children viewed sixteen, 30 s television food advertisements with similar fruit content and label elements as in the food label condition. After viewing each food label and advertisement, children responded to the question 'Did they use fruit to make this?' with responses of yes, no or don't know. Schools, day-care centres, after-school programmes and other community groups. Children aged 4-7 years. In the food label condition, χ 2 analysis of within fruit content variation differences indicated children (n 58; mean age 4·2 years) were significantly more accurate in identifying real fruit foods as the label's informational load increased and were least accurate when neither a fruit name nor an image was on the label. Children (n 49; mean age 5·4 years) in the food advertisement condition were more likely to identify real fruit foods when advertisements had fruit images compared with when no image was included, while fruit images in advertisements for sham fruit foods significantly reduced accuracy of responses. Findings suggest that labels and advertisements for sham fruit foods mislead children with regard to the food's real fruit content.

  2. Latent Semantic Analysis as a Method of Content-Based Image Retrieval in Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovoz, Gennadiy

    2010-01-01

    The research investigated whether a Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA)-based approach to image retrieval can map pixel intensity into a smaller concept space with good accuracy and reasonable computational cost. From a large set of M computed tomography (CT) images, a retrieval query found all images for a particular patient based on semantic…

  3. Analysis of image content recognition algorithm based on sparse coding and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an image classification algorithm based on spatial sparse coding model and random forest. Firstly, SIFT feature extraction of the image; and then use the sparse encoding theory to generate visual vocabulary based on SIFT features, and using the visual vocabulary of SIFT features into a sparse vector; through the combination of regional integration and spatial sparse vector, the sparse vector gets a fixed dimension is used to represent the image; at last random forest classifier for image sparse vectors for training and testing, using the experimental data set for standard test Caltech-101 and Scene-15. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively represent the features of the image and improve the classification accuracy. In this paper, we propose an innovative image recognition algorithm based on image segmentation, sparse coding and multi instance learning. This algorithm introduces the concept of multi instance learning, the image as a multi instance bag, sparse feature transformation by SIFT images as instances, sparse encoding model generation visual vocabulary as the feature space is mapped to the feature space through the statistics on the number of instances in bags, and then use the 1-norm SVM to classify images and generate sample weights to select important image features.

  4. International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Lora W; Black, Michele; Cochran, Matthew; Daniel, Benjamin J; Davies, Derek; DeLay, Monica; Gardner, Rui; Gregory, Michael; Kunkel, Desiree; Lannigan, Joanne; Marvin, James; Salomon, Robert; Torres, Carina; Walker, Rachael

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to define minimal standards for a flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) and provide guidance for best practices in several important areas. This effort is driven by the desire of International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) members in SRLs to define and maintain standards of excellence in flow cytometry, and act as a repository for key elements of this information (e.g. example SOPs/training material, etc.). These best practices are not intended to define specifically how to implement these recommendations, but rather to establish minimal goals for an SRL to address in order to achieve excellence. It is hoped that once these best practices are established and implemented they will serve as a template from which similar practices can be defined for other types of SRLs. Identification of the need for best practices first occurred through discussions at the CYTO 2013 SRL Forum, with the most important areas for which best practices should be defined identified through several surveys and SRL track workshops as part of CYTO 2014. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Low gray scale values of computerized images of carotid plaques associated with increased levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and with increased plaque lipid content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise M.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Weibe, Britt M.

    1997-01-01

    Relatioin between low gray scale values in computerized images of carotid plaques and 1) plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and 2) plaque lipid content......Relatioin between low gray scale values in computerized images of carotid plaques and 1) plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and 2) plaque lipid content...

  6. New approach using Bayesian Network to improve content based image classification systems

    OpenAIRE

    jayech, Khlifia; mahjoub, mohamed ali

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach based on augmented naive Bayes for image classification. Initially, each image is cutting in a whole of blocks. For each block, we compute a vector of descriptors. Then, we propose to carry out a classification of the vectors of descriptors to build a vector of labels for each image. Finally, we propose three variants of Bayesian Networks such as Naive Bayesian Network (NB), Tree Augmented Naive Bayes (TAN) and Forest Augmented Naive Bayes (FAN) to classify ...

  7. Political leaders and the media. Can we measure political leadership images in newspapers using computer-assisted content analysis?

    OpenAIRE

    Aaldering, Loes; Vliegenthart, Rens

    2015-01-01

    Despite the large amount of research into both media coverage of politics as well as political leadership, surprisingly little research has been devoted to the ways political leaders are discussed in the media. This paper studies whether computer-aided content analysis can be applied in examining political leadership images in Dutch newspaper articles. It, firstly, provides a conceptualization of political leader character traits that integrates different perspectives in the literature. Moreo...

  8. [Research on predicting modeling for chlorophyll contents of greenhouse tomato leaves based on multi-spectral imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-jie; Sun, Ming

    2011-03-01

    Traditional spectrum analysis technology has low accuracy for forecasting chlorophyll content of plants. Research based on 3CCD camera has the limitations of high cost and the number of sensitive wavelengths not adjustable. The present paper develops a new approach to forecasting the chlorophyll content of tomato leaves by the image gray value of the selected sensitive wavelengths (532, 610 and 700 nm). Three common methods such as multi-linear regression, principal component analysis and partial least square regression were employed in forecast modeling, the good results were obtained, and both Rc2 and Rv2 reached about 0.9. The method has proven effective and feasible for prediction of chlorophyll contents of tomato leaves, which also lays the foundation for the development of testing instruments for the growing of crops.

  9. Nonlinear Fusion of Multispectral Citrus Fruit Image Data with Information Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peilin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main issue of vison-based automatic harvesting manipulators is the difficulty in the correct fruit identification in the images under natural lighting conditions. Mostly, the solution has been based on a linear combination of color components in the multispectral images. However, the results have not reached a satisfactory level. To overcome this issue, this paper proposes a robust nonlinear fusion method to augment the original color image with the synchronized near infrared image. The two images are fused with Daubechies wavelet transform (DWT in a multiscale decomposition approach. With DWT, the background noises are reduced and the necessary image features are enhanced by fusing the color contrast of the color components and the homogeneity of the near infrared (NIR component. The resulting fused color image is classified with a C-means algorithm for reconstruction. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated with the statistical F measure in comparison to some existing methods using linear combinations of color components. The results show that the fusion of information in different spectral components has the advantage of enhancing the image quality, therefore improving the classification accuracy in citrus fruit identification in natural lighting conditions.

  10. Socializing Young Readers: A Content Analysis of Body Size Images in Caldecott Medal Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedwick, Linda; Latham, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have examined gender issues in children's literature, but a review of the literature reveals that few studies have examined the instances of fatness in the images. Studying the fat representation in the images of children's literature is important because exposure to a variety of body types may slow the rate of children's body…

  11. Determination of fat and total protein content in milk using conventional digital imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey; Melenteva, Anastasiia; Bogomolov, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of conventional digital imaging to quantitative determination of fat and total protein in cow’s milk, based on the phenomenon of light scatter, has been proved. A new algorithm for extracting features from digital images of milk samples has been developed. The algorithm takes...

  12. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Willner

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science.

  13. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science.

  14. Content-Based Image Retrieval Method using the Relative Location of Multiple ROIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE, J.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently the method of specifying multiple regions of interest (ROI based image retrieval has been suggested. However it measures the similarity of the images without proper consideration of the spatial layouts of the ROIs and thus fails to accurately reflect the intent of the user. In this paper, we propose a new similarity measurement using the relative layouts of the ROIs. The proposed method divides images into blocks of certain size and extracted MPEG-7 dominant colors from the blocks overlapping with the user-designated ROIs to measure their similarities with the target images. At this point, similarity was weighted when the relative location of the ROIs in the query image and the target image was the same. The relative location was calculated by four directions (i.e. up, down, left and right of the basis ROI. The proposed method by an experiment using MPEG-7 XM shows that its performance is higher than the global image retrieval method or the retrieval method that does not consider the relative location of ROIs.

  15. Application of flow cytometry to wine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longin, Cédric; Petitgonnet, Clément; Guilloux-Benatier, Michèle; Rousseaux, Sandrine; Alexandre, Hervé

    2017-04-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a powerful technique allowing detection and enumeration of microbial populations in food and during food process. Thanks to the fluorescent dyes used and specific probes, FCM provides information about cell physiological state and allows enumeration of a microorganism in a mixed culture. Thus, this technique is increasingly used to quantify pathogen, spoilage microorganisms and microorganisms of interest. Since one decade, FCM applications to the wine field increase greatly to determine population and physiological state of microorganisms performing alcoholic and malolactic fermentations. Wine spoilage microorganisms were also studied. In this review we briefly describe FCM principles. Next, a deep revision concerning enumeration of wine microorganisms by FCM is presented including the fluorescent dyes used and techniques allowing a yeast and bacteria species specific enumeration. Then, the last chapter is dedicated to fluorescent dyes which are used to date in fluorescent microscopy but applicable in FCM. This chapter also describes other interesting "future" techniques which could be applied to study the wine microorganisms. Thus, this review seeks to highlight the main advantages of the flow cytometry applied to wine microbiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Feature Extraction Technique Using Binarization of Bit Planes for Content Based Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Thepade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of techniques have been proposed earlier for feature extraction using image binarization. Efficiency of the techniques was dependent on proper threshold selection for the binarization method. In this paper, a new feature extraction technique using image binarization has been proposed. The technique has binarized the significant bit planes of an image by selecting local thresholds. The proposed algorithm has been tested on a public dataset and has been compared with existing widely used techniques using binarization for extraction of features. It has been inferred that the proposed method has outclassed all the existing techniques and has shown consistent classification performance.

  17. High signal intensity of intervertebral calcified disks on T1-weighted MR images resulting from fat content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Berg, Bruno C. Vande; Duprez, Thierry; Cosnard, Guy; Maldague, Baudouin E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Francois, Robert [Belgian Military Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-02-01

    To explain a cause of high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images in calcified intervertebral disks associated with spinal fusion. Magnetic resonance and radiological examinations of 13 patients were reviewed, presenting one or several intervertebral disks showing a high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images, associated both with the presence of calcifications in the disks and with peripheral fusion of the corresponding spinal segments. Fusion was due to ligament ossifications (n=8), ankylosing spondylitis (n=4), or posterior arthrodesis (n=1). Imaging files included X-rays and T1-weighted MR images in all cases, T2-weighted MR images in 12 cases, MR images with fat signal suppression in 7 cases, and a CT scan in 1 case. Histological study of a calcified disk from an anatomical specimen of an ankylosed lumbar spine resulting from ankylosing spondylitis was examined. The signal intensity of the disks was similar to that of the bone marrow or of perivertebral fat both on T1-weighted MR images and on all sequences, including those with fat signal suppression. In one of these disks, a strongly negative absorption coefficient was focally measured by CT scan, suggesting a fatty content. The histological examination of the ankylosed calcified disk revealed the presence of well-differentiated bone tissue and fatty marrow within the disk. The high signal intensity of some calcified intervertebral disks on T1-weighted MR images can result from the presence of fatty marrow, probably related to a disk ossification process in ankylosed spines. (orig.)

  18. High content live cell imaging for the discovery of new antimalarial marine natural products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cervantes, Serena; Stout, Paige E; Prudhomme, Jacques; Engel, Sebastian; Bruton, Matthew; Cervantes, Michael; Carter, David; Tae-Chang, Young; Hay, Mark E; Aalbersberg, William; Kubanek, Julia; Le Roch, Karine G

    2012-01-01

    .... Here we used our newly developed live cell-imaging platform to discover novel marine natural products and their cellular phenotypic effects against the most lethal malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum...

  19. Cluster signal-to-noise analysis for evaluation of the information content in an image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawanich, Warangkana; Shimizu, Mayumi; Takeshita, Yohei; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshida, Shoko; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2018-01-01

    (1) To develop an observer-free method of analysing image quality related to the observer performance in the detection task and (2) to analyse observer behaviour patterns in the detection of small mass changes in cone-beam CT images. 13 observers detected holes in a Teflon phantom in cone-beam CT images. Using the same images, we developed a new method, cluster signal-to-noise analysis, to detect the holes by applying various cut-off values using ImageJ and reconstructing cluster signal-to-noise curves. We then evaluated the correlation between cluster signal-to-noise analysis and the observer performance test. We measured the background noise in each image to evaluate the relationship with false positive rates (FPRs) of the observers. Correlations between mean FPRs and intra- and interobserver variations were also evaluated. Moreover, we calculated true positive rates (TPRs) and accuracies from background noise and evaluated their correlations with TPRs from observers. Cluster signal-to-noise curves were derived in cluster signal-to-noise analysis. They yield the detection of signals (true holes) related to noise (false holes). This method correlated highly with the observer performance test (R2 = 0.9296). In noisy images, increasing background noise resulted in higher FPRs and larger intra- and interobserver variations. TPRs and accuracies calculated from background noise had high correlation with actual TPRs from observers; R2 was 0.9244 and 0.9338, respectively. Cluster signal-to-noise analysis can simulate the detection performance of observers and thus replace the observer performance test in the evaluation of image quality. Erroneous decision-making increased with increasing background noise.

  20. Improving uptake and engagement with child body image interventions delivered to mothers: Understanding mother and daughter preferences for intervention content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Kirsty M; Diedrichs, Phillippa C

    2016-12-01

    Mothers are a key influence on adolescent girls' body image. This study aimed to improve understanding of mothers' and daughters' preferences for content in body image interventions designed to assist mothers to promote positive body image among their daughters. British mother-daughter dyads (N=190) viewed descriptions of five evidence-based influences on body image (family, friends, and relationships; appearance-based teasing; media and celebrities; appearance conversations; body acceptance and care). Mothers and daughters each selected the two most important influences to learn about in these interventions. Overall, both mothers and daughters most frequently opted for family, friends, and relationships and body acceptance and care, whereas media and celebrities was their least preferred topic. While the overall sample of mothers and daughters agreed on preferences, Fisher's exact tests showed that within-dyad agreement was low. Recommendations for improving parent and child engagement with, and effectiveness of, child body image interventions delivered to parents are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hybrid DWT-DCT-Hash function based digital image watermarking for copyright protection and content authentication of DubaiSat-2 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansoori, Saeed; Kunhu, Alavi

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a new technique for copyright protection and content authentication of satellite images. The novelty in the presented approach consists in designing a hybrid Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and hash function based digital image watermarking. In this study, two watermarks are embedded in the cover image called robust copyright watermark and fragile authentication watermark. The robust watermark is embedded in hybrid frequency and wavelet domain by applying DWT and DCT respectively. Such two steps embedding allows the proposed approach to provide better imperceptibility in harmony with the human visual system and offers higher robustness against signal processing attacks. Subsequently, the fragile watermark is embedded in a spatial domain using the hash function approach. The proposed hybrid watermarking technique has been tested on DubaiSat-2 images with 1 meter resolution. The experimental results show that the proposed method is robust against JPEG compression, rotation and resizing attacks. In addition, the multi-watermarked image has a good transparency and the fragile watermark is sensitive to any tampering.

  2. Towards semantic-driven high-content image analysis: an operational instantiation for mitosis detection in digital histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racoceanu, D; Capron, F

    2015-06-01

    This study concerns a novel symbolic cognitive vision framework emerged from the Cognitive Microscopy (MICO(1)) initiative. MICO aims at supporting the evolution towards digital pathology, by studying cognitive clinical-compliant protocols involving routine virtual microscopy. We instantiate this paradigm in the case of mitotic count as a component of breast cancer grading in histopathology. The key concept of our approach is the role of the semantics as driver of the whole slide image analysis protocol. All the decisions being taken into a semantic and formal world, MICO represents a knowledge-driven platform for digital histopathology. Therefore, the core of this initiative is the knowledge representation and the reasoning. Pathologists' knowledge and strategies are used to efficiently guide image analysis algorithms. In this sense, hard-coded knowledge, semantic and usability gaps are to be reduced by a leading, active role of reasoning and of semantic approaches. Integrating ontologies and reasoning in confluence with modular imaging algorithms, allows the emergence of new clinical-compliant protocols for digital pathology. This represents a promising way to solve decision reproducibility and traceability issues in digital histopathology, while increasing the flexibility of the platform and pathologists' acceptance, the one always having the legal responsibility in the diagnosis process. The proposed protocols open the way to increasingly reliable cancer assessment (i.e. multiple slides per sample analysis), quantifiable and traceable second opinion for cancer grading, and modern capabilities for cancer research support in histopathology (i.e. content and context-based indexing and retrieval). Last, but not least, the generic approach introduced here is applicable for number of additional challenges, related to molecular imaging and, in general, to high-content image exploration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fat is fashionable and fit: A comparative content analysis of Fatspiration and Health at Every Size®Instagram images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer B; Vinoski, Erin R; Bonar, Adrienne S; Davies, Alexandria E; Etzel, Lena

    2017-09-01

    In step with the proliferation of Thinspiration and Fitspiration content disseminated in popular web-based media, the fat acceptance movement has garnered heightened visibility within mainstream culture via the burgeoning Fatosphere weblog community. The present study extended previous Fatosphere research by comparing the shared and distinct strategies used to represent and motivate a fat-accepting lifestyle among 400 images sourced from Fatspiration- and Health at Every Size ® -themed hashtags on Instagram. Images were systematically analyzed for the socio-demographic and body size attributes of the individuals portrayed alongside content reflecting dimensions of general fat acceptance, physical appearance pride, physical activity and health, fat shaming, and eating and weight loss-related themes. #fatspiration/#fatspo-tagged images more frequently promoted fat acceptance through fashion and beauty-related activism; #healthateverysize/#haes posts more often featured physically-active portrayals, holistic well-being, and weight stigma. Findings provide insight into the common and unique motivational factors and contradictory messages encountered in these fat-accepting social media communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced Cell Classifier: User-Friendly Machine-Learning-Based Software for Discovering Phenotypes in High-Content Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Filippo; Balassa, Tamas; Szkalisity, Abel; Molnar, Csaba; Paavolainen, Lassi; Kujala, Kaisa; Buzas, Krisztina; Sarazova, Marie; Pietiainen, Vilja; Kutay, Ulrike; Smith, Kevin; Horvath, Peter

    2017-06-28

    High-content, imaging-based screens now routinely generate data on a scale that precludes manual verification and interrogation. Software applying machine learning has become an essential tool to automate analysis, but these methods require annotated examples to learn from. Efficiently exploring large datasets to find relevant examples remains a challenging bottleneck. Here, we present Advanced Cell Classifier (ACC), a graphical software package for phenotypic analysis that addresses these difficulties. ACC applies machine-learning and image-analysis methods to high-content data generated by large-scale, cell-based experiments. It features methods to mine microscopic image data, discover new phenotypes, and improve recognition performance. We demonstrate that these features substantially expedite the training process, successfully uncover rare phenotypes, and improve the accuracy of the analysis. ACC is extensively documented, designed to be user-friendly for researchers without machine-learning expertise, and distributed as a free open-source tool at www.cellclassifier.org. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Time-lapse monitoring of soil water content using electromagnetic conductivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The volumetric soil water content (VWC) is fundamental to agriculture. Unfortunately, the universally accepted thermogravimetric method is labour intensive and time-consuming to use for field-scale monitoring. Electromagnetic (EM) induction instruments have proven to be useful in mapping the spatio-...

  6. Complex event processing for content-based text, image, and video retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowman, E.K.; Broome, B.D.; Holland, V.M.; Summers-Stay, D.; Rao, R.M.; Duselis, J.; Howe, J.; Madahar, B.K.; Boury-Brisset, A.C.; Forrester, B.; Kwantes, P.; Burghouts, G.; Huis, J. van; Mulayim, A.Y.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of an exploratory team of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Information Systems Technology panel into Content-Based Analytics (CBA). The team carried out a technical review into the current status of theoretical and practical developments of methods,

  7. Freezing of gait in early Parkinson's disease: Nigral iron content estimated from magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieler, Marguerite; Gee, Myrlene; Camicioli, Richard; Martin, W R Wayne

    2016-02-15

    Freezing of gait is a major source of disability associated with the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our objective was to determine whether evolving changes in nigral iron content in association with declining motor function in early PD differentiates subjects who develop freezing from those who do not. A cohort of previously untreated individuals with early PD (n=19) was followed for 36 months clinically and with MRI. The cohort was divided into two groups based on the development of freezing during follow-up. A multiple gradient echo MRI sequence provided an index of basal ganglia iron content. There were significant baseline differences between those who developed freezing (n=7) and those who did not (n=12) in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores, time to complete a 14 m walk and timed up and go. There was a significant correlation between the measured change in transverse relaxation in the lateral substantia nigra pars compacta and the change in motor score from baseline to 36 months (p=0.002). The freezing group showed a greater change in motor score and iron content than did the non-freezing group. Individuals destined to develop freezing early in PD have more motor impairment at baseline, more rapid deterioration in motor function, and pars compacta changes suggestive of increased iron content in comparison to those who do not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The contributions of image content and behavioral relevancy to overt attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Onat

    Full Text Available During free-viewing of natural scenes, eye movements are guided by bottom-up factors inherent to the stimulus, as well as top-down factors inherent to the observer. The question of how these two different sources of information interact and contribute to fixation behavior has recently received a lot of attention. Here, a battery of 15 visual stimulus features was used to quantify the contribution of stimulus properties during free-viewing of 4 different categories of images (Natural, Urban, Fractal and Pink Noise. Behaviorally relevant information was estimated in the form of topographical interestingness maps by asking an independent set of subjects to click at image regions that they subjectively found most interesting. Using a Bayesian scheme, we computed saliency functions that described the probability of a given feature to be fixated. In the case of stimulus features, the precise shape of the saliency functions was strongly dependent upon image category and overall the saliency associated with these features was generally weak. When testing multiple features jointly, a linear additive integration model of individual saliencies performed satisfactorily. We found that the saliency associated with interesting locations was much higher than any low-level image feature and any pair-wise combination thereof. Furthermore, the low-level image features were found to be maximally salient at those locations that had already high interestingness ratings. Temporal analysis showed that regions with high interestingness ratings were fixated as early as the third fixation following stimulus onset. Paralleling these findings, fixation durations were found to be dependent mainly on interestingness ratings and to a lesser extent on the low-level image features. Our results suggest that both low- and high-level sources of information play a significant role during exploration of complex scenes with behaviorally relevant information being more effective

  9. The eschatological content of the images of Kalki and Buddha Maitreya: the comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Ivanova

    2017-12-01

    Proceeding from the earlier origin of the myth about Maitreya, it should be noted that the image of Kalki in the literature of the Puranas was formed by the influence of the inclusivist strategies of the Vishnu tradition.Despite the unity of mythological functions and active interaction, the images of Kalki and Maitreya are contrasted in relation to each other, since they show two different scenarios of cyclic eschatology : the Kalki court and his cruel retribution, and the preaching of Maitreya, that bring salvation for all beings.

  10. An automated analysis of highly complex flow cytometry-based proteomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuchlý, Jan; Kanderová, Veronika; Fišer, Karel; Cerná, Daniela; Holm, Anders; Wu, Weiwei; Hrušák, Ondřej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Kalina, Tomáš

    2012-02-01

    The combination of color-coded microspheres as carriers and flow cytometry as a detection platform provides new opportunities for multiplexed measurement of biomolecules. Here, we developed a software tool capable of automated gating of color-coded microspheres, automatic extraction of statistics from all subsets and validation, normalization, and cross-sample analysis. The approach presented in this article enabled us to harness the power of high-content cellular proteomics. In size exclusion chromatography-resolved microsphere-based affinity proteomics (Size-MAP), antibody-coupled microspheres are used to measure biotinylated proteins that have been separated by size exclusion chromatography. The captured proteins are labeled with streptavidin phycoerythrin and detected by multicolor flow cytometry. When the results from multiple size exclusion chromatography fractions are combined, binding is detected as discrete reactivity peaks (entities). The information obtained might be approximated to a multiplexed western blot. We used a microsphere set with >1,000 subsets, presenting an approach to extract biologically relevant information. The R-project environment was used to sequentially recognize subsets in two-dimensional space and gate them. The aim was to extract the median streptavidin phycoerythrin fluorescence intensity for all 1,000+ microsphere subsets from a series of 96 measured samples. The resulting text files were subjected to algorithms that identified entities across the 24 fractions. Thus, the original 24 data points for each antibody were compressed to 1-4 integrated values representing the areas of individual antibody reactivity peaks. Finally, we provide experimental data on cellular protein changes induced by treatment of leukemia cells with imatinib mesylate. The approach presented here exemplifies how large-scale flow cytometry data analysis can be efficiently processed to employ flow cytometry as a high-content proteomics method. Copyright

  11. The stellar content of the halo of NGC 5907 from deep Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zepf, SE; Liu, MC; Marleau, FR; Sackett, PD; Graham, [No Value

    We present H-band images obtained with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) of a field 75 " (5 kpc) above the plane of the disk of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 5907. Ground-based observations have shown that NGC 5907 has a luminous halo with a shallow radial profile

  12. Rapid and non-destructive assessment of polyunsaturated fatty acids contents in Salmon using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feifei; Mba, Ogan; Liu, Li; Ngadi, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important nutrients present in Salmon. However, current methods for quantifying the fatty acids (FAs) contents in foods are generally based on gas chromatography (GC) technique, which is time-consuming, laborious and destructive to the tested samples. Therefore, the capability of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging to predict the PUFAs contents of C20:2 n-6, C20:3 n-6, C20:5 n-3, C22:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3 in Salmon fillets in a rapid and non-destructive way was investigated in this work. Mean reflectance spectra were first extracted from the region of interests (ROIs), and then the spectral pre-processing methods of 2nd derivative and Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing were performed on the original spectra. Based on the original and the pre-processed spectra, PLSR technique was employed to develop the quantitative models for predicting each PUFA content in Salmon fillets. The results showed that for all the studied PUFAs, the quantitative models developed using the pre-processed reflectance spectra by "2nd derivative + SG smoothing" could improve their modeling results. Good prediction results were achieved with RP and RMSEP of 0.91 and 0.75 mg/g dry weight, 0.86 and 1.44 mg/g dry weight, 0.82 and 3.01 mg/g dry weight for C20:3 n-6, C22:5 n-3 and C20:5 n-3, respectively after pre-processing by "2nd derivative + SG smoothing". The work demonstrated that NIR hyperspectral imaging could be a useful tool for rapid and non-destructive determination of the PUFA contents in fish fillets.

  13. New investigation of distribution imaging and content uniformity of very low dose drugs using hot-melt extrusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Bom; Kang, Chin-Yang; Kang, Wie-Soo; Choi, Han-Gon; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-12-31

    The content uniformity of low dose drugs in dosage forms is very important for quality assurance. The aim of this study was to prepare uniformly and homogeneously distributed dosage forms of very low-dose drugs using twin screw hot-melt extrusion (HME) and to investigate the distribution of drugs using instrumental analyses. For the feasibility of HME method, a very low amount of coumarin-6, a fluorescent dye, was used to visualize distribution images using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Limaprost, tamsulosin and glimepiride were then used as low-dose model drugs to study the applicability of HME for content uniformity and distribution behaviors. Hydrophilic thermosensitive polymers with low melting point, such as Poloxamer188 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, were chosen as carriers. The melt extrusion was carried out around 50°C, at which both carriers were easily dissolved but model drugs remained in solid form. The physicochemical properties of the hot-melt extrudates, including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), were measured. Content uniformity of the drugs was also checked by HPLC. CLSM imaging showed that model drugs were well distributed throughout the hot-melt extrudate, giving better content uniformity with low batch-to-batch variations compared with simple physical mixtures. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR data showed that there was no interaction or interference between model drugs and thermosensitive polymers. The current HME methods could be used to prepare uniformly distributed and reproducible solid dosage forms containing very low dose drugs for further pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationships between brain water content and diffusion tensor imaging parameters (apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy) in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Irwan, Roy; Potze, Jan Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Mostert, Jop P.; Keyser, Jacques de [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Neurology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    Fifteen multiple sclerosis patients were examined by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to determine fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in a superventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm{sup 3} containing gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue. Point resolved spectroscopy 2D-chemical shift imaging of the same volume was performed without water suppression. The water contents and DTI parameters in 64 voxels of 2 cm{sup 3} were compared. The water content was increased in patients compared with controls (GM: 244{+-}21 vs. 194{+-}10 a.u.; WM: 245{+-}32 vs. 190{+-}11 a.u.), FA decreased (GM: 0.226{+-}0.038 vs. 0.270{+-}0.020; WM: 0.337{+-}0.044 vs. 0.402{+-}0.011) and ADC increased [GM: 1134{+-}203 vs. 899{+-}28 (x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s); WM: 901{+-}138 vs. 751{+-}17 (x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s)]. Correlations of water content with FA and ADC in WM were strong (r=-0.68, P<0.02; r=0.75; P<0.01, respectively); those in GM were weaker (r=-0.50, P<0.05; r=0.45, P<0.1, respectively). Likewise, FA and ADC were more strongly correlated in WM (r=-0.88; P<0.00001) than in GM (r=-0.69, P<0.01). The demonstrated relationship between DTI parameters and water content in multiple sclerosis patients suggests a potential for therapy monitoring in normal-appearing brain tissue. (orig.)

  15. A New Content-Based Image Retrieval Using the Multidimensional Generalization of Wald-Wolfowitz Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leauhatong, Thurdsak; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Atsuta, Kiyoaki; Kondo, Shozo

    This paper proposes two new similarity measures for the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. The similarity measures are based on the k-means clustering algorithm and the multidimensional generalization of the Wald-Wolfowitz (MWW) runs test. The performance comparisons between the proposed similarity measures and a current CBIR similarity measure based on the MWW runs test were performed, and it can be seen that the proposed similarity measures outperform the current similarity measure with respect to the precision and the computational time.

  16. Polyploidy in the olive complex (Olea europaea): Evidence from flow cytometry and nuclear microsatellite analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besnard, G.; Garcia-Verdugo, C.; Rubio de Casas, R.

    2008-01-01

    putative polyploidization events and their evolutionary significance in the diversification of the olive tree and its relatives. Methods: Representatives of the six olive subspecies were investigated using (a) flow cytometry to estimate genome content, and (b) six highly variable nuclear microsatellites....... Lastly, abnormalities in chromosomes inheritance leading to aneuploid formation were revealed using microsatellite analyses in the offspring from the controlled cross in subsp. maroccana. Conclusions: This study constitutes the first report for multiple polyploidy in olive tree relatives. Formation...

  17. Multimedia human brain database system for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy with content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multimedia database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted MRI and FLAIR MRI and ictal and interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication pretty much fits with the surgeons" expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  18. High-content live cell imaging with RNA probes: advancements in high-throughput antimalarial drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Serena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, a major public health issue in developing nations, is responsible for more than one million deaths a year. The most lethal species, Plasmodium falciparum, causes up to 90% of fatalities. Drug resistant strains to common therapies have emerged worldwide and recent artemisinin-based combination therapy failures hasten the need for new antimalarial drugs. Discovering novel compounds to be used as antimalarials is expedited by the use of a high-throughput screen (HTS to detect parasite growth and proliferation. Fluorescent dyes that bind to DNA have replaced expensive traditional radioisotope incorporation for HTS growth assays, but do not give additional information regarding the parasite stage affected by the drug and a better indication of the drug's mode of action. Live cell imaging with RNA dyes, which correlates with cell growth and proliferation, has been limited by the availability of successful commercial dyes. Results After screening a library of newly synthesized stryrl dyes, we discovered three RNA binding dyes that provide morphological details of live parasites. Utilizing an inverted confocal imaging platform, live cell imaging of parasites increases parasite detection, improves the spatial and temporal resolution of the parasite under drug treatments, and can resolve morphological changes in individual cells. Conclusion This simple one-step technique is suitable for automation in a microplate format for novel antimalarial compound HTS. We have developed a new P. falciparum RNA high-content imaging growth inhibition assay that is robust with time and energy efficiency.

  19. High-content live cell imaging with RNA probes: advancements in high-throughput antimalarial drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Serena; Prudhomme, Jacques; Carter, David; Gopi, Krishna G; Li, Qian; Chang, Young-Tae; Le Roch, Karine G

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria, a major public health issue in developing nations, is responsible for more than one million deaths a year. The most lethal species, Plasmodium falciparum, causes up to 90% of fatalities. Drug resistant strains to common therapies have emerged worldwide and recent artemisinin-based combination therapy failures hasten the need for new antimalarial drugs. Discovering novel compounds to be used as antimalarials is expedited by the use of a high-throughput screen (HTS) to detect parasite growth and proliferation. Fluorescent dyes that bind to DNA have replaced expensive traditional radioisotope incorporation for HTS growth assays, but do not give additional information regarding the parasite stage affected by the drug and a better indication of the drug's mode of action. Live cell imaging with RNA dyes, which correlates with cell growth and proliferation, has been limited by the availability of successful commercial dyes. Results After screening a library of newly synthesized stryrl dyes, we discovered three RNA binding dyes that provide morphological details of live parasites. Utilizing an inverted confocal imaging platform, live cell imaging of parasites increases parasite detection, improves the spatial and temporal resolution of the parasite under drug treatments, and can resolve morphological changes in individual cells. Conclusion This simple one-step technique is suitable for automation in a microplate format for novel antimalarial compound HTS. We have developed a new P. falciparum RNA high-content imaging growth inhibition assay that is robust with time and energy efficiency. PMID:19515257

  20. Implementing a routine flow cytometry assay for nucleated red blood cell counts in cord blood units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, C; Cloutier, M; Jobin, C; Dion, J; Fournier, D; Néron, S

    2016-12-01

    As required by standards organizations, Héma-Québec Cord Blood Bank performs enumeration of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in cord blood units (CBUs). This study presents the validation and implementation approaches developed to transfer the routine NRBC enumeration from the manual blood film method to a flow cytometric assay. The flow cytometry method was adapted from Tsuji (Cytometry, 37, 1999, 291). This assay was validated to assess the specificity, detection limit, repeatability, and reproducibility of the method, including interoperator and interlaboratory testing. Finally, postimplementation follow-up and adjustments were performed for CBU over a 7-month period. Blood film and flow cytometry NRBC enumerations showed a strong correlation (n = 40; Pearson's r correlation = 0.90). Validation was successful as exemplified by the correlation in interlaboratory testing (n = 30; r = 0.98). During implementation, our routine laboratory analyses revealed that CBU with low NRBC content (≤2%), representing 26% of all CBU tested, resulted in 15% of repeated reading and/or staining and was the principal source of nonconformity. Small adjustments in the standard operating procedures (SOPs), including a fixed 200-event setting in the NRBC gate for the second reading of the replicates, have completely solved this issue. Flow cytometric NRBC enumerations, now implemented in Héma-Québec Public Cord Blood Bank, is an improvement in the efficiency of our operations by integrating the count for NRBC into our flow cytometry platform. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Study on the Application of Near Infrared Hyperspectral Chemical Imaging for Monitoring Moisture Content and Water Activity in Low Moisture Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Achata

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Moisture content and water activity are key parameters in predicting the stability of low moisture content products. However, conventional methods for moisture content and water activity determination (e.g., loss on drying method, ‎Karl Fischer titration, dew point method are time consuming, demand specialized equipment and are not amenable to online processing. For this reason they are typically applied at-line on a limited number of samples. Near infrared hyperspectral chemical imaging is an emerging technique for spatially characterising the spectral properties of samples. Due to the fast acquisition of chemical images, many samples can be evaluated simultaneously, thus providing the potential for online evaluation of samples during processing. In this study, the potential of NIR chemical imaging for predicting the moisture content and water activity of a selection of low moisture content food systems is evaluated.

  2. A study on the application of near infrared hyperspectral chemical imaging for monitoring moisture content and water activity in low moisture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achata, Eva; Esquerre, Carlos; O'Donnell, Colm; Gowen, Aoife

    2015-02-03

    Moisture content and water activity are key parameters in predicting the stability of low moisture content products. However, conventional methods for moisture content and water activity determination (e.g., loss on drying method, ‎Karl Fischer titration, dew point method) are time consuming, demand specialized equipment and are not amenable to online processing. For this reason they are typically applied at-line on a limited number of samples. Near infrared hyperspectral chemical imaging is an emerging technique for spatially characterising the spectral properties of samples. Due to the fast acquisition of chemical images, many samples can be evaluated simultaneously, thus providing the potential for online evaluation of samples during processing. In this study, the potential of NIR chemical imaging for predicting the moisture content and water activity of a selection of low moisture content food systems is evaluated.

  3. Spectral embedding-based multiview features fusion for content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Yu, Laihang; Zhu, Hai

    2017-09-01

    In many computer vision applications, an object can be described by multiple features from different views. For instance, to characterize an image well, a variety of visual features is exploited to represent color, texture, and shape information and encode each feature into a vector. Recently, we have witnessed a surge of interests of combining multiview features for image recognition and classification. However, these features are always located in different high-dimensional spaces, which challenge the features fusion, and many conventional methods fail to integrate compatible and complementary information from multiple views. To address the above issues, multifeatures fusion framework is proposed, which utilizes multiview spectral embedding and a unified distance metric to integrate features, the alternating optimization is reconstructed by learning the complementarities between different views. This method exploits complementary property of different views and obtains a low-dimensional embedding wherein the different dimensional subspace. Various experiments on several benchmark datasets have verified the excellent performance of the proposed method.

  4. Content Preserving Watermarking for Medical Images Using Shearlet Transform and SVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorskaya, M. N.; Savchina, E. I.

    2017-05-01

    Medical Image Watermarking (MIW) is a special field of a watermarking due to the requirements of the Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine (DICOM) standard since 1993. All 20 parts of the DICOM standard are revised periodically. The main idea of the MIW is to embed various types of information including the doctor's digital signature, fragile watermark, electronic patient record, and main watermark in a view of region of interest for the doctor into the host medical image. These four types of information are represented in different forms; some of them are encrypted according to the DICOM requirements. However, all types of information ought to be resulted into the generalized binary stream for embedding. The generalized binary stream may have a huge volume. Therefore, not all watermarking methods can be applied successfully. Recently, the digital shearlet transform had been introduced as a rigorous mathematical framework for the geometric representation of multi-dimensional data. Some modifications of the shearlet transform, particularly the non-subsampled shearlet transform, can be associated to a multi-resolution analysis that provides a fully shift-invariant, multi-scale, and multi-directional expansion. During experiments, a quality of the extracted watermarks under the JPEG compression and typical internet attacks was estimated using several metrics, including the peak signal to noise ratio, structural similarity index measure, and bit error rate.

  5. Comparison of the Coffea canephora and C. arabica karyotype based on chromosomal DNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarindo, Wellington Ronildo; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear genome size has been measured in various plants, seeing that knowledge of the DNA content is useful for taxonomic and evolutive studies, plant breeding programs and genome sequencing projects. Besides the nuclear DNA content, tools and protocols to quantify the chromosomal DNA content have been also applied, expanding the data about genomic structure. This study was conducted in order to calculate the Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica chromosomal DNA content, associating cytogenetic methodologies with flow cytometry (FCM) and image cytometry (ICM) tools. FCM analysis showed that the mean nuclear DNA content of C. canephora and C. arabica is 2C = 1.41 and 2.62 pg, respectively. The cytogenetic methodology provided prometaphase and metaphase cells exhibiting adequate chromosomes for the ICM measurements and karyogram assembly. Based on cytogenetic, FCM and ICM results; it was possible to calculate the chromosomal DNA content of the two species. The 1C chromosomal DNA content of C. canephora ranged from 0.09 (chromosome 1) to 0.05 pg (chromosome 11) and C. arabica from 0.09 (chromosome 1) to 0.03 pg (chromosome 22). The methodology presented in this study was suitable for DNA content measuring of each chromosome of C. canephora and C. arabica. The cytogenetic characterization and chromosomal DNA content analyses evidenced that C. arabica is a true allotetraploid originated from a cross between Coffea diploid species. Besides, the same analyses also reinforce that C. canephora is a possible progenitor of C. arabica.

  6. Estimation of Plaque Contents With Multi-Angle 3D Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Grønholdt, Marie Louise; Rasmussen, Steen Tofthøj

    1996-01-01

    This investigation exploits the potential of using multiple insonification angles in characterizing plaques in the carotid artery. Specifically, previous work has shown that certain plaque materials such as lipid exhibit a low degree of angle-dependence in the received echo signal while the signal...... to lateral resolution size (1.4 mm @ -3 dB) to obtain an omnidirectional range cell. After scanning, the plaques underwent histological analysis in order to estimate the amount of calcification, fibrous tissues, lipid, blood and thrombus. So far, 13 plaques surgically removed during carotid endarterectomy...... and the content of fibrous tissues. The preliminary results indicate that the method has good potential for characterization of plaque....

  7. Paradoxical correlation between signal in functional magnetic resonance imaging and deoxygenated haemoglobin content in capillaries: a new theoretical explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Kato, Toshinori

    2002-04-01

    Signal increases in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are believed to be a result of decreased paramagnetic deoxygenated haemoglobin (deoxyHb) content in the neural activation area. However, discrepancies in this canonical blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) theory have been pointed out in studies using optical techniques, which directly measure haemoglobin changes. To explain the discrepancies, we developed a new theory bridging magnetic resonance (MR) signal and haemoglobin changes. We focused on capillary influences, which have been neglected in most previous fMRI studies and performed a combined fMRI and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study using a language task. Paradoxically, both the MR signal and deoxyHb content increased in Broca's area. On the other hand, fMRI activation in the auditory area near large veins correlated with a mirror-image decrease in deoxyHb and increase in oxygenated haemoglobin (oxyHb), in agreement with canonical BOLD theory. All fMRI signal changes correlated consistently with changes in oxyHb, the diamagnetism of which is insensitive to MR. We concluded that the discrepancy with the canonical BOLD theory is caused by the fact that the BOLD theory ignores the effect of the capillaries. Our theory explains the paradoxical phenomena of the oxyHb and deoxyHb contributions to the MR signal and gives a new insight into the precise haemodynamics of activation by analysing fMRI and NIRS data.

  8. Paradoxical correlation between signal in functional magnetic resonance imaging and deoxygenated haemoglobin content in capillaries: a new theoretical explanation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toru [College of Medical Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)]. E-mail: yamamoto@cme.hokudai.ac.jp; Kato, Toshinori [Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (US) and Ogawa Laboratories for Brain Function Research, Hamano Life Science Research Foundation, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: kato@hlsrf.or.jp

    2002-04-01

    Signal increases in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are believed to be a result of decreased paramagnetic deoxygenated haemoglobin (deoxyHb) content in the neural activation area. However, discrepancies in this canonical blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) theory have been pointed out in studies using optical techniques, which directly measure haemoglobin changes. To explain the discrepancies, we developed a new theory bridging magnetic resonance (MR) signal and haemoglobin changes. We focused on capillary influences, which have been neglected in most previous fMRI studies and performed a combined fMRI and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study using a language task. Paradoxically, both the MR signal and deoxyHb content increased in Broca's area. On the other hand, fMRI activation in the auditory area near large veins correlated with a mirror-image decrease in deoxyHb and increase in oxygenated haemoglobin (oxyHb), in agreement with canonical BOLD theory. All fMRI signal changes correlated consistently with changes in oxyHb, the diamagnetism of which is insensitive to MR. We concluded that the discrepancy with the canonical BOLD theory is caused by the fact that the BOLD theory ignores the effect of the capillaries. Our theory explains the paradoxical phenomena of the oxyHb and deoxyHb contributions to the MR signal and gives a new insight into the precise haemodynamics of activation by analysing fMRI and NIRS data. (author)

  9. SCENERY: a web application for (causal) network reconstruction from cytometry data

    KAUST Repository

    Papoutsoglou, Georgios

    2017-05-08

    Flow and mass cytometry technologies can probe proteins as biological markers in thousands of individual cells simultaneously, providing unprecedented opportunities for reconstructing networks of protein interactions through machine learning algorithms. The network reconstruction (NR) problem has been well-studied by the machine learning community. However, the potentials of available methods remain largely unknown to the cytometry community, mainly due to their intrinsic complexity and the lack of comprehensive, powerful and easy-to-use NR software implementations specific for cytometry data. To bridge this gap, we present Single CEll NEtwork Reconstruction sYstem (SCENERY), a web server featuring several standard and advanced cytometry data analysis methods coupled with NR algorithms in a user-friendly, on-line environment. In SCENERY, users may upload their data and set their own study design. The server offers several data analysis options categorized into three classes of methods: data (pre)processing, statistical analysis and NR. The server also provides interactive visualization and download of results as ready-to-publish images or multimedia reports. Its core is modular and based on the widely-used and robust R platform allowing power users to extend its functionalities by submitting their own NR methods. SCENERY is available at scenery.csd.uoc.gr or http://mensxmachina.org/en/software/.

  10. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  11. Real-time three-dimensional counting and shape measurement of RBCs using digital holographic cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamizu, Hideki; Sonoda, Kotaro; Goto, Ryoji; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2017-04-01

    Digital holography is a useful technique for recording and reconstruction of the complex amplitude of an optical field. In this technique, an interference pattern of two waves is detected by an image sensor, and digital holograms are acquired in computer. The wavefront is reconstructed by a numerical calculation. In this study, we present the real-time threedimensional counting and shape measurement of RBCs using flow cytometry with digital holographic microscopy.

  12. A Study on the Application of Near Infrared Hyperspectral Chemical Imaging for Monitoring Moisture Content and Water Activity in Low Moisture Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Achata; Carlos Esquerre; Colm O'Donnell; Aoife Gowen

    2015-01-01

    Moisture content and water activity are key parameters in predicting the stability of low moisture content products. However, conventional methods for moisture content and water activity determination (e.g., loss on drying method, ‎Karl Fischer titration, dew point method) are time consuming, demand specialized equipment and are not amenable to online processing. For this reason they are typically applied at-line on a limited number of samples. Near infrared hyperspectral chemical imaging is ...

  13. Interactive content-based image retrieval (CBIR) computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system for ultrasound breast masses using relevance feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-chong; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Helvie, Mark; Nees, Alexis V.

    2012-03-01

    We designed a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) system to assist radiologists in characterizing masses on ultrasound images. The CADx system retrieves masses that are similar to a query mass from a reference library based on computer-extracted features that describe texture, width-to-height ratio, and posterior shadowing of a mass. Retrieval is performed with k nearest neighbor (k-NN) method using Euclidean distance similarity measure and Rocchio relevance feedback algorithm (RRF). In this study, we evaluated the similarity between the query and the retrieved masses with relevance feedback using our interactive CBIR CADx system. The similarity assessment and feedback were provided by experienced radiologists' visual judgment. For training the RRF parameters, similarities of 1891 image pairs obtained from 62 masses were rated by 3 MQSA radiologists using a 9-point scale (9=most similar). A leave-one-out method was used in training. For each query mass, 5 most similar masses were retrieved from the reference library using radiologists' similarity ratings, which were then used by RRF to retrieve another 5 masses for the same query. The best RRF parameters were chosen based on three simulated observer experiments, each of which used one of the radiologists' ratings for retrieval and relevance feedback. For testing, 100 independent query masses on 100 images and 121 reference masses on 230 images were collected. Three radiologists rated the similarity between the query and the computer-retrieved masses. Average similarity ratings without and with RRF were 5.39 and 5.64 on the training set and 5.78 and 6.02 on the test set, respectively. The average Az values without and with RRF were 0.86+/-0.03 and 0.87+/-0.03 on the training set and 0.91+/-0.03 and 0.90+/-0.03 on the test set, respectively. This study demonstrated that RRF improved the similarity of the retrieved masses.

  14. Similarity evaluation between query and retrieved masses using a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) CADx system for characterization of breast masses on ultrasound images: an observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-chong; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark; Nees, Alexis V.; Paramagul, Chintana

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the similarity between the query and retrieved masses by a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system for characterization of breast masses on ultrasound (US) images based on radiologists' visual similarity assessment. We are developing a CADx system to assist radiologists in characterizing masses on US images. The CADx system retrieves masses that are similar to a query mass from a reference library based on automatically extracted image features. An observer study was performed to compare the retrieval performance of four similarity measures: Euclidean distance (ED), Cosine (Cos), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Bayesian Neural Network (BNN). For ED and Cos, a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) algorithm was used for retrieval. For LDA and BNN, the features of a query mass were combined first into a malignancy score and then masses with similar scores were retrieved. For a query mass, three most similar masses were retrieved with each method and were presented to the radiologists in random order. Three MQSA radiologists rated the similarity between the query mass and the computer-retrieved masses using a nine-point similarity scale (1=very dissimilar, 9=very similar). The average similarity ratings of all radiologists for LDA, BNN, Cos, and ED were 4.71, 4.95, 5.18 and 5.32. The ED measures retrieved masses of significantly higher similarity (p<0.008) than LDA and BNN. Although the BNN measure had the best classification performance (Az: 0.90+/-0.03) in the CBIR scheme, ED exhibited higher image retrieval performance than others based on radiologists' assessment.

  15. DNA flow cytometry of human spermatozoa: consistent stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA using a novel decondensation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Tamás; Békési, Gyöngyi; Fábián, Akos; Rákosy, Zsuzsa; Horváth, Gábor; Mátyus, László; Balázs, Margit; Jenei, Attila

    2008-10-01

    Rapid flow cytometric measurement of the frequency of aneuploid human sperms is in increasing demand but development of an exploitable method is hindered by difficulties of stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA. An aggressive decondensation protocol is needed after which cell integrity still remains intact. We used flow cytometry to examine the effect of lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS, chaotropic agent) on fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide-treated human spermatozoa from 10 normozoospermic men. When flow cytometric identification of diploid spermatozoa was achieved, validation was performed after sorting by three-color FISH. In contrast with the extremely variable histograms of nondecondensed sperms, consistent identification of haploid and diploid spermatozoa was possible if samples were decondensed with LIS prior to flow cytometry. A 76-fold enrichment of diploid sperms was observed in the sorted fractions by FISH. A significant correlation was found between the proportion of sorted cells and of diploid sperms by FISH. Application of LIS during the preparation of sperm for flow cytometry appears to ensure the stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA, making quantification of aneuploid sperm percentage possible. To our knowledge this is the first report in terms of separating spermatozoa with confirmedly abnormal chromosomal content. High correlation between the proportion of cells identified as having double DNA content by flow cytometry and diploid sperm by FISH allows rapid calculation of diploidy rate. Copyright 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  16. An introduction to mass cytometry: fundamentals and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Scott D; Baranov, Vladimir I; Ornatsky, Olga I; Bandura, Dmitry R; George, Thaddeus C

    2013-05-01

    Mass cytometry addresses the analytical challenges of polychromatic flow cytometry by using metal atoms as tags rather than fluorophores and atomic mass spectrometry as the detector rather than photon optics. The many available enriched stable isotopes of the transition elements can provide up to 100 distinguishable reporting tags, which can be measured simultaneously because of the essential independence of detection provided by the mass spectrometer. We discuss the adaptation of traditional inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to cytometry applications. We focus on the generation of cytometry-compatible data and on approaches to unsupervised multivariate clustering analysis. Finally, we provide a high-level review of some recent benchmark reports that highlight the potential for massively multi-parameter mass cytometry.

  17. Relevance of sample preparation for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccio, V E; Saraci, E; Gilestro, M; Oddolo, D; Ruggeri, M; Caltagirone, S; Bruno, B; Boccadoro, M; Omedè, P

    2017-10-06

    Flow cytometry is a useful tool for diagnosis and minimal residual disease (MRD) study of hematological diseases. Standard sample preparation protocols are characterized by stain-lyse-wash (SLW). To prevent nonspecific bindings and achieve high sensitivity in MRD studies, lyse-wash-stain-wash (LWSW) is required. To our knowledge, no comparison between the two methods has been performed. We compared mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), stain index, signal-to-noise ratio, and percentage of positive cells of 104 antibodies and of 13 selected antibodies tested in 10 samples simultaneously prepared with the two methods. MFI and percentages of positive cells obtained by the two methods did not show significant differences and showed a very high correlation. Stain index and signal-to-noise ratio presented higher values for kappa and lambda surface chains in LWSW samples and a trend of higher values for the other antibodies in SLW samples. We suggest to use LWSW method also at diagnosis to obtain more comparable antibody intensity expressions when samples from the same patient are processed for MRD evaluation after bulk lysis. Moreover, LWSW can prevent nonspecific bindings, shows no differences in the identification and quantitation of the populations of interest, and reduces acquisition of cell debris. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Purification of dopamine neurons by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, C W; Lee, L J; Romero, A A; Stull, N D; Iacovitti, L

    1994-12-05

    The heterogeneity and preponderence of other cell types present in cultures has greatly impeded our ability to study dopamine neurons. In this report, we describe methods for isolating nearly pure dopamine neurons for study in culture. To do so, the lipid-soluble dye, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (diI) was injected into the embryonic rat striata where it was taken up by nerve terminals and transported overnight back to the innervating perikarya in the ventral midbrain. Midbrain cells were then dissected, dissociated and separated on the basis of their (rhodamine) fluorescence by flow cytometry. Nearly all cells recovered as fluorescent positive (> 98%) were also immunoreactive for the dopamine specific enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (80%-96%). Little contamination by other cells types was observed after labeling for specific neuronal and glial markers. Purified dopamine neurons continued to thrive and elaborate neuronal processes for at least 3 days in culture. Using this new model, it may now be possible to directly study the cellular and molecular processes regulating the survival and functioning of developing, injured and transplanted dopamine neurons.

  19. Computer-Aided Diagnosis in Mammography Using Content-Based Image Retrieval Approaches: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available As the rapid advance of digital imaging technologies, the content-based image retrieval (CBIR has became one of the most vivid research areas in computer vision. In the last several years, developing computer-aided detection and/or diagnosis (CAD schemes that use CBIR to search for the clinically relevant and visually similar medical images (or regions depicting suspicious lesions has also been attracting research interest. CBIR-based CAD schemes have potential to provide radiologists with “visual aid” and increase their confidence in accepting CAD-cued results in the decision making. The CAD performance and reliability depends on a number of factors including the optimization of lesion segmentation, feature selection, reference database size, computational efficiency, and relationship between the clinical relevance and visual similarity of the CAD results. By presenting and comparing a number of approaches commonly used in previous studies, this article identifies and discusses the optimal approaches in developing CBIR-based CAD schemes and assessing their performance. Although preliminary studies have suggested that using CBIR-based CAD schemes might improve radiologists’ performance and/or increase their confidence in the decision making, this technology is still in the early development stage. Much research work is needed before the CBIR-based CAD schemes can be accepted in the clinical practice.

  20. Whole organism high-content screening by label-free, image-based Bayesian classification for parasitic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A Paveley

    Full Text Available Sole reliance on one drug, Praziquantel, for treatment and control of schistosomiasis raises concerns about development of widespread resistance, prompting renewed interest in the discovery of new anthelmintics. To discover new leads we designed an automated label-free, high content-based, high throughput screen (HTS to assess drug-induced effects on in vitro cultured larvae (schistosomula using bright-field imaging. Automatic image analysis and Bayesian prediction models define morphological damage, hit/non-hit prediction and larval phenotype characterization. Motility was also assessed from time-lapse images. In screening a 10,041 compound library the HTS correctly detected 99.8% of the hits scored visually. A proportion of these larval hits were also active in an adult worm ex-vivo screen and are the subject of ongoing studies. The method allows, for the first time, screening of large compound collections against schistosomes and the methods are adaptable to other whole organism and cell-based screening by morphology and motility phenotyping.

  1. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  2. THE SUBJECTIVAL CONTENT OF IMAGES “SUCCESSFUL MAN” AND “SUCCESSFUL WOMAN” AS A FACTOR OF PSYCHIC ADJUSTMENT OF WOMEN IN INVOLUNTARY UNEMPLOYMENT SITUATION

    OpenAIRE

    Lopukhova Olga Gennadevna; Beglova Elmira Ildusovna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study is investigation of correlation between a content of gender appearance of image “successful person” and parameters of psychic and social adjustment of women belonging to different generations.Methodology.  Subjective image “successful person” means a stable and possibly gender differentiated element of “Ideal Me” images system. It includes cognitive component (conscious and verbalization representations of typical description of successful person), and affective component...

  3. Combination of spectral and textural information of hyperspectral imaging for the prediction of the moisture content and storage time of cooked beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; He, Dandan; Lu, Anxiang; Ren, Dong; Wang, Jihua

    2017-06-01

    The feasibility of combining spectral and textural information from hyperspectral imaging to predict the moisture content and storage time of cooked beef was explored. A total of 10 optimal wavelengths were selected for the moisture content and storage time by conducting variable combination population analysis (VCPA). Principal component analysis was employed to reduce the number of dimensions of hyperspectral images, while a discrete cosine transform was applied to the first three principal component images to extract 30 textural features. A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) model and partial least-squares regression model were developed to predict the moisture content and storage time from spectra, textural data, and their combination. The fused BP-ANN model provided satisfactory results with Rp2 of 0.977, and RMSEP of 0.9151 for the prediction of moisture content; these results were superior to those obtained with spectral or textual information alone. Combined with the storage time, the distribution map of the moisture content of cooked beef was visualized using the best fused BP-ANN model with imaging process method. The results reveal that the combination of spectral and textural information of hyperspectral imaging coupled with the BP-ANN algorithm has strong potential for the prediction and visualization of the moisture content of cooked beef at different storage times.

  4. Flow cytometry in the study of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro L Bertho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report we present a concise review concerning the use of flow cytometric methods to characterize and differentiate between two different mechanisms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis. The applications of these techniques to clinical and basic research are also considered. The following cell features are useful to characterize the mode of cell death: (1 activation of an endonuclease in apoptotic cells results in extraction of the low molecular weight DNA following cell permeabilization, which, in turn, leads to their decreased stainability with DNA-specific fluorochromes. Measurements of DNA content make it possible to identify apoptotic cells and to recognize the cell cycle phase specificity of apoptotic process; (2 plasma membrane integrity, which is lost in necrotic but not in apoptotic cells; (3 the decrease in forward light scatter, paralleled either by no change or an increase in side scatter, represent early changes during apoptosis. The data presented indicate that flow cytometry can be applied to basic research of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of apoptosis, as well as in the clinical situations, where the ability to monitor early signs of apoptosis in some systems may be predictive for the outcome of some treatment protocols.

  5. [Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging combined with CARS algorithm to quantitatively determine soluble solids content in "Ya" pear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Bo; Peng, Yan-Kun; Chen, Li-Ping; Huang, Wen-Qian

    2014-05-01

    The present study proposed competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm to be used to select the key variables from near-infrared hyperspectral imaging data of "Ya" pear. The performance of the developed model was evaluated in terms of the coefficient of determination(r2), and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and the ratio (RPD) of standard deviation of the validation set to standard error of prediction were used to evaluate the performance of proposed model in the prediction process. The selected key variables were used to build the PLS model, called CARS-PLS model. Comparing results obtained from CARS-PLS model and results obtained from full spectra PLS, it was found that the better results (r(2)pre = 0. 908 2, RMSEP=0. 312 0 and RPD=3. 300 5) were obtained by CARS-PLS model based on only 15. 6% information of full spectra. Moreover, performance of CARS-PLS model was also compared with PLS models built by using variables got by Monte Carlo-uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE) and genetic algorithms (GA) method. The result found that CARS variable selection algorithm not only can remove the uninformative variables in spectra, but also can reduce the collinear variables from informative variables. Therefore, this method can be used to select the key variables of near-infrared hyperspectral imaging data. This study showed that near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technology combined with CARS-PLS model can quantitatively predict the soluble solids content (SSC) in "Ya" pear. The results presented from this study can provide a reference for predicting other fruits quality by using the near-infrared hyperspectral imaging.

  6. Measurement of lymphocyte aggregation by flow cytometry-physiological implications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezorella, Nili; Kay, Sigi; Baron, Shoshana; Shapiro, Mika; Porat, Ziv; Deutsch, Varda; Herishanu, Yair; Katz, Ben-Zion

    2016-05-01

    Cellular aggregation is a physiological response of lymphocytes to various extracellular stimuli. Currently, lymphocytes aggregation is only evaluated qualitatively or by semiquantitative methods. In this study, we assessed the capacity of flow cytometry to measure lymphocytes aggregation in a quantitative, accurate, and reproducible manner, and examined the significance of aggregation responses in various lymphoproliferative diseases. Extracellular triggers such as anti-CD19 antibodies or phorbol ester were utilized to induce lymphoid cells aggregation in a concentration dependent manner. Aggregation was quantified by flow cytometry based on the forward or side scatter (SSC), or by dark-field SSC of aggregates measured by ImageStreamX. Accuracy, reproducibility, and limitations of the methodology were evaluated. Aggregation responses were measured in various types of lymphoproliferative diseases, and correlated with immunophenotyping and IGHV mutational status in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Lymphoid aggregates provoked by extracellular stimuli elevate the forward and SSC signals relatively to the number of cells in each event. Aggregation responses vary among different types of lymphoproliferative diseases. Moreover, elevated levels of CD19-induced aggregation are associated with aberrant chronic lymphocytic leukemia characteristics, but not with IGHV mutational status of the disease We have demonstrated that flow cytometry can provide accurate and reproducible measurement of both primary as well as T and B cell lines aggregation in response to extracellular stimuli. The use of quantitative evaluation of activation driven or other cellular aggregation may provide an analytical tool to elucidate biochemical and molecular mechanisms associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  7. Stochastic Optimized Relevance Feedback Particle Swarm Optimization for Content Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges for the CBIR is to bridge the gap between low level features and high level semantics according to the need of the user. To overcome this gap, relevance feedback (RF coupled with support vector machine (SVM has been applied successfully. However, when the feedback sample is small, the performance of the SVM based RF is often poor. To improve the performance of RF, this paper has proposed a new technique, namely, PSO-SVM-RF, which combines SVM based RF with particle swarm optimization (PSO. The aims of this proposed technique are to enhance the performance of SVM based RF and also to minimize the user interaction with the system by minimizing the RF number. The PSO-SVM-RF was tested on the coral photo gallery containing 10908 images. The results obtained from the experiments showed that the proposed PSO-SVM-RF achieved 100% accuracy in 8 feedback iterations for top 10 retrievals and 80% accuracy in 6 iterations for 100 top retrievals. This implies that with PSO-SVM-RF technique high accuracy rate is achieved at a small number of iterations.

  8. A high-throughput method for detection of DNA in chloroplasts using flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Delene J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of DNA in the chloroplasts of some plant species has been shown recently to decline dramatically during leaf development. A high-throughput method of DNA detection in chloroplasts is now needed in order to facilitate the further investigation of this process using large numbers of tissue samples. Results The DNA-binding fluorophores 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI, SYBR Green I (SG, SYTO 42, and SYTO 45 were assessed for their utility in flow cytometric analysis of DNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR were used to validate flow cytometry data. We found neither DAPI nor SYTO 45 suitable for flow cytometric analysis of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA content, but did find changes in cpDNA content during development by flow cytometry using SG and SYTO 42. The latter dye provided more sensitive detection, and the results were similar to those from the fluorescence microscopic analysis. Differences in SYTO 42 fluorescence were found to correlate with differences in cpDNA content as determined by qPCR using three primer sets widely spaced across the chloroplast genome, suggesting that the whole genome undergoes copy number reduction during development, rather than selective reduction/degradation of subgenomic regions. Conclusion Flow cytometric analysis of chloroplasts stained with SYTO 42 is a high-throughput method suitable for determining changes in cpDNA content during development and for sorting chloroplasts on the basis of DNA content.

  9. High content imaging-based assay to classify estrogen receptor-α ligands based on defined mechanistic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, F J; Newberg, J Y; Jones, E D; Mikic, I; Mancini, M A

    2011-05-15

    Estrogen receptor-α (ER) is an important target both for therapeutic compounds and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs); however, the mechanisms involved in chemical modulation of regulating ER transcriptional activity are inadequately understood. Here, we report the development of a high content analysis-based assay to describe ER activity that uniquely exploits a microscopically visible multi-copy integration of an ER-regulated promoter. Through automated single-cell analyses, we simultaneously quantified promoter occupancy, recruitment of transcriptional cofactors and large-scale chromatin changes in response to a panel of ER ligands and EDCs. Image-derived multi-parametric data was used to classify a panel of ligand responses at high resolution. We propose this system as a novel technology providing new mechanistic insights into EDC activities in a manner useful for both basic mechanistic studies and drug testing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Laser scanning cytometry: principles and applications-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozarowski, Piotr; Holden, Elena; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Laser scanning cytometer (LSC) is the microscope-based cytofluorometer that offers a plethora of unique analytical capabilities, not provided by flow cytometry (FCM). This review describes attributes of LSC and covers its numerous applications derived from plentitude of the parameters that can be measured. Among many LSC applications the following are emphasized: (a) assessment of chromatin condensation to identify mitotic, apoptotic cells, or senescent cells; (b) detection of nuclear or mitochondrial translocation of critical factors such as NF-κB, p53, or Bax; (c) semi-automatic scoring of micronuclei in mutagenicity assays; (d) analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and use of the FISH analysis attribute to measure other punctuate fluorescence patterns such as γH2AX foci or receptor clustering; (e) enumeration and morphometry of nucleoli and other cell organelles; (f) analysis of progeny of individual cells in clonogenicity assay; (g) cell immunophenotyping; (h) imaging, visual examination, or sequential analysis using different probes of the same cells upon their relocation; (i) in situ enzyme kinetics, drug uptake, and other time-resolved processes; (j) analysis of tissue section architecture using fluorescent and chromogenic probes; (k) application for hypocellular samples (needle aspirate, spinal fluid, etc.); and (l) other clinical applications. Advantages and limitations of LSC are discussed and compared with FCM.

  11. Bone marrow fat content in 70 adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa: Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, Kirsten; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Mulkern, Robert V; Feldman, Henry A; O'Donnell, Jennifer M; DiVasta, Amy D; Gordon, Catherine M

    2017-07-01

    Adolescents and women with anorexia nervosa have increased bone marrow fat and decreased bone formation, at least in part due to hormonal changes leading to preferential stem cell differentiation to adipocytes over osteoblasts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate marrow fat content and correlate with age and disease severity using knee MRI with T1 relaxometry (T1-R) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) in 70 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. We enrolled 70 girls with anorexia nervosa who underwent 3-T knee MRI with coronal T1-W images, T1-R and single-voxel proton MRS at 30 and 60 ms TE. Metaphyses were scored visually on the T1-W images for red marrow. Visual T1 score, T1 relaxometry values, MRS lipid indices and fat fractions were analyzed by regression on age, body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) as disease severity markers. MRS measures included unsaturated fat index, T2 water, unsaturated and saturated fat fractions. All red marrow measures declined significantly with age. T1-R values were associated negatively with BMI and BMD for girls ≤16 years (P=0.03 and P=0.002, respectively) and positively for those≥17 years (P=0.05 and P=0.003, respectively). MRS identified a strong inverse association between T2 water and saturated fat fraction from 60 ms TE data (r=-0.85, Panorexia nervosa. In contrast, the physiological association between marrow fat content and age remained dominant in younger patients. The strong association between T2 water and saturated fat may relate to the restricted mobility of water with increasing marrow fat.

  12. Bone marrow fat content in 70 adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa: Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecklund, Kirsten; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Mulkern, Robert V. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Feldman, Henry A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Clinical Research Center, Boston, MA (United States); O' Donnell, Jennifer M. [Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); DiVasta, Amy D. [Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Gordon, Catherine M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Adolescents and women with anorexia nervosa have increased bone marrow fat and decreased bone formation, at least in part due to hormonal changes leading to preferential stem cell differentiation to adipocytes over osteoblasts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate marrow fat content and correlate with age and disease severity using knee MRI with T1 relaxometry (T1-R) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) in 70 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. We enrolled 70 girls with anorexia nervosa who underwent 3-T knee MRI with coronal T1-W images, T1-R and single-voxel proton MRS at 30 and 60 ms TE. Metaphyses were scored visually on the T1-W images for red marrow. Visual T1 score, T1 relaxometry values, MRS lipid indices and fat fractions were analyzed by regression on age, body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) as disease severity markers. MRS measures included unsaturated fat index, T2 water, unsaturated and saturated fat fractions. All red marrow measures declined significantly with age. T1-R values were associated negatively with BMI and BMD for girls ≤16 years (P=0.03 and P=0.002, respectively) and positively for those≥17 years (P=0.05 and P=0.003, respectively). MRS identified a strong inverse association between T2 water and saturated fat fraction from 60 ms TE data (r=-0.85, P<0.0001). There was no association between unsaturated fat index and BMI or BMD. The association between T1 and BMI and BMD among older girls suggests more marrow fat in those with severe anorexia nervosa. In contrast, the physiological association between marrow fat content and age remained dominant in younger patients. The strong association between T2 water and saturated fat may relate to the restricted mobility of water with increasing marrow fat. (orig.)

  13. Design and implementation of high-content imaging platforms: lessons learned from end user-developer collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cynthia L; Sjaastad, Michael D

    2009-11-01

    Automated high-content screening and analysis (HCS/HCA) technology solutions have become indispensable in expediting the pace of drug discovery. Because of the complexity involved in designing, building, and validating HCS/HCA platforms, it is important to design, build, and validate a HCS/HCA platform before it is actually needed. Managed properly, collaboration between technology providers and end users in research is essential in accelerating development of the hardware and software of new HCS/HCA platforms before they become commercially available. Such a collaboration results in the cost effective creation of new technologies that meet specific and customized industrial requirements. This review outlines the history of, and considerations relevant to, the development of the Cytometrix Profiling System by Cytokinetics, Inc. and the "Complete Imaging Solution" for high-content screening, developed by Molecular Devices Corporation (MDC) (now MDS Analytical Technologies), from original conception and testing of various components, to multiple development cycles from 1998 to the present, and finally to market consolidation.

  14. Muscle fat content and abdominal adipose tissue distribution investigated by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in obese children and youths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilius E. Fonvig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fat deposition in muscle and its implications for obesity-related complications in youth are not well understood. One hundred and fifty-nine patients (mean age: 13.3 years; range: 6-20 with a body mass index (BMI >90th percentile for age and sex were included. Muscle fat content (MFC was measured in the psoas muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The patients were assigned to two groups: MFC <5% or ³5%. Visceral adipose tissue volume (VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue volume (SAT were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Blood samples were obtained from 119 patients, and liver enzyme concentrations and other variables were measured. The data were analysed to detect any associations between MFC and BMI standard deviation scores, VAT and SAT, blood values, and physical activity levels. The mean BMI standard deviation score (SDS was 3.04 (range 1.32-5.02. The mean MFC was 8.9% (range 0.8-46.7, and 118 (74.2% of 159 patients had an MFC ³5%. Children with a high MFC had a higher BMI SDS (P=0.03 and had a higher VAT, but not SAT or SAT/VAT ratio. Both intramyocellular lipid (IMCL and extramyocellular lipid (EMCL content were elevated in patients with an MFC ³5%. Blood values and physical activity levels did not differ between the two groups. Severely obese children and adolescents tend to have a high MFC, which is associated with elevated VAT and IMCL and EMCL content. An increased MFC may be associated with impaired metabolic processes, which may predispose young people to obesity-related complications.

  15. Flow Cytometry and Solid Organ Transplantation: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Orla; Tario, Joseph D.; Shanahan, Thomas C.; Wallace, Paul K.; Minderman, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In the field of transplantation, flow cytometry serves a well-established role in pre-transplant crossmatching and monitoring immune reconstitution following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The capabilities of flow cytometers have continuously expanded and this combined with more detailed knowledge of the constituents of the immune system, their function and interaction and newly developed reagents to study these parameters have led to additional utility of flow cytometry-based analyses, particularly in the post-transplant setting. This review discusses the impact of flow cytometry on managing alloantigen reactions, monitoring opportunistic infections and graft rejection and gauging immunosuppression in the context of solid organ transplantation. PMID:25296232

  16. Workflow management of content-based image retrieval for CAD support in PACS environments based on IHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Petra; Hocken, Christian; Deserno, Thomas M; Grouls, Christoph; Günther, Rolf W

    2010-07-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) bears great potential for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, current CBIR systems are not able to integrate with clinical workflow and PACS generally. One essential factor in this setting is scheduling. Applied and proved with modalities and the acquisition of images for a long time, we now establish scheduling with CBIR. Our workflow is based on the IHE integration profile 'Post-Processing Workflow' (PPW) and the use of a DICOM work list. We configured dcm4chee PACS and its including IHE actors for the application of CBIR. In order to achieve a convenient interface for integrating arbitrary CBIR systems, we realized an adapter between the CBIR system and PACS. Our system architecture constitutes modular components communicating over standard protocols. The proposed workflow management system offers the possibility to embed CBIR conveniently into PACS environments. We achieve a chain of references that fills the information gap between acquisition and post-processing. Our approach takes into account the tight and solid organization of scheduled and performed tasks in clinical settings.

  17. Integrating high-content imaging and chemical genetics to probe host cellular pathways critical for Yersinia pestis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna P Kota

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery that regulates the entry and survival of Yersinia pestis in host macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we report the development of automated high-content imaging assays to quantitate the internalization of virulent Y. pestis CO92 by macrophages and the subsequent activation of host NF-κB. Implementation of these assays in a focused chemical screen identified kinase inhibitors that inhibited both of these processes. Rac-2-ethoxy-3 octadecanamido-1-propylphosphocholine (a protein Kinase C inhibitor, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor, and parthenolide (an IκB kinase inhibitor, inhibited pathogen-induced NF-κB activation and reduced bacterial entry and survival within macrophages. Parthenolide inhibited NF-κB activation in response to stimulation with Pam3CSK4 (a TLR2 agonist, E. coli LPS (a TLR4 agonist or Y. pestis infection, while the PI3K and PKC inhibitors were selective only for Y. pestis infection. Together, our results suggest that phagocytosis is the major stimulus for NF-κB activation in response to Y. pestis infection, and that Y. pestis entry into macrophages may involve the participation of protein kinases such as PI3K and PKC. More importantly, the automated image-based screening platform described here can be applied to the study of other bacteria in general and, in combination with chemical genetic screening, can be used to identify host cell functions facilitating the identification of novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  18. Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between Bacillus mojavensis and Alternaria alternata. Asma Milet, Noreddine Kacem Chaouche, Laid Dehimat, Asma Ait Kaki, Mounira Kara Ali, Philippe Thonart ...

  19. Flow cytometry in Spermatology: A bright future ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Gil, M C; Rodríguez-Martínez, H; Anel, L; Peña, F J; Martín-Muñoz, P

    2017-12-01

    Techniques such as mass spectrometry have led to unprecedented knowledge of the proteins that are present in the spermatozoa of humans and other mammals. However, in spite of their high-throughput and fractioning techniques, most of the techniques in use only offer average values for the entire sperm population. Yet, ejaculate is very heterogeneous, and average values may mask relevant biological information.The application of flow cytometry may overcome this disadvantage, allowing proteomic analysis at the single-cell level. Moreover, recent advances in cytometry, allowing multiple analyses within a single cell combined with powerful statistical tools, as an expanding subfield in spermatology, are described. The increased use of advanced flow cytometers in andrology laboratories will allow the rapid development of multiparametric, multicolour flow cytometry in andrology that will expand the clinical applications and research possibilities of flow cytometry-based proteomic approaches, especially in the subfields of clinical andrology and sperm biotechnology. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Minimal residual disease in multiple myeloma: Benefits of flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtseva, I V; Davydova, Y O; Kapranov, N M; Julhakyan, H L; Mendeleeva, L P

    2017-10-23

    Over the last 20 years, the approaches to the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) have changed considerably, which led to an increase in remission rate. Using new diagnostic methods has made it possible to assess the response to treatment more reliably and forecast disease recurrence: allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, new-generation sequencing and multicolor flow cytometry enable minimal residual disease (MRD) detection of with sensitivity of 10(-5) to 10(-6) . MRD assessment with flow cytometry using is a rapidly developing area of research. The goal of multicenter groups that use flow cytometry as a tool to detect MRD in patients with MM is achieving standardization and increasing sensitivity and specificity of this method. This article provides data about the methods used for MRD monitoring and describes the advances in the field of flow cytometry. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Induction and flow cytometry identification of mixoploidy through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Induction and flow cytometry identification of mixoploidy through colchicine treatment of Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Faten Omezzine, Afef Ladhari, Faten Nefzi, Rafik Harrath, Mahjoub Aouni, Rabiaa Haouala ...

  2. Normalization of mass cytometry data with bead standards

    OpenAIRE

    Finck, Rachel; Simonds, Erin F.; Jager, Astraea; Krishnaswamy, Smita; Sachs, Karen; Fantl, Wendy; Pe’er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P.; Bendall, Sean C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass cytometry uses atomic mass spectrometry combined with isotopically pure reporter elements to currently measure as many as 40 parameters per single cell. As with any quantitative technology, there is a fundamental need for quality assurance and normalization protocols. In the case of mass cytometry, the signal variation over time due to changes in instrument performance combined with intervals between scheduled maintenance must be accounted for and then normalized. Here, samples were mixe...

  3. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  4. Visible and Near Infrared Fluorescence Spectral Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; Condello, Danilo; Duggan, Erika; Naivar, Mark; Novo, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a long standing interest in measuring complete emission spectra from individual cells in flow cytometry. We have developed flow cytometry instruments and analysis approaches to enable this to be done routinely and robustly. Our spectral flow cytometers use a holographic grating to disperse light from single cells onto a CCD for high speed, wavelength-resolved detection. Customized software allows the single cell spectral data to be displayed and analyzed to produce new spectra-derived parameters. We show that familiar reference and calibration beads can be employed to quantitatively assess instrument performance. We use microspheres stained with six different quantum dots to compare a virtual bandpass filter approach with classic least squares (CLS) spectral unmixing, and then use antibody capture beads and CLS unmixing to demonstrate immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using spectral flow cytometry. Finally, we characterize and evaluate several near infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophores for use in spectral flow cytometry. Spectral flow cytometry offers a number of attractive features for single cell analysis, including a simplified optical path, high spectral resolution, and streamlined approaches to quantitative multiparameter measurements. The availability of robust instrumentation, software, and analysis approaches will facilitate the development of spectral flow cytometry applications. PMID:23225549

  5. An introduction to automated flow cytometry gating tools and their implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P Verschoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current flow cytometry reagents and instrumentation allow for the measurement of an unprecedented number of parameters for any given cell within a homogenous or heterogeneous population. While this provides a great deal of power for hypothesis testing, it also generates a vast amount of data, which is typically analyzed manually through a processing called gating. For large experiments, such as high-content screens, in which many parameters are measured, the time required for manual analysis as well as the technical variability inherent to manual gating can increase dramatically, even becoming prohibitive depending on the clinical or research goal. In the following article, we aim to provide the reader an overview of automated flow cytometry analysis as well as an example of the implementation of FLOCK (FLOw Clustering without K, a tool that we consider accessible to researchers of all levels of computational expertise. In most cases, computational assistance methods are more reproducible and much faster than manual gating, and for some, also allow for the discovery of cellular populations that might not be expected or evident to the researcher. We urge any researcher that is planning or has previously performed large flow cytometry experiments to consider implementing computational assistance into their analysis pipeline.

  6. In vivo, label-free, and noninvasive detection of melanoma metastasis by photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Cheng; Wang, Xueding; Wei, Xunbin

    2014-02-01

    Melanoma, a malignant tumor of melanocytes, is the most serious type of skin cancer in the world. It accounts for about 80% of deaths of all skin cancer. For cancer detection, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) serve as a marker for metastasis development, cancer recurrence, and therapeutic efficacy. Melanoma tumor cells have high content of melanin, which has high light absorption and can serve as endogenous biomarker for CTC detection without labeling. Here, we have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of melanoma cancer by counting CTCs of melanoma tumor bearing mice in vivo. To test in vivo PAFC's capability of detecting melanoma cancer, we have constructed a melanoma tumor model by subcutaneous inoculation of highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10. In order to effectively distinguish the targeting PA signals from background noise, we have used the algorithm of Wavelet denoising method to reduce the background noise. The in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) has shown a great potential for detecting circulating tumor cells quantitatively in the blood stream. Compared with fluorescence-based in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC), PAFC technique can be used for in vivo, label-free, and noninvasive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

  7. Using flow cytometry for counting natural planktonic bacteria and understanding the structure of planktonic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Gasol

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is rapidly becoming a routine methodology in aquatic microbial ecology. The combination of simple to use bench-top flow cytometers and highly fluorescent nucleic acid stains allows fast and easy determination of microbe abundance in the plankton of lakes and oceans. The different dyes and protocols used to stain and count planktonic bacteria as well as the equipment in use are reviewed, with special attention to some of the problems encountered in daily routine practice such as fixation, staining and absolute counting. One of the main advantages of flow cytometry over epifluorescence microscopy is the ability to obtain cell-specific measurements in large numbers of cells with limited effort. We discuss how this characteristic has been used for differentiating photosynthetic from non-photosynthetic prokaryotes, for measuring bacterial cell size and nucleic acid content, and for estimating the relative activity and physiological state of each cell. We also describe how some of the flow cytometrically obtained data can be used to characterize the role of microbes on carbon cycling in the aquatic environment and we prospect the likely avenues of progress in the study of planktonic prokaryotes through the use of flow cytometry.

  8. An automatic fuzzy-based multi-temporal brain digital subtraction angiography image fusion algorithm using curvelet transform and content selection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Saba; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2014-08-01

    Recently image fusion has prominent role in medical image processing and is useful to diagnose and treat many diseases. Digital subtraction angiography is one of the most applicable imaging to diagnose brain vascular diseases and radiosurgery of brain. This paper proposes an automatic fuzzy-based multi-temporal fusion algorithm for 2-D digital subtraction angiography images. In this algorithm, for blood vessel map extraction, the valuable frames of brain angiography video are automatically determined to form the digital subtraction angiography images based on a novel definition of vessel dispersion generated by injected contrast material. Our proposed fusion scheme contains different fusion methods for high and low frequency contents based on the coefficient characteristic of wrapping second generation of curvelet transform and a novel content selection strategy. Our proposed content selection strategy is defined based on sample correlation of the curvelet transform coefficients. In our proposed fuzzy-based fusion scheme, the selection of curvelet coefficients are optimized by applying weighted averaging and maximum selection rules for the high frequency coefficients. For low frequency coefficients, the maximum selection rule based on local energy criterion is applied to better visual perception. Our proposed fusion algorithm is evaluated on a perfect brain angiography image dataset consisting of one hundred 2-D internal carotid rotational angiography videos. The obtained results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed fusion algorithm in comparison with common and basic fusion algorithms.

  9. Application of flow cytometry to monitor assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbial community changes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadidy, Ahmed M; Van Dyke, Michele I; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2016-11-01

    Flow cytometry is an efficient monitoring tool for rapid cell counting, and can be applied to research on water quality and treatment. In this study, a method that employs flow cytometry and a natural microbial inoculum to determine assimilable organic carbon (AOC) was adapted for use with challenging surface waters that have a high organic and particle content, and subsequently applied in a long term river water study. AOC method optimization showed that river water bacteria could pass through a 0.2μm membrane filter, and therefore membrane filtration combined with heat treatment was required for sample sterilization. Preparation of the natural river inoculum with an acceptable yield value could only be achieved when grown using the natural water source, since growth was limited on different types of inorganic minimal media and in natural spring water. The resulting flow cytometry AOC method was reliable and reproducible, and results were comparable to the standard plate count AOC method. Size exclusion chromatography showed that both high and low molecular weight organic matter fractions were utilized by the natural AOC inoculum. Flow cytometry was used to measure both AOC levels and total cell counts in a long term study to monitor the water quality of a river which was used as a drinking water source. The method could distinguish between high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA) groups of bacteria, and HNA bacteria were found to respond faster than LNA bacteria to seasonal changes in nutrients and water temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Flow Cytometry Enables Multiplexed Measurements of Genetically Encoded Intramolecular FRET Sensors Suitable for Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Jaimee; Zhao, Ziyan; Geyer, Rory J; Barra, Melanie M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded sensors based on intramolecular FRET between CFP and YFP are used extensively in cell biology research. Flow cytometry has been shown to offer a means to measure CFP-YFP FRET; we suspected it would provide a unique way to conduct multiplexed measurements from cells expressing different FRET sensors, which is difficult to do with microscopy, and that this could be used for screening. We confirmed that flow cytometry accurately measures FRET signals using cells transiently transfected with an ERK activity reporter, comparing responses measured with imaging and cytometry. We created polyclonal long-term transfectant lines, each expressing a different intramolecular FRET sensor, and devised a way to bar-code four distinct populations of cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of multiplexed measurements and determined that robust multiplexed measurements can be conducted in plate format. To validate the suitability of the method for screening, we measured responses from a plate of bacterial extracts that in unrelated experiments we had determined contained the protein kinase C (PKC)-activating compound teleocidin A-1. The multiplexed assay correctly identifying the teleocidin A-1-containing well. We propose that multiplexed cytometric FRET measurements will be useful for analyzing cellular function and for screening compound collections. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Continuous monitoring of API content, API distribution and crushing strength after tableting via near-infrared chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, P R; Pucher, I; Scheibelhofer, O; Kerschhaggl, M; Sacher, S; Khinast, J G

    2017-02-25

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) with high-speed cameras based on the push-broom acquisition principle is a rapidly-evolving and can be used for a variety of purposes, from classification (and sorting) of products to mapping spatial distribution of materials. The present study examined if NIR-CI is suitable for tablet manufacturing. To that end, the tablets were introduced into the CI system via a flat belt conveyor. A formulation, which consisted of 4wt.%-6wt.% caffeine, 5wt.% crospovidone as a disintegrant, 88wt.%-90wt.% lactose as a filler and 1wt.% magnesium stearate as a lubricator, was tableted at compression forces ranging from 5kN to 30kN. The intra- and inter-tablet homogeneity of caffeine and the tablet's hardness were analyzed via NIR-CI. For the homogeneity evaluation, two methods were applied: standard deviation (SD) and distributional homogeneity index (DHI). The results showed that the SD of caffeine in a single tablet increased with an increase in the caffeine content. This was attributed to natural variations in a binary mixture of caffeine and excipients. Overall, the chosen NIR-CI setup has strong potential to be transferred to the production scale to monitor all tablets in a production stream. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Impact of Body Image on the WTP Values for Reduced-Fat and Low-Salt Content Potato Chips among Obese and Non-Obese Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana de-Magistris

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the influence of body image on consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP for potato chips carrying nutritional claims among obese and non-obese people. About 309 non-clinical individuals participated in a Real Choice Experiment. They were recruited by a company and grouped in: (i non-obese with good body image; (ii non-obese with body image dissatisfaction; (iii obese with good body image; (iv obese with body image dissatisfaction. Results indicate differences in consumers’ willingness to pay among consumer groups. Body image dissatisfaction of normal people did not influence the WTP for healthier chips. Obese people with body image dissatisfaction were willing to pay more for healthier chips (i.e., low-salt content potato chips than normal ones with body image dissatisfaction. Examining the role of knowledge in the light of how this could impact on body image is relevant to improve the health status of individuals and their diet. Knowledge about nutrition could improve the body image of obese people.

  13. The Impact of Body Image on the WTP Values for Reduced-Fat and Low-Salt Content Potato Chips among Obese and Non-Obese Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Magistris, Tiziana; López-Galán, Belinda; Caputo, Vincenzina

    2016-12-21

    The aim of this study is to assess the influence of body image on consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for potato chips carrying nutritional claims among obese and non-obese people. About 309 non-clinical individuals participated in a Real Choice Experiment. They were recruited by a company and grouped in: (i) non-obese with good body image; (ii) non-obese with body image dissatisfaction; (iii) obese with good body image; (iv) obese with body image dissatisfaction. Results indicate differences in consumers' willingness to pay among consumer groups. Body image dissatisfaction of normal people did not influence the WTP for healthier chips. Obese people with body image dissatisfaction were willing to pay more for healthier chips (i.e., low-salt content potato chips) than normal ones with body image dissatisfaction. Examining the role of knowledge in the light of how this could impact on body image is relevant to improve the health status of individuals and their diet. Knowledge about nutrition could improve the body image of obese people.

  14. Determination and Visualization of Peimine and Peiminine Content in Fritillaria thunbergii Bulbi Treated by Sulfur Fumigation Using Hyperspectral Imaging with Chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Juan; He, Yong; Zhang, And Chu

    2017-08-23

    Rapid, non-destructive, and accurate quantitative determination of the effective components in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is required by industries, planters, and regulators. In this study, near-infrared hyperspectral imaging was applied for determining the peimine and peiminine content in Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi under sulfur fumigation. Spectral data were extracted from the hyperspectral images. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was conducted to determine the reference peimine and peiminine content. The successive projection algorithm (SPA), weighted regression coefficient (Bw), competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), and random frog (RF) were used to select optimal wavelengths, while the partial least squares (PLS), least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM) and extreme learning machine (ELM) were used to build regression models. Regression models using the full spectra and optimal wavelengths obtained satisfactory results with the correlation coefficient of calibration (rc), cross-validation (rcv) and prediction (rp) of most models being over 0.8. Prediction maps of peimine and peiminine content in Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi were formed by applying regression models to the hyperspectral images. The overall results indicated that hyperspectral imaging combined with regression models and optimal wavelength selection methods were effective in determining peimine and peiminine content in Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi, which will help in the development of an online detection system for real-world quality control of Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi under sulfur fumigation.

  15. Determination and Visualization of Peimine and Peiminine Content in Fritillaria thunbergii Bulbi Treated by Sulfur Fumigation Using Hyperspectral Imaging with Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, non-destructive, and accurate quantitative determination of the effective components in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is required by industries, planters, and regulators. In this study, near-infrared hyperspectral imaging was applied for determining the peimine and peiminine content in Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi under sulfur fumigation. Spectral data were extracted from the hyperspectral images. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was conducted to determine the reference peimine and peiminine content. The successive projection algorithm (SPA, weighted regression coefficient (Bw, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS, and random frog (RF were used to select optimal wavelengths, while the partial least squares (PLS, least-square support vector machine (LS–SVM and extreme learning machine (ELM were used to build regression models. Regression models using the full spectra and optimal wavelengths obtained satisfactory results with the correlation coefficient of calibration (rc, cross-validation (rcv and prediction (rp of most models being over 0.8. Prediction maps of peimine and peiminine content in Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi were formed by applying regression models to the hyperspectral images. The overall results indicated that hyperspectral imaging combined with regression models and optimal wavelength selection methods were effective in determining peimine and peiminine content in Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi, which will help in the development of an online detection system for real-world quality control of Fritillaria thunbergii bulbi under sulfur fumigation.

  16. Multispectral flow cytometry: The consequences of increased light collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Kristen; von Volkmann, Konrad; Kirsch, Jenny; Radbruch, Andreas; Popien, Jan; Kaiser, Toralf

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, multispectral flow cytometry systems have come to attention. They differ from conventional flow cytometers in two key ways: a multispectral flow cytometer collects the full spectral information at the single cell level and the detector configuration is fixed and not explicitly tuned to a particular staining panel. This brings about clear hardware advantages, as a closed system should be highly stable, and ease-of-use should be improved if used in conjunction with custom unmixing software. An open question remains: what are the benefits of multispectral over conventional flow cytometry in terms of sensitivity and resolution? To probe this, we use Q (detection efficiency) and B (background) values and develop a novel "multivariate population overlap factor" to characterize the cytometer performance. To verify the usefulness of our factor, we perform representative experiments and compare our overlap factor to Q and B. Finally, we conclude that the increased light collection of multispectral flow cytometry does indeed lead to increased sensitivity, an improved detection limit, and a higher resolution. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Comparison of different CCD detectors and chemometrics for predicting total anthocyanin content and antioxidant activity of mulberry fruit using visible and near infrared hyperspectral imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lingxia; Zhou, Yibin; Meng, Liuwei; Wu, Di; He, Yong

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the potential of using hyperspectral imaging technique in tandem with chemometrics for rapid and invasive predicting total anthocyanin content and antioxidant activity of mulberry fruit. Two calibration methods of partial least square regression and least-squares support vector machines and three wavelength selection algorithms of successive projections algorithm, uninformation variable elimination, and competitive adaptive reweighted sampling were applied. The best prediction models for the analysis of total anthocyanin content and antioxidant activity had Rval(2) of 0.959 and 0.995 respectively. The performances of two CCD detectors named silicon (Si) and indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) were compared. The results show that hyperspectral imaging has a great potential for the assessment of total anthocyanin content and antioxidant activity of mulberry fruit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prognostic Significance of DNA Cytometry in Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix FIGO Stage IB and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jürgen Grote

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prognostic value of DNA‐image cytometry in cervical carcinoma of the uterus and its relation to other established prognostic factors. Study design: The study included 116 cases of cervical carcinoma FIGO stages IB and II which were treated with radical abdominal hysterectomy. The median follow‐up was 55 months (range 1–162 months. DNA image cytometry was performed on cytologic specimens prepared by enzymatic cell separation from formalin‐fixed, paraffin‐embedded tissues. DNA stemline ploidy, DNA stemline aneuploidy, 5c exceeding rate, 9c exceeding rate, 2c deviation index, and DNA malignancy grade were computed. DNA‐variables as well as various clinical and histological variables were related to survival rates. Results: In multivariate statistical analysis DNA stemline ploidy using 2.2c as a cut‐off value and FIGO stage showed to be statistically significant available presurgery predictors of survival, whereas the postsurgical parameters lymphonodal status, tumor size and parametrial involvement were significantly correlated with survival. The synopsis of all parameters in a multivariate Cox model indicated that – with declining relevance – the number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, DNA stemline ploidy using a cut‐off level at a modal value of 2.2c, largest pelvic lymph node, 5c exceeding rate, and ratio of carcinoma area to cervix area, were of predictive value for survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that prognostic information deducted from classical staging parameters is successfully complemented by DNA image cytometry which can be applied pretherapeutically.

  19. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Chen; Chengcheng Xue; Yang Zhao; Deyong Chen; Min-Hsien Wu; Junbo Wang

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance ...

  20. Noninvasive quantification of hepatic fat content using three-echo dixon magnetic resonance imaging with correction for T2* relaxation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Jens-Peter; Evert, Matthias; Friedrich, Nele; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Mayerle, Julia; Thiel, Robert; Lerch, Markus M; Dombrowski, Frank; Mensel, Birger; Hosten, Norbert; Puls, Ralf

    2011-12-01

    To investigate three-echo T2*-corrected Dixon magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for noninvasively estimating hepatic fat content (HFC) compared with biopsy. One hundred patients (50 men, 50 women; mean age, 57.7±14.2 years) underwent clinically indicated liver core biopsy (102 valid tissue samples) and liver MRI 24 to 72 hours later. MRI was performed at 1.5T (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using Dixon imaging with T2* correction (work in progress, WIP-432.rev.1, Siemens Healthcare). An ultrafast breath-hold three-echo 3D-gradient echo sequence with TR/TE1/TE2/TE3 of 11/2.4/4.8/9.6 milliseconds, and online calculation of T2*-corrected water images (signal intensities of water [SIW]), fat images (SIF), and fat content map (SIFAT=10×SIF/(SIW+SIF)) was used. SIs of the calculated fat content map (SIFAT) were verified using the histologically quantified HFC (HFC(path)). Spearman correlation for HFC(path) and SIFAT was calculated. Stage of fibrosis, hepatic iron content, and patterns of liver fat (macrovesicular, microvesicular, mixed) and their influence on predicting HFC by MRI were determined. Correlation between SIFAT and HFC(path) was rspearman=0.89. Agreement between HFC predicted by MRI and HFC(path) calculated by nonlinear saturation-growth regression was rspearman=0.89. Kruskal-Wallis analysis revealed no significant difference for SIFAT across fibrosis grades (P=0.90) and liver iron content (P=0.76). Regarding the cellular architecture of liver fat, the microvesicular pattern showed lower mean ranks in SI than macrovesicular and mixed patterns (P=0.01). T2*-corrected Dixon MRI is a noninvasive tool for estimating HFC, showing excellent correlation with liver biopsy without being limited by liver iron content and fibrosis/cirrhosis.

  1. Flow cytometry-based diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Kanegane

    2018-01-01

    Flow cytometry can evaluate specific cell populations and subpopulations, cell surface, intracellular and intranuclear proteins, biologic effects associated with specific immune defects, and certain functional immune characteristics, each being useful for the diagnosis and evaluation of PIDs. Flow cytometry effectively identifies major forms of PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, hyper IgM syndromes, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, IPEX syndrome, CTLA 4 haploinsufficiency and LRBA deficiency, IRAK4 and MyD88 deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, chronic mucocuneous candidiasis, and chronic granulomatous disease. While genetic analysis is the definitive approach to establish specific diagnoses of PIDs, flow cytometry provides a tool to effectively evaluate patients with PIDs at relatively low cost.

  2. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results.

  3. Multicolor Digital Flow Cytometry in Human Translational Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Samit R; Mohanty, Subhasis; Shaw, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    By facilitating the simultaneous analysis of parameters from diverse cell lineages and biological pathways, multicolor flow cytometry is integral to many studies in human immunology-particularly those in older individuals-where sample amounts may be limiting. Studies in human cohorts require particular attention to fluorochrome panel design and procedures to standardize instrument performance; reproducible instrument conditions (over time and between centers) are crucial to accurate comparisons and conclusions in the analysis of heterogeneous groups of human subjects. Here, we describe procedures for multicolor digital flow cytometry, our experience in flow cytometry panel design and our approach in standardizing instrument performance using BD Biosciences hardware and software (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA). These techniques allow for the generation of accurate and precise data in a variety of settings.

  4. Effect of slice thickness on image noise and diagnostic content of single-source-dual energy computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshipli, Marwan; Kabir, Norlaili A.

    2017-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) employs X-ray radiation to create cross-sectional images. Dual-energy CT acquisition includes the images acquired from an alternating voltage of X-ray tube: a low- and a high-peak kilovoltage. The main objective of this study is to determine the best slice thickness that reduces image noise with adequate diagnostic information using dual energy CT head protocol. The study used the ImageJ software and statistical analyses to aid the medical image analysis of dual-energy CT. In this study, ImageJ software and F-test were utilised as the combination methods to analyse DICOM CT images. They were used to investigate the effect of slice thickness on noise and visibility in dual-energy CT head protocol images. Catphan-600 phantom was scanned at different slice thickness values;.6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 mm, then quantitative analyses were carried out. The DECT operated in helical mode with another fixed scan parameter values. Based on F-test statistical analyses, image noise at 0.6, 1, and 2 mm were significantly different compared to the other images acquired at slice thickness of 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm. However, no significant differences of image noise were observed at 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm. As a result, better diagnostic image value, image visibility, and lower image noise in dual-energy CT head protocol was observed at a slice thickness of 3 mm.

  5. THE SUBJECTIVAL CONTENT OF IMAGES “SUCCESSFUL MAN” AND “SUCCESSFUL WOMAN” AS A FACTOR OF PSYCHIC ADJUSTMENT OF WOMEN IN INVOLUNTARY UNEMPLOYMENT SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Геннадьевна Лопухова

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study is investigation of correlation between a content of gender appearance of image “successful person” and parameters of psychic and social adjustment of women belonging to different generations.Methodology.  Subjective image “successful person” means a stable and possibly gender differentiated element of “Ideal Me” images system. It includes cognitive component (conscious and verbalization representations of typical description of successful person, and affective component (positive or negative positions in regards to image “successful person”. We have compared results of survey and valuation of 265 women belonging to different generations and staying in different social situations: involuntary unemployment situation, employment and getting professional education. Subjective and projective methods were used in survey of cognitive and affective components of “successful person” image. Valuation of psychic adjustment based on parameters of internal conflict in comparison with manifestations of anxiety, frustration, aggression, rigidity, neurotic. Data analysis used parametric and nonparametric methods, including ANOVA/MANOVA.Results. It has been discovered that level of psychic adjustment of women depends much more on proper integration of subjective “successful person” image content with individual features of self-conception than on objective “social status” (being in involuntary unemployment situation.Practical implications are psychology consulting and correction of social or psychic unadjustment.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-41

  6. A penny for your thoughts! patterns of fMRI activity reveal the content and the spatial topography of visual mental images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Palermo, Liana; Nemmi, Federico; Sulpizio, Valentina; Galati, Gaspare; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2015-03-01

    Visual mental imagery is a complex process that may be influenced by the content of mental images. Neuropsychological evidence from patients with hemineglect suggests that in the imagery domain environments and objects may be represented separately and may be selectively affected by brain lesions. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the possibility of neural segregation among mental images depicting parts of an object, of an environment (imagined from a first-person perspective), and of a geographical map, using both a mass univariate and a multivariate approach. Data show that different brain areas are involved in different types of mental images. Imagining an environment relies mainly on regions known to be involved in navigational skills, such as the retrosplenial complex and parahippocampal gyrus, whereas imagining a geographical map mainly requires activation of the left angular gyrus, known to be involved in the representation of categorical relations. Imagining a familiar object mainly requires activation of parietal areas involved in visual space analysis in both the imagery and the perceptual domain. We also found that the pattern of activity in most of these areas specifically codes for the spatial arrangement of the parts of the mental image. Our results clearly demonstrate a functional neural segregation for different contents of mental images and suggest that visuospatial information is coded by different patterns of activity in brain areas involved in visual mental imagery. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. ImageMiner: a software system for comparative analysis of tissue microarrays using content-based image retrieval, high-performance computing, and grid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, David J; Yang, Lin; Chen, Wenjin; Hu, Jun; Goodell, Lauri A; Reiss, Michael; Wang, Fusheng; Kurc, Tahsin; Pan, Tony; Sharma, Ashish; Saltz, Joel H

    2011-01-01

    The design and implementation of ImageMiner, a software platform for performing comparative analysis of expression patterns in imaged microscopy specimens such as tissue microarrays (TMAs), is described. ImageMiner is a federated system of services that provides a reliable set of analytical and data management capabilities for investigative research applications in pathology. It provides a library of image processing methods, including automated registration, segmentation, feature extraction, and classification, all of which have been tailored, in these studies, to support TMA analysis. The system is designed to leverage high-performance computing machines so that investigators can rapidly analyze large ensembles of imaged TMA specimens. To support deployment in collaborative, multi-institutional projects, ImageMiner features grid-enabled, service-based components so that multiple instances of ImageMiner can be accessed remotely and federated. The experimental evaluation shows that: (1) ImageMiner is able to support reliable detection and feature extraction of tumor regions within imaged tissues; (2) images and analysis results managed in ImageMiner can be searched for and retrieved on the basis of image-based features, classification information, and any correlated clinical data, including any metadata that have been generated to describe the specified tissue and TMA; and (3) the system is able to reduce computation time of analyses by exploiting computing clusters, which facilitates analysis of larger sets of tissue samples.

  8. Non-destructive evaluation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves by simple and multiple regression analysis of RGB image components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riccardi, M.; Mele, G.; Pulvento, C.

    2014-01-01

    components analysis of digital images acquired with a standard SLR camera. Digital images of leaves from different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth were acquired directly in the field. Mean values of each RGB component were evaluated via image analysis software and correlated to leaf chlorophyll provided...... of foliar chlorophyll content and had a lower amount of noise in the whole range of chlorophyll studied compared with SPAD and other leaf image processing based models when applied to quinoa and amaranth....... for different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth was also checked. Color data acquisition of the leaves in the field with a digital camera was quick, more effective, and lower cost than SPAD. The proposed RGB models provided better correlation (highest R 2) and prediction (lowest RMSEP) of the true value...

  9. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with

  10. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with clinical workflow.

  11. Immunophenotyping of actue leukaemias by flow cytometry: a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To provide an overview of the utility of flow cytometry for phenotyping of acute leukaemias and selection of monoclonal antibodies. Data sources: The literature review was obtained through internet, journals and chapters in the relevant books. Data selection: Relevant articles and chapters on immunophenotyping ...

  12. Flow cytometry applications in the study of immunological lung disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29141320X; Gudarzi, Hoda; Tabarsi, Payam; M Adcock, Ian; Masjedi, Mohamad Reza; Jamaati, Hamid Reza; Garssen, Johan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086369962; Velayati, Ali Akbar; A Redegeld, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074752464

    The use of flow cytometry in the clinical laboratory has grown substantially in the past decade. Flow cytometric analysis provides a rapid qualitative and quantitative description of multiple characteristics of individual cells. For example, it is possible to detect the cell size and granularity,

  13. Flow cytometry based rapid duplexed immunoassay for fusarium mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czéh, Árpád; Mézes, Miklós; Mandy, Francis; Szőke, Zsuzsanna; Nagyéri, György; Laufer, Noémi; Kőszegi, Balázs; Koczka, Tamás; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Lustyik, György

    2017-02-01

    At small food processing facilities, the most frequently used test to determine if grain-derived mycotoxin concentrations are compliant with legal limits is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Each kit is designed to detect one of the six dangerous mycotoxins. With the increasing occurrence of coinfection of grain with multiple-mycotoxins in the field and/or during storage, ELISA is no longer a cost effective best assay option. With ELISA, each species of mycotoxin requires different sample preparation/extraction and a 45 min incubation. The alternative multiplexed assay presented here, the competitive fluorescent microsphere immunoassay (CFIA), follows current food safety standards. It handles several toxins simultaneously with a single universal extraction protocol. The authors' objective was to modify an existing commercial CFIA kit developed for bench top flow cytometry and extend its utility for point-of-need (PON) applications. The accelerated protocol offers over 60% reduction in total processing time and it detects dual mycotoxin contamination simultaneously. The observed enhanced binding kinetics equations reported here utilizing suspended solid phase particles in liquid phase, are also supported by published theoretical calculations. In the near future portable cytometry may bring rapid multiplexed PON testing to assure the safety of small food processing installations. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  14. Flow cytometry determination of ploidy level in winged bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flow cytometry determination of ploidy level in winged bean [ Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC] and its response to colchicine-induced mutagenesis. ... For mutation induction, 20 seeds from accessionsTPt26 and TPt154 were soaked in three different concentrations of colchicine (5,10, 15mg/l) for 24, 48, and 72 hours, ...

  15. Flow: Statistics, visualization and informatics for flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepler Thomas B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flow is an open source software application for clinical and experimental researchers to perform exploratory data analysis, clustering and annotation of flow cytometric data. Flow is an extensible system that offers the ease of use commonly found in commercial flow cytometry software packages and the statistical power of academic packages like the R BioConductor project.

  16. Quantification of microglial proliferation and apoptosis by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Finsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    of proliferation and apoptosis maintain a low rate of microglial turnover. Here, we describe quantitative analysis of proliferation and apoptosis of microglial cells isolated from individual adult mice by flow cytometry, which allows distinction from perivascular or infiltrating macrophages, based on differential...

  17. The curvHDR method for gating flow cytometry samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wand Matthew P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput flow cytometry experiments produce hundreds of large multivariate samples of cellular characteristics. These samples require specialized processing to obtain clinically meaningful measurements. A major component of this processing is a form of cell subsetting known as gating. Manual gating is time-consuming and subjective. Good automatic and semi-automatic gating algorithms are very beneficial to high-throughput flow cytometry. Results We develop a statistical procedure, named curvHDR, for automatic and semi-automatic gating. The method combines the notions of significant high negative curvature regions and highest density regions and has the ability to adapt well to human-perceived gates. The underlying principles apply to dimension of arbitrary size, although we focus on dimensions up to three. Accompanying software, compatible with contemporary flow cytometry infor-matics, is developed. Conclusion The method is seen to adapt well to nuances in the data and, to a reasonable extent, match human perception of useful gates. It offers big savings in human labour when processing high-throughput flow cytometry data whilst retaining a good degree of efficacy.

  18. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  19. Determination of ploidy level by flow cytometry and autopolyploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A procedure for chromosome doubling of the white cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) type was established by using colchicine and oryzalin treatments to in vitro plantlets. Flow cytometry was successfully used for analyzing ploidy levels within three cocoyam types and regenerated plants. Treating in vitro white cocoyam ...

  20. Primena satelitskih snimaka za dopunu sadržaja topografskih karata / An application of satellite images for improving the content of topographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag D. Regodić

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Neažurnost sadržaja topografskih karata (TK, uslovljena ponajviše stvarnim ekonomskim teškoćama pri izradi novih i dopuni postojećih izdanja, kao i nedovoljnost i sve teže stanje pri izradi ostalih geotopografskih materijala (GTM, u velikoj meri otežavaju geotopografsko obezbeđenje (GTOb vojske u miru, kao i u svim periodima pripreme i vođenja ratnih dejstava. Rešenje ovog problema je u iznalaženju adekvatnog načina upotrebe proizvoda svih vrsta daljinskih snimanja, a naročito u obradi kvalitetnih satelitskih snimaka. Kao najbolji pokazatelj velikih mogućnosti daljinske detekcije, korišćenjem satelitskih snimaka, u kartografskoj praksi primenom kvalitetnih softverskih rešenja, u radu je predstavljena dopuna topografske karte nedostajućim topografskim sadržajem. / Lack of updated content of topographic maps (TMs, mainly due to economic issues regarding the publishing of existing or revised TMs, substantially affects geo-topographic supply (GTS of the Army both in peace and warfare time, as well as shortage of other geo-topographic materials (GTMs. The solution to this problem is in finding an appropriate method of using products of all types of remote sensing, high quality satellite images in particular. Having shown the best possibilities of remote sensing while using satellite images in mapping through the quality software solutions, the author presents an addition to topographic maps based on missing topographic data. Introduction Numerous natural and social phenomena are constantly observed, surveyed, registered and analyzed. Permanent or periodical satellite surveillance and recording for different purposes are growing in importance. The purposes can range from meteorological issues, through study of large water surfaces to military intelligence, etc. These recording can be used in making topographic, thematic and working maps as well as other geo-topographic material. Processing and analyzing of ikonos2 satellite images

  1. Flow cytometry for monitoring contaminant exposure in black-crowned night-herons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Lyne, T.B.; Lewis, T.; Ruedas, L.A.; Custer, Christine M.; Melancon, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The flow cytometry method (FCM) was employed to determine cellular DNA content of black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) embryos and 10-day-old chicks collected at sites differing in types of chemical contamination. The coefficient of variation of DNA content (CV) in blood collected from embryos suggested cytogenetic damage at a site in Louisiana known to be contaminated with petroleum. Blood CV from chicks suggested genetic damage at a site in Texas also known to be contaminated with petroleum. Spleen CVs in chicks were significantly lower than respective means from the reference site. The CVs of chick blood and liver and spleen negatively correlated, suggesting recovery of spleen and liver cells after exposure to a clastogenic compound. Thus, the lower CVs may also have been indicative of genetic damage. Based on the findings of this study, FCM is a potential indicator of certain environmental contaminants in black-crowned night-herons.

  2. Flow cytometry vs. Ki67 labelling index in breast cancer: a prospective evaluation of 181 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Arribas, F; Núñez, M J; Piqueras, V; Lucas, A R; Sánchez, J; Tejerina, A; Schneider, J

    2002-01-01

    Excessive proliferation is one of the first steps in oncogenic activation and one of the most important biological features defining the aggressiveness of tumors. Quantifying the proportion of tumor cells in S-phase by means of flow cytometry has shown, in the past, to be useful for defining high-risk subgroups in breast cancer. Several antigens closely associated with proliferation are also detectable by means of immunohistochemistry, offering in theory an easy to perform and cheap alternative to flow cytometry for measuring proliferation. To test this hypothesis, we compared both methods prospectively in a series of breast cancers. We studied the proliferation rate of 181 breast cancers (152 ductal infiltrating, 17 lobular infiltrating, 12 other histological varieties), operated upon at our institution, by means of flow cytometry and the Ki67 labelling index, using the MIBI antibody. Ploidy (expressed as DNA content or DNA-index), S-phase fraction and the Ki67 labelling index were the variables of the study. The S-phase fraction was considered separately for diploid and aneuploid tumors, following the 1992 Maine Consensus guidelines and was judged abnormally elevated if higher than the 75th percentile for each group. The Ki67 labelling index was expressed as percent positive tumor cells, positive cells being those showing specific nuclear staining. DNA-ploidy and the Ki67 labelling index could be evaluated in all tumors. Of the total, 96 (53%) were diploid and 85 (47%) aneuploid. S-phase fraction could be measured in 172 out of the 181 tumors (95%). The 75th percentile cut-offs for diploid and aneuploid tumors were 9.9% and 15.8%, respectively. We found a significant correlation beween rising DNA content and increasing Ki67 index (r = 0.18; p = 0.022), as well as between the percentage of cells in S-phase of the whole tumor population and Ki67 (r = 0.22; p = 0.0055). A Ki67 cut-off of 50% or higher identified most aneuploid tumors, or a small group of diploid

  3. An automated wide-field time-gated optically sectioning fluorescence lifetime imaging multiwell plate reader for high-content analysis of protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibhai, Dominic; Kumar, Sunil; Kelly, Douglas; Warren, Sean; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an optically-sectioned FLIM multiwell plate reader that combines Nipkow microscopy with wide-field time-gated FLIM, and its application to high content analysis of FRET. The system acquires sectioned FLIM images in protein. It has been applied to study the formation of immature HIV virus like particles (VLPs) in live cells by monitoring Gag-Gag protein interactions using FLIM FRET of HIV-1 Gag transfected with CFP or YFP. VLP formation results in FRET between closely packed Gag proteins, as confirmed by our FLIM analysis that includes automatic image segmentation.

  4. In vivo flow cytometry and time-resolved near-IR angiography and lymphography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Brock, Robert W.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2007-05-01

    Integration of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques with high-speed, high-resolution transmission and fluorescence microscopy shows great potential for in vivo flow cytometry and indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared (IR) angiography of blood and lymph microvessels. In particular, the capabilities of in vivo flow cytometry using rat mesentery and nude mouse ear models are demonstrated for real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells in skin, mesentery, lymph nodes, liver, kidney; studying vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics; monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems; high-speed imaging of cell deformability in flow; and label-free real-time monitoring of single cell extravasation from blood vessel lumen into tissue. As presented, the advantages of ICG IR-angiography include estimation of time resolved dye dynamics (appearance and clearance) in blood and lymph microvessels using fluorescent and photoacoustic modules of the integrated technique. These new approaches are important for monitoring and quantifying metastatic and apoptotic cells; comparative measurements of plasma and cell velocities; analysis of immune responses; monitoring of circulating macromolecules, chylomicrons, bacteria, viruses and nanoparticles; molecular imaging. In the future, we believe that the integrated technique presented will have great potential for translation to early disease diagnoses (e.g. cancer) or assessment of innovative therapeutic interventions in humans.

  5. Effects of acupuncture therapy on abdominal fat and hepatic fat content in obese children: a magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Peng, Yun; Liu, ZuXiang; Li, Shilian; Lv, Zhongli; Tian, LiFang; Zhu, Jie; Zhao, XuNa; Chen, Min

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to study the influence of acupuncture therapy on abdominal fat and hepatic fat content in obese children. The design was a longitudinal, clinical intervention study of acupuncture therapy. SUBJECTS were 10 healthy, obese children (age: 11.4 ± 1.65 years, body-mass index [BMI]: 29.03 ± 4.81 kg/m(2)). Measurements included various anthropometric parameters, abdominal fat (assessed by MRI) and hepatic fat content (assessed by (1)H-MRS) at baseline and after 1 month of acupuncture therapy. One (1) month of acupuncture therapy significantly reduced the subjects' BMI by 3.5% (p = 0.005), abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume by 16.04% (p  0.05). There was a significant correlation between the level of abdominal fat (SAT, VAT) and anthropometric parameters (weight, BMI, waist circumferences, hip circumferences). There was no statistically significant correlation between IHTG and anthropometric parameters or abdominal fat content. The first direct experimental evidence is provided demonstrating that acupuncture therapy significantly reduces BMI and abdominal adipose tissue by reducing abdominal VAT content without significant changes in body weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, WHR, abdominal SAT, or IHTG content. Thus, the use of acupuncture therapy to selectively target a reduction in abdominal VAT content should become more important and more popular in the future.

  6. Non-destructive determination and visualisation of insoluble and soluble dietary fibre contents in fresh-cut celeries during storage periods using hyperspectral imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ling; Xiong, Chuanwu; Qu, Hao; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Lei

    2017-08-01

    The feasibility of using hyperspectral imaging technique to non-destructively determine insoluble dietary fibre (IDF) and soluble dietary fibre (SDF) contents in fresh-cut celeries and visualise their spatial distribution during 28-day storage periods was investigated. Genetic synergy interval partial least square (GA-Si-PLS) algorithm was developed to establish calibration model, which, superior to the PLS and Si-PLS developed models, achieved the prediction performance with Rp of 0.9638 and 0.9756, and RMSEP of 1.180 and 0.336, respectively. The developed GA-Si-PLS models were then applied pixel-wise to visualise the spatial distribution of IDF and SDF contents during storage, which clearly showed that the IDF content increased with storage time, while the SDF content kept decreasing. The study provides the basis for further understanding of the spatial-temporal variation of IDF and SDF contents during storage, demonstrating that HSI could be useful in real-time IDF and SDF contents monitoring in vegetable research and industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Semiautomatic High-Content Analysis of Complex Images from Cocultures of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages: A CellProfiler Showcase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeper, Matthias; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger C; Weinert, Sönke

    2017-08-01

    Automatization in microscopy, cell culture, and the ease of digital imagery allow obtainment of more information from single samples and upscaling of image-based analysis to high-content approaches. Simple segmentation algorithms of biological imagery are nowadays widely spread in biomedical research, but processing of complex sample structures, for example, variable sample compositions, cell shapes, and sizes, and rare events remains a difficult task. As there is no perfect method for image segmentation and fully automatic image analysis of complex content, we aimed to succeed by identification of unique and reliable features within the sample. Through exemplary use of a coculture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages (MPs), we demonstrate how rare interactions within this highly variable sample type can be analyzed. Because of limitations in immunocytochemistry in our specific setup, we developed a semiautomatic approach to examine the interaction of lipid-laden MPs with VSMCs under hypoxic conditions based on nuclei morphology by high-content analysis using the open-source software CellProfiler ( www.cellprofiler.org ). We provide evidence that, in comparison with fully automatic analysis, a low threshold within the analysis workflow and subsequent manual control save time, while providing more objective and reliable results.

  8. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1 early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2 microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3 microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4 integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  9. Microfluidic impedance flow cytometry enabling high-throughput single-cell electrical property characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-04-29

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  10. Content-based image retrieval using scale invariant feature transform and gray level co-occurrence matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant; Khare, Manish; Khare, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    The rapid growth of different types of images has posed a great challenge to the scientific fraternity. As the images are increasing everyday, it is becoming a challenging task to organize the images for efficient and easy access. The field of image retrieval attempts to solve this problem through various techniques. This paper proposes a novel technique of image retrieval by combining Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and Co-occurrence matrix. For construction of feature vector, SIFT descriptors of gray scale images are computed and normalized using z-score normalization followed by construction of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) of normalized SIFT keypoints. The constructed feature vector is matched with those of images in database to retrieve visually similar images. The proposed method is tested on Corel-1K dataset and the performance is measured in terms of precision and recall. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms some of the other state-of-the-art methods.

  11. BayesFlow: latent modeling of flow cytometry cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Kerstin; Wallin, Jonas; Fontes, Magnus

    2016-01-12

    Flow cytometry is a widespread single-cell measurement technology with a multitude of clinical and research applications. Interpretation of flow cytometry data is hard; the instrumentation is delicate and can not render absolute measurements, hence samples can only be interpreted in relation to each other while at the same time comparisons are confounded by inter-sample variation. Despite this, most automated flow cytometry data analysis methods either treat samples individually or ignore the variation by for example pooling the data. A key requirement for models that include multiple samples is the ability to visualize and assess inferred variation, since what could be technical variation in one setting would be different phenotypes in another. We introduce BayesFlow, a pipeline for latent modeling of flow cytometry cell populations built upon a Bayesian hierarchical model. The model systematizes variation in location as well as shape. Expert knowledge can be incorporated through informative priors and the results can be supervised through compact and comprehensive visualizations. BayesFlow is applied to two synthetic and two real flow cytometry data sets. For the first real data set, taken from the FlowCAP I challenge, BayesFlow does not only give a gating which would place it among the top performers in FlowCAP I for this dataset, it also gives a more consistent treatment of different samples than either manual gating or other automated gating methods. The second real data set contains replicated flow cytometry measurements of samples from healthy individuals. BayesFlow gives here cell populations with clear expression patterns and small technical intra-donor variation as compared to biological inter-donor variation. Modeling latent relations between samples through BayesFlow enables a systematic analysis of inter-sample variation. As opposed to other joint gating methods, effort is put at ensuring that the obtained partition of the data corresponds to actual

  12. AN ENSEMBLE TEMPLATE MATCHING AND CONTENT-BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL SCHEME TOWARDS EARLY STAGE DETECTION OF MELANOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiros Kostopoulos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma represents the most dangerous type of skin cancer. In this study we present an ensemble classification scheme, employing the mutual information, the cross-correlation and the clustering based on proximity of image features methods, for early stage assessment of melanomas on plain photography images. The proposed scheme performs two main operations. First, it retrieves the most similar, to the unknown case, image samples from an available image database with verified benign moles and malignant melanoma cases. Second, it provides an automated estimation regarding the nature of the unknown image sample based on the majority of the most similar images retrieved from the available database. Clinical material comprised 75 melanoma and 75 benign plain photography images collected from publicly available dermatological atlases. Results showed that the ensemble scheme outperformed all other methods tested in terms of accuracy with 94.9±1.5%, following an external cross-validation evaluation methodology. The proposed scheme may benefit patients by providing a second opinion consultation during the self-skin examination process and the physician by providing a second opinion estimation regarding the nature of suspicious moles that may assist towards decision making especially for ambiguous cases, safeguarding, in this way from potential diagnostic misinterpretations.

  13. Method of detaching adherent cells for flow cytometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2015-12-24

    In one aspect, a method for detaching adherent cells can include adding a cell lifting solution to the media including a sample of adherent cells and incubating the sample of adherent cells with the cell lifting solution. No scraping or pipetting is needed to facilitate cell detachment. The method do not require inactivation of cell lifting solution and no washing of detaching cells is required to remove cell lifting solution. Detached cells can be stained with dye in the presence of cell lifting solution and are further analyzed using flow cytometer. The method has been tested using 6 different cell lines, 4 different assays, two different plate formats (96 and 384 well plates) and two different flow cytometry instruments. The method is simple to perform, less time consuming, with no cell loss and makes high throughput flow cytometry on adherent cells a reality.

  14. Merging Mixture Components for Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Finak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a framework for the identification of cell subpopulations in flow cytometry data based on merging mixture components using the flowClust methodology. We show that the cluster merging algorithm under our framework improves model fit and provides a better estimate of the number of distinct cell subpopulations than either Gaussian mixture models or flowClust, especially for complicated flow cytometry data distributions. Our framework allows the automated selection of the number of distinct cell subpopulations and we are able to identify cases where the algorithm fails, thus making it suitable for application in a high throughput FCM analysis pipeline. Furthermore, we demonstrate a method for summarizing complex merged cell subpopulations in a simple manner that integrates with the existing flowClust framework and enables downstream data analysis. We demonstrate the performance of our framework on simulated and real FCM data. The software is available in the flowMerge package through the Bioconductor project.

  15. Analysis and Isolation of Adipocytes by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, Susan M.; Miller, Heidi L.; Helm, Karen M.; Acosta, Alistaire S.; Childs, Christine R.; Kong, Raymond; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis and isolation of adipocytes via flow cytometry is particularly useful to study their biology. However, the adoption of this technology has often been hampered by the presence of stromal/vascular cells in adipocyte fractions prepared from collagenase-digested adipose tissue. Here, we describe a multistep staining method and gating strategy that effectively excludes stromal contaminants. Initially, we set a gate optimized to the size and internal complexity of adipocytes. Exclusion of cell aggregates is then performed based on fluorescence of a nuclear stain followed by positive selection to collect only those cell events containing lipid droplets. Lastly, negative selection of cells expressing stromal or vascular lineage markers removes any remaining stromal contaminants. These procedures are applicable to simple analysis of adipocytes and their subcellular constituents by flow cytometry as well as isolation of adipocytes by flow sorting. PMID:24480352

  16. Step-specific Sorting of Mouse Spermatids by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Olivier; Leduc, Frédéric; Acteau, Geneviève; Arguin, Mélina; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Brazeau, Marc-André; Marois, Isabelle; Richter, Martin V; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2015-12-31

    The differentiation of mouse spermatids is one critical process for the production of a functional male gamete with an intact genome to be transmitted to the next generation. So far, molecular studies of this morphological transition have been hampered by the lack of a method allowing adequate separation of these important steps of spermatid differentiation for subsequent analyses. Earlier attempts at proper gating of these cells using flow cytometry may have been difficult because of a peculiar increase in DNA fluorescence in spermatids undergoing chromatin remodeling. Based on this observation, we provide details of a simple flow cytometry scheme, allowing reproducible purification of four populations of mouse spermatids fixed with ethanol, each representing a different state in the nuclear remodeling process. Population enrichment is confirmed using step-specific markers and morphological criterions. The purified spermatids can be used for genomic and proteomic analyses.

  17. Multiplexed mass cytometry profiling of cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Zunder, Eli R.; Finck, Rachel; Chen, Tiffany J.; Savig, Erica S.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Sachs, Karen; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to comprehensively explore the impact of bio-active molecules on human samples at the single-cell level can provide great insight for biomedical research. Mass cytometry enables quantitative single-cell analysis with deep dimensionality, but currently lacks high-throughput capability. Here we report a method termed mass-tag cellular barcoding (MCB) that increases mass cytometry throughput by sample multiplexing. 96-well format MCB was used to characterize human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) signaling dynamics, cell-to-cell communication, the signaling variability between 8 donors, and to define the impact of 27 inhibitors on this system. For each compound, 14 phosphorylation sites were measured in 14 PBMC types, resulting in 18,816 quantified phosphorylation levels from each multiplexed sample. This high-dimensional systems-level inquiry allowed analysis across cell-type and signaling space, reclassified inhibitors, and revealed off-target effects. MCB enables high-content, high-throughput screening, with potential applications for drug discovery, pre-clinical testing, and mechanistic investigation of human disease. PMID:22902532

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Rhoeo discolor Phenolic Rich Extracts Determined by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Varela, Rebeca; García-García, Rebeca M; Barba-Dávila, Bertha A; Fajardo-Ramírez, Oscar R; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O; Cardineau, Guy A

    2015-10-14

    Traditional medicine has led to the discovery of important active substances used in several health-related areas. Phytochemicals in Rhoeo discolor extracts have proven to have important antimicrobial activity. In the present study, our group determined the antimicrobial effects of extracts of Rhoeo discolor, a plant commonly used in Mexico for both medicinal and ornamental purposes. We evaluated the in vitro activity of phenolic rich extracts against specifically chosen microorganisms of human health importance by measuring their susceptibility via agar-disc diffusion assay and flow cytometry: Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Streptococcus mutans, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and lastly a fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Ten different extracts were tested in eight different doses on all the microorganisms. Analytical data revealed a high content of phenolic compounds. Both agar-disc diffusion assay and flow cytometry results demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the least affected by extract exposure. However, low doses of these extracts (predominantly polar), in a range from 1 to 4 μg/mL, did produce a statistically significant bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect on the rest of the microorganisms. These results suggest the addition of certain natural extracts from Rhoeo discolor could act as antibacterial and antimycotic drugs or additives for foods and cosmetics.

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Rhoeo discolor Phenolic Rich Extracts Determined by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca García-Varela

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine has led to the discovery of important active substances used in several health-related areas. Phytochemicals in Rhoeo discolor extracts have proven to have important antimicrobial activity. In the present study, our group determined the antimicrobial effects of extracts of Rhoeo discolor, a plant commonly used in Mexico for both medicinal and ornamental purposes. We evaluated the in vitro activity of phenolic rich extracts against specifically chosen microorganisms of human health importance by measuring their susceptibility via agar-disc diffusion assay and flow cytometry: Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Streptococcus mutans, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and lastly a fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Ten different extracts were tested in eight different doses on all the microorganisms. Analytical data revealed a high content of phenolic compounds. Both agar-disc diffusion assay and flow cytometry results demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the least affected by extract exposure. However, low doses of these extracts (predominantly polar, in a range from 1 to 4 μg/mL, did produce a statistically significant bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect on the rest of the microorganisms. These results suggest the addition of certain natural extracts from Rhoeo discolor could act as antibacterial and antimycotic drugs or additives for foods and cosmetics.

  20. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  1. Report of the European Myeloma Network on multiparametric flow cytometry in multiple myeloma and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawstron, Andy C.; Orfao, Alberto; Beksac, Meral; Bezdickova, Ludmila; Broolmans, Rik A.; Bumbea, Horia; Dalva, Klara; Fuhler, Gwenny; Gratama, Jan; Hose, Dirk; Kovarova, Lucie; Lioznov, Michael; Mateo, Gema; Morilla, Ricardo; Mylin, Anne K.; Omede, Paola; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Andres, Martin Perez; Petrucci, Maria; Ruggeri, Marina; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schmitz, Alexander; Schreder, Martin; Seynaeve, Carine; Spacek, Martin; de Tute, Ruth M.; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Weston-Bell, Nicky; Owen, Roger G.; Miguel, Jesus F. San; Sonneveld, Pieter; Johnsen, Hans E.

    The European Myeloma Network (EMN) organized two flow cytometry workshops. The first aimed to identify specific indications for flow cytometry in patients with monoclonal gammopathies, and consensus technical approaches through a questionnaire-based review of current practice in participating

  2. Non-destructive evaluation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves by simple and multiple regression analysis of RGB image components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, M; Mele, G; Pulvento, C; Lavini, A; d'Andria, R; Jacobsen, S-E

    2014-06-01

    Leaf chlorophyll content provides valuable information about physiological status of plants; it is directly linked to photosynthetic potential and primary production. In vitro assessment by wet chemical extraction is the standard method for leaf chlorophyll determination. This measurement is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Over the years alternative methods, rapid and non-destructive, have been explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the applicability of a fast and non-invasive field method for estimation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves based on RGB components analysis of digital images acquired with a standard SLR camera. Digital images of leaves from different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth were acquired directly in the field. Mean values of each RGB component were evaluated via image analysis software and correlated to leaf chlorophyll provided by standard laboratory procedure. Single and multiple regression models using RGB color components as independent variables have been tested and validated. The performance of the proposed method was compared to that of the widely used non-destructive SPAD method. Sensitivity of the best regression models for different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth was also checked. Color data acquisition of the leaves in the field with a digital camera was quick, more effective, and lower cost than SPAD. The proposed RGB models provided better correlation (highest R (2)) and prediction (lowest RMSEP) of the true value of foliar chlorophyll content and had a lower amount of noise in the whole range of chlorophyll studied compared with SPAD and other leaf image processing based models when applied to quinoa and amaranth.

  3. Impedance Flow Cytometry: A Novel Technique in Pollen Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Heidmann, Iris; Schade-Kampmann, Grit; Lambalk, Joep; Ottiger, Marcel; Di Berardino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An efficient and reliable method to estimate plant cell viability, especially of pollen, is important for plant breeding research and plant production processes. Pollen quality is determined by classical methods, like staining techniques or in vitro pollen germination, each having disadvantages with respect to reliability, analysis speed, and species dependency. Analysing single cells based on their dielectric properties by impedance flow cytometry (IFC) has developed into a comm...

  4. Managing Multi-center Flow Cytometry Data for Immune Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Scott; Laske, Karoline; Welters, Marij Jp; Bidmon, Nicole; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M; Enzor, Jennifer; Staats, Janet; Weinhold, Kent J; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    With the recent results of promising cancer vaccines and immunotherapy1-5, immune monitoring has become increasingly relevant for measuring treatment-induced effects on T cells, and an essential tool for shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for a successful treatment. Flow cytometry is the canonical multi-parameter assay for the fine characterization of single cells in solution, and is ubiquitously used in pre-clinical tumor immunology and in cancer immunotherapy trials. Current state-of-the-art polychromatic flow cytometry involves multi-step, multi-reagent assays followed by sample acquisition on sophisticated instruments capable of capturing up to 20 parameters per cell at a rate of tens of thousands of cells per second. Given the complexity of flow cytometry assays, reproducibility is a major concern, especially for multi-center studies. A promising approach for improving reproducibility is the use of automated analysis borrowing from statistics, machine learning and information visualization21-23, as these methods directly address the subjectivity, operator-dependence, labor-intensive and low fidelity of manual analysis. However, it is quite time-consuming to investigate and test new automated analysis techniques on large data sets without some centralized information management system. For large-scale automated analysis to be practical, the presence of consistent and high-quality data linked to the raw FCS files is indispensable. In particular, the use of machine-readable standard vocabularies to characterize channel metadata is essential when constructing analytic pipelines to avoid errors in processing, analysis and interpretation of results. For automation, this high-quality metadata needs to be programmatically accessible, implying the need for a consistent Application Programming Interface (API). In this manuscript, we propose that upfront time spent normalizing flow cytometry data to conform to carefully designed data models enables automated

  5. A CLIPS expert system for clinical flow cytometry data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, G. C.; Duque, R. E.; Braylan, R. C.; Stewart, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed using CLIPS to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data from cancer patients. Cluster analysis is used to find subpopulations representing various cell types in multiple datasets each consisting of four to five measurements on each of 5000 cells. CLIPS facts are derived from results of the clustering. CLIPS rules are based on the expertise of Drs. Stewart, Duque, and Braylan. The rules incorporate certainty factors based on case histories.

  6. Setting objective thresholds for rare event detection in flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Adam J.; Staats, Janet; Enzor, Jennifer; McKinnon, Katherine; Frelinger, Jacob; Denny, Thomas N.; Weinhold, Kent J.; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    The accurate identification of rare antigen-specific cytokine positive cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after antigenic stimulation in an intracellular staining (ICS) flow cytometry assay is challenging, as cytokine positive events may be fairly diffusely distributed and lack an obvious separation from the negative population. Traditionally, the approach by flow operators has been to manually set a positivity threshold to partition events into cytokine-positive and cytokin...

  7. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International

  8. In vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry for early malaria diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chengzhong; Carey, Kai A; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Menyaev, Yulian A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Stumhofer, Jason S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    In vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) has already demonstrated a great potential for the diagnosis of deadly diseases through ultrasensitive detection of rare disease-associated circulating markers in whole blood volume. Here, we demonstrate the first application of this powerful technique for early diagnosis of malaria through label-free detection of malaria parasite-produced hemozoin in infected red blood cells (iRBCs) as high-contrast PA agent. The existing malaria tests using blood smears can detect the disease at 0.001-0.1% of parasitemia. On the contrary, linear PAFC showed a potential for noninvasive malaria diagnosis at an extremely low level of parasitemia of 0.0000001%, which is ∼10(3) times better than the existing tests. Multicolor time-of-flight PAFC with high-pulse repetition rate lasers at wavelengths of 532, 671, and 820 nm demonstrated rapid spectral and spatial identification and quantitative enumeration of individual iRBCs. Integration of PAFC with fluorescence flow cytometry (FFC) provided real-time simultaneous detection of single iRBCs and parasites expressing green fluorescence proteins, respectively. A combination of linear and nonlinear nanobubble-based multicolor PAFC showed capability to real-time control therapy efficiency by counting of iRBCs before, during, and after treatment. Our results suggest that high-sensitivity, high-resolution ultrafast PAFC-FFC platform represents a powerful research tool to provide the insight on malaria progression through dynamic study of parasite-cell interactions directly in bloodstream, whereas portable hand-worn PAFC device could be broadly used in humans for early malaria diagnosis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  9. Managing Multi-center Flow Cytometry Data for Immune Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Scott; Laske, Karoline; Welters, Marij JP; Bidmon, Nicole; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M; Enzor, Jennifer; Staats, Janet; Weinhold, Kent J; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    With the recent results of promising cancer vaccines and immunotherapy1–5, immune monitoring has become increasingly relevant for measuring treatment-induced effects on T cells, and an essential tool for shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for a successful treatment. Flow cytometry is the canonical multi-parameter assay for the fine characterization of single cells in solution, and is ubiquitously used in pre-clinical tumor immunology and in cancer immunotherapy trials. Current state-of-the-art polychromatic flow cytometry involves multi-step, multi-reagent assays followed by sample acquisition on sophisticated instruments capable of capturing up to 20 parameters per cell at a rate of tens of thousands of cells per second. Given the complexity of flow cytometry assays, reproducibility is a major concern, especially for multi-center studies. A promising approach for improving reproducibility is the use of automated analysis borrowing from statistics, machine learning and information visualization21–23, as these methods directly address the subjectivity, operator-dependence, labor-intensive and low fidelity of manual analysis. However, it is quite time-consuming to investigate and test new automated analysis techniques on large data sets without some centralized information management system. For large-scale automated analysis to be practical, the presence of consistent and high-quality data linked to the raw FCS files is indispensable. In particular, the use of machine-readable standard vocabularies to characterize channel metadata is essential when constructing analytic pipelines to avoid errors in processing, analysis and interpretation of results. For automation, this high-quality metadata needs to be programmatically accessible, implying the need for a consistent Application Programming Interface (API). In this manuscript, we propose that upfront time spent normalizing flow cytometry data to conform to carefully designed data models enables

  10. Identification and detection of murine leukemia blasts by flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Human leukemia has been determined and classified with the help of flow cytometry for the past two decades. Past attempts to detect leukemia blasts relied on both forward and side scatter (FSC and SSC) based on cell size and granularity. However, this technique failed to show a clean separation of blasts from normal lineage cells. In 1993, Borowitz, et al developed flow cytometric analysis to distinguish human leukemia blasts from other normal lineage cells by using fluorescence-conjugated CD...

  11. Standardized Multi-Color Flow Cytometry and Computational Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, Stephan; Streitz, Mathias; Sawitzki, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Multi-color flow cytometry has become a valuable and highly informative tool for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of patients with immune deficiencies or inflammatory disorders. However, the method complexity and error-prone conventional manual data analysis often result in a high variability between different analysts and research laboratories. Here, we provide strategies and guidelines aiming at a more standardized multi-color flow cytometric staining and unsupervised data analysis for whole blood patient samples.

  12. WE-AB-BRA-01: 3D-2D Image Registration for Target Localization in Spine Surgery: Comparison of Similarity Metrics Against Robustness to Content Mismatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M; Siewerdsen, J H [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G [Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Lo, S F; Wolinsky, J P; Gokaslan, Z L [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Aygun, N [Department of Raiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided spine surgery, mapping 3D preoperative images to 2D intraoperative images via 3D-2D registration can provide valuable assistance in target localization. However, the presence of surgical instrumentation, hardware implants, and soft-tissue resection/displacement causes mismatches in image content, confounding existing registration methods. Manual/semi-automatic methods to mask such extraneous content is time consuming, user-dependent, error prone, and disruptive to clinical workflow. We developed and evaluated 2 novel similarity metrics within a robust registration framework to overcome such challenges in target localization. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study in 19 spine surgery patients included 19 preoperative 3D CT images and 50 intraoperative mobile radiographs in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine regions. A neuroradiologist provided truth definition of vertebral positions in CT and radiography. 3D-2D registration was performed using the CMA-ES optimizer with 4 gradient-based image similarity metrics: (1) gradient information (GI); (2) gradient correlation (GC); (3) a novel variant referred to as gradient orientation (GO); and (4) a second variant referred to as truncated gradient correlation (TGC). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) of the vertebral levels. Results: Conventional similarity metrics were susceptible to gross registration error and failure modes associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation: for GI, the median PDE and interquartile range was 33.0±43.6 mm; similarly for GC, PDE = 23.0±92.6 mm respectively. The robust metrics GO and TGC, on the other hand, demonstrated major improvement in PDE (7.6 ±9.4 mm and 8.1± 18.1 mm, respectively) and elimination of gross failure modes. Conclusion: The proposed GO and TGC similarity measures improve registration accuracy and robustness to gross failure in the presence of strong image content mismatch. Such

  13. Facilitating medical information search using Google Glass connected to a content-based medical image retrieval system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Antoine; Schaer, Roger; Markonis, Dimitrios; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Wearable computing devices are starting to change the way users interact with computers and the Internet. Among them, Google Glass includes a small screen located in front of the right eye, a camera filming in front of the user and a small computing unit. Google Glass has the advantage to provide online services while allowing the user to perform tasks with his/her hands. These augmented glasses uncover many useful applications, also in the medical domain. For example, Google Glass can easily provide video conference between medical doctors to discuss a live case. Using these glasses can also facilitate medical information search by allowing the access of a large amount of annotated medical cases during a consultation in a non-disruptive fashion for medical staff. In this paper, we developed a Google Glass application able to take a photo and send it to a medical image retrieval system along with keywords in order to retrieve similar cases. As a preliminary assessment of the usability of the application, we tested the application under three conditions (images of the skin; printed CT scans and MRI images; and CT and MRI images acquired directly from an LCD screen) to explore whether using Google Glass affects the accuracy of the results returned by the medical image retrieval system. The preliminary results show that despite minor problems due to the relative stability of the Google Glass, images can be sent to and processed by the medical image retrieval system and similar images are returned to the user, potentially helping in the decision making process.

  14. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  15. Accurate and fast urinalysis in febrile patients by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Foppie J; Gieteling, Elske; van Egmond-Kreileman, Heidi; Moshaver, Bijan; van der Leur, Sjef J C M; Stegeman, Coen A; Groeneveld, Paul H P

    2017-05-01

    The urine culture is worldwide accepted as the gold standard in diagnosing urinary tract infections, but is time consuming and costly, other methods are fast but moderately reliable. We investigated whether counting the number of bacteria by flow cytometry could be a fast and accurate method to analyze urine samples in febrile patients at the emergency department (ED). Urine samples were obtained from 140 febrile patients at the ED. Urinalysis was performed according to standard procedures. Flow cytometric analysis for bacteria was performed with the Accuri C6 flow cytometer. Diagnostic values were determined at various cut-off points by using urine culture as the gold standard. The highest diagnostic accuracy of urinalysis of bacteria was obtained with flow cytometric analysis (AUC of 0.96). The best cut-off value for bacteria counted by flow cytometry based on the ROC-curve was 3.72 × 10(6) bacteria/mL, this resulted in a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 88.2%. Counting bacteria by flow cytometry has the highest diagnostic accuracy and is superior to other methods in urinalysis in febrile patients in the ED when using urine culture as the gold standard.

  16. Abnormalities in emotion processing within cortical and subcortical regions in criminal psychopaths: evidence from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using pictures with emotional content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jürgen L; Sommer, Monika; Wagner, Verena; Lange, Kirsten; Taschler, Heidrun; Röder, Christian H; Schuierer, Gerhardt; Klein, Helmfried E; Hajak, Göran

    2003-07-15

    Neurobiology of psychopathy is important for our understanding of current neuropsychiatric questions. Despite a growing interest in biological research in psychopathy, its neural underpinning remains obscure. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the influence of affective contents on brain activation in psychopaths. Series containing positive and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System were shown to six male psychopaths and six male control subjects while 100 whole-brain echo-planar-imaging measurements were acquired. Differences in brain activation were evaluated using BrainVoyager software 4.6. In psychopaths, increased activation through negative contents was found right-sided in prefrontal regions and amygdala. Activation was reduced right-sided in the subgenual cingulate and the temporal gyrus, and left-sided in the dorsal cingulate and the parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation through positive contents was found left-sided in the orbitofrontal regions. Activation was reduced in right medial frontal and medial temporal regions. These findings underline the hypotheses that psychopathy is neurobiologically reflected by dysregulation and disturbed functional connectivity of emotion-related brain regions. These findings may be interpreted within a framework including prefrontal regions that provide top-down control to and regulate bottom-up signals from limbic areas. Because of the small sample size, the results of this study have to be regarded as preliminary.

  17. Measuring sickle cell morphology in flow using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Dann, Eldad J.; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-02-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage and even organ failure. Measuring these cellular structural and morphological changes is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and developing an effective treatment. In this work, we use spectrally encoded flow cytometry for confocal, high-resolution imaging of flowing blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients. A wide variety of cell morphologies were observed by analyzing the interference patterns resulting from reflections from the front and back faces of the cells' membrane. Using numerical simulation for calculating the two-dimensional reflection pattern from the cells, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of a characteristic sickle cell and compare it to a previous from the literature. In vitro spectrally encoded flow cytometry offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells in stress-free environment, and could provide an effective tool for studying the unique physiological properties of these cells.

  18. Performance of computer vision in vivo flow cytometry with low fluorescence contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Stacey; Li, Siyuan; Niedre, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Detection and enumeration of circulating cells in the bloodstream of small animals are important in many areas of preclinical biomedical research, including cancer metastasis, immunology, and reproductive medicine. Optical in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) represents a class of technologies that allow noninvasive and continuous enumeration of circulating cells without drawing blood samples. We recently developed a technique termed computer vision in vivo flow cytometry (CV-IVFC) that uses a high-sensitivity fluorescence camera and an automated computer vision algorithm to interrogate relatively large circulating blood volumes in the ear of a mouse. We detected circulating cells at concentrations as low as 20 cells/mL. In the present work, we characterized the performance of CV-IVFC with low-contrast imaging conditions with (1) weak cell fluorescent labeling using cell-simulating fluorescent microspheres with varying brightness and (2) high background tissue autofluorescence by varying autofluorescence properties of optical phantoms. Our analysis indicates that CV-IVFC can robustly track and enumerate circulating cells with at least 50% sensitivity even in conditions with two orders of magnitude degraded contrast than our previous in vivo work. These results support the significant potential utility of CV-IVFC in a wide range of in vivo biological models.

  19. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  20. Political leaders and the media: can we measure political leadership images in newspapers using computer-assisted content analysis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaldering, L.; Vliegenthart, R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large amount of research into both media coverage of politics as well as political leadership, surprisingly little research has been devoted to the ways political leaders are discussed in the media. This paper studies whether computer-aided content analysis can be applied in examining

  1. Oil production towards biofuel from autotrophic microalgae semicontinuous cultivations monitorized by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Teresa Lopes; Reis, Alberto; Medeiros, Roberto; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Gouveia, Luisa

    2009-11-01

    Two microalgae species (Scenedesmus obliquus and Neochloris oleoabundans) were cultivated in closed sleeve photobioreactors in order to select the best oil producer for further large-scale open raceway pond cultivations, aiming at biofuel production. Scenedesmus obliquus reached a higher maximum biomass concentration (1.41 g l(-1)) with a lower lipid content (12.8% w/w), as compared to N. oleoabundans [maximum biomass concentration of 0.92 g l(-1) with 16.5% (w/w) lipid content]. Both microalgae showed adequate fatty acid composition and iodine values as substitutes for diesel fuel. Based on these results, N. oleoabundans was selected for further open raceway pond cultivations. Under these conditions, N. oleoabundans reached a maximum biomass concentration of 2.8 g l(-1) with 11% (w/w) of lipid content. A high correlation between the Nile Red fluorescence intensity measured by flow cytometry and total lipid content assayed by the traditional gravimetric lipid analysis was found for both microalgae, making this method a suitable and quick technique for the screening of microalgae strains for lipid production and optimization of biofuel production bioprocesses. Medium growth optimization for enhancement of microalgal oil production is now in progress.

  2. Changes in water content and distribution in Quercus ilex leaves during progressive drought assessed by in vivo 1H magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardans, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia

    2010-08-24

    Drought is a common stressor in many regions of the world and current climatic global circulation models predict further increases in warming and drought in the coming decades in several of these regions, such as the Mediterranean basin. The changes in leaf water content, distribution and dynamics in plant tissues under different soil water availabilities are not well known. In order to fill this gap, in the present report we describe our study withholding the irrigation of the seedlings of Quercus ilex, the dominant tree species in the evergreen forests of many areas of the Mediterranean Basin. We have monitored the gradual changes in water content in the different leaf areas, in vivo and non-invasively, by 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using proton density weighted (rhow) images and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) maps. Rhow images showed that the distal leaf area lost water faster than the basal area and that after four weeks of similar losses, the water reduction was greater in leaf veins than in leaf parenchyma areas and also in distal than in basal leaf area. There was a similar tendency in all different areas and tissues, of increasing T2 values during the drought period. This indicates an increase in the dynamics of free water, suggesting a decrease of cell membranes permeability. The results indicate a non homogeneous leaf response to stress with a differentiated capacity to mobilize water between its different parts and tissues. This study shows that the MRI technique can be a useful tool to follow non-intrusively the in vivo water content changes in the different parts of the leaves during drought stress. It opens up new possibilities to better characterize the associated physiological changes and provides important information about the different responses of the different leaf areas what should be taken into account when conducting physiological and metabolic drought stress studies in different parts of the leaves during drought stress.

  3. Test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of in vivo myelin content indices: Myelin water fraction and calibrated T1 w/T2 w image ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muzamil; Stanley, Jeffrey A; Raz, Naftali

    2017-04-01

    In an age-heterogeneous sample of healthy adults, we examined test-retest reliability (with and without participant repositioning) of two popular MRI methods of estimating myelin content: modeling the short spin-spin (T2 ) relaxation component of multi-echo imaging data and computing the ratio of T1 -weighted and T2 -weighted images (T1 w/T2 w). Taking the myelin water fraction (MWF) index of myelin content derived from the multi-component T2 relaxation data as a standard, we evaluate the concurrent and differential validity of T1 w/T2 w ratio images. The results revealed high reliability of MWF and T1 w/T2 w ratio. However, we found significant correlations of low to moderate magnitude between MWF and the T1 w/T2 w ratio in only two of six examined regions of the cerebral white matter. Notably, significant correlations of the same or greater magnitude were observed for T1 w/T2 w ratio and the intermediate T2 relaxation time constant, which is believed to reflect differences in the mobility of water between the intracellular and extracellular compartments. We conclude that although both methods are highly reliable and thus well-suited for longitudinal studies, T1 w/T2 w ratio has low criterion validity and may be not an optimal index of subcortical myelin content. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1780-1790, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reel Principals: A Descriptive Content Analysis of the Images of School Principals Depicted in Movies from 1997-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrom, Katy J.

    2010-01-01

    According to Glanz's early research, school principals have been depicted as autocrats, bureaucrats, buffoons, and/or villains in movies from 1950 to 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine if these stereotypical characterizations of school principals have continued in films from 1997-2009, or if more favorable images have emerged that…

  5. Quantitative analysis of γ-oryzanol content in cold pressed rice bran oil by TLC-image analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakunpak, Apirak; Suksaeree, Jirapornchai; Monton, Chaowalit; Pathompak, Pathamaporn; Kraisintu, Krisana

    2014-02-01

    To develop and validate an image analysis method for quantitative analysis of γ-oryzanol in cold pressed rice bran oil. TLC-densitometric and TLC-image analysis methods were developed, validated, and used for quantitative analysis of γ-oryzanol in cold pressed rice bran oil. The results obtained by these two different quantification methods were compared by paired t-test. Both assays provided good linearity, accuracy, reproducibility and selectivity for determination of γ-oryzanol. The TLC-densitometric and TLC-image analysis methods provided a similar reproducibility, accuracy and selectivity for the quantitative determination of γ-oryzanol in cold pressed rice bran oil. A statistical comparison of the quantitative determinations of γ-oryzanol in samples did not show any statistically significant difference between TLC-densitometric and TLC-image analysis methods. As both methods were found to be equal, they therefore can be used for the determination of γ-oryzanol in cold pressed rice bran oil.

  6. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of photosynthetic activity and pigment contents of the resurrection plants Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae during dehydration and rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashi, Bekim; Babani, Fatbardha; Kongjika, Efigjeni

    2013-07-01

    The desiccation-tolerant plants of the R. serbica and R. nathaliae are resurrection plants which are able to fully recover their physiological function after anabiosis. A comparison of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and photosynthetic pigment contents responses of R. serbica and, for the first time, R. nathaliae to dehydration and rehydration were investigated. For this purpose, plants after collection from their natural habitats were kept fully watered for 14 days at natural condition. The experiment was conducted with mature leaves of both species. R. serbica and R. nathaliae plants were dehydrated to 5.88 % and 7.87 % relative water content (RWC) by withholding water for 15 days, afterwards the plants were rehydrated for 72 hours to 94.67 % and 97.02 % RWC. During desiccation, R. serbica plants preserved the chlorophyll content about 84 %, while R. nathaliae about 90 %. During dehydration when RWC were more than 40 %, photochemical efficiency of PSII for photochemistry, the Fv/Fm ratio, decreased about 40 % in R. nathaliae plants, but a strong reduction with 60 % was recorded for R. serbica. Following rehydration, the Fv/Fm ratio recovered more rapidly in R. nathaliae. The higher photosynthetic rates could also be detected via imaging the chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio Rfd, which possessed higher values after rehydration leaves of R. nathaliae as compared to R. serbica. The results showed that the photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll contents after rehydration are recovered more rapidly in R. nathaliae in comparison to R. serbica.

  7. TOTO and YOYO: New very bright fluorochromes for DNA content analyses by flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirons, G.T.; Fawcett, J.J.; Crissman, H.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Flow cytometric (FCM) studies were performed on nuclei, ethanol-fixed CHO cells, and isolated human GM130 chromosomes stained with two new cyanine dyes, TOTO and YOYO. These fluorochromes, which are dimers of thiazole orange and oxazole yellow, respectively, have high quantum efficiencies and exhibit specificities for both DNA and RNA. Bound to dsDNA in solution, TOTO and YOYO emit at 530 and 510 nm, respectively, when excited at 488 nm and 457 nm, wavelengths available from most lasers employed in FCM. RNase-treated CHO nuclei, stained with either TOTO or YOYO, provided DNA histograms, with low coefficients of variation, that were as good as or better than those obtained with nuclei stained with propidium iodide (PI) or mithramycin (MI). In addition, by comparison on an equimolar basis, nuclei stained with YOYO fluoresced over 1,000 times more intensely than nuclei stained with MI. Fluorescence ratio analyses of nuclei stained with both YOYO and Hoechst 33258 showed that the ratio of YOYO to Hoechst fluorescence remained relatively constant for G[sub 1] and S phase cells, but decreased significantly for cells in G[sub 2]/M. These results indicate that the cyanine dyes may be useful in examining specific changes in chromatin structure during G[sub 2]/M phases of the cell cycle. Ethanol-fixed CHO cells stained with TOTO or YOYO did not yield reproducible DNA histograms of good quality, presumably because of the poor accessibility of DNA to these large fluorochromes. However, bivariate analyses of human GM130 chromosomes stained with TOTO or YOYO alone and excited sequentially with uv and visible wavelengths showed resolution of many individual chromosome peaks similar to results obtained for chromosomes stained with HO and chromomycin A[sub 3]. Collectively, these studies show potential advantages for the use of these new cyanine dyes in FCM studies that require the sensitive detection of DNA. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. TOTO and YOYO: new very bright fluorochromes for DNA content analyses by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirons, G T; Fawcett, J J; Crissman, H A

    1994-02-01

    Flow cytometric (FCM) studies were performed on nuclei, ethanol-fixed CHO cells, and isolated human GM130 chromosomes stained with two new cyanine dyes, TOTO and YOYO. These fluorochromes, which are dimers of thiazole orange and oxazole yellow, respectively, have high quantum efficiencies and exhibit specificities for both DNA and RNA. Bound to dsDNA in solution, TOTO and YOYO emit at 530 and 510 nm, respectively, when excited at 488 nm and 457 nm, wavelengths available from most lasers employed in FCM. RNase-treated CHO nuclei, stained with either TOTO or YOYO, provided DNA histograms, with low coefficients of variation, that were as good as or better than those obtained with nuclei stained with propidium iodide (PI) or mithramycin (MI). In addition, by comparison on an equimolar basis, nuclei stained with YOYO fluoresced over 1,000 times more intensely than nuclei stained with MI. Fluorescence ratio analyses of nuclei stained with both YOYO and Hoechst 33258 showed that the ratio of YOYO to Hoechst fluorescence remained relatively constant for G1 and S phase cells, but decreased significantly for cells in G2/M. These results indicate that the cyanine dyes may be useful in examining specific changes in chromatin structure during G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Ethanol-fixed CHO cells stained with TOTO or YOYO did not yield reproducible DNA histograms of good quality, presumably because of the poor accessibility of DNA to these large fluorochromes. However, bivariate analyses of human GM130 chromosomes stained with TOTO or YOYO alone and excited sequentially with uv and visible wave-lengths showed resolution of many individual chromosome peaks similar to results obtained for chromosomes stained with HO and chromomycin A3. Collectively, these studies show potential advantages for the use of these new cyanine dyes in FCM studies that require the sensitive detection of DNA.

  9. DNA contents in Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera) selected in Texas and Oklahoma determined by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr.) is a dioecious, perennial, cool-season grass native to southern Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas and most of Texas. Its major use has been for forage on rangelands in Texas and Oklahoma. More recently, interspecific hybrids between Texas bluegrass and Kentuc...

  10. Nuclear DNA content variation within the genus Daucus (Apiaceae) determined by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Daucus (Apiaceae) comprises species from around the world, covering a wide climatic range, and showing great morphological plasticity. Both cultivated and wild forms are described within the genus. The aim of the present study was to estimate the genome size variability in the collection o...

  11. [Determination of iodine content in the left ventricular myocardium of healthy subjects using dual-source dual-energy CT myocardial first perfusion imaging: a preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z X; Wang, G; Liang, L; Lu, X R; Guo, Q H; Zhai, Y N; Shi, X N

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To analyze the normal value of the iodine content in the left ventricular myocardium of healthy subjects and to observe if there is a segmental differences on iodine distribution by using the second generation dual-source dual-energy computed tomography myocardial first perfusion imaging. Methods: In this retrospective study, 42 healthy subjects, who admitted to our department between January to June 2016, with normal second generation dual-source dual-energy computed tomography and coronary CT angioghphy (CTA), electrocardiogram (ECG) results, normal cardiac, hepatic, renal function, normal myocardial enzymes results were enrolled, data from 38 out of 42 subjects with satisfactory image quality were analyzed using Siemens Dual Energy-Heart PBV image processing software.In accordance with the standards of the American Heart Association myocardial 17 fractionation method, content of iodine was measured at different segmental left ventricular myocardium and aorta (left coronary artery from the opening level). The standardized containing iodine value (nIC) was calculated. Results: The iodine content of left ventricular myocardium in normal subjects was 3.1-7.8 mg/ml.The nIC of myocardium from 1st to 17th segments was 0.28±0.06, 0.31±0.07, 0.30±0.07, 0.30±0.04, 0.28±0.04, 0.29±0.05, 0.29±0.01, 0.30±0.07, 0.31±0.07, 0.27±0.06, 0.28±0.08, 0.28±0.07, 0.29±0.08, 0.31±0.07, 0.27±0.06, 0.29±0.06 and 0.21±0.07, respectively.The nIC of the 17th segment was the lowest and was significantly lower than in other segments (all PnIC was similar among the rest 16 segments (all P>0.05). Conclusion: The normal iodine content range in left ventricle myocardium is 3.1-7.8 mg/ml, and the lowest iodine content is detected in the apex and which is significantly lower than the other left ventricular segments.

  12. Content-based image retrieval for brain MRI: An image-searching engine and population-based analysis to utilize past clinical data for future diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia V. Faria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiological diagnosis is based on subjective judgment by radiologists. The reasoning behind this process is difficult to document and share, which is a major obstacle in adopting evidence-based medicine in radiology. We report our attempt to use a comprehensive brain parcellation tool to systematically capture image features and use them to record, search, and evaluate anatomical phenotypes. Anatomical images (T1-weighted MRI were converted to a standardized index by using a high-dimensional image transformation method followed by atlas-based parcellation of the entire brain. We investigated how the indexed anatomical data captured the anatomical features of healthy controls and a population with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA. PPA was chosen because patients have apparent atrophy at different degrees and locations, thus the automated quantitative results can be compared with trained clinicians' qualitative evaluations. We explored and tested the power of individual classifications and of performing a search for images with similar anatomical features in a database using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA and principal component analysis (PCA. The agreement between the automated z-score and the averaged visual scores for atrophy (r = 0.8 was virtually the same as the inter-evaluator agreement. The PCA plot distribution correlated with the anatomical phenotypes and the PLS-DA resulted in a model with an accuracy of 88% for distinguishing PPA variants. The quantitative indices captured the main anatomical features. The indexing of image data has a potential to be an effective, comprehensive, and easily translatable tool for clinical practice, providing new opportunities to mine clinical databases for medical decision support.

  13. Limited flow cytometry panels on bone marrow specimens reduce costs and predict negative cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Douglas G; Kim, Burton H

    2014-01-01

    To determine the clinical and financial impact and predictive value of a limited flow cytometry strategy in the evaluation of bone marrow specimens. Consecutive bone marrow cases (n = 1,242) were reviewed following the independent, prospective application of two flow cytometry protocols: a limited marker strategy and a multimarker strategy. Combined morphologic and flow cytometry findings were also compared with cytogenetic results. A limited flow cytometry strategy did not have a negative impact on disease detection and resulted in reduced utilization and cost. In addition, negative combined morphology and flow cytometry had a 98.4% predictive value for negative cytogenetics (P flow cytometric and cytogenetic studies on these samples.

  14. Content-based retrieval of focal liver lesions using bag-of-visual-words representations of single- and multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Lu, Zhentai; Yu, Mei; Huang, Meiyan; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed at developing and evaluating a content-based retrieval method for contrast-enhanced liver computed tomographic (CT) images using bag-of-visual-words (BoW) representations of single and multiple phases. The BoW histograms are extracted using the raw intensity as local patch descriptor for each enhance phase by densely sampling the image patches within the liver lesion regions. The distance metric learning algorithms are employed to obtain the semantic similarity on the Hellinger kernel feature map of the BoW histograms. The different visual vocabularies for BoW and learned distance metrics are evaluated in a contrast-enhanced CT image dataset comprised of 189 patients with three types of focal liver lesions, including 87 hepatomas, 62 cysts, and 60 hemangiomas. For each single enhance phase, the mean of average precision (mAP) of BoW representations for retrieval can reach above 90 % which is significantly higher than that of intensity histogram and Gabor filters. Furthermore, the combined BoW representations of the three enhance phases can improve mAP to 94.5 %. These preliminary results demonstrate that the BoW representation is effective and feasible for retrieval of liver lesions in contrast-enhanced CT images.

  15. High-throughput flow cytometry for drug discovery: principles, applications, and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mei; Kaspersson, Karin; Murray, David; Bardelle, Catherine

    2017-09-12

    Flow cytometry is a technology providing multiparametric analysis of single cells or other suspension particles. High-throughput (HT) flow cytometry has become an attractive screening platform for drug discovery. In this review, we highlight the recent HT flow cytometry applications, and then focus on HT flow cytometry deployment at AstraZeneca (AZ). Practical considerations for successful HT flow cytometry assay development and screening are provided based on experience from four project case studies at AZ. We provide an overview of the scientific rationale, explain why HT flow cytometry was chosen and how HT flow cytometry assays deliver new ways to support the drug discovery process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of PNH cells by flow cytometry, using multiparameter analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Camargos Rocha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The laboratory diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH, disease that is categorized by reduced synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor, is based on the detection of blood cells deficient in GPI-anchored proteins by flow cytometry. PNH clones have been detected in patients with aplastic anaemia (AA and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, with therapeutic implications.Objectives:To validate a sensitive assay for detection of GPI-anchored protein-deficient cells, by flow cytometry, and to analyze the clone frequency in AA and MDS patients.Methods:Samples from 20 AA patients, 30 MDS patients and 20 adult volunteers (control group were analyzed using monoclonal antibodies to CD16, CD24, CD55 and CD59 (neutrophils; CD14 and CD55 (monocytes; CD55 and CD59 (erythrocytes; besides fluorescent aerolysin reagent (FLAER (neutrophils and monocytes and lineage markers. The proportions of PNH cells detected in neutrophils and monocytes, using different reagent combinations, were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA and Pearson's correlation.Results:PNH cells were detected in five (25% AA patients, and the proportions of PNH cells varied from 0.14% to 94.84% of the analyzed events. PNH cells were not detected in the MDS patients. However, by the analysis of these samples, it was possible to identify the technical challenges caused by the presence of immature and dysplastic circulating cells. FLAER showed clear distinction of GPI-deficient cells.Conclusion:Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis offers high sensitivity and accuracy in the detection of subclinical PNH clones. FLAER shows excellent performance in detection of PNH neutrophils and monocytes.

  17. Distance metric learning using random forest for cytometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, M Baran; Birjandtalab, J; Nourani, M

    2016-08-01

    Visualization and clustering of single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) data are analytic techniques to identify different cell types. Most of such techniques, such as Euclidean norm, lose their effectiveness when the data dimension increases due to the curse of dimensionality. In this paper, we propose a new cell distance (called CytoRFD) that works based on Random Forest (RF) concept. The experimental results show that the proposed distance can achieve a much higher quality and effectiveness in large data analysis than traditional metrics specially for CyTOF data.

  18. Mapping within-field variations of soil organic carbon content using UAV multispectral visible near-infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Michelin, Joël

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the PROSTOCK-Gessol3 project supported by the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME), the TOSCA-PLEIADES-CO project of the French Space Agency (CNES) and the SOERE PRO network working on environmental impacts of Organic Waste Products recycling on field crops at long time scale. The organic matter is an important soil fertility parameter and previous studies have shown the potential of spectral information measured in the laboratory or directly in the field using field spectro-radiometer or satellite imagery to predict the soil organic carbon (SOC) content. This work proposes a method for a spatial prediction of bare cultivated topsoil SOC content, from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) multispectral imagery. An agricultural plot of 13 ha, located in the western region of Paris France, was analysed in April 2013, shortly before sowing while it was still bare soil. Soils comprised haplic luvisols, rendzic cambisols and calcaric or colluvic cambisols. The UAV platform used was a fixed wing provided by Airinov® flying at an altitude of 150m and was equipped with a four channels multispectral visible near-infrared camera MultiSPEC 4C® (550nm, 660nm, 735 nm and 790 nm). Twenty three ground control points (GCP) were sampled within the plot according to soils descriptions. GCP positions were determined with a centimetric DGPS. Different observations and measurements were made synchronously with the drone flight: soil surface description, spectral measurements (with ASD FieldSpec 3® spectroradiometer), roughness measurements by a photogrammetric method. Each of these locations was sampled for both soil standard physico-chemical analysis and soil water content. A Structure From Motion (SFM) processing was done from the UAV imagery to produce a 15 cm resolution multispectral mosaic using the Agisoft Photoscan® software. The SOC content was modelled by partial least squares regression (PLSR) between the

  19. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, Jr., Billy W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  20. Flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method for the modal content characterization in a broad range of wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muliar, Olena; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Michieletto, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    as the phase distribution are extracted by the alternative method of 2D FT filtering. Being exceptionally tunable the flexible C2 method gives an ability to adapt the system’s parameters in a desired manner satisfying even measurements of very specific fiber designs opening up new possibilities for advanced......We demonstrate a flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method in the time domain by application of a tunable and highly flexible light source. An advantage of the flexible C2method is shown by characterization of the step-index fiber (SMF28) over a broad range of wavelengths from 870nm to 1090nm...

  1. In vivo assessment of iron content of the cerebral cortex in healthy aging using 7-Tesla T2*-weighted phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Mathijs; Doan, Nhat Trung; van Rooden, Sanneke; Versluis, Maarten J; van Lew, Baldur; Milles, Julien; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Buchem, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    Accumulation of brain iron has been suggested as a biomarker of neurodegeneration. Increased iron has been seen in the cerebral cortex in postmortem studies of neurodegenerative diseases and healthy aging. Until recently, the diminutive thickness of the cortex and its relatively low iron content have hampered in vivo study of cortical iron accumulation. Using phase images of a T2*-weighted sequence at ultrahigh field strength (7 Tesla), we examined the iron content of 22 cortical regions in 70 healthy subjects aged 22-80 years. The cortex was automatically segmented and parcellated, and phase shift was analyzed using an in-house developed method. We found a significant increase in phase shift with age in 20 of 22 cortical regions, concurrent with current understanding of cortical iron accumulation. Our findings suggest that increased cortical iron content can be assessed in healthy aging in vivo. The high spatial resolution and sensitivity to iron of our method make it a potentially useful tool for studying cortical iron accumulation in healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the potential of artificial neural network and neuro-fuzzy techniques for estimating antioxidant activity and anthocyanin content of sweet cherry during ripening by using image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadomi-Saberi, Saeedeh; Omid, Mahmoud; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Ahmadi, Hojjat

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents a versatile way for estimating antioxidant activity and anthocyanin content at different ripening stages of sweet cherry by combining image processing and two artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. In comparison with common time-consuming laboratory methods for determining these important attributes, this new way is economical and much faster. The accuracy of artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models was studied to estimate the outputs. Sensitivity analysis and principal component analysis were used with ANN and ANFIS respectively to specify the most effective attributes on outputs. Among the designed ANNs, two hidden layer networks with 11-14-9-1 and 11-6-20-1 architectures had the highest correlation coefficients and lowest error values for modeling antioxidant activity (R = 0.93) and anthocyanin content (R = 0.98) respectively. ANFIS models with triangular and two-term Gaussian membership functions gave the best results for antioxidant activity (R = 0.87) and anthocyanin content (R = 0.90) respectively. Comparison of the models showed that ANN outperformed ANFIS for this case. By considering the advantages of the applied system and the accuracy obtained in somewhat similar studies, it can be concluded that both techniques presented here have good potential to be used as estimators of proposed attributes. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Calibration of Flow Cytometry for Quantitative Quantum Dot Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rowena; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2009-07-01

    Observations of quantum dot (QD) labeled cells in biomedical research are mainly qualitative in nature, which limits the ability of researchers to compare results experiment-to-experiment and lab-to-lab to improve the state-of-the-art. Labeled cells are useful in a range of in vitro and in vivo assays where tracking behavior of administered cells is integral for answering research questions in areas such as tissue engineering and stem cell therapy. Before the full potential of QD based toolsets can be realized in the clinic, uptake of QDs by cells must be quantified and standardized. This unit describes a novel, simple method to assess the number of QDs per cell using flow cytometry and commercially available standards. This quick and easy method can be used by all researchers to calibrate their flow cytometry instruments and settings, and quantify QD uptake by cells for in vitro and in vivo experimentation for comparable results across QD conjugate types, cell types, research groups, lots of commercial QDs, and homemade QDs.

  4. Shooting movies of signaling network dynamics with multiparametric cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell technologies like mass cytometry enable researchers to comprehensively monitor signaling network responses in the context of heterogeneous cell populations. Cell-to-cell variability, the possibly nonlinear topology of signaling processes, and the destructive nature of mass cytometry necessitate nontrivial computational approaches to reconstruct and sensibly describe signaling dynamics. Modeling of signaling states depends on a set of coherent examples, that is, a set of cell events representing the same cell state. This requirement is frequently compromized by process asynchrony phenomena or nonlinear process topologies. We discuss various computational deconvolution approaches to define molecular process coordinates and enable compilation of coherent data sets for cell state inference. In addition to the conceptual presentation of these approaches, we discuss the application of these methods to modeling of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Due to their generic applicability these computational approaches will contribute to the elucidation of dynamic intracellular signaling networks in various settings. The resulting signaling maps constitute a promising source for novel interventions and are expected to be particularly valuable in clinical settings.

  5. Thrombocytopenia: diagnosis with flow cytometry and antiplatelet antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, João Carlos de Campos; Kanayama, Ruth Hissae; Nozawa, Sonia Tsukasa; Ioshida, Márcia Regina; Takiri, Irina Yoko; Lazaro, Robson José; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Rosenfeld, Luiz Gastão Mange; Guerra, Celso Carlos de Campos; Bacal, Nydia Strachman

    2011-06-01

    To identify antiplatelet antibodies by flow cytometry (direct method) in patients with thrombocytopenia. Between January 1997 and March 2004 a total of 15100 patients were referred to the Centro de Hematologia de São Paulo for hematological investigation of several diagnoses (anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, adenomegaly, leukemia and others). Of those, 1057 were referred because of thrombocytopenia and were divided into two groups: Group Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, with no identifiable cause; and Group Other thrombocytopenia, which included low normal platelet counts cause to be established, hepatitis C and HIV infection, hypersplenism, EDTA-induced artifacts, laboratory error, and other causes. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping was done in 115 cases to identify platelet autoantibodies (direct method). Of the total number of patients, 1057 (7%) presented low platelet counts, 670 were females (63.4%) and age range of one to 75 years. Of the 115 cases (9.7%) submitted to immunophenotyping, the results were positive in 40% and the test was inconclusive in 5%. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was found in 52% of patients, more often in women. Hepatitis C virus infection was found in 7% and HIV infection in 1%. Low normal platelet counts were found in 17%, laboratory errors in 6%, and laboratory artifacts in 1% of cases. Platelet autoantibodies were found in 76.9% of all idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura cases. It was negative in 83.3% of the low normal counts. antiplatelet autoantibodies when present help to diagnose idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. When absent, suggest other causes of thrombocytopenia.

  6. Image cytometric evaluation of nuclear texture features and DNA content of the reticular form of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Matjaz; Flezar, Margareta Strojan; Kogoj-Rode, Mirela; Us-Krasovec, Marija

    2006-10-01

    To analyze image cytometric chromatin changes reflected in nuclear texture features and DNA ploidy of oral lichen planus in relation to the normal buccal mucosa and buccal mucosa expressing malignancy-associated changes in cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients with the reticular form of oral lichen planus, with a follow-up period of 25 years, 50 healthy controls and 50 lung cancer patients were included in the study. Scrapings of buccal mucosa were suspended in transport medium. Monolayer filter preparations were Feulgen-thionin stained. Image cytometric analysis was performed by Cyto-Savant. All oral lichen planus specimens in our study were diploid. In univariate analysis, differences between the normal buccal mucosa and oral lichen planus were found in several nuclear texture features, which gave an 80% correct classification rate in multivariate analysis. In the second part of the study, the classifier that recognizes malignancy-associated changes on the buccal mucosa of patients with lung cancer correctly recognized > 80% of oral lichen planus samples as normal buccal mucosa. Our results indicate that chromatin changes in oral lichen planus exist compared to normal cells; however, the chromatin structure of the reticular form of oral lichen planus does not express malignancy-associated changes and is more similar to normal squamous cells.

  7. High-content image informatics of the structural nuclear protein NuMA parses trajectories for stem/progenitor cell lineages and oncogenic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Sebastián L. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Liu, Er; Arvind, Varun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Bushman, Jared [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Piscataway, NJ (United States); School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Sung, Hak-Joon [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, New Jersey Center for Biomaterials, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Becker, Matthew L. [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, OH (United States); Lelièvre, Sophie [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafa