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Sample records for contempt lwr containment

  1. CONTEMPT, LWR Containment Pressure and Temperature Distribution in LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargroves, D.W.; Metcalfe, L.J.; Cheng, Teh-Chin; Wheat, L.L.; Mings, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CONTEMPT-LT was developed to predict the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. CONTEMPT-LT calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. One to four compartments can be modeled, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. The user determines the compartments to be used, specifies input mass and energy additions, defines heat structure and leakage systems, and prescribes the time advancement and output control. CONTEMPT-LT/28-H (NESC0433/08) includes also models for hydrogen combustion. 2 - Method of solution: The initial conditions of the containment atmosphere are calculated from input values, and the initial temperature distributions through the containment structures are determined from the steady-state solution of the heat conduction equations. A time advancement proceeds as follows. The input water and energy rates are evaluated at the midpoint of a time interval and added to the containment system. Pressure suppression, spray system effects, and fan cooler effects are calculated using conditions at the beginning of a time-step. Leakage and heat losses or gains, extrapolated from the last time-step, are added to the containment system. Containment volume pressure and temperature are estimated by solving the mass, volume, and energy balance equations. Using these results as boundary conditions, the heat conduction equations

  2. CONTEMPT-4MOD3, LWR Containment Long-Term Pressure Distribution and Temperature Distribution in LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Economos, C.; Lehner, J.R.; Maise, G.; Ng, K.K.; Mirsky, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CONTEMPT-4/MOD5 describes the response of multi-compartment containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program can accommodate both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) containment systems. Also, both design basis accident (DBA) and degraded core type LOCA conditions can be analyzed. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, and mass and energy inventories due to inter-compartment mass and energy exchange taking into account user- supplied descriptions of compartments, inter-compartment junction flow areas, LOCA source terms, and user-selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, heat conducting structures, sump drains, PWR ice condensers, and BWR pressure suppression systems. To accommodate degraded core type accidents, analytical models for hydrogen combustion within compartments and energy transfer due to gas radiation are also provided. CONTEMPT4/MOD6 is an update of previous CONTEMPT4 versions. Improvements in CONTEMPT4/MOD6 over CONTEMPT4/MOD3 include coding of a BWR pressure suppression system model, a hydrogen/carbon monoxide burn model, a gas radiation heat transfer model, a user specified variable junction (leakage) area as a function of pressure or time, additional heat transfer coefficient options for heat structures, generalized initial compartment conditions for inerted containment, an alternative containment spray model and spray carry-over capability. Also, the thermodynamic properties routines have been extended to accommodate the higher temperature and multicomponent gas mixtures associated with combustion. In addition, reduced running time is achieved by incorporation of an optional implicit numerical algorithm for junction flow. This makes economically feasible the analysis of very long

  3. Status of the CONTAIN computer code for LWR containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Murata, K.K.; Rexroth, P.E.; Clauser, M.J.; Senglaub, M.E.; Sciacca, F.W.; Trebilcock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of the CONTAIN code for LWR safety analysis is reviewed. Three example calculations are discussed as illustrations of the code's capabilities: (1) a demonstration of the spray model in a realistic PWR problem, and a comparison with CONTEMPT results; (2) a comparison of CONTAIN results for a major aerosol experiment against experimental results and predictions of the HAARM aerosol code; and (3) an LWR sample problem, involving a TMLB' sequence for the Zion reactor containment

  4. Status of the CONTAIN computer code for LWR containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Murata, K.K.; Rexroth, P.E.; Clauser, M.J.; Senglaub, M.E.; Sciacca, F.W.; Trebilcock, W.

    1982-01-01

    The current status of the CONTAIN code for LWR safety analysis is reviewed. Three example calculations are discussed as illustrations of the code's capabilities: (1) a demonstration of the spray model in a realistic PWR problem, and a comparison with CONTEMPT results; (2) a comparison of CONTAIN results for a major aerosol experiment against experimental results and predictions of the HAARM aerosol code; and (3) an LWR sample problem, involving a TMLB' sequence for the Zion reactor containment

  5. CONTEMPT-DG containment analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deem, R.E.; Rousseau, K.

    1982-01-01

    The assessment of hydrogen burning in a containment building during a degraded core event requires a knowledge of various system responses. These system responses (i.e. heat sinks, fan cooler units, sprays, etc.) can have a marked effect on the overall containment integrity results during a hydrogen burn. In an attempt to properly handle the various system responses and still retain the capability to perform sensitivity analysis on various parameters, the CONTEMPT-DG computer code was developed. This paper will address the historical development of the code, its various features, and the rationale for its development. Comparisons between results from the CONTEMPT-DG analyses and results from similar MARCH analyses will also be given

  6. Preliminary calculation with code CONTEMPT-LT for spray cooling tests with JAERI model containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mitsugu

    1978-01-01

    LWR plants have a containment spray system to reduce the escape of radioactive material to the environment in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) by washing out fission products, especially radioiodine, and condensing the steam to lower the pressure. For carrying out the containment spray tests, pressure and temperature behaviour of the JAERI Model Containment Vessel in spray cooling has been calculated with computer program CONTEMPT-LT. The following could be studied quantitatively: (1) pressure and temperature raise rates for steam addition rate and (2) pressure fall rate for spray flow rate and spray heat transfer efficiency. (auth.)

  7. Containment pressure analysis model using CONTEMPT-LT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.N.

    1975-09-01

    An analytical model for evaluating the reactor containment pressure transient following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is presented. The model uses the CONTEMPT-LT computer program developed by Aerojet Nuclear Company. The sample problem studied is the containment response following the most severe postulated LOCA at the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station. The results show good agreement with the response predicted by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. (auth)

  8. Comparison of containment response by model difference between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Choong Sup; Song, Dong Soo; Park, Young Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    GOTHIC and CONTEMPT are containment performance analysis codes, which are used in calculation of containment pressure and temperature for design basis accidents such as a loss of coolant accident(LOCA) and main steam line break(MSLB) accident. CONTEMPT models vapor and liquid phases, but GOTHIC has one more phase, drop phase. The containment responses between two codes are different each other during initial stage of accident due to this model difference. This paper evaluates the model difference between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT.

  9. Comparison of containment response by model difference between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Choong Sup; Song, Dong Soo; Park, Young Chan

    2005-01-01

    GOTHIC and CONTEMPT are containment performance analysis codes, which are used in calculation of containment pressure and temperature for design basis accidents such as a loss of coolant accident(LOCA) and main steam line break(MSLB) accident. CONTEMPT models vapor and liquid phases, but GOTHIC has one more phase, drop phase. The containment responses between two codes are different each other during initial stage of accident due to this model difference. This paper evaluates the model difference between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT

  10. CONTEMPT4/MOD6: a multicompartment containment system analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Economos, C.; Lehner, J.R.; Maise, G.

    1986-03-01

    CONTEMPT4/MOD6 is a digital computer program that describes the response of multicompartment containment system subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program is written in FORTRAN IV and can accomodate both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) containment systems. Also, both design basis accident (DBA) and degraded core type LOCA conditions can be analyzed. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures and mass and energy inventories due to intercompartment mass and energy exchange taking into account user supplied descriptions of compartments, intercompartment junction flow areas, LOCA source terms and user selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, heat conducting structures, sump drains, PWR ice condensers and BWR pressure suppression systems. To accommodate degraded core type accidents, analytical models for hydrogen and carbon monoxide combustion within compartments and energy transfer due to gas radiation are also provided. Dynamic storage allocation (DSA) is used to limit the amount of computer core used for each problem. The flexibility needed to more realistically model the complexity of prototypical containments is provided by the multicompartment capability (up to 999 individual compartments) and generalized user oriented input data descriptions. The program employs an implicit algorithm to compute junction flow when numerically induced flow oscillations are encountered. This capability provides significant reduction of computer run time relative to previous codes in the CONTEMPT series. Descriptions of these analytical models are presented, together with input instructions for the CONTEMPT4/MOD6 program and sample problem results. 23 refs., 62 figs

  11. CONTEMPT4/MOD2: a multicompartment containment system analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, L.J.; Mings, W.J.; Hartman, J.E.; Crail, A.C.

    1978-02-01

    CONTEMPT4/MOD2 is a digital computer program, written in FORTRAN IV, which describes the behavior of multicompartment pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment systems and experimental containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and intercompartment mass and energy exchange based on user-supplied values for compartment descriptions, time step and edit controls, and selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, fan coolers, heat conducting structures, sump drain, and PWR ice condensers. Dynamic storage allocations (DSA) is used to limit the amount of computer core used for each problem. Optional automatic time step control allows the code to determine time step sizes within limits dictated by the user. Multicompartment capability (up to 999 individual compartments) and generalized, user-oriented input data descriptions permit improved flexibility over previous codes in the CONTEMPT series. Analytical model descriptions, input instructions, and sample problem results are presented

  12. CONTEMPT 4/MOD 3: a multicompartment containment system analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, T.C.; Metcalfe, L.J.; Hartman, J.E.; Mings, W.J.; Crail, A.C.

    1982-12-01

    CONTEMPT4/MOD3 is a digital computer program, written in FORTRAN IV, that describes the behavior of multicompartment pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment systems and experimental containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditons. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and intercompartment mass and energy exchange based on user-supplied values for compartment descriptions, time step and edit controls, and selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, fan coolers, heat-conducting structures, sump drains, and PWR ice condensers. Dynamic stroage allocation (DSA) is used to limit the amount of computer core used for each problem. Optional automatic time step control allows the code to determine time step sizes within limits dictated by the user. Multicompartment capability (up to 999 individual compartments) and generalized, user-oriented input-data descriptions permit improved flexibility over previous codes in the CONTEMPT series. Analytical model descriptions, input instructions, and sample problem results are presented

  13. Performance Comparison of Containment PT analysis between CAP and CONTEMPT Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yeon Jun; Hong, Soon Joon; Hwang, Su Hyun; Kim, Min Ki; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Tech., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang Jun; Choi, Hoon [KHNP-CENTERAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    CAP, in the form that is linked with SPACE, computed the containment back-pressure during LOCA accident. In previous SAR (safety analysis report) report of Shin-Kori Units 3 and 4, the CONTEMPT series of codes(hereby referred to as just 'CONTEMPT') is used to evaluate the containment safety during the postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). In more detail, CONTEMPT-LT/028 was used to calculate the containment maximum PT, while CONTEMPT4/MOD5 to calculate the minimum PT. Actually, in minimum PT analysis, CONTEMPT4/MOD5, which provide back pressure condition of containment, was linked with RELAP5/MOD3.3 which calculate the amount of blowdown into containment. In this analysis, CONTEMPT4/MOD5 was modified based on KREM. CONTEMPT code was developed to predict the long term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to LOCA conditions. It calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments, leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray as engineered safety systems. Any compartment may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. As mentioned above, CONTEMP has the similar code features and it therefore is expected to show the similar analysis performance with CAP. In this study, the differences between CAP and two CONTEMPT code versions (CONTEMPT-LT/028 for maximum PT and CONTEMPT4/MOD5 for minimum PT) are, in detail, identified and the code performances were compared for the same problem. Code by code comparison was carried out to identify the difference of LOCA analysis between a series of COMTEMPT and CAP code. With regard to important factors that affect the transient behavior of compartment thermodynamic

  14. Performance Comparison of Containment PT analysis between CAP and CONTEMPT Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yeon Jun; Hong, Soon Joon; Hwang, Su Hyun; Kim, Min Ki; Lee, Byung Chul; Ha, Sang Jun; Choi, Hoon

    2013-01-01

    CAP, in the form that is linked with SPACE, computed the containment back-pressure during LOCA accident. In previous SAR (safety analysis report) report of Shin-Kori Units 3 and 4, the CONTEMPT series of codes(hereby referred to as just 'CONTEMPT') is used to evaluate the containment safety during the postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). In more detail, CONTEMPT-LT/028 was used to calculate the containment maximum PT, while CONTEMPT4/MOD5 to calculate the minimum PT. Actually, in minimum PT analysis, CONTEMPT4/MOD5, which provide back pressure condition of containment, was linked with RELAP5/MOD3.3 which calculate the amount of blowdown into containment. In this analysis, CONTEMPT4/MOD5 was modified based on KREM. CONTEMPT code was developed to predict the long term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to LOCA conditions. It calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments, leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray as engineered safety systems. Any compartment may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. As mentioned above, CONTEMP has the similar code features and it therefore is expected to show the similar analysis performance with CAP. In this study, the differences between CAP and two CONTEMPT code versions (CONTEMPT-LT/028 for maximum PT and CONTEMPT4/MOD5 for minimum PT) are, in detail, identified and the code performances were compared for the same problem. Code by code comparison was carried out to identify the difference of LOCA analysis between a series of COMTEMPT and CAP code. With regard to important factors that affect the transient behavior of compartment thermodynamic state in

  15. Corrections and additions to CONTEMPT-LT computer codes for containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerikaeinen, Lauri.

    1980-01-01

    The report presents a new version of CONTEMPT-LT/26 tainment code. The corrections and additions are applicable also to other CONTEMPT-LT versions. Thermodynamical background of corrections are shortly described, and in addition, some essential points which should be taken into account in the analysis of a pressure suppression containment have been pointed out. The results obtained by the corrected version have been compared to those calculated by the original program, and to the measured data in the Marviken containment experiment No 10. Finally, it has been indicated that for reliable pressure suppression analysis a wide ranging condensation model for air-steam mixture is necessary. (author)

  16. Containment accident analysis using CONTEMPT4/M0D2 compared with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, L.J.; Hargroves, D.W.; Wells, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    CONTEMPT4/MOD2 is a new computer program developed to predict the long-term thermal hydraulic behavior of light-water reactor and experimental containment systems during postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. Improvements over previous containment codes include multicompartment capability and ice condenser analytical models. A program description and comparisons of calculated results with experimental data are presented

  17. CONTEMPT-G computer program and its application to HTGR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, D.I.

    1976-03-01

    The CONTEMPT-G computer program has been developed by General Atomic Company to simulate the temperature-pressure response of a containment atmosphere to postulated depressurization of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) primary or secondary coolant circuits. The mathematical models currently used in the code are described, and applications of the code in examples of the atmospheric response of a representative containment to a variety of postulated HTGR accident conditions are presented. In particular, maximum containment temperature and pressure, equilibrated long-term prestressed concrete reactor vessel and containment pressures, and peak containment conditions following steam pipe ruptures are examined for a representative 770-MW(e) HTGR

  18. LWR and HTGR coolant dynamics: the containment of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Gherson, P.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Hu, K.; Iyer, K.; Viskanta, R.; Lommers, L.

    1983-07-01

    This is the final report of a project containing three major tasks. Task I deals with the fundamental aspects of energetic fuel/coolant interactions (steam explosions) as they pertain to LWR core melt accidents. Task II deals with the applied aspects of LWR core melt accident sequences and mechanisms important to containment response, and includes consideration of energetic fuel/coolant interaction events, as well as non-explosive ones, corium material disposition and eventual coolability, and containment pressurization phenomena. Finally, Task III is concerned with HTGR loss of forced circulation accidents. This report is organized into three major parts corresponding to these three tasks respectively

  19. Benchmarking Analysis between CONTEMPT and COPATTA Containment Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kwi Hyun; Song, Wan Jung [ENERGEO Inc. Sungnam, (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong Soo; Byun, Choong Sup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The containment is the requirement that the releases of radioactive materials subsequent to an accident do not result in doses in excess of the values specified in 10 CFR 100. The containment must withstand the pressure and temperature of the DBA(Design Basis Accident) including margin without exceeding the design leakage rate. COPATTA as Bechtel's vendor code is used for the containment pressure and temperature prediction in power uprating project for Kori 3,4 and Yonggwang 1,2 nuclear power plants(NPPs). However, CONTEMPTLT/ 028 is used for calculating the containment pressure and temperatures in equipment qualification project for the same NPPs. During benchmarking analysis between two codes, it is known two codes have model differences. This paper show the performance evaluation results because of the main model differences.

  20. Benchmarking Analysis between CONTEMPT and COPATTA Containment Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kwi Hyun; Song, Wan Jung; Song, Dong Soo; Byun, Choong Sup

    2006-01-01

    The containment is the requirement that the releases of radioactive materials subsequent to an accident do not result in doses in excess of the values specified in 10 CFR 100. The containment must withstand the pressure and temperature of the DBA(Design Basis Accident) including margin without exceeding the design leakage rate. COPATTA as Bechtel's vendor code is used for the containment pressure and temperature prediction in power uprating project for Kori 3,4 and Yonggwang 1,2 nuclear power plants(NPPs). However, CONTEMPTLT/ 028 is used for calculating the containment pressure and temperatures in equipment qualification project for the same NPPs. During benchmarking analysis between two codes, it is known two codes have model differences. This paper show the performance evaluation results because of the main model differences

  1. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  2. Filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Bachofner, E.; Graeslund, C.; Johansson, K.; Nilsson, L.; Persson, Aa.; Eriksson, B.

    1981-03-01

    The FILTRA project is a cooperative Swedish programme which started in February 1980. It is aimed at investigating the possibility of reducing the risk for a large release of radioactivity, assuming a severe reactor accident. The project has been focused on filtered venting of the reactor containment. The first stage of the project has dealt with two types of severe accident sequences, namely core meltdown as a result of the complete loss of water supplies to the reactor pressure vessel and insufficient cooling of the reactor containment. Some important conclusion are the following. The applicability of computer models used to describe various phenomena in the accident sequence must be scrutinized. The details of the design of the containment are important and must be taken into consideration in a more accurate manner than in previous analyses. A pressure relief area of less than 1 m 2 appears to be adequate. The following principles should guide the technical design of filtered venting systems, namely reduction of the risk for the release of those radioactive substances which could cause long term land contamination, provision for a passive function of the vent filter system during the first 24 hours and achievement of filtering capabilities which make leakages in severe accidents comparable to the leakages of radioactive substances in less severe accidents, which do not necessarily actuate the pressure relief system. Nothing indicates that a system for filtered venting of a BWR containment would have a significant negative effect on the safety within the framework of the design basis. Efforts should be directed towards designing a filtered venting system for a BWR such as Barsebaeck. (authors)

  3. LWR containment safety research in PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, D.; Huggenberger, M.; Andreani, M.; Gupta, S.; Guentay, S.; Dreier, J.; Prasser, H.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of the OECD/SETH-2 project, an experimental program is being carried out at PSI (PANDA Facility in Switzerland) and CEA (MISTRA Facility in France) with the aim of generating high-quality experimental data which will be used for improving modeling and for Lumped Parameter and 3D (CFD) code validations. The PANDA test program consists of seven types of test series, focusing on gas stratification break-up induced b) mass sources (simulating the release of steam and hydrogen), heat sources (simulating the energy) generated hydrogen-oxygen recombiner operation) or heat sinks (due to condensation of steam caused by containment coolers, sprays or 'cold' walls). Two series of PANDA tests are devoted to obtaining detailed data on the integral behavior of Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS) of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) in the presence of different non-condensable gases (air; hydrogen) and also to investigating the gas mixing and stratification induced by the sudden interconnection of compartments with large gas concentration differences, e.g. the opening of rupture disks. (authors)

  4. An estimation of uncertainties in containment P/T analysis using CONTEMPT/LT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.M.; Park, G.C.; Lee, U.C.; Kang, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, the containment design pressure and temperature (P/T) have been established based on the unrealistic conservatism with suffering from a drawback in the economics. Thus, it is necessary that the uncertainties of design P/T values have to be well defined through an extensive uncertainty analysis with plant-specific input data and or models used in the computer code. This study is to estimate plant-specific uncertainties of containment design P/T using the Monte Carlo method in Kori-3 reactor. Kori-3 plant parameters and Uchida heat transfer coefficient are selected to be treated statistically after the sensitivity study. The Monte Carlo analysis has performed based on the response surface method with the CONTEMPT/LT code and Latin Hypercube sampling technique. Finally, the design values based on 95 %/95 % probability are compared with worst estimated values to assess the design margin. (author)

  5. Contempt-LT: a computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat, L.L.; Wagner, R.J.; Niederauer, G.F.; Obenchain, C.F.

    1975-06-01

    CONTEMPT-LT is a digital computer program, written in FORTRAN IV, developed to describe the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided to describe fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. Up to four compartments can be modeled with CONTEMPT-LT, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. CONTEMPT-LT can be used to model all current boiling water reactor pressure suppression systems, including containments with either vertical or horizontal vent systems. CONTEMPT-LT can also be used to model pressurized water reactor dry containments, subatmospheric containments, and dual volume containments with an annulus region, and can be used to describe containment responses in experimental containment systems. The program user defines which compartments are used, specifies input mass and energy additions, defines heat structure and leakage systems, and describes the time advancement and output control. CONTEMPT-LT source decks are available in double precision extended-binary-coded-decimal-interchange-code (EBCDIC) versions. Sample problems have been run on the IBM360/75 computer. (U.S.)

  6. Constructing contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Victoria L; Cameron, C Daryl; Gray, Kurt; Lindquist, Kristen A

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler argue that contempt is a natural kind and that its experience cannot be explained by a constructionist account of emotion. We dispute these claims and offer a positive constructionist model of contempt that accounts for the existing evidence and unifies conflicting findings in the literature on contempt.

  7. Hydrogen mixing study (HMS) in LWR type containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical technique has been developed for calculating the full three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations with multiple speies transport. The method is a modified form of the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique to solve the governing equations for low Mach number flows where pressure waves and local variations in compression and expansion are not significant. Large density variations, due to thermal and species concentration gradients, are accounted for without the restrictions of the classical Boussinesq approximation. Calculations of the EPRI/HEDL standard problems verify the feasibility of using this finite-difference technique for analyzing hydrogen mixing within LWR containments

  8. CONTEMPT: computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsii, Y.H.

    1978-04-01

    The CONTEMPT code is used by Babcock and Wilcox for containment analysis following a postulated loss of coolant accident. An additional model is described which is used for the calculation of long term post reflood mass and energy releases to the containment that is used for the containment design basis LOCA calculations. These calculations maximize the rate of energy flow to the containment. The mass and energy data are given to the containment designer for use in calculating the containment building design pressure and temperature and in sizing containment heat removal equipment

  9. Improving containment mass and energy releases for CONTEMPT-LT/028 TU with RELAP5/MOD3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DaSilva, H.C.; Choe, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    In order to obtain boundary conditions for RELAP5/MOD3 best estimate (BE) large break (LB) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) calculations, it is necessary to utilize a separate containment analysis code CONTEMPT-LT/028 TU, which in turn accepts mass and energy releases from the RELAP5/MOD3 calculation. When these boundary conditions are obtained, they are observed to be significantly lower than those reported in FSAR containment analyses. This motivates the present study, where RELAP5/MOD3 mass and energy releases are generated using the same assumptions listed in the FSAR containment calculations. Then CONTEMPT-LT/028 TU pressures and temperatures calculated with both sets of mass and energy releases are compared. It is seen that those obtained with the RELAP5/MOD3 input are still significantly lower, indicating a level of conservatism in the FSAR mass and energy releases that is even above that explicitly listed and also incorporated into the RELAP5/MOD3 calculation. An important conclusion from this finding is that Environmental Qualification (EQ) issues requiring containment re-analyses are likely to be easily resolved if new mass and energy releases are calculated with state-of-the-art LOCA codes modeling the entire reactor coolant system, even when conservative assumptions are incorporated

  10. Determination of optimal LWR containment design, excluding accidents more severe than Class 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Min, T.K.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning the restrictive effect of existing NRC requirements; definition of possible targets for containment; possible containment systems for LWR; optimization of containment design for class 3 through class 8 accidents (PWR); estimated costs of some possible containment arrangements for PWR relative to the standard dry containment system; estimated costs of BWR containment

  11. Babcock and Wilcox revisions to CONTEMPT, computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsii, Y.H.

    1975-01-01

    The CONTEMPT computer program predicts the pressure-temperature response of a single-volume reactor building to a loss-of-coolant accident. The analytical model used for the program is described. CONTEMPT assumes that the loss-of-coolant accident can be separated into two phases; the primary system blowdown and reactor building pressurization. The results of the blowdown analysis serve as the boundary conditions and are input to the CONTEMPT program. Thus, the containment model is only concerned with the pressure and temperature in the reactor building and the temperature distribution through the reactor building structures. The program also calculates building leakage and the effects of engineered safety features such as reactor building sprays, decay heat coolers, sump coolers, etc. 11 references. (U.S.)

  12. Computer program of iodine removal in the LWR containment vessel under LOCA conditions, MIRA-PB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Gunji; Tanaka, Mitsugu; Tamura, Tomohiko.

    1978-03-01

    LWR plants have a containment system for reactor safety consisting of spray and air cleaning filter. R.L.Ritzman of Battele Columbus Lab. developed computer code MIRAP/MIRAB for predicting iodine removal by containment system for PWR and BWR; which has some problem, however. The computer code MIRA-PB prepared by the authors is a modification of MIRAP/MIRAB. (auth.)

  13. Pretest aerosol code comparisons for LWR aerosol containment tests LA1 and LA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.L.; Wilson, J.H.; Arwood, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Light-Water-Reactor (LWR) Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) are being performed in Richland, Washington, at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) under the leadership of an international project board and the Electric Power Research Institute. These tests have two objectives: (1) to investigate, at large scale, the inherent aerosol retention behavior in LWR containments under simulated severe accident conditions, and (2) to provide an experimental data base for validating aerosol behavior and thermal-hydraulic computer codes. Aerosol computer-code comparison activities are being coordinated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For each of the six LACE tests, ''pretest'' calculations (for code-to-code comparisons) and ''posttest'' calculations (for code-to-test data comparisons) are being performed. The overall goals of the comparison effort are (1) to provide code users with experience in applying their codes to LWR accident-sequence conditions and (2) to evaluate and improve the code models

  14. CONTEMPT-LT/028: a computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargroves, D.W.; Metcalfe, L.J.; Wheat, L.L.; Niederauer, G.F.; Obenchain, C.F.

    1979-03-01

    CONTEMPT-LT is a digital computer program, written in FORTRAN IV, developed to describe the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided to describe fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. An annular fan model is also provided to model pressure control in the annular region of dual containment systems. Up to four compartments can be modeled with CONTEMPT-LT, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air--vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different

  15. Status of the LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, G.R.; Dickinson, D.R.; Hilliard, R.K.; McCormack, J.D.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LACE program, sponsored by an international consortium, is investigating inherent aerosol behavior for three postulated high consequence accident sequences; the containment bypass or V-sequence, failure to isolate containment, and delayed containment failure. Six large-scale tests are described which focus on these accident situations and which will be completed in the Containment Systems Test Facility at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The aerosol generation systems used to generate soluble and insoluble aerosols for the large-scale tests are described. The report then focuses on those tests which deal with the containment bypass accident sequence. Test results are presented and discussed for three containment bypass scoping tests

  16. Standard problem exercise to validate criticality codes for spent LWR fuel transport container calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitesides, G.H.; Stephens, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    During the past two years, a Working Group established by the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) has been developing a set of criticality benchmark problems which could be used to help establish the validity of criticality safety computer programs and their associated nuclear data for calculation of ksub(eff) for spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel transport containers. The basic goal of this effort was to identify a set of actual critical experiments which would contain the various material and geometric properties present in spent LWR transport contrainers. These data, when used by the various computational methods, are intended to demonstrate the ability of each method to accurately reproduce the experimentally measured ksub(eff) for the parameters under consideration

  17. Babcock and Wilcox revisions to CONTEMPT, computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsii, Y.H.

    1976-06-01

    The CONTEMPT computer program predicts the pressure-temperature response of a single-volume reactor building to a loss-of-coolant accident. The report describes the analytical model used for the program. CONTEMPT assumes that the loss-of-coolant accident can be separated into two phases; the primary system blowdown and reactor building pressurization. The results of the blowdown analysis serve as the boundary conditions and are input to the CONTEMPT program. Thus, the containment model is only concerned with the pressure and temperature in the reactor building and the temperature distribution through the reactor building structures. The user is required to input the description of the discharge of coolant, the boiling of residual water by reactor decay heat, the superheating of steam passing through the core, and metal-water reactions. The reactor building is separated into liquid and vapor regions. Each region is in thermal equilibrium itself, but the two may not be in thermal equilibrium; the liquid and gaseous regions may have different temperatures. The reactor building is represented as consisting of several heat-conducting structures whose thermal behavior can be described by the one-dimensional multi-region heat conduction equation. The program also calculates building leakage and the effects of engineered safety features such as reactor building sprays, decay heat coolers, sump coolers, etc

  18. LWR containment thermal hydraulic codes benchmark demona B3 exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Loggia, E.; Gauvain, J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent discussion about the aerosol codes currently used for the analysis of containment retention capabilities have revealed a number of questions concerning the reliabilities and verifications of the thermal-hydraulic modules of these codes with respect to the validity of implemented physical models and the stability and effectiveness of numerical schemes. Since these codes are used for the calculation of the Source Term for the assessment of radiological consequences of severe accidents, they are an important part of reactor safety evaluation. For this reason the Commission of European Communities (CEC), following the recommendation mode by experts from Member Stades, is promoting research in this field with the aim also of establishing and increasing collaboration among Research Organisations of member countries. In view of the results of the studies, the CEC has decided to carry out a Benchmark exercise for severe accident containment thermal hydraulics codes. This exercise is based on experiment B3 in the DEMONA programme. The main objective of the benchmark exercise has been to assess the ability of the participating codes to predict atmosphere saturation levels and bulk condensation rates under conditions similar to those predicted to follow a severe accident in a PWR. This exercise follows logically on from the LA-4 exercise, which, is related to an experiment with a simpler internal geometry. We present here the results obtained so far and from them preliminary conclusions are drawn, concerning condensation temperature, pressure, flow rates, in the reactor containment

  19. Hydrogen management techniques in German LWR-containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.; Froehmel, T.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations are described which are necessary to develop an accident management concept for German PWRs, in particular possible solutions of the hydrogen problem resulting from a core melting accident. This work is an important part of the Nuclear Regulatory Research Programme initiated and financed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). Two fundamental strategies are discussed: prevention of the formation of inflammable gas mixtures by making the atmosphere of the containment inert, and mitigation of the consequence of possible combustion by limiting the local hydrogen concentration. (Z.S.) 1 fig

  20. Toward a CFD-grade database addressing LWR containment phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paladino, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.paladino@psi.ch [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Andreani, Michele; Zboray, Robert; Dreier, Joerg [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SETH-2 PANDA tests have supplied data with CFD-grade on plumes and jets at large-scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PANDA tests have contributed to the understanding of phenomena with high safety relevance for LWRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analytical activities related increased confidence in the use of various computational tools for safety analysis. - Abstract: The large-scale, multi-compartment PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland) is one of the state-of-the-art facilities which is continuously upgraded to progressively match the requirements of CFD-grade experiments. Within the OECD/SETH projects, the PANDA facility has been used for the creation of an experimental database on basic containment phenomena e.g. gas mixing, transport, stratification, condensation. In the PANDA tests, these phenomena are driven by large scale plumes or jets. In the paper is presented a selection of the SETH PANDA experimental results. Examples of analytical activities performed at PSI using the GOTHIC, CFX-4 and CFX-5 codes will be used to illustrate how the spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurement grid in PANDA tests are adequate for CFD code (and advanced containment codes) assessment and validation purposes.

  1. Toward a CFD-grade database addressing LWR containment phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Domenico; Andreani, Michele; Zboray, Robert; Dreier, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The SETH-2 PANDA tests have supplied data with CFD-grade on plumes and jets at large-scale. ► The PANDA tests have contributed to the understanding of phenomena with high safety relevance for LWRs. ► The analytical activities related increased confidence in the use of various computational tools for safety analysis. - Abstract: The large-scale, multi-compartment PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland) is one of the state-of-the-art facilities which is continuously upgraded to progressively match the requirements of CFD-grade experiments. Within the OECD/SETH projects, the PANDA facility has been used for the creation of an experimental database on basic containment phenomena e.g. gas mixing, transport, stratification, condensation. In the PANDA tests, these phenomena are driven by large scale plumes or jets. In the paper is presented a selection of the SETH PANDA experimental results. Examples of analytical activities performed at PSI using the GOTHIC, CFX-4 and CFX-5 codes will be used to illustrate how the spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurement grid in PANDA tests are adequate for CFD code (and advanced containment codes) assessment and validation purposes.

  2. Iodine behavior in containment under LWR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisbey, S.J.; Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.; Wang, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    The description of containment iodine behavior in reactor accident sequences requires an understanding of iodine volatility effects, deposition and revaporization/resuspension (from surfaces and aerosols), chemical changes between species, and mass transport. The experimental work in this program has largely centered on the interactions of iodine in or with water pools. The formation of volatile iodine, as I 2 or organic iodides, is primarily dependent on radiation and solution pH. Lower pH results in increased formation of volatile iodine species; thus, for example, a pH of 3.05 resulted in a conversion of I - to I 2 that was more than two orders of magnitude greater than tests run at pH 6.1 or 6.8. The formation or organic iodides involving water pools has been linked to the presence of iodine as I 2 , the solution/gas contact, and to the type of organic material

  3. Congress's Contempt Power: A Sketch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenberg, Morton; Tatelman, Todd B

    2007-01-01

    ...), and/or to remove the obstruction (civil contempt). Although arguably any action that directly obstructs the effort of Congress to exercise its constitutional powers may constitute a contempt, in the last seventy years the contempt power...

  4. Hydrogen removal from LWR containments by catalytic-coated thermal insulation elements (THINCAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Broeckerhoff, P.; Ahlers, G.; Gustavsson, V.; Herranz, L.; Polo, J.; Dominguez, T.; Royl, P.

    2003-01-01

    In the THINCAT project, an alternative concept for hydrogen mitigation in a light water reactor (LWR) containment is being developed. Based on catalytic coated thermal insulation elements of the main coolant loop components, it could be considered either as an alternative to backfitting passive autocatalytic recombiner devices, or as a reinforcement of their preventive effect. The present paper summarises the results achieved at about project mid-term. Potential advantages of catalytic thermal insulation studied in the project are:-reduced risk of unintended ignition,;-no work space obstruction in the containment,;-no need for seismic qualification of additional equipment,;-improved start-up behaviour of recombination reaction. Efforts to develop a suitable catalytic layer resulted in the identification of a coating procedure that ensures high chemical reactivity and mechanical stability. Test samples for use in forthcoming experiments with this coating were produced. Models to predict the catalytic rates were developed, validated and applied in a safety analysis study. Results show that an overall hydrogen concentration reduction can be achieved which is comparable to the reduction obtained using conventional recombiners. Existing experimental information supports the argument of a reduced ignition risk

  5. MARS 1.3 system analysis code coupling with CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS containment analysis code using dynamic link library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae

    1998-01-01

    The two independent codes, MARS 1.3 and CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS, have been coupled using the method of dynamic-link-library (DLL) technique. Overall configuration of the code system is designed so that MARS will be a main driver program which use CONTEMPT as associated routines. Using Digital Visual Fortran compiler, DLL was generated from the CONTEMPT source code with the interfacing routine names and arguments. Coupling of MARS with CONTEMPT was realized by calling the DLL routines at the appropriate step in the MARS code. Verification of coupling was carried out for LBLOCA transient of a typical plant design. It was found that the DLL technique is much more convenient than the UNIX process control techniques and effective for Window operating system. Since DLL can be used by more than one application and an application program can use many DLLs simultaneously, this technique would enable the existing codes to use more broadly with linking others

  6. MARS 1.3 system analysis code coupling with CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS containment analysis code using dynamic link library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    The two independent codes, MARS 1.3 and CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS, have been coupled using the method of dynamic-link-library (DLL) technique. Overall configuration of the code system is designed so that MARS will be a main driver program which use CONTEMPT as associated routines. Using Digital Visual Fortran compiler, DLL was generated from the CONTEMPT source code with the interfacing routine names and arguments. Coupling of MARS with CONTEMPT was realized by calling the DLL routines at the appropriate step in the MARS code. Verification of coupling was carried out for LBLOCA transient of a typical plant design. It was found that the DLL technique is much more convenient than the UNIX process control techniques and effective for Window operating system. Since DLL can be used by more than one application and an application program can use many DLLs simultaneously, this technique would enable the existing codes to use more broadly with linking others.

  7. Numerical modelling of the processes in the WWER-1000 containment building during cold leg LOCA using the CONTEMPT-LT/026 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.; Sybotinov, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The CONTEMPT-LT/026 code has been used to produce numerical results for the processes in a WWER-1000 containment building during cold leg LOCA with break at the reactor vessel. The objective of the analysis is to estimate the maximal loads on the containment in case of LOCA. Available design data for the geometry and for the operational characteristics of the low-pressure ECC system and the sprinkler system have been used. Boundary conditions such as mass flow and enthalpies at the breach are given by a RELAP4/MOD6 computation. Hydrogen explosions in the containment are not considered. It is found that in case of normal functioning of the low-pressure ECC system the maximal pressure is 3,26±0,44 bar. In the case of malfunctioning of the low-pressure ECC system, the predicted maximal pressure is 4±0,44 bar, when: a) only 50% of the heat transfer surface of the heat exchanger is effectively used due to pollution; b) the main pipeline of the sprinkler is broken; c) the pipeline to the heat exchanger is partially broken so that the mass flow through the exchanger is only 50% of the nominal; and d) ECC low-pressure ECC system attains its maximal efficiency within 3 min, the predicted maximal pressure is 4±0,44 bar

  8. Summary of aerosol code-comparison results for LWR aerosol containment tests LA1, LA2, and LA3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.L.; Wilson, J.H.; Arwood, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The light-water reactor (LWR) aerosol containment experiments (LACE) are being performed in Richland, Washington, at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory under the leadership of an international project board and the Electric Power Research Institute. These tests have two objectives: (1) to investigate, at large scale, the inherent aerosol retention behavior in LWR containments under simulated severe accident conditions, and (2) to provide an experimental data base for validating aerosol behavior and thermal-hydraulic computer codes. Aerosol computer-code comparison activities for the LACE tests are being coordinated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For each of the six experiments, pretest calculations (for code-to-code comparisons) and blind post-test calculations (for code-to-test data comparisons) are being performed. This paper presents a summary of the pretest aerosol-code results for tests LA1, LA2, and LA3

  9. Filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments: the Swedish research programme and design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeslund, C.; Johansson, K.; Nilsson, L.; Tiren, I.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of filtered atmospheric venting of LWR containments has been recommended by a governmental reactor safety committee as a means of reducing the large releases of radioactivity which it is believed could arise as a result of accidents beyond the design bases (class 9) in nuclear power plants. The purpose of the project is to provide the technical basis for evaluating the feasibility, effectiveness and costs of some vent filter design concepts. The main design objective is substantially to reduce releases to the atmosphere of those radioactive substances which could cause long-lasting contamination of large land areas resulting from accidents beyond the design basis. The degree to which that objective can be reached by applying vent-filter functions becomes the main design evaluation criterion. The governing principle for the vent filter design is to utilize passive components and functions to the greatest possible extent. The design concept is to vent the stream and gases from the containment into an underground tunnel containing a large bed of gravel where the steam is condensed. Non-condensable gases are vented through a sand filter at the outlet of the tunnel via a stack to the atmosphere. The tunnel volume envisaged is of the order of 100,000m 3 , and the length about 1000m. A deep tunnel in rock can be made to withstand the pressures from the burning of hydrogen-air mixtures. As an alternative method the condensing and filtering functions can be achieved by utilizing water pools built sub-surface in concrete structures. Concrete structures can also be built to withstand hydrogen burning. (author)

  10. Benchmarking LWR codes capability to model radionuclide deposition within SFR containments: An analysis of the Na ABCOVE tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, Luis E., E-mail: luisen.herranz@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, Monica, E-mail: monica.gmartin@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Morandi, Sonia, E-mail: sonia.morandi@rse-web.it [Nuclear and Industrial Plant Safety Team, Power Generation System Department, RSE, via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Assessment of LWR codes capability to model aerosol deposition within SFR containments. • Original hypotheses proposed to partially accommodate drawbacks from Na oxidation reactions. • A defined methodology to derive a more accurate characterization of Na-based particles. • Key missing models in LWR codes for SFR applications are identified. - Abstract: Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide transport, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide deposition, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. The present paper is aimed at assessing the current capability of LWR codes to model aerosol deposition within a SFR containment under BDBA conditions. Through a systematic application of the ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR codes to relevant ABCOVE tests, insights have been gained into drawbacks and capabilities of these computation tools. Hypotheses and approximations have

  11. Benchmarking LWR codes capability to model radionuclide deposition within SFR containments: An analysis of the Na ABCOVE tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, Luis E.; Garcia, Monica; Morandi, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of LWR codes capability to model aerosol deposition within SFR containments. • Original hypotheses proposed to partially accommodate drawbacks from Na oxidation reactions. • A defined methodology to derive a more accurate characterization of Na-based particles. • Key missing models in LWR codes for SFR applications are identified. - Abstract: Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide transport, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide deposition, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. The present paper is aimed at assessing the current capability of LWR codes to model aerosol deposition within a SFR containment under BDBA conditions. Through a systematic application of the ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR codes to relevant ABCOVE tests, insights have been gained into drawbacks and capabilities of these computation tools. Hypotheses and approximations have been adopted so that

  12. Probabilistic safety assessment of LWR containment systems performance. Report of principal working group n.5 on risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, N.J.; Harper, F.T.; Bellard, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews current approaches to PSA of LWR containment systems performance. It is based on a variety of recent PSA reports which deal with Level-2 PSA. The report is a summary of recent state-of-the-art containment analysis and is intended to assist analysts in their selection of the most appropriate methods of extending Level-1 plant safety evaluations into Level-2 assessments of the containment performance. The document is primarily concerned with the performance of the containment as an engineered system rather than with the source terms consequent upon its failure. It is addressed mainly to the performance of large dry PWR containments, with a secondary emphasis on other containment types. After explaining the purposes of these analyses, a survey of LWR containment analysis options is presented: direct approaches using containment event tree construction, indirect approaches based on previous PSAs, alternative and novel approaches. The selection process is then described, followed by conclusions on their suitability for various cases: accident management, research prioritization, identifying design weaknesses, specific issue resolution, modelling physical reality, etc.

  13. Contempt: Derogating Others While Keeping Calm

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Agneta H.; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2016-01-01

    While philosophers have discussed the emotion of contempt from antiquity to the present day, contempt has received less attention in psychological research. We review the defining features of contempt, both as a short-term emotion and as a more long lasting sentiment. Contempt is similar to anger in that it may occur after (repeated) social or moral transgressions, but it differs from anger in its appraisals, actions and emotivational goals. Unlike anger, contempt arises when a person’s or gr...

  14. Containment loadings due to hydrogen burning in LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulskis, P.

    1981-01-01

    The potential pressure loadings due to hydrogen burning under conditions representative of meltdown accident conditions are examined for a variety of PWR and BWR containment designs. For the PWR, the large dry, ice condenser, as well as subatmospheric containments are considered. For the BWR, MARK I, II, and III pressure suppression containments are evaluated. The key factors considered are: free volume, design pressure, extend to hydrogen generation, and the flammability of the atmosphere under a range of accident conditions. The potential for and the possible implications of hydrogen detonation are also considered. The results of these analyses show that the accumulation and rapid burning of the quantities of hydrogen that would be generated during core meltdown accidents will lead to pressures above design levels in all of the containments considered. As would be expected, containments characterized by small volumes and/or low design pressures are the most vulnerable to damage due to hydrogen burning. Large volume, high pressure designs may also be threatened but offer significantly more potential for accomodating hydrogen burns. The attainment of detonable hydrogen mixtures is made easier by smaller containment volumes. Detonable mixtures are also possible in the larger volume containments, but imply the accumulation of hydrogen for long periods of time without prior ignition. Hydrogen detonations, if they occur, would probably challenge the integrity of any of the containments considered. (orig.)

  15. Insights into the behavior of LWR steel containment buildings during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, D.B.; Horschel, D.S.; Blejwas, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of steel containment subject to pressure and temperature greater than their design basis loads are discussed. The timing, mechanism, and location of a containment failure, i.e., release of radioactive materials, have an important impact on the consequences of a severe accident. We review the results of experiments on steel containment models pressurized to failure, on aged and unaged seals subjected to elevated temperature and pressure, and on electrical penetration assemblies tested for leakage. Based on the results, the important features and details of analytical methods that can be used to predict containment performance are identified. Finally, we speculate on the performance of steel containments in severe accident conditions. (orig.)

  16. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process

  17. From disgust to contempt-speech: The nature of contempt on the map of prejudicial emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilewicz, Michal; Kamińska, Olga Katarzyna; Winiewski, Mikołaj; Soral, Wiktor

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing the contempt as an intergroup emotion, we suggest that contempt and anger are not built upon each other, whereas disgust seems to be the most elementary and specific basic-emotional antecedent of contempt. Concurring with Gervais & Fessler, we suggest that many instances of "hate speech" are in fact instances of "contempt speech" - being based on disgust-driven contempt rather than hate.

  18. Contempt of Court Pada Peradilan Administrasi

    OpenAIRE

    Nurbaningsih, Enny

    1997-01-01

    Kedudukan tergugat (pejabat TUN) yang lebih kuat dibandingkan dengan penggugat menyebabkan Peradilan Administrasi lebih mudah terkena Contempt. Meski secara jelas hukum Positif yang berlaku belum mengnal lembaga Contempt namun KUHP sering dipakai sarana untuk menjeratnya. Tulisan ini akan melihat sebab dan faktor pendukung apa saja yang mendorong timbulnya Contempt ex Facie; ketidakpatutan melaksanakan perintah pengadilan yang sering termuat dalam Peradilan Administrasi.

  19. Explanations for Contempt Expressed Towards Old People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Eleanor Krassen; Maxwell, Robert J.

    The issue of contempt expressed towards the aged was examined from a cross-cultural perspective. Eight reasons for expressions of contempt emerged from a study of 95 societies drawn from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample, and were treated as independent variables, with the overall level of contempt as the dependent variable, in a application of…

  20. 32 CFR 935.53 - Contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contempt. 935.53 Section 935.53 National Defense... CODE Penalties § 935.53 Contempt. A Judge may, in any civil or criminal case or proceeding, punish any person for disobedience of any order of the Court, or for any contempt committed in the presence of the...

  1. LWR severe accident simulation: Iodine behaviour in FPT2 experiment and advances on containment iodine chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, N., E-mail: nathalie.girault@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP3 - 13115 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bosland, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP3 - 13115 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dickinson, S. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Harwell, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Funke, F. [AREVA NP Gmbh, PO Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Guentay, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Herranz, L.E. [Centro des Investigaciones Energeticas, MedioAmbiantales y Tecnologicas, av. Complutense 2, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Powers, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short term gaseous iodine fraction can be produced either in primary circuit or on containment condensing surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gaseous radiolytic reactions convert volatile iodine into non-volatile iodine oxide particulates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline and evaporating sump decrease the iodine volatility in containment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Release of volatile iodine from containment surfaces explained the long term stationary residual gaseous iodine concentration. - Abstract: The Phebus Fission Product (FP) Program studies key phenomena of severe accidents in water-cooled nuclear reactors. In the framework of the Phebus program, five in-pile experiments have been performed that cover fuel rod degradation and behaviour of fission products released via the coolant circuit into the containment vessel. The focus of this paper is on iodine behaviour during the Phebus FPT2 test. FPT2 used a 33 GWd/t uranium dioxide fuel enriched to 4.5%, re-irradiated in situ for 7 days to a burn-up of 130 MWd/t. This test was performed to study the impact of steam-poor conditions and boric acid on the fission product chemistry. For the containment vessel, more specifically, the objective was to study iodine chemistry in an alkaline sump under evaporating conditions. The iodine results of the Phebus FPT2 test confirmed many of the essential features of iodine behaviour in the containment vessel provided by the first two Phebus tests, FPT0 and FPT1. These are the existence of an early gaseous iodine fraction, the persistence of low gaseous iodine concentrations and the importance of the sump in suppressing the iodine partitioning from sump to atmosphere. The main new insights provided by the Phebus FPT2 test were the iodine desorption from stainless steel walls deposits and the role of the evaporating sump in further iodine depletion in the containment atmosphere. The current paper presents an interpretation of

  2. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated {sup 131}I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to

  3. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C.; Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2012-12-01

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and 131 I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated 131 I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to be

  4. Congress's Contempt Power: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenberg, Morton; Tatelman, Todd B

    2007-01-01

    ...), and/or to remove the obstruction (civil contempt). Although arguably any action that directly obstructs the effort of Congress to exercise its constitutional powers may constitute a contempt, in the last 70 years the contempt power...

  5. Held in contempt: the psychological, interpersonal, and performance consequences of contempt in a work context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melwani, Shimul; Barsade, Sigal G

    2011-09-01

    Guided by a social function of emotions perspective, the authors examined a model of the psychological, interpersonal, and performance consequences of contempt in a series of 3 experiments that tested the outcomes of being a recipient of contempt in the work domain. In these experiments, participants engaged in a business strategy simulation with a virtual partner-a computer programmed to give contemptuous and other types of feedback. In Study 1, which examined the task performance and interpersonal outcomes of contempt, recipients of contempt had significantly better task performance but also significantly more interpersonal aggressiveness toward their virtual partners compared with recipients of failure, angry, or neutral feedback. Study 2 examined 3 psychological outcomes mediating the contempt-task performance/aggression relationship: self-esteem, returned feelings of contempt, and activation levels. Lowered levels of implicit self-esteem and greater levels of activation significantly mediated the relationship between receiving contempt and task performance, whereas the contempt-aggression relationship was mediated by lowered implicit self-esteem and increased feelings of returned contempt. Study 3 examined status as a moderator of these relationships. Low-status recipients had significantly better task performance than did equal-status recipients, who performed significantly better than did the high-status recipients of contempt. In addition, low-status recipients displayed significantly lower levels of aggression in response to contempt than did equal-status and high-status recipients. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Thinly disguised contempt: a barrier to excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Stewart, P

    1987-04-01

    Many elements in contemporary leadership and management convey contempt for employees. "Thinly disguised contempt," a concept introduced by Peters and Austin in A Passion For Excellence, explains many barriers to the achievement of excellence in corporations across disciplines. Health care executives and managers can learn from the errors of corporate management and avoid replicating these errors in the health care industry.

  7. The Moral Shadows of Shame and Contempt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2018-01-01

    Are shame and contempt moral, immoral, or non-moral emotions? The answer, I argue in this paper, is less than straightforward.......Are shame and contempt moral, immoral, or non-moral emotions? The answer, I argue in this paper, is less than straightforward....

  8. 28 CFR 522.11 - Civil contempt commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil contempt commitments. 522.11..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.11 Civil contempt commitments. Inmates can come into Bureau custody for civil contempt commitments in two ways: (a) The U.S...

  9. 28 CFR 522.14 - Inmates serving civil contempt commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmates serving civil contempt... ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.14 Inmates serving civil contempt commitments. We treat inmates serving civil contempt commitments in...

  10. Further implications in analyzing contempt in modern society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    The target article by Gervais & Fessler represents a comprehensive analysis of contempt but is not fully adequate in addressing how contempt produces hatred, how contempt is used manipulatively by aspiring leaders, and how contempt can be cured or at least mitigated. This commentary addresses these concerns.

  11. The relationship among expressions, labels, and descriptions of contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, David; Ekman, Paul

    2004-10-01

    This article reports 4 studies that demonstrate that the contempt expression is reliably associated with situations that elicit contempt and that the inability to label the contempt expression reflects a problem with its label or concept and not with the relationship between its expression and emotion. In Study I, the labeling of contempt in fixed-choice judgment tasks did not occur because of a process of elimination. In Studies 2 and 3, the contempt expression was associated with situations that elicit contempt, but participants did not label the situations in an open-ended response. In Study 3, participants also more reliably labeled the contempt expression with situations rather than with labels and did not generate contempt situations from labels. In Study 4, participants reported using, hearing, and reading about contempt the least among 7 emotions tested. (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Validation of Ulchin Units 1, 2 CONTEMPT Model Prior to the Production of EQ Envelope Curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Su Hyun; Kim, Min Ki; Hong, Soon Joon; Lee, Byung Chul; Suh, Jeong Kwan; Lee, Jae Yong; Song, Dong Soo

    2010-01-01

    The Ulchin Units 1, 2 will be refurbished with RSG (Replacement of Steam Generator) and PU (Power Uprate). The current EQ (Environmental Qualification) envelope curve should be modified according to RSG and PU. The containment P/T (Pressure/Temperature) analysis in Ulchin Units 1, 2 FSAR was done using EDF computer program PAREO6. PAREO6 uses the same assumptions as the US NRC CONTEMPT program, and the results given by both programs are in good agreement. It is utilized to determine pressure and temperature variations in a PWR containment subsequent to a reactor coolant or secondary system pipe break. But PAREO6 cannot be available to the production of EQ envelope curve, so CONTEMPT code should be used instead of PAREO6. It is essential to validate the CONTEMPT OSG (Original Steam Generator) model prior to the production of EQ envelope curve considering RSG and PU. This study has been performed to validate the CONTEMPT model of Ulchin Units 1, 2 by comparing the CONTEMPT results with the PAERO6 results in Ulchin Units 1, 2 FSAR

  13. Validation of Ulchin Units 1, 2 CONTEMPT Model Prior to the Production of EQ Envelope Curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Su Hyun; Kim, Min Ki; Hong, Soon Joon; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Technology Co., SNU, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jeong Kwan; Lee, Jae Yong; Song, Dong Soo [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The Ulchin Units 1, 2 will be refurbished with RSG (Replacement of Steam Generator) and PU (Power Uprate). The current EQ (Environmental Qualification) envelope curve should be modified according to RSG and PU. The containment P/T (Pressure/Temperature) analysis in Ulchin Units 1, 2 FSAR was done using EDF computer program PAREO6. PAREO6 uses the same assumptions as the US NRC CONTEMPT program, and the results given by both programs are in good agreement. It is utilized to determine pressure and temperature variations in a PWR containment subsequent to a reactor coolant or secondary system pipe break. But PAREO6 cannot be available to the production of EQ envelope curve, so CONTEMPT code should be used instead of PAREO6. It is essential to validate the CONTEMPT OSG (Original Steam Generator) model prior to the production of EQ envelope curve considering RSG and PU. This study has been performed to validate the CONTEMPT model of Ulchin Units 1, 2 by comparing the CONTEMPT results with the PAERO6 results in Ulchin Units 1, 2 FSAR

  14. Contempt: a hot feeling hidden under a cold jacket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, A.; Trnka, R.; Balcar, K.; Kuška, M.

    2011-01-01

    Contempt is the feeling when one judges another person as an inferior human being, and is typically expressed through social exclusion. Feeling contempt thus implies rejecting others, considering others as unworthy of one’s attention. Contempt is often mixed with other emotions, such as anger,

  15. The Danger of Contempt in Universities and in Modern Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Segments of modern U.S. society are rewarding rather than punishing the expression of contempt. College campuses are increasingly becoming tolerant of expressions of contempt rather than of respect for diversity of opinions. Universities need to take an active role in teaching students the danger of contempt because of its role in the development…

  16. Contempt as the absence of appraisal, not recognition, respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler's defense of a sentiment construct for contempt captures features distinguishing the phenomenon from basic emotions and highlights the fact that it comprises a coordinated syndrome of responses. However, their conceptualization of contempt as the absence of respect equivocates. Consequently, a "dignity" culture that prescribes respect does not thereby limit legitimate contempt in the manner the authors claim.

  17. 44 CFR 5.61 - Contempt for noncompliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contempt for noncompliance. 5... Contempt for noncompliance. In the event of noncompliance by FEMA with an order of a district court pursuant to § 5.60, the district court may punish for contempt the FEMA employee responsible for the...

  18. Two kinds of respect for two kinds of contempt: Why contempt can be both a sentiment and an emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, Florian; Deonna, Julien; Sander, David; Teroni, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler argue that because contempt is a sentiment, it cannot be an emotion. However, like many affective labels, it could be that "contempt" refers both to a sentiment and to a distinct emotion. This possibility is made salient by the fact that contempt can be defined by contrast with respect, but that there are different kinds of respect.

  19. Large-scale, multi-compartment tests in PANDA for LWR-containment analysis and code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Domenico; Auban, Olivier; Zboray, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale thermal-hydraulic PANDA facility has been used for the last years for investigating passive decay heat removal systems and related containment phenomena relevant for next-generation and current light water reactors. As part of the 5. EURATOM framework program project TEMPEST, a series of tests was performed in PANDA to experimentally investigate the distribution of hydrogen inside the containment and its effect on the performance of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) designed for the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). In a postulated severe accident, a large amount of hydrogen could be released in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) as a consequence of the cladding Metal- Water (M-W) reaction and discharged together with steam to the Drywell (DW) compartment. In PANDA tests, hydrogen was simulated by using helium. This paper illustrates the results of a TEMPEST test performed in PANDA and named as Test T1.2. In Test T1.2, the gas stratification (steam-helium) patterns forming in the large-scale multi-compartment PANDA DW, and the effect of non-condensable gas (helium) on the overall behaviour of the PCCS were identified. Gas mixing and stratification in a large-scale multi-compartment system are currently being further investigated in PANDA in the frame of the OECD project SETH. The testing philosophy in this new PANDA program is to produce data for code validation in relation to specific phenomena, such as: gas stratification in the containment, gas transport between containment compartments, wall condensation, etc. These types of phenomena are driven by buoyant high-momentum injections (jets) and/or low momentum injection (plumes), depending on the transient scenario. In this context, the new SETH tests in PANDA are particularly valuable to produce an experimental database for code assessment. This paper also presents an overview of the PANDA SETH tests and the major improvements in instrumentation carried out in the PANDA

  20. Comparison Results on the Basic Phenomena between CAP and CONTEMPT-LT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yeon Joon; Hong, Soon Joon; Hwang, Su Hyun; Kim, Min Ki; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Tech., SNU, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang Jun; Choi, Hoon [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A development project for the domestic design code was launched to be used for the safety and performance analysis of pressurized light water reactors. As a part of this project, CAP (Containment Analysis Package) code has been developing for the containment safety and performance analysis side by side with SPACE. CAP Beta version has been released lately and validation processes are under way currently. Code by code comparison activity is scheduled in the validation processes and the first comparable code is CONTEMPT-LT. CONTEMPT-LT was developed to predict the longterm behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) conditions. CONTEMPT-LT calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments, leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray as engineered safety systems. Any compartment may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. As mentioned above, CONTEMP-LT has the similar code features and it, therefore, is expected to show the similar analysis performance with CAP. In this study, the code performances were compared for the same phenomena between CAP and CONTEMPT-LT. Code comparison is carried out through two stages; separate and integral effect comparison

  1. Comparison Results on the Basic Phenomena between CAP and CONTEMPT-LT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yeon Joon; Hong, Soon Joon; Hwang, Su Hyun; Kim, Min Ki; Lee, Byung Chul; Ha, Sang Jun; Choi, Hoon

    2011-01-01

    A development project for the domestic design code was launched to be used for the safety and performance analysis of pressurized light water reactors. As a part of this project, CAP (Containment Analysis Package) code has been developing for the containment safety and performance analysis side by side with SPACE. CAP Beta version has been released lately and validation processes are under way currently. Code by code comparison activity is scheduled in the validation processes and the first comparable code is CONTEMPT-LT. CONTEMPT-LT was developed to predict the longterm behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) conditions. CONTEMPT-LT calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments, leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray as engineered safety systems. Any compartment may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. As mentioned above, CONTEMP-LT has the similar code features and it, therefore, is expected to show the similar analysis performance with CAP. In this study, the code performances were compared for the same phenomena between CAP and CONTEMPT-LT. Code comparison is carried out through two stages; separate and integral effect comparison

  2. BEACON/MOD3, 1-D and 2-D 2 Phase Flow and Heat Transfer in Containment, LWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadus, C.R.; Doyle, R.J.; James, S.W.; Lime, J.F.; Mings, W.J.; Ramsthaler, J.A.; Sahota, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The BEACON series of programs is designed to perform a best-estimate analysis of the flow of a mixture of air, water, and steam in a nuclear reactor containment system under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The code can simulate two-component, two-phase fluid flow in complex geometries using a combination of two-dimensional, one-dimensional, and lumped- parameter representations for the various parts of the system. BEACON/MOD3 contains mass and heat transfer models for wall film and for wall conduction, and is suitable for the evaluation of short- term transients in PWR dry containment systems. The capability to examine the details of a two-components, two-phase flow field in one or two dimensions under nonhomogeneous, nonequilibrium conditions (unequal velocities, unequal temperatures between the two phases) allows analysis of such problems as the calculation of jet impact forces of a fluid leaving a pipe break, the motion of a large pressure wave across a compartment, the variation in flow properties as air is displaced from a compartment by steam and water, the water entrainment or de-entrainment by a high-speed vapor flow, the flow of a flashing liquid, and many other complex nonequilibrium problems of containment system analyses. 2 - Method of solution: The basic Eulerian flow solution procedure is based on the K-FIX two-dimensional two-phase numerical method. Each phase is described by its own density, velocity, and temperature as determined by separate sets of mass, momentum, and energy equations. The two phases are coupled by exchange parameters which model the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the two phases. The two sets of field equations are solved with a Eulerian finite- difference technique that implicitly treats the phase transitions and inter-phasic heat transfer in the pressure iteration. The implicit solution is accomplished iteratively without linearization and allows both phases to be

  3. Decay calculations on medium-level and actinide-containing wastes from the LWR fuel cycle. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, H.O.

    1981-12-01

    1. The radiotoxicity index as inherent property of the radionuclide inventory was calculated for medium-level and actinide-containing wastes. The calculations were based on the annual limits of intake of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance as well as the new values of annual limits of intake from ICRP-30. The latter imply a higher rating of the toxicity of transuranium nuclides and a lower rating of Sr-90, Tc-99, and Ra-226. Thus, the annual radiotoxicity index is controlled by the transuranics after 10 to 100 years. 2. From the comparison of the radiotoxicity index of conditional and packed wastes with the same volume of uranium ore, it was evaluated that the relative radiotoxicity of the medium-level wastes decreases below the level of pitchblende after less than 100 years and below a 3% uranium ore after less than 2000 of decay. However, based on ICRP-30, the relative radiotoxicity index decreases below the level of pitchblende after 1000 years and decays to the level of the 3% uranium ore at about 10 5 years. 3. The comparison of the radiotoxicity concentration of the total disposal layer with a uranium ore deposit shows that the radiotoxicity concentration based on ICRP-30 of the self-heating wastes placed in single boreholes decays within 2000 years (high level waste within 3000 years) below the level of a uranium ore deposit of 0.2% uranium. The radiotoxicity concentration of the medium-level process waste and the alpha-waste disposed off in disposal chambers decreases to the level of a uranium ore deposit with 0.4 to 6% uranium after about 10 4 years, and 1% after about 10 5 years. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Shame and contempt in the everyday life of the psychotherapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, C

    1994-01-01

    This article describes aspects of the impact of shame and contempt in psychotherapy and in our daily lives. Psychotherapy is seen as moving between the poles of shame and hope. Shame-anxiety alerts us to the imminent danger of being shamed; shame is described as the experience of finding our individuality unacceptable and contempt is seen as a means of coping with shame where the other is made to feel one's shame. Examples of each are provided as well as comments about psychotherapy issues with patients who exhibit shame-anxiety, shame and contempt. Shame-anxiety, shame, contempt and tyranny are seen as points along a spectrum of humiliation experiences.

  5. 45 CFR 702.12 - Contempt of the Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contempt of the Commission. 702.12 Section 702.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS RULES ON HEARINGS, REPORTS, AND MEETINGS OF THE COMMISSION Hearings and Reports § 702.12 Contempt of the Commission...

  6. 25 CFR 11.912 - Contempt of court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Children's Court § 11.912 Contempt of court. Any willful disobedience or interference with any order of the children's court constitutes contempt of court which may be punished in accordance...

  7. Dispositional contempt : A first look at the contemptuous person

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriber, Roberta A; Chung, J.M.H.; Sorensen, Katherine S; Robins, Richard W

    2017-01-01

    Contempt is a powerful emotion. Marriages fail (Gottman, 1994), coworkers are shamed (Melwani & Barsade, 2011), terrorism is tended toward (Tausch et al., 2011). Despite its importance, contempt has not been investigated at the level of personality. The present research examines how our contemptuous

  8. Psychiatric aspects of contempt of court among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Orbán, P T

    1985-08-01

    The case histories of 72 women admitted to prison for contempt of court in 1979-83 were reviewed. The sample included 45% of all women imprisoned for contempt in England and Wales over the 5-year period. The contemnors were significantly older than other sentenced prisoners, one third were foreign born and 37.5% were suffering from psychiatric disorder. Two thirds of the mentally disordered group had a paranoid disorder, litigiousness was a prominent feature of their illness, and 52% committed contempt in the context of a matrimonial dispute or a dispute with neighbours. Recent legislation may help to prevent the imprisonment of mentally ill contemnors.

  9. Disgust, contempt, and anger and the stereotypes of obese people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Lenny R; Thomas, Margaret A; Vanman, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    Emotions form an important part of stereotyping and prejudice, but little is known about how intergroup emotions are associated with anti-fat prejudice. This study examined the relation between negative intergroup emotions (disgust, contempt, and anger) and the stereotypes of obese people. A community sample (n = 380) and an undergraduate sample (n = 96) rated obese people on common obesity stereotypes (e.g., lazy, sloppy), and also indicated the extent to which they felt disgust, contempt, and anger toward obese people. In both samples, participants reported feeling more disgust and contempt than anger toward obese people. Furthermore, regression analyses indicated that disgust was a significant positive predictor of obesity stereotypes, but contempt and anger were not. Overall, these findings provide further evidence that disgust plays an important role in prejudice toward obese people.

  10. Dispositional contempt: A first look at the contemptuous person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriber, Roberta A; Chung, Joanne M; Sorensen, Katherine S; Robins, Richard W

    2017-08-01

    Contempt is a powerful emotion. Marriages fail (Gottman, 1994), coworkers are shamed (Melwani & Barsade, 2011), terrorism is tended toward (Tausch et al., 2011). Despite its importance, contempt has not been investigated at the level of personality. The present research examines how our contemptuous reactions can be conceptualized and measured as a stable individual-difference variable with a range of theoretically predicted correlates. First, we introduce a measure of dispositional contempt , the tendency to look down on, distance, and derogate others who violate our standards. We then unpack the dynamics of dispositional contempt. Across 6 studies using self-report and emotion elicitation in student and MTurk samples (Ns = 165 to 1,368), we examined its (a) nomological network, (b) personality and behavioral correlates, and (c) implications for relationship functioning. Dispositional contempt was distinguished from tendencies toward related emotions and was most associated with dispositional envy, anger, and hubristic pride. Somewhat paradoxically, dispositional contempt was related to being cold and "superior," with associations found with narcissism, other-oriented perfectionism, and various antisocial tendencies (e.g., Disagreeableness, Machiavellianism, racism), but it was also related to being self-deprecating and emotionally fragile, with associations found with low self-esteem, insecure attachment, and feeling that others impose perfectionistic standards on oneself. Dispositional contempt predicted contemptuous reactions to eliciting film clips, particularly when targets showed low competence/power. Finally, perceiving one's romantic partner as dispositionally contemptuous was associated with lower commitment and satisfaction. Taken together, results give a first look at the contemptuous person and provide a new organizing framework for understanding contempt. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. UPAYA PERANCANGAN UNDANG-UNDANG TENTANG LARANGAN MERENDAHKAN MARTABAT PENGADILAN (CONTEMPT OF COURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimly Asshiddiqie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Untuk menjaga martabat dan kehormatan peradilan tidak semata menggunakan pendekatan melalui mekanisme hukum pidana, melainkan juga diperlukan pendekatan melalui mekanisme civil contempt of court dan ethical contempt of court secara integral.

  12. Literature Review: Is the Emotional Expression of Contempt Recognized Universally or Culturally?

    OpenAIRE

    Phoukhao, Julianna

    2017-01-01

    The universal facial expression of contempt is often described as one lip corner raised and tightened. This literature reviews whether or not this expression is recognized universally. After examining theories and methods, low agreement of this expression recognized as contempt was found across cultures. Evidence so far is not sufficient enough to support the unilateral lip corner as an universal expression for contempt. The expression and recognition of contempt is highly dependent on cultur...

  13. 28 CFR 522.15 - No good time credits for inmates serving only civil contempt commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... only civil contempt commitments. 522.15 Section 522.15 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.15 No good time credits for inmates serving only civil contempt...

  14. Including pride and its group-based, relational, and contextual features in theories of contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gavin Brent

    2017-01-01

    Sentiment includes emotional and enduring attitudinal features of contempt, but explaining contempt as a mixture of basic emotion system affects does not adequately address the family resemblance structure of the concept. Adding forms of individual, group-based, and widely shared arrogance and contempt is necessary to capture the complex mixed feelings of proud superiority when "looking down upon" and acting harshly towards others.

  15. Sex Differences in Neural Activation to Facial Expressions Denoting Contempt and Disgust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, Andre; Swart, Marte

    2008-01-01

    The facial expression of contempt has been regarded to communicate feelings of moral superiority. Contempt is an emotion that is closely related to disgust, but in contrast to disgust, contempt is inherently interpersonal and hierarchical. The aim of this study was twofold. First, to investigate the

  16. My objective: zero contempt, not zero risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delevoye, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    With technology, scientific research and dissemination of knowledge, medical practice has improved thereby achieving an efficient health care system. However, it would be appropriate to consider the human dimension of medicine as a key development. There are two major challenges in risk management: organizational management of risk on one hand and the management of human relationship with the patient especially when problems arise, on the other. It is therefore a question of achieving awareness, managing a culture change in the medical circle i.e. moving from a culture of guilt to a culture of error and finally relaxing the atmosphere of mutual distrust that exists between health professionals and patients. Indeed, the relation 'health professional-patient' has deteriorated over time due to poor risk management. An educational effort must be done to avoid frustration of the patient and contribute to zero contempt. On reflection, this means that the quality of a system is due to the individual quality of its members, the quality of methods and the organization in place. (author)

  17. The Use of Contempt to Enforce Child-Support Orders in North Carolina. Special Series No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Trudy Allen; Mason, Janet

    In North Carolina the most common procedure for enforcing civil orders for the payment of child support is a contempt proceeding. The distinctions between civil and criminal contempt include different purposes of the contempt proceedings, different procedures that must be followed, and different consequences of a finding of contempt. Criminal…

  18. Light Water Reactor (LWR) safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a historical review of the developments in the safely of LWR power plants is presented. The paper reviews the developments prior to the TMI-2 accident, i.e. the concept of the defense in depth, the design basis, the large LOCA technical controversies and the LWR safety research programs. The TMI-2 accident, which became a turning point in the history of the development of nuclear power is described briefly. The Chernobyl accident, which terrified the world and almost completely curtailed the development of nuclear power is also described briefly. The great international effort of research in the LWR design-base and severe accidents, which was, respectively, conducted prior to and following the TMI-2 and Chernobyl accidents is described next. We conclude that with the knowledge gained and the improvements in plant organisation/management and in the training of the staff at the presently-installed nuclear power stations, the LWR plants have achieved very high standards of safety and performance. The Generation 3 + LWR power plants, next to be installed, may claim to have reached the goal of assuring the safety of the public to a very large extent. This review is based on the historical developments in LWR safety that occurred primarily in USA. however, they are valid for the rest of the Western World. This review can not do justice to the many many fine contributions that have been made over the last fifty years to the cause of LWR safety. We apologize if we have not mentioned them. We also apologize for not providing references to many of the fine investigations, which have contributed towards LWR safety earning the conclusions that we describe just above

  19. Thermal-hydraulic calculation and analysis for QNPP (Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant) containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hui; Zhou Jie; He Yingchao

    1993-01-01

    Three containment thermal-hydraulic codes CONTEMPT-LT/028, CONTEMPT-4/MOD3 and COMPARE are used to compute and analyse the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) containment response under LOCA or MSLB conditions. An evaluation of the capability of containment of QNPP is given

  20. Individual Differences in Gelotophobia Predict Responses to Joy and Contempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hofmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a paradigm facilitating smile misattribution, facial responses and ratings to contempt and joy were investigated in individuals with or without gelotophobia (fear of being laughed at. Participants from two independent samples (N1 = 83, N2 = 50 rated the intensity of eight emotions in 16 photos depicting joy, contempt, and different smiles. Facial responses were coded by the Facial Action Coding System in the second study. Compared with non-fearful individuals, gelotophobes rated joy smiles as less joyful and more contemptuous. Moreover, gelotophobes showed less facial joy and more contempt markers. The contempt ratings were comparable between the two groups. Looking at the photos of smiles lifted the positive mood of non-gelotophobes, whereas gelotophobes did not experience an increase. We hypothesize that the interpretation bias of “joyful faces hiding evil minds” (i.e., being also contemptuous and exhibiting less joy facially may complicate social interactions for gelotophobes and serve as a maintaining factor of gelotophobia.

  1. Understanding of the operation behaviour of a Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner (PAR) for hydrogen mitigation in realistic containment conditions during a severe Light Water nuclear Reactor (LWR) accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payot, Frédéric; Reinecke, Ernst-Arndt; Morfin, Franck; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Meynet, Nicolas; Bentaib, Ahmed; March, Philippe; Zeyen, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Recombineur operation in the presence of fission products (severe accident conditions). ► Operation of catalysts in the integral and small-scale tests. ► The catalyst performance was observed by measuring the coupon temperature increase. ► The experimental observations were corroborated by numerical calculations (SPARK code). - Abstract: In the context of hydrogen risk mitigation in nuclear power plants (NPPs), experimental studies of a possible poisoning of Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PARs) by fission products (FPs) and aerosols released during a core meltdown accident were mainly conducted in the past with non-radioactive fission product surrogates (e.g., in the H2PAR facility at Cadarache, France). The decision was taken in 1997 to complete these studies by a test in the Phébus facility, a research nuclear reactor also at Cadarache: it was a rare opportunity to expose catalyst samples to an atmosphere as representative as possible of a core meltdown accident, containing gaseous fission products and aerosols released during the degradation of an actual irradiated nuclear fuel bundle. Before testing in Phébus during the FPT3 experiment, reference and qualification tests were performed in the H2PAR facility using the same samples — the so-called “coupons” — and coupons holder to check that the apparatus was functional and correctly designed for avoiding to tamper with the thermal-hydraulics and chemical conditions in the Phébus containment. The correct operation of catalysts was checked by measuring the surface temperature increase of the coupons due to the exothermic reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. After the Phébus FPT3 test (November 2004), REKO-1 tests were initiated at Jülich, Germany, to confirm the discrepancy in coupons temperature observed in Phébus FPT3 and H2PAR PHEB-03 tests, and to study the operation behaviour of PARs. Besides, before REKO-1 tests, a first interpretation of H2PAR and Phébus experiments

  2. Design consideration on severe accident for future LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, A.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities' Severe Accident Management strategies, selected based on Individual Plant Examination, are in the process of implementation for each operating plant. Activities for the next generation LWR design are going on by Utilities, NSSS vendors and Research Institutes. The proposed new designs vary from evolutionary design to revolutionary design such as the supercritical LWR. Discussion on the consideration of Severe Accident in the design of next generation LWR is being held to establish the industry's self-regulatory document on containment design and its performance, which ABWR-IER (Improved Evolutionary Reactor) on the part of BWR and Evolutionary APWR and New PWR21 on the part of PWR are expected to comply. Conceptual design study for ABWR-IER will illustrate an example of design approach for the prevention and mitigation of Severe Accident and its impact on capital cost

  3. Wolf Creek Generating Station containment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.H.; Neises, G.J.; Howard, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a CONTEMPT-LT/28 containment model that has been developed by Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation (WCNOC) to predict containment pressure and temperature behavior during the postulated events at Wolf Creek Generating Station (WCGS). The model has been validated using data provided in the WCGS Updated Safety Analysis Report (USAR). CONTEMPT-LT/28 model has been used extensively at WCGS to support plant operations, and recently, to support its 4.5% thermal power uprate project

  4. LWR-core behaviour project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.

    1982-07-01

    The LWR-Core behaviour project concerns the mathematical simulation of a light water reactor in normal operation (emergency situations excluded). Computational tools are assembled, i.e. programs and libraries of data. These computational tools can likewise be used in nuclear power applications, industry and control applications. The project is divided into three parts: the development and application of calculation methods for quantisation determination of LWR physics; investigation of the behaviour of nuclear fuels under radiation with special attention to higher burnup; simulation of the operating transients of nuclear power stations. (A.N.K.)

  5. The Witness in Contempt: Reflections on Overfamiliarity, Pain and Desecration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tumarkin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are many opportunities for lying and cheating in engaging with, what Susan Sontag called, ‘the pain of others’. One of them is the gradual emergence of the feeling that you know what happened, what it was like to go through it. Yet overfamiliarity can, at times, injure more than contempt or blatant disregard. With so many recent tragedies, the experts who know how it feels and what it’s like, send tropical medications to war-torn continental countries, offer free art therapy classes in place of bread and water, write reports about the ‘atmosphere of fear and uncertainty’ that can neither produce the most negligible of changes nor console even the most naive of souls. It’s possible to counter contempt and indifference with knowledge, laughter and moral courage, but what is the defence against the thick web of assumptions?

  6. 28 CFR 522.13 - Relationship between existing civil contempt commitment orders and new criminal sentences imposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contempt commitment orders and new criminal sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C. Code. 522.13 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.13 Relationship between existing civil contempt commitment orders and new criminal sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C...

  7. Contempt, like any other social affect, can be an emotion as well as a sentiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Fischer, Agneta H

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler assert that contempt is (a) not an emotion (or an attitude) but (b) a sentiment. Here, we challenge the validity and empirical basis of these two assertions, arguing that contempt, like many other emotions, can be both an emotion and a sentiment.

  8. Contempt, like any other social affect, can be an emotion as well as a sentiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giner-Sorolla, R.; Fischer, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    Gervais and Fessler assert that contempt is (a) not an emotion (or an attitude), but (b) a sentiment. Here, we challenge the validity and empirical basis of these two assertions, arguing that contempt, as many other emotions, can be both an emotion and sentiment.

  9. How dare you not recognize the role of my contempt? Insight from experimental psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Frederickson, Jon; Job, Remo

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler argue that contempt is an attitude state defined as a lack of respect that potentiates the activation and deactivation of two different clusters of emotions. However, clinical and experimental findings do not support this view. We provide evidence that contempt is not an emotion, nor an attitude, but a reactive defensive mechanism evolved to help individuals avoid shame.

  10. Building a house of sentiment on sand: Epistemological issues with contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lench, Heather C; Bench, Shane W; Perez, Kenneth A

    2017-01-01

    Contempt shares its features with other emotions, indicating that there is no justification for creating "sentiment" as a new category of feelings. Scientific categories must be created or updated on the basis of evidence. Building a new category on the currently limited contempt literature would be akin to building a house on sand - likely to fall at any moment.

  11. Socioecological factors are linked to changes in prevalence of contempt over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnum, Michael E W; Grossmann, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler argue that the perceived legitimacy of contempt has declined over time in the United States, citing evidence of a decrease in the frequency of its use in the American English corpus. We argue that this decline in contempt, as reflected in cultural products, is linked to shifts in key socioecological features previously associated with other forms of cultural change.

  12. NPP Krsko containment environmental conditions during postulated accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaric, M.; Cavlina, N.; Spalj, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents NPP Krsko containment pressure and temperature increase during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB). Containment environmental condition calculation was performed by CONTEMPT4/MOD4 computer code. Design accident calculations were performed by RELAP4/MOD6 and RELAP5/MOD1 computer codes. Calculational abilities and application methodology of these codes are presented. The CONTEMPT code is described in more detail. The containment pressure and temperature time distribution are presented as well. (author)

  13. Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 1. Summary: alternatives for the back of the LWR fuel cycle types and properties of LWR fuel cycle wastes projections of waste quantities; selected glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Volume I of the five-volume report contains executive and technical summaries of the entire report, background information of the LWR fuel cycle alternatives, descriptions of waste types, and projections of waste quantities. Overview characterizations of alternative LWR fuel cycle modes are also included

  14. APR1400 Containment Simulation with CONTAIN code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Chung, Bub Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The more realistic containment pressure variation predicted by the CONTAIN code through the coupled analysis during a large break loss of coolant accident in the nuclear power plant is expected to provide more accurate prediction for the plant behavior than a standalone MARS-KS calculation. The input deck has been generated based on the already available ARP- 1400 input for CONTEMPT code. Similarly to the CONTEMPT input deck, a simple two-cell model was adopted to model the containment behavior, one cell for the containment inner volume and another cell for the environment condition. The developed input for the CONTAIN code is to be eventually applied for the coupled code calculation of MARS-KS/CONTAIN

  15. APR1400 Containment Simulation with CONTAIN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Chung, Bub Dong

    2010-01-01

    The more realistic containment pressure variation predicted by the CONTAIN code through the coupled analysis during a large break loss of coolant accident in the nuclear power plant is expected to provide more accurate prediction for the plant behavior than a standalone MARS-KS calculation. The input deck has been generated based on the already available ARP- 1400 input for CONTEMPT code. Similarly to the CONTEMPT input deck, a simple two-cell model was adopted to model the containment behavior, one cell for the containment inner volume and another cell for the environment condition. The developed input for the CONTAIN code is to be eventually applied for the coupled code calculation of MARS-KS/CONTAIN

  16. ERDA LWR plant technology program: role of government/industry in improving LWR performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented under the following chapter headings: executive summary; LWR plant outages; LWR plant construction delays and cancellations; programs addressing plant outages, construction delays, and cancellations; need for additional programs to remedy continuing problems; criteria for government role in LWR commercialization; and the proposed government program

  17. Expert system for estimating LWR plutonium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    An Artificial Intelligence-Expert System called APES (Analysis of Proliferation by Expert System) has been developed and tested to permit a non proliferation expert to evaluate the capability and capacity of a specified LWR reactor and PUREX reprocessing system for producing and separating plutonium even when system information may be limited and uncertain. APES employs an expert system coded in LISP and based upon an HP-RL (Hewlett Packard-Representational Language) Expert System Shell. The user I/O interface communicates with a blackboard and the knowledge base which contains the quantitative models required to describe the reactor, selected fission product production and radioactive decay processes, Purex reprocessing and ancillary knowledge

  18. Flexible fuel cycle system for the transition from LWR to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Junichi; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi; Sasahira, Akira; Inoue, Tadashi; Minato, Kazuo; Sato, Seichi

    2009-01-01

    Japan will deploy commercial fast breeder reactor (FBR) from around 2050 under the suitable conditions for the replacement of light water reactor (LWR) with FBR. The transition scenario from LWR to FBR is investigated in detail and the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) system has been proposed as a optimum transition system. The FFCI removes ∼95% uranium from LWR spent fuel (SF) in LWR reprocessing and residual material named Recycle Material (RM), which is ∼1/10 volume of original SF and contains ∼50% U, ∼10% Pu and ∼40% other nuclides, is treated in FBR reprocessing to recover Pu and U. If the FBR deployment speed becomes lower, the RM will be stored until the higher speed again. The FFCI has some merits compared with ordinary system that consists of full reprocessing facilities for both LWR and FBR SF during the transition period. The economy is better for FFCI due to the smaller LWR reprocessing facility (no Pu/U recovery and fabrication). The FFCI can supply high Pu concentration RM, which has high proliferation resistance and flexibly respond to FBR introduction rate changes. Volume minimization of LWR SF is possible for FFCI by its conversion to RM. Several features of FFCI were quantitatively evaluated such as Pu mass balance, reprocessing capacities, LWR SF amounts, RM amounts, and proliferation resistance to compare the effectiveness of the FFCI system with other systems. The calculated Pu balance revealed that the FFCI could supply enough but no excess Pu to FBR. These evaluations demonstrated the applicability of FFCI system to the transition period from LWR to FBR cycles. (author)

  19. KAJIAN YURIDIS TERHADAP CONTEMPT OF COURT DI DEPAN PENGADILAN (STUDI DI DEPAN PENGADILAN NEGERI MEDAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Masthura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pengertian Contempt Of Court adalah segala tindakan berbuat aktif atau tidak melakukan (fasif dilakuan oleh mereka yang berperkara atau pihak lain yang tidak terlibat yang cenderung mengganggu, mencampuri proses penyelenggaraan peradilan sehingga merendahkan martabat peradilan.Pengaturan mengenai tindak pidana terhadap peradilan Contempt Of Court di Indonesia dapat dilihat dari diundangkannya UU No 14 Tahun 1985 tentang Mahkamah Agung dan juga tersebar dalam beberapa pasal dalam KUHP. Fenomena dalam peradilan kita menunjukan Contempt Of Court terjadi hampir di setiap lembaga pengadilan. Kewibaan peradilan mengalami penurunan akibat perilaku tidak baik yang dilakukan oleh para pihak yang berperkara maupun juga dilakukan oleh aparat penegak hukum. Dalam penelitian ini akan mmengkaji pengaturan bentuk-bentuk Contempt Of Court di Indonesia, selanjutnya akan di teliti sebab-sebab terjadi Contempt Of Court di depan pengadilan dan bagaimana seharusnya penanggulan tindak pidana Contempt Of Court.Contempt Of Court terjadi di depan pengadilan disebabkan belum bekerjanya sistem hukum dengan  baik. Perilaku hukum dan budaya hukum yang dipengaruhi oleh sistem hukum yang diterapkan di Indonesia. Hukum modern di Indonesia diterima dan dijalankan sebagai suatu instansi baru yang yang didatangkan atau dipaksakan dari luar, yakni melalui kebijakan colonial Hindia Belanda. Aparat penegak hukum belum bekerja dengan baik untuk dapat menegakan hukum, terutama ketika sidang di pengadilan maka fungsi dan peran jaksa, advokat, dan hakim belum mencerminkan upaya  hukum yang maksimal. Budaya hukum masyarakat dalam euphoria reformasi menunjukan kurangnya penghargaan terhadap kewibawaan hukum. Hal ini diperparah dengan kekecewaan praktek pengadilan dan mafia peradilan.

  20. Beat them or ban them: the characteristics and social functions of anger and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Agneta H; Roseman, Ira J

    2007-07-01

    This article reports 3 studies in which the authors examined (a) the distinctive characteristics of anger and contempt responses and (b) the interpersonal causes and effects of both emotions. In the 1st study, the authors examined the distinction between the 2 emotions; in the 2nd study, the authors tested whether contempt could be predicted from previous anger incidents with the same person; and in the 3rd study, the authors examined the effects of type of relationship on anger and contempt reactions. The results of the 3 studies show that anger and contempt often occur together but that there are clear distinctions between the 2 emotions: Anger is characterized more by short-term attack responses but long-term reconciliation, whereas contempt is characterized by rejection and social exclusion of the other person, both in the short-term and in the long-term. The authors also found that contempt may develop out of previously experienced anger and that a lack of intimacy with and perceived control over the behavior of the other person, as well as negative dispositional attributions about the other person, predicted the emergence of contempt. Copyright 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Sex differences in neural activation to facial expressions denoting contempt and disgust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, André; Swart, Marte

    2008-01-01

    The facial expression of contempt has been regarded to communicate feelings of moral superiority. Contempt is an emotion that is closely related to disgust, but in contrast to disgust, contempt is inherently interpersonal and hierarchical. The aim of this study was twofold. First, to investigate the hypothesis of preferential amygdala responses to contempt expressions versus disgust. Second, to investigate whether, at a neural level, men would respond stronger to biological signals of interpersonal superiority (e.g., contempt) than women. We performed an experiment using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in which participants watched facial expressions of contempt and disgust in addition to neutral expressions. The faces were presented as distractors in an oddball task in which participants had to react to one target face. Facial expressions of contempt and disgust activated a network of brain regions, including prefrontal areas (superior, middle and medial prefrontal gyrus), anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala, parietal cortex, fusiform gyrus, occipital cortex, putamen and thalamus. Contemptuous faces did not elicit stronger amygdala activation than did disgusted expressions. To limit the number of statistical comparisons, we confined our analyses of sex differences to the frontal and temporal lobes. Men displayed stronger brain activation than women to facial expressions of contempt in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and superior temporal gyrus. Conversely, women showed stronger neural responses than men to facial expressions of disgust. In addition, the effect of stimulus sex differed for men versus women. Specifically, women showed stronger responses to male contemptuous faces (as compared to female expressions), in the insula and middle frontal gyrus. Contempt has been conceptualized as signaling perceived moral violations of social hierarchy, whereas disgust would signal violations of physical purity. Thus, our results suggest a

  2. Sex Differences in Neural Activation to Facial Expressions Denoting Contempt and Disgust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, André; Swart, Marte

    2008-01-01

    The facial expression of contempt has been regarded to communicate feelings of moral superiority. Contempt is an emotion that is closely related to disgust, but in contrast to disgust, contempt is inherently interpersonal and hierarchical. The aim of this study was twofold. First, to investigate the hypothesis of preferential amygdala responses to contempt expressions versus disgust. Second, to investigate whether, at a neural level, men would respond stronger to biological signals of interpersonal superiority (e.g., contempt) than women. We performed an experiment using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in which participants watched facial expressions of contempt and disgust in addition to neutral expressions. The faces were presented as distractors in an oddball task in which participants had to react to one target face. Facial expressions of contempt and disgust activated a network of brain regions, including prefrontal areas (superior, middle and medial prefrontal gyrus), anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala, parietal cortex, fusiform gyrus, occipital cortex, putamen and thalamus. Contemptuous faces did not elicit stronger amygdala activation than did disgusted expressions. To limit the number of statistical comparisons, we confined our analyses of sex differences to the frontal and temporal lobes. Men displayed stronger brain activation than women to facial expressions of contempt in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and superior temporal gyrus. Conversely, women showed stronger neural responses than men to facial expressions of disgust. In addition, the effect of stimulus sex differed for men versus women. Specifically, women showed stronger responses to male contemptuous faces (as compared to female expressions), in the insula and middle frontal gyrus. Contempt has been conceptualized as signaling perceived moral violations of social hierarchy, whereas disgust would signal violations of physical purity. Thus, our results suggest a

  3. Sex differences in neural activation to facial expressions denoting contempt and disgust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Aleman

    Full Text Available The facial expression of contempt has been regarded to communicate feelings of moral superiority. Contempt is an emotion that is closely related to disgust, but in contrast to disgust, contempt is inherently interpersonal and hierarchical. The aim of this study was twofold. First, to investigate the hypothesis of preferential amygdala responses to contempt expressions versus disgust. Second, to investigate whether, at a neural level, men would respond stronger to biological signals of interpersonal superiority (e.g., contempt than women. We performed an experiment using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, in which participants watched facial expressions of contempt and disgust in addition to neutral expressions. The faces were presented as distractors in an oddball task in which participants had to react to one target face. Facial expressions of contempt and disgust activated a network of brain regions, including prefrontal areas (superior, middle and medial prefrontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala, parietal cortex, fusiform gyrus, occipital cortex, putamen and thalamus. Contemptuous faces did not elicit stronger amygdala activation than did disgusted expressions. To limit the number of statistical comparisons, we confined our analyses of sex differences to the frontal and temporal lobes. Men displayed stronger brain activation than women to facial expressions of contempt in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and superior temporal gyrus. Conversely, women showed stronger neural responses than men to facial expressions of disgust. In addition, the effect of stimulus sex differed for men versus women. Specifically, women showed stronger responses to male contemptuous faces (as compared to female expressions, in the insula and middle frontal gyrus. Contempt has been conceptualized as signaling perceived moral violations of social hierarchy, whereas disgust would signal violations of physical purity. Thus, our

  4. Equipment designs for the spent LWR fuel dry storage demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, R.J.; Kurasch, D.H.; Hardin, R.T.; Schmitten, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    In conjunction with the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program (SFHPP) equipment has been designed, fabricated and successfully utilized to demonstrate the packaging and interim dry storage of spent LWR fuel. Surface and near surface storage configurations containing PWR fuel assemblies are currently on test and generating baseline data. Specific areas of hardware design focused upon include storage cell components and the support related equipment associated with encapsulation, leak testing, lag storage, and emplacement operations

  5. Recycling U and Pu in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing.

    1986-01-01

    This article, from viewpoints of technical feasibility, safety evaluation and socioeconomic benefit-risk analysis, introduces and comments on history and status of recycling U and Pu in LWR, dealing with reactor, reprocessing, conversion and fuel element fabrication et al. Author has analysed LWR fuel cycle strategies in China and made a proposal

  6. LWR physics in SKODA Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbytovsky, A.; Lehmann, M.; Vyskocil, V.; Vacek, J.; Krysl, V.

    1980-01-01

    Computation of nuclear power reactors of the WWER-1000 type is described as are computer programs used by Skoda Works for the solution of neutron problems. The programs are analyzed for applicability in the unified program system of the CMEA countries which will be used in the preparation of safety reports, the evaluation of safety hazards, the design of fuel charges, economical studies etc. A detailed description is also presented of multigroup transport calculations and of the preparation of input data for macrocalculations of the heterogeneous lattices of LWR's. (author)

  7. Deep mechanisms of social affect - Plastic parental brain mechanisms for sensitivity versus contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, James E; Ho, S Shaun

    2017-01-01

    Insensitive parental thoughts and affect, similar to contempt, may be mapped onto a network of basic emotions moderated by attitudinal representations of social-relational value. Brain mechanisms that reflect emotional valence of baby signals among parents vary according to individual differences and show plasticity over time. Furthermore, mental health problems and treatments for parents may affect these brain systems toward or away from contempt, respectively.

  8. Preferential responses in amygdala and insula during presentation of facial contempt and disgust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambataro, Fabio; Dimalta, Savino; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Taurisano, Paolo; Blasi, Giuseppe; Scarabino, Tommaso; Giannatempo, Giuseppe; Nardini, Marcello; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2006-10-01

    Some authors consider contempt to be a basic emotion while others consider it a variant of disgust. The neural correlates of contempt have not so far been specifically contrasted with disgust. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the neural networks involved in the processing of facial contempt and disgust in 24 healthy subjects. Facial recognition of contempt was lower than that of disgust and of neutral faces. The imaging data indicated significant activity in the amygdala and in globus pallidus and putamen during processing of contemptuous faces. Bilateral insula and caudate nuclei and left as well as right inferior frontal gyrus were engaged during processing of disgusted faces. Moreover, direct comparisons of contempt vs. disgust yielded significantly different activations in the amygdala. On the other hand, disgusted faces elicited greater activation than contemptuous faces in the right insula and caudate. Our findings suggest preferential involvement of different neural substrates in the processing of facial emotional expressions of contempt and disgust.

  9. Outline of Swedish activities on LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M [Studsvik Nuclear, Nykoeping (Sweden); Roennberg, G [OKG AB (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    The presentation outlines the Swedish activities on LWR fuel and considers the following issues: electricity production; performance of operating nuclear power plants; nuclear fuel cycle and waste management; research and development in nuclear field. 4 refs, 4 tabs.

  10. A development of containment performance analysis methodology using GOTHIC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. C.; Yoon, J. I. [Future and Challenge Company, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, C. S.; Lee, J. Y. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    In a circumstance that well-established containment pressure/temperature analysis code, CONTEMPT-LT treats the reactor containment as a single volume, this study introduces, as an alternative, the GOTHIC code for an usage on multi-compartmental containment performance analysis. With a developed GOTHIC methodology, its applicability is verified for containment performance analysis for Korean Nuclear Unit 1. The GOTHIC model for this plant is simply composed of 3 compartments including the reactor containment and RWST. In addition, the containment spray system and containment recirculation system are simulated. As a result of GOTHIC calculation, under the same assumptions and conditions as those in CONTEMPT-LT, the GOTHIC prediction shows a very good result; pressure and temperature transients including their peaks are nearly the same. It can be concluded that the GOTHIC could provide reasonable containment pressure and temperature responses if considering the inherent conservatism in CONTEMPT-LT code.

  11. A development of containment performance analysis methodology using GOTHIC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Yoon, J. I.; Byun, C. S.; Lee, J. Y.; Lee, J. Y.

    2003-01-01

    In a circumstance that well-established containment pressure/temperature analysis code, CONTEMPT-LT treats the reactor containment as a single volume, this study introduces, as an alternative, the GOTHIC code for an usage on multi-compartmental containment performance analysis. With a developed GOTHIC methodology, its applicability is verified for containment performance analysis for Korean Nuclear Unit 1. The GOTHIC model for this plant is simply composed of 3 compartments including the reactor containment and RWST. In addition, the containment spray system and containment recirculation system are simulated. As a result of GOTHIC calculation, under the same assumptions and conditions as those in CONTEMPT-LT, the GOTHIC prediction shows a very good result; pressure and temperature transients including their peaks are nearly the same. It can be concluded that the GOTHIC could provide reasonable containment pressure and temperature responses if considering the inherent conservatism in CONTEMPT-LT code

  12. On the deep structure of social affect: Attitudes, emotions, sentiments, and the case of "contempt".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Matthew M; Fessler, Daniel M T

    2017-01-01

    Contempt is typically studied as a uniquely human moral emotion. However, this approach has yielded inconclusive results. We argue this is because the folk affect concept "contempt" has been inaccurately mapped onto basic affect systems. "Contempt" has features that are inconsistent with a basic emotion, especially its protracted duration and frequently cold phenomenology. Yet other features are inconsistent with a basic attitude. Nonetheless, the features of "contempt" functionally cohere. To account for this, we revive and reconfigure the sentiment construct using the notion of evolved functional specialization. We develop the Attitude-Scenario-Emotion (ASE) model of sentiments, in which enduring attitudes represent others' social-relational value and moderate discrete emotions across scenarios. Sentiments are functional networks of attitudes and emotions. Distinct sentiments, including love, respect, like, hate, and fear, track distinct relational affordances, and each is emotionally pluripotent, thereby serving both bookkeeping and commitment functions within relationships. The sentiment contempt is an absence of respect; from cues to others' low efficacy, it represents them as worthless and small, muting compassion, guilt, and shame and potentiating anger, disgust, and mirth. This sentiment is ancient yet implicated in the ratcheting evolution of human ultrasocialty. The manifolds of the contempt network, differentially engaged across individuals and populations, explain the features of "contempt," its translatability, and its variable experience as "hot" or "cold," occurrent or enduring, and anger-like or disgust-like. This rapprochement between psychological anthropology and evolutionary psychology contributes both methodological and empirical insights, with broad implications for understanding the functional and cultural organization of social affect.

  13. Passive cooling containment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J.J.; Iotti, R.C.; Wright, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure and temperature transients of nuclear reactor containment following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally for the full scale NPR (New Production Reactor). All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified CONTEMPT code CONTEMPT-NPR. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux, and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and half foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of CONTEMPT-NPR and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale NPR

  14. The Impact of Gender on the Processing of Probation Violations and Contempt: A Study of One Juvenile Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dyan McGuire

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence to suggest that in at least some contexts juvenile court judges are circumventing the proscription contained in the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (“JJDPA”, which prohibits the secure confinement of status offenders, by securely detaining status offenders for contempt.  Some evidence also indicates that gender may influence whether a juvenile is detained as a result of violating a valid court order.  This study seeks to expand existing research by examining what happens to court order violators beyond detention and by explicitly comparing the treatment of court order violators with the treatment of probation violators in terms of detention, adjudication and confinement to shed light on how gender influences these decision points.  While high rates of detention and commitment were uncovered, these results do not suggest that females were more likely to experience these consequences than males.

  15. Contempt and defensiveness in couple relationships related to childhood sexual abuse histories for self and partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Eric C; Sheffield, Rachel; Larson, Jeffry H; Holman, Thomas B

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) for one or both members of a romantic couple and perceptions of contempt and defensiveness for self and partner. Data from the Relationship Evaluation (RELATE) were analyzed for 10,061 couples. The findings suggest that when either or both partner(s) has a history of CSA, contempt and defensiveness in the couple relationship are greater than when neither reports a history of CSA. Furthermore, the males' experience of CSA had a greater impact on their perceptions of self and partner's contempt and defensiveness than females' experience of CSA. Explanations of gender differences are offered and implications for future research and practice are suggested. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  16. Fatigue management considering LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae eun

    2000-01-01

    Design fatigue curve for structural material in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments has been a concern ever since the early 1970's. And, recent fatigue test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of carbon steels, low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. For these reasons, fatigue of major components has been identified as a technical issue remaining to be resolved for life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. In the present paper, results of recent investigations by many organizations are reviewed to provide technical justification to support the development of utility approach regarding the management of fatigue considering LWR coolant environments for the purpose of life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. (author)

  17. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.F.W.

    1985-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  18. Contempt - Where the modularity of the mind meets the modularity of the brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdok, Danilo; Schilbach, Leonhard

    2017-01-01

    "Contempt" is proposed to be a unique aspect of human nature, yet a non-natural kind. Its psychological construct is framed as a sentiment emerging from a stratification of diverse basic emotions and dispositional attitudes. Accordingly, "contempt" might transcend traditional conceptual levels in social psychology, including experience and recognition of emotion, dyadic and group dynamics, context-conditioned attitudes, time-enduring personality structure, and morality. This strikes us as a modern psychological account of a high-level, social-affective cognitive facet that joins forces with recent developments in the social neuroscience by drawing psychological conclusions from brain biology.

  19. A study for small-medium LWR development of JAPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Toshihiko; Hida, Takahiko; Hoshi, Takashi; Kawahara, Hiroto; Tominaga, Kenji; Asano, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    LWR (Light Water Reactor) power stations have accumulated many experiences of design, construction and operation. In addition, large-sized reactors have an advantage of economy of scale and 1,000 MWe LWR has therefore become the mainstream reactor in Japan. Meanwhile, introduction of the medium and small-sized LWRs (SMRs) has also been under review in Japan in order to respond to stagnant growth in electricity demand and electricity market liberalization or for investment risk mitigation; however, it has not been realized due to the economic disadvantage of scale. Therefore, JAPC has been developing the concept of SMR (300 MWe - 600 MWe) which is competitive to the large-sized LWR cooperating with Japanese plant makers (Hitachi, Toshiba Corporation and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries), assessing the possibility of realization of SMRs as one of the electric power sources in the future. As the result of the JAPC's study, we developed SMR concepts whose cost and safety are almost equal to large-sized LWR and confirmed technical feasibility of the concept in order to start developing basic design. In this paper, the outline of the SMR concepts and the current development status are presented. Concepts have been developed for two types of SMRs (i.e. BWR and PWR). As for the BWR type, reactor system is simplified by adopting natural circulation core method and CRD falling under gravity in order to downsize the reactor containments. As for the PWR type, the risk of LOCA occurrence is eliminated by unifying the primary system (e.g. incorporating steam generator into reactor). Furthermore, the primary system is simplified by adopting natural circulation core method in operation and containment vessel also become compact for the PWR. As for JAPC's further development of SMRs, key elements of SMR concepts are studied. In addition, the environment surrounding the SMRs has changed in recent years and the one with capacity exceeding 300-600 MWe class or small-sized reactor with

  20. Environmental development plan. LWR commercial waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the planning and managerial requirements and schedules needed to evaluate and assess the environmental, health and safety (EH and S) aspects of the Commercial Waste Management Program (CWM). Environment is defined in its broadest sense to include environmental, health (occupational and public), safety, socioeconomic, legal and institutional aspects. This plan addresses certain present and potential Federal responsibilities for the storage, treatment, transfer and disposal of radioactive waste materials produced by the nuclear power industry. The handling and disposal of LWR spent fuel and processed high-level waste (in the event reprocessing occurs) are included in this plan. Defense waste management activities, which are addressed in detail in a separate EDP, are considered only to the extent that such activities are common to the commercial waste management program. This EDP addresses three principal elements associated with the disposal of radioactive waste materials from the commercial nuclear power industry, namely Terminal Isolation Research and Development, Spent Fuel Storage and Waste Treatment Technology. The major specific concerns and requirements addressed are assurance that (1) radioactivity will be contained during waste transport, interim storage or while the waste is considered as retrievable from a repository facility, (2) the interim storage facilities will adequately isolate the radioactive material from the biosphere, (3) the terminal isolation facility will isolate the wastes from the biosphere over a time period allowing the radioactivity to decay to innocuous levels, (4) the terminal isolation mode for the waste will abbreviate the need for surveillance and institutional control by future generations, and (5) the public will accept the basic waste management strategy and geographical sites when needed

  1. Cooling methods of station blackout scenario for LWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the cooling method of station blackout scenario for both the BWR and PWR plants by RELAP5 code and to check the validity of the cooling method proposed by the utilities. In the BWR plant cooling scenario, the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System (RCIC), which is operated with high pressure steam from the reactor, injects cooling water into the reactor to keep the core water level. The steam generated in the core is released into the suppression pool at containment vessel to condense. To restrict the containment vessel pressure rising, the ventilation from the wet-well is operated. The scenario is analyzed by RELAP5 and CONTEMPT-LT code. In the PWR plant scenario, the primary pressure is decreased by the turbine-driven auxiliary feed water system operated with secondary side steam of the steam generators (SGs). And the core cooling is kept by the natural circulation flow at the primary loop. The analytical method of un-uniform flow behavior among the SG U-tubes, which affects the natural circulation flow rate, is developed. (author)

  2. Intracategorial Varieties of Contempt in a Heterogeneous Sample / Variedades intracategoriales del desprecio en una muestra heterogénea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Delgado

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with current emotion theory, we should note that contempt is not a homogeneous category but rather shows intracategorial variability. Previous research on Spanish samples shows a communicative structure in which contempt is felt towards intimate, social or abstract receivers, for reciprocal, altruistic or prejudiced reasons. Our objective was to test, on a large and heterogeneous sample, the previously found structure and variations of the experience of contempt as well as its spontaneous facial expression. Testing the association of contempt varieties with certain subject attributes was a secondary goal. Results from 130 participants from the Spanish general population corroborated the previously found structure and varieties, as well as the associations between contempt receiver and attribution. No relation was found with sex, age or emotion recognition ability. As to spontaneous facial expression, disgust was more often expressed by those who narrated their personal episodes of contempt for reciprocal reasons, and was less often expressed by the people who described prejudiced scenarios. This result indicates that the conventionally considered facial expression of contempt is not the only one, as already stated by Darwin, and should not be considered as such by experimental and psychometric procedures.

  3. Affect in social media: The role of audience and the presence of contempt in cyberbullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocea, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler's Attitude-Scenario-Emotion (ASE) model is a useful tool for the detection of affect in social media. In this commentary, an addition to the model is proposed - the audience - and its role in the manifestation of affect is discussed using a cyberbullying scenario. The presence of contempt in cyberbullying is also discussed.

  4. Seeing the elephant: Parsimony, functionalism, and the emergent design of contempt and other sentiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Matthew M; Fessler, Daniel M T

    2017-01-01

    The target article argues that contempt is a sentiment, and that sentiments are the deep structure of social affect. The 26 commentaries meet these claims with a range of exciting extensions and applications, as well as critiques. Most significantly, we reply that construction and emergence are necessary for, not incompatible with, evolved design, while parsimony requires explanatory adequacy and predictive accuracy, not mere simplicity.

  5. URGENSI DAN PENGATURAN UU TENTANG CONTEMPT OF COURT UNTUK MENJAMIN HARKAT, MARTABAT DAN WIBAWA PERADILAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Wisnu Mulyadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of the Contempt of Court is an event that is rife in Indonesia lately. It is considered to reduce the dignity, majesty and authority of the judiciary and its apparatus. Particularly the dignity and authority of the judge. Attitudes and actions displayed by the search for justice, legal practitioners, the press, political and social organizations, NGOs, academics, judicial commission, as well as various other parties in such a way can be categorized injure the dignity, majesty and authority of the judiciary, good attitude and actions directed against the judicial process, judicial officials, as well as court decisions. Lack of strict legal instruments and adequate to serve as guidelines and benchmarks to judge such a phenomenon is made Contempt of Court always the case. View of the judge is an arm of God would have been contrary to Contempt of Court. The judge in charge of prosecuting and providing justice for justice seekers should not accept the bad treatments. This study is based on normative research method using statutory approach and conceptual approaches. Legislation that used is Law No. 4 of 1985 on the Supreme Court, Code of criminal law, the law book of the law of criminal procedure, the draft book of the Criminal Justice Act 2012 and draft the Code of Criminal Procedure 2012. This research is expected to contribute significantly for the creation benchmarks and appropriate guidelines in terms of the establishment of regulations and legislation on Contempt of Court Act

  6. FAUST/CONTAIN; FAUST/CONTAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherdron, W.; Minges, J.; Sauter, H.; Schuetz, W.

    1995-08-01

    The FAUNA facility has been restructured after completion of the sodium fire experiments. It is now serving LWR research, cf. report II on program no. 32.21.02 concerning steam explosions. The CONTAIN code system for computing the thermodynamic, aerosol and radiological phenomena in a containment under severe accident conditions is being developed with a new to fission product release and transport. (orig.)

  7. QNPP containment response to MSLB accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jie

    1989-01-01

    The containment behavior of nuclear power plant under accident conditions plays an important role in nuclear safety analysis. The analysis and parametric studies are performed and some conclusions are obtained for QNPP (Qinshen Nuclear Power Plant) as reported in the paper. The CONTEMPT-LT/028 code is used

  8. LWR risk management by safety R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sheikh, K.A.; Damon, D.R.; Temme, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology which has been developed for selecting LWR safety RandD projects. The methodology provides ranking of the RandD projects and the RandD budget allocation which minimizes public risk. The methodology contains procedures to identify institutional, organizational, legal, and contractual factors which affect the probabilities of success and use of RandD projects so that these factors can be evaluated and possibly managed.The methodology also contains a nonlinear optimization code to provide the optimum selection of RandD projects and evaluate the sensitivity of this selection to uncertainity in the input data. Application of the methodology to a test case has shown that: 1) commonly used schemes for ranking RandD projects do not necessarily lead to the optimum selection, and 2) the optimum selection is not necessarily strongly sensitive to uncertainty in the input data

  9. Comparison of results of simulation of the CONTEMPT-LT/028 and lAP-3B codes for the analysis of the internal vacuum breaker valves of the CNLV; Comparacion de resultados de simulacion de los codigos CONTEMPT-LT/028 y MAAP-3B para el analisis de las valvulas rompedoras de vacio internas de la CNLV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovando C, R.; Cecenas F, M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113 Col. Palmira. 62490, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Moya C, M.M. [Comision Federal de Electricidad. Gerencia de Centrales Nucleoelectricas Disciplina de Analisis de Ingenieria. Subgerencia de Ingenieria. Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Dos Bocas, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: rovando@iie.org.mx

    2006-07-01

    In the primary container of a BWR type reactor, the humid and dry wells its are communicate by means of valves designed to equal the pressure in case of a significant pressure difference exists, produced by an operative event just as the performance of an emergency system. These valves are known as internal vacuum breakers and its analysis it is made by means of the use of a code with the capacity to analyze the primary contention of the reactor. Among the codes able to carry out this analysis type there is CONTEMPT-LT/028 and MAAP-3B; however, these codes possess characteristic different respect the modeling one of the different damage mitigation systems to the contention (dews, windy, emergency systems), of the transfer of heat among the different compartments of the primary container and in the details of the civil construction. In previous works carried out with the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code, they have been carried out different cases of simulation related with the operation of the internal breaker vacuum valves. These cases include small ruptures in the main steam lines and ruptures in the recirculation knots. It was selected the case more restrictive and it was generated an equivalent scenario file for the MAAP-3B code. In this work the performance of the internal breaker vacuum valves is analyzed by means of the CONTEMPT-LT/028 and MAAP-3B codes, when using the case more restrictive consistent in a small rupture in a main steam line. The analysis of the simulations indicates that both codes produce very similar results and the found differences are explained with base in the models used by each code to obtain the answer of the main thermohydraulic variables. In general terms, MAAP-3B possesses models that adapt in a form more convenient to the prospective phenomenology for this analysis, maintaining a conservative focus. (Author)

  10. URGENSI DAN PROSPEK PENGATURAN (IUS CONSTITUENDUM UU TENTANG CONTEMPT OF COURT UNTUK MENEGAKKAN MARTABAT DAN WIBAWA PERADILAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilik Mulyadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available UU Contempt of Court merupakan kebutuhan yang bersifat urgent, segera dan mendesak, sehingga perlu dilakukan kajian dan penelitian secara kritis, akademis dan bersifat komprehensif untuk menjaga keluhuran dan menegakkan martabat dan wibawa peradilan.

  11. Development of training simulator for LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureshbabu, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scope training simulator was developed for a light water reactor (LWR). This paper describes how the development evolved from a desktop simulator to the full-scope training simulator. It also describes the architecture and features of the simulator including the large number of failures that it simulates. The paper also explains the three-level validation tests that were used to qualify the training simulator. (author)

  12. 'CANDLE' burnup regime after LWR regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nagata, Akito

    2008-01-01

    CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) burnup strategy can derive many merits. From safety point of view, the change of excess reactivity along burnup is theoretically zero, and the core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed along burnup. Application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replacing fuels. About 40% of natural or depleted uranium undergoes fission without the conventional reprocessing and enrichment. If the LWR produced energy of X Joules, the CANDLE reactor can produce about 50X Joules from the depleted uranium left at the enrichment facility for the LWR fuel. If we can say LWRs have produced energy sufficient for full 20 years, we can produce the energy for 1000 years by using the CANDLE reactors with depleted uranium. We need not mine any uranium ore, and do not need reprocessing facility. The burnup of spent fuel becomes 10 times. Therefore, the spent fuel amount per produced energy is also reduced to one-tenth. The details of the scenario of CANDLE burnup regime after LWR regime will be presented at the symposium. (author)

  13. Modeling the economic consequences of LWR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.P.; Aldrich, D.C.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    Models to be used for analyses of economic risks from events which may occur during LWR plant operation are developed in this study. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The models can be used by both the nuclear power industry and regulatory agencies in cost-benefit analyses for decisionmaking purposes. The newly developed economic consequence models are applied in an example to estimate the economic risks from operation of the Surry Unit 2 plant. The analyses indicate that economic risks from US LWR operation, in contrast to public health risks, are dominated by relatively high-frequency forced outage events. Even for severe (e.g., core-melt) accidents, expected offsite costs are less than expected onsite costs for the Surry site. The implications of these conclusions for nuclear power plant operation and regulation are discussed

  14. Technical report on LWR design decision methodology. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Energy Incorporated (EI) was selected by Sandia Laboratories to develop and test on LWR design decision methodology. Contract Number 42-4229 provided funding for Phase I of this work. This technical report on LWR design decision methodology documents the activities performed under that contract. Phase I was a short-term effort to thoroughly review the curret LWR design decision process to assure complete understanding of current practices and to establish a well defined interface for development of initial quantitative design guidelines

  15. Status of LWR fuel design and future usage of JENDL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takuya

    2008-01-01

    For all conventional LWR fuel design codes of LWR fuel manufactures in Japan, the cross section library are based on the ENDF/B. Recently we can see several movements for the utilization of JENDL library for the LWR fuel design. The latest version of NEUPHYS cross section library is based on the JENDL-3.2. To accelerate this movement of JENDL utilization in LWR fuel design, it is necessary to prepare a high quality JENDL document, systematic validation of JENDL and to appeal them abroad effectively. (author)

  16. Implementation of static generalized perturbation theory for LWR design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byron, R.F.; White, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized perturbation theory (GPT) formulation is developed for application to light water reactor (LWR) design. The extensions made to standard generalized perturbation theory are the treatment of thermal-hydraulic and fission product poisoning feedbacks, and criticality reset. This formulation has been implemented into a standard LWR design code. The method is verified by comparing direct calculations with GPT calculations. Data are presented showing that feedback effects need to be considered when using GPT for LWR problems. Some specific potential applications of this theory to the field of LWR design are discussed

  17. Containment parametric analysis for loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, L.

    1985-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents parametric analysis of double containment response to LOCA using CONTEMPT-LT/28 code. The influence of the active and passive heat sinks on thermodynamic parameters in the containment after big and small LOCA was considered. (author)

  18. FAUST/CONTAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherdron, W.; Minges, J.; Sauter, H.; Schuetz, W.

    1995-01-01

    The FAUNA facility has been restructured after completion of the sodium fire experiments. It is now serving LWR research, cf. report II on program no. 32.21.02 concerning steam explosions. The CONTAIN code system for computing the thermodynamic, aerosol and radiological phenomena in a containment under severe accident conditions is being developed with a new to fission product release and transport. (orig.)

  19. Tougher containment design goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Farrelly, C.

    1978-01-01

    Present day LWR containment design goals are reviewed, together with their potential failure modes. Rasmussen's estimates of failure probabilities are discussed and the concept of ''delayed failure'' is seen to be a valuable safety goal for hypothetical accidents. The paper investigates the inherent coremelt resistance capability of various containment designs and suggests improvements, with special emphasis on increasing the failure delay times. (author)

  20. Containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The primary mission of the Containment Group is to ensure that underground nuclear tests are satisfactorily contained. The main goal is the development of sound technical bases for containment-related methodology. Major areas of activity include siting, geologic description, emplacement hole stemming, and phenomenological predictions. Performance results of sanded gypsum concrete plugs on the Jefferson, Panamint, Cornucopia, Labquark, and Bodie events are given. Activities are also described in the following areas: computational capabilities site description, predictive modeling, and cavity-pressure measurement. Containment publications are listed. 8 references

  1. Does familiarity breed contempt or liking? Comment on Reis, Maniaci, Caprariello, Eastwick, and Finkel (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Michael I; Frost, Jeana H; Ariely, Dan

    2011-09-01

    Reis, Maniaci, Caprariello, Eastwick, and Finkel (see record 2011-04644-001) conducted 2 studies that demonstrate that in certain cases, familiarity can lead to liking--in seeming contrast to the results of our earlier article (see record 2006-23056-008). We believe that Reis et al. (a) utilized paradigms far removed from spontaneous, everyday social interactions that were particularly likely to demonstrate a positive link between familiarity and liking and (b) failed to include and incorporate other sources of data-both academic and real-world-showing that familiarity breeds contempt. We call for further research exploring when and why familiarity is likely to lead to contempt or liking, and we suggest several factors that are likely to inform this debate. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Dominance as a competence domain, and the evolutionary origins of respect and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapais, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis of a phylogenetic connection between protorespect in primate dominance hierarchies and respect in human prestige hierarchies lies in the principle that dominance is a domain of competence like others and, hence, that high-ranking primates have protoprestige. The idea that dominant primates manifest protocontempt to subordinates suggests that "looking down on" followers is intrinsic to leadership in humans, but that the expression of contempt varies critically in relation to the socioecological context.

  3. Looking down: the influence of contempt and compassion on emergent leadership categorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melwani, Shimul; Mueller, Jennifer S; Overbeck, Jennifer R

    2012-11-01

    By integrating the literatures on implicit leadership and the social functions of discrete emotions, we develop and test a theoretical model of emotion expression and leadership categorizations. Specifically, we examine the influence of 2 socio-comparative emotions-compassion and contempt-on assessments of leadership made both in 1st impression contexts and over time. To demonstrate both internal and external validity, Studies 1a and 1b provide laboratory and field evidence to show that expressing the discrete emotions of contempt and compassion positively relates to perceptions that an individual is a leader. Study 2 tests the mechanism explaining these associations. Specifically, we show that in a leadership emergence context, contempt and compassion both positively relate to perceptions that the expresser is a leader because each provides cues matching the implicit theory that leaders have higher intelligence. Our findings add to a growing body of literature focused on identifying the processes through which leaders emerge in groups, showing that emotions are an important input to this process. We discuss the implications of our findings and how they might guide future research efforts. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. The moral emotions: a social-functionalist account of anger, disgust, and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcherson, Cendri A; Gross, James J

    2011-04-01

    Recent research has highlighted the important role of emotion in moral judgment and decision making (Greene, Sommerville, Nystrom, Darley, & Cohen, 2001; Haidt, 2001). What is less clear is whether distinctions should be drawn among specific moral emotions. Although some have argued for differences among anger, disgust, and contempt (Rozin, Lowery, Imada, & Haidt, 1999), others have suggested that these terms may describe a single undifferentiated emotional response to morally offensive behavior (Nabi, 2002). In this article, we take a social-functionalist perspective, which makes the prediction that these emotions should be differentiable both in antecedent appraisals and in consequent actions and judgments. Studies 1-3 tested and found support for our predictions concerning distinctions among antecedent appraisals, including (a) a more general role for disgust than has been previously been described, (b) an effect of self-relevance on anger but not other emotions, and (c) a role for contempt in judging incompetent actions. Studies 4 and 5 tested and found support for our specific predictions concerning functional outcomes, providing evidence that these emotions are associated with different consequences. Taken together, these studies support a social-functionalist account of anger, disgust, and contempt and lay the foundation for future research on the negative interpersonal emotions.

  5. Fission product release from high gap-inventory LWR fuel under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Osborne, M.F.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fission product release tests were performed with light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod segments containing large amounts of cesium and iodine in the pellet-to-cladding gap space in order to check the validity of the previously published Source Term Model for this type of fuel. The model describes the release of fission product cesium and iodine from LWR fuel rods for controlled loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) transients in the temperature range 500 to 1200 0 C. The basis for the model was test data obtained with simulated fuel rods and commercial fuel irradiated to high burnup but containing relatively small amounts of cesium and iodine in the pellet-to-cladding gap space

  6. Creep damage in zircaloy-4 at LWR temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusseyan, R.L.; Hu, C.P.; Li, C.Y.

    1978-08-01

    The observation of creep damage in the form of grain boundary cavitation in Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range of interest to Light Water Reactor (LWR) applications is reported. The observed damage is shown to reduce the ductility of Zircaloy-4 in a tensile test at LWR temperatures

  7. Is it the end of history for LWR safety?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2004-01-01

    In this essay a parallel is drawn between the struggle for recognition, which is argued by Fukuyama as the 'motor' of human history and that waged by the LWR safety for the public to recognize the LWR plants as a source of safe nuclear power. The end of history for the ''human struggle for recognition'' as the capitalistic liberal democracy is equated with the ''end of history'' for the LWR safety to provide assurance to the public of termination of a severe accident it ever would occur. It is suggested that we are near ''the end of history'' of the LWR safety for the new-design LWR plants but fall short for the presently-installed plants. The essay bases these suggestions on an examination of the history of nuclear power development in U.S.A., but also considering the more recent regulatory and public acceptance developments in Europe and the rest of the World. (author)

  8. Recycle of LWR actinides to an IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Large quantities of actinide elements are present in irradiated light water reactor fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission to capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high energy neutrons in metal-fueled integral fast reactors (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel may represent valuable resource for the expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, the removal of TRU elements from spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of high level waste facilities by reducing the heat load and may increase the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirement. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. Two pyrochemical processes, that is, salt transport process and blanket processing study, are discussed in this paper. Also the experimental studies are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fatigue design curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping materials in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel in air and LWR environments to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm the significant decrease in fatigue life in water. The environmentally assisted decrease in fatigue life depends both on strain rate and DO content in water. A decrease in strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004%/s decreases fatigue life by a factor of ∼ 8. However, unlike carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. At ∼ 0.004%/s strain rate, reduction in fatigue life in water containing <10 ppb D is greater by a factor of ∼ 2 than in water containing ≥ 200 ppb DO. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on the statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in austenitic stainless steels in air and LWR environments are discussed

  10. The CAD triad hypothesis: a mapping between three moral emotions (contempt, anger, disgust) and three moral codes (community, autonomy, divinity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, P; Lowery, L; Imada, S; Haidt, J

    1999-04-01

    It is proposed that 3 emotions--contempt, anger, and disgust--are typically elicited, across cultures, by violations of 3 moral codes proposed by R. A. Shweder and his colleagues (R. A. Shweder, N. C. Much, M. Mahapatra, & L. Park, 1997). The proposed alignment links anger to autonomy (individual rights violations), contempt to community (violation of communal codes including hierarchy), and disgust to divinity (violations of purity-sanctity). This is the CAD triad hypothesis. Students in the United States and Japan were presented with descriptions of situations that involve 1 of the types of moral violations and asked to assign either an appropriate facial expression (from a set of 6) or an appropriate word (contempt, anger, disgust, or their translations). Results generally supported the CAD triad hypothesis. Results were further confirmed by analysis of facial expressions actually made by Americans to the descriptions of these situations.

  11. LWR Spent Fuel Management for the Smooth Deployment of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, T.; Yamashita, J.; Hoshino, K.; Sasahira, A.; Inoue, T.; Minato, K.; Sato, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) and FBR fuel cycle are indispensable to prevent the global warming and to secure the long-term energy supply. Commercial FBR expects to be deployed from around 2050 until around 2110 in Japan by the replacement of light water reactors (LWR) after their 60 years life. The FBR deployment needs Pu (MOX) from the LWR-spent fuel (SF) reprocessing. As Japan can posses little excess Pu, its balance control is necessary between LWR-SF management (reprocessing) and FBR deployment. The fuel cycle systems were investigated for the smooth FBR deployment and the effectiveness of proposed flexible system was clarified in this work. (author)

  12. Comparison of results of simulation of the CONTEMPT-LT/028 and lAP-3B codes for the analysis of the internal vacuum breaker valves of the CNLV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovando C, R.; Cecenas F, M.; Moya C, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the primary container of a BWR type reactor, the humid and dry wells its are communicate by means of valves designed to equal the pressure in case of a significant pressure difference exists, produced by an operative event just as the performance of an emergency system. These valves are known as internal vacuum breakers and its analysis it is made by means of the use of a code with the capacity to analyze the primary contention of the reactor. Among the codes able to carry out this analysis type there is CONTEMPT-LT/028 and MAAP-3B; however, these codes possess characteristic different respect the modeling one of the different damage mitigation systems to the contention (dews, windy, emergency systems), of the transfer of heat among the different compartments of the primary container and in the details of the civil construction. In previous works carried out with the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code, they have been carried out different cases of simulation related with the operation of the internal breaker vacuum valves. These cases include small ruptures in the main steam lines and ruptures in the recirculation knots. It was selected the case more restrictive and it was generated an equivalent scenario file for the MAAP-3B code. In this work the performance of the internal breaker vacuum valves is analyzed by means of the CONTEMPT-LT/028 and MAAP-3B codes, when using the case more restrictive consistent in a small rupture in a main steam line. The analysis of the simulations indicates that both codes produce very similar results and the found differences are explained with base in the models used by each code to obtain the answer of the main thermohydraulic variables. In general terms, MAAP-3B possesses models that adapt in a form more convenient to the prospective phenomenology for this analysis, maintaining a conservative focus. (Author)

  13. Safety research for LWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The current R and D activities are to be seen in connection with the LWR risk assessment studies. Two trends are emerging, of which the one concentrates more on BWR-specific problems, and the other on the efficiency or safety-related assessment of accident management activities. This annual report of 1988 reviews the progress of work done by the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, (KfK), or on behalf of KfK by external institutions, in the field of safety research. The papers of this report present the state of work at the end of the year 1988. They are written in German, with an abstract in English. (orig./HP) [de

  14. LWR nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.H.

    1980-10-01

    An analysis of the most significant light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant component failures, from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank, shows that for both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants the component category most responsible for reactor shutdowns is valves. Next in importance for PWR shutdowns is steam generators followed by seals of all kinds. For BWR plants, seals, and pipes and pipe fittings are the second and third most important component failure categories which lead to reactor shutdown. The data are for records extending from early 1972 through September 1978. A list of the most significant component categories and a breakdown of the number of component citations for both PWR and BWR reactor types are presented

  15. Problems associated with domestic LWR technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watamori, Tikara

    1975-01-01

    To cope with the future energy problem in Japan, the enhancement of her own technology is continuing in the nuclear power field. Developments in the past, current state, and problems for the future are described regarding LWR power plants. The technology introduced from overseas countries cannot be used as it is. The domestic technology thus consists of the conversion of nuclear power technology so as to meet Japan's own condition and the domestic manufacture of machinery. In the former category, there are the aspects of aseismatic design, waste disposal, software, etc. In the latter, there are the productions of reactor vessels, steam generators, large valves, piping, etc. As the problems for the future, there are reliability and safety and the associated standardization. (Mori, K.)

  16. Do proposed facial expressions of contempt, shame, embarrassment, and compassion communicate the predicted emotion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widen, Sherri C; Christy, Anita M; Hewett, Kristen; Russell, James A

    2011-08-01

    Shame, embarrassment, compassion, and contempt have been considered candidates for the status of basic emotions on the grounds that each has a recognisable facial expression. In two studies (N=88, N=60) on recognition of these four facial expressions, observers showed moderate agreement on the predicted emotion when assessed with forced choice (58%; 42%), but low agreement when assessed with free labelling (18%; 16%). Thus, even though some observers endorsed the predicted emotion when it was presented in a list, over 80% spontaneously interpreted these faces in a way other than the predicted emotion.

  17. Perspectives on the economic risks of LWR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Burke, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Models which can be used for the analysis of the economic risks from events which may occur during LWR operation have been developed. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant forced outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The economic consequence models have been applied in studies of the economic risks from the operation of US LWR plants. The results of the analyses provide some important perspectives regarding the economic risks of LWR accidents. The analyses indicate that economic risks, in contrast to public health risks, are dominated by the onsite costs of relatively high-frequency forced outage events. Even for severe (e.g., core-melt) accidents, expected offsite costs are less than expected onsite costs for a typical US plant

  18. The Relation Between Contempt, Anger, and Intimate Partner Violence: A Dyadic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johannah; Iyican, Susan; Babcock, Julia

    2016-08-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a persistent problem in our society, and there is strong evidence for the existence of bidirectional violence in heterosexual romantic relationships. Couples' research has long focused on conflict and distressed communication patterns as a source of relationship distress and eventual dissolution. In addition to relationship dissatisfaction, dysfunctional communication also appears to be associated with elevated risk of IPV. In fact, one study found that communication difficulties were one of the most frequently self-reported motivations for committing partner violence in a sample of both males and females arrested for IPV. The current study sought to explore the association between the expression of distressed communication (contempt and anger) during a laboratory conflict discussion and reports of IPV perpetration using a dyadic data analysis method, the Actor Partner Interdependence Model, in a large ethnically diverse sample of heterosexual couples. We found that negative communication in the form of contempt was not only associated with one's own physical assault perpetration, but it was also associated with physical assault perpetration of the other partner. In contrast, anger was only associated with one's own physical assault perpetration. Therefore, our results highlight the potential efficacy of treatments for IPV that target negative communication patterns and affect.

  19. Modelling and simulation of containment on full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Tingyun

    1996-01-01

    A multi-node containment thermal-hydraulic model has been developed and adapted in Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit with good realtime simulation effects. Containment pressure for LBLOCA calculated by the model is well agreed with those of CONTEMPT-4/MOD3

  20. EURLIB-LWR-45/16 and - 15/5. Two board group libraries for LWR-shielding problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrnberger, V

    1982-04-01

    Specifications of the broad group cross section libraries EURLIB-LWR-45/16 and -15/5 are given. They are based on EURLIB-III data and produced for LWR shielding problems. The elements considered are H, C{sub 12}, O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zr, U{sub 235}, U{sub 238}. The cross section libraries are available upon request from EIR, RSIC, NEA-CPL and IAEA-NDS. (author) Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    difference between these two bounds is 2% over the considered temperature range. The predictions obtained with the equations of Maxwell-Eucken (Eq. (3)) and Bergman (Eq. (4)) are equal and are in the interval between the series and parallel bounds. This result shows that the use of a sophisticated analytical or numerical model to predict the thermal conductivity is not justified [38]. The model of Maxwell-Eucken [31] was therefore chosen to predict the equivalent thermal conductivity of the heterogeneous MOX.The equivalent thermal conductivity of the stoichiometric heterogeneous MOX with an average PuO2 content of 7.2 wt.% (constituted by a stoichiometric UO2 matrix containing 15 vol.% of (U0.76Pu0.24)O1.975 agglomerates and 55 vol.% of a coating phase of (U0.94Pu0.06)O1.995) was calculated. The results show that the apparent thermal conductivity of the heterogeneous MOX, calculated using homogeneous MOX data (Eq. (5)) with O/M = 2.000, 1.995 and 1.975 (labeled Model 1 in Fig. 4) is not significantly different from the values measured by Duriez. The latter values are also very similar to the thermal conductivity of homogeneous MOX with O/M = 1.995. This simple model shows that the stoichiometry effect is sufficient to explain the lower thermal conductivity of LWR MOX fuel as compared to UO2. The advantage of this simple model is its consistency, as the calculations for the heterogeneous MOX are based on a unique formula for non-stoichiometric homogeneous (U,Pu)O2.In the second model, the effect of the plutonium is taken into account for the coating phase and for the Pu-rich agglomerates. The thermal conductivity is described by the correlations of Fink [16] for UO2.000, of Duriez et al. [2] for (U0.94Pu0.06)O1.995 (coating phase with low PuO2 content) and of Philipponneau [8] for (U0.76Pu0.24)O1.975 (Pu-rich agglomerates with high PuO2 content). The results (labeled Model 2 in Fig. 5) show that the calculated thermal conductivity of the heterogeneous 'stoichiometric' MOX is

  2. Utility requirements for advanced LWR passive plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedidia, J.M.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    LWR Passive Plants are becoming an increasingly attractive and prominent option for future electric generating capacity for U.S. utilities. Conceptual designs for ALWR Passive Plants are currently being developed by U.S. suppliers. EPRI-sponsored work beginning in 1985 developed preliminary conceptual designs for a passive BWR and PWR. DOE-sponsored work from 1986 to the present in conjunction with further EPRI-sponsored studies has continued this development to the point of mature conceptual designs. The success to date in developing the ALWR Passive Plant concepts has substantially increased utility interest. The EPRI ALWR Program has responded by augmenting its initial scope to develop a Utility Requirements Document for ALWR Passive Plants. These requirements will be largely based on the ALWR Utility Requirements Document for Evolutionary Plants, but with significant changes in areas related to the passive safety functions and system configurations. This work was begun in late 1988, and the thirteen-chapter Passive Plant Utility Requirements Document will be completed in 1990. This paper discusses the progress to date in developing the Passive Plant requirements, reviews the top-level requirements, and discusses key issues related to adaptation of the utility requirements to passive safety functions and system configurations. (orig.)

  3. Criticality impacts on LWR fuel storage efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolitano, D.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation discusses the criticality impacts throughout storage of fuel onsite including new fuel storage, spent fuel storage, consolidation, and dry storage. The general principles for criticality safety are also be discussed. There is first an introduction which explains today's situation for criticality safety concerns. This is followed by a discussion of criticality safety Regulatory Guides, safety limits and fundamental principles. Design objectives for criticality safety in the 1990's include higher burnups, longer cycles, and higher enrichments which impact the criticality safety design. Criticality safety for new fuel storage, spent fuel storage, fuel consolidation, and dry storage are followed by conclusions. Today's situation is one in which the US does not reprocess, and does not have an operating MRS facility or repository. High density fuel storage rack designs of the 1980s, are filling up. Dry cask storage systems for spent fuel storage are being utilized. Enrichments continue to increase PWR fuel assemblies with enrichments of 4.5 to 5.0 weight percent U-235 and BWR fuel assemblies with enrichments of 3.25 to 3.5 weight percent U-235 are common. Criticality concerns affect the capacity and the economics of light water reactor (LWR) fuel storage arrays by dictating the spacing of fuel assemblies in a storage system, or the use of poisons or exotic materials in the storage system design

  4. Economic analyses of LWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, F.R.

    1977-05-01

    An economic comparison was made of three options for handling irradiated light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. These options are reprocessing of spent reactor fuel and subsequent recycle of both uranium and plutonium, reprocessing and recycle of uranium only, and direct terminal storage of spent fuel not reprocessed. The comparison was based on a peak-installed nuclear capacity of 507 GWe by CY 2000 and retirement of reactors after 30 years of service. Results of the study indicate that: Through the year 2000, recycle of uranium and plutonium in LWRs saves about $12 billion (FY 1977 dollars) compared with the throwaway cycle, but this amounts to only about 1.3% of the total cost of generating electricity by nuclear power. If deferred costs are included for fuel that has been discharged from reactors but not reprocessed, the economic advantage increases to $17.7 billion. Recycle of uranium only (storage of plutonium) is approximately $7 billion more expensive than the throwaway fuel cycle and is, therefore, not considered an economically viable option. The throwaway fuel cycle ultimately requires >40% more uranium resources (U 3 O 8 ) than does reprocessing spent fuel where both uranium and plutonium are recycled

  5. NUPEC proves reliability of LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    It is very important in assuring the safety of nuclear reactors to confirm the reliability of fuel assemblies. The test program of the Nuclear Power Engineering Center on the reliability of fuel assemblies has verified the high performance and reliability of Japanese LWR fuels, and confirmed the propriety of their design and fabrication. This claim is based on the data obtained from the fuel assemblies irradiated in commercial reactors. The NUPEC program includes irradiation test which has been conducted for 11 years since fiscal 1976, and the maximum thermal loading test using the out of pile test facilities simulating a real reactor which has been continued since fiscal 1978. The irradiation test on BWR fuel assemblies in No.3 reactor in Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., and on PWR fuel assemblies in No.3 reactor in Mihama Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., and the maximum thermal loading test on BWR and PWR fuel assemblies are reported. The series of postirradiation examination of the fuel assemblies used for commercial reactors was conducted for the first time in Japan, and the highly systematic data on 27 items were obtained. (Kako, I.)

  6. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Griffith, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R and D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental enhancements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and fuel/cladding interaction to allow improved fuel economy via power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an 'accident tolerant' fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. In a staged development approach, the LWRS program will engage stakeholders throughout the development process to ensure commercial viability of the investigated technologies. Applying minimum performance criteria, several of the top-ranked materials and fabrication concepts will undergo a rigorous series of mechanical, thermal and chemical characterization tests to better define their properties and operating potential in a relatively low-cost, nonnuclear test series. A reduced number of options will be recommended for test rodlet fabrication and in-pile nuclear testing under steady-state, transient and accident conditions. (author)

  7. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Results of LWR core transient benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnemann, H.; Bauer, H.; Galati, A.; Martinelli, R.

    1993-10-01

    LWR core transient (LWRCT) benchmarks, based on well defined problems with a complete set of input data, are used to assess the discrepancies between three-dimensional space-time kinetics codes in transient calculations. The PWR problem chosen is the ejection of a control assembly from an initially critical core at hot zero power or at full power, each for three different geometrical configurations. The set of problems offers a variety of reactivity excursions which efficiently test the coupled neutronic/thermal - hydraulic models of the codes. The 63 sets of submitted solutions are analyzed by comparison with a nodal reference solution defined by using a finer spatial and temporal resolution than in standard calculations. The BWR problems considered are reactivity excursions caused by cold water injection and pressurization events. In the present paper, only the cold water injection event is discussed and evaluated in some detail. Lacking a reference solution the evaluation of the 8 sets of BWR contributions relies on a synthetic comparative discussion. The results of this first phase of LWRCT benchmark calculations are quite satisfactory, though there remain some unresolved issues. It is therefore concluded that even more challenging problems can be successfully tackled in a suggested second test phase. (authors). 46 figs., 21 tabs., 3 refs

  9. Evaluating the loss of a LWR spent fuel or plutonium shipping package into the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaberlin, S.W.; Baker, D.A.

    1976-06-01

    As the nations of the world turn to nuclear power for an energy source, commerce in nuclear fuel cycle materials will increase. Some of this commerce will be transported by sea. Such shipments give rise to the possibility of loss of these materials into the sea. This paper discusses the postulated accidental loss of two materials, light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and plutonium, at sea. The losses considered are that of a single shipping package which is either undamaged or damaged by fire prior to the loss. The containment failure of the package in the sea,

  10. Building the Old Contemptibles: British Military Transformation and Tactical Development from the Boer War to the Great War, 1899-1914

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Risio, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Impressed with the tactical lessons of the Boer War, the British Army reformed its doctrine and training from 1899 to 1914, deploying a combat ready force, the "Old Contemptibles" of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in 1914...

  11. NPR and ANSI Containment Study Using Passive Cooling Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. J.; Iotti, R. C.; Wright, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    Passive containment cooling study of NPR (New Production Reactor) and ANSI (Advanced Neutron Source) following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally. All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified Contempt code Contempt-Npr. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and halt foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of Contempt-Npr and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale Npr. It is concluded that Npr and ANSI containments can be passively cooled with air alone without extended cooling surfaces or passive water spray

  12. Development of the containment transient analysis code for the passive reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Young Dong; Kim, Young In; Bae, Yoon Young; Chang, Moon Hi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-05-01

    This study was performed to develop the analysis tools for the passively cooled steel containment and to construct the integrated code system which can analyze a thermal hydraulic behavior of the containment and reactor system during a loss of coolant accident. The computer code CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS was developed by incorporating the passive containment cooling models to the containment pressure and temperature transient analysis computer code CONTEMPT4/MOD5. The integrated reactor thermal hydraulic analysis code system for passive reactor was constructed by coupling the best estimate thermal hydraulic system analysis code RELAP5/MOD3 and CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS through the process control method. In addition, to evaluate the applicability of the code the CONTEMPT4/MOD5/PCCS was applied to the SMART(System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). The pressure and temperature transient following the small break LOCA of SMART was analysed by modeling the safeguard vessel using both the newly added passive containment cooling model and existing pool model. (author). 16 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Less is more: the lure of ambiguity, or why familiarity breeds contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Michael I; Frost, Jeana H; Ariely, Dan

    2007-01-01

    The present research shows that although people believe that learning more about others leads to greater liking, more information about others leads, on average, to less liking. Thus, ambiguity--lacking information about another--leads to liking, whereas familiarity--acquiring more information--can breed contempt. This "less is more" effect is due to the cascading nature of dissimilarity: Once evidence of dissimilarity is encountered, subsequent information is more likely to be interpreted as further evidence of dissimilarity, leading to decreased liking. The authors document the negative relationship between knowledge and liking in laboratory studies and with pre- and postdate data from online daters, while showing the mediating role of dissimilarity. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  14. [Contempt and hatred: sociologic indications for an approach to current juvenile violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudet, B

    1999-03-01

    Violence is present in all forms of society that impose limits that must not be surpassed (murder, incest ...) in order for social life to be possible. But these limits are always broken. Youth are, in this respect, in a difficult situation, especially those from marginalized areas. Victims of contempt and exclusion, they react through violent acts; to violence experienced because of excessive constraints in school, they respond with violence. This juvenile violence calls for macro-social responses that return credibility to the institutional system often corrupt and responsible for hidden social violence. It also calls for micro-social actions, especially within the community. These actions may allow for awareness of violence generating phenomena, the discovery of obstacles to exercising rights, and the make-up of conflicts and their resolution in negotiation procedures.

  15. Nonverbal contention and contempt in U.K. parliamentary oversight hearings on fiscal and monetary policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    In parliamentary committee oversight hearings on fiscal policy, monetary policy, and financial stability, where verbal deliberation is the focus, nonverbal communication may be crucial in the acceptance or rejection of arguments proffered by policymakers. Systematic qualitative coding of these hearings in the 2010-15 U.K. Parliament finds the following: (1) facial expressions, particularly in the form of anger and contempt, are more prevalent in fiscal policy hearings, where backbench parliamentarians hold frontbench parliamentarians to account, than in monetary policy or financial stability hearings, where the witnesses being held to account are unelected policy experts; (2) comparing committees across chambers, hearings in the House of Lords committee yield more reassuring facial expressions relative to hearings in the House of Commons committee, suggesting a more relaxed and less adversarial context in the former; and (3) central bank witnesses appearing before both the Lords and Commons committees tend toward expressions of appeasement, suggesting a willingness to defer to Parliament.

  16. Analysis of the metallic containment integrity of Angra I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to evaluate the pressure and temperature long-term behavior inside the metalic containment of a PWR building subjected to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The computer program used was CONDRU 4. Calculations were made for Angra I plant assuming the ocurrence of the worst accident to the containment integrity. The results obtained from CONDRU were compared with those from CONTEMPT-LT and COCO, which are codes similar to CONDRU. (Author) [pt

  17. Hydrogen transport in the containment; Wasserstofftransport im Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royl, P.; Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.

    1995-08-01

    For the description of transport phenomena in water vapor/hydrogen mixtures released in nuclear meltdown accidents, an integrated analytical model is being developed for LWR containments. Thermal and mechanical loads due to recombination and combustion are to be calculable. The 3-dimensional GASFLOW code was taken over from LANL in exchange for HDR experimental results and Battelle BMC program results. (orig.)

  18. The need for LWR metrology standardization: the imec roughness protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Gian Francesco; Sutani, Takumichi; Rutigliani, Vito; van Roey, Frieda; Moussa, Alain; Charley, Anne-Laure; Mack, Chris; Naulleau, Patrick; Constantoudis, Vassilios; Ikota, Masami; Ishimoto, Toru; Koshihara, Shunsuke

    2018-03-01

    As semiconductor technology keeps moving forward, undeterred by the many challenges ahead, one specific deliverable is capturing the attention of many experts in the field: Line Width Roughness (LWR) specifications are expected to be less than 2nm in the near term, and to drop below 1nm in just a few years. This is a daunting challenge and engineers throughout the industry are trying to meet these targets using every means at their disposal. However, although current efforts are surely admirable, we believe they are not enough. The fact is that a specification has a meaning only if there is an agreed methodology to verify if the criterion is met or not. Such a standardization is critical in any field of science and technology and the question that we need to ask ourselves today is whether we have a standardized LWR metrology or not. In other words, if a single reference sample were provided, would everyone measuring it get reasonably comparable results? We came to realize that this is not the case and that the observed spread in the results throughout the industry is quite large. In our opinion, this makes the comparison of LWR data among institutions, or to a specification, very difficult. In this paper, we report the spread of measured LWR data across the semiconductor industry. We investigate the impact of image acquisition, measurement algorithm, and frequency analysis parameters on LWR metrology. We review critically some of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) metrology guidelines (such as measurement box length larger than 2μm and the need to correct for SEM noise). We compare the SEM roughness results to AFM measurements. Finally, we propose a standardized LWR measurement protocol - the imec Roughness Protocol (iRP) - intended to ensure that every time LWR measurements are compared (from various sources or to specifications), the comparison is sensible and sound. We deeply believe that the industry is at a point where it is

  19. The minimum attention plant inherent safety through LWR simplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turk, R.S.; Matzie, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Minimum Attention Plant (MAP) is a unique small LWR that achieves greater inherent safety, improved operability, and reduced costs through design simplification. The MAP is a self-pressurized, indirect-cycle light water reactor with full natural circulation primary coolant flow and multiple once-through steam generators located within the reactor vessel. A fundamental tenent of the MAP design is its complete reliance on existing LWR technology. This reliance on conventional technology provides an extensive experience base which gives confidence in judging the safety and performance aspects of the design

  20. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Technology for LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Bell, Gary L.; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for the specific LWR application has been provided. Basic fuel properties and characteristics that aim to improve operational reliability, enlarge performance envelope, and enhance safety margins under design-basis accident scenarios are summarized. Fabrication of M3 rodlets with various coated fuel particles over a temperature range of 800-1300 C is discussed. Results from preliminary irradiation testing of LWR M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles are also reported.

  1. Hydrogen transport in the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.; Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.

    1995-01-01

    For the description of transport phenomena in water vapor/hydrogen mixtures released in nuclear meltdown accidents, an integrated analytical model is being developed for LWR containments. Thermal and mechanical loads due to recombination and combustion are to be calculable. The 3-dimensional GASFLOW code was taken over from LANL in exchange for HDR experimental results and Battelle BMC program results. (orig.)

  2. Flooding of a large, passive, pressure-tube LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A reactor concept has been developed which can survive LOCA without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory. The proposed concept is a pressure tube type reactor similar to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects: (1) a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles, (2) the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, and (3) the calandria tank contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. The gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during loss of coolant or loss of heat sink accidents, it allows passive calandria flooding. This paper describes the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the gravity driven calandria flooding process. Flooding the calandria space with light water is a unique and very important feature of the proposed pressure-tube LWR concept. The flooding of the top row of fuel channels must be accomplished fast enough so that none of the critical components of the fuel channel exceed their design limits. The flooding process has been modeled and shown to be rapid enough to maintain all components within their design limits. Two other considerations are important. The thermal shock experienced by the calandria and pressure tubes has been evaluated and shown to be within acceptable bounds. Finally, although complete flooding renders the reactor deeply subcritical, various steam/water densities can be hypothesized to be present during the flooding process which could cause reactivity to increase from the initially voided calandria case. One such hypothesis which leads to the maximum possible density of the steam/water mixture in the still unflooded calandria space is entrainment from the free surface. It is shown that the steam/water mixture density yielding the maximum reactivity peak cannot be achieved by entrainment because it exceeds thermohydraulically attainable densities of steam/water by an order of magnitude.

  3. The effects of alcohol on the recognition of facial expressions and microexpressions of emotion: enhanced recognition of disgust and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisberti, Fatima; Terry, Philip

    2015-09-01

    The study compared alcohol's effects on the recognition of briefly displayed facial expressions of emotion (so-called microexpressions) with expressions presented for a longer period. Using a repeated-measures design, we tested 18 participants three times (counterbalanced), after (i) a placebo drink, (ii) a low-to-moderate dose of alcohol (0.17 g/kg women; 0.20 g/kg men) and (iii) a moderate-to-high dose of alcohol (0.52 g/kg women; 0.60 g/kg men). On each session, participants were presented with stimuli representing six emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust and contempt) overlaid on a generic avatar in a six-alternative forced-choice paradigm. A neutral expression (1 s) preceded and followed a target expression presented for 200 ms (microexpressions) or 400 ms. Participants mouse clicked the correct answer. The recognition of disgust was significantly better after the high dose of alcohol than after the low dose or placebo drinks at both durations of stimulus presentation. A similar profile of effects was found for the recognition of contempt. There were no effects on response latencies. Alcohol can increase sensitivity to expressions of disgust and contempt. Such effects are not dependent on stimulus duration up to 400 ms and may reflect contextual modulation of alcohol's effects on emotion recognition. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnier, C.S.; Cravens, M.N.

    1978-04-01

    Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel during storage, handling and transportation are presented. Principal emphasis is placed on means to achieve timely detection by an international authority. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) as part of the overall Sandia Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program

  5. Safety criteria related to microheterogeneities in LWR mixed oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Mostin, N.

    1978-01-01

    The main safety aspets of PuO 2 microheterogeneities in the pellets of LWR mixed oxide fuels are reviewed. Points of interest are studied, especially the transient behaviour in accidental conditions and criteria are deduced for use in the specification and quality control of the fabricated product. (author)

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of LWR spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, D.W.

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods currently being used to evaluate the integrity of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel shipping casks is presented. An assessment of anticipated NDT needs related to breeder reactor cask requirements is included. Specific R and D approaches to probable NDT problem areas such as the evaluation of austenitic stainless steel weldments are outlined

  7. Materials choices for the advanced LWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.; McIlree, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Current light water reactor (LWR) steam generators have been affected by a variety of corrosion and mechanical damage degradation mechanisms. Included are wear caused by tube vibration, intergranular corrosion, pitting, and thinning or wastage of the steam generator tubing and accelerated corrosion of carbon steel supports (denting). The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Steam Generator Owners Groups (I, II) have sponsored laboratory and field studies to provide ameliorative actions for the majority of the damage forms experienced to date. Some of the current corrosion mechanisms are aggravated or caused by unique materials choices or materials interactions. New materials have been proposed and at least partially qualified for use in replacement model steam generators, including an advanced LWR design. In so far as possible, the materials choices for the advanced LWR steam generator avoid the corrosion pitfalls seemingly inherent in the current designs. The EPRI Steam Generator Project staff has recommended materials and design choices for a new steam generator. Based on these recommendations we believe that the advanced LWR steam generators will be much less affected by corrosion and mechanical damage mechanisms than are now experienced

  8. Contributions to LWR spent fuel storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers included in this document describe the aspects of spent LWR fuel storage and transport-behaviour of spent fuel during storage; use of compact storage packs; safety of storage; design of storage facilities AR and AFR; description of transport casks and transport procedures

  9. LWR safety research in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the German LWR safety research programme. It describes how the programme was initiated and informs on its goals, development andpractical realization, and indicates how it is bound up with international collaboration. The contribution so far made by the programme to an enhancement of the understanding of major safety problems and to the improvement of safety technology is demonstrated by means of a few selected examples. Experiments relating to loss-of--coolant accidents have deepened our understanding of the heat transfer in the reactor core during blowdown as well as during the flooding phase. Investigations of the dynamic effects going on in dry full pressure containments and pressure suppression systems, following a loss-of--coolant accident, have indicated that existing computer models cannot satisfactorily predict all relevant physical phenomena. Yet, the experimental results obtained constitute a sufficient basis for safe containment design. Research work on core meltdown accidents has identified the particular importance of the type of concrete used for the containment structures and its foundation. If basaltic concrete is used, a substantial fission product release to the environment is extremely unlikely even in the case of a core meltdown accident. At least, it would take place much later than was previously assumed. Resrach on the safety of pressurized components has been concentrated on the problem of cracks in the heat-affected zone of welds. New methods were developed for the detection and analysis of the acceptability of microcrack fields. Additional investigations of specimens and components to increase the understanding of the long-term behaviour of components with microcracks are envisaged in the frame of a new major project on ''component safety''. Considerable progress has been made in the development of methods for automatic remote-control volumetric testing of reactor pressure vessels using ultrasonic techniques

  10. Performance and reliability of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.; Deramaix, P.; Vandenberg, C.

    1977-01-01

    The main requirements for fuel reloads are: good reliability, minimum fuel cycle costs and flexibility of operation. Fulfilling these goals requires a background of experience. The approach to the acquisition of this experience in the particular case of BN has included over the last 15 years a proper development and cross-checking of the design methods and criteria, a continuous updating of the drawings and specifications and the qualification of adequate fabrication plants. This approach can best be outlined on the basis of the gradual implementation of the modern features of the LWR fuel. The first fuel clad with stainless steel was loaded in the BR 3 (11 MWe) in 1969 and later on (since 1974) in the SENA plant (310 MWe). Similarly, Zircaloy 4 cladding was first introduced in a reactor reload in 1969 as autoclaved cladding and later on (in 1971) the autoclaving was suppressed for the further reloads. Zircaloy 2 was loaded in DODEWAARD (51.5 MWe) in 1970. The first demonstration assembly in a PWR was a Pu-island assembly loaded in the BR 3 in 1963. It was followed by an all-Pu assembly in the same reactor in 1965 and by the loading of Pu fuels in four prototype assemblies in GARIGLIANO (160 MWe) in 1968. A full reload incorporating Pu fuel has been experienced by the supply of fuel for GARIGLIANO (BOL: 1975) and for BR 3 (BOL: 1972 and 1976). While in the early sixties the brazed design was still being utilized, the first assembly incorporating grids with springs was introduced in BR 3 in 1963. The first Inconel grids were loaded in the same reactor in 1969 and the first Zircaloy grids in 1972 (the first Zr grid has been loaded in a BWR in 1973). The experience covered successively the shrouded design (BOL: 1963), the shroudless design (BOL: 1969), a BWR assembly (BOL: 1971), a typical RCC assembly first with large diameter fuel rods (1972) and later on with small diameter fuel rods (1974). The experience on the reactivity control covered successively diluted

  11. Containment Loads Analysis for CANDU6 Reactor using CONTAIN 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae H.; Yang, Chae Y.

    2013-01-01

    The containment plays an important role to limit the release of radioactive materials to the environment during design basis accidents (DBAs). Therefore, the containment has to maintain its integrity under DBA conditions. Generally, a containment functional DBA evaluation includes calculations of the key containment loads, i. e., pressure and temperature effects associated with a postulated large rupture of the primary or secondary coolant system piping. In this paper, the behavior of containment pressure and temperature was evaluated for loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) of the Wolsong unit 1 in order to assess the applicability of CONTAIN 2.0 code for the containment loads analysis of the CANDU6 reactor. The containment pressure and temperature of the Wolsong unit 1 were evaluated using the CONTAIN 2.0 code and the results were compared with the CONTEMPT4 code. The peak pressure and temperature calculated by CONTAIN 2.0 agreed well with those of CONTEMPT4 calculation. The overall result of this analysis shows that the CONTAIN 2.0 code can apply to the containment loads analysis for the CANDU6 reactor

  12. Prediction of fission product and aerosol behaviour during a postulated severe accident in a LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.; Aeby, F.; Raguin, M.; Passalacqua, R.

    1990-02-01

    Lack of appropriate energy removal causes fuel elements in a reactor core to overheat and may eventually cause core to degrade. Fission products will be emitted from a degraded reactor core. Aerosols are generated when the vapours of various fuel and structural materials reach a cold environment and nucleate. In addition to the fission products release and aerosol generation taking place in the reactor vessel, some more fission products release and aerosol generation will occur when the molten core debris leaves the pressure vessel bottom head and comes in contact with the pedestal concrete floor. Fission products, if they are released to environment from the containment boundary, exert a great danger to public health. A source term is defined as the quantity, timing, and characteristics of the release of radionuclide material to the environment following a postulated severe accident. At PSI a considerable effort hase been spent in investigating and establishing a source term assessment methodology in order to predict the source term for a given Light Water Reactor (LWR) accident scenario. This report introduces the computer programs and the methods associated with the release of the fission products, generation of the aerosols and behaviour of the aerosols in LWR compartments used for a source term assessment analysis at PSI. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 28 refs

  13. Emotion recognition bias for contempt and anger in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhlmann, Ulrike; Etcoff, Nancy L; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) patients are preoccupied with imagined defects or flaws in appearance (e.g., size or shape of nose). They are afraid of negative evaluations by others and often suffer significant morbidity including hospitalization and suicide attempts. Many patients experience ideas of reference, e.g., they often believe others take special notice of their "flaw". Facial expressions play an important role in conveying negative or positive feelings, and sympathy or rejection. In this study, we investigated emotion recognition deficits in 18 BDD patients and 18 healthy controls. Participants were presented with two questionnaires accompanying facial photographs. One questionnaire included self-referent scenarios ("Imagine that the bank teller is looking at you. What is his facial expression like?"), whereas the other one included other-referent scenarios ("Imagine that the bank teller is looking at a friend of yours," etc.), and participants were asked to identify the corresponding emotion (e.g., anger, contempt, neutral, or surprise). Overall, BDD patients, relative to controls, had difficulty identifying emotional expressions in self-referent scenarios. They misinterpreted more expressions as contemptuous and angry in self-referent scenarios than did controls. However, they did not have significantly more difficulties identifying emotional expressions in other-referent scenarios than controls. Thus, poor insight and ideas of reference, common in BDD, might be related to a bias for misinterpreting other people's emotional expressions as negative. Perceiving others as rejecting might reinforce concerns about one's personal perceived ugliness and social desirability.

  14. Phoenix type concepts for transmutation of LWR waste minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, M.

    1994-01-01

    A number of variations on the original Phoenix theme were studied. The basic rationale of the Phoenix incinerator is making oxide fuel of the LWR waste minor actinides, loading it in an FFTF-like subcritical core, then bombarding the core with the high current beam accelerated protons to generate considerable energy through spallation and fission reactions. As originally assessed, if the machine is fed with 1600 MeV protons in a 102 mA current, then 8 core modules are driven to transmute the yearly minor actinides waste of 75 1000 MW LWRs into Pu 238 and fission products; in a 2 years cycle the energy extracted is 100000 MW d/T. This performance cannot be substantiated in a rigorous analysis. A calculational consistent methodology, based on a combined execution of the Hermes, NCNP, and Korigen codes, shows, nonetheless that changes in the original Phoenix parameters can upgrade its performance.The original Phoenix contains 26 tons minor actinides in 8 core modules; 1.15 m 3 module is shaped for 40% neutron leakage; with a beam of 102 mA the 8 modules are driven to 100000 MW/T in 10.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinide waste of 15 LWRs; the operation must be assisted by grid electricity. If the 1.15 m 3 module is shaped to allow only 28% leakage, then a beam of 102 mA will drive the 8 modules to 100000 MW/T in 3.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 45 LWRs. Some net grid electricity will be generated. If 25 tons minor actinides are loaded into 5 modules, each 1.72 m 3 in volume and of 24% leakage, then a 97 mA beam will drive the module to 100000 MW/T in 2.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 70 LWRs. A considerable amount of net grid electricity will be generated. If the lattice is made of metal fuel, and 26 tons minor actinides are loaded into 32 small modules, 0.17 m 3 each, then a 102 mA beam will drive the modules to 100000 MW/T in 2 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 72 LWRs. A considerable

  15. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Yoshioka, T.; Toyota, M.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    To develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on safety assurance and to endeavour to devise measures to improve plant availability, based on the careful analysis of causes that reduce plant availability. The paper discusses the results of studies on the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and operating experience of LWR nuclear power plants in Japan: operating experience with LWRs; improvements in LWR design during the past ten years; analysis of the factors affecting plant availability; (2) Assurance of safety and measures to increase availability: measures for safety and environmental protection; measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees; appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work; measures to increase plant availability; measures to improve reliability of equipment and components; (3) Future technical problems. (author)

  16. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs

  17. Development of top nozzle for Korean standard LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. K.; Kim, I. K.; Choi, K. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. N.; Kim, H. K. [KNFC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Performance evaluation was executed for each component and its assembly for the deduced Top Nozzles to develop the new Top Nozzle for LWR. This new Top Nozzle is composed of the optimum components among the derived Top Nozzles that have been evaluated in the viewpoint of structural integrity, simpleness of dismantle and assembly, manufacturability etc. In this study, the developed Top Nozzle satisfied all the related design criteria. In special, it makes fuel repair time reduced by assembling and disassembling itself as one body, and improves Fuel Assembly holddown ability by revising the design parameters of its spring and the structural integrity through the betterment of its geometrical shpae of Flange and Holddown Plate as compared with the existing LWR Top Nozzles.

  18. Development of LWR fuel performance code FEMAXI-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2006-01-01

    LWR fuel performance code: FEMAXI-6 (Finite Element Method in AXIs-symmetric system) is a representative fuel analysis code in Japan. Development history, background, design idea, features of model, and future are stated. Characteristic performance of LWR fuel and analysis code, what is model, development history of FEMAXI, use of FEMAXI code, fuel model, and a special feature of FEMAXI model is described. As examples of analysis, PCMI (Pellet-Clad Mechanical Interaction), fission gas release, gap bonding, and fission gas bubble swelling are reported. Thermal analysis and dynamic analysis system of FEMAXI-6, function block at one time step of FEMAXI-6, analytical example of PCMI in the output increase test by FEMAXI-III, analysis of fission gas release in Halden reactor by FEMAXI-V, comparison of the center temperature of fuel in Halden reactor, and analysis of change of diameter of fuel rod in high burn up BWR fuel are shown. (S.Y.)

  19. Review and comparison of WWER and LWR Codes and Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.; Tashkinov, A.; Brynda, J.; Davies, L.M.; Cueto-Felgeueroso, C.; Detroux, P.; Bieniussa, K.; Guinovart, J.

    2003-01-01

    The results of work on a collaborative project on comparison of Codes and Standards used for safety related components of the WWER and LWR type reactors is presented. This work was performed on behalf of the European Commission, Working Group Codes and Standards and considers areas such as rules, criteria and provisions, failure mechanisms , derivation and understanding behind the fatigue curves, piping, materials and aging, manufacturing and ISI. WWERs are essentially designed and constructed using the Russian PNAE Code together with special provisions in a few countries (e.g. Czech Republic) from national standards. The LWR Codes have a strong dependence on the ASME Code. Also within Western Europe other codes are used including RCC-M, KTA and British Standards. A comparison of procedures used in all these codes and standards have been made to investigate the potential for equivalencies between the codes and any grounds for future cooperation between eastern and western experts in this field. (author)

  20. Safety-related LWR research. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueper, R.

    1994-06-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1993 summarizes the results on LWR safety. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status at the end of 1993. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1978-04-01

    Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables

  2. Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1978-04-01

    Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables.

  3. Standard casks for the transport of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past decade, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has developed, licensed and marketed a family of standard casks for the transport of spent fuel from LWR reactors to reprocessing plants and the ancillary equipments necessary for their operation and transport. A large number of these casks have been manufactured in different countries and are presently used for european and intercontinental transports. The main advantages of these casks are: large payload, moderate cost, reliability, standardisation facilitating fabrication, operation and spare part supply [fr

  4. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems

  5. Modular approach to LWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urli, N.; Pevec, D.; Coffou, E.; Petrovic, B.

    1980-01-01

    The most important methods in the LWR in-core fuel management are reviewed. A modular approach and optimization by use of infinite multiplication factor and power form-factor are favoured. A computer program for rotation of fuel assemblies at reloads has been developed which improves further fuel economy and reliability of nuclear power plants. The program has been tested on the PWR core and showed to decrease the power form-factors and flatten the radial power distribution. (author)

  6. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility

  7. Preliminary Study for Radioactivity Evaluation of MSR compared with LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geun Hyeong; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    LWR uses fuel as {sup 235}U and fissile material as solid (enriched uranium). Those cannot control its component artificially and hard to change fuel frequently. Therefore this fuel remains as much as possible. That makes risk of high radiation leakage because of long neutron irradiation time. On the other hand, MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) uses fuel as thorium-uranium; fissile {sup 233}U when {sup 232}Th absorbs one neutron, and fissile material as liquid (molten salt). It has plenty of benefits respect to radioactive safety. It leads nuclear fuel dump when accident happens, diminishes basic fission substances' radiation and even the cost (Th exist 3∼4 times more on the earth compared with natural uranium). Source term is much lower than conventional LWR in order to processing time. Radiation exposure from volatile fission products in severe accidents is thought to be negligible due to the continuous removal mechanism. The generation of high level radioactive wastes from MSR is estimated to be much smaller than that of conventional LWR because of its less converting probability of thorium to minor actinides. It was thought the fundamental approach to MSR would make it possible to realize the safety of reactor when considering the severe accidents affecting on nuclear power plants due to natural disaster.

  8. Preliminary Study for Radioactivity Evaluation of MSR compared with LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geun Hyeong; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2014-01-01

    LWR uses fuel as 235 U and fissile material as solid (enriched uranium). Those cannot control its component artificially and hard to change fuel frequently. Therefore this fuel remains as much as possible. That makes risk of high radiation leakage because of long neutron irradiation time. On the other hand, MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) uses fuel as thorium-uranium; fissile 233 U when 232 Th absorbs one neutron, and fissile material as liquid (molten salt). It has plenty of benefits respect to radioactive safety. It leads nuclear fuel dump when accident happens, diminishes basic fission substances' radiation and even the cost (Th exist 3∼4 times more on the earth compared with natural uranium). Source term is much lower than conventional LWR in order to processing time. Radiation exposure from volatile fission products in severe accidents is thought to be negligible due to the continuous removal mechanism. The generation of high level radioactive wastes from MSR is estimated to be much smaller than that of conventional LWR because of its less converting probability of thorium to minor actinides. It was thought the fundamental approach to MSR would make it possible to realize the safety of reactor when considering the severe accidents affecting on nuclear power plants due to natural disaster

  9. Energy profit ratio on LWR by uranium recycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Uno, Takeki; Matsushima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Energy profit ratio is defined as the ratio of output energy/input system total energy. In case of electric power generation, input energy is a total for fuel such as uranium mining and enrichment, fuel transportation, build nuclear power plant, M and O and for disposal waste and decommission of reactor vessel. Output energy is the total electricity on LWR during the plant life. EPR on both PWR and BWR is high value using gas centrifuge enrichment compared other type of electric power generation such as a thermal power, a hydraulic power, a wind power and a photovoltaic power. How is the EPR on LWR by MOX? We need understanding the energy of reprocessing spent fuel, MOX fuel fabrication, low level waste disposal and high level radioactive glass disposal. As we show the material balance for two cases, the first is the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR, the second is the MOX fuel cycle on LWR plant. The MOX fuel recycle is better EPR value rather than the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR (LTSRBF). At the gaseous diffusion enrichment case, MOX fuel recycle has 15 to 18% higher EPR value than LTSRBF. At the gas centrifuge enrichment case the MOX fuel recycle has 17 to 18 higher EPR value than LTSRBF. MOX fuel recycle decreases the uranium mining and refine mass, enrichment separative work and the spent fuel interim storage. It tells us the MOX fuel recycle is good way from view of EPR. (author)

  10. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility.

  11. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  12. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, P.O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading

  13. Overview of LWR severe accident research activities at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, Alexei; Albrecht, Giancarlo; Foit, Jerzy-Jan; Jordan, Thomas; Steinbrück, Martin; Stuckert, Juri; Tromm, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The research activities in the light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents domain at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are concentrated on the in- and ex-vessel core melt behavior. The overall objective is to investigate the core melt scenarios from the beginning of core degradation to melt formation and relocation in the vessel, possible melt dispersion to the reactor cavity and to the containment, corium concrete interaction and corium coolability in the reactor cavity, and hydrogen behaviour in reactor systems. The results of the experiments contribute to a better understanding of the core melt sequences and thus improve safety of existing and, in the long-term, of future reactors by severe accident mitigation measures and by safety installations where required. This overview paper describes the experimental facilities used at KIT for severe accident research and gives an overview of the main directions and objectives of the R&D work. (author)

  14. Fuel elements for LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepenack, H.

    1977-01-01

    About five times more expensive than the fabrication of a fuel element is the enriched uranium contained therein; soon the monthly interest charges for the uranium value of a fuel element reload will account for five percent of the fabrication costs, and much more expensive than all this together can it be if reactor operation has to be interrupted because of damaged elements. Thus, quality assurance comes first. (orig.) [de

  15. Research work for improving LWR safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bork, G.

    1993-09-01

    The work performed in 1992 for the PSF project centers on various phenomena of severe fuel damage and on selected aspects of a core meltdown accident, relating to aerosol behaviour and filter engineering, and to methods of assessing and minimizing the radiological impacts of a reactor accident. The 1992 task programme of the project included research into extreme load conditions affecting the containment in a core meltdown accident: first results are given of the experiments performed. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Simplified methodology for Angra 1 containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves Conti, T. das; Souza, A.L. de; Sabundjian, G.

    1991-08-01

    A simplified methodology of analysis was developed to simulate a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident in the Angra 1 Nuclear Power Station. Using the RELAP5/MOD1, RELAP4/MOD5 and CONTEMPT-LT Codes, the time variation of pressure and temperature in the containment was analysed. The obtained data was compared with the Angra 1 Final Safety Analysis Report, and too those calculated by a Detailed Model. The results obtained by this new methodology such as the small computational time of simulation, were satisfactory when getting the preliminary evaluation of the Angra 1 global parameters. (author)

  17. Aerosol in the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, S.; Mariotti, P.

    1986-01-01

    The US program LACE (LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments), in which Italy participates together with several European countries, Canada and Japan, aims at evaluating by means of a large scale experimental activity at HEDL the retention in the pipings and primary container of the radioactive aerosol released following severe accidents in light water reactors. At the same time these experiences will make available data through which the codes used to analyse the behaviour of the aerosol in the containment and to verify whether by means of the codes of thermohydraulic computation it is possible to evaluate with sufficient accuracy variable influencing the aerosol behaviour, can be validated. This report shows and compares the results obtained by the participants in the LACE program with the aerosol containment codes NAVA 5 and CONTAIN for the pre-test computations of the test LA 1, in which an accident called containment by pass is simulated

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized

  19. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-01-01

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The 99 Tc, 129 I, 137 Cs, 97 Mo, and 90 Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the 99 Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup

  20. Public comments and Task Force responses regarding the environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    This document contains responses by the NRC Task Force to comments received on the report ''Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116). These responses are directed at all comments, inclding those received after the close of the comment period. Additional information on the environmental impacts of reprocessing and waste management which has either become available since the publication of NUREG-0116 or which adds requested clarification to the information in that document

  1. On the substantial contribution of "contempt" as a folk affect concept to the history of the European popular institution of charivari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagota, Bogdan; Benga, Ileana; Benga, Oana

    2017-01-01

    The integration of the folk affect concept of "contempt" into the analysis of the complex institution known generally as charivari is mutually beneficial for both ethno-anthropology (which may thus access inner causes for disputed social and collective behaviors) and evolutionary psychology (which may thus study the length of tradition together with the width of the institution spread, serving the same social functions).

  2. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289 degree C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 degree C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections

  3. Measurement and characterization of fission products released from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Collins, J.L.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of commercial LWR fuel have been heated under simulated accident conditions to determine the extent and the chemical forms of fission product release. This project was sponsored by the USNRC under a broad program of reactor safety studies. Of the five tests discussed, the fractional releases of Kr, I, and Cs varied from approx. 2% at 1400 0 C to >50% at 2000 0 C; much smaller fractions of Ru, Ag, Sb, and Te were measured in some tests. The major chemical forms in the effluent appeared to include CsI, CsOH, Sb, Te, and Ag

  4. Conceptual design of a spent LWR fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.H.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose was to design a licensable facility, to make cost-benefit analyses of alternatives, and to aid in developing licensing criteria. The Savannah River Plant was taken to be the site for the recycle complex. The spent LWR fuel will be processed through the plant at the rate of 3000 metric tons of heavy metal per year. The following aspects of the complex are discussed: operation, maintenance, co-conversion (Coprecal), waste disposal, off-gas treatment, ventilation, safeguards, accounting, equipment and fuel fabrication. Differences between the co-processing case and the separated streams case are discussed. 44 figures

  5. Issues in risk analysis of passive LWR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, R.W.; Pratt, W.T.; Amico, P.J.; Gallagher, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses issues which bear on the question of how safety is to be demonstrated for ''simplified passive'' light water reactor (LWR) designs. First, a very simplified comparison is made between certain systems in today's plants. comparable systems in evolutionary designs, and comparable systems in the simplified passives. in order to introduce the issues. This discussion is not intended to describe the designs comprehensively, but is offered only to show why certain issues seem to be important in these particular designs. Next, an important class of accident sequences is described; finally, based on this discussion, some priorities in risk analysis are presented and discussed

  6. Hamor-2: a computer code for LWR inventory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, L.N.F.; Marzo, M.A.S.

    1985-01-01

    A method for calculating the accuracy inventory of LWR reactors is presented. This method uses the Hamor-2 computer code. Hamor-2 is obtained from the coupling of two other computer codes Hammer-Techion and Origen-2 for testing Hamor-2, its results were compared to concentration values measured from activides of two PWR reactors; Kernkraftwerk Obrighein (KWO) and H.B. Robinson (HBR). These actinides are U 235 , U 236 , U 238 , Pu 239 , Pu 241 and PU 242 . The computer code Hammor-2 shows better results than the computer code Origem-2, when both are compared with experimental results. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Measurement and characterization of fission products released from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Collins, J.L.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of commercial LWR fuel have been heated under simulated accident conditions to determine the extent and the chemical forms of fission product release. Of the five tests discussed, the fractional releases of Kr, I, and Cs varied from proportional 2% at 1400 0 C to >50% at 2000 0 C; much smaller fractions of Ru, Ag, Sb, and Te were measured in some tests. The major chemical forms in the effluent appeared to include CsI, CsOH, Sb, Te, and Ag. (orig./HP)

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of LWR spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, D.W.

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of nondestructve testing (NDT) methods currently being used to evaluate the integrity of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel shipping casks is presented. An assessment of anticipated NDT needs related to breeder reactor cask requirements is included. Specific R and D approaches to probable NDT problem areas such as the evaluation of austenitic stainless steel weldments are outlined. A comprehensive bibliography of current NDT methods for cask evaluation in the USA, Great Britain, Japan and West Germany was compiled for this study

  9. Standard casks for the transport of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.

    1985-01-01

    During the past decade, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has developed, licensed and marketed a family of standard casks for the transport of spent fuel from LWR reactors to reprocessing plants and the ancillary equipments necessary for their operation and transport. A large number of these casks have been manufacturer under TRANSNUCLEAIRE supervision in different countries and are presently used for European and intercontinental transports. The main advantages of these casks are: - large payload for considered modes of transport, - moderate cost, - reliability due to the large experience gained by TRANSNUCLEAIRE as concerns fabrication and operation problems, - standardisation facilitating fabrication, operation and spare part supply [fr

  10. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

  11. Transmutation of LWR waste actinides in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle of actinides to a reactor for transmutation to fission products is being considered as a possible means of waste disposal. Actinide transmutation calculations were made for two irradiation options in a thermal (LWR) reactor. The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies, and transuranic actinides recycled in separate mixed oxide (MOX) assemblies. When all actinides were recycled in a uranium lattice, a reduction of 62% in the transuranic inventory was achieved after 10 recycles, compared to the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from 2 regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after 5 recycles

  12. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs

  13. Pie technique of LWR fuel cladding fracture toughness test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Shinya; Usami, Koji; Nakata, Masahito; Fukuda, Takuji; Numata, Masami; Kizaki, Minoru; Nishino, Yasuharu

    2006-01-01

    Remote-handling techniques were developed by cooperative research between the Department of Hot Laboratories in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. (NFI) for evaluating the fracture toughness on irradiated LWR fuel cladding. The developed techniques, sample machining by using the electrical discharge machine (EDM), pre-cracking by fatigue tester, sample assembling to the compact tension (CT) shaped test fixture gave a satisfied result for a fracture toughness test developed by NFL. And post-irradiation examination (PIE) using the remote-handling techniques were carried out to evaluate the fracture toughness on BWR spent fuel cladding in the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF). (author)

  14. Assessment of nitrogen as an atmosphere for dry storage of spent LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.R.; Knox, C.A.; White, G.D.

    1985-09-01

    Interim dry storage of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel is being developed as a licensed technology in the United States. Because it is anticipated that license agreements will specify dry storage atmospheres, the behavior of spent LWR fuel in a nitrogen atmosphere during dry storage was investigated. In particular, the thermodynamics of reaction of nitrogen compounds (expected to form in the cover gas during dry storage) and residual impurities (such as moisture and oxygen) with Zircaloy cladding and with spent fuel at sites of cladding breaches were examined. The kinetics of reaction were not considered it was assumed that the 20 to 40 years of interim dry storage would be sufficient for reactions to proceed to completion. The primary thermodynamics reactants were found to be NO 2 , N 2 O, H 2 O 2 , and O 2 . The evaluation revealed that the limited inventories of these reactants produced by the source terms in hermetically sealed dry storage systems would be too low to cause significant spent fuel degradation. Furthermore, the oxidation of spent fuel to degrading O/U ratios is unlikely because the oxidation potential in moist nitrogen limits O/U ratios to values less than UO/sub 2.006/ (the equilibrium stoichiometric form in equilibrium with moist nitrogen). Tests were performed with bare spent UO 2 fuel and nonirradiated UO 2 pellets (with no Zircaloy cladding) in a nitrogen atmosphere containing moisture concentrations greater than encountered under dry storage conditions. These tests were performed for at least 1100 h at temperatures as high as 380 0 C, where oxidation reactions proceed in a matter of minutes. No visible degradation was detected, and weight changes were negligible

  15. Parametric study of radioactive release from a breached containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Hasan, D.; Elias, E.

    1980-01-01

    A hypothetical accident is analyzed, in which an external (out-of-plant) natural or man-made event causes a loss-of-coolant accident after penetrating the containment wall. The computer codes CONTEMPT and RELAP4 have been used to study the containment thermal-hydraulic behavior during the accident. Results are given in the form of graphs showing the thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and the profile of radioactive release to the atmosphere. The physical model and input data are discussed. 13 refs

  16. Principles of MONJU maintenance. Characteristic of MONJU maintenance and reflection of LWR maintenance experience to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Satoru; Nishio, Ryuichi; Uchihashi, Masaya; Kaneko, Yoshihisa; Yamashita, Hironobu; Yamaguchi, Atsunori; Aoki, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    A sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) has unique systems and components and different degradation mechanism from light water reactor (LWR) so that need to establish maintenance technology in accordance with its features. The examination of the FBR maintenance technology is carried out in the special committee for considering the maintenance for Monju established in the Japan Society of Maintenology (JSM). As a result of the study such as extraction of Monju maintenance feature, maintenance technology benchmark between Monju and LWR components and survey of LWR maintenance experience, it is clear that principles of maintenance are same as LWR, necessity of LWR maintenance experience reflection and points to be considered in Monju maintenance. The road map to establish a FBR maintenance technology in the technical aspect became clear and it is vital to acquire operation and maintenance experience of the plant to implement this road map, and to establish a fast reactor maintenance. (author)

  17. The dupic fuel cycle synergism between LWR and HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.S.; Yang, M.S.; Park, H.S.; Lee, H.H.; Kim, K.P.; Sullivan, J.D.; Boczar, P.G.; Gadsby, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    The DUPIC fuel cycle can be developed as an alternative to the conventional spent fuel management options of direct disposal or plutonium recycle. Spent LWR fuel can be burned again in a HWR by direct refabrication into CANDU-compatible DUPIC fuel bundles. Such a linkage between LWR and HWR can result in a multitude of synergistic effects, ranging from savings of natural uranium to reductions in the amount of spent fuel to be buried in the earth, for a given amount of nuclear electricity generated. A special feature of the DUPIC fuel cycle is its compliance with the 'Spent Fuel Standard' criteria for diversion resistance, throughout the entire fuel cycle. The DUPIC cycle thus has a very high degree of proliferation resistance. The cost penalty due to this technical factor needs to be considered in balance with the overall benefits of the DUPIC fuel cycle. The DUPIC alternative may be able to make a significant contribution to reducing spent nuclear fuel burial in the geosphere, in a manner similar to the contribution of the nuclear energy alternative in reducing atmospheric pollution from fossil fuel combustion. (author)

  18. Effects of cooling time on a closed LWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R. P.; Forsberg, C. W.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cooling time prior to reprocessing spent LWR fuel has on the reactor physics characteristics of a PWR fully loaded with homogeneously mixed U-Pu or U-TRU oxide (MOX) fuel is examined. A reactor physics analysis was completed using the CASM04e code. A void reactivity feedback coefficient analysis was also completed for an infinite lattice of fresh fuel assemblies. Some useful conclusions can be made regarding the effect that cooling time prior to reprocessing spent LWR fuel has on a closed homogeneous MOX fuel cycle. The computational analysis shows that it is more neutronically efficient to reprocess cooled spent fuel into homogeneous MOX fuel rods earlier rather than later as the fissile fuel content decreases with time. Also, the number of spent fuel rods needed to fabricate one MOX fuel rod increases as cooling time increases. In the case of TRU MOX fuel, with time, there is an economic tradeoff between fuel handling difficulty and higher throughput of fuel to be reprocessed. The void coefficient analysis shows that the void coefficient becomes progressively more restrictive on fuel Pu content with increasing spent fuel cooling time before reprocessing. (authors)

  19. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ''Alternative Teams,'' chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S ampersand S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT's analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option

  20. Qualification of ARROTTA code for LWR accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, P.-H.; Peng, K.Y.; Lin, W.-C.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the qualification efforts performed by TPC and INER for the 3-D spatial kinetics code ARROTTA for LWR core transient analysis. TPC and INER started a joint 5 year project in 1989 to establish independent capabilities to perform reload design and transient analysis utilizing state-of-the-art computer programs. As part of the effort, the ARROTTA code was chosen to perform multi-dimensional kinetics calculations such as rod ejection for PWR and rod drop for BWR. To qualify ARROTTA for analysis of FSAR licensing basis core transients, ARROTTA has been benchmarked for the static core analysis against plant measured data and SIMULATE-3 predictions, and for the kinetic analysis against available benchmark problems. The static calculations compared include critical boron concentration, core power distribution, and control rod worth. The results indicated that ARROTTA predictions match very well with plant measured data and SIMULATE-3 predictions. The kinetic benchmark problems validated include NEACRP rod ejection problem, 3-D LMW LWR rod withdrawal/insertion problem, and 3-D LRA BWR transient benchmark problem. The results indicate that ARROTTA's accuracy and stability are excellent as compared to other space-time kinetics codes. It is therefore concluded that ARROTTA provides accurate predictions for multi-dimensional core transient for LWRs. (author)

  1. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

  2. Evaluation of LWR fuel rod behavior under operational transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Hiramoto, K.; Maru, A.

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of fission gas flow and diffusion in the fuel-cladding gap on fuel rod thermal and mechanical behaviors in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods under operational transient conditions, computer sub-programs which can calculate the gas flow and diffusion have been developed and integrated into the LWR fuel rod performance code BEAF. This integrated code also calculates transient temperature distribution in the fuel-pellet and cladding. The integrated code was applied to an analysis of Inter Ramp Project data, which showed that by taking into account the gas flow and diffusion effects, the calculated cladding damage indices predicted for the failed rods in the ramp test were consistent with iodine-SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) failure conditions which were obtained from out-of-reactor pressurized tube experiments with irradiated Zircaloy claddings. This consistency was not seen if the gas flow and diffusion effects were neglected. Evaluation were also made for the BWR 8x8 RJ fuel rod temperatures under power ramp conditions. (orig.)

  3. The Impact of Fukushima Accidents on LWR Safety and the Nuclear Power Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    The history of the consideration of severe accidents (SA) safety begins really with WASH-1400 [1] initiated by USNRC in early 1970s. The WASH-1400 considered accidents of decreasing probability and increasing consequence.The accidents considered, occurred due to successive faults which lead to at least the melting of the core and a possible radioactivity release to the environment. The increasing consequence accidents would entail additional failures e.g., vessel failure, late containment failure, containment bypass, early containment failure etc. These additional failures would lead to larger releases of radioactivity and thus larger consequences for the public in the vicinity of the plant. WASH -1400 did not provide estimates of the costs for cleanup of the contaminated land area. Also there were no estimates of the economic costs involved in removal of the molten fuel and the decommissioning of the stricken plant. The emphasis in WASH-1400 was primarily with physical damage to the population in the vicinity of the plant and peripherally with the societal, social and economic costs of a severe accident in a large LWR plant

  4. Less is often more, but not always: additional evidence that familiarity breeds contempt and a call for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Michael I; Frost, Jeana H; Ariely, Dan

    2013-12-01

    Ullrich, Krueger, Brod, and Groschupf (2013)-using a replication of the trait paradigm from Norton, Frost, and Ariely (2007)-suggest that less information does not always equal greater liking. We first ground the current debate in a larger historical debate in social psychology regarding the merits of configural versus algebraic models of person perception. We next review (a) related research that has suggested that more information can in some cases lead to more liking and (b) a large body of "real world" data-from friendships, daters, married couples, employment, celebrities, and politics-that suggests that more information often leads to less liking. We then provide an additional replication of our "less is more" effect, using a slight variation of the trait-list paradigm. The existing data suggest a need for further integrative explorations of when familiarity leads to contempt or liking or has no effect. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Validating the BISON fuel performance code to integral LWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R.L., E-mail: Richard.Williamson@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gamble, K.A., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Perez, D.M., E-mail: Danielle.Perez@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Novascone, S.R., E-mail: Stephen.Novascone@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Pastore, G., E-mail: Giovanni.Pastore@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gardner, R.J., E-mail: Russell.Gardner@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Hales, J.D., E-mail: Jason.Hales@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Liu, W., E-mail: Wenfeng.Liu@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Mai, A., E-mail: Anh.Mai@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The BISON multidimensional fuel performance code is being validated to integral LWR experiments. • Code and solution verification are necessary prerequisites to validation. • Fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable. • Accuracy in predicting fission gas release is consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and the involved uncertainties. • Rod diameter comparisons are not satisfactory and further investigation is underway. - Abstract: BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. Code validation is underway and is the subject of this study. A brief overview of BISON's computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described, followed by a summary of the experimental data used to date for validation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Validation comparisons focus on fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release, and rod diameter both before and following fuel-clad mechanical contact. Comparisons for 35 LWR rods are consolidated to provide an overall view of how the code is predicting physical behavior, with a few select validation cases discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrate that (1) fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable with deviations between predictions and experimental data within ±10% for early life through high burnup fuel and only slightly out of these bounds for power ramp experiments, (2) accuracy in predicting fission gas release appears to be consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and with the involved uncertainties and (3) comparison

  6. Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the LWR Quantities Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.E.; Moore, R.S.

    1990-08-01

    The LWR Quantities Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's waste, technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes non-LWR spent fuel, high-level and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the LWR Quantities Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. The PC data base itself may be requested from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using the order form provided in Volume 1 of publication DOE/RW-0184

  7. Development of a data bank system for LWR integral experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Aoyagi, Hideo

    1983-01-01

    A data bank system for LWR integral experiment has been developed for the purpose of alleviating various efforts associated with the verification of computer codes. The final aim of this system is such that the imput data for the code to be verified can be easily obtained, and the results of calculation can be obtained in the form of the comparison with measurement. Geometry and material composition as well as measured data are stored in the data bank. This data bank system is composed of four sub-programs; (1) registration program, (2) information retrieval program, (3) maintenance program, and (4) figure representation program. In this report, the structure of this data bank system and how to use the system are explained. An example of the use of this system is also included. (Aoki, K.)

  8. Alternatives for managing post LWR reactor nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The two extremes in the LWR fuel cycle are discarding the spent fuel and recycling the U and Pu to the maximum extent possible. The waste volumes from the two alternatives are compared. A preliminary evaluation is made of the technology available for handling wastes from each step of the fuel cycle. The wastes considered are fuel materials, high--level wastes, other liquids, combustible and non-combustible solids, and non--high--level wastes. Evaluation of processing gaseous wastes indicates that technology is available for capture of Kr and I 2 , but further development is needed for T 2 . Technology for interim storage and geological isolation is considered adequate. An outline is given of the steps in the selection of a final storage site

  9. LWR-PV Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program review graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Gold, R.; Gutherie, G.L.

    1979-10-01

    A primary objective of the multilaboratory program is to prepare an updated and improved set of dosimetry, damage correlation, and the associated reactor analysis ASTM standards for LWR-PV irradiation surveillance programs. Supporting this objective are a series of analytical and experimental validation and calibration studies in Benchmark Neutron Fields, reactor Test Regions, and operating power reactor Surveillance Positions. These studies will establish and certify the precision and accuracy of the measurement and predictive methods which are recommended for use in these standards. Consistent and accurate measurement and data analysis techniques and methods, therefore, will have been developed and validated along with guidelines for required neutron field calculations that are used to (1) correlate changes in material properties with the characteristics of the neutron radiation field and (2) predict pressure vessel steel toughness and embrittlement from power reactor surveillance data

  10. Spent LWR fuel leach tests: Waste Isolation Safety Assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.B.

    1979-04-01

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels with burnups of 54.5, 28 and 9 MWd/kgU were leach-tested in deionized water at 25 0 C. Fuel burnup has no apparent effect on the calculated leach rates based upon the behavior of 137 Cs and 239+240 Pu. A leach test of 54.5 MWd/kgU spent fuel in synthetic sea brine showed that the cesium-based leach rate is lower in sea brine than in deionized water. A rise in the leach rate was observed after approximately 600 d of cumulative leaching. During the rise, the leach rate for all the measured radionuclides become nearly equal. Evidence suggests that exposure of new surfaces to the leachant may cause the increase. As a result, experimental work to study leaching mechanisms of spent fuel has been initiated. 22 figures

  11. Evaluation of management alternatives for LWR hulls and caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudon, L.; Mehling, O.; Cecille, L.; Thiels, G.; Kowa, S.

    1993-01-01

    Hulls and caps resulting from the reprocessing of LWR spent fuels represent one of the major sources of alpha-bearing solid waste generated during the nuclear fuel cycle. The Commission of the European Communities has undertaken considerable R and D efforts on the development of advanced treatment and conditioning methods for this type of waste. In view of the encouraging results achieved, the Commission launched a theoretical assessment study on cladding waste management. Six practical or potential schemes were identified and elaborated: direct cementation, decontamination prior to cementation, rolling before cementation, rolling followed by embedding in graphite, compaction, and melting in a cold crucible. The economic aspects of each management option were also investigated. This included the assessment of the plant (treatment, conditioning and interim storage), transport and disposal costs. Further consideration will be required to define the best management option for 'cap' wastes. Transport and disposal costs will also require further analysis from an industrial standpoint

  12. Cost optimization of long-cycle LWR operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerk, C.S.; Driscoll, M.J.; McMahon, M.V.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    The continuing emphasis on improvement of plant capacity factor, as a major means to make nuclear energy more cost competitive in the current deregulatory environment, motivates heightened interest in long intra-refueling intervals and high burnup in LWR units. This study examines the economic implications of these trends, to determine the envelope of profitable fuel management tactics. One batch management is found to be significantly more expensive than two-batch management. Parametric studies were carried out varying the most important input parameters. If ultra-high burnup can be achieved, then n = 3 or even n = 4 management may be preferable. For n = 1 or 2, economic performance declines at higher burnups, hence providing no great incentive for moving further in that direction. Values for n > 2 are also attractive because, for a given burnup target, required enrichment decreases as n increases. This study was limited to average batch burnups below 60,000 MWd/MT

  13. Irradiation effects on thermal properties of LWR hydride fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, Kurt, E-mail: terrani@berkeley.edu [University of California, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, M.C. 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Balooch, Mehdi [University of California, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, M.C. 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Carpenter, David; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Olander, Donald [University of California, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, M.C. 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Three hydride mini-fuel rods were fabricated and irradiated at the MIT nuclear reactor with a maximum burnup of 0.31% FIMA or ∼5 MWd/kgU equivalent oxide fuel burnup. Fuel rods consisted of uranium-zirconium hydride (U (30 wt%)ZrH{sub 1.6}) pellets clad inside a LWR Zircaloy-2 tubing. The gap between the fuel and the cladding was filled with lead-bismuth eutectic alloy to eliminate the gas gap and the large temperature drop across it. Each mini-fuel rod was instrumented with two thermocouples with tips that are axially located halfway through the fuel centerline and cladding surface. In-pile temperature measurements enabled calculation of thermal conductivity in this fuel as a function of temperature and burnup. In-pile thermal conductivity at the beginning of test agreed well with out-of-pile measurements on unirradiated fuel and decreased rapidly with burnup.

  14. LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Blink, J.A.; Shaw, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide energy consumption in 2003 was 421 quadrillion Btu (Quads), and included 162 quads for oil, 99 quads for natural gas, 100 quads for coal, 27 quads for nuclear energy, and 33 quads for renewable sources. The projected worldwide energy consumption for 2030 is 722 quads, corresponding to an increase of 71% over the consumption in 2003. The projected consumption for 2030 includes 239 quads for oil, 190 quads for natural gas, 196 quads for coal, 35 quads for nuclear energy, and 62 quads for renewable sources (International Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0484, Table D1 (2006) p. 133]. The current fleet of light water reactors (LRWs) provides about 20% of current U.S. electricity, and about 16% of current world electricity. The demand for electricity is expected to grow steeply in this century, as the developing world increases its standard of living. With the increasing price for oil and gasoline within the United States, as well as fear that our CO2 production may be driving intolerable global warming, there is growing pressure to move away from oil, natural gas, and coal towards nuclear energy. Although there is a clear need for nuclear energy, issues facing waste disposal have not been adequately dealt with, either domestically or internationally. Better technological approaches, with better public acceptance, are needed. Nuclear power has been criticized on both safety and waste disposal bases. The safety issues are based on the potential for plant damage and environmental effects due to either nuclear criticality excursions or loss of cooling. Redundant safety systems are used to reduce the probability and consequences of these risks for LWRs. LIFE engines are inherently subcritical, reducing the need for systems to control the fission reactivity. LIFE engines also have a fuel type that tolerates much higher temperatures than LWR fuel, and has two safety systems to remove decay heat in the event of loss of coolant or loss of coolant flow. These features of

  15. Fracture probability evaluation of a LWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandemange, J.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.; Quero, J.; Carnino, A.; Dufresne, J.

    1978-01-01

    Fracture probability evaluation, of a LWR pressure vessel have been performed in the past, using statistical data from conventional plant. A more accurate evaluation has been requested in 1976 from the SCSIN to the CEA. With this object, a joint collaboration agreement has been signed between CEA, EURATOM/ISPRA and FRAMATOME. The whole program proceeding from this agreement is managed by a joint board including the three partners. The basic objective of this program is to develop a method which integrates, or makes it possible to integrate at a later stage, the greatest number of significant parameters. Also, in order to prepare the practical applications, a special effort is being made to collect the data corresponding to these parameters. Parallel basic research program have been launched in order to clarify our knowledge on some important parts of the main factors contributing to the evaluation. The results of this research will be progressively introduced into the method or will help checking its validity

  16. Dual-purpose LWR supplying heat for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waplington, G.; Fitcher, H.

    1977-01-01

    A number of desalination processes are at present in various stages of development but distillation is the only serious choice for a large-scale project. The distillation process temperature requirement is low compared with the temperature of steam normally delivered to the turbine in a power generation plant. This gives the possibility for combining the functions of electricity generation with water distillation. The brine heater of the multi-stage flash distillation plant can be supplied with steam after partial expansion through a turbine. Such an arrangement allows the use of a standard nuclear steam supply system and makes fuller use of the energy output than would either single purpose role. The LWR represents a safe, reliable and economic system, and is easily able to provide heat of a quality adequate for the desalination process. (M.S.)

  17. Analysis of alternative light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Boegel, A.J.; Jenquin, U.P.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Lewallen, M.A.; Merrill, E.T.; Nolan, A.M.

    1979-12-01

    Nine alternative LWR fuel cycles are analyzed in terms of the isotopic content of the fuel material, the relative amounts of primary and recycled material, the uranium and thorium requirements, the fuel cycle costs and the fraction of energy which must be generated at secured sites. The fuel materials include low-enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium-uranium (MOX), highly-enriched uranium-thorium (HEU-Th), denatured uranium-thorium (DU-Th) and plutonium-thorium (Pu-Th). The analysis is based on tracing the material requirements of a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a 30-year period at constant annual energy output. During this time period all the created fissile material is recycled unless its reactivity worth is less than 0.2% uranium enrichment plant tails

  18. A study on the behavior of defected LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Kim, Eun Ka; Kim, Keon Sik; Suh, Hang Suck; Kim, Seung Jung; Ro, Seung Gy; Park, Chong Mook; Ji, Pyung Gook

    1992-03-01

    To investigate the storage behavior of the defective LWR spent fuel rods, the characteristic changes of fuel and cladding are to be measured and analyzed. In addition, the oxidation study in air on non-irradiated and irradiated U0 2 was performed. No changes were observed in the tested fuel rods after 30 month storage. The Cs-134, 137 released rapidly during the initial 3 months of storage, but remained in constant value after 3 month storage and the release was almost ceased after 30 month storage. The weight gain of non-irradiated U0 2 samples showed a trend of S type curves and the activation energies were 11OKJ/mol above 350 deg C. and 143KJ/mol below 350 deg C. But irradiated U0 2 showed a rapid increase at initial stage of oxidation and a decrease at later stage when compared with the results of non-irradiated U0 2 . (Author)

  19. Development of PIE techniques for irradiated LWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Masahiro; Kizaki, Minoru; Sukegawa, Tomohide

    1999-01-01

    For the evaluation of safety and integrity of light water reactors (LWRs), various post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and fuel claddings have been carried out in the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL). In recent years, the instrumented Charpy impact testing machine was remodeled aiming at the improvement of accuracy and reliability. By this remodeling, absorbed energy and other useful information on impact properties can be delivered from the force-displacement curve for the evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement behavior of LWR-RPV steels at one-time striking. In addition, two advanced PIE technologies are now under development. One is the remote machining of mechanical test pieces from actual irradiated pressure vessel steels. The other is development of low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue test technology in order to clarify the post-irradiation fatigue characteristics of structural and fuel cladding materials. (author)

  20. Progress in Development of I2S-LWR Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The paper will present the progress in developing the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (12S-LWR) concept. This new concept aims to combine the competitive economics of a large nuclear power plant, with enhanced safety achieved by the integral primary circuit configuration (previously considered only for PWRs with power levels not exceeding several hundred MWc), and with enhanced accident tolerance (to address concerns after the Fukushima Dai-lchi accidents). Several new technologies are being developed to enable this concept, including novel silicide fuel and micro-channel primary heat exchangers. This project is performed by a multi-disciplinary multi-organization team led by Georgia Tech, including academia, a national laboratory, nuclear industry, and a power utility, wit expected participation of the University of Zagreb. (author)

  1. Quality assurance in the course of fabrication of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, G.; Perry, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A high quality level of LWR fuel elements can only be assured by a system of Quality Assurance measures purposefully designed, balanced, and appropriately applied. This includes application of and the appropriate balance between both system and product oriented measures. A prerequisite to the establishment of these measures is a precise analysis of the various influences of the individual process steps on the quality characteristics of the starting materials, semi-finished and finished products. In addition, these characteristics require classification criteria relative to their significance. The described classification is used to establish sampling plans and to disposition non-conformances. The EXXON Nuclear Quality Assurance system which is based on these principles is described and illustrated with some examples. (orig.)

  2. Automatic test equipment for C and I of compact LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayya, Anuradha; Marathe, P.P.; Madala, Kalyan C.

    2014-01-01

    The C and I of compact LWR consist of a wide variety of electronic modules. Testing of these modules manually was found to be very cumbersome. To ease the testing of these modules, Automatic Test Equipments (ATE) were developed jointly by BARC and ECIL. This paper describes the design of two ATEs for testing 69 types of modules. A power supply ATE was developed for 43 types of power supply modules of type AC-AC, AC-DC, DC-DC and signal conditioning modules. A VME ATE was developed to test 26 types of VME bus based and other microcontroller based non-bussed modules. These ATEs are used for the automated black box testing of modules by feeding power and control inputs and checking the outputs without operator intervention. This paper describes the important considerations in design and the major design challenges. (author)

  3. Core design of super LWR with double tube water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor with double tube water rods is developed. • Double-row fuel rod assembly and out-in fuel loading pattern are applied. • Separation plates in peripheral assemblies increase average outlet temperature. • Neutronic and thermal design criteria are satisfied during the cycle. - Abstract: Double tube water rods are employed in core design of super LWR to simplify the upper core structure and refueling procedure. The light water moderator flows up in the inner tube from the bottom of the core, then, changes the flow direction at the top of the core into the outer tube and flows out at the bottom of the core. It eliminates the moderator guide/distribution tubes into the single tube water rods from the top dome of the reactor pressure vessel of the previous super LWR design. Two rows of fuel rods are filled between the water rods in the fuel assembly. Out-in refueling pattern is adopted to flatten radial power distribution. The peripheral fuel assemblies of the core are divided into four flow zones by separation plates for increasing the average core outlet temperature. Three enrichment zones are used for axial power flattening. The equilibrium core is analyzed based on neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled model. The results show that, by applying the separation plates in peripheral fuel assemblies and low gadolinia enrichment, the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is limited to 653 °C with the average outlet temperature of 500 °C. The inherent safety is satisfied by the negative void reactivity effects and sufficient shutdown margin

  4. Conceptual development of a complete LWR reload design methodology based on generalized perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach for the physics design and analysis of LWR reload cores is developed and demonstrated through several practical applications. The new design philosophy uses first- and second-order response derivatives to predict the important reactor performance characteristics (power peaking, reactivity coefficients, etc.) for any number of possible material configurations (assembly shuffling and burnable poison loadings). The response derivatives are computed using generalized perturbation theory (GPT) techniques. This report describes in detail an idealized GPT-based design system. The idealized system would contain individual modules to generate the required first-order and higher-order sensitivity data. It would also contain at least two major application codes; one for core design optimization and the other for evaluation of several safety parameters of interest in off-normal situations. This ideal system would be fully automated, user-friendly, and quite flexible in its ability to provide a variety of design and analysis capabilities. Information gained form these three studies gives a good foundation for the development of a complete integrated design package

  5. A Brief Assessment of North Korea's Capacities for Building an Experimental LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hyu; An, Jin Soo

    2011-01-01

    On November 2010, North Korea revealed the construction site of 100 MWt (thermal) experimental LWR in the early stage with a target operation date of 2012. And they claimed that their first LWR construction project is proceeding with strictly domestic talent and resources. Introduction of LWR imposes various technical challenges, even though North Korea has experiences in the construction and management of graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactor. So, there are doubts about whether they can successfully complete the project in time without any external support. In this paper, to estimate the fate of the LWR construction, we focused on the North Korea's capability to deal with the technical challenges which differ from those of gas-graphite reactor

  6. A Brief Assessment of North Korea's Capacities for Building an Experimental LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hyu; An, Jin Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    On November 2010, North Korea revealed the construction site of 100 MWt (thermal) experimental LWR in the early stage with a target operation date of 2012. And they claimed that their first LWR construction project is proceeding with strictly domestic talent and resources. Introduction of LWR imposes various technical challenges, even though North Korea has experiences in the construction and management of graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactor. So, there are doubts about whether they can successfully complete the project in time without any external support. In this paper, to estimate the fate of the LWR construction, we focused on the North Korea's capability to deal with the technical challenges which differ from those of gas-graphite reactor

  7. LWR pressure vessel irradiation surveillance dosimetry. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, G L; McElroy, W N; Lippincott, E P; Gold, R

    1978-12-01

    Program objectives and progress to date by the national laboratories in LWR pressure vessel irradiation surveillance dosimetry are summarized. Participants in the program include: Rockwell International, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, National Bureau of Standards, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. ICECON: a computer program used to calculate containment back pressure for LOCA analysis (including ice condenser plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The ICECON computer code provides a method for conservatively calculating the long term back pressure transient in the containment resulting from a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) for PWR plants including ice condenser containment systems. The ICECON computer code was developed from the CONTEMPT/LT-022 code. A brief discussion of the salient features of a typical ice condenser containment is presented. Details of the ice condenser models are explained. The corrections and improvements made to CONTEMPT/LT-022 are included. The organization of the code, including the calculational procedure, is outlined. The user's manual, to be used in conjunction with the CONTEMPT/LT-022 user's manual, a sample problem, a time-step study (solution convergence) and a comparison of ICECON results with the results of the NSSS vendor are presented. In general, containment pressure calculated with the ICECON code agree with those calculated by the NSSS vendor using the same mass and energy release rates to the containment

  9. Metholology for the selection of LWR safety R and D projects. Phase I, status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sheikh, K.A.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of the LWR R and D Selection Methodology Program is to develop and demonstrate an R and D selection methodology appropriate for LWR safety technology. This report documents the development work from the program beginning in April, 1979 to the end of Fiscal Year 1979. The scope of work for this period included three tasks; methodology review (Task 1), measures development (Task 2), and methodology development for the first phase of application (Task 3). The accomplishments of these tasks are presented

  10. Implications of plutonium utilization strategies on the transition from a LWR economy to a breeder economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Fleischman, R.M.; White, M.K.

    1977-02-01

    The plutonium interface between the LWR and LMFBR fuel cycles is examined for typical nuclear growth projections both with and without plutonium recycle in LWRs. In order to guarantee a fuel supply for projected LMFBR growth rates, significant multiple Pu recycle in LWRs will not be possible. However, about 78% of the benefit of multiple plutonium recycle between now and the turn of the century is realized by one recycle and then stockpiling spent MOX for the LMFBR. LMFBR reprocessing schecules are estimated based on accumulation of reprocessing load. These schedules are used to estimate the amount of plutonium recovered from LMFBR fuels and determine the residual LWR plutonium required to meet LMFBR demand. The stockpile of LWR produced plutonium in spent MOX is sufficient to fuel the LMFBR until commercial LMFBR reprocessing can be justified. After that time, recycle of plutonium in LWRs will be significantly limited by a continuing LMFBR demand for LWR plutonium due to the projected high LMFBR growth rate. LWR reprocessing requirements are estimated for the assumed condition that LWR plutonium recycle is not approved, but the LMFBR is still pursued as an energy option. The uncertainties presented by this condition are addressed qualitatively. However, in our judgment these uncertainties in the plutonium market would likely delay LMFBR growth to levels significantly below current projections

  11. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 6. Cost determination of the LWR waste management routes (treatment/conditioning/packaging/transport operations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiels, G.M.; Kowa, S.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the cost determination of a number of schemes for the treatment, conditioning, packaging, interim storage and transport operations of LWR wastes drawn up on the basis of Belgian, French and German practices in this particular area. In addition to the general procedure elaborated for determining, actualizing and scaling of plant and transport costs associated with the various schemes, in-depth calculations of each intermediate management stage are included in this report. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  12. Safety aspects of LWR fuel reprocessing and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Herrmann, G.W.; Schueller, W.; Hagenberg, W.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is focused on the safety and the control of the consequences of credible accidents in LWR fuel reprocessing plants and in mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Each of these plants serve for many power reactor (about 50.000 Mwel) thus the contribution to the overall risk of nuclear energy is correspondingly low. Because of basic functional differences between reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants and nuclear power reactors, the structure and safety systems of these plants are different in many respects. The most important differences that influence safety systems are: (1) Both fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants do not have the high system pressure that is associated with power reactors. (2) A considerable amount of the radioactivity of the fuel, which is in the form of short-lived radionuclides has decayed. Therefore, fuel reprocessing plants and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants are designed with multiple confinement barriers for control of radioactive materials, but do not require the high-pressure containment systems that are used in LWR plants. The consequences of accidents which may lead to the dispersion of radioactive materials such as chemical explosions, nuclear excursions, fires and failure of cooling systems are considered. A reasonable high reliability of the multiple confinement approach can be assured by design. In fuel reprocessing plants, forced cooling is necessary only in systems where fission products are accumulated. However, the control of radioactive materials can be maintained during normal operation and during the above mentioned accidents, if the dissolver off-gas and vessel off-gas treatment systems provide for effective removal of radioactive iodine, radioactive particulates, nitrogen oxides, tritium and krypton 85. In addition, the following incidents in the dissolver off-gas system itself must be controlled: failures of iodine filters, hydrogen explosion in O 2 - and NOsub(x)-reduction component, decomposition of

  13. Characterization of LWR fuel rod irradiations with power transients in the BR2 reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.; Bodart, S.; Meer, K. van der; Raedt, C. de

    1996-01-01

    Fuel rod irradiations in reflector positions of the materials testing reactor BR2 are becoming increasingly important. A typical example is that of irradiation devices containing single LWR fuel rods, to be tested in the framework of a new international fuel investigation and development programme. Some of the irradiations will comprise power transients with central fuel melting (at 2800 deg. C), the power increase being obtained by decreasing the pressure in a He-3 neutron absorbing screen and/or by varying the BR2 reactor operating power. A total power variation by a factor of at least 2.5 in the fuel rod irradiated could thus be achieved. In some of the rods, central temperature measurements (up to 2000 deg. C) will be carried out. Both fresh and pre-irradiated fuel rods are concerned in the programme. For these irradiations, the accurate knowledge of the neutron-induced fission heating and of the gamma heating is required, as one of the purposes of the programme consists in establishing the correlation among the thermal conductivity, the burn-up and the irradiation temperature. Calibration work among various measuring methods and between measurements and one- and two-dimensional calculations is being pursued. (author). 10 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Spent fuel handling and storage facility for an LWR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.H.; King, F.D.

    1979-01-01

    The facility will have the capability to handle spent fuel assemblies containing 10 MTHM/day, with 30% if the fuel received in legal weight truck (LWT) casks and the remaining fuel received in rail casks. The storage capacity will be about 30% of the annual throughput of the reprocessing plant. This size will provide space for a working inventory of about 50 days plant throughput and empty storage space to receive any fuel that might be in transit of the reprocessing plant should have an outage. Spent LWR fuel assemblies outside the confines of the shipping cask will be handled and stored underwater. To permit drainage, each water pool will be designed so that it can be isolated from the remaining pools. Pool water quality will be controlled by a filter-deionizer system. Radioactivity in the water will be maintained at less than or equal to 2 x 10 -4 Ci/m 3 ; conductivity will be maintained at 1 to 2 μmho/cm. The temperature of the pool water will be maintained at less than or equal to 40 0 C to retard algae growth and reduce evaporation. Decay heat will be transferred to the environment via a heat exchanger-cooling tower system

  15. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  16. Thermal-hydraulics technological strategy roadmap for LWR safety improvement and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide

    2015-01-01

    New version of the Thermal-Hydraulics Safety Evaluation Fundamental Technology Enhancement Strategy Roadmap (TH-RM) was developed by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) for LWR safety improvement and development. The 1st version of TH-RM was prepared in 2009 under collaboration of utilities, vendors, universities, research institutes and technical support organizations (TSO) for regulatory body. The revision was made by three sub-working groups (SWGs) by considering the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Accident. The 'safety assessment' SWG pursued development of computer codes for safety assessment. The 'fundamental technology' SWG pursued safety improvement and risk reduction via accident management (AM) measures by referring the technical map for severe accident (SA) established by the 'severe accident' SWG. Phenomena and components for counter-measures and/or proper prediction are identified by going through SA progression in both reactor and spent-fuel pool of PWR and BWR. Twelve important technology development subjects were identified, which include melt coolability enhancement to maintain integrity of containment vessel. Fact Sheet was developed to describe each of identified and selected R and D subjects. External hazards are also considered how to cope with from thermal-hydraulic safety point of view. This paper summarizes the revised TH-RM with several examples and future perspectives. (author)

  17. Neutron dosimetry at nuclear power plants with light water reactors (LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.; Schwarz, W.; Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1989-02-01

    During nuclear start-up of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant in 1986 the neutron radiation fields in the primary and auxiliary component rooms of the containment were investigated using the Single Sphere Albedo Technique and additional measurement techniques. For personnel monitoring albedo neutron dosemeters were used consisting of thermoluminescent detectors and track etch detectors combined with boron converters. Results: (1) The neutron radiation fields reach dose rate values up to 1000 mSv/h at the sleeves of the reactor coolant pipes, in the refuelling pool and the reactor cavity sump. The neutron component varies between 10% in the steam generator rooms up to 92% in the refuelling pool. (2) The mean value of the effective neutron energy at the different locations was found to be about 100 keV. Thermal neutrons contribute with about 10% to the area dose. (3) By direct intercomparisons and different evaluation methods of the Single Sphere Albedo Dosemeter it was shown, that rem-counters used within routine monitoring in the mixed radiation fields of the LWR overestimate the neutron dose rate only insignificantly (+20%) and are therefore usable for practical radiation protection work. (4) The sensitivity of albedo neutron dosemeters allows the detection of neutrons above 10 μSv. The contribution of neutrons to the total personnel dose was 25% in maximum. For the evaluation of albedo detectors a constant calibration factor can be applied. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists' meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists' meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  19. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle

  20. Simplified methodology for analysis of Angra-1 containing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves Conti, T. das; Souza, A.L. de; Sabundjian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified methodology of analysis was developed to simulate a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident in the Angra 1 Nuclear Power Station. Using the RELAP5/MOD1, RELAP4/MOD5 and CONTEMPT-LT Codes, the time the variation of pressure and temperature in the containment was analysed. The obtained data was compared with the Angra 1 Final Safety Analysis Report, and too those calculated by a Detailed Model. The results obtained by this new methodology such as the small computational time of simulation, were satisfactory when getting the preliminar avaliation of the Angra 1 global parameters. (author) [pt

  1. Behavior of LWR fuel elements under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Bocek, M.; Erbacher, F.; Fiege, A.; Fischer, M.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Holleck, H.; Karb, E.; Leistikow, S.; Melang, S.; Ondracek, G.; Thuemmler, F.; Wiehr, K.

    1977-01-01

    In the frame of the German reactor safety research program, the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe is carrying out a comprehensive program on the behavior of LWR fuel elements under a variety of power cooling mismatch conditions in particular during loss-of-coolant accidents. The major objectives are to establish a detailed quantitative understanding of fuel rod failures mechanisms and their thresholds, to evaluate the safety margins of power reactor cores under accident conditions and to investigate the feedback of fuel rod failures on the efficiency of emergency core cooling systems. This detailed quantitative understanding is achieved through extensive basic and integral experiments and is incorporated in a fuel behavior code. On the basis of these results the design of power reactor fuel elements and of safety devices can be further improved. The results of investigations on the inelastic deformation (ballooning) behavior of Zircaloy 4 cladding at LOCA temperatures in oxidizing atmosphere are presented. Depending upon strain rate and temperature superplastic deformation behavior was observed. In the equation of state of Zry 4 the strain rate sensitivity index depends strongly upon strain and in the superplastic region upon sample anisotropy. Oxidation kinetics experiments with Zry-tubes at 900-1300 0 C showed that the Baker-Just correlation describes the reality quite conservative. Therefore a reduction of the amount of Zry oxidation can be assumed in the course of a LOCA. The external oxidation of Zry-cladding by steam as well as internal oxidation by the oxygen in oxide fuel and fission products (Cs, I, Te) have an influence on the strain and rupture behavior of Zry-cladding at LOCA temperatures. In out-of-pile and inpile experiments the mechanical and thermal behavior of fuel rods during the blowdown, the heatup and the reflood phases of a LOCA are investigated under representative and controlled thermohydraulic conditions. The task of the inpile experiments is

  2. Analysis on Containment Response Following a LBLOCA of APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyu Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The predictions are in good agreements with the final safety analysis report, which implies the containment integrity is maintained during or after an accident like loss of coolant accident. In this study, the CONTEMPT-LT/028 was used to calculate the pressure and temperature, and in the follow-up study, CONTAIN 2.0 will be used for the pressure and temperature predictions in APR1400 reactors. Shin-Hanul Units 1 and 2 may possess different characteristics of peak pressure and temperature in containment following a large break loss-of-coolant-accident. To assess the important performance independently and to compare with prediction results presented in the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of Shin-Hanul Units 1 and 2 might be helpful to regulatory review for identifying validity of the FSAR. The end of blowdown (EOB) time during a LOCA could largely affect the peak pressure and temperature in the containment. This paper provides CONTEMPT-LT/028 prediction of the peak pressure and temperature of Shin-Hanul Units 1 and 2 following a large break loss-of-coolant-accident and compares with licensee's prediction results.

  3. Analysis on Containment Response Following a LBLOCA of APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyu Hyun [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The predictions are in good agreements with the final safety analysis report, which implies the containment integrity is maintained during or after an accident like loss of coolant accident. In this study, the CONTEMPT-LT/028 was used to calculate the pressure and temperature, and in the follow-up study, CONTAIN 2.0 will be used for the pressure and temperature predictions in APR1400 reactors. Shin-Hanul Units 1 and 2 may possess different characteristics of peak pressure and temperature in containment following a large break loss-of-coolant-accident. To assess the important performance independently and to compare with prediction results presented in the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of Shin-Hanul Units 1 and 2 might be helpful to regulatory review for identifying validity of the FSAR. The end of blowdown (EOB) time during a LOCA could largely affect the peak pressure and temperature in the containment. This paper provides CONTEMPT-LT/028 prediction of the peak pressure and temperature of Shin-Hanul Units 1 and 2 following a large break loss-of-coolant-accident and compares with licensee's prediction results.

  4. Main outcomes from the EURATOM-ROSATOM ERCOSAM SAMARA parallel projects for hydrogen safety of LWR - 15357

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, D.; Kiselev, A.

    2015-01-01

    ERCOSAM and SAMARA are the acronyms for 2 parallel projects co-financed respectively by EURATOM and ROSATOM during the 2010-2014 period with the general aim to advance the knowledge on the phenomenology associated to the hydrogen and steam spreading and stratification in the LWR containment during a severe accident. The important peculiarity of the project was its experimental and analytical investigation of the impact of safety systems such as spray, coolers and PAR (Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners) on the distribution of gas species (hydrogen, steam and air). The main outcomes of the ERCOSAM-SAMARA projects are presented in this paper. The research needs, which could be considered in follow-up activities, are also identified. (authors)

  5. ZZ SAIL, Albedo Scattering Data Library for 3-D Monte-Carlo Radiation Transport in LWR Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Format: SAIL format; Number of groups: 23 neutron / 17 gamma-ray; Nuclides: Type 04 Concrete and Low Carbon Steel (A533B). Origin: Science Applications, Inc (SAI); Weighting spectrum: yes. SAIL is a library of albedo scattering data to be used in three-dimensional Monte Carlo codes to solve radiation transport problems specific to the reactor pressure vessel cavity region of a LWR. The library contains data for Type 04 Concrete and Low Carbon Steel (A533B). 2 - Method of solution: The calculation of the albedo data was perform- ed with a version of the discrete ordinates transport code DOT which treats the transport of neutrons, secondary gamma-rays and gamma- rays in one dimension, while maintaining the complete two-dimension- al treatment of the angular dependence

  6. TRU transmutation using ThO2-UO2 and fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuels in LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gonghoon; Hong, Sergi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design new LWR fuel assemblies which are able to efficiently destroy TRU (transuranics) nuclide without degradation of safety aspects by using ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel pins and FCM (Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated) fuel pins containing TRU fuel particles. Thorium was mixed to UO 2 in order to reduce the generation of plutonium nuclides and to save the uranium resources in the UO 2 pins. Additionally, the use of thorium contributes to the extension of the fuel cycle length. All calculations were performed by using DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) code. The results show that the new concept of fuel assembly has the TRU destruction rates of ∼40% and ∼25% per 1200 EFPD (Effective Full Power Day) over the TRU FCM pins and the overall fuel assembly, respectively, without degradation of FTC and MTC

  7. Adapting LWR to future needs: SECURE-P (PIUS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced nuclear technology based on breeder reactors and fuel reprocessing may eventually be applied on a large scale, although the timing for this appears uncertain. However, in many parts of the world societal conditions and technological infrastructure mandate the use of a less complicated technology if the benefits of clean, safe nuclear power are to be available. Such a technology must be based on thermal reactors. Lack of fuel resources for their operation through most of the next century is unlikely to be a serious limitation. A natural contender would be the light water reactor, but today's designs lack many of the desired characteristics. However, introduction of certain new design features can eliminate the shortcomings and make the LWR the prime longterm candidate for a simple, technologically unsophisticated generation of nuclear power. Availability of such an option will also be a major asset for utilities in the large industrial countries before the advent of the era of advanced 'second generation' nuclear power. The costs of demonstrating the new design features are miniscule in relation to the benefits that should accrue. (author)

  8. Democratic People's Republic of Korea LWR project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligan, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1994, at Geneva, the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) signed an Agreed Framework as a first step toward resolving international concerns about nuclear activities in the DPRK. This Agreement, when implemented, will ultimately lead to the complete dismantlement of those aspects of the DPRK's nuclear program, including reprocessing-related facilities, that have undermined the viability of the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and the stability of the Asia-Pacific region. The essence of the Agreement is that the DPRK will take near-term action to cease the activities of concern and permit some International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) verification inspection. In the future, it will dismantle its production reactors and accept full-scope IAWA safeguards. In return, the United Stated agreed to lead an international effort to supply the DPRK with light-water reactors which are less of proliferation concern than are graphite-moderated production reactors. Until the first LWR is in operation the DPRK will receive shipments of heavy oil to replace the energy lost by shutting down the production reactors

  9. Evaluation of inorganic sorbent treatment for LWR coolant process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddy, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents results of a survey of the literature and of experience at selected nuclear installations to provide information on the feasibility of replacing organic ion exchangers with inorganic sorbents at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants. Radioactive contents of the various streams in boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors were examined. In addition, the methods and performances of current methods used for controlling water quality at these plants were evaluated. The study also includes a brief review of the physical and chemical properties of selected inorganic sorbents. Some attributes of inorganic sorbents would be useful in processing light water reactor (LWR) streams. The inorganic resins are highly resistant to damage from ionizing radiation, and their exchange capacities are generally equivalent to those of organic ion exchangers. However, they are more limited in application, and there are problems with physical integrity, especially in acidic solutions. Research is also needed in the areas of selectivity and anion removal before inorganic sorbents can be considered as replacements for the synthetic organic resins presently used in LWRs. 11 figures, 14 tables

  10. LWR reactivity/isotopics code for pedagogical and scoping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuZaied, G.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A program designated BRICC (Burnup Reactivity and Isotopic Composition Computation), has been programmed for use on microcomputers to permit rapid parametric studies of the neutronics of light water reactor (LWR) assemblies. It is currently employed as a teaching tool in a graduate-level subject on nuclear fuel management, and has proven to be of sufficient accuracy to permit its use as a submodule in a more comprehensive program used to evaluate various mechanical spectral shift concepts for pressurized water reactor control. It should also prove useful in teaching reactor physics as it will fill an important gap between hand calculations of inadequate accuracy and state-of-the-art multigroup programs of daunting complexity. The BRICC program combines a minimum adequate set of old-fashioned phenomenological submodels that describe key physics attributed in an integral fashion, thereby providing the student or researcher with convenient mental pictures to serve as the basis for deductive reasoning. The program is short, written in a simplistic version of the Basic language, with many interspersed Remark statements, and is therefore easy to tinker with for various constructive purposes

  11. CCGT + LWR = the power plant of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, G.

    1997-01-01

    The thermal efficiency of LWR type reactors can be increased making use of the Tsikl-Durst cycle, where the gas turbine is combined with the nuclear reactor using a steam mixer. The principle of this combined cycle is outlined. It is envisaged that the overall thermal efficiency of the power plant can be increased to 41 - 44%. The total output would be two to three times higher. With advanced light-water reactors (ABWR, AP-600) and advanced gas turbines in combination with the one-way steam generator as developed by Solar Turbines Inc., producing steam at 650 degC to 750 degC, it is feasible to attain a total thermal efficiency of 55%. The combination of two kinds of fuel (nuclear fuel and natural gas) improves operating flexibility of the cycle in various regimes so as to respond to natural gas prices and electricity demands. The gas turbine adds to the nuclear power plant an independent source of power, so that standby dieselgenerators are no more necessary. (P.A.). 1 tab., 2 figs

  12. Feasibility study on the development of advanced LWR fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Sohn, D. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Song, K. W.; Song, K. N.; Chun, T. H.; Bang, J. G.; Bae, K. K.; Kim, D. H. and others.

    1997-07-01

    Worldwide R and D trends related to core technology of LWR fuels and status of patents have been surveyed for the feasibility study. In addition, various fuel cycle schemes have been studied to establish the target performance parameters. For the development of cladding material, establishment of long-term research plan for alloy development and optimization of melting process and manufacturing technology were conducted. A work which could characterize the effect of sintering additives on the microstructure of UO 2 pellet has been experimentally undertaken, and major sintering variables and their ranges have been found in the sintering process of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber pellet. The analysis of state of the art technology related to flow mixing device for spacer grid and debris filtering device for bottom nozzle and the investigation of the physical phenomena related to CHF enhancement and the establishment of the data base for thermal-hydraulic performance tests has been done in this study. In addition, survey on the documents of the up-to-date PWR fuel assemblies developed by foreign vendors have been carried out to understand their R and D trends and establish the direction of R and D for these structural components. And, to set the performance target of the new fuel, to be developed, fuel burnup and economy under the extended fuel cycle length scheme were estimated. A preliminary study on the failure mechanism of CANDU fuel, key technology and advanced coating has been performed. (author). 190 refs., 31 tabs., 129 figs

  13. Qualification of the neutronic evolution of LWR fuels in MELUSINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretz, D.; Garcin, J.; Ducros, G.; Vanhumbeeck, D.; Chaucheprat, P.

    1984-09-01

    MELUSINE, a swimming pool type reactor, in Grenoble, for research and technological irradiations is well fitted to the neutronic evolution qualification of the LWR fuel. Thus, with an adjustment of the lattice pitch, representative neutron spectrum locations are available. The re-leading management and the regulation mode flexibility of MELUSINE lead to reproductible neutronic parameters configurations without restricting the reactor to this purpose only. Under these conditions, simple calculations can be carried out for interpretation, without taking into account the whole core. An instrumentation by Self Power Neutron Detectors (collectrons) gives on-line information on the fluxes at the periphery of the device. When required by the neutronicians, experimental pins can be unloaded during the irradiation process and scanned on a gammametry bench immersed in the reactor-pool itself, before their isotopic composition analysis. Thus, within the framework of neutronic evolution qualification, are studied fuel pins for advanced assemblies for the light water reactors or their derivatives, with large advantages over irradiations in power reactors [fr

  14. Convergence studies of deterministic methods for LWR explicit reflector methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canepa, S.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Pautz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The standard approach in modem 3-D core simulators, employed either for steady-state or transient simulations, is to use Albedo coefficients or explicit reflectors at the core axial and radial boundaries. In the latter approach, few-group homogenized nuclear data are a priori produced with lattice transport codes using 2-D reflector models. Recently, the explicit reflector methodology of the deterministic CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system was identified to potentially constitute one of the main sources of errors for core analyses of the Swiss operating LWRs, which are all belonging to GII design. Considering that some of the new GIII designs will rely on very different reflector concepts, a review and assessment of the reflector methodology for various LWR designs appeared as relevant. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to first recall the concepts of the explicit reflector modelling approach as employed by CASMO/SIMULATE. Then, for selected reflector configurations representative of both GII and GUI designs, a benchmarking of the few-group nuclear data produced with the deterministic lattice code CASMO-4 and its successor CASMO-5, is conducted. On this basis, a convergence study with regards to geometrical requirements when using deterministic methods with 2-D homogenous models is conducted and the effect on the downstream 3-D core analysis accuracy is evaluated for a typical GII deflector design in order to assess the results against available plant measurements. (authors)

  15. Research on ultrasonic flow detection techniques for LWR facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Katsumi; Fukuhara, Hiroaki; Hoshimoto, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Shojiro; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Ito, Hideyuki; Uetake, Ichizo

    1986-01-01

    Aiming at establishing the techniques for inspecting the inside of LWR pressure vessels by ultrasonic flaw detection from the outside of the vessels, the development of a probe suitable to the flaw detection in the thick steel plates with stainless steel overlay and the method of its driving, the examination of the ultrasonic characteristics of austenitic stainless steel welded metal used for overlay, and the improvement of the detectability of defects and the accuracy of measuring dimensions by the application of signal processing techniques to ultrasonic flaw detection were attempted. In order to cope with the impedance lowering accompanying the increase of oscillator size, the oscillator was divided into the rings with equal area, and the driving and signal receiving were carried out individually, in this way, the good results were obtained by summing the signals. It was theoretically proved that it is rational to use longitudinal waves for the flaw detection in overlay. It was found that by displaying the results of flaw detection as pictures using a microcomputer, the capability of defect detection was increased. Also by the signal processing combining Fourier transformation and filtering, noise removal and the heightening of the accuracy of measuring dimensions were able to be attained. (Kako, I.)

  16. Modelling of a LWR open fuel cycle using the message

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estanislau, Fidéllis B.G.L. e; Jonusan, Raoni A.S.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: fidellis01@hotmail.com, E-mail: rjonusan@gmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The main goal of the national energy planning is the development of a short and long-term strategies based on a holistic evaluation of all available energy sources guiding trends and delimiting expansion alternatives in the energetic sector. For a better understanding of the future possibilities, energy systems analyses are indispensable and support in the decision making related to the long term strategy and energy planning. Due to the projections for increased energy consumption according to the Energy Decennial Plan (year 2015) and the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions presented by Brazil in the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change), alternative energy sources such as solar, wind, nuclear and biomass sources have played an important role in the world energy matrix. In this way, since the nuclear energy is an option for the national energy mix, the present work aims to use the modelling tool MESSAGE (Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and Their General Environmental Impact) to analyze and evaluate a nuclear power plant in an energy system. This tool is an optimization model for medium and long-term energy planning taking into account conversion and distribution technologies, energy policies and scenarios to satisfy a determined demand and systems constraints. In this work, a reproduction of results considering an LWR (Light Water Reactor) open-cycle are presented using a model in the MESSAGE code. (author)

  17. MCNP analysis of the nine-cell LWR gadolinium benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkuszewski, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Monte Carlo results for a 9-cell fragment of the light water reactor square lattice with a central gadolinium-loaded pin are presented. The calculations are performed with the code MCNP-3A and the ENDF-B/5 library and compared with the results obtained from the BOXER code system and the JEF-1 library. The objective of this exercise is to study the feasibility of BOXER for the analysis of a Gd-loaded LWR lattice in the broader framework of GAP International Benchmark Analysis. A comparison of results indicates that, apart from unavoidable discrepancies originating from different data evaluations, the BOXER code overestimates the multiplication factor by 1.4 % and underestimates the power release in a Gd cell by 4.66 %. It is hoped that further similar studies with use of the JEF-1 library for both BOXER and MCNP will help to isolate and explain these discrepancies in a cleaner way. (author) 4 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs

  18. The scale analysis sequence for LWR fuel depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system is used extensively to perform away-from-reactor safety analysis (particularly criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer analyses) for spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Spent fuel characteristics such as radiation sources, heat generation sources, and isotopic concentrations can be computed within SCALE using the SAS2 control module. A significantly enhanced version of the SAS2 control module, which is denoted as SAS2H, has been made available with the release of SCALE-4. For each time-dependent fuel composition, SAS2H performs one-dimensional (1-D) neutron transport analyses (via XSDRNPM-S) of the reactor fuel assembly using a two-part procedure with two separate unit-cell-lattice models. The cross sections derived from a transport analysis at each time step are used in a point-depletion computation (via ORIGEN-S) that produces the burnup-dependent fuel composition to be used in the next spectral calculation. A final ORIGEN-S case is used to perform the complete depletion/decay analysis using the burnup-dependent cross sections. The techniques used by SAS2H and two recent applications of the code are reviewed in this paper. 17 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Validation of KENOREST with LWR-PROTEUS phase II samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M.; Kilger, R.; Pautz, A.; Zwermann, W. [GRS, Garching (Germany); Grimm, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    In order to broaden the validation basis of the reactivity and nuclide inventory code KENOREST two samples of the LWR-PROTEUS phase II program have been calculated and compared to the experimental results. In general most nuclides are reproduced very well and agree within about ten percent with the experiment. Some already known problems, the overprediction of metallic fission products and the underprediction of the higher curium isotopes, have been confirmed. One of the largest uncertainties in the calculation was the burnup of the samples due to differences between a core simulation of the fuel vendor and the burnup determined from the measured values of the burnup indicator Nd-148. Two different models taking into account the environment for a peripheral fuel rod have been studied. The more detailed model included the three direct neighbor fuel assemblies depleted along with the fuel rod of interest. The influence on the results has been found to be very small. Compared to the uncertainties from the burnup, this effect can be considered negligible. The reason for the low influence was basically that the spectrum did not get considerably harder with increasing burnup beyond about 20GWd/tHM. Since the sample reached burnups far beyond that value, an effect could not be seen. In the near future an update of the used libraries is planned and it will be very interesting to study the effect on the results, especially for Curium. (orig.)

  20. Preliminary concepts for detecting diversion of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, T.A.

    Sandia Laboratories, under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Safeguards and Security, has been developing conceptual designs of advanced systems to rapidly detect diversion of LWR spent fuel. Three detection options have been identified and compared on the basis of timeliness of detection and cost. Option 1 is based upon inspectors visiting each facility on a periodic basis to obtain and review data acquired by surveillance instruments and to verify the inventory. Option 2 is based upon continuous inspector presence, aided by surveillance instruments. Option 3 is based upon the collection of data from surveillance instruments with periodic readout either at the facility or at a remote central monitoring and display module and occasional inspection. Surveillance instruments are included in each option to assure a sufficiently high probability of detection. An analysis technique with an example logic tree that was used to identify performance requirements is described. A conceptual design has been developed for Option 3 and the essential hardware elements are not being developed. These elements include radiation, crane and pool acoustic sensors, a Data Collection Module, a Local Collection Module, a Local Display Module and a Central Monitoring and Display Module. A demonstration, in operating facilities, of the overall system concept is planned for the March to June 1979 time frame

  1. Discussion of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Royer, E.; Gillford, J.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for best estimate calculations in nuclear reactor design and safety evaluations has increased in recent years. Uncertainty quantification has been highlighted as part of the best estimate calculations. The modelling aspects of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are to be further developed and validated on scientific grounds in support of their performance and application to multi-physics reactor simulations. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has endorsed the creation of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (EGUAM). Within the framework of activities of EGUAM/NSC the OECD/NEA initiated the Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling for Design, Operation, and Safety Analysis of Light Water Reactor (OECD LWR UAM benchmark). The general objective of the benchmark is to propagate the predictive uncertainties of code results through complex coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. The benchmark is divided into three phases with Phase I highlighting the uncertainty propagation in stand-alone neutronics calculations, while Phase II and III are focused on uncertainty analysis of reactor core and system respectively. This paper discusses the progress made in Phase I calculations, the Specifications for Phase II and the incoming challenges in defining Phase 3 exercises. The challenges of applying uncertainty quantification to complex code systems, in particular the time-dependent coupled physics models are the large computational burden and the utilization of non-linear models (expected due to the physics coupling). (authors)

  2. Halon 1301 protection system for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHale, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Halon 1301 can provide protection against any combustion hazard that hydrogen gas might present in an LWR containment following a loss-of-coolant accident. A development program was conducted, comprising analytical study, laboratory experiments and large-scale testing, to define the requirements for a Halon 1301 system and to examine certain operational problems that were hypothesized. Some results of the study are presented in this paper

  3. Public comments and Task Force responses regarding the environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-01

    This document contains responses by the NRC Task Force to comments received on the report ''Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116). These responses are directed at all comments, inclding those received after the close of the comment period. Additional information on the environmental impacts of reprocessing and waste management which has either become available since the publication of NUREG-0116 or which adds requested clarification to the information in that document.

  4. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  5. The Fuel Performance Analysis of LWR Fuel containing High Thermal Conductivity Reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Su; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of fuel affects many performance parameters including the fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release and internal pressure. In addition, enhanced safety margin of fuel might be expected when the thermal conductivity of fuel is improved by the addition of high thermal conductivity reinforcements. Therefore, the effects of thermal conductivity enhancement on the fuel performance of reinforced UO2 fuel with high thermal conductivity compounds should be analyzed. In this study, we analyzed the fuel performance of modified UO2 fuel with high thermal conductivity reinforcements by using the FRAPCON-3.5 code. The fissile density and mechanical properties of the modified fuel are considered the same with the standard UO2 fuel. The fuel performance of modified UO2 with high thermal conductivity reinforcements were analyzed by using the FRAPCON-3.5 code. The thermal conductivity enhancement factors of the modified fuels were obtained from the Maxwell model considering the volume fraction of reinforcements

  6. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench (removal of stored energy from initial temperature to saturation temperature) of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  7. Computation programs for the thermofluidodynamic transient analysis in the containment system following a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlandi, A.; Mazzini, M.; Oriolo, F.

    1979-01-01

    This works briefly describes the features of the computation codes available at the Istituto di Impianti Nucleari of the Pisa University for the analysis of the thermofluidodynamic transient in the containment system of a nuclear power plant following a LOCA (RELAP 4/MOD.S, COMPARE, FUMO and CONTEMPT-LT/026). More details are contained in the Annex. Particular attention has been devoted to the opportunity to study, through the computation codes, the effects of the sub division of a full pressure containment system

  8. Uncertainties in radioactivity release from LWR plants under LOCA conditions - magnitude and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.J.

    1977-01-01

    Standardized, deterministic, and supposedly conservative calculation methods and parameter values are applied in radiological safety analyses required for licensing individual nuclear power plants. As realistic as possible and comprehensive analyses are, however, absolutely necessary for many purposes, such as developing improved designs, comparisons between nuclear and non-nuclear power plant alternatives or entire energy production strategies, and also formulating improved acceptance criteria for plant licensing. A specific type of LOCA, called design basis accident (DBA), has obtained an exceptionally important status in the licensing procedure of light water reactor nuclear power plants. This postulated accident has a decisive influence on plant siting and on the design of the various engineered safety features. To avoid certain potential negative effects of the highly standardized guideline-based accident analysis procedure - such as introduction of apparent design ''improvements'', wrong priorization of research efforts, etc. - and to provide a realistic view about the safety of light water reactors to supplement the conservative results from regulatory analyses, a comprehensive understanding of the radiological consequences of LOCA's is indispensable. Estimates of fission product release from LWR plants under different LOCA conditions are associated with uncertainties due to deficient knowledge and truly random variability. The following steps of the fission product transport chain are discussed: generation of activity, fission product release from fuel to fuel pin voids prior to the accident, fuel rod puncturing and fission product release from punctured rods during the accident, further release from fuel during the transient, transport to the containment and finally removal in and leakage from the containment. Numerical examples are given by comparing assumptions, parameter values, and results from the following four analyses: the present guideline

  9. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and

  10. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods

  11. Feasibility study on the development of advanced LWR fuel technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Sohn, D. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Song, K. W.; Song, K. N.; Chun, T. H.; Bang, J. G.; Bae, K. K.; Kim, D. H. and others

    1997-07-01

    Worldwide R and D trends related to core technology of LWR fuels and status of patents have been surveyed for the feasibility study. In addition, various fuel cycle schemes have been studied to establish the target performance parameters. For the development of cladding material, establishment of long-term research plan for alloy development and optimization of melting process and manufacturing technology were conducted. A work which could characterize the effect of sintering additives on the microstructure of UO{sub 2} pellet has been experimentally undertaken, and major sintering variables and their ranges have been found in the sintering process of UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable absorber pellet. The analysis of state of the art technology related to flow mixing device for spacer grid and debris filtering device for bottom nozzle and the investigation of the physical phenomena related to CHF enhancement and the establishment of the data base for thermal-hydraulic performance tests has been done in this study. In addition, survey on the documents of the up-to-date PWR fuel assemblies developed by foreign vendors have been carried out to understand their R and D trends and establish the direction of R and D for these structural components. And, to set the performance target of the new fuel, to be developed, fuel burnup and economy under the extended fuel cycle length scheme were estimated. A preliminary study on the failure mechanism of CANDU fuel, key technology and advanced coating has been performed. (author). 190 refs., 31 tabs., 129 figs.

  12. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    From the outset of nuclear power development in Japan, major emphasis has been placed on the safety of the nuclear power plants. There are now twelve nuclear power plants in operation with a total output of 6600 MWe. Their operating records were generally satisfactory, but in the 1974 to 1975 period, they experienced somewhat declined availability due to the repair work under the specific circumstances. After investigation of causes of troubles and the countermeasures thereof were made to ensure safety, they are now keeping good performance. In Japan, nuclear power plants are strictly subject to sufficient and careful inspection in compliance with the safety regulation, and are placed under stringent radiation control of employees. Under the various circumstances, however, the period of annual inspection tends to be prolonged more than originally planned, and this consequently is considered to be one of the causes of reduced availability. In order to develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on the assurance of safety and to endeavor to devise measures to improve availability of the plants, based on the careful analysis of causes which reduce plant availability. This paper discusses the results of studies made for the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and Operating Experience of LWR Nuclear Power Plants in Japan; a) Operating experience with light water reactors b) Improvements in design of light water reactors during the past ten years c) Analysis of the factors which affect plant availability; 2) Assurance of Safety and Measures to Increase Availability a) Measures for safety and environmental protection b) Measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees c) Appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work d) Measures to increase plant availability e) Measures to improve reliability of equipments and components; and 3) Future Technical Problems

  13. A review on future trends of LWR fuel cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, S.; Otomo, T.; Meguro, T.

    1977-01-01

    In the cost estimations in the past, the main components of fuel cycle were mining and milling, uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication, and reprocessing charge deemed to be recovered by plutonium credit. Since the oil crisis, every component of fuel cycle cost has gone up in recent years as well as the construction cost of a power station. Recent analysis shows that the costs in the back end of fuel cycle are much higher than those anticipated several years ago, although their contribution to the electricity generating cost by nuclear would be small. The situation of the back end of the fuel cycle has been quite changed in recent years, and there are still many uncertainties in this field, that is, regulatory requirements for reprocessing plant such as safety, safeguards, environmental protection and high level waste management. So, it makes it more difficult to estimate the investment in this sector of fuel cycle, therefore, to estimate the cost of this sector. The institutional problems must be cleared in relation to the ultimate disposal of high level waste, too. Co-location of some parts of fuel cycle facilities may also affect on the fuel cycle costs. In this paper a review is made of the future trend of nuclear fuel cycle cost of LWR based on the recent analysis. Those factors which affect the fuel cycle costs are also discussed. In order to reduce the uncertainties of the cost estimations as soon as possible, the necessity is emphasized to discuss internationally such items as the treatment and disposal of high level radioactive wastes, siting issues of a reprocessing plant, physical protection of plutonium and the effects of plutonium on the environment

  14. Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Suzaki, Takenori

    2000-10-01

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled 'Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels'. Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burn-up and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report. (author)

  15. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  16. Effects of Listening While Reading (LWR on Swahili Reading Fluency and Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipo Lubua

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have examined the contribution of technology in teaching such languages as English, French, and Spanish, among many others. Contrarily, most LCTL’s, have received very little attention. This study investigates if listening while reading (LWR may expedite Swahili reading fluency and comprehension. The study employed the iBook Author tool to create weekly mediated and interactive reading texts, with comprehension exercises, which were eventually used to collect descriptive and qualitative data from four Elementary Swahili students. Participants participated in a seven week reading program, which provided them with some kind of directed self-learning, and met with the instructor for at least 30 minutes every week for observation and more reading activities. The teacher recorded their reading scores, and a number of themes on how LWR influenced reading fluency and comprehension are discussed here. It shows that participants have a positive attitude towards LWR and they suggest it for all the reading classes.

  17. Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Suzaki, Takenori [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-10-01

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled 'Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels'. Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burn-up and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report. (author)

  18. EUV lithography for 22nm half pitch and beyond: exploring resolution, LWR, and sensitivity tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putna, E. Steve; Younkin, Todd R.; Leeson, Michael; Caudillo, Roman; Bacuita, Terence; Shah, Uday; Chandhok, Manish

    2011-04-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) denotes Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography as a leading technology option for realizing the 22nm half pitch node and beyond. According to recent assessments made at the 2010 EUVL Symposium, the readiness of EUV materials remains one of the top risk items for EUV adoption. The main development issue regarding EUV resists has been how to simultaneously achieve high resolution, high sensitivity, and low line width roughness (LWR). This paper describes our strategy, the current status of EUV materials, and the integrated post-development LWR reduction efforts made at Intel Corporation. Data collected utilizing Intel's Micro- Exposure Tool (MET) is presented in order to examine the feasibility of establishing a resist process that simultaneously exhibits <=22nm half-pitch (HP) L/S resolution at <=11.3mJ/cm2 with <=3nm LWR.

  19. Evaluation of nuclear fuel reprocessing strategies. 2. LWR fuel storage, recycle economics and plutonium logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, B.E.; Hadley, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report intended as a critical review of certain issues involved with closing the Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cycle and establishing the basis for future transition to commercial breeder applications. The report is divided into four main sections consisting of (1) a review of the status of the LWR spent fuel management and storage problem; (2) an analysis of the economic incentives for instituting reprocessing and recycle in LWRs; (3) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium economic value particularly as related to the LWR-breeder transition; and (4) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium requirements and supply relative to this transition

  20. Feasibility assessment of the once-through thorium fuel cycle for the PTVM LWR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The PTVM LWR is an innovation reactor concept operating in a “breed & burn” mode. • An advanced once-through thorium fuel cycle for the PTVM LWR concept is proposed. • The PTVM LWR concept makes use of a seed-blanket geometry. • A novel fuel management scheme based on two separate fuel flow routes is analyzed. • The analysis indicates a potential for utilizing the fuel in an efficient manner. - Abstract: This paper investigates the feasibility of a once-through thorium fuel cycle for the novel reactor-design concept named the pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control (PTVM LWR). The PTVM LWR operates in a “breed & burn” mode, which makes it an attractive system for utilizing thorium fuel in a once-through mode. The “breed & burn” mode can emphasize the in situ generation as well as incineration of 233 U, which are the basic foundations of the once-through thorium fuel cycle. The PTVM LWR concept makes use of a seed–blanket geometry, whereby the core is divided into separated regions of thorium-based fuel channel assemblies (blanket) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel channel assemblies (seed). A novel fuel in-core management scheme based on two separate fuel flow routes (i.e., seed route and blanket route) is proposed and analyzed. Neutronic performance analysis indicates that the proposed novel fuel in-core management scheme has the potential to utilize both LEU- and thorium-based fuel in an efficient manner. The once-through thorium cycle, presented and discussed in this paper, provide interesting research leads and can serve as a bridge between current LEU-based fuel cycles and a thorium fuel cycle based on recycling of 233 U

  1. Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan.

  2. ORIGEN2 libraries based on JENDL-3.2 for LWR-MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Onoue, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Hideki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sasahara, Akihiro [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    A set of ORIGEN2 libraries for LWR MOX fuels was developed based on JENDL-3.2. The libraries were compiled with SWAT using the specification of MOX fuels that will be used in nuclear power reactors in Japan. The verification of the libraries were performed by the analyses of post irradiation examinations for the fuels from European PWR. By the analysis of PIE data from PWR in United States, the comparison was made between calculation and experimental results in the case of that parameters for making the libraries are different from irradiation conditions. These new libraries for LWR MOX fuels are packaged in ORLIBJ32, the libraries released in 1999. (author)

  3. Review of literature on the TMI accident and correlation to the LWR Safety Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report is the result of approximately two man-months of effort devoted to assimilating and comprehending significant publicly available material related to Three Mile Island Unit 2 and events during and subsequent to the accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Those events were then correlated with the Preliminary LWR Safety Technology Program Plan (Preliminary Program Plan) prepared for the US Department of Energy by Sandia National Lab. This report is being submitted simultaneously with the SAI report entitled Preliminary Prioritization of Tasks in the Draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan

  4. Comparison of scale/triton and helios burnup calculations for high burnup LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittelbach, S.; Mispagel, T.; Phlippen, P.W. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The presented analyses provide information about the suitability of the lattice burnup code HELIOS and the recently developed code SCALE/TRITON for the prediction of isotopic compositions of high burnup LWR fuel. The accurate prediction of the isotopic inventory of high burnt spent fuel is a prerequisite for safety analyses in and outside of the reactor core, safe loading of spent fuel into storage casks, design of next generation spent fuel casks and for any consideration of burnup credit. Depletion analyses are performed with both burnup codes for PWR and BWR fuel samples which were irradiated far beyond 50 GWd/t within the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II project. (orig.)

  5. Degradation of austenitic stainless steel (SS) light water ractor (LWR) core internals due to neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Appajosula S., E-mail: Appajosula.Rao@nrc.gov

    2014-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are extensively being used in the fabrication of light water reactor (LWR) core internal components. It is because these steels have relatively high ductility, fracture toughness and moderate strength. However, the LWR internal components exposure to neutron irradiation over an extended period of plant operation degrades the materials mechanical properties such as the fracture toughness. This paper summarizes some of the results of the existing open literature data on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of 316 CW steels that have been published by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), industry, academia, and other research agencies.

  6. Generalized perturbation theory for LWR depletion analysis and core design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Frank, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive time-dependent perturbation theory formulation that includes macroscopic depletion, thermal-hydraulic and poison feedback effects, and a criticality reset mechanism is developed. The methodology is compatible with most current LWR design codes. This new development allows GTP/DTP methods to be used quantitatively in a variety of realistic LWR physics applications that were not possible prior to this work. A GTP-based optimization technique for incore fuel management analyses is addressed as a promising application of the new formulation

  7. CONTAIN LMR/1B-Mod.1, A computer code for containment analysis of accidents in liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, K.K.; Carroll, D.E.; Bergeron, K.D.; Valdez, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    The CONTAIN computer code is a best-estimate, integrated analysis tool for predicting the physical, chemical, and radiological conditions inside a nuclear reactor containment building following the release of core material from the primary system. CONTAIN is supported primarily by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), and the official code versions produced with this support are intended primarily for the analysis of light water reactors (LWR). The present manual describes CONTAIN LMR/1B-Mod. 1, a code version designed for the analysis of reactors with liquid metal coolant. It is a variant of the official CONTAIN 1.11 LWR code version. Some of the features of CONTAIN-LMR for treating the behavior of liquid metal coolant are in fact present in the LWR code versions but are discussed here rather than in the User's Manual for the LWR versions. These features include models for sodium pool and spray fires. In addition to these models, new or substantially improved models have been installed in CONTAIN-LMR. The latter include models for treating two condensables (sodium and water) simultaneously, sodium atmosphere and pool chemistry, sodium condensation on aerosols, heat transfer from core-debris beds and to sodium pools, and sodium-concrete interactions. A detailed description of each of the above models is given, along with the code input requirements

  8. Conceptual study of the future nuclear fuel cycle system for the extended LWR age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Takano, Hideki; Sato, Osamu; Tone, Tatsuzo; Yamada, Takashi; Kurosawa, Katsutoshi.

    1993-08-01

    A large scale integrated fuel cycle facility (IFCF) is assumed for the future nuclear fuel cycle in the extended LWR age. Spent MOX fuels are reprocessed mixed with UOX in a centralized reprocessing plant. The reprocessing plant separates long-lived nuclides as well as Pu. Nitric acid solutions of those products are fed directly to MOX fabrication process which is incorporated with reprocessing. MOX pellets are made by sphere-cal process. Two process concepts are made as advanced reprocessing incorporated with partitioning (ARP) which has the function of long-lived nuclides recovery. One is a simplified Purex combined with partitioning. Extractable long-lived nuclides, 237 Np and 99 Tc, are assumed to be recovered in main flow stream of the improved Purex process. The other process concept is made aiming at recovering all TRU nuclides in reprocessing to meet with TRU recycle requirement in the long future. A concept of the future fuel cycle system is made by combining integrated fuel cycle facility and very high burnup LWRs (VHBR). The reactor concept of VHBRs has been proposed to improve Pu recycle economy in the future. Highly enriched MOX fuel are loaded in the full core of reactor in order to increase reactivity for the burnup. Fuel cycle indices such as Pu isotopic composition change, spent fuel integration, nuclide transmutation effect are estimated by simulating the Pu recycling in the system of VHBR and ARP. It is concluded that Pu enrichment of MOX fuel can be kept less than 20 % through multi-recycle. Reprocessing MOX fuels with UOX shows a favorable effect for keeping Pu reactivity high enough for VHBR. Integration of spent MOX fuel can be reduced by Pu recycle. Transmutation of Np is feasible by containing Np into MOX fuel. (author)

  9. Icare/Cathare coupling: three-dimensional thermal hydraulics of severe LWR accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, V.; Fichot, F. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, DRS, 92 (France); Boudier, P.; Parent, M. [CEA Grenoble, Dir. des Reacteurs Nucleaires, DRN, 38 (France); Roser, R. [Communication et Systemes Systemes d' Information, CS SI, 38 - Fontaine (France)

    2001-07-01

    In the phenomenology of severe LWR accidents considered in safety studies, the accidental sequences can be divided into three phases: the initial phase, where no severe damage of fuel or control rods and structures occurs; the early core degradation phase, where limited material melting and relocation takes place; and the late core degradation phase during which substantial material relocation happens, molten pools and debris beds can form and corium may fall into the lower plenum and, in case of vessel failure, come into the containment. The CATHARE2 code is a system code which has been developed by CEA for IPSN, EDF and FRAMATOME to describe the thermal-hydraulics behavior of a whole PWR circuit during the first of these three phases, with a core degradation model limited to clad rupture. The ICARE2 code, developed by IPSN, allows the complete description of early and late core degradation phases, with a thermal-hydraulics model limited to the vessel, initial and boundary conditions being provided by a system code. The aim of this paper is to present the main features of the new version of the coupling, ICARE/CATHARE V2. First, the general characteristics of ICARE2 V3mod1 and CATHARE2 V1.5 standard codes, dealing with physical models and numerical aspects, are described. Second, the technical features of the coupling between the two codes are detailed. At last, some results of ICARE/CATHARE V2 calculations are presented which demonstrate the ability of the code to simulate a severe accident in a PWR and notably to describe multi-dimensional effects occurring in the core during the LOCA and degradation phases. (authors)

  10. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.

    1990-01-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the low-temperature embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light water reactor (LWR) operating conditions and to evaluate possible remedies for the embrittlement problem in existing and future plants. The scope of the investigation includes the following goals: develop a methodology and correlations for predicting the toughness loss suffered by cast stainless steel components during normal and extended life of LWRs, validate the simulation of in-reactor degradation by accelerated aging, and establish the effects of key compositional and metallurgical variables on the kinetics and extent of embrittlement. Microstructural and mechanical property data are being obtained on 25 experimental heats (static-cast keel blocks and slabs) and 6 commercial heats (centrifugally cast pipes and a static-cast pump impeller and pump casing ring), as well as on reactor-aged material of CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M grades of cast stainless steel. The ferrite content of the cast materials ranges from 3 to 30%. Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests have been conducted on several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steel that were aged up to 30,000 h at temperatures of 290 to 400 degrees C. The results indicate that thermal aging at these temperatures increases the tensile strength and decreases the impact energy and fracture toughness of the steels. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 steels are the most resistant to embrittlement, and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M steels are the least resistant. Ferrite morphology has a strong effect on the degree or extent of embrittlement, and the kinetics of embrittlement can vary significantly with small changes in the constituent elements of the cast material

  11. Tuvan volunteers on the frontline: contempt of death and high patriotism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii V. Rubtsov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Article presents the archival materials included in album book "Tuva for the frontline” (Moscow, 2014. The publication edited by the Russian Minister of Defense S.K. Shoygu is a scientific popular source study. It contains a significant number of documents regarding the participation of Tuva in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 specially revealed for this title by the Russian State Archive of Sociopolitical History and the Central Archive of Russian Ministry of Defense.

  12. Experience gained in the current LWR that influence the design and operation of the LWR advanced from the viewpoint of safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, J.; Corisco, M.; Riverola, J.

    2010-01-01

    Since the construction of the first light water reactors (LWR) safety analysis has played a very important role in the operation and its evolution to come up with designs that are currently operating. With new tools available, this role will see increased allowing more efficient operation with security assessments in real time, and a more efficient designs both in terms of fuel efficiency and from the security of the plant during operation.

  13. Sensitivity Study on Analysis of Reactor Containment Response to LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ku Young; Sung, Key Yong

    2010-01-01

    As a reactor containment vessel is the final barrier to the release of radioactive material during design basis accidents (DBAs), its structural integrity must be maintained by withstanding the high pressure conditions resulting from DBAs. To verify the structural integrity of the containment, response analyses are performed to get the pressure transient inside the containment after DBAs, including loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The purpose of this study is to give regulative insights into the importance of input variables in the analysis of containment responses to a large break LOCA (LBLOCA). For the sensitivity study, a LBLOCA in Kori 3 and 4 nuclear power plant (NPP) is analyzed by CONTEMPT-LT computer code

  14. Sensitivity Study on Analysis of Reactor Containment Response to LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ku Young; Sung, Key Yong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    As a reactor containment vessel is the final barrier to the release of radioactive material during design basis accidents (DBAs), its structural integrity must be maintained by withstanding the high pressure conditions resulting from DBAs. To verify the structural integrity of the containment, response analyses are performed to get the pressure transient inside the containment after DBAs, including loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The purpose of this study is to give regulative insights into the importance of input variables in the analysis of containment responses to a large break LOCA (LBLOCA). For the sensitivity study, a LBLOCA in Kori 3 and 4 nuclear power plant (NPP) is analyzed by CONTEMPT-LT computer code

  15. CONTEMPT/LT-028 Browns Ferry studies of an anticipated transient without scram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, E.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant containment response during the first 30 min of an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) is the subject of this paper. Three cases, each initiated by a main steam isolation valve closure, are presented: the ATWS is mitigated by operator actions in the spirit of the General Electric Emergency Procedure Guidelines; the ATWS is managed by the plant automatic control systems; and the ATWS proceeds as in first case except that the drywell coolers are unavailable. Success of the standby liquid control system is assumed in the last two transients

  16. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B.

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative

  17. Reduction of nuclear waste burden from LWR by deployment of the SCNES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Kazuo; Watanabe, Junko; Mori, Kenji; Kubota, Kenichi; Kawashima, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Yoshiyuki; Nakazono, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Yuji; Fujiie, Yoichi

    2009-01-01

    Current efforts for enhancing capabilities for energy generation by LWR systems are efficient against the global warming crisis. In parallel to those movements, early realization of the SCNES concept can be the most viable solution to reduce nuclear waste burden produced by the current energy production system. (author)

  18. Air quality impacts due to construction of LWR waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Air quality impacts of construction activities and induced housing growth as a result of construction activities were evaluated for four possible facilities in the LWR fuel cycle: a fuel reprocessing facility, fuel storage facility, fuel fabrication plant, and a nuclear power plant. Since the fuel reprocessing facility would require the largest labor force, the impacts of construction of that facility were evaluated in detail

  19. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  20. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  1. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su' ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  2. OREST, LWR Burnup Simulation Using Program HAMMER and ORIGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Ulrich; Sieberer, Johann

    2006-01-01

    printer-output. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: NEA version is limited for 100 loops, 1000 burnup time-steps and 10 post-irradiation steps. GRS recommends the use of LWR fuels based on oxygen and on the main HAMMER isotopes 235-U, 236-U, 238-U, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 239-Pu, 240-Pu, 241-Pu, 242-Pu, 241-Am and 243-Am. Gadolinium entries should be handled with care if singular positions of Gd-rods in real assemblies are found. Other mixture entries at start of calculation should only be impurities. Cladding should be Zr, Al or stainless steel. Special options for handling other materials can be found in the user description. Activation of structure materials is not calculated. Strong heterogeneous assembly problems outside of the input data processor should be pre-calculated by using more-dimensional codes to achieve a neutron spectra equivalent HAMMER lattice (FEC-method). Coolant pressure, coolant temperatures and coolant steam contents are assumed to be constant during burnup. During each program loop neutron spectra and cross sections are assumed to be constant

  3. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Michael H; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2010-05-05

    Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2) = 83.8; P<0.001). Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been experimentally observed among medium or large vertebrates - where a local response

  4. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Parsons

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo, along with a control (water. If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous, western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area.We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones. Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P0.5. Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2 = 83.8; P<0.001.Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with that observed from other species following repeated anti-predator conditioning, However, this is the first time this response has been experimentally observed among medium or large vertebrates - where a local

  5. The advanced containment experiments (ACE) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Ritzman, R.; Merilo, M.; Rahn, F.; Machiels, A.

    1992-01-01

    The overall structure and content of the ACE Project, which has been obtaining experimental data in four key areas of LWR severe accident technology are described. The key areas consist of filtration systems for vented containment concepts, radioiodine behavior in containment, the interaction of molten core material with structural concrete, and the use of water to terminate the core-concrete interaction process. Experiment procedures used in each phase of the work are summarized and the principal results and conclusions developed to date are discussed

  6. Evaluation of the 252Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The 252 Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt LWR fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. The motivation for this evaluation was that measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This in turn could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on (1) experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of PWR fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, (2) the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and (3) the ability to construct ionization chambers containing 252 Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements. These three considerations are discussed

  7. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2B, User's guide to the LWR assemblies data base, Appendix 2C, User's guide to the LWR radiological data base, Appendix 2D, User's guide to the LWR quantities data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This User's Guide for the LWR Assemblies data base system is part of the Characteristics Data Base being developed under the Waste Systems Data Development Program. The objective of the LWR Assemblies data base is to provide access at the personal computer level to information about fuel assemblies used in light-water reactors. The information available is physical descriptions of intact fuel assemblies and radiological descriptions of spent fuel disassembly hardware. The LWR Assemblies data base is a user-oriented menu driven system. Each menu is instructive about its use. Section 5 of this guide provides a sample session with the data base to assist the user

  8. Design and construction of a large reinforced concrete containment model to be tested to failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucciferro, J.J.; Horschel, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating the performance of LWR containments subjected to severe accidents. This work is being performed by the Containment Integrity Division at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The latest research effort involves the testing of a 1/6-scale reinforced concrete containment model. The containment, which was designed and constructed by United Engineers and Constructors, is the largest and most complex model of its kind. The design and construction of the containment model are the subject of this paper. The objective of the containment model tests is to generate data that can be used to qualify methods for reliably predicting the response of LWR containment buildings to severe accident loads. The data recorded during testing include deformations and leakage past sealing surfaces, as well as strains and displacements of the containment shell

  9. CNTB program for the analysis of partially mixed containment atmospheres during depressurization events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landoni, J.A.

    1979-07-01

    This program describes the analytical models for the CNTB computer program, which is permanently filed in the archive library of the General Atomic (GA) San Diego Data Center under reference number THSD-2699. Developed during the last four years, this computer program has been successfully applied in its presented form to the type of containment atmosphere transients illustrated in this report. For example, the CNTB computer program is applicable (1) to the design basis depressurization accident (DBDA) to determine the effect of the partial mixing on the containment atmospheric peak pressure (known as nonmixing penalty) and (2) for Class 9 accidents, such as the loss of forced circulation (LOFC), for the AIPA Phase I studies. The capability of the CNTB computer program has been substantially improved over its precursor, the CONTEMPT-G computer program, to predict the thermodynamic behavior of the containment atmosphere during helium releases, assuming partial mixing of the original air with the effluent and to predict the amount of the environmental leaks under closed and open containment conditions. In addition, the CNTB computer program running times are considerably below the ones required for the CONTEMPT-G computer program. Computational solution of the variable parameters in the containment atmosphere is effected by an iterative technique, while the temperatures for its boundaries are obtained by finite differences. The CNTB computer program, written in FORTRAN V, has been implemented at GA on the UNIVAC 1110 computer

  10. Advanced hybrid process with solvent extraction and pyro-chemical process of spent fuel reprocessing for LWR to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Reiko; Mizuguchi, Koji; Fuse, Kouki; Saso, Michitaka; Utsunomiya, Kazuhiro; Arie, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Toshiba has been proposing a new fuel cycle concept of a transition from LWR to FBR. The new fuel cycle concept has better economical process of the LWR spent fuel reprocessing than the present Purex Process and the proliferation resistance for FBR cycle of plutonium with minor actinides after 2040. Toshiba has been developing a new Advanced Hybrid Process with Solvent Extraction and Pyrochemical process of spent fuel reprocessing for LWR to FBR. The Advanced Hybrid Process combines the solvent extraction process of the LWR spent fuel in nitric acid with the recovery of high pure uranium for LWR fuel and the pyro-chemical process in molten salts of impure plutonium recovery with minor actinides for metallic FBR fuel, which is the FBR spent fuel recycle system after FBR age based on the electrorefining process in molten salts since 1988. The new Advanced Hybrid Process enables the decrease of the high-level waste and the secondary waste from the spent fuel reprocessing plants. The R and D costs in the new Advanced Hybrid Process might be reduced because of the mutual Pyro-chemical process in molten salts. This paper describes the new fuel cycle concept of a transition from LWR to FBR and the feasibility of the new Advanced Hybrid Process by fundamental experiments. (author)

  11. Commentary: Understanding the origins of anger, contempt, and disgust in public health policy disputes: applying moral psychology to harm reduction debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Jess; Dollar, Katherine M; Kozlowski, Lynn T

    2010-04-01

    Scientific disputes about public health issues can become emotional battlefields marked by strong emotions like anger, contempt, and disgust. Contemporary work in moral psychology demonstrates that each of these emotions is a reaction to a specific type of moral violation. Applying this work to harm reduction debates, specifically the use of smokeless tobacco to reduce harm from tobacco use, we attempt to explain why some public health disputes have been so heated. Public health ethics tend to emphasize social justice concerns to the exclusion of other moral perspectives that value scientific authority, professional loyalty, and bodily purity. An awareness of their different emotional reactions and underlying moral motivations might help public health professionals better understand each others' viewpoints, ultimately leading to more productive dialogue.

  12. Proceedings of the 2007 LWR Fuel Performance Meeting / TopFuel 2007 'Zero by 2010'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    ANS, ENS, AESJ and KNS are jointly organizing the 2007 International LWR Fuel Performance Meeting following the successful ENS TopFuel meeting held during 22-26 October, 2006 in Salamaca, Spain. Merging three premier nuclear fuel design and performance meetings: the ANS LWR Fuel Performance Meeting, the ENS TopFuel and Asian Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting (WRFPM) created this international meeting. The meeting will be held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in USA, Asia, and Europe. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as performance experience in commercial and test reactors. The meeting excludes front end and back end fuel issues, however, it covers all front and/or back issues that impact fuel designs and performance

  13. Workshop on initiation of stress corrosion cracking under LWR conditions: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Cubicciotti, D.; Licina, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    A workshop titled ''Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking under LWR Conditions'' was held in Palo Alto, California on November 13, 1986, hosted by the Electric Power Research Institute. Participants were experts on the topic from nuclear steam supply and component manufacturers, public and private research laboratories, and university environments. Presentations included discussions on the definition of crack initiation, the effects of environmental and electrochemical variables on cracking susceptibility, and detection methods for the determination of crack initiation events and measurement of critical environmental and stress parameters. Examination of the questions related to crack initiation and its relative importance to the overall question of cracking of LWR materials from these perspectives provided inputs to EPRI project managers on the future direction of research efforts designed to prevent and control cracking. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately

  14. Development and testing of standardized procedures and reference data for LWR surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.

    1979-02-01

    The resources and talents of many national and international organizations and laboratories, both governmental and industrial, are being used to establish analysis methods for predicting the embrittlement condition of light water reactor (LWR) primary systems. The exact interrelationships and responsibilities between those developing, understanding, combining, and applying state-of-the-art technology in dosimetry, metallurgy, and fracture mechanics for reactor systems analysis are being carefully reviewed and studied. This has resulted in a more comprehensive definition of the scope of new and updated ASTM standards required for the analysis and interpretation of LWR pressure vessel surveillance results. Fifteen new and updated ASTM standards have now been identified, together with a restructuring of the main interfaces between the individual standard practices, guides, and methods. The paper briefly discusses these standards and the initial results of multi-laboratory research work involved in their validation and calibration

  15. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO 2 fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed

  16. FABRICATION AND MATERIAL ISSUES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SiC COMPOSITES TO LWR FUEL CLADDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEON-JU KIM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication methods and requirements of the fiber, interphase, and matrix of nuclear grade SiCf/SiC composites are briefly reviewed. A CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composite with a PyC or (PyC-SiCn interphase utilizing Hi-Nicalon Type S or Tyranno SA3 fiber is currently the best combination in terms of the irradiation performance. We also describe important material issues for the application of SiC composites to LWR fuel cladding. The kinetics of the SiC corrosion under LWR conditions needs to be clarified to confirm the possibility of a burn-up extension and the cost-benefit effect of the SiC composite cladding. In addition, the development of end-plug joining technology and fission products retention capability of the ceramic composite tube would be key challenges for the successful application of SiC composite cladding.

  17. EUV lithography for 30nm half pitch and beyond: exploring resolution, sensitivity, and LWR tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putna, E. Steve; Younkin, Todd R.; Chandhok, Manish; Frasure, Kent

    2009-03-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) denotes Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography as a leading technology option for realizing the 32nm half-pitch node and beyond. Readiness of EUV materials is currently one high risk area according to assessments made at the 2008 EUVL Symposium. The main development issue regarding EUV resist has been how to simultaneously achieve high sensitivity, high resolution, and low line width roughness (LWR). This paper describes the strategy and current status of EUV resist development at Intel Corporation. Data is presented utilizing Intel's Micro-Exposure Tool (MET) examining the feasibility of establishing a resist process that simultaneously exhibits <=30nm half-pitch (HP) L/S resolution at <=10mJ/cm2 with <=4nm LWR.

  18. Behaviour of LWR core materials under accident conditions. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    At the invitation of the Government of the Russian Federation, following a proposal of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Behaviour of LWR Core Materials Under Accident Conditions from 9 to 13 October 1995 in Dimitrovgrad to analyze and evaluate the behaviour of LWR core materials under accident conditions with special emphasis on severe accidents. In-vessel severe accidents phenomena were considered in detail, but specialized thermal hydraulic aspects as well as ex-vessel phenomena were outside the scope of the meeting. Forty participants representing eight countries attended the meeting. Twenty-three papers were presented and discussed during five sessions. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Performance of artificially defected LWR fuel rods in an unlimited air dry storage atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Knecht, R.L.; Cantley, D.A.; Cook, J.A.

    1983-09-01

    Thus far the tests are inconclusive as to whether breached LWR fuel can be stored at 230 0 C for long periods of time in air without fuel oxidation and dispersion. There is every indication, as expected, that there is no oxidation problem in an inert atmosphere. Only one of four defects exposed to unlimited air gave any indication of fuel oxidation. It has been suggested that this might be an incubation effect and continued operation would result in oxidation occurring at all four defects. As yet the destructive examination of the BWR rod has not been completed, so it is not possible to determine if cladding splitting was due to an anomoly in this test rod or something that can be expected in LWR rods in general. Thus far there is no indication of respirable particle dispersal even if fuel oxidation does occur

  20. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S. J. [ed.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics listed are based upon the experience of ODAI and also based upon a sampling of over 100 engineers/scientists in the LWR industry. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  1. Investigation of LWR environmental effect on fatigue lifetime of austenitic stainless steel component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Youm, H. K.; Jin, T. E.

    1999-01-01

    The fatigue lifetime of principal components in nuclear power plant is evaluated by using the design fatigue curves in ASME B and PV code during design process. However, it is inadequate to evaluate fatigue lifetime considering the LWR environmental effect by these design fatigue curves because these are presented only under atmosphere environment. Therefore, many studies are recently performed for the design fatigue curves considering LWR environmental effect and are presented that the design fatigue curves in ASME B and PV code can be non-conservative. In present paper, the limits and differences of the design fatigue curves considering environmental effect are presented. To investigate the change of fatigue lifetime according to each design fatigue curve, the CUFs for the pressurizer spray nozzle partly composed of austenitic stainless steel are calculated according to each one. Finally, if the evaluation result can not be satisfied with fatigue design requirement, the alternatives to reduce design cumulative usage factor are discussed. (author)

  2. Light water reactors development in Japan. (1) Introduction of LWR technology (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Ichita; Suzuki, Shigemitsu

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary progress of the LWR plants in the last half-century was reviewed in series. Introduction of LWR technology (PWR) in Japan was reviewed in this article. Kansai Electric Power imported the Mihama-1 - a 340 MWe PWR built by Westinghouse Corp. It began operating in 1970 to supply power to the World Exposition (EXPO70). There followed a period in which designs was purchased from US vendors and they were constructed with the co-operation of Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, who would then receive a license to build similar plants in Japan and develop the capacity to design and construct PWRs by itself. Progress of designs, fabrications, project management and construction of PWRs were reviewed from technology transfer to its autonomy age. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics listed are based upon the experience of ODAI and also based upon a sampling of over 100 engineers/scientists in the LWR industry. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation

  4. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO[sub 2] fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO{sub 2} fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  6. Analytical methods of leakage rate estimation from a containment under a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Three most outstanding maximum flow rate formulas are identified from many existing models. Outlines of the three limiting mass flow rate models are given along with computational procedures to estimate approximate amount of fission products released from a containment to environment for a given characteristic hole size for containment-isolation failure and containment pressure and temperature under a loss of coolant accident. Sample calculations are performed using the critical ideal gas flow rate model and the Moody's graphs for the maximum two-phase flow rates, and the results are compared with the values obtained from then mass leakage rate formula of CONTEMPT-LT code for converging nozzle and sonic flow. It is shown that the critical ideal gas flow rate formula gives almost comparable results as one can obtain from the Moody's model. It is also found that a more conservative approach to estimate leakage rate from a containment under a LOCA is to use the maximum ideal gas flow rate equation rather than the mass leakage rate formula of CONTEMPT-LT. (author)

  7. Draft report: a selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseiny, A. A.; Ritzman, R. L.

    1980-03-01

    The results of work done to develop a methodology for selecting LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. A critical survey of relevant decision analysis methods is provided including the specifics of multiattribute utility theory. This latter method forms the basis of the developed selection methodology. Details of the methodology and its use are provided along with a sample illustration of its application.

  8. Challenges in coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics simulations for LWR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Kostadin; Avramova, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The simulation of nuclear power plant accident conditions requires three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the reactor core to ensure a realistic description of physical phenomena. The operational flexibility of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants can be improved by utilizing accurate 3D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics calculations for safety margins evaluations. There are certain requirements to the coupling of thermal-hydraulic system codes and neutron-kinetics codes that ought to be considered. The objective of these requirements is to provide accurate solutions in a reasonable amount of CPU time in coupled simulations of detailed operational transient and accident scenarios. These requirements are met by the development and implementation of six basic components of the coupling methodologies: ways of coupling (internal or external coupling); coupling approach (integration algorithm or parallel processing); spatial mesh overlays; coupled time-step algorithms; coupling numerics (explicit, semi-implicit and implicit schemes); and coupled convergence schemes. These principles of the coupled simulations are discussed in details along with the scientific issues associated with the development of appropriate neutron cross-section libraries for coupled code transient modeling. The current trends in LWR nuclear power generation and regulation as well as the design of next generation LWR reactor concepts along with the continuing computer technology progress stimulate further development of these coupled code systems. These efforts have been focused towards extending the analysis capabilities as well as refining the scale and level of detail of the coupling. This article analyses the coupled phenomena and modeling challenges on both global (assembly-wise) and local (pin-wise) levels. The issues related to the consistent qualification of coupled code systems as well as their application to different types of LWR transients are presented. Finally, the advances in numerical

  9. EUR, an European utility requirements documents for future LWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbey, Pierre; Lienard, Michel; Redon, Ramon; Essmann, Juergen; Taylor, David T.

    2004-01-01

    A group of the major European utilities are developing a common requirement document which will be used for the LWR nuclear power plants to be built in Europe from the beginning of the next century. This document provides harmonised policies and technical requirements that will allow the implementation of a design developed in one country into another one. The objectives and contents of the document, the organisation set up for its production and the main requirements are summarised in the paper. (author)

  10. Draft report: a selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    The results of work done to develop a methodology for selecting LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. A critical survey of relevant decision analysis methods is provided including the specifics of multiattribute utility theory. This latter method forms the basis of the developed selection methodology. Details of the methodology and its use are provided along with a sample illustration of its application

  11. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, C.R.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL

  12. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation; Mei, Zhi-Gang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  13. Recycle of LWR [Light Water Reactor] actinides to an IFR [Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    A large quantity of actinide elements is present in irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission-to-capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high-energy neutrons in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel represents a valuable resource for an expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, removal of the TRU elements from the spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of a high-level waste facility by reducing the heat loads and increasing the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirements. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle, for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. The major objective of the LWR fuel recovery process is high TRU element recovery, with decontamination a secondary issue, because fission product removal is accomplished in the IFR process. The extensive pyrochemical processing studies of the 1960s and 1970s provide a basis for the design of possible processes. Two processes were selected for laboratory-scale investigation. One is based on the Salt Transport Process studied at ANL for mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel, and the other is based on the blanket processing studies done for ANL's second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2). This paper discusses the two processes and is a status report on the experimental studies. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, C R [comp.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL.

  15. Comment: collection of assay data on isotopic composition in LWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Kurosawa, Masayoshi; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Many assay data of LWR spent fuels have been collected from reactors in the world and some of them are already stored in the database SFCOMPO which was constructed on a personal computer IBM PC/AT. On the other hand, Group constant libraries for burnup calculation code ORIGEN-II were generated from the nuclear data file JENDL3.2. These libraries were evaluated by using the assay data in SFCOMPO. (author)

  16. New development in nondestructive measurement and verification of irradiated LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.M.; Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Hsue, S.T.; Lindquist, L.O.; Ortega, E.M.; Caine, J.C.; Swansen, J.; Kaieda, K.; Dermendjiev, E.

    1979-01-01

    Nondestructive techniques for characterizing irradiated LWR fuel assemblies are discussed. This includes detection systems that measure the axial activity profile, neutron yield and gamma yield. A multi-element profile monitor has been developed that offers a significant improvement in speed and complexity over existing mechanical scanning systems. New portable detectors and electronics, applicable to safeguard inspection, are presented and results of gamma-ray and neutron measurements at commercial reactor facilities are given

  17. Experimental critical loadings and control rod worths in LWR-PROTEUS configurations compared with MCNPX results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaschy, M.; Murphy, M.; Jatuff, F.; Seiler, R.; Chawla, R.

    2006-01-01

    The PROTEUS research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI) has been operating since the sixties and has already permitted, due to its high flexibility, investigation of a large range of very different nuclear systems. Currently, the ongoing experimental programme is called LWR-PROTEUS. This programme was started in 1997 and concerns large-scale investigations of advanced light water reactors (LWR) fuels. Until now, the different LWR-PROTEUS phases have permitted to study more than fifteen different configurations, each of them having to be demonstrated to be operationally safe, in particular, for the Swiss safety authorities. In this context, recent developments of the PSI computer capabilities have made possible the use of full-scale SD-heterogeneous MCNPX models to calculate accurately different safety related parameters (e.g. the critical driver loading and the shutdown rod worth). The current paper presents the MCNPX predictions of these operational characteristics for seven different LWR-PROTEUS configurations using a large number of nuclear data libraries. More specifically, this significant benchmarking exercise is based on the ENDF/B6v2, ENDF/B6v8, JEF2.2, JEFF3.0, JENDL3.2, and JENDL3.3 libraries. The results highlight certain library specific trends in the prediction of the multiplication factor k eff (e.g. the systematically larger reactivity calculated with JEF2.2 and the smaller reactivity associated with JEFF3.0). They also confirm the satisfactory determination of reactivity variations by all calculational schemes, for instance, due to the introduction of a safety rod pair, these calculations having been compared with experiments. (authors)

  18. An overview of advanced high-strength nickel-base alloys for LWR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prybylowski, J.; Ballinger, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the behavior of high strength nickel base alloys used in light water reactor (LWR) applications. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fundamental mechanisms controlling crack propagation in these environments. To provide a foundation for this survey, general mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement are first reviewed. The behavior of high strength nickel base alloys in LWR environments, as well as in other relevant environments is then reviewed. Suggested mechanisms of crack propagation are discussed. Alternate alloys and microstructural modifications that may result in improved behavior are presented. It is now clear that, at temperatures near 100C, alloy X-750, the predominant high strength nickel base alloy used today in LWR applications, is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. A review of published data from hydrogen embrittlement studies of nickel base superalloys during electrolytic charging and in hydrogen sulfide/brine solutions suggests that other nickel base superalloys are available possessing resistance to hydrogen embrittlement superior to that of alloy X-750. Available results of tests in gaseous hydrogen suggest that reduced grain boundary precipitation and a fine distribution of intragranular precipitates that act as irreversible hydrogen traps is the optimum microstructure for hydrogen embrittlement resistance. 42 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Minutes of the Twelfth LWR pressure vessel surveillance dosimtery improvement program meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The 1983 Twelfth Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP) Meeting, which was held October 24-28, 1983. Sections 1 through 14 of this report provide documentation of agreements, commitments, and reports that are subject to the approval and concurrence of the participating laboratories and supporting agencies and organizations. Attachment No. 1 provides information on the preparation of a number of NUREG publications that will document the results of various aspects of the LWR-PV-SDIP. For each NUREG publication, a tentative ''Table of Contents'' is provided in addition to suggested interlaboratory writing assignments and camera-ready copy contribution due dates, as appropriate. Attachment No. 2 provides information on planning for the Fifth ASTM-EURATOM Symposium. Attachment No. 3 provides information on an ASTM press release about an MPC-6 meeting and dpa and E > 1 MeV exposure parameters. Attachments No. 4 and 5 provide copies of two LWR-PV-SDIP related papers presented at the Eleventh WRSR Information Meeting, October 24-28, 1983

  20. APEX nuclear fuel cycle for production of LWR fuel and elimination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    The development of a nuclear fission fuel cycle is proposed which eliminates all the radioactive fission product waste effluent and the need for geological-age high level waste storage and provides a long term supply of fissile fuel for an LWR power reactor economy. The fuel cycle consists of reprocessing LWR spent fuel (1 to 2 years old) to remove the stable nonradioactive (NRFP, e.g. lanthanides, etc.) and short-lived fission products SLFP e.g. half-lives of (1 to 2 years) and returning, in dilute form, the long-lived fission products, ((LLFPs, e.g. 30 y half-life Cs, Sr, and 10 y Kr, and 16 x 10 6 y I) and the transuranics (TUs, e.g. Pu, Am, Cm, and Np) to be refabricated into fresh fuel elements. Makeup fertile and fissile fuel are to be supplied through the use of a Spallator (linear accelerator spallation-target fuel-producer). The reprocessing of LWR fuel elements is to be performed by means of the Chelox process which consists of Airox treatment (air oxidation and hydrogen reduction) followed by chelation with an organic reagent (β-diketonate) and vapor distillation of the organometallic compounds for separation and partitioning of the fission products

  1. Results of the LIRES Round Robin test on high temperature reference electrodes for LWR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.W. [SCK.CEN, Nuclear Research Centre Belgium, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nagy, G. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia KFKI Atomenergia Kutatointezet, AEKI, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Feron, D. [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Navas, M. [CIEMAT, Edificio 30, Dpto. Fision Nuclear, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid, (Spain); Bogaerts, W. [KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 31, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Karnik, D. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Dorsch, T. [Framatone ANP, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Molander, A. [Studsvik AB SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Maekelae, K. [Materials and Structural Integrity, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Kemistintie 3, P.O. Box 1704, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    A European sponsored research project has been started on 1 October 2000 to develop high temperature reference electrodes that can be used for in-core electrochemical measurements in Light Water Reactors (LWR's). This LIRES-project (Development of Light Water Reactor Reference Electrodes) consists of 9 partners (SCK-CEN, AEKI, CEA, CIEMAT, KU Leuven, NRI Rez, Framatone ANP, Studsvik Nuclear and VTT) and will last for four years. The main objective of this LIRES project is to develop a reference electrode, which is robust enough to be used inside a LWR. Emphasize is put on the radiation hardness of both the mechanical design of the electrode as the proper functioning of the electrode. A four steps development trajectory is foreseen: (1) To set a testing standard for a Round Robin, (2) To develop different reference electrodes, (3) To perform a Round Robin test of these reference electrodes followed by selection of the best reference electrode(s), (4) To perform irradiation tests under appropriate LWR conditions in a Material Test Reactor (MTR). Four different high temperature reference electrodes have been developed and are being tested in a Round Robin test. These electrodes are: A Ceramic Membrane Electrode (CME), a Rhodium electrode, an external Ag/AgCl electrode and a Palladium electrode. The presentation will focus on the results obtained with the Round Robin test. (authors)

  2. PANDA: A Multipurpose Integral Test Facility for LWR Safety Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, D.; Dreier, J.

    2012-01-01

    The PANDA facility is a large scale, multicompartmental thermal hydraulic facility suited for investigations related to the safety of current and advanced LWRs. The facility is multipurpose, and the applications cover integral containment response tests, component tests, primary system tests, and separate effect tests. Experimental investigations carried on in the PANDA facility have been embedded in international projects, most of which under the auspices of the EU and OECD and with the support of a large number of organizations (regulatory bodies, technical dupport organizations, national laboratories, electric utilities, industries) worldwide. The paper provides an overview of the research programs performed in the PANDA facility in relation to BWR containment systems and those planned for PWR containment systems.

  3. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Y.; Qian, S.; Littrell, K.; Parish, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Plummer, L.K. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless-steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount (≈20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for determining absolute hydrogen concentrations.

  4. Disposal of Kr-85 separated from the dissolver off-gas of a reprocessing plant for LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nommensen, O.

    1981-08-01

    The principle of the radiation protection to keep the radiation load of the population as low as possible requires the development of methods for retaining the radionuclide Krypton 85 seperated off the dissolver waste gas of future reprocessing plants for LWR-nuclear fuel elements. In a recommendation of the RSK the long-termed storage of the Kr-85 in a pressure gas bottle and the marine disposal we considered to be disposal methods low in risk. The present work develops a concept for both of the disposal methods and demonstrates their technical feasibility. The comparison of the cost estimations effected for both of the disposal methods shows that the costs related with the marine disposal of the pressure gas bottles amounting to 1.90 DM/kg of reprocessed U fall by the factor 10 below the costs that result from the surface storage of the bottles. In both cases was referred to a reprocessing capacity of 1400 t U/a corresponding to 50 GW installed nuclear power, thereby accumulating approximately 629 PBq (17 MCi) Kr-85 per year. Both concepts project the seperated radioactive inert gas to be filled in pressure gas bottles in a low temperature rectification plant. Each of the 85 bottles to be filled per year contains 7.4 PBq (200 kCi) Kr-85. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Fluidized-bed calcination of LWR fuel-reprocessing HLLW: requirements and potential for off-gas cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Fluidized-bed solidification (calcination) was developed on a pilot scale for a variety of simulated LWR high-level liquid-waste (HLLW) and blended high-level and intermediate-level liquid-waste (ILLW) compositions. It has also been demonstrated with ICPP fuel-reprocessing waste since 1963 in the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at gross feed rates of 5 to 12 m 3 /day. A fluidized-bed calciner produces a relatively large volume of off-gas. A calciner solidifying 6 m 3 /day of liquid waste would generate about 13 standard m 3 /min of off-gas containing 10 to 20 g of entrained solids per standard m 3 of off-gas. Use of an off-gas system similar to that of the WCF could provide an overall process decontamination factor for particulates of about 2 x 10 10 . A potential advantage of fluidized-bed calcination over other solidification methods is the ability to control ruthenium volatilization from the calciner at less than 0.01% by calcining at 500 0 C or above. Use of an off-gas system similar to that of the WCF would provide an overall process decontamination factor for volatile ruthenium of greater than 1.6 x 10 7

  6. Initial assessment of the mechanisms and significance of low-temperature embrittlement of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Sather, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Metallurgical characterization and mechanical property data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests are presented for several experimental and commercial heats, as well as for reactor-aged CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M cast stainless steels. The effects of material variables on the embrittlement of cast stainless steels are evaluated. Chemical composition and ferrite morphology strongly affect the extent and kinetics of embrittlement. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 stainless steels are the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M stainless steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. The microstructural and mechanical-property data are analyzed to establish the mechanisms of embrittlement. The procedure and correlations for predicting the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for low-temperature-aged cast stainless steel are defined. 39 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs

  7. A PC-based computer program for simulation of containment pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifaee, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that a PC-based computer program has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment during various transients. This containment model is capable of determining pressure and temperature history of a PWR containment in the event of a loss of coolant accident, as well as main steam line breaks inside the containment. Conservation of mass and energy equations are applied to the containment model. Development of the program is based on minimization of input specified information and user friendliness. Maximization of calculation efficiency is obtained by superseding the traditional trial and error procedure for determination of the state variables and implementation of an explicit solution for pressure. The program includes simplified models for active heat removal systems. The results are in close agreement between the present model and CONTEMPT-MOD5 computer code for pressure and temperature inside the containment

  8. Gap conductance in Zircaloy-clad LWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainscough, J.B.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the procedures currently used to calculate fuel-cladding gap conductance in light water reactor fuel rods containing pelleted UO 2 in Zircaloy cladding, under both steady-state and transient conditions. The relevant theory is discussed together with some of the approximations usually made in performance modelling codes. The state of the physical property data which are needed for heat transfer calculations is examined and some of the relevant in- and out-of-reactor experimental work on fuel rod conductance is reviewed

  9. Components of the LWR primary circuit. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This standard is to be applied to components made of metallic materials, operated at design temperatures of up to 673 K (400 0 C). The primary circuit as the pressure containment of the reactor coolant comprises: Reactor pressure vessel (without internals), steam generator (primary loop), pressurizer, reactor coolant pump housing, interconnecting pipings between the components mentioned above and appropriate various valve and instrument casings, pipings branding from the above components and interconnecting pipings, including the appropriate instrument casings, up to and including the first isolating valve, pressure shielding of control rod drives. (orig.) [de

  10. Research work for improving LWR safety. 1991 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The work performed in 1991 for the PNS project centers on various phenomena of severe fuel damage and on selected aspects of a core meltdown accident, relating to aerosol behaviour and filter engineering, and to methods of assessing and minimizing the radiological impacts of a reactor accident. One paper included in this annual report summarizes the evaluation of experiments carried out in 1990 at the Wuerenlingen PROTEUS reactor. The 1991 task programme of the project for the first time included research into extreme load conditions affecting the containment in a core meltdown accident; first results are given of the experiments performed. (orig./DG) [de

  11. Cooling methods of station blackout scenario for LWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this study is to analyze the cooling method of station blackout scenario for both the BWR and PWR plants by RELAP5 code and to check the validity of the cooling method proposed by the utilities. In the BWR plant cooling scenario, the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System (RCIC), which is operated with high pressure steam from the reactor, injects cooling water into the reactor to keep the core water level. The steam generated in the core is released into the suppression pool at containment vessel to condense. To restrict the containment vessel pressure rising, the ventilation from the wet-well is operated. The scenario is analyzed by RELAP5 code. In the PWR plant scenario, the primary pressure is decreased by the turbine-driven auxiliary feed water system operated with secondary side steam of the steam generators (SGs). And the core cooling is kept by the natural circulation flow at the primary loop. From the RELAP5 code analysis, it was shown that the primary system cooling was practicable by using the turbine-driven auxiliary feed water system. (author)

  12. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure

  13. Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuel containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as fission products of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and iodine. It comprises reducing the oxide fuel with Ca metal in the presence of Ca halide; separating the Ca halide with the CaO and the fission products contained therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein and electrolytically contacting the calcium salts with a carbon electrode; contacting the liquid U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel with liquid Mg metal, thereafter separating the liquid Mg and the metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metal dissolved therein, distilling the Mg from the transuranium actinide and rare earth metals, recontacting the U-Fe alloy with liquid Mg metal a sufficient number of times until not less than about 99% by weight of the transuranium actinide values have been removed from the U-Fe alloy

  14. Plutonium and minor actinide transmutation by long irradiation in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchini, A.; Sanjust, V.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was made on the conceptual possibility of burning in a thermal reactor MOX fuel together with special pins containing plutonium, minor actinides and long lived fission products, recovered from the reprocessing of previously irradiated MOX fuel and mixed with an inter matrix. Preliminary calculations showed that the long term radiotoxicity of the above special pins is reduced to reasonable levels when they are irradiated up to 20 divided-by 30 years, and cooled for some centuries. In particular, during the whole life such a reactor should be able to burn a considerable fraction of plutonium, minor actinides and long lived fission products recovered from the MOX fuel irradiated along the same period of time

  15. Safety-oriented LWR research. Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The annual report 1987 includes the results of out-of-pile bundle experiments for severe fuel damage investigations (CORA), aerosol behaviour under core meltdown accident condition, dynamic behaviour of PWR containments, theoretical and experimental investigations of crack growth under thermal and thermomechanical fatigue loading, the thermal hydraulic code COMMIX-1B, the interfacial exchange processes in two-phase flow (NOVA-Program), the retention of penetrating iodine species, the development of exhaust filters and HEPA filter systems, advanced PWR's (APWR's) and related safety considerations, the HERA test facility and the KRISTA-program, and RELAP5/MOD2 post-test analysis of a forced feed reflood experiment. 20 papers are separately indexed in the database. (DG)

  16. Aging management of major LWR components with nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; MacDonald, P.E.; Akers, D.W.; Sellers, C.; Murty, K.L.; Miraglia, P.Q.; Mathew, M.D.; Haggag, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of material damage can contribute to continued safe, reliable, and economical operation of nuclear power plants through their current and renewed license period. The aging mechanisms active in the major light water reactor components are radiation embrittlement, thermal aging, stress corrosion cracking, flow-accelerated corrosion, and fatigue, which reduce fracture toughness, structural strength, or fatigue resistance of the components and challenge structural integrity of the pressure boundary. This paper reviews four nondestructive evaluation methods with the potential for in situ assessment of damage caused by these mechanisms: stress-strain microprobe for determining mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel and cast stainless materials, magnetic methods for estimating thermal aging damage in cast stainless steel, positron annihilation measurements for estimating early fatigue damage in reactor coolant system piping, and ultrasonic guided wave technique for detecting cracks and wall thinning in tubes and pipes and corrosion damage to embedded portion of metal containments

  17. Iodine behaviour under LWR accident conditions: Lessons learnt from analyses of the first two Phebus FP tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girault, N.; Dickinson, S.; Funke, F.; Auvinen, A.; Herranz, L.; Krausmann, E.

    2006-01-01

    The International Phebus Fission Product programme, initiated in 1988 and performed by the French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IRSN), investigates through a series of in-pile integral experiments, key phenomena involved in light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents. The tests cover fuel rod degradation and the behaviour of fission products released via the primary coolant circuit into the containment building. The results of the first two tests, called FPT0 and Ftp, carried out under low pressure, in a steam rich atmosphere and using fresh fuel for Ftp and fuel burned in a reactor at 23 GWdt -1 for Ftp, were immensely challenging, especially with regard to the iodine radiochemistry. Some of the most important observed phenomena with regard to the chemistry of iodine were indeed neither predicted nor pre-calculated, which clearly shows the interest and the need for carrying out integral experiments to study the complex phenomena governing fission product behaviour in a PWR in accident conditions. The three most unexpected results in the iodine behaviour related to early detection during fuel degradation of a weak but significant fraction of volatile iodine in the containment, the key role played by silver rapidly binding iodine to form insoluble AgI in the containment sump and the importance of painted surfaces in the containment atmosphere for the formation of a large quantity of volatile organic iodides. To support the Phebus test interpretation small-scale analytical experiments and computer code analyses were carried out. The former, helping towards a better understanding of overall iodine behaviour, were used to develop or improve models while the latter mainly aimed at identifying relevant key phenomena and at modelling weaknesses. Specific efforts were devoted to exploring the potential origins of the early-detected volatile iodine in the containment building. If a clear explanation has not yet been found, the non-equilibrium chemical

  18. A Preliminary Study on the Containment Integrity following BIT Removal for Kori NPP Unit 3,4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Byun, Choong Sup [KEPRI, Nuclear Power Generation Laboratory, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong Young [ENERGEO Inc., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The Boron Injection Tank (BIT) is to provide high concentrated boric acid to the reactor in order to mitigate the consequences of postulated Main Steam Line Break accidents (MSLB). Although BIT plays an important role in mitigating the accident, high concentration of 20,000ppm causes valve leakage, pipe clog, precipitation and continuous heat tracing have to be provided. This paper is for the feasibility study of containment integrity using CONTEMPT code for BIT removal of Kori Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 3, 4.

  19. A Preliminary Study on the Containment Integrity following BIT Removal for Kori NPP Unit 3,4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Dong Soo; Byun, Choong Sup; Jo, Jong Young

    2008-01-01

    The Boron Injection Tank (BIT) is to provide high concentrated boric acid to the reactor in order to mitigate the consequences of postulated Main Steam Line Break accidents (MSLB). Although BIT plays an important role in mitigating the accident, high concentration of 20,000ppm causes valve leakage, pipe clog, precipitation and continuous heat tracing have to be provided. This paper is for the feasibility study of containment integrity using CONTEMPT code for BIT removal of Kori Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 3, 4

  20. Total sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for LWR pin-cells with improved UNICORN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Chenghui; Cao, Liangzhi; Wu, Hongchun; Shen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new model is established for the total sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. • The NR approximation applied in S&U analysis can be avoided by the new model. • Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is performed to PWR pin-cells by the new model. • The effects of the NR approximation for the PWR pin-cells are quantified. - Abstract: In this paper, improvements to the multigroup cross-section perturbation model have been proposed and applied in the self-developed UNICORN code, which is capable of performing the total sensitivity and total uncertainty analysis for the neutron-physics calculations by applying the direct numerical perturbation method and the statistical sampling method respectively. The narrow resonance (NR) approximation was applied in the multigroup cross-section perturbation model, implemented in UNICORN. As improvements to the NR approximation to refine the multigroup cross-section perturbation model, an ultrafine-group cross-section perturbation model has been established, in which the actual perturbations are applied to the ultrafine-group cross-section library and the reconstructions of the resonance cross sections are performed by solving the neutron slowing-down equation. The total sensitivity and total uncertainty analysis were then applied to the LWR pin-cells, using both the multigroup and the ultrafine-group cross-section perturbation models. The numerical results show that the NR approximation overestimates the relative sensitivity coefficients and the corresponding uncertainty results for the LWR pin-cells, and the effects of the NR approximation are significant for σ_(_n_,_γ_) and σ_(_n_,_e_l_a_s_) of "2"3"8U. Therefore, the effects of the NR approximation applied in the total sensitivity and total uncertainty analysis for the neutron-physics calculations of LWR should be taken into account.

  1. Application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model for highly poisoned LWR core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.; Cathalau, S.; Hudelot, J.P.; Barran, F.; Bellanger, V.; Magnaud, C.; Moreau, F.

    2011-01-01

    Burnable poisons are extensively used by Light Water Reactor designers in order to preserve the fuel reactivity potential and increase the cycle length (without increasing the uranium enrichment). In the industrial two-steps (assembly 2D transport-core 3D diffusion) calculation schemes these heterogeneities yield to strong flux and cross-sections perturbations that have to be taken into account in the final 3D burn-up calculations. This paper presents the application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model (implemented in the French CRONOS2 code) to LWR (highly poisoned) depleted core calculations. The principle is to use the absorbers (or actinide) concentrations as the new interpolation parameters instead of the standard local burnup/fluence parameters. It is shown by comparing the standard (burnup/fluence) and new (concentration) interpolation models and using the lattice transport code APOLLO2 as a numerical reference that reactivity and local reaction rate prediction of a 2x2 LWR assembly configuration (slab geometry) is significantly improved with the concentration interpolation model. Gains on reactivity and local power predictions (resp. more than 1000 pcm and 20 % discrepancy reduction compared to the reference APOLLO2 scheme) are obtained by using this model. In particular, when epithermal absorbers are inserted close to thermal poison the 'shadowing' ('screening') spectral effects occurring during control operations are much more correctly modeled by concentration parameters. Through this outstanding example it is highlighted that attention has to be paid to the choice of cross-section interpolation parameters (burnup 'indicator') in core calculations with few energy groups and variable geometries all along the irradiation cycle. Actually, this new model could be advantageously applied to steady-state and transient LWR heterogeneous core computational analysis dealing with strong spectral-history variations under

  2. A simplified geometrical model for transient corium propagation in core for LWR with heavy reflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saas Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the simulation of the Severe Accidents (SA in Light Water Reactors (LWR, we are interested on the in-core corium pool propagation transient in order to evaluate the corium relocation in the vessel lower head. The goal is to characterize the corium and debris flows from the core to accurately evaluate the corium pool propagation transient in the lower head and so the associated risk of vessel failure. In the case of LWR with heavy reflector, to evaluate the corium relocation into the lower head, we have to study the risk associated with focusing effect and the possibility to stabilize laterally the corium in core with a flooded down-comer. It is necessary to characterize the core degradation and the stratification of the corium pool that is formed in core. We assume that the core degradation until the corium pool formation and the corium pool propagation could be modeled separately. In this document, we present a simplified geometrical model (0D model for the in-core corium propagation transient. A degraded core with a formed corium pool is used as an initial state. This state can be obtained from a simulation computed with an integral code. This model does not use a grid for the core as integral codes do. Geometrical shapes and 0D models are associated with the corium pool and the other components of the degraded core (debris, heavy reflector, core plate…. During the transient, these shapes evolve taking into account the thermal and stratification behavior of the corium pool and the melting of the core surrounding components. Some results corresponding to the corium pool propagation in core transients obtained with this model on a LWR with a heavy reflector are given and compared to grid approach of the integral codes MAAP4.

  3. LWR surveillance dosimetry improvement program: PSF metallurgical blind test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Guthrie, G.; McElroy, W.N.

    1985-01-01

    The ORR-PSF benchmark experiment was designed to simulate the surveillance capsule-pressure vessel configuration in power reactors and to test the validity of procedures which determine the radiation damage in the vessel from test results in the surveillance capsule. The PSF metallurgical blind test was initiated to give participants an opportunity to test their current embrittlement prediction methodologies. Experimental results were withheld from the participants except for the type of information which is normally contained in surveillance reports. Preliminary analysis of the PSF metallurgical blind test results shows that: (1) current prediction methodologies, as used by the PSF Blind Test participants, are adequate, falling within +- 20 0 C of the measured values for Δ NDT. None of the different methods is clearly superior; (2) the proposed revision of Reg. Guide 1.99 (Rev. 2) gives a better representation of the fluence and chemistry dependency of Δ NDT than the current version (Rev. 1); and (3) fluence rate effects can be seen but not quantified. Fluence spectral effects are too small to be detectable in this experiment. (orig.)

  4. Review of current status of LWR safety research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tasaburo; Mishima, Yoshitsugu; Ando, Yoshio; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Takashima, Yoichi.

    1977-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Commission has exerted efforts on the research of the safety of nuclear plants in Japan, and ''Nuclear plant safety research committees'' was established in August 1974, which is composed of the government and the people. The philosophy of safety research, research and development plan, the forwarding procedure of the plan, international cooperation, for example LOFT program, and the effective feed back of the experimental results concerning nuclear safety are reviewed in this paper at first. As for the safety of nuclear reactors the basic philosophy that radio active fission products are contained in fuel or reactors with multiple barriers, (defence in depth) and almost no fission product is released outside reactor plants even at the time of hypothetical accident, is kept, and the research and development history and the future plan are described in this paper with the related technical problems. The structural safety is also explained, for example, on the philosophy ''leak before break'', pipe rupture, pipe restraint and stress analysis. The release of radioactive gas and liquid is decreased as the philosophy ''ALAP''. And probability safety evaluation method, LOCA, reactivity, accident and aseismatic design in nuclear plants in Japan are described. (Nakai, Y.)

  5. Safety-related investigations on power distribution in MOX fuel elements in LWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, E.; Langenbuch, S.

    1991-01-01

    For the concept of thermal recycling various fuel assembly designs have been developped during the last years. An overview is given describing the present status of MOX-fuel assembly design for PWR and BWR. The local power distribution within the MOX-fuel assembly and influences between neighbouring MOX- and Uranium fuel assemblies have been analyzed by own calculations. These investigations are limited to specific aspects of the spatial power distribution, which are related to the use of MOX-fuel assemblies within the reactor core of LWR. (orig.) [de

  6. A Stochastic LWR Model with Consideration of the Driver's Individual Property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Tieqiao; Wang Yunpeng; Yu Guizhen; Huang Haijun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a stochastic LWR model based on the influences of the driver's individual property on his/her perceived density and speed deviation. The numerical results show that the driver's individual property has great effects on traffic flow only when the initial density is moderate, i.e., at this time, oscillating traffic flow will occur and the oscillating phenomena in the traffic system consisting of the conservative and aggressive drivers is more serious than that in the traffic system consisting of the conservative (aggressive) drivers.

  7. Residual life assessment of major LWR components: NPAR approach and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Weidenhamer, G.H.; Vora, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear plant aging research (NPAR) program is systematically addressing the technical issues associated with understanding and managing aging of major LWR components. Twenty-one major components have been identified and prioritized according to their relevance to plant safety. Qualitative aging assessment has identified pertinent design features, materials, stressors, environments, aging mechanisms. and failure modes for each of the components. Emerging inspection, surveillance, and monitoring methods to characterize aging damage and mitigation methods to reduce the damage are currently being assessed. The results of all these assessments are used to develop life-assessment procedures for the components and are included in appropriate documents supporting the regulatory requirements for license renewal. (author)

  8. Prioritization of tasks in the draft LWR safety technology program plan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, E.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Parkinson, W.J.; Ritzman, R.L.; vonHerrmann, J.L.; Wood, P.J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe both the approach taken and the results produced in the SAI effort to prioritize the tasks in the Sandia draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan. This work used the description of important safety issues developed in the Reactor Safety Study (2) to quantify the effect of safety improvements resulting from a research and development program on the risk from nuclear power plants. Costs of implementation of these safety improvements were also estimated to allow a presentation of the final results in a value (i.e., risk reduction) vs. impact (i.e., implementation costs) matrix

  9. Characterization and chemistry of fission products released from LWR fuel under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, K.S.; Collins, J.L.; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Wichner, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Segments from commercial LWR fuel rods have been tested at temperatures between 1400 and 2000 0 C in a flowing steam-helium atmosphere to simulate severe accident conditions. The primary goals of the tests were to determine the rate of fission product release and to characterize the chemical behavior. This paper is concerned primarily with the identification and chemical behavior of the released fission products with emphasis on antimony, cesium, iodine, and silver. The iodine appeared to behave primarily as cesium iodide and the antimony and silver as elements, while cesium behavior was much more complex. 17 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  10. Review of tellurium release rates from LWR fuel elements under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Beahm, E.C.; Wichner, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Although fission product tellurium presents a potentially significant radiohazard, its release and transport in source-term experiments is frequently overlooked because it does not possess a readily measurable, gamma emission; moreover, a recent study emphasized noble gas, iodine and cesium release from LWR fuel elements because of the large data base that exists for these materials. Some new tests show that in some cases tellurium may be held up in core material to a greater degree than previously assumed - an observation that prompts a careful reappraisal of the existing tellurium-release data and its chemical foundation

  11. Assesment On The Possibility To Modify Fabrication Equipment For Fabrication Of HWR And LWR Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-Yulianto

    1996-01-01

    Based on TOR BATAN for PELITA VI. On of BATAN program in the fuel element production technology section is the acquisition of the fuel element fabrication technology for research reactor as well as power reactor. The acquisition can be achieved using different strategies, e.g. by utilizing the facility owned for research and development of the technology desired or by transferring the technology directly from the source. With regards to the above, PEBN through its facility in BEBE has started the acquisition of the fuel element fabrication technology for power reactor by developing the existing equipment initially designed to fabricate HWR Cinere fuel element. The development, by way of modifying the equipment, is intended for the production of HWR (Candu) and LWR (PWR and BWR) fuel elements. To achieve above objective, at the early stage of activity, an assesment on the fabrication equipment for pelletizing, component production and assembly. The assesment was made by comparing the shape and the size of the existing fuel element with those used in the operating reactors such as Candu reactors, PWR and BWR. Equipment having the potential to be modified for the production of HWR fuel elements are as followed: For the pelletizing equipment, the punch and dies can be used of the pressing machine for making green pellet can be modified so that different sizes of punch and dies can be used, depending upon the size of the HWR and LWR pellets. The equipment for component production has good potential for modification to produce the HWR Candu fuel element, which has similar shape and size with those of the existing fuel element, while the possibility of producing the LWR fuel element component is small because only a limited number of the required component can be made with the existing equipment. The assembly equipment has similar situation whit that of the component production, that is, to assemble the HWR fuel element modification of few assembly units very probable

  12. Perspective on US NRC Policy Issues Concerning Use of Risk Insights for Non-LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Su; Kim, In Goo; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Kyun Tae

    2011-01-01

    Since the PRA Implementation plan of US NRC (1994), PRA has been applied to all NPPs in USA and risk insights have been used for the regulation as a complement of the deterministic approaches. RIRIP (Risk-Informed Regulation Implementation Plan, 2000) and RPP (Risk-Informed and Performance-Based Plan, 2007) were announced by US NRC thereafter, which recommended enhanced use of risk insights. In the meantime, there have been lots of policy issues concerning use of risk insights for licensing Non-LWR designs, which will be discussed in this paper to understand the stream of perspectives on US NRC's approach

  13. Validation of the LWR-EIR methods for the evaluation of compact beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foskolos, K.; Grimm, P.; Maeder, C.; Paratte, J.M.

    1983-10-01

    The EIR code system for the calculation of light water reactors is presented and the methods used are briefly described. The application of the system on various types of critical experiments and benchmark problems proves its good precision, even for heterogeneous configurations with strong neutron absorbers like Boral. As the accuracy of the multiplication factor ksub(eff) is always better than 0.5% for normal LWR configurations, this code system is validated for the calculation of such configurations with a safety margin of 1.5% on ksub(eff). (Auth.)

  14. Risk management: integration of social and technical risk variables into safety assessments of LWR'S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnage, J.J.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A risk management methodology is developed here to formalize the acceptability levels of commercial LWR power plants via the estimation of risk levels acceptable to the public and the integration of such estimates into risk-benefit analysis. Utility theory is used for developing preference models based on value trade-offs among multiple objectives and uncertainties about the impact of alternatives. The method involves reducing the various variables affecting safety acceptability decisions to a single function that provides a metric for acceptability levels. The function accomondates for technical criteria related to design and licensing decisions, as well as public reactions to certain choices

  15. Advantages of retrofitting high velocity separators to LWR turbines; experience in VVR NPP Loviisa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueymes, E.; Peyrelongue, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Erosion-corrosion by wet steam is a concern for VVER operators and also, in numerous LWR power plants of western technology. The backfitting of moisture separators at the HP Turbine outlets is a way to avoid maintenance costs, repairs, replacement of pipes or equipments. Installation of HVS at LOVIISA confirms that this device, whose installation work is reduced to a minimum, is able to remove quite all the water from the steam just a few meters downstream the HP cylinder. A long term operation can be expected for carbon steel equipments, even those previously damaged by erosion-corrosion. (authors). 6 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Uncertainties in criticality analysis which affect the storage and transportation of LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolitani, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Satisfying the design criteria for subcriticality with uncertainties affects: the capacity of LWR storage arrays, maximum allowable enrichment, minimum allowable burnup and economics of various storage options. There are uncertainties due to: calculational method, data libraries, geometric limitations, modelling bias, the number and quality of benchmarks performed and mechanical uncertainties in the array. Yankee Atomic Electric Co. (YAEC) has developed and benchmarked methods to handle: high density storage rack designs, pin consolidation, low density moderation and burnup credit. The uncertainties associated with such criticality analysis are quantified on the basis of clean criticals, power reactor criticals and intercomparison of independent analysis methods

  17. Iodine/steel reactions under severe accident conditions in LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, F.; Greger, G-U.; Hellman, S.; Bleier, A.; Morell, W.

    1994-01-01

    Due to large surface areas, the reaction of volatile, molecular iodine (I 2 ) with steel surfaces in the containment may play an important role in predicting the source term to the environment. Both wall retention of iodine and conversion of volatile into non-volatile iodine compounds at steel surfaces have to be considered. Two types of laboratory experiments were carried out at Siemens/KWU in order to investigate the reaction of I 2 at steel surfaces representative for German power plants. 1) For steel coupons submerged in an I 2 solution at T = 50 deg C, 90 deg C or 140 deg C the reaction rate of the I 2 /I - conversion was determined. No iodine loading was observed on the steel in the aqueous phase tests. I 2 reacts with the steel components (Fe, Cr or Ni) to form metal iodides on the surface which are all immediately dissolved in water under dissociation into the metal and the iodide ions. From these experiments, the I 2 /I - conversion rate constants over the temperature range 50 deg C - 140 deg C as well as the activation energy were determined. The measured data are suitable to be included in severe accident iodine codes such as IMPAIR. 2) Steel tubes were exposed to a steam/I 2 flow under dry air at T=120 deg C and steam-condensing conditions at T= 120 deg C and 160 deg C. In dry air I 2 was retained on the steel surface and a deposition rate constant was measured. Under steam-condensing conditions there is an effective conversion of volatile I 2 to non-volatile I - which is subsequently washed off from the steel surface. The I 2 /I - conversion rate constants suitable for modelling this process were determined. No temperature dependency was found in the range 120 deg C - 160 deg C. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  18. Short Communication on "In-situ TEM ion irradiation investigations on U3Si2 at LWR temperatures"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinbin; Harp, Jason; Mo, Kun; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Baldo, Peter; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-02-01

    The radiation-induced amorphization of U3Si2 was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy using 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation. Both arc-melted and sintered U3Si2 specimens were irradiated at room temperature to confirm the similarity in their responses to radiation. The sintered specimens were then irradiated at 350 °C and 550 °C up to 7.2 × 1015 ions/cm2 to examine their amorphization behavior under light water reactor (LWR) conditions. U3Si2 remains crystalline under irradiation at LWR temperatures. Oxidation of the material was observed at high irradiation doses.

  19. Technical program to study the benefits of nonlinear analysis methods in LWR component designs. Technical report TR-3723-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, P.P.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the study program to assess the benefits of nonlinear analysis methods in Light Water Reactor (LWR) component designs. The current study reveals that despite its increased cost and other complexities, nonlinear analysis is a practical and valuable tool for the design of LWR components, especially under ASME Level D service conditions (faulted conditions) and it will greatly assist in the evaluation of ductile fracture potential of pressure boundary components. Since the nonlinear behavior is generally a local phenomenon, the design of complex components can be accomplished through substructuring isolated localized regions and evaluating them in detail using nonlinear analysis methods

  20. LWR mox fuel experience in Belgium and France with special emphasis on results obtained in BR3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.; Haas, D.; Lippens, M.; Motte, F.; Lebastard, G.; Marin, J.F.

    1986-09-01

    The course of the paper reflects two main topics: LWR MOX fuel experience in Belgium and France, summarizing the fabrication techniques, the references, the underlying MOX fuel technology and the current R and D programs for expanding the data base; behaviour of MOX fuel rods irradiated under steady state and transient operating conditions, focusing on MOX fuel technology features acquired through the irradiations performed in the BR3 PWR, supplemented by tests in the BR2 MTR. This paper focuses on the thermomechanical behaviour of LWR MOX fuel rods, which is intimately related to the fabrication technique and vice-versa. 22 refs

  1. My objective: zero contempt, not zero risk;Mon objectif n'est pas le risque zero mais le zero mepris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delevoye, J.P. [Mediateur de la Republique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-12-15

    With technology, scientific research and dissemination of knowledge, medical practice has improved thereby achieving an efficient health care system. However, it would be appropriate to consider the human dimension of medicine as a key development. There are two major challenges in risk management: organizational management of risk on one hand and the management of human relationship with the patient especially when problems arise, on the other. It is therefore a question of achieving awareness, managing a culture change in the medical circle i.e. moving from a culture of guilt to a culture of error and finally relaxing the atmosphere of mutual distrust that exists between health professionals and patients. Indeed, the relation 'health professional-patient' has deteriorated over time due to poor risk management. An educational effort must be done to avoid frustration of the patient and contribute to zero contempt. On reflection, this means that the quality of a system is due to the individual quality of its members, the quality of methods and the organization in place. (author)

  2. The necessity of improvement for the current LWR fuel assembly homogenization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chuntao; Huang Hao; Zhang Shaohong

    2007-01-01

    When the modern LWR core analysis method is used to do core nuclear design and in-core fuel management calculation, how to accurately obtain the fuel assembly homogenized parameters is a crucial issue. In this paper, taking the NEA C5G7-MOX benchmark problem as a severe test problem, which involves low-enriched uranium assemblies interspersed with MOX assemblies, we have re-examined the applicability of the two major assumptions of the modern equivalence theory for fuel assembly homoge- nization, i.e. the isolated assembly spatial spectrum assumption and the condensed two- group representation assumption. Numerical results have demonstrated that for LWR cores with strong spectrum interaction, both of these two assumptions are no longer applicable and the improvement for the homogenization method is necessary, the current two-group representation should be improved by the multigroup representation and the current reflective assembly boundary condition should be improved by the 'real' assembly boundary condition. This is a research project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10605016). (authors)

  3. Validation of the Nuclear Design Method for MOX Fuel Loaded LWR Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, E.; Inoue, Y.; Mori, M.; Ushio, T.

    2001-01-01

    The actual batch loading of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in light water reactors (LWRs) is now ready to start in Japan. One of the efforts that have been devoted to realizing this batch loading has been validation of the nuclear design methods calculating the MOX-fuel-loaded LWR core characteristics. This paper summarizes the validation work for the applicability of the CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 in-core fuel management code system to MOX-fuel-loaded LWR cores. This code system is widely used by a number of electric power companies for the core management of their commercial LWRs. The validation work was performed for both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Each validation consists of two parts: analyses of critical experiments and core tracking calculations of operating plants. For the critical experiments, we have chosen a series of experiments known as the VENUS International Program (VIP), which was performed at the SCK/CEN MOL laboratory in Belgium. VIP consists of both BWR and PWR fuel assembly configurations. As for the core tracking calculations, the operating data of MOX-fuel-loaded BWR and PWR cores in Europe have been utilized

  4. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented

  5. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  6. Data needs for long-term dry storage of LWR fuel. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Baldwin, D.L.; Pitman, S.G.

    1998-04-01

    The NRC approved dry storage of spent fuel in an inert environment for a period of 20 years pursuant to 10CFR72. However, at-reactor dry storage of spent LWR fuel may need to be implemented for periods of time significantly longer than the NRC's original 20-year license period, largely due to uncertainty as to the date the US DOE will begin accepting commercial spent fuel. This factor is leading utilities to plan not only for life-of-plant spent-fuel storage during reactor operation but also for the contingency of a lengthy post-shutdown storage. To meet NRC standards, dry storage must (1) maintain subcriticality, (2) prevent release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, (3) ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable limits, and (4) maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. In light of these requirements, this study evaluates the potential for storing spent LWR fuel for up to 100 years. It also identifies major uncertainties as well as the data required to eliminate them. Results show that the lower radiation fields and temperatures after 20 years of dry storage promote acceptable fuel behavior and the extension of storage for up to 100 years. Potential changes in the properties of dry storage system components, other than spent-fuel assemblies, must still be evaluated

  7. Study on reprocessing plant during transition period from LWR to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Takashi; Matsui, Minefumi; Nishimura, Masashi; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Mori, Yukihide; Kuroda, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We have proposed a concept of a reprocessing plant suitable for the transition period from the light water reactors (LWRs) to the fast breeder reactors (FBRs) by making comparison of two plant concepts: (1) Independent Plant which processes LWR fuel and FBR fuel in separately constructed lines and (2) Modularized Plant which processes LWR fuel and FBR fuel in a same line. We made construction plans based on the reference power generation plan, and evaluated the Pu supply capability using the power generation plan as an indicator of plant operation flexibility. In general, a margin of processing capacity increases the Pu supply capability. The margin of the Modularized Plant necessary to obtain equivalent Pu supply capability is smaller than that of the Independent Plant. Also the margin of the Independent Plant results in decrease in the plant utilization factor. But the margin of the Modularized Plant results in little decrease in the plant utilization factor, because the Modularized Plant can address the types of reprocessing fuel to adjust to Pu demand and processing capacity. Therefore, the Modularized Plant has a greater potential for the reprocessing plants during transition period. (author)

  8. Decay heat and gamma dose-rate prediction capability in spent LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, G.J.; Schmittroth, F.

    1982-08-01

    The ORIGEN2 code was established as a valid means to predict decay heat from LWR spent fuel assemblies for decay times up to 10,000 year. Calculational uncertainties ranged from 8.6% to a maximum of 16% at 2.5 years and 300 years cooling time, respectively. The calculational uncertainties at 2.5 years cooling time are supported by experiment. Major sources of uncertainty at the 2.5 year cooling time were identifed as irradiation history (5.7%) and nuclear data together with calculational methods (6.3%). The QAD shielding code was established as a valid means to predict interior and exterior gamma dose rates of spent LWR fuel assemblies. A calculational/measurement comparison was done on two assemblies with different irradiation histories and supports a 35% calculational uncertainty at the 1.8 and 3.0 year decay times studied. Uncertainties at longer times are expected to increase, but not significantly, due to an increased contribution from the actinides whose inventories are assigned a higher uncertainty. The uncertainty in decay heat rises to a maximum of 16% due to actinide uncertainties. A previous study was made of the neutron emission rate from a typical Turkey Point Unit 3, Region 4 spent fuel assembly at 5 years decay time. A conservative estimate of the neutron dose rate at the assembly surface was less than 0.5 rem/hr

  9. On the Diffusion Coefficient of Two-step Method for LWR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-01-01

    The few-group constants including diffusion coefficients are generated from the assembly calculation results. Once the assembly calculation is done, the cross sections (XSs) are spatially homogenized, and a critical spectrum calculation is performed in order to take into account the neutron leakages of the lattice. The diffusion coefficient is also generated through the critical spectrum calculation. Three different methods of the critical spectrum calculation such as B1 method, P1 method, and fundamental mode (FM) calculation method are considered in this paper. The diffusion coefficients can also be affected by transport approximations for the transport XS calculation which is used in the assembly transport lattice calculation in order to account for the anisotropic scattering effects. The outflow transport approximation and the inflow transport approximation are investigated in this paper. The accuracy of the few group data especially the diffusion coefficients has been studied to optimize the combination of the transport correction methods and the critical spectrum calculation methods using the UNIST lattice physics code STREAM. The combination of the inflow transport approximation and the FM method is shown to provide the highest accuracy in the LWR core calculations. The methodologies to calculate the diffusion coefficients have been reviewed, and the performances of them have been investigated with a LWR core problem. The combination of the inflow transport approximation and the fundamental mode critical spectrum calculation shows the smallest errors in terms of assembly power distribution

  10. Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1990-08-01

    This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from April to September 1988. Characteristics of the primary mechanism of aging embrittlement (i.e., spinodal decomposition of ferrite) and synergistic effects of alloying and impurity elements that influence the kinetics of the primary mechanism are discussed. Several secondary metallurgical processes of embrittlement, strongly dependent on the C, N, Ni, Mo, and Si content of various heats, are identified. Information on kinetics and data on impact properties are analyzed and correlated with microstructural characteristics to provide a unified method of extrapolating accelerated-aging data to reactor operating conditions. Fracture toughness data are presented for several heats of cast stainless steel aged at temperatures between 320 and 450 degrees C for times up to 10,000 h. Mechanical property data are analyzed to develop the procedure and correlations or predicting the kinetics and extent of embrittlement of reactor components from known material parameters. The method and examples of estimating the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower-bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for cast stainless steels at LWR operating temperatures are defined. 42 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Information on the evolution of severe LWR fuel element damage obtained in the CORA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, G.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Sepold, L.; Schumacher, G.

    1992-01-01

    In the CORA program a series of out-of-pile experiments on LWR severe accidental situations is being performed, in which test bundles of LWR typical components and arrangements (PWR, BWR) are exposed to temperature transients up to about 2400deg C under flowing steam. The individual features of the facility, the test conduct, and the evaluation will be presented. In the frame of the international cooperation in severe fuel damage (SFD) programs the CORA tests are contributing confirmatory and complementary informations to the results from the limited number of in-pile tests. The identification of basic phenomena of the fuel element destruction, observed as a function of temperature, is supported by separate-effects test results. Most important mechanisms are the steam oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding, which determines the temperature escalation, the chemical interaction between UO 2 fuel and cladding, which dominates fuel liquefaction, relocation and resulting blockage formation, as well as chemical interactions with Inconel spacer grids and absorber units ((Ag, In, Cd) alloy or B 4 C), which are leading to extensive low-temperature melt formation around 1200deg C. Interrelations between those basic phenomena, resulting for example in cladding deformation ('flowering') and the dramatic hydrogen formation in response to the fast cooling of a hot bundle by cold water ('quenching') are determining the evolution paths of fuel element destruction, which are to be identified. (orig.)

  12. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  13. The Width of High Burnup Structure in LWR UO2 Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Oh, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2007-01-01

    The measured data available in the open literature on the width of high burnup structure (HBS) in LWR UO 2 fuel were analyzed in terms of pellet average burnup, enrichment, and grain size. Dependence of the HBS width on pellet average burnup was shown to be divided into three regions; while the HBS width is governed by accumulation of fission damage (i.e., burnup) for burnup below 60 GWd/tU, it seems to be restricted to some limiting value of around 1.5 mm for burnup above 75 GWd/tU due to high temperature which might have caused extensive annealing of irradiation damage. As for intermediate burnup between 60 and 75 GWd/tU, although temperature would not have been so high as to induce extensive annealing, the microstructural damage could have been partly annealed, resulting in the reduction of the HBS width. It was found that both enrichment and grain size also affects the HBS width. However, as long as the pellet average burnup is lower than about 75 GWd/tU, the effect does not appear to be significant for the enrichment and grain size that are typically used in current LWR fuel. (authors)

  14. Validation of the AZTRAN 1.1 code with problems Benchmark of LWR reactors; Validacion del codigo AZTRAN 1.1 con problemas Benchmark de reactores LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: amhed.jvq@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The AZTRAN module is a computational program that is part of the AZTLAN platform (Mexican modeling platform for the analysis and design of nuclear reactors) and that solves the neutron transport equation in 3-dimensional using the discrete ordinates method S{sub N}, steady state and Cartesian geometry. As part of the activities of Working Group 4 (users group) of the AZTLAN project, this work validates the AZTRAN code using the 2002 Yamamoto Benchmark for LWR reactors. For comparison, the commercial code CASMO-4 and the free code Serpent-2 are used; in addition, the results are compared with the data obtained from an article of the PHYSOR 2002 conference. The Benchmark consists of a fuel pin, two UO{sub 2} cells and two other of MOX cells; there is a problem of each cell for each type of reactor PWR and BWR. Although the AZTRAN code is at an early stage of development, the results obtained are encouraging and close to those reported with other internationally accepted codes and methodologies. (Author)

  15. Modelling intragranular fission gas release in irradiation of sintered LWR UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesoenen, Pekka

    2002-01-01

    A model for the release of stable fission gases by diffuion from sintered LWR UO 2 fuel grains is presented. The model takes into account intragranular gas bubble behaviour as a function of grain radius. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and the gas migrates to grain boundaries by diffusion of single gas atoms. The intragranular bubble population in the model at low burn-ups or temperatures consists of numerous small bubbles. The presence of the bubbles attenuates the effective gas atom diffusion coefficient. Rapid coarsening of the bubble population in increased burn-up at elevated temperatures weakens significantly the attenuation of the effective diffusion coefficient. The solution method introduced in earlier papers, locally accurate method, is enhanced to allow accurate calculation of the intragranular gas behaviour in time varying conditions without excessive computing time. Qualitatively the detailed model can predict the gas retention in the grain better than a more simple model

  16. Selection methodology for LWR safety programs and proposals. Volume 2. Methodology application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzman, R.L.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    The results of work done to update and apply a methodology for selecting (prioritizing) LWR safety technology R and D programs are described. The methodology is based on multiattribute utility (MAU) theory. Application of the methodology to rank-order a group of specific R and D programs included development of a complete set of attribute utility functions, specification of individual attribute scaling constants, and refinement and use of an interactive computer program (MAUP) to process decision-maker inputs and generate overall (multiattribute) program utility values. The output results from several decision-makers are examined for consistency and conclusions and recommendations regarding general use of the methodology are presented. 3 figures, 18 tables

  17. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan; Memmott, Matthew; Boy, Guy; Charit, Indrajit; Manera, Annalisa; Downar, Thomas; Lee, John; Muldrow, Lycurgus; Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, Wesley; Haghighat, Alierza

    2017-01-01

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project ''Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I 2 S-LWR)''. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  18. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    To contribute to the Department of Energy's identification of needs for improved environmental controls in nuclear fuel cycles, a study was made of a light water reactor system. A reference LWR fuel cycle was defined, and each step in this cycle was characterized by facility description and mainline and effluent treatment process performance. The reference fuel cycle uses fresh uranium in light water reactors. Final treatment and ultimate disposition of waste from the fuel cycle steps were not included, and the waste is assumed to be disposed of by approved but currently undefined means. The characterization of the reference fuel cycle system is intended as basic information for further evaluation of alternative effluent control systems

  19. Verification of the depletion capabilities of the MCNPX code on a LWR MOX fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerba, S.; Hrncir, M.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    The study deals with the verification of the depletion capabilities of the MCNPX code, which is a linked Monte-Carlo depletion code. For such a purpose the IV-B phase of the OECD NEA Burnup credit benchmark has been chosen. The mentioned benchmark is a code to code comparison of the multiplication coefficient k eff and the isotopic composition of a LWR MOX fuel assembly at three given burnup levels and after five years of cooling. The benchmark consists of 6 cases, 2 different Pu vectors and 3 geometry models, however in this study only the fuel assembly calculations with two Pu vectors were performed. The aim of this study was to compare the obtained result with data from the participants of the OECD NEA Burnup Credit project and confirm the burnup capability of the MCNPX code. (Authors)

  20. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 1. Main achievements of the joint study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glibert, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the main achievements of a joint theoretical study aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR wastes, relying to a certain extent on national practices in this particular area, on the basis of economical and radiological criteria. All individual intermediate steps entering a management route, from radioactive-wastes production up to their disposal in near-surface sites or in a deep repository, have been identified, described and cost-evaluated throughout the study. The radiological impact assessment comprises estimates of both individual and collective doses resulting from normal discharges of radioactive effluents and from disposal of radioactive waste products in near-surfaces sites. All specific data concerning the description of the different management routes considered as well as the methodology applied to evaluate cost and radiological impact are detailed in the subsequent volumes of the series (Volumes 2 to 8)

  1. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The IAEA Specialists` Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs.

  2. Critical corrosion issues and mitigation strategies impacting the operability of LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent corrosion experience in US light water reactor nuclear power plants is reviewed with emphasis on mitigation strategies to control the cost of corrosion to LWR operators. Many components have suffered corrosion problems resulting in industry costs of billions of dollars. The most costly issues have been stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel coolant piping in boiling water reactors and corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors. Through industry wide R and D programs these problems are now understood and mitigation strategies have been developed to address the issues in a cost effective manner. Other significant corrosion problems for both reactor types are briefly reviewed. Tremendous progress has been made in controlling corrosion, however, minimizing its impact on plant operations will present a continuing challenge throughout the remaining service lives of these power plants

  3. Evaluation of alternative waste management schemes for LWR hulls and caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudon, L.; Cecille, L.; Klein, M.; Kowa, S.; Mehling, O.; Thiels, G.

    1990-01-01

    LWR hulls and caps represent one of the major sources of α bearing solid waste generated in the nuclear fuel cycle. For this reason, the CEC launched a theoretical study to evaluate alternative schemes for the overall management of this waste. Both volume reduction techniques and α decontamination of the hulls were assessed. The study demonstrated that the transport and disposal of the conditioned waste in deep geological formations play a dominant part in the total management costs. Important cost savings can be achieved through the implementation of efficient volume reduction techniques, i.e. melting or compaction. As an alternative approach, exhaustive α decontamination of the hulls appears promising, provided that the conditioned waste can be made to comply with the disposal criteria of mines. Finally, prolongation of the interim storage period for the waste packages from 1 to 30 years may prove beneficial on the transport costs

  4. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Memmott, Matthew [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Boy, Guy [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lee, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Muldrow, Lycurgus [Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA (United States); Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Haghighat, Alierza [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project “Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I2S-LWR)”. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  5. Estimation of the core-wide fuel rod damage during a LWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Sairanen, R.; Stengaard, J.-O.

    1975-01-01

    The number of fuel rods puncturing during a LWR LOCA must be estimated as a part of the plant radioactivity release analysis. Due to the great number of fuel rods in the core and the great number of contributing parameters, many of them associated with wide uncertainty and/or truly random variability limits, probabilistic methods are well applicable. A succession of computer models developed for this purpose is described together with applications to WWER-440 PWR. Deterministic models are shown to be seriously inadequate and even misleading under certain circumstances. A simple analytical probabilistic model appears to be suitable for many applications. Monte Carlo techniques allow the development of such sophisticated models that errors in the input data presently available probably become dominant in the residual uncertainty of the corewide fuel rod puncture analysis. (author)

  6. Improving the computation efficiency of COBRA-TF for LWR safety analysis of large problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo, D.; Avramova, M. N.; Ivanov, K. N.

    2004-01-01

    A matrix solver is implemented in COBRA-TF in order to improve the computation efficiency of both numerical solution methods existing in the code, the Gauss elimination and the Gauss-Seidel iterative technique. Both methods are used to solve the system of pressure linear equations and relay on the solution of large sparse matrices. The introduced solver accelerates the solution of these matrices in cases of large number of cells. The execution time is reduced in half as compared to the execution time without using matrix solver for the cases with large matrices. The achieved improvement and the planned future work in this direction are important for performing efficient LWR safety analyses of large problems. (authors)

  7. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    To contribute to the Department of Energy's identification of needs for improved environmental controls in nuclear fuel cycles, a study was made of a light water reactor system. A reference LWR fuel cycle was defined, and each step in this cycle was characterized by facility description and mainline and effluent treatment process performance. The reference fuel cycle uses fresh uranium in light water reactors. Final treatment and ultimate disposition of waste from the fuel cycle steps were not included, and the waste is assumed to be disposed of by approved but currently undefined means. The characterization of the reference fuel cycle system is intended as basic information for further evaluation of alternative effluent control systems.

  8. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  9. Recent results from CEC cost sharing research programme on LWR fuel behaviour under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The present structure and intentions of the CEC sponsored cost sharing programme for LWR safety research are outlined. Detailed results are reported for two projects from this programme. The first project concerns experimental data on the thermohydraulic effects of flow diversion around ballooned fuel rods. Data are presented on single and two phase heat transfer in an electrically heated rod bundle. Detailed photographic data on droplet behaviour are also given. The second project is an investigation of the effects of zircaloy oxidation on rewetting during reflood. It is shown that as oxide thickness increases from 1μm to 76μm that rewet rates can increase by up to 40%. A systematic effect of oxidation on rewet temperatures is also noted. (author)

  10. Fabrication of Multi-Layerd SiC Composite Tube for LWR Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daejong; Jung, Choonghwan; Kim, Weonju; Park, Jiyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jongmin [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this study, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) methods were employed for the fabrication of the composite tubes. SiC ceramics and SiC-based composites have recently been studied for LWR fuel cladding applications because of good mechanical/physical properties, neutron irradiation resistance and excellent compatibility with coolant under severe accident. A multi-layered SiC composite tube as the nuclear fuel cladding is composed of the monolith SiC inner layer, SiC/SiC composite intermediate layer, and monolith SiC outer layer. Since all constituents should be highly pure, stoichiometric to achieve the good properties, it has been considered that the chemical process is a well-suited technique for the fabrication of the SiC phases.

  11. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S. J. [ed.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  13. Mechanical damage due to corrosion of parts of pump technology and valves of LWR power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, J.; Krumpl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two types are described of uneven corrosion of austenitic chromium-nickel steel: pitting and slit corrosion. The occurrence of slit corrosion is typical of parts of pumping technology and valves. The corrosion damage of austenitic chromium-nickel steels spreads as intergranular, transgranular or mixed corrosion. In nuclear power facilities with LWR's, intergranular corrosion is due to chlorides and sulphur compounds while transgranular corrosion is due to the presence of dissolved oxygen and chlorides. In mechanically stressed parts, stress corrosion takes place. The recommended procedures are discussed of reducing the corrosion-mechanical damage of pumping equipment of light water reactors during design, production and assembly. During the service of the equipment, corrosion cracks are detected using nondestructive methods and surface cracks are repaired by grinding and welding. (E.S.)

  14. AFCI : Co-extraction impacts on LWR and fast reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwo, T. A.; Szakalay, F. J.; Kim, T. K.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the impact of the co-extraction COEXTM process on reactor performance has been performed. The proliferation implication of the process was also evaluated using the critical mass, radioactivity, decay heat and neutron and gamma source rates and gamma doses as indicators. The use of LWR-spent-uranium-based MOX fuel results in a higher initial plutonium content requirement in an LWR MOX core than if natural uranium based MOX fuel is used (by about 1%); the plutonium for both cases is derived from the spent LWR spent fuel. More transuranics are consequently discharged in the spent fuel of the MOX core. The presence of U-236 in the initial fuel was also found to result in higher content of Np-237 in the spent MOX fuel and less consumption of Pu-238 and Am-241 in the MOX core. The higher quantities of Np-237 (factor of 5), Pu-238 (20%) and Am-241 (14%) decrease the effective repository utilization, relative to the use of natural uranium in the PWR MOX core. Additionally, the minor actinides continue to accumulate in the fuel cycle, even if the U-Pu co-extraction products are continuously recycled in the PWR cores, and thus a solution is required for the minor actinides. The utilization of plutonium derived from LWR spent fuel versus weapons-grade plutonium for the startup core of a 1,000 MWT advanced burner fast reactor (ABR) increases the TRU content by about 4%. Differences are negligible for the equilibrium recycle core. The impact of using reactor spent uranium instead of depleted uranium was found to be relatively smaller in the fast reactor (TRU content difference less than 0.4%). The critical masses of the co-extraction products were found to be higher than that of weapons-grade plutonium and the decay heat and radiation sources of the materials (products) were also found to be generally higher than that of weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) in the transuranics content range of 0.1 to 1.0 in the heavy-metal. The magnitude of the

  15. Tools for LWR spent fuel characterization: Assembly classes and fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.S.; Notz, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Characteristics Data Base (CDB) is sponsored by the DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The CDB provides a single, comprehensive source of data pertaining to radioactive wastes that will or may require geologic disposal, including detailed data describing the physical, quantitative, and radiological characteristics of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. In developing the CDB, tools for the classification of fuel assembly types have been developed. The assembly class scheme is particularly useful for size- and handling-based describes these tools and presents results of their applications in the areas of fuel assembly type identification, characterization of projected discharges, cask accommodation analyses, and defective fuel analyses. Suggestions for additional applications are also made. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of age-hardenable nickel-base alloys in LWR-conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekkonen, T.; Haenninen, H.

    1985-01-01

    At present it seems that the microstructure most resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in high temperature water is obtained by a solution annealing treatment at a relatively high temperature (appr. 1100 deg C) followed by water quenching and a single aging treatment (appr. 700 deg C/20 h). This should produce a microstructure with a high M 23 Cc 6 :MC ratio, semi-continous coherent M 23 C 6 precipitation, and an evenly distributed gamma prime in the matrix. However, since the actual mechanism of SCC in age-hardenable Ni-base alloys is unclear, the microstructural features resulting in the good resistance to SCC cannot be specified. Furthermore, the possible microstructural changes caused by prolonged use in LWR-conditions are unknown

  17. Vectorization of LWR transient analysis code RELAP5/MOD1 and its effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Misako; Harada, Hiroo; Shinozawa, Naohisa; Naraoka, Ken-itsu

    1985-03-01

    The RELAP5/MOD1 is a large thermal-hydraulic code to analyze LWR LOCA and non-LOCA transients. The code originally was designed for use on a CDC Cyber-176. This report documents vectorization of the RELAP5/MOD1 code conducted for the purpose of efficient use of VP-100 (peak speed 250 MFLOPS, clock period 7.5 ns) at the JAERI. The code was vectorized using the junction and volume level parallelisms in the hydrodynamic calculations, and the heat-structure and heat-mesh level in the heat conduction calculations. The vectorized version runs as much as 2.4 to 2.8 times faster than the original scalar version, while the speedup ratio is dependent on the number of spactial cells included in the problem. (author)

  18. Least squares methodology applied to LWR-PV damage dosimetry, experience and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagschal, J.J.; Broadhead, B.L.; Maerker, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The development of an advanced methodology for Light Water Reactors (LWR) Pressure Vessel (PV) damage dosimetry applications is the subject of an ongoing EPRI-sponsored research project at ORNL. This methodology includes a generalized least squares approach to a combination of data. The data include measured foil activations, evaluated cross sections and calculated fluxes. The uncertainties associated with the data as well as with the calculational methods are an essential component of this methodology. Activation measurements in two NBS benchmark neutron fields ( 252 Cf ISNF) and in a prototypic reactor field (Oak Ridge Pool Critical Assembly - PCA) are being analyzed using a generalized least squares method. The sensitivity of the results to the representation of the uncertainties (covariances) was carefully checked. Cross element covariances were found to be of utmost importance

  19. Plant for retention of 14C in reprocessing plants for LWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Gutowski, H.; Bonka, H.; Gruendler, D.

    1983-01-01

    The 14 C produced from nuclear power plants is actually totally emitted from nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants. Using the radiation protection principles proposed in ICRP 26, 14 C should be retained at heavy water moderated reactors and reprocessing plants due to a cost-benefit analysis. In the frame of a research work to cost-benefit analysis, which was sponsored by the Federal Minister of the Interior, an industrial plant for 14 C retention at reprocessing plants for LWR fuel elements has been planned according to the double alkali process. The double alkali process has been chosen because of the sufficient operation experience in the conventional chemical technique. In order to verify some operational parameters and to gain experiences, a cold test plant was constructed. The experiment results showed that the double alkali process is a technically suitable method with high operation security. Solidifying CaCO 3 with cement gives a product fit for final disposal

  20. Aging assessment and mitigation for major LWR [light water reactor] components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Y.N.; Ware, A.G.; Conley, D.A.; MacDonald, P.E.; Burns, J.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the results of the Aging Assessment and Mitigation Project sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of the project is to develop an understanding of the aging degradation of the major light water reactor (LWR) structures and components and to develop methods for predicting the useful life of these components so that the impact of aging on the safe operation of nuclear power plants can be evaluated and addressed. The research effort consists of integrating, evaluating, and updating the available aging-related information. This paper discusses current accomplishments and summarizes the significant degradation processes active in two major components: pressurized water reactor pressurizer surge and spray lines and nozzles, and light water reactor primary coolant pumps. This paper also evaluates the effectiveness of the current inservice inspection programs and presents conclusions and recommendations related to aging of these two major components. 37 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  1. CONTAIN 2.0 code release and the transition to licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, K.K.; Griffith, R.O.; Bergeron, K.D.; Tills, J.

    1997-10-01

    CONTAIN is a reactor accident simulation code developed by Sandia National Laboratories under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to provide integrated analysis of containment phenomena, including those related to nuclear reactor containment loads and radiological source terms. The recently released CONTAIN 2.0 code version represents a significant advance in CONTAIN modeling capabilities over the last major code release (CONTAIN 1.12V). The new modeling capabilities are discussed here. The principal motivation for many of the recent model improvements has been to allow CONTAIN to model the special features in advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs. The work done in this area is also summarized. In addition to the ALWR work, the USNRC is currently engaged in an effort to qualify CONTAIN for more general use in licensing, with the intent of supplementing or possibly replacing traditional licensing codes. To qualify the CONTAIN code for licensing applications, studies utilizing CONTAIN 2.0 are in progress. A number of results from this effort are presented in this paper to illustrate the code capabilities. In particular, CONTAIN calculations of the NUPEC M-8-1 and ISP-23 experiments and CVTR test number-sign 3 are presented to illustrate (1) the ability of CONTAIN to model non-uniform gas density and/or temperature distributions, and (2) the relationship between such gas distributions and containment loads. CONTAIN and CONTEMPT predictions for a large break loss of coolant accident scenario in the San Onofre plant are also compared

  2. Testing of LWR fuel rods to support criticality safety analysis of transport accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, P.C. [BNFL International Transport, Spent Fuel Services (United Kingdom); Dallongeville, M. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France)

    2004-07-01

    For the transport of low enriched materials, criticality safety may be demonstrated by applying pessimistic modelling assumptions that bound any realistic case. Where Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel is being transported, enrichment levels are usually too high to permit this approach and more realistic data is needed. This requires a method by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions can be approximated or bounded. In 2000, BNFL and COGEMA LOGISTICS jointly commenced the Fuel Integrity Project (FIP) whose objective was to develop such methods. COGEMA LOGISTICS were well advanced with a method for determining the impact response of unirradiated fuel, but required further test data before acceptance by the Transport Regulators. The joint project team extensively discussed the required inputs to the FIP, from which it was agreed that BNFL would organise new tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS would take major responsibility for evaluating the test results. Tests on unirradiated fuel rod samples involved both dynamic and quasi-static loading on fuel samples. PWR fuel rods loaded with uranium pellets were dropped vertically from 9m onto a rigid target and this was repeated on BWR fuel rods, similar tests on empty fuel rods were also conducted. Quasi-static tests were conducted on 530 mm long PWR and BWR fuel specimens under axial loading. Tests on irradiated fuel samples were conducted on high burn-up fuel rods of both PWR and BWR types. These were believed original to the FIP project and involved applying bending loads to simply supported pressurised rod specimens. In one test the fuel rod was heated to nearly 500oC during loading, all specimens were subject to axial impact before testing. Considerable experience of fuel rod testing and new data was gained from this test programme.

  3. New Developments in Actinides Burning with Symbiotic LWR-HTR-GCFR Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomboni, Eleonora

    2008-01-01

    The long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste is currently the main drawback of nuclear power production. Particularly, isotopes of Neptunium and Plutonium along with some long-lived fission products are dangerous for more than 100000 years. 96% of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel consists of actinides, hence it is able to produce a lot of energy by fission if recycled. Goals of Generation IV Initiative are reduction of long-term radiotoxicity of waste to be stored in geological repositories, a better exploitation of nuclear fuel resources and proliferation resistance. Actually, all these issues are intrinsically connected with each other. It is quite clear that these goals can be achieved only by combining different concepts of Gen. IV nuclear cores in a 'symbiotic' way. Light-Water Reactor - (Very) High Temperature Reactor ((V)HTR) - Fast Reactor (FR) symbiotic cycles have good capabilities from the viewpoints mentioned above. Particularly, HTR fuelled by Plutonium oxide is able to reach an ultra-high burn-up and to burn Neptunium and Plutonium effectively. In contrast, not negligible amounts of Americium and Curium build up in this core, although the total mass of Heavy Metals (HM) is reduced. Americium and Curium are characterised by an high radiological hazard as well. Nevertheless, at least Plutonium from HTR (rich in non-fissile nuclides) and, if appropriate, Americium can be used as fuel for Fast Reactors. If necessary, dedicated assemblies for Minor Actinides (MA) burning can be inserted in Fast Reactors cores. This presentation focuses on combining HTR and Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) concepts, fuelled by spent LWR fuel and depleted uranium if need be, to obtain a net reduction of total mass and radiotoxicity of final waste. The intrinsic proliferation resistance of this cycle is highlighted as well. Additionally, some hints about possible Curium management strategies are supplied. Besides, a preliminary assessment of different chemical forms of

  4. Testing of LWR fuel rods to support criticality safety analysis of transport accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, P.C.; Dallongeville, M.

    2004-01-01

    For the transport of low enriched materials, criticality safety may be demonstrated by applying pessimistic modelling assumptions that bound any realistic case. Where Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel is being transported, enrichment levels are usually too high to permit this approach and more realistic data is needed. This requires a method by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions can be approximated or bounded. In 2000, BNFL and COGEMA LOGISTICS jointly commenced the Fuel Integrity Project (FIP) whose objective was to develop such methods. COGEMA LOGISTICS were well advanced with a method for determining the impact response of unirradiated fuel, but required further test data before acceptance by the Transport Regulators. The joint project team extensively discussed the required inputs to the FIP, from which it was agreed that BNFL would organise new tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS would take major responsibility for evaluating the test results. Tests on unirradiated fuel rod samples involved both dynamic and quasi-static loading on fuel samples. PWR fuel rods loaded with uranium pellets were dropped vertically from 9m onto a rigid target and this was repeated on BWR fuel rods, similar tests on empty fuel rods were also conducted. Quasi-static tests were conducted on 530 mm long PWR and BWR fuel specimens under axial loading. Tests on irradiated fuel samples were conducted on high burn-up fuel rods of both PWR and BWR types. These were believed original to the FIP project and involved applying bending loads to simply supported pressurised rod specimens. In one test the fuel rod was heated to nearly 500oC during loading, all specimens were subject to axial impact before testing. Considerable experience of fuel rod testing and new data was gained from this test programme

  5. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 1: Plenary sessions; Pressure vessel research; BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; Environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; Update on severe accident code improvements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1998-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following information: (1) plenary sessions; (2) pressure vessel research; (3) BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; (4) environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; and (5) update on severe accident code improvements and applications. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  6. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 1: Plenary sessions; Pressure vessel research; BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; Environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; Update on severe accident code improvements and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following information: (1) plenary sessions; (2) pressure vessel research; (3) BWR strainer blockage and other generic safety issues; (4) environmentally assisted degradation of LWR components; and (5) update on severe accident code improvements and applications. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of solidification agents used and products formed with radioactive wastes at LWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    Solidification of evaporator concentrates, filter sludges, and spent ion exchange resins used in LWR streams is discussed. The introduction of solidification agents to immobilize these sludges and resins can increase the volume of these wastes by a factor of slightly over 1 to greater than 2, depending on the binder chosen. The agents and methods used or proposed for use in solidification of LWR power plant wastes are generally suitable for treating most of the other-than-high-level wastes generated throughout the entire fuel cycle. Among the solidification agents most commonly used or suggested for use are the inorganic cements and organic plastics, which are listed and compared. A summary of considerations important in choosing a solidification agent is presented tabularly

  8. Legal, institutional, and political issues in transportation of nuclear materials at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippek, H.E.; Schuller, C.R.

    1979-03-01

    A study was conducted to identify major legal and institutional problems and issues in the transportation of spent fuel and associated processing wastes at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle. (Most of the discussion centers on the transportation of spent fuel, since this activity will involve virtually all of the legal and institutional problems likely to be encountered in moving waste materials, as well.) Actions or approaches that might be pursued to resolve the problems identified in the analysis are suggested. Two scenarios for the industrial-scale transportation of spent fuel and radioactive wastes, taken together, high-light most of the major problems and issues of a legal and institutional nature that are likely to arise: (1) utilizing the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) facility at Barnwell, SC, as a temporary storage facility for spent fuel; and (2) utilizing AGNS for full-scale commercial reprocessing of spent LWR fuel

  9. Legal, institutional, and political issues in transportation of nuclear materials at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippek, H.E.; Schuller, C.R.

    1979-03-01

    A study was conducted to identify major legal and institutional problems and issues in the transportation of spent fuel and associated processing wastes at the back end of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle. (Most of the discussion centers on the transportation of spent fuel, since this activity will involve virtually all of the legal and institutional problems likely to be encountered in moving waste materials, as well.) Actions or approaches that might be pursued to resolve the problems identified in the analysis are suggested. Two scenarios for the industrial-scale transportation of spent fuel and radioactive wastes, taken together, high-light most of the major problems and issues of a legal and institutional nature that are likely to arise: (1) utilizing the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) facility at Barnwell, SC, as a temporary storage facility for spent fuel; and (2) utilizing AGNS for full-scale commercial reprocessing of spent LWR fuel.

  10. Parameters' influence estimation on Puf supply and demand in transitional period from LWR to FBR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Ohta, Hirokazu; Inoue, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Plutonium fissile (Puf) amounts to balance supply and demand during transition period were evaluated with different parameters. Estimated total Puf demand in transitional period was sensitive to deployment speed of FBR. Because FBRs will be deployed as replacements of old LWRs for keeping total capacity, deployment history of existing LWRs should be taken into consideration. According to the estimation, LWR fuel burnup and utilized capacity are not big issue. Because certain amount of LWR spent fuel will remain in early phase of transitional period, there is enough time for preparing Puf supply. On the other hand, FBR fuel cycle time (SF cooling time + fuel fabrication time) have large impact on Puf supply. Fuel cycle technologies including transportation for applying to short cooling spent fuels should be developed. (author)

  11. Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Part II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Turnage, J.J.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning overview of literature relating to radiation exposure and operating experience; details of LWR-MTC3 classification system; histograms for individual BWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; histograms for individual PWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; and Fortran program for M and T data clustering

  12. Evaluation of conceptual flowsheets for incorporating Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel materials in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.T.; Burch, W.D.; Collins, E.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Prince, B.E.; Bond, W.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Delene, J.G.; Mailen, J.C.

    1990-08-01

    A preliminary study by a group of experts at ORNL has generated and evaluated a number of aqueous and non-aqueous flowsheets for recovering transuranium actinides from LWR fuel for use as fuel in an LMR and, at the same time, for transmutation of the wastes to less hazardous materials. The need for proliferation resistance was a consideration in the flowsheets. The current state of development of the flowsheets was evaluated and recommendations for additional study were made. 3 refs., 6 figs

  13. Minutes of the 13th light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry improvement program (LWR-PV-SDIP) meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Information is presented concerning ASTM LWR standards and program documentation; trend curves, PSF, and other test reactor metallurgical programs; PSF dosimetry and metallurgical capsule neutron and gamma environment characterization and metallurgical studies; PVS characterization program; other neutron fields; surveillance dosimetry measurement facility (SDMF) and perturbation studies; transport theory calculations; gamma field benchmarks and photo-reaction studies; and fission and non-fission sensor inventories and quality assurance

  14. Some difference of concepts between design guideline for FBR base isolation system and aseismic design guideline of LWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Heki

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the concept and the relation of 'the Base Isolation System and FBR' to the Safety Criteria and the Guideline of the Aseismic Design of LWR in Japan. The Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industries have been working for FBR last several years. The author has been contribute to their works, and this is one of the subjects. He described his own idea obtained through the cooperative work with CRIEPI. (author)

  15. Fast reactor core design studies to cope with TRU fuel composition changes in the LWR-to-FBR transition period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Maruyama, Shuhei; Ohki, Shigeo; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project), sodium-cooled fast reactor core design efforts have been made to cope with the TRU fuel composition changes expected during LWR-to-FBR transition period, in which a various kind of TRU fuel compositions are available depending on the characteristics of the LWR spent fuels and a way of recycling them. A 750 MWe mixed-oxide fuel core is firstly defined as a FaCT medium-size reference core and its neutronics characteristics are determined. The core is a high internal conversion type and has an average burnup of 150 GWD/T. The reference TRU fuel composition is assumed to come from the FBR equilibrium state. Compared to the LWR-to-FBR transition period, the TRU fuels in the FBR equilibrium period are multi-recycled through fast reactors and have a different composition. An available TRU fuel composition is determined by fast reactor spent fuel multi-recycling scenarios. Then the FaCT core corresponding to the TRU fuel with different compositions is set according to the TRU fuel composition changes in LWR-to-FBR transition period, and the key core neutronics characteristics are assessed. It is shown that among the core neutronics characteristics, the burnup reactivity and the safety parameters such as sodium void reactivity and Doppler coefficient are significantly influenced by the TRU fuel composition changes. As a result, a general characteristic in the FaCT core design to cope with TRU fuel composition changes is grasped and the design envelopes are identified in terms of the burnup reactivity and the safety parameters. (author)

  16. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  17. Fracture toughness evaluation of select advanced replacement alloys for LWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Xiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments by 2024. Fracture toughness is one of the key engineering properties required for core internal materials. Together with other properties, which are being examined such as high-temperature steam oxidation resistance, radiation hardening, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking resistance, the alloys will be down-selected for neutron irradiation study and comprehensive post-irradiation examinations. According to the candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, ductile fracture toughness of eight alloys was evaluated at room temperature and the LWR-relevant temperatures. The tested alloys include two ferritic alloys (Grade 92 and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy 14YWT), two austenitic stainless steels (316L and 310), four Ni-base superalloys (718A, 725, 690, and X750). Alloy 316L and X750 are included as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. Compact tension specimens in 0.25T and 0.2T were machined from the alloys in the T-L and R-L orientations according to the product forms of the alloys. This report summarizes the final results of the specimens tested and analyzed per ASTM Standard E1820. Unlike the

  18. Stylized whole-core benchmark of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hon, Ryan; Kooreman, Gabriel; Rahnema, Farzad; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A stylized benchmark specification of the I2S-LWR core. • A library of cross sections were generated in both 8 and 47 groups. • Monte Carlo solutions generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. • Cross sections and pin fission densities provided in journal’s repository. - Abstract: The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept under development by a multi-institutional team led by Georgia Tech. The core is similar in size to small 2-loop PWRs while having the power level of current large reactors (∼1000 MWe) but using uranium silicide fuel and advanced stainless steel cladding. A stylized benchmark specification of the I 2 S-LWR core has been developed in order to test whole-core neutronics codes and methods. For simplification the core was split into 57 distinct material regions for cross section generation. Cross sections were generated using the lattice physics code HELIOS version 1.10 in both 8 and 47 groups. Monte Carlo solutions, including eigenvalue and pin fission densities, were generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. Due to space limitations in this paper, the full cross section library and normalized pin fission density results are provided in the journal’s electronic repository.

  19. Testing round robin on cyclic crack growth of low and medium sulfur A533-B steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Komai, K.; Nakajima, H.; Higuchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    After the facts of environmentally assisted crack growth of low alloy steel was first observed when cyclically loaded in high temperature water. The subject has been extensively studied in connection with the evaluation of the integrity of LWR pressure boundary materials. In 1977, International Cooperative Group on Cyclic Crack Growth Rate Testing Evaluation (the ICCGR group) was organized for more systematic and effective solution of the problem. Successful results have been reported on the programs of the ICCGR activity, particularly in the promotion of a couple of programs of testing round robin and the associated research. JAERI also organized a domestic group of 15 organizations as the Corrosion Fatigue Subcommittee(JCF) of the LWR Safety Research Committee to carry out the similar test program. The group has been evaluating the behavior of steels representing the range of quality for the existing Japanese LWR plants. This paper describes the present status of the Japanese domestic testing round robin and related research especially focused on the test methodology

  20. A simplified computational scheme for thermal analysis of LWR spent fuel dry storage and transportation casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Hyun

    1997-02-01

    A simplified computational scheme for thermal analysis of the LWR spent fuel dry storage and transportation casks has been developed using two-step thermal analysis method incorporating effective thermal conductivity model for the homogenized spent fuel assembly. Although a lot of computer codes and analytical models have been developed for application to the fields of thermal analysis of dry storage and/or transportation casks, some difficulties in its analysis arise from the complexity of the geometry including the rod bundles of spent fuel and the heat transfer phenomena in the cavity of cask. Particularly, if the disk-type structures such as fuel baskets and aluminium heat transfer fins are included, the thermal analysis problems in the cavity are very complex. To overcome these difficulties, cylindrical coordinate system is adopted to calculate the temperature profile of a cylindrical cask body using the multiple cylinder model as the step-1 analysis of the present study. In the step-2 analysis, Cartesian coordinate system is adopted to calculate the temperature distributions of the disk-type structures such as fuel basket and aluminium heat transfer fin using three- dimensional conduction analysis model. The effective thermal conductivity for homogenized spent fuel assembly based on Manteufel and Todreas model is incorporated in step-2 analysis to predict the maximum fuel temperature. The presented two-step computational scheme has been performed using an existing HEATING 7.2 code and the effective thermal conductivity for the homogenized spent fuel assembly has been calculated by additional numerical analyses. Sample analyses of five cases are performed for NAC-STC including normal transportation condition to examine the applicability of the presented simplified computational scheme for thermal analysis of the large LWR spent fuel dry storage and transportation casks and heat transfer characteristics in the cavity of the cask with the disk-type structures