WorldWideScience

Sample records for contaminant hydrogeology research

  1. A review of non-invasive imaging methods and applications in contaminant hydrogeology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Changyong; Brusseau, Mark L; Oostrom, Mart; Baumann, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Contaminant hydrogeological processes occurring in porous media are typically not amenable to direct observation. As a result, indirect measurements (e.g., contaminant breakthrough at a fixed location) are often used to infer processes occurring at different scales, locations, or times. To overcome this limitation, non-invasive imaging methods are increasingly being used in contaminant hydrogeology research. Four of the most common methods, and the subjects of this review, are optical imaging using UV or visible light, dual-energy gamma radiation, X-ray microtomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Non-invasive imaging techniques have provided valuable insights into a variety of complex systems and processes, including porous media characterization, multiphase fluid distribution, fluid flow, solute transport and mixing, colloidal transport and deposition, and reactions. In this paper we review the theory underlying these methods, applications of these methods to contaminant hydrogeology research, and methods' advantages and disadvantages. As expected, there is no perfect method or tool for non-invasive imaging. However, optical methods generally present the least expensive and easiest options for imaging fluid distribution, solute and fluid flow, colloid transport, and reactions in artificial two-dimensional (2D) porous media. Gamma radiation methods present the best opportunity for characterization of fluid distributions in 2D at the Darcy scale. X-ray methods present the highest resolution and flexibility for three-dimensional (3D) natural porous media characterization, and 3D characterization of fluid distributions in natural porous media. And MRI presents the best option for 3D characterization of fluid distribution, fluid flow, colloid transport, and reaction in artificial porous media. Obvious deficiencies ripe for method development are the ability to image transient processes such as fluid flow and colloid transport in natural porous media in three

  2. Contaminant Hydrogeology, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James E.

    Groundwater is a valuable resource that has received much attention over the last couple of decades. Extremely large sums of money have been and will be spent on groundwater contamination problems and the public has become increasingly sensitive to groundwater issues. Groundwater contamination has even become the subject of a major Hollywood movie with the recent release of A Civil Action starring John Travolta. The high profile of groundwater contaminant problems, the associated relatively strong job market over the last 20 years, and the general shift toward an environmental emphasis in science and engineering have resulted in a sustained high demand for senior undergraduate courses and graduate programs in hydrogeology Many voice the opinion that we have seen the peak demand for hydrogeologists pass, but the placement of graduates from hydrogeology programs into career-oriented positions has remained very high.

  3. Case studies in organic contaminant hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effective management of domestic solid waste and hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste is a major problem in the area of environmental geology and water sciences throughout the world. A series of case studies is presented of organic contaminants from both solid and hazardous waste disposal facilities to provide examples of these problems. The facilities were investigated to determine risks and liabilities before acquisition, to determine the site hydrogeologic conditions for design of appropriate groundwater monitoring plans, and/or to determine the potential for groundwater contamination. The case studies are of disposal facilities located in glacial tills, carbonaceous weathered clay soils, weathered shale, limestone bedrock, dolomite bedrock, and alluvial and sedimentary deposits. The results of these studies and investigations show certain relationships in the distribution of organic pollutants to the different geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of each facility. In each of the four case studies, all 129 priority pollutants were analyzed in private wells and/or monitoring wells. The 31 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the priority pollutant list were the majority of organic compounds detected. When VOCs are found in groundwater impacted by disposal facilities, they are present in groups and tend to be distributed in patterns based on their relative concentrations. It is rare to find only one or two VOCs from facilities where leakage has been detected. The ethylenes and ethanes appear to be more prevalent and mobile than aromatic VOCs. The aromatics are restricted primarily to leachates and wastes and in monitoring wells located adjacent to facilities. 2 refs., 15 figs

  4. West Siberian basin hydrogeology - regional framework for contaminant migration from injected wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.

    1994-05-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle activities of the former Soviet Union (FSU) have resulted in massive contamination of the environment in western Siberia. We are developing three-dimensional numerical models of the hydrogeology and potential contaminant migration in the West Siberian Basin. Our long-term goal at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is to help determine future environmental and human impacts given the releases that have occurred to date and the current waste management practices. In FY 1993, our objectives were to (1) refine and implement the hydrogeologic conceptual models of the regional hydrogeology of western Siberia developed in FY 1992 and develop the detailed, spatially registered digital geologic and hydrologic databases to test them, (2) calibrate the computer implementation of the conceptual models developed in FY 1992, and (3) develop general geologic and hydrologic information and preliminary hydrogeologic conceptual models relevant to the more detailed models of contaminated site hydrogeology. Calibration studies of the regional hydrogeologic computer model suggest that most precipitation entering the ground-water system moves in the near-surface part of the system and discharges to surface waters relatively near its point of infiltration. This means that wastes discharged to the surface and near-surface may not be isolated as well as previously thought, since the wastes may be carried to the surface by gradually rising ground waters

  5. Expert panel on hydrogeology; report to AECL Research (1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenico, P.A.; Grisak, G.E.; Schwartz, F.W.

    1995-02-01

    In 1992 AECL Research convened a panel of external hydrogeological experts consisting of P.A. Domenico, G.E. Grisak, and F.W. Schwartz, to review AECL's proposed approach to siting a geological repository in the rocks of the Canadian Shield for the safe disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. In particular the panel was asked to provide its opinion on 1) the soundness of the technical approach developed to characterize the groundwater flow systems for the purpose of selecting a location for a disposal vault, 2) the validity and effectiveness of the geological case study used to demonstrate the performance assessment methodology based on the hydrogeological conditions observed at the Whiteshell Research Area, and 3) the adequacy of the hydrogeological information that AECL proposes to use in its Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the disposal concept. This report presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the hydrogeology review panel. The report was submitted to AECL Research in 1992 December. (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  6. Hydrophysical logging: A new wellbore technology for hydrogeologic and contaminant characterization of aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedler, W.H.; Williams, L.L.; Head, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    In the continuing search for improved groundwater characterization technologies, a new wellbore fluid logging method has recently been developed to provide accurate and cost effective hydrogeologic and contaminant characterization of bedrock aquifers. This new technique, termed hydrophysical logging, provides critical information for contaminated site characterization and water supply studies and, in addition, offers advantages compared to existing industry standards for aquifer characterization. Hydrophysical logging is based on measuring induced electrical conductivity changes in the fluid column of a wellbore by employing advanced downhole water quality instrumentation specifically developed for the dynamic borehole environment. Hydrophysical logging contemporaneously identifies the locations of water bearing intervals, the interval-specific inflow rate during pumping, and in-situ hydrochemistry of the formation waters associated with each producing interval. In addition, by employing a discrete point downhole fluid sampler during hydrophysical logging, this technique provides evaluation of contaminant concentrations and migration of contaminants vertically within the borehole. Recently, hydrophysical logging was applied in a deep bedrock wellbore at an industrial site in New Hampshire contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The results of the hydrophysical logging, conducted as part of a hydrogeologic site investigation and feasibility study, facilitated investigation of the site by providing information which indicated that the contamination had not penetrated into deeper bedrock fractures at concentrations of concern. This information was used to focus the pending Remedial Action Plan and to provide a more cost-effective remedial design

  7. Integrated socio-hydrogeological approach to tackle nitrate contamination in groundwater resources. The case of Grombalia Basin (Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, V; Sacchi, E; Kammoun, S; Tringali, C; Trabelsi, R; Zouari, K; Daniele, S

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate contamination still remains one of the main groundwater quality issues in several aquifers worldwide, despite the perduring efforts of the international scientific community to effectively tackle this problem. The classical hydrogeological and isotopic investigations are obviously of paramount importance for the characterization of contaminant sources, but are clearly not sufficient for the correct and long-term protection of groundwater resources. This paper aims at demonstrating the effectiveness of the socio-hydrogeological approach as the best tool to tackle groundwater quality issues, while contributing bridging the gap between science and society. An integrated survey, including land use, hydrochemical (physicochemical parameters and major ions) and isotopic (δ 15 N NO3 and δ 18 O NO3 ) analyses, coupled to capacity building and participatory activities was carried out to correctly attribute the nitrate origin in groundwater from the Grombalia Basin (North Tunisia), a region where only synthetic fertilizers have been generally identified as the main source of such pollution. Results demonstrates that the basin is characterized by high nitrate concentrations, often exceeding the statutory limits for drinking water, in both the shallow and deep aquifers, whereas sources are associated to both agricultural and urban activities. The public participation of local actors proved to be a fundamental element for the development of the hydrogeological investigation, as it permitted to obtain relevant information to support data interpretation, and eventually guaranteed the correct assessment of contaminant sources in the studied area. In addition, such activity, if adequately transferred to regulators, will ensure the effective adoption of management practices based on the research outcomes and tailored on the real needs of the local population, proving the added value to include it in any integrated investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. A review of hydrogeology research techniques and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisak, G.E.; Pickens, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    A review of techniques and technology pertaining to the movement of ground water, solutes/radionuclides and heat through porous and fractured media has been conducted. The theory describing each of these processes has been presented in terms of their partial differential equations. The equations serve as the basis for the identification of processes. These parameters have been discussed in detail with regards to their importance in controlling the overall transport processes. A hypothetical research program has been assembled for the purpose of illustrating the hydrogeologic methods and research techniques applicable to site characterization studies. Areas where the current state of the art is lacking have been identified and the necessary research has been recommended. 103 refs

  9. Essential application of depositional analysis and interpretation in hydrogeologic assessments of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciacca, J.

    1991-01-01

    In most hydrogeologic studies of contaminated sites, little attention is given to analysis of depositional environments and associated depositional patterns. This analysis is essential for sedimentary deposits present at a majority of these sites. The depositional processes associated with alluvial, fluvial and deltaic environments yield heterogeneity ranging from large to small scale. These processes also yield preferential grain orientations in coarse grained units which result in preferential directions of increased permeability. Studies conducted in fluvial and deltaic petroleum reservoirs have shown varying permeabilities resulting from deposition that strongly control the flow of fluids. The marked heterogeneity evident in the sandy portion of a single 3 to 30-foot thick fluvial point bar deposit can exert significant differences in porous flow. Preferential permeability has been shown parallel to the long axis of fluvial channel sand units while barrier beach sands exhibit preferential permeability perpendicular to the long axis of the sand body. Such controls influence natural flow and transport of contaminants in groundwater. Hydrogeologic studies should: determine the depositional environment and facies present at the site; determine the propensity for heterogeneity within the entire vertical sequence investigated and within the different facies present; assess the potential for preferential permeability within sand bodies; and provide a predictive depositional model to assess potential connections between major high permeability units. Sand unit connections are commonly forced during cross section generation and subsequent aquifer analysis. Failure to incorporate the above objectives in hydrogeologic investigations ignores the basic precept that process controls the distribution of permeability and will result in poor prediction of natural and remedial transport of contaminants in groundwater

  10. Hydrogeological characterization of deep subsurface structures at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Shinji; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Amano, Kenji; Takeuchi, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    Several hydrogeological investigation techniques have been used at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory site to assess hydrogeological structures and their control on groundwater flow. For example, the properties of water-conducting features (WCFs) can be determined using high-resolution electrical conductivity measurements of fluids, and compared to measurements using conventional logging techniques. Connectivity of WCFs can be estimated from transmissivity changes over time, calculated from the pressure derivative of hydraulic pressure data obtained from hydraulic testing results. Hydraulic diffusivity, obtained from hydraulic interference testing by considering the flow dimension, could be a key indicator of the connectivity of WCFs between boreholes. A conceptual hydrogeological model of several hundred square meters to several square kilometers, bounded by flow barrier structures, has been developed from pressure response plots, based on interference hydraulic testing. The applicability of several methods for developing conceptual hydrogeological models has been confirmed on the basis of the hydrogeological investigation techniques mentioned above. (author)

  11. Waterborne toxoplasmosis investigated and analysed under hydrogeological assessment: new data and perspectives for further research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Flávia Pereira; Alves, Maria da Glória; Martins, Livia Mattos; Rangel, Alba Lucínia Peixoto; Dubey, Jitender Prakash; Hill, Dolores; Bahia-Oliveira, Lilian Maria Garcia

    2015-11-01

    We present a set of data on human and chicken Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence that was investigated and analysed in light of groundwater vulnerability information in an area endemic for waterborne toxoplasmosis in Brazil. Hydrogeological assessment was undertaken to select sites for water collection from wells for T. gondii oocyst testing and for collecting blood from free-range chickens and humans for anti-T. gondii serologic testing. Serologic testing of human specimens was done using conventional commercial tests and a sporozoite-specific embryogenesis-related protein (TgERP), which is able to differentiate whether infection resulted from tissue cysts or oocysts. Water specimens were negative for the presence of viable T. gondii oocysts. However, seroprevalence in free-range chickens was significantly associated with vulnerability of groundwater to surface contamination (p toxoplasmosis in light of groundwater vulnerability information associated with prevalence in humans estimated by oocyst antigens recognition have implications for the potential role of hydrogeological assessment in researching waterborne toxoplasmosis at a global scale.

  12. On the significance of contaminant plume-scale and dose-response models in defining hydrogeological characterization needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R.; Bai, H.

    2007-12-01

    Defining rational and effective hydrogeological data acquisition strategies is of crucial importance since financial resources available for such efforts are always limited. Usually such strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of the impacts of uncertainty. This paper presents an approach for determining site characterization needs based on human health risk factors. The main challenge is in striking a balance between improved definition of hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological parameters. Striking this balance can provide clear guidance on setting priorities for data acquisition and for better estimating adverse health effects in humans. This paper addresses this challenge through theoretical developments and numerical testing. We will report on a wide range of factors that affect the site characterization needs including contaminant plume's dimensions, travel distances and other length scales that characterize the transport problem, as well as health risk models. We introduce a new graphical tool that allows one to investigate the relative impact of hydrogeological and physiological parameters in risk. Results show that the impact of uncertainty reduction in the risk-related parameters decreases with increasing distances from the contaminant source. Also, results indicate that human health risk becomes less sensitive to hydrogeological measurements when dealing with ergodic plumes. This indicates that under ergodic conditions, uncertainty reduction in human health risk may benefit from better understanding of the physiological component as opposed to a detailed hydrogeological characterization

  13. Hydrogeological research at the site of the Asse salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batsche, H.; Rauert, W.; Klarr, K.

    1980-01-01

    In connection with the storage of radioactive wastes in the abandoned Asse salt mine near Brunswick (Federal Republic of Germany), the hydrogeology of the ridge of hills of Asse has been investigated. In order to obtain as detailed information as possible on the hydrogeological conditions, a long-term investigation programme has been set up and many methods of investigation have been used. Hydrogeological boring operations resulted in important scientific findings regarding, for example, the course of the salt table and the main anhydrite which towers up above the salt table into the overlying collapsed rocks. Hydrochemical data showed the hydraulic effect of transverse faults. Isotopic hydrological measurements permitted distinction between the flow behaviour of the groundwater in different aquifers. The origin of the salt springs at the northwest end of the structure can be explained. Some additional pumping and labelling tests are expected to yield quantitative results concerning hydraulic interrelationships recognized to date. The very complex hydrogeological structure of the ridge of hills of Asse is the result of the multiple succession of permeable and impermeable layers on the flanks of the structure, and, furthermore, is possibly due to the fact that in some individual faults groundwater may seep through normally impermeable layers as well as via waterways at the salt table. (author)

  14. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992

  15. Research on the hydrogeological and geochemical conditions at the coastal area and submarine formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Tomochika; Taniguchi, Makoto; Goto, Junji

    2003-05-01

    One of the major concerns for the high-level radioactive waste disposal is the possibility of the radionuclides to reach biosphere by groundwater flow. Recent research results have shown that the fresh groundwater discharge from subsea formations are widespread phenomena, thus, it is necessary to evaluate the submarine groundwater discharge as possible pathways of contaminant discharge towards the biosphere. It is also important to unravel the groundwater flow and associated material transport at the coastal area and subsea formations. To better understand the groundwater flow processes and the submarine groundwater discharge, we have conducted the hydrological, hydrogeological, geochemical, and numerical modeling studies at the Kurobe alluvial fan and its offshore, Toyama Prefecture, Japan. In this report, the results of the following research activities are presented: 1) Development and application of a method to detect the locations of the submarine groundwater discharge. 2) Development and application of a method to collect uncontaminated groundwater samples from subsea formations. 3) Measurements of submarine groundwater discharge fluxes by automated seepage meter. 4) Hydrological and geochemical studies for groundwater flow at the coastal area. 5) Geochemical studies to understand sources of fresh submarine groundwater discharge. 6) Examination of groundwater flow and submarine groundwater discharge using methane concentration and carbon isotope ratio. 7) Numerical modeling studies for coastal groundwater flow system. (author)

  16. Hydrogeological characterization of Back Forty area, Albany Research Center, Albany, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, S.Y.; Smith, W.H.

    1983-12-01

    Radiological surveys were conducted to determine the potential migration of radionuclides from the waste area to the area commonly referred to as the Back Forty, located in the southern portion of the ARC site. The survey results indicated that parts of the Back Forty contain soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and their associated decay products. A hydrogeologic characterization study was conducted at the Back Forty as part of an effort to more thoroughly assess radionuclide migration in the area. The objectives of the study were: (1) to define the soil characteristics and stratigraphy at the site, (2) to describe the general conditions of each geologic unit, and (3) to determine the direction and hydraulic gradient of areal groundwater flow. The site investigation activities included literature review of existing hydrogeological data for the Albany area, onsite borehold drilling, and measurement of groundwater levels. 7 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  17. Hydrogeological characterization, modelling and monitoring of the site of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Guvanasen, V.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is constructing an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) to a depth of 250 m in a previously undisturbed granitic pluton located near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, as one of the major research projects within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This paper discusses the hydrogeological characterization of the URL site, the modelling approach used to represent this information, the hydrogeological monitoring system installed to monitor the actual drawdown conditions that develop in response to the excavation, and the procedures employed to calibrate the numerical model. Comparisons between the drawdown predictions made by the model prior to any excavation and the actual drawdowns that have been measured since shaft excavation began in May 1984 are also discussed

  18. The KINDRA H2020 Project: a knowledge inventory for hydrogeology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitta, Marco; Bodo, Balazs; Caschetto, Mariachiara; Correia, Victor; Cseko, Adrienn; Fernandez, Isabel; Hartai, Eva; Hinsby, Klaus; Madarasz, Tamas; Garcia Padilla, Mercedes; Szucs, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogeology-related research activities cover a wide spectrum of research areas at EU and national levels. This fact is due to the intrinsic nature of the "water" topic, representing a key-aspect of the modern society: water is not only necessary for human, biological and environmental requirements, but it is one basic "engine" of several interconnected research topics, including energy, health, climate, food, security and others as exemplified by the water-food-energy-climate nexus described by e.g. the World Economic Forum. With respect to the water cycle, the management of groundwater brings additional challenges to the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and climate change adaptation (such as integrated transboundary management of groundwater resources). This fact is related to the nature of groundwater, which represents the "hidden" part of the water cycle, difficult to evaluate, communicate and appreciate, although it sustains the health of both humans and ecosystems as well as industrial and agricultural production. In general, groundwater has been considered mainly for its relationships with surface waters, influencing river flow, e-flows, GDE (groundwater-dependent ecosystems), pollutant fate, agricultural practices, water scarcity and others. In this framework, the importance of groundwater inside the WFD has been reinforced by the daughter directive on groundwater. In the last years, particular insights have been developed on surface waters/groundwater interactions and several related research projects have been carried out. Nevertheless, a specific focus on hydrogeology, the science branch studying groundwater, has not looked into until now, despite of its utmost importance as renewable, high-quality, naturally protected (but still vulnerable) resource. At the same time the European knowledge-base that has been acquired on this important topic is widespread into several projects, plans, actions, realized at national and fragmented

  19. Plutonium contaminated materials research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is a progress report for 1985 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party (PCMWP). The PCMWP co-ordinates research and development on a national basis in the areas of management, treatment and immobilisation of plutonium contaminated materials, for the purpose of waste management. The progress report contains a review of the development work carried out in eight areas, including: reduction of arisings, plutonium measurement, sorting and packaging, washing of shredded combustible PCM, decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment, PCM immobilisation, treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes, and engineering objectives. (UK)

  20. Fault zone hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and address remaining challenges by co-locating study areas, sharing approaches and fusing data, developing conceptual models from hydrogeologic data, numerical modeling, and training interdisciplinary scientists.

  1. Hydrogeological characterization on surface-based investigation phase in the Mizunami underground research laboratory project, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Onoe, Hironori; Takeuchi, Shinji; Takeuchi, Ryuji; Ohyama, Takuya

    2007-01-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project is being carried out by Japan Atomic Energy Agency in the Cretaceous Toki granite in the Tono area, central Japan. The MIU project is a purpose-built generic underground research laboratory project that is planned for a broad scientific study of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes. One of the main goals of the MIU project is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment. The MIU project has three overlapping phases: Surface-based Investigation (Phase I), Construction (Phase II) and Operation (Phase III). Hydrogeological investigations using a stepwise process in Phase I have been carried out in order to obtain information on important properties such as, location of water conducting features, hydraulic conductivity and so on. Hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow simulations in Phase I have been carried out in order to synthesize these investigation results, to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrogeological model and to identify the main issues for further investigations. Using the stepwise hydrogeological characterization approach and combining the investigation with modeling and simulation, understanding of the hydrogeological environment has been progressively improved. (authors)

  2. Contamination sources, prevention, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination is defined as anything other than cotton in cotton lint. Worldwide, contamination is on the rise and plastic contamination has increased at a faster rate than contamination overall. In the U.S., there are many sources of plastic contaminants, such as plastic trash that collects in cott...

  3. Model Intercomparison Study to Investigate a Dense Contaminant Plume in a Complex Hydrogeologic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Mark D.; Cole, Charles R.; Foley, Michael G.; Zinina, Galina A.; Zinin, Alexander I.; Vasil'Kova, Nelly A.; Samsonova, Lilia M.

    2001-01-01

    A joint Russian and U.S. model intercomparison study was undertaken for developing more realistic contaminant transport models of the Mayak Site, Southern Urals. The test problems were developed by the Russian Team based on their experience modeling contaminant migration near Lake Karachai. The intercomparison problems were designed to address lake and contaminant plume interactions, as well as river interactions and plume density effects. Different numerical codes were used. Overall there is good agreement between the results of both models. Features shown by both models include (1) the sinking of the plume below the lake, (2) the raising of the water table in the fresh water adjacent to the lake in response to the increased pressure from the dense plume, and (3) the formation of a second sinking plume in an area where evapotranspiration exceeded infiltration, thus increasing the solute concentrations above the source (i.e., lake) values

  4. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment of a ground-water contamination area in Wolcott, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J.R.; Casey, G.D.; Mondazzi, R.A.; Frick, T.W.

    1997-01-01

    Contamination of ground water by volatile organic compounds and inorganic constituents has been identified at a number of industrial sites in the Town of Wolcott, Connecticut. Contamination is also present at a municipal landfill in the City of Waterbury that is upgradient from the industrial sites in the local ground-water-flow system. The study area, which lies in the Western Highlands of Connecticut, is in the Mad River Valley, a tributary to the Naugatuck River. Geohydrologic units (aquifer materials) include unconsolidated glacial sediments (surficial materials) and fractured crystalline (metamorphic) bedrock. Surficial materials include glacial till, coarse-grained andfine-grained glacial stratified deposits, and postglacial floodplain alluvium and swamp deposits. The ground-water-flow system in the surficial aquifer is complex because the hydraulic properties of the surficial materials are highly variable. In the bedrock aquifer, ground water moves exclusively through fractures. Hydrologic characteristics of the crystalline bedrock-degree of confinement, hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and porosity-are poorly defined in the study area. Further study is needed to adequately assess ground-water flow and contaminant migration under current or past hydrologic conditions. All known water-supply wells in the study area obtain water from the bedrock aquifer. Twenty households in a hillside residential area on Tosun Road currently obtain drinking water from private wells tapping the bedrock aquifer. The extent of contamination in the bedrock aquifer and the potential for future contamination from known sources of contamination in the surficial aquifer is of concern to regulatory agencies. Previous investigations have identified ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds at the Nutmeg Valley Road site area. Contamination has been associated with on-site disposal of heavy metals, chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compounds, and

  5. Techniques to better understand complex epikarst hydrogeology and contaminant transport in telogenetic karst settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The movement of autogenic recharge through the shallow epikarstic zone in soil-mantled karst aquifers is important in understanding recharge areas and rates, groundwater storage, and contaminant transport processes. The groundwater flow in agricultural karst areas, such as Kentucky’s Pennyroyal Plat...

  6. Does the Rayleigh equation apply to evaluate field isotope data in contaminant hydrogeology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yumiko; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Stable isotope data have been increasingly used to assess in situ biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater. The data are usually evaluated using the Rayleigh equation to evaluate whether isotope data follow a Rayleigh trend, to calculate the extent of contaminant biodegradation, or to estimate first-order rate constants. However, the Rayleigh equation was developed for homogeneous systems while in the subsurface, contaminants can migrate at different velocities due to physical heterogeneity. This paper presents a method to quantify the systematic effect that is introduced by applying the Rayleigh equation to field isotope data. For this purpose, the travel time distribution between source and sampling point is characterized by an analytical solution to the advection-dispersion equation. The systematic effect was evaluated as a function of the magnitude of physical heterogeneity, geometry of the contaminant plume, and degree of biodegradation. Results revealed that the systematic effect always leads to an underestimation of the actual values of isotope enrichment factors, the extent of biodegradation, or first-order rate constants, especially in the dispersion-dominant region representing a higher degree of physical heterogeneity. A substantial systematic effect occurs especially for the quantification of first-order rate constants (up to 50% underestimation of actual rate) while it is relatively small for quantification of the extent of biodegradation (< 5% underestimation of actual degree of biodegradation). The magnitude of the systematic effect is in the same range as the uncertainty due to uncertainty of the analytical data, of the isotope enrichment factor, and the average travel time.

  7. Hydrogeological measurements and modelling of the Down Ampney Fault Research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.; Sen, M.A.; Abbott, M.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey, in cooperation with ISMES of Italy, is carrying out a research programme into the properties of faults cutting clay formations. The programme has two major aims; firstly, to develop geophysical techniques to locate and measure the geophysical properties of a fault in clay; secondly, to measure the hydrogeological properties of the fault and its effect on the groundwater flow pattern through a sequence of clays and aquifers. Analysis of pulse tests performed in the clays at the Down Ampney Research site gave values of hydraulic conductivity ranging from 5 x 10 -12 to 2 x 10 -8 ms -1 . Numerical modelling of the effects of groundwater abstraction from nearby wells on the site was performed using the finite element code FEMWATER. The results are discussed. (Author)

  8. Hydrogeology and water quality of areas with persistent ground- water contamination near Blackfoot, Bingham County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Groveland-Collins area near Blackfoot, Idaho, has a history of either periodic or persistent localized groundwater contamination. Water users in the area report offensive smell, metallic taste, rust deposits, and bacteria in water supplies. During 1984 and 1985, data were collected to define regional and local geologic, hydrologic, and groundwater quality conditions, and to identify factors that may have affected local groundwater quality. Infiltration or leakage of irrigation water is the major source of groundwater recharge, and water levels may fluctuate 15 ft or more during the irrigation season. Groundwater movement is generally northwestward. Groundwater contains predominantly calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate ions and characteristically has more than 200 mg/L hardness. Groundwater near the Groveland-Collins area may be contaminated from one or more sources, including infiltration of sewage effluent, gasoline or liquid fertilizer spillage, or land application of food processing wastewater. Subsurface basalt ridges impede lateral movement of water in localized areas. Groundwater pools temporarily behind these ridges and anomalously high water levels result. Maximum concentrations or values of constituents that indicate contamination were 1,450 microsiemens/cm specific conductance, 630 mg/L bicarbonate (as HCO3), 11 mg/L nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen), 7.3 mg/L ammonia (as nitrogen), 5.9 mg/L organic nitrogen, 4.4 mg/L dissolved organic carbon, 7,000 micrograms/L dissolved iron, 5 ,100 microgram/L dissolved manganese, and 320 microgram/L dissolved zinc. Dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 8.9 mg/L in uncontaminated areas to 0 mg/L in areas where food processing wastewater is applied to the land surface. Stable-isotope may be useful in differentiating between contamination from potato-processing wastewater and whey in areas where both are applied to the land surface. Development of a ground-water model to evaluate effects of land applications

  9. RESEARCH INTO THE HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE SAVA RIVER BASIN IN EASTERN SLAVONIA AND ITS KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Capar

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Geological explorations, especially hydrogeology of quaternary waterbearing deposits of Eastern Slavonia are presented. Hydro-geological and hydrochemical parameters are discussed and evaluation of groundwater reserves is done. Critical approach to the results of exploration is provided by some suggestions for future quaternary deposits exploration in the area (the paper is published in Croatian.

  10. Hydrogeology and management of freshwater lenses on atoll islands: Review of current knowledge and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Adrian D.; Sharp, Hannah K.; Galvis, Sandra C.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Sinclair, Peter

    2017-08-01

    On atoll islands, fresh groundwater occurs as a buoyant lens-shaped body surrounded by saltwater derived from the sea, forming the main freshwater source for many island communities. A review of the state of knowledge of atoll island groundwater is overdue given their susceptibility to adverse impacts, and the task to address water access and sanitation issues within the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals framework before the year 2030. In this article, we review available literature to summarise the key processes, investigation techniques and management approaches of atoll island groundwater systems. Over fifty years of investigation has led to important advancements in the understanding of atoll hydrogeology, but a paucity of hydrogeological data persists on all but a small number of atoll islands. We find that the combined effects of buoyancy forces, complex geology, tides, episodic ocean events, strong climatic variability and human impacts create highly dynamic fresh groundwater lenses. Methods used to quantify freshwater availability range from simple empirical relationships to three-dimensional density-dependent models. Generic atoll island numerical models have proven popular in trying to unravel the individual factors controlling fresh groundwater lens behaviour. Major challenges face the inhabitants and custodians of atoll island aquifers, with rising anthropogenic stresses compounded by the threats of climate variability and change, sea-level rise, and some atolls already extracting freshwater at or above sustainability limits. We find that the study of atoll groundwater systems remains a critical area for further research effort to address persistent knowledge gaps, which lead to high uncertainties in water security issues for both island residents and surrounding environs.

  11. A new pumping strategy for petroleum product recovery from contaminated hydrogeologic systems: Laboratory and field evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    More than 200,000 gallons of automatic transmission fluid (ATF) leaked from an underground storage tank system and contaminated an area of about 64,000 ft 2 of a soil and ground water system. A pumping strategy for improved drainage and recovery of free oil was developed, tested in a laboratory model aquifer, and implemented (1) the oil recovery rate is carefully controlled to maximize the pumping rate while maintaining continuity between the oil layer in the soil and the recovery well, to avoid isolation of the oil in the subsurface; and (2) the rate of ground water pumping is controlled to maintain the depressed oil/water interface at its prepumped position. This approach prevents further spread of oil into the ground water, prevents reduction in the volume of recoverable oil due to residual retention, and maintains a gradient for oil flow toward the recovery well. In a model aquifer study, nearly 100% of the recoverable volume of ATF was pumped from the system, and about 56,000 gallons of the ATF has been recovered from the field site

  12. Hydrogeology of Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, David L.; Harlow, George; Bruce, T. Scott; Bailey, Christopher M.; Sherwood, W. Cullen; Eaton, L. Scott; Powars, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogeology of Virginia documented herein is in two parts. Part 1 consists of an overview and description of the hydrogeology within each regional aquifer system in the Commonwealth. Part 2 includes discussions of hydrogeologic research topics of current relevance including: 1. the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, 2. subsidence/compaction in the Coastal Plain, 3. groundwater age and aquifer susceptibility, 4. the occurrence of groundwater at depth in fractured-rock and karst terrains, and 5. hydrologic response of wells to earthquakes around the world.

  13. A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of a crystalline rock environment, Whiteshell research area, southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.R.; Brown, A.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.; McGregor, R.G.; Ophori, D.U.; Scheier, N.W.; Stanchell, F.; Thorne, G.A.; Tomsons, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of regional groundwater flow in the crystalline rocks of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) has been developed by a team of AECL geoscientists. The revised model updates an earlier model developed in 1985, and has a much broader database. This database was compiled from Landsat and airborne radar images, geophysical surveys and surface mapping, and from analyses of fracture logs, hydraulic tests and water samples collected from a network of deep boreholes drilled across the WRA. The boundaries of the revised conceptual model were selected to coincide with the natural hydraulic boundaries assumed for the regional groundwater flow systems in the WRA. The upper and lower boundaries are the water table and a horizontal plane 4 km below ground surface. For modelling purposes the rocks below 4 km are considered to be impermeable. The rocks of the modelled region were divided on the basis of fracture characteristics into three categories: fractured zones (FZs); moderately fractured rock (MFR); and sparsely fractured rock (SFR). The FZs are regions of intensely fractured rock. Seventy-six FZs were selected to form the fault framework within the revised conceptual model. The physical rock/water properties of the FZs, MFR and SFR were selected by analysis of field data from hydraulic and tracer tests, laboratory test data and water quality data. These properties were used to define a mathematical groundwater flow model of the WRA using AECL's MOTIF finite element code (Ophori et al. 1995, 1996). (author). 29 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  14. Hydrogeological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, E.; Heinzen, W.; Santana, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work shows the hydrogeological study and well drilling carried out in the Teaching Formation Institute San Jose de Mayo Province Uruguay. It was developed a geological review in the National Directorate of Geology and Mining data base as well as field working, geology and hydrogeology recognition and area well drilling inventory.

  15. Hydrogeology of the rock mass encountered at the 240 level of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, E.T.; Davison, C.C.

    1992-09-01

    The rock mass surrounding the 240 level of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) has been hydrogeologically characterized through observations made in the tunnel and room excavations and from a network of radiating low-dipping boreholes. The 240 level complex sits in a wedge of grey-to-pink granite between two important, low-dipping, hydraulically active fracture zones, known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2) and Fracture Zone 2.5 (FZ2.5), a splay of FZ2. There is no apparent seepage into the 240 level room and tunnel network from the surrounding rock mass except from a vertical fracture intersected by the Room 209 tunnel. Extensive hydraulic and geomechanical tests have been conducted in boreholes intersecting the Room 209 vertical fracture, and transmissivities were found to range from 10 -10 to 10 -6 m 2 /s. FZ2 and FZ2.5 occur at the 240 m depth approximately 10 m to the west and 100 m to the south respectively of the 240 level tunnel network. Hydraulic testing within packer-isolated boreholes intersecting these fracture zones showed that transmissivities ranged from 10 -7 to 10 -5 m 2 /s in FZ2, and 10 -9 to 10 -7 m 2 /s in FZ2.5. No naturally-occurring fractures were encountered east of the 240 level complex up to 300 m away. The rock mass to the north of the 240 level is dominated by the Room 209 vertical fracture, which tends to splay with distance and has been intersected 95 m from the Room 209 tunnel. (Author) (50 figs., 5 tabs., 10 refs.)

  16. Waterborne toxoplasmosis investigated and analyzed under hydrogeological assessment: new data and perspectives for further research

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a set of data on human and chicken Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence that was investigated and analyzed in light of groundwater vulnerability information in an area of endemic waterborne toxoplasmosis in Brazil. Hydrogeological assessment was undertaken to conduct water collection from wel...

  17. Hydrogeological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, E.; Carrion, R.

    1987-01-01

    This work refers to the hydrogeological study about underground water to domestic uses. It was required by Artigas intendence of Uruguay, in the rural school 10, located belongs to the Chiflero zone around the capital of the Artigas Province.

  18. Stepwise hydrogeological characterisation utilising a geo-synthesis methodology - A case study from the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, H.; Osawa, H.; Onoe, H.; Ohyama, T.; Takeuchi, R.; Takeuchi, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) is now under construction by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the Cretaceous Toki granite in the Tono area of central Japan. One of the main goals of the MIU project, which is a broad scientific study of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes, is to establish comprehensive techniques for the investigation, analysis and assessment of the deep geological environment in fractured crystalline rock. For this purpose, a geo-synthesis methodology has been developed and will be tested in a dry run to determine if it produces the data required for repository design and associated integrated safety assessment modelling. Surface-based hydrogeological characterisation, intended to develop conceptual models of the deep geological environment based on an understanding of the undisturbed conditions before excavation of this URL, was carried out in a stepwise manner. This allows field investigations, construction of geological and hydrogeological models and interpretation of resultant groundwater flow simulations to develop in an iterative manner. Investigations have the goal of obtaining information on factors relevant to repository design, associated construction, operational and postclosure safety assessment, evaluation of the practicality of implementation and environmental impact assessment. Such factors include bulk hydraulic conductivity, the locations and properties of water conducting features, direct and indirect indicators of regional and local flow (e.g. based on chemistry or isotopes), etc. Following evaluation of pre-existing site information, field investigations began with fault mapping. This was followed by reflection seismic and vertical seismic profile surveys. In addition, a large programme of investigations was carried out in boreholes, including cross-hole tomography and hydraulic tests. Such input is utilised for the construction

  19. Role of high-elevation groundwater flows in the hydrogeology of the Cimino volcano (central Italy) and possibilities to capture drinking water in a geogenically contaminated environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscopo, V.; Armiento, G.; Baiocchi, A.; Mazzuoli, M.; Nardi, E.; Piacentini, S. M.; Proposito, M.; Spaziani, F.

    2018-01-01

    Origin, yield and quality of the groundwater flows at high elevation in the Cimino volcano (central Italy) were examined. In this area, groundwater is geogenically contaminated by arsenic and fluoride, yet supplies drinking water for approximately 170,000 inhabitants. The origin of the high-elevation groundwater flows is strictly related to vertical and horizontal variability of the rock types (lava flows, lava domes and ignimbrite) in an area of limited size. In some cases, groundwater circuits are related to perched aquifers above noncontinuous aquitards; in other cases, they are due to flows in the highly fractured dome carapace, limited at the bottom by a low-permeability dome core. The high-elevation groundwater outflow represents about 30% of the total recharge of Cimino's hydrogeological system, which has been estimated at 9.8 L/s/km2. Bicarbonate alkaline-earth, cold, neutral waters with low salinity, and notably with low arsenic and fluoride content, distinguish the high-elevation groundwaters from those of the basal aquifer. Given the quantity and quality of these resources, approaches in the capture and management of groundwater in this hydrogeological environment should be reconsidered. Appropriate tapping methods such as horizontal drains, could more efficiently capture the high-elevation groundwater resources, as opposed to the waters currently pumped from the basal aquifer which often require dearsenification treatments.

  20. Role of high-elevation groundwater flows in the hydrogeology of the Cimino volcano (central Italy) and possibilities to capture drinking water in a geogenically contaminated environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscopo, V.; Armiento, G.; Baiocchi, A.; Mazzuoli, M.; Nardi, E.; Piacentini, S. M.; Proposito, M.; Spaziani, F.

    2018-06-01

    Origin, yield and quality of the groundwater flows at high elevation in the Cimino volcano (central Italy) were examined. In this area, groundwater is geogenically contaminated by arsenic and fluoride, yet supplies drinking water for approximately 170,000 inhabitants. The origin of the high-elevation groundwater flows is strictly related to vertical and horizontal variability of the rock types (lava flows, lava domes and ignimbrite) in an area of limited size. In some cases, groundwater circuits are related to perched aquifers above noncontinuous aquitards; in other cases, they are due to flows in the highly fractured dome carapace, limited at the bottom by a low-permeability dome core. The high-elevation groundwater outflow represents about 30% of the total recharge of Cimino's hydrogeological system, which has been estimated at 9.8 L/s/km2. Bicarbonate alkaline-earth, cold, neutral waters with low salinity, and notably with low arsenic and fluoride content, distinguish the high-elevation groundwaters from those of the basal aquifer. Given the quantity and quality of these resources, approaches in the capture and management of groundwater in this hydrogeological environment should be reconsidered. Appropriate tapping methods such as horizontal drains, could more efficiently capture the high-elevation groundwater resources, as opposed to the waters currently pumped from the basal aquifer which often require dearsenification treatments.

  1. Using geographic distribution of well-screen depths and hydrogeologic conditions to identify areas of concern for contaminant migration through inactive supply wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailey, Robert M.

    2018-02-01

    Contaminant migration through inactive supply wells can negatively affect groundwater quality and the combined effects from groups of such wells may cause greater impacts. Because the number of wells in many basins is often large and the geographic areas involved can be vast, approaches are needed to estimate potential impacts and focus limited resources for investigation and corrective measures on the most important areas. One possibility is to evaluate the geographic distribution of well-screen depths relative to hydrogeologic conditions and assess where contaminant migration through wells may be impacting groundwater quality. This approach is demonstrated for a geographically extensive area in the southern Central Valley of California, USA. The conditions that lead to wells acting as conduits for contaminant migration are evaluated and areas where the problem likely occurs are identified. Although only a small fraction of all wells appear to act as conduits, potential impacts may be significant considering needs to control nonpoint-source pollution and improve drinking water quality for rural residents. Addressing a limited number of areas where contaminant migration rates are expected to be high may cost-effectively accomplish the most beneficial groundwater quality protection and improvement. While this work focuses on a specific region, the results indicate that impacts from groups of wells may occur in other areas with similar conditions. Analyses similar to that demonstrated here may guide efficient investigation and corrective action in such areas with benefits occurring for groundwater quality. Potential benefits may justify expenditures to develop the necessary data for performing the analyses.

  2. Hydrogeologic Settings and Ground-Water Flow Simulations for Regional Studies of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to Public-Supply Wells - Studies Begun in 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2007-01-01

    This study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) is being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and was designed to increase understanding of the most important factors to consider in ground-water vulnerability assessments. The seven TANC studies that began in 2001 used retrospective data and ground-water flow models to evaluate hydrogeologic variables that affect aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability at a regional scale. Ground-water flow characteristics, regional water budgets, pumping-well information, and water-quality data were compiled from existing data and used to develop conceptual models of ground-water conditions for each study area. Steady-state regional ground-water flow models were used to represent the conceptual models, and advective particle-tracking simulations were used to compute areas contributing recharge and traveltimes from recharge to selected public-supply wells. Retrospective data and modeling results were tabulated into a relational database for future analysis. Seven study areas were selected to evaluate a range of hydrogeologic settings and management practices across the Nation: the Salt Lake Valley, Utah; the Eagle Valley and Spanish Springs Valley, Nevada; the San Joaquin Valley, California; the Northern Tampa Bay region, Florida; the Pomperaug River Basin, Connecticut; the Great Miami River Basin, Ohio; and the Eastern High Plains, Nebraska. This Professional Paper Chapter presents the hydrogeologic settings and documents the ground-water flow models for each of the NAWQA TANC regional study areas that began work in 2001. Methods used to compile retrospective data, determine contributing areas of public-supply wells, and characterize oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions also are presented. This Professional Paper Chapter provides the foundation for future susceptibility and vulnerability analyses in the TANC

  3. Modernization of hydrogeological and mine dewatering researches in the Transdanubian Mid-Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, G.; Vizy, B.

    1990-01-01

    The present state of the karst water system of the Transdanubian Mid-Mountains is outlined and the measures to be done in order to protect the main karst system of the region are listed. The items of modernization are presented including the closing of mines (both the coal and the bauxite mines) and the modernization of hydrogeological exploration methods (to develop a uniform information system on the karst system of the Transdanubian Mid-Mountains).

  4. Development of a summer field-based hydrogeology research experience for undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    A critical problem in motivating and training the next generation of environmental scientists is providing them with an integrated scientific experience that fosters a depth of understanding and helps them build a network of colleagues for their future. As the education part of an NSF-funded CAREER proposal, I have developed a three-week summer research experience for undergraduate students that links their classroom education with field campaigns aiming to make partial differential equations come "alive" in a practical, applied setting focused on hydrogeologic processes. This course has been offered to freshman- to junior-level undergraduate students from Penn State and also the three co-operating Historically Black Universities (HBUs)--Jackson State University, Fort Valley State University, and Elizabeth City State University-since 2009. Broad learning objectives include applying their knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to flow and transport processes in the field and communicating science effectively in poster and oral format. In conjunction with ongoing research about solute transport, students collected field data in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in Central Pennsylvania, including slug and pumping tests, ground-penetrating radar, electrical resistivity imaging, wireline logging, and optical televiewers, among other instruments. Students conducted tracer tests, where conservative solutes are introduced into a local stream and monitored. Students also constructed numerical models using COMSOL Multiphysics, a research-grade code that can be used to model any physical system; with COMSOL, students create models without needing to be trained in computer coding. With guidance, students built basic models of fluid flow and transport to visualize how heterogeneity of hydraulic and transport properties or variations in forcing functions impact their results. The development of numerical models promoted confidence in predicting flow and

  5. Hydrogeology, water quality, and potential for contamination of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Silver Springs ground-water basin, central Marion County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer, composed of a thick sequence of very porous limestone and dolomite, is the principal source of water supply in the Silver Springs ground-water basin of central Marion County, Florida. The karstic nature of the local geology makes the aquifer susceptible to contaminants from the land surface. Contaminants can enter the aquifer by seepage through surficial deposits and through sinkholes and drainage wells. Potential contaminants include agricultural chemicals, landfill leachates and petroleum products from leaking storage tanks and accidental spills. More than 560 sites of potential contamination sources were identified in the basin in 1990. Detailed investigation of four sites were used to define hydrologic conditions at representative sites. Ground-water flow velocities determined from dye trace studies ranged from about 1 foot per hour under natural flow conditions to about 10 feet per hour under pumping conditions, which is considerably higher than velocities estimated using Darcy's equation for steady-state flow in a porous medium. Water entering the aquifer through drainage wells contained bacteria, elevated concentrations of nutrients, manganese and zinc, and in places, low concentrations of organic compounds. On the basis of results from the sampling of 34 wells in 1989 and 1990, and from the sampling of water entering the Upper Floridan aquifer through drainage wells, there has been no widespread degradation of water quality in the study area. In an area of karst, particularly one in which fracture flow is significant, evaluating the effects from contaminants is difficult and special care is required when interpolating hydrogeologic data from regional studies to a specific. (USGS)

  6. Hydrogeology, groundwater seepage, nitrate distribution, and flux at the Raleigh hydrologic research station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    rom 2005 to 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, conducted a study to describe the geologic framework, measure groundwater quality, characterize the groundwater-flow system, and describe the groundwater/surface-water interaction at the 60-acre Raleigh hydrogeologic research station (RHRS) located at the Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant in eastern Wake County, North Carolina. Previous studies have shown that the local groundwater quality of the surficial and bedrock aquifers at the RHRS had been affected by high levels of nutrients. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from 3 coreholes, 12 wells, and 4 piezometers at 3 well clusters, as well as from 2 surface-water sites, 2 multiport piezometers, and 80 discrete locations in the streambed of the Neuse River. Data collected were used to evaluate the three primary zones of the Piedmont aquifer (regolith, transition zone, and fractured bedrock) and characterize the interaction of groundwater and surface water as a mechanism of nutrient transport to the Neuse River. A conceptual hydrogeologic cross section across the RHRS was constructed using new and existing data. Two previously unmapped north striking, nearly vertical diabase dikes intrude the granite beneath the site. Groundwater within the diabase dike appeared to be hydraulically isolated from the surrounding granite bedrock and regolith. A correlation exists between foliation and fracture orientation, with most fractures striking parallel to foliation. Flowmeter logging in two of the bedrock wells indicated that not all of the water-bearing fractures labeled as water bearing were hydraulically active, even when stressed by pumping. Groundwater levels measured in wells at the RHRS displayed climatic and seasonal trends, with elevated groundwater levels occurring during the late spring and declining to a low in the late fall. Vertical

  7. Role of raptors in contaminant research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter reviews the history of and approaches used in studies focused on the effects of contaminants on raptors and raptor populations at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent) in Laurel, MD. Worldwide raptor declines following World War II were unprecedented and resulted in a sequence of major efforts at Patuxent to understand their cause(s). The peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and osprey (Pandion haliaetus) were the species of most concern in North America. Laboratory and field studies at Patuxent complemented each other and yielded timely results of national and international importance, including some findings published in the journals “Science” and “Nature.” Concern about contaminant effects on wildlife populations came to the forefront during the years immediately following World War II. This concern was worldwide and not limited to one taxonomic group or to personnel and investigations at Patuxent. Contaminant studies of raptors were only part of the story, but this review, with minor exceptions, is limited to raptor studies and the role Patuxent played in this research. Indeed, many important nonraptor contaminant studies done at Patuxent, as well as raptor studies conducted elsewhere, are not mentioned here. For other reviews of contaminant-wildlife issues in the 1950s and 1960s, the reader is referred to “Silent Spring” by Rachel Carson (1962), “Pesticides and the Living Landscape” by Robert Rudd (1964), and “Return of the Peregrine: A North American Saga of Tenacity and Teamwork” by Tom Cade and Bill Burnham (Cade and Burnham, 2003).

  8. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Carsten, E-mail: vogt@umb.ufz.de; Alfreider, Albin [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology (Germany); Lorbeer, Helmut [University of Technology Dresden, Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment (Germany); Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Industrial and Mining Landscapes (Germany); Boehme, Olaf [GFE GmbH Halle (Germany); Weiss, Holger [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Industrial and Mining Landscapes (Germany); Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology (Germany)

    2002-05-15

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L{sup -1}; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found.

  9. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Carsten; Alfreider, Albin; Lorbeer, Helmut; Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd; Boehme, Olaf; Weiss, Holger; Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar

    2002-01-01

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L -1 ; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found

  10. Groundwater quality assessment for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant. 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several waste management facilities and petroleum fuel underground storage tank (UST) sites associated with the Y-12 Plant. These sites are within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (UEFPCHR), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring and remediation. This report was prepared for informational purposes. Included are the analytical data for groundwater samples collected from selected monitoring wells during 1991 and the results for quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) samples associated with each groundwater sample. This report also contains summaries of selected data, including ion-charge balances for each groundwater sample, a summary of analytical results for nitrate (a principle contaminant in the UEFPCHR), results of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyses validated using the associated QA/QC sample data, a summary of trace metal concentrations which exceeded drinking-water standards, and a summary of radiochemical analyses and associated counting errors.

  11. Controlling geological and hydrogeological processes in an arsenic contaminated aquifer on the Red River flood plain, Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Flemming; Nhan Quy Pham; Nhan Duc Dang; Postma, Dieke; Jessen, Soren; Viet Hung Pham; Nguyen, Thao Bach; Trieu, Huy Duc; Luu Thi Tran; Hoan Nguyen; Chambon, Julie; Hoan Van Nguyen; Dang Hoang Ha; Nguyen Thi Hue; Mai Thanh Duc; Refsgaard, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    Geological and hydrogeological processes controlling recharge and the mobilization of As were investigated in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the Red River flood plain near Hanoi, Vietnam. The geology was investigated using surface resistivity methods, geophysical borehole logging, drilling of boreholes and installation of more than 200 piezometers. Recharge processes and surface-groundwater interaction were studied using (i) time-series of hydraulic head distribution in surface water and aquifers, (ii) the stable isotope composition of waters and (iii) numerical groundwater modeling. The Red River and two of its distributaries run through the field site and control the groundwater flow pattern. For most of the year, there is a regional groundwater flow towards the Red River. During the monsoon the Red River water stage rises up to 6 m and stalls the regional groundwater flow. The two distributaries recharge the aquifer from perched water tables in the dry season, whilst in the flooding period surface water enters the aquifer through highly permeable bank sediments. The result is a dynamic groundwater flow pattern with rapid fluctuations in the groundwater table. A transient numerical model of the groundwater flow yields an average recharge rate of 60-100 mm/a through the confining clay, and a total recharge of approximately 200 mm/a was estimated from 3 H/ 3 He dating of the shallow groundwater. Thus in the model area, recharge of surface water from the river distributaries and recharge through a confining clay is of the same magnitude, being on average around 100 mm/a. The thickness of the confining clay varies between 2 and 10 m, and affects the recharge rate and the transport of electron acceptors (O 2 , NO 3 - and SO 4 2- ) into the aquifer. Where the clay layer is thin, an up to 2 m thick oxic zone develops in the shallow aquifer. In the oxic zone the As concentration is less than 1 μg/L but increases in the reduced zone below to 550 μg/L. In the Holocene

  12. Contaminated sediment research task: SHC Task 3.61.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    A poster presentation for the SHC BOSC review will summarize the research efforts under Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program (SHC) in the Contaminated Sediment Task within the Contaminated Sites Project. For the Task, Problem Summary & Decision Context; Task O...

  13. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  14. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas

  15. Undergraduate Education in Hydrogeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, John Richard, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a course at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire which improved instruction in physical hydrogeology, chemical hydrogeology, and water resources. Describes 14 laboratory activities including objectives, methods, and a list of equipment needed. (Author/MVL)

  16. System for the hydrogeologic analysis of uranium mill waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osiensky, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Most of the uranium mill wastes generated before 1977 are stored in unlined tailings ponds. Seepage from some of these ponds has been of sufficient severity that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has required the installation of withdrawal wells to remove the contaminated groundwater. Uranium mill waste disposal facilities typically are located in complex hydrogeologic environments. This research was initiated in 1980 to analyze hydrogeologic data collected at seven disposal sites in the US that have experienced problems with groundwater contamination. The characteristics of seepage migration are site specific and are controlled by the hydrogeologic environment in the vicinity of each tailings pond. Careful monitoring of most seepage plumes was not initiated until approximately 1977. These efforts were accelerated as a consequence of the uranium Mill Tailings Act of 1979. Some of the data collected at uranium mill waste disposal sites in the past are incomplete and some were collected by methods that are outdated. Data frequently were collected in sequences which disrupted the continuity of the hydrogeologic analysis and decreased the effectiveness of the data collection programs. Evaluation of data collection programs for seven uranium mill waste disposal sites in the US has led to the development and presentation herein of a system for the hydrogeologic analysis of disposal sites

  17. Isotopic methods in hydrogeology and their application to the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Kotzer, T.

    1995-09-01

    This review examines isotopic methods used to determine groundwater sources, residence times and processes of geochemical evolution that have been published in the international literature, with specific reference to AECL's experience in these methods and applications to groundwaters at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL), Manitoba. The program of groundwater sampling and analysis currently being planned for the URL area over the next several years will concentrate on specific isotopic measurements that may assist in understanding the groundwater flow system at the URL site. These results will add to the existing data for the URL area and indicate which isotopes are most useful when applied to the known groundwater flow system of the URL. This program of study is especially important because it not only uses standard geochemical and isotopic measurements (e.g., major ion, trace elements, 2 H/ 18 O, 14 C, 34 S) of groundwaters, but will determine values of more exotic and unusual ratios, such as 6 Li/ 7 Li, and B 11 /B 10 , whose potential for understanding groundwater geochemical evolution is largely unknown at present. In addition, the more established but equally complex methods of isotopic analysis, to determine 3 He/ 4 He, 36 Cl/Cl and 129 I/I, will be used to assess their potential for adding to the hydrogeochemical understanding of flow paths in crystalline rock. (author). 182 refs., 11 tabs., 27 figs

  18. The application of isotopic technique to the hydrogeological condition research in a nuclear waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Feng; Wang Zhiming; Li Sen

    1995-01-01

    Through the research on chemical compositions of various kinds of ground water, hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes and radioactive isotopes in ground water in the study area, the shallow underground water (pore water) and the weathering fissure water in bedrock are distinguished. It is determined that the recharge area of ground water is the Paiyashan area. The main direction for the surface water and ground water runoff is SE-striking, in the meantime the lateral migration of ground water exists and recharges the shallow water and surface water in the form of springs. Based on the decay calculation of tritium and compared with the data from Hongkong observation station, the relative ages of water in the area have been established and they are divided into 3 age groups: (1) ground water with the shortest runoff time, having tritium concentration identical to that of recent meteoric water; (2) shallow ground water with the relative age of about 20 years; (3) low tritium water with the relative age of more than 30 years

  19. Isotopic methods in hydrogeology and their application to the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.; Kotzer, T

    1995-09-01

    This review examines isotopic methods used to determine groundwater sources, residence times and processes of geochemical evolution that have been published in the international literature, with specific reference to AECL`s experience in these methods and applications to groundwaters at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL), Manitoba. The program of groundwater sampling and analysis currently being planned for the URL area over the next several years will concentrate on specific isotopic measurements that may assist in understanding the groundwater flow system at the URL site. These results will add to the existing data for the URL area and indicate which isotopes are most useful when applied to the known groundwater flow system of the URL. This program of study is especially important because it not only uses standard geochemical and isotopic measurements (e.g., major ion, trace elements, {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O, {sup 14}C, {sup 34}S) of groundwaters, but will determine values of more exotic and unusual ratios, such as {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li, and B{sup 11}/B{sup 10}, whose potential for understanding groundwater geochemical evolution is largely unknown at present. In addition, the more established but equally complex methods of isotopic analysis, to determine {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He, {sup 36}Cl/Cl and {sup 129}I/I, will be used to assess their potential for adding to the hydrogeochemical understanding of flow paths in crystalline rock. (author). 182 refs., 11 tabs., 27 figs.

  20. Contamination control research activities for space optics in JAXA RANDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Contamination control research activities for space optics projects in JAXA R&D are described. More accurate contamination control techniques are requested because of intensified recent science mission requirements. One approach to control the contamination effects is analysis by software. JAXA has been developing a contamination analytical tool "J-SPICE" (Japanese Spacecraft Induced Contamination analysis software) as well as experiment facilities to improve the J-SPICE. A reflection model in J-SPICE has been experimentally verified and outgassing model data has been acquired by a facility. JAXA has developed a facility which could determine the influence of the contamination at a specific wavelength by combining a vacuum chamber with an I-R spectrometer and performed an experiment to inspect the effect of baking. Space material exposure experiment results reveal the actual thickness of the contamination layer in ISS orbit.

  1. Hydrogeological Investigation and Groundwater Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper assesses groundwater quality and productivity in Haromaya watershed, eastern. Ethiopia. ... zones, quantity and quality of plant and animal life (Tamire H., 1981). Steep to very ... Present research work was proposed to conduct hydrogeological investigation and assess ...... Water Balance of Haromaya basin,.

  2. HydroCube: an entity-relationship hydrogeological data model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojda, Piotr; Brouyère, Serge; Derouane, Johan; Dassargues, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Managing, handling and accessing hydrogeological information depends heavily on the applied hydrogeological data models, which differ between institutions and countries. The effective dissemination of hydrogeological information requires the convergence of such models to make hydrogeological information accessible to multiple users such as universities, water suppliers, and administration and research organisations. Furthermore, because hydrogeological studies are complex, they require a wide variety of high-quality hydrogeological data with appropriate metadata in clearly designed and coherent structures. A need exists, therefore, to develop and implement hydrogeological data models that cover, as much as possible, the full hydrogeological domain. A new data model, called HydroCube, was developed for the Walloon Region in Belgium in 2005. The HydroCube model presents an innovative holistic project-based approach which covers a full set of hydrogeological concepts and features, allowing for effective hydrogeological project management. The model stores data relating to the project locality, hydrogeological equipment, and related observations and measurements. In particular, it focuses on specialized hydrogeological field experiments such as pumping and tracer tests. This logical data model uses entity-relationship diagrams and it has been implemented in the Microsoft Access environment. It has been enriched with a fully functional user interface.

  3. Groundwater quality assessment for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The report contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several hazardous and non- hazardous waste management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). These sites are southwest of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring and remediation (Figure 2). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Division manages the monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP).

  4. Groundwater quality assessment for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: 1991 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The report contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1991 calendar year at several hazardous and non- hazardous waste management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). These sites are southwest of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring and remediation (Figure 2). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Division manages the monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP)

  5. Hydrogeology, Ground-Water-Age Dating, Water Quality, and Vulnerability of Ground Water to Contamination in a Part of the Whitewater Valley Aquifer System near Richmond, Indiana, 2002-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, Paul M.; Watson, Lee R.; Greeman, Theodore K.

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of the vulnerability to contamination of ground-water sources used by public-water systems, as mandated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996, commonly have involved qualitative evaluations based on existing information on the geologic and hydrologic setting. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program has identified ground-water-age dating; detailed water-quality analyses of nitrate, pesticides, trace elements, and wastewater-related organic compounds; and assessed natural processes that affect those constituents as potential, unique improvements to existing methods of qualitative vulnerability assessment. To evaluate the improvement from use of these methods, in 2002 and 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Richmond, Indiana, compiled and interpreted hydrogeologic data and chemical analyses of water samples from seven wells in a part of the Whitewater Valley aquifer system in a former glacial valley near Richmond. This study investigated the application of ground-water-age dating, dissolved-gas analyses, and detailed water-quality analyses to quantitatively evaluate the vulnerability of ground water to contamination and to identify processes that affect the vulnerability to specific contaminants in an area of post-1972 greenfield development.

  6. Hydrogeology of Gypsum formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimchouk A.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed explanation of hydrogeological characteristics of gypsum aquifers is given in various situations: deep-seated karst-confined conditions, subjacent, entrenched and denuded karst types-semi-confined, phreatic and vadose conditions. The hydrogeological evolution of barren exposed gypsum karst and flow velocities in gypsum karst aquifers is also discussed.

  7. Hydrogeology and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past 50 years, significant progress has been made in improving our understanding of the extent and potential consequences of groundwater contamination, with research advancing on several fronts including groundwater sampling methods, laboratory detection methods, subsurface transport (and m...

  8. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Watson

    2005-01-01

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the

  9. [Research on hyperspectral remote sensing in monitoring snow contamination concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xu-guang; Liu, Dian-wei; Zhang, Bai; Du, Jia; Lei, Xiao-chun; Zeng, Li-hong; Wang, Yuan-dong; Song, Kai-shan

    2011-05-01

    Contaminants in the snow can be used to reflect regional and global environmental pollution caused by human activities. However, so far, the research on space-time monitoring of snow contamination concentration for a wide range or areas difficult for human to reach is very scarce. In the present paper, based on the simulated atmospheric deposition experiments, the spectroscopy technique method was applied to analyze the effect of different contamination concentration on the snow reflectance spectra. Then an evaluation of snow contamination concentration (SCC) retrieval methods was conducted using characteristic index method (SDI), principal component analysis (PCA), BP neural network and RBF neural network method, and the estimate effects of four methods were compared. The results showed that the neural network model combined with hyperspectral remote sensing data could estimate the SCC well.

  10. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE`s Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  11. Materials of conference: Hydrogeological Problems of South-West Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogeological problems of South-west Poland is the collection of conference papers held in Szklarska Poreba on 20-22 June 1996. The materials have been gathered in three topical groups: water quality problems in hydrological cycle, regional hydrogeology of South-west Poland, theoretical problems and research methods in hydrogeology. More of performed articles have a interdisciplinary character taking into account the precipitation and surface water quality and their influence on ground water features

  12. The hydrogeology of the Tully Valley, Onondaga County, New York: an overview of research, 1992-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Onondaga Creek begins approximately 15 miles south of Syracuse, New York, and flows north through the Onondaga Indian Nation, then through Syracuse, and finally into Onondaga Lake in central New York. Tully Valley is in the upper part of the Onondaga Creek watershed between U.S. Route 20 and the Valley Heads end moraine near Tully, N.Y. Tully Valley has a history of several unusual hydrogeologic phenomena that affected past land use and the water quality of Onondaga Creek; the phenomena are still present and continue to affect the area today (2014). These phenomena include mud volcanoes or mudboils, landslides, and land-surface subsidence; all are considered to be naturally occurring but may also have been influenced by human activity. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Onondaga Lake Partnership, began a study of the Tully Valley mudboils beginning in October 1991 in hopes of understanding (1) what drives mudboil activity in order to remediate mudboil influence on the water quality of Onondaga Creek, and (2) land-surface subsidence issues that have caused a road bridge to collapse, a major pipeline to be rerouted, and threatened nearby homes. Two years into this study, the 1993 Tully Valley landslide occurred just over 1 mile northwest of the mudboils. This earth slump-mud flow was the largest landslide in New York in more than 70 years (Fickies, 1993); this event provided additional insight into the geology and hydrology of the valley. As the study of the Tully Valley mudboils progressed, other unusual hydrogeologic phenomena were found within the Tully Valley and provided the opportunity to perform short-term, small-scale studies, some of which became graduate student theses—Burgmeier (1998), Curran (1999), Morales-Muniz (2000), Baldauf (2003), Epp (2005), Hackett, (2007), Tamulonis (2010), and Sinclair (2013). The unusual geology and hydrology of the Tully Valley, having been investigated for

  13. Vulnerability and Hydrogeologic Risk of the Guarani Aquifer System in the outcropping area located in Rivera Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, J.; Collazo, P.; Auge, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Project named Vulnerability and Hydrogeologic Risk of the Guarani Aquifer System in the outcropping area located in Rivera, Uruguay is developed by the Faculty of Science University of the Republic, together with the Faculty of Natural and Exact Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires, and it is financed by the Guarani Fund of Universities - Project for the Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development of the Guarani Aquifer System. This project has the aim of researching the characteristics and the hydrogeologic behavior of the Guarani Aquifer in the North portion of Uruguay, Department of Rivera (outcropping area). Moreover, to propose measures directed to their preservation through their sustainable use. The Hydrogeologic Study of the Guarani Aquifer System in this area will contribute not only with the best knowledge in its dynamics, but also helping to take measures in the water management and to avoid potential risks of contamination [es

  14. Editors' message--Hydrogeology Journal in 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford; Olcott, Perry; Schneider, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeology Journal appeared in six issues containing a total of 710 pages and 48 major articles, including 31 Papers and 14 Reports, as well as some Technical Notes and Book Reviews. The number of submitted manuscripts continues to increase. The final issue of 2003 also contained the annual volume index. Hydrogeology Journal (HJ) is an international forum for hydrogeology and related disciplines and authors in 2003 were from about 28 countries. Articles advanced hydrogeologic science and described hydrogeologic systems in many regions worldwide. These articles focused on a variety of general topics and on studies of hydrogeology in 24 countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, France, India, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, and U.S.A. The Guest Editor of the 2003 HJ theme issue on “Hydromechanics in Geology and Geotechnics”, Ove Stephansson, assembled a valuable collection of technical reviews and research papers from eminent authors on important aspects of the subject area.

  15. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  16. Hydrogeological Study of Mangrove Areas Around Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Cardoso da Silva Júnior;

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The study area covers part of the mangrove belt located around Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Representing a continental-marine transition, the mangrove ecosystem is very susceptible to environmental variations and impacts. The vegetation cover plays an important role in prevention of erosion and contamination processes in those areas. An ongoing extensive research effort in the Petrochemical Complex of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, focuses on the man-induced changes in the physical environment (soils, groundwater flow system, type and volumes of contaminants, geochemical aspects and the consequences on the neighboring mangrove ecosystem. This article describes the importance of hydrogeological studies in mangrove areas as part of an appropriate environmental assessment, taking as an example an industrial dumping area located in that Petrochemical Complex. Field work included extensive drilling and sampling to obtain basic geological and hydrogeological parameters and data in the pilot area, such as hydraulic conductivity and piezometric heads; emphasizing the tracking of possible contamination by industrial effluents and the marine influence; validation of the conceptual model with mathematical models (numerical and analytical models was carried out. Results show the great importance of well conducted and detailed hydrogeological studies to properly address environmental problems caused by industrial plants in mangrove areas.

  17. Comparison of the availability of groundwater information sources in Poland with other European countries. Knowledge inventory for hydrogeology research - project KINDRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Barbara; Dendys, Marta; Tyszer, Magdalena

    2017-11-01

    Regulations of the Water Framework Directive 200/60/EC (WFD) had been applied by European Union countries into their legislation system. However, it does not guarantee that the groundwater research has the same standard and quality in EU countries. KINDRA international research project was launched to assessment of existing groundwater-related practical and scientific knowledge based on a new Hydrogeological Research Classification System (HRC-SYS). This classification is supported by a web-service - the European Inventory of Groundwater Research (EIGR). The main goal of the project is implementation policy of optimization in groundwater research in EU. The preliminary result of survey about groundwater management shows that in Poland is a good state of implementation WFD. Good level of implementation is especially related with groundwater monitoring. It is because a lot of institutions and municipal entities carry out their tasks referring to quality or quantity assessment. Results of their works are published as reports, newsletters, maps, bulletins etc. These materials are potential source of information which can be a valuable contribution to EIGR. However, a lot of information are published only in polish language, so it is impossible to spread this knowledge in Europe.

  18. Comparison of the availability of groundwater information sources in Poland with other European countries. Knowledge inventory for hydrogeology research – project KINDRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaszewska Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulations of the Water Framework Directive 200/60/EC (WFD had been applied by European Union countries into their legislation system. However, it does not guarantee that the groundwater research has the same standard and quality in EU countries. KINDRA international research project was launched to assessment of existing groundwater-related practical and scientific knowledge based on a new Hydrogeological Research Classification System (HRC-SYS. This classification is supported by a web-service – the European Inventory of Groundwater Research (EIGR. The main goal of the project is implementation policy of optimization in groundwater research in EU. The preliminary result of survey about groundwater management shows that in Poland is a good state of implementation WFD. Good level of implementation is especially related with groundwater monitoring. It is because a lot of institutions and municipal entities carry out their tasks referring to quality or quantity assessment. Results of their works are published as reports, newsletters, maps, bulletins etc. These materials are potential source of information which can be a valuable contribution to EIGR. However, a lot of information are published only in polish language, so it is impossible to spread this knowledge in Europe.

  19. Hydrogeology of the basalts in the Uruguayan NW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, A.; Fernandez, A.

    1967-01-01

    This work is about the hydrogeological aspects in the NW Uruguayan basaltic area. The results of this research are the main geological, morphological and hydrogeological aspects of the area as well as the characteristics and the color of the basalt and sandstones

  20. Proceedings of the joint Russian-American hydrogeology seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mironenko, V.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogeology research has been very active in both Russia and the US because of the concerns for migration of radioactive and chemical contaminants in soils and geologic formations, as well as for water problems related to mining and other industrial operations. Russian hydrogeologists have developed various analysis and field testing techniques, sometimes in parallel with US counterparts. These Proceedings come out of a Seminar held to bring together a small group (about 15) of active Russian researchers in geologic flow and transport associated with the disposal of radioactive and chemical wastes either on the soils or through deep injection wells, with a corresponding group (about 25) of American hydrogeologists. The meeting was intentionally kept small to enable informal, detailed and in-depth discussions on hydrogeological issues of common interest. Out of this interaction, the authors hope that, firstly, they will have learned from each other and secondly, that research collaborations will be established where there is the opportunity. This proceedings presents the summaries and viewgraphs from the presentations. What cannot be conveyed here is the warm and cooperative atmosphere of these interactions, both inside and outside the formal sessions, which may well lead to future collaborations

  1. Hydrogeology of Mors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    The covering layers protect the salt in the dome. Ground water velocities are small and the chalk exhibits good retention properties for the radionuclides. As ground water velocities below 500 m are small, knowledge of hydrogeology over only a small area over the dome is necessary (1 km horizontal transport takes about 15 mill. years). Additionally if the retention properties of the chalk together with radioactive decay are taken into account, it becomes obvious that the nuclides can travel only a few metres into the chalk, before they have decayed to safe radioactive levels. Therefore it does not appear to be necessary to investigate the hydrogeology beyond a few metres from the disposal area. The hydrogeological investigations that have been carried out, although they cover only a limited area, thus give an excellent and sufficient basis for a safety evaluation for determining the suitability of the Mors salt dome for waste disposal. (EG)

  2. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Artiola, Janick F.; Maier, Raina M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  3. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation and decision-making, and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with contaminated sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites.

  4. Confirmatory research program: effects of atmospheric contaminants on commercial charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.; Dietz, V.R.

    1979-01-01

    The increased use of activated charcoals in engineered-safety-feature and normal ventilation systems of nuclear power stations to continually remove radioiodine from flowing air prior to release to the environment has added importance to the question of the effect of atmospheric contaminants on the useful life of the charcoal. In January of 1977 the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) began an investigation to determine the extent to which atmospheric contaminants in ambient concentrations degrade the efficiency of various commercially-available charcoals for removing methyl iodide. The approach employed by NRL is two-fold. First, charcoal samples are exposed to unmodified outdoor air for periods of one to nine months, then examined for methyl iodide retention, increase in weight, and the pH of water extract. The atmospheric contaminants are identified by the NRL Air Quality Monitoring Station, and concentrations of the various contaminants (ozone, SO 2 , NO 2 , CO 2 , methane and total hydrocarbons) are also available. Second, additional charcoal samples are exposed to the same pollutants under controlled laboratory conditions in various pollutant combinations. Results indicate that the water vapor-charcoal interaction is an important factor in the degradation of the commercial charcoals. Laboratory results indicate the pollutant sulfur dioxide plus water vapor can result in significant charcoal deterioration, as did ozone plus water vapor. Conversely, carbon monoxide did not appear to affect the charcoal. Also, differences were observed for various charcoals

  5. Phytoremediation of radioactive contaminated soil research and feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianguo; Han Baohua; Ma Binghui; Wang Huijuan; Liang Yong; Liu Jie

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging environmental control technology with economic, environmental friendliness, etc., but also constrained by a variety of factors, such as difficulties of Hyperaccumulator screening, poor adaptability of plants, longer growing season and low biomass, which greatly limited the development and application of phytoremediation technology. This paper decribed the principles of phytoremediation for U, Sr and Cs contaminated soil, introduced research status involved, briefly nanlyzed the feasibility of phytoremediation techniques combined with the nuclear environmental remediation standards, and proposed suggestions for further researches. (authors)

  6. Laboratory contamination in the early period of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rona, E.

    1979-01-01

    Meagre records exist of the levels of contamination and human exposure encountered by those who took part in the early research on radioactive materials. In order to throw some light on the nature and extent of the problem the author presents some recollections of the conditions of the laboratories in which she worked from 1924-1940. These include the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, the Radium Institute of Vienna and the Curie Institute. The health, radiation injuries and causes of death of some early workers are discussed. Although the effects of acute exposure were recognised early on, there was less awareness of the possible effects of chronic exposure, and lack of prompt clinical signs of injury encouraged complacency. Laboratory contamination was often seen more as a problem affecting experimental results than as a health hazard. (author)

  7. Internal Contamination Program in hospital and biomedical research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellez de Cepeda, M.; Macias, M.T.; Plaza, R.; Martinez Hidalgo, C.

    1992-01-01

    Program and the criteria for establishing such program to control the internal contamination from a point of view, not yet systematized and standardized in Hospital and Biomedical Research centers. The main purpose of this work is to review our own situation, to establish and systematize an operative program with variable means (instruments) and the use of external means if need. This program will be established taking into account the new recommendations of I.C.R.P. and the new criteria A.L.I. (author)

  8. Hydrogeology of the West Siberian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Cole, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle activities of the former Soviet Union (FSU) have resulted in extensive radioactive contaminant releases to the environment in western Siberia. We are developing three-dimensional numerical models of the hydrogeology and potential contaminant migration in the West Siberian Basin. We have assumed that ground-water flow in the West Siberian Basin is topographically driven, with recharge to the basin occurring in the highlands on the west, east, and south, and internal discharge localized in numerous river valleys and lakes that ultimately discharge north to the ocean. We are modeling the regional hydrogeology as three-dimensional, steady-state, saturated flow that is recharged from above. We acquired topographic, geologic, hydrostratigraphic, hydrogeologic, and water-balance data for the West Siberian Basin and constructed a regional water table. We correlated and combined 70 different rock types derived from published descriptions of West Siberian Basin rocks into 17 rock types appropriate for assignment of hydrogeologic properties on the basis of spatial heterogeneity and constituent (i.e., sand, silt, and clay) diversity. Examination of resulting three-dimensional assemblages of rock types showed that they were consistent with published and inferred paleogeography and depositional processes. Calibrating the basin's moisture balance (i.e., recharge and discharge) to the derived water table determined plausible input parameter values for unknowns such as hydraulic conductivities. The general directions of calculated ground-water flow suggest that major rivers act as discharge areas, with upwelling below the rivers extending down into the basement rocks, and that ground-water divides that penetrate the entire thickness of the model are evident between major rivers

  9. Hydrogeology of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Mazza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the hydrogeological setting of Rome is figured out. This setting has been strongly influenced by different factors as tectonic activity, volcanism and seal level variations. The conceptual model of the groundwater flow in the roman area is represented by four aquifers, three of which being overlappingones. These aquifers flow from peripheral sectors of the study area toward Tiber and Aniene Rivers and the Sea.

  10. Use of isotopic tracers in pesticide and environmental contamination research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casida, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The era of synthetic organic pesticides, starting with DDT and the herbicide 2,4-D about 1940, coincides with that of rapid advances in radiotracer applications. This is indeed fortunate since isotopic experiments are an essential step in evaluating each new pesticide and in continually reassessing older compounds for safety and most efficient utilization. This research is carried out in all developed nations with important supplementation on local problems or use conditions from investigations in the developing countries. Several slides will help illustrate the sequence of studies for establishing the disposition and fate of pesticides and other environmental contaminants.It is clear that very little of the pesticide ever contacts the pest. Pesticide chemicals are generally applied at dosages of 0.2 to 2 kilogram per hectare from one to five or more times per crop season. Less than 0.01% of an insecticide is absorbed or ingested by the pest insect. The remaining amount, more than 99.99%, is an environmental contaminant, a portion of which is a potential residue in food, feed and fibre. Isotopic research is critical in understanding or solving several aspects of the problem. The isotopic label is introduced into the chemical by synthesis in a commercial or university laboratory or in a national or regional atomic research centre. The most common radioisotopes used are tritium, 14carbon, 32phosphorus, 35sulphur and 36chlorine. Stable isotopes are becoming increasingly important in pesticide research, particularly carbon 13, nitrogen 15 and oxygen 18. The initial studies usually involve administration of the 14 carbon-labelled pesticide to rats, which are then held in metabolism cages that allow separate collection of expired gases, urine and faeces. The products in the excreta are identified by various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The persistence of the chemical and its metabolites in various tissues is also determined to make sure that the material

  11. Hydrogeological Characteristics of Fractured Rocks around the In-DEBS Test Borehole at the Underground Research Facility (KURT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Nak-Youl; Kim, Geon Young; Kim, Kyung-Su

    2016-04-01

    In the concept of the deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes, canisters including high-level wastes are surrounded by engineered barrier, mainly composed of bentonite, and emplaced in disposal holes drilled in deep intact rocks. The heat from the high-level radioactive wastes and groundwater inflow can influence on the robustness of the canister and engineered barrier, and will be possible to fail the canister. Therefore, thermal-hydrological-mechanical (T-H-M) modeling for the condition of the disposal holes is necessary to secure the safety of the deep geological disposal. In order to understand the T-H-M coupling phenomena at the subsurface field condition, "In-DEBS (In-Situ Demonstration of Engineered Barrier System)" has been designed and implemented in the underground research facility, KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) in Korea. For selecting a suitable position of In-DEBS test and obtaining hydrological data to be used in T-H-M modeling as well as groundwater flow simulation around the test site, the fractured rock aquifer including the research modules of KURT was investigated through the in-situ tests at six boreholes. From the measured data and results of hydraulic tests, the range of hydraulic conductivity of each interval in the boreholes is about 10-7-10-8 m/s and that of influx is about 10-4-10-1 L/min for NX boreholes, which is expected to be equal to about 0.1-40 L/min for the In-DEBS test borehole (diameter of 860 mm). The test position was determined by the data and availability of some equipment for installing In-DEBS in the test borehole. The mapping for the wall of test borehole and the measurements of groundwater influx at the leaking locations was carried out. These hydrological data in the test site will be used as input of the T-H-M modeling for simulating In-DEBS test.

  12. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nanonodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst particles and generate plenty of fines which severely influence units’ smooth running. A dense layer could be formed on the catalysts’ surface after iron contamination and the dense layer stops reactants to diffuse to inner structures of catalyst. This causes extremely negative effects on catalyst’s heavy oil conversion ability and could greatly cut down gasoline yield while increasing yields of dry gas, coke, and slurry largely. Research shows that catalyst’s reaction performance would be severely deteriorated when iron content in E-cat (equilibrium catalyst exceeds 8000 μg/g.

  13. Current university and USDA lab cotton contamination research

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. cotton is considered to have some of the lowest levels of contamination in the world. However, that reputation is in jeopardy as complaints of contamination from domestic and foreign mills are on the rise. Cotton contamination can be classified under four major categorizes: fabrics and strings ...

  14. Education and Employment in Hydrogeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Darryll T.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study of position descriptions in the field of hydrogeology appearing in want ads, published studies describing the working professional, and published descriptions of hydrogeology programs. Results indicate an increase in positions of ten times that of five years ago. Suggests basic training requirements for beginning…

  15. Hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary rock, Newark Basin, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Pierre J.; Burton, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Trenton, New Jersey, a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated site in the Newark Basin, is developed using an understanding of the geologic history of the strata, gamma-ray logs, and rock cores. NAWC is the newest field research site established as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and DoD Environmental Security Technology Certification Program to investigate contaminant remediation in fractured rock. Sedimentary bedrock at the NAWC research site comprises the Skunk Hollow, Byram, and Ewing Creek Members of the Lockatong Formation and Raven Rock Member of the Stockton Formation. Muds of the Lockatong Formation that were deposited in Van Houten cycles during the Triassic have lithified to form the bedrock that is typical of much of the Newark Basin. Four lithotypes formed from the sediments include black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone, dark-gray laminated mudstone, light-gray massive mudstone, and red massive mudstone. Diagenesis, tectonic compression, off-loading, and weathering have altered the rocks to give some strata greater hydraulic conductivity than other strata. Each stratum in the Lockatong Formation is 0.3 to 8 m thick, strikes N65 degrees E, and dips 25 degrees to 70 degrees NW. The black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone tends to fracture easily, has a relatively high hydraulic conductivity and is associated with high natural gamma-ray count rates. The dark-gray laminated mudstone is less fractured and has a lower hydraulic conductivity than the black carbon-rich laminated mudstone. The light-gray and the red massive mudstones are highly indurated and tend to have the least fractures and a low hydraulic conductivity. The differences in gamma-ray count rates for different mudstones allow gamma-ray logs to be used to correlate and

  16. Hydrogeological and isotopic studies for selected springs in Sinai Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, M S; Awad, M A; El-gamal, S A [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo Egypt and Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Center for The Arab Countries, Dokki, 12311, Cairo (Egypt); Hammad, F A [Desert Research Centre, Materia, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    This paper deals with the hydrogeology and isotopic composition of water samples collected from selected spring in sinai (e.g. Algudierate, Alqusiema, qidis and Isram) in order to identify their genesis, their interaction with the host rocks and mixing trend. Results of isotopic composition have indicated the similarity in the hydrogeologic situation of Ain qidis and Ain-al-gudierate, while Ain Isram has shown a marked difference in its stable isotope and this could be due to evaporation effect. The isotopic and hydrochemical constituents of the studied springs reflect eater of a meteoric origin with a possible contamination from surficial materials (evaporates) and deeper aquifers. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Drilling methods to keep the hydrogeological parameters of natural aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqin

    2004-01-01

    In hydrogeological drilling, how to keep the hydrogeological parameters of natural aquifer unchanged is a deeply concerned problem for the technicians, this paper introduces the methods taken by the state-owned 'Red Hill' geological company of Uzbekistan. By the research and contrast of different kinds of flush liquid, the company has found the methods to reduce the negative effects of drilling on the permeability of the vicinal aquifer. (author)

  18. An evaluation of hydrogeologic data of crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raven, K.G.; Lafleur, D.W.

    1986-12-01

    This report presents a detailed review of hydrogeologic data collected as part of various research programs investigating fractured crystalline rock around the world. Based on the available information describing the test equipment, test methods and analytical techniques, the data have been assessed in terms of their reliability and representativeness, and likely error ranges have been assigned. The data reviewed include both hydrogeologic parameters, such as permeability, storage coefficient components (principally porosity), and fracture characteristic data

  19. Geological investigations and hydrogeologic model development in support of DoD and DOE environmental programs on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.D.; Pratt, G.; Davidson, H.; DeWitt, C.; Hitchcock, C.; Kelson, K.; Noller, J.; Sawyer, T.; Thomas, E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents results of preliminary geologic site characterization and hydrogeologic conceptual model development for the 250-km 2 Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) and associated lands in central New Mexico. The research, development, and other operational activities of the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) on KAFB over the last 50 years have resulted in diverse hazardous, radioactive, and mixed-waste environmental concerns. Because multiple federal, state, and local agencies are responsible for administrating the involved lands and because of the nature of many U.S. environmental regulations, individual contaminated and potentially contaminated DoD and DOE environmental restoration (ER) sites on KAFB are commonly handled as distinct entities with little consideration for the cumulative environmental and health risk from all sites. A site-wide characterization program has been undertaken at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM), under the auspices of the DOE, to construct a conceptual hydrogeologic model for the base. This conceptual model serves as the basis for placing each ER site into a broader context for evaluating background (i.e., non-contaminated) conditions and for modeling of possible contaminant pathways and travel-times. Regional and local hydrogeologic investigations from KAFB can be used as models for characterizing and evaluating other sites around the world where combined civilian and military environmental programs must work together to resolve environmental problems that may present health risks to workers and the general public

  20. Aquifer sensitivity to pesticide leaching: Testing a soils and hydrogeologic index method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, E.; Keefer, D.A.; Dey, W.S.; Wehrmann, H.A.; Wilson, S.D.; Ray, C.

    2005-01-01

    For years, researchers have sought index and other methods to predict aquifer sensitivity and vulnerability to nonpoint pesticide contamination. In 1995, an index method and map were developed to define aquifer sensitivity to pesticide leaching based on a combination of soil and hydrogeologic factors. The soil factor incorporated three soil properties: hydraulic conductivity, amount of organic matter within individual soil layers, and drainage class. These properties were obtained from a digital soil association map. The hydrogeologic factor was depth to uppermost aquifer material. To test this index method, a shallow ground water monitoring well network was designed, installed, and sampled in Illinois. The monitoring wells had a median depth of 7.6 m and were located adjacent to corn and soybean fields where the only known sources of pesticides were those used in normal agricultural production. From September 1998 through February 2001, 159 monitoring wells were sampled for 14 pesticides but no pesticide metabolites. Samples were collected and analyzed to assess the distribution of pesticide occurrence across three units of aquifer sensitivity. Pesticides were detected in 18% of all samples and nearly uniformly from samples from the three units of aquifer sensitivity. The new index method did not predict pesticide occurrence because occurrence was not dependent on the combined soil and hydrogeologic factors. However, pesticide occurrence was dependent on the tested hydrogeologic factor and was three times higher in areas where the depth to the uppermost aquifer was <6 m than in areas where the depth to the uppermost aquifer was 6 to <15 m. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  1. SERDP and ESTCP Workshop on Research and Development Needs for Long-Term Management of Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Ph.D. Exponent Cara Patton HydroGeoLogic, Inc. Michael Pound U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest Danny Reible, Ph.D...David Barclift NAVFAC Atlantic Todd Bridges, Ph.D. U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center Sean Bushart, Ph.D. Electric Power... Electric Power Research Institute Chuck Coyle U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Stephen Ells U.S. EPA Yoko Furukawa, Ph.D. Naval Research

  2. A compilation of subsurface hydrogeologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This volume contains the permeability data for the research sites discussed in Volume 1 which have been studied in sufficient detail to allow for analysis. These sites are the following: Stripa Mine, Sweden; Finnsjon, Kamlunge, Fjallveden, Gidea, Svartboberget, Sweden; Olkiluoto, Loviisa, Lavia, Finland; Climax Granite Nevada Test Site; OCRD Room, Colorado School of Mines; Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina; Oracle, Arizona; Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), Hanford, Washington; Underground Research Laboratory, AECL, Canada; Atikokan Research Area, AECL; Chalk River Research Area, AECL; Whiteshell Research Area, AECL. Other sources of information have been included where sufficient site specific geologic and hydrogeologic information is provided

  3. A compilation of subsurface hydrogeologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This volume contains a continuation of the fracture data for the research sites discussed in Volume 1 which have been studied in sufficient detail to allow for analysis. The sites discussed in this volume are the following: Climax Granite Nevada Test Site; OCRD Room, Colorado School of Mines; Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina; Oracle, Arizona; Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), Hanford, Washington Underground Research Laboratory, AECL, Canada; Atikokan Research Area, AECL; Chalk River Research Area, AECL; Whiteshell Research Area, AECL. Other sources of information have been included where sufficient site specific geologic and hydrogeologic information is provided

  4. Tono regional hydrogeological study project. Annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Teruki; Ota, Kunio; Takeuchi, Shinji; Amano, Kenji; Takeuchi, Ryuji; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Osawa, Hideaki

    2005-09-01

    Tono Geoscience Center, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has been conducting a wide range of geoscientific research in order to build firm scientific and technological basis for the research and development of geological disposal. One of the geoscientific research programme is a Regional Hydrogeological Study (RHS) project in the Tono region, central Japan. This report mainly summarizes the results of research in DH-14 and DH-15 boreholes at Toki city and Mizunami city in fiscal year 2004 which were carried out to support and improve the results in fiscal year 2003. The research in the regional scale area shows the reliability of conceptual hydrogeological model and numerical simulation for the evaluation of regional hydrogeology. On the other hand, the geological and geophysical investigation, and borehole investigation during the surface-based investigations in the local scale area provide the pragmatic distribution of hydrogeological structure that may control regional groundwater hydrology. Hydrogeological simulations regarding the geological structure such as fault and hydrogeological property demonstrate the priority of investigation of geological structure for the evaluation of hydrogeology. The fault perpendicular to groundwater flow direction crucially affects on regional hydrology. Such fault is necessary to be investigated by priority. Hydrochemical investigation shows that chemical evolution process in this groundwater illustrated is mixing between groundwaters with different salinities. Principal component analysis and mass balance calculation reveal reliable chemistry of end-member waters for mixing. Regarding methodology development, the strategy and procedure of investigations are summarized based on the results of surface-based investigation. Moreover the multi interval monitoring system for water pressure and temperature has developed and started to monitor the in-situ condition of groundwater. The geology, geological structure, hydraulic

  5. Calendar year 1995 groundwater quality report for the upper east Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic regime, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1995 Groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1995 calendar year (CY) at several waste management facilities associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number for the Y-12 Plant is TN3 89 009 0001. The sites addressed by this document are located within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime). The East Fork Regime, which is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant, encompasses the Y-12 Plant

  6. Soil Contamination and Remediation Strategies. Current research and future challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Soil contamination: the heritage of industrial development Contamination is only a part of a whole set of soil degradation processes, but it is one of paramount importance since soil pollution greatly influences the quality of water, food and human health. Soil contamination has been identified as an important issue for action in the European strategy for soil protection, it has been estimated that 3.5 million of sites are potentially contaminated in Europe. Contaminated soils have been essentially discovered in industrial sites landfills and energy production plants, but accumulation of heavy metals and organic compounds can be found also in agricultural land . Remediation strategies. from incineration to bioremediation The assessment of soil contamination is followed by remedial action. The remediation of contaminated soils started using consolidates technologies (incineration inertization etc.) previously employed in waste treatment,. This has contributed to consider a contaminated soil as an hazardous waste. This rough approximation was unfortunately transferred in many legislations and on this basis soil knowledge have been used only marginally in the clean up procedures. For many years soil quality has been identified by a value of concentration of a contaminant and excavation and landfill disposal of soil has been largely used. In the last years the knowledge of remediation technology has rapidly grown, at present many treatment processes appear to be really feasible at field scale, and soil remediation is now based on risk assessment procedures. Innovative technologies, largely dependent on soil properties, such as in situ chemical oxidation, electroremediation, bioventing, soil vapor extraction etc. have been successfully applied. Hazardous organic compounds are commonly treated by biological technologies, biorememdiation and phytoremediation, being the last partially applied also for metals. Technologies selection is no longer exclusively based on

  7. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  8. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  9. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  10. Hydrogeological modelling for migration of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunny, Faby; Chopra, Manish; Oza, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogeological modelling for migration of radionuclides basically involves modelling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport through the groundwater. The water that occurs below the land surface or within the lithosphere is called groundwater. The groundwater constitutes about 4 % of the total water on the earth and about 30 % of freshwater on the earth. Groundwater models describe groundwater flow and contaminant transport processes using mathematical equations that are based on certain simplifying assumptions. These assumptions typically involve the direction of flow, geometry of the aquifer, the heterogeneity or anisotropy of sediments or bedrock within the aquifer, the contaminant transport mechanisms and chemical reactions. Because of the simplifying assumptions and the many uncertainties in the values of data, a model must be viewed as an approximation and not an exact duplication of field conditions. However, these models are useful investigation tool for a number of applications such as prediction of the possible fate and migration of contaminants for risk evaluation; tracking the possible pathway of groundwater contamination; evaluation of design of hydraulic containment and pump-and-treat systems; design of groundwater monitoring networks; evaluation of regional groundwater resources and prediction of the effect of future groundwater withdrawals on groundwater levels

  11. Drilling technologies in hydrogeological survey

    OpenAIRE

    Vorlíček, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the drilling technologies used in hydrogeology. The main aim of the work is to explore types of drilling technologies used at hydrogeological drilling wells and modern technologies that could potentially be used in the future. The work also summarizes a historical development of drilling techniques, a drilling process procedure, information obtained from boreholes and the most common types of drilling fluids.

  12. Hydrogeologic Modeling at the Sylvania Corning FUSRAP Site - 13419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewy, Ann [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District (United States); Heim, Kenneth J. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District (United States); McGonigal, Sean T.; Talimcioglu, Nazmi M. [The Louis Berger Group, Inc. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A comparative groundwater hydrogeologic modeling analysis is presented herein to simulate potential contaminant migration pathways in a sole source aquifer in Nassau County, Long Island, New York. The source of contamination is related to historical operations at the Sylvania Corning Plant ('Site'), a 9.49- acre facility located at 70, 100 and 140 Cantiague Rock Road, Town of Oyster Bay in the westernmost portion of Hicksville, Long Island. The Site had historically been utilized as a nuclear materials manufacturing facility (e.g., cores, slug, and fuel elements) for reactors used in both research and electric power generation in early 1950's until late 1960's. The Site is contaminated with various volatile organic and inorganic compounds, as well as radionuclides. The major contaminants of concern at the Site are tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), nickel, uranium, and thorium. These compounds are present in soil and groundwater underlying the Site and have migrated off-site. The Site is currently being investigated as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The main objective of the current study is to simulate the complex hydrogeologic features in the region, such as numerous current and historic production well fields; large, localized recharge basins; and, multiple aquifers, and to assess potential contaminant migration pathways originating from the Site. For this purpose, the focus of attention was given to the underlying Magothy formation, which has been impacted by the contaminants of concern. This aquifer provides more than 90% of potable water supply in the region. Nassau and Suffolk Counties jointly developed a three-dimensional regional groundwater flow model to help understand the factors affecting groundwater flow regime in the region, to determine adequate water supply for public consumption, to investigate salt water intrusion in localized areas, to evaluate the impacts of regional

  13. The physical hydrogeology of ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Appold, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits represent a convergence of fluid flow, thermal energy, and solute flux that is hydrogeologically unusual. From the hydrogeologic perspective, hydrothermal ore deposition represents a complex coupled-flow problem—sufficiently complex that physically rigorous description of the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes (THMC modeling) continues to challenge our computational ability. Though research into these coupled behaviors has found only a limited subset to be quantitatively tractable, it has yielded valuable insights into the workings of hydrothermal systems in a wide range of geologic environments including sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic. Examples of these insights include the quantification of likely driving mechanisms, rates and paths of fluid flow, ore-mineral precipitation mechanisms, longevity of hydrothermal systems, mechanisms by which hydrothermal fluids acquire their temperature and composition, and the controlling influence of permeability and other rock properties on hydrothermal fluid behavior. In this communication we review some of the fundamental theory needed to characterize the physical hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and discuss how this theory has been applied in studies of Mississippi Valley-type, tabular uranium, porphyry, epithermal, and mid-ocean ridge ore-forming systems. A key limitation in the computational state-of-the-art is the inability to describe fluid flow and transport fully in the many ore systems that show evidence of repeated shear or tensional failure with associated dynamic variations in permeability. However, we discuss global-scale compilations that suggest some numerical constraints on both mean and dynamically enhanced crustal permeability. Principles of physical hydrogeology can be powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal ore formation and are becoming increasingly accessible with ongoing advances in modeling software.

  14. Groundwater arsenic contamination in Bangladesh-21 Years of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Mukherjee, Amitava; Alauddin, Mohammad; Hassan, Manzurul; Dutta, Rathindra Nath; Pati, Shymapada; Mukherjee, Subhash Chandra; Roy, Shibtosh; Quamruzzman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Morshed, Salim; Islam, Tanzima; Sorif, Shaharir; Selim, Md; Islam, Md Razaul; Hossain, Md Monower

    2015-01-01

    Department of Public Health Engineering (DPHE), Bangladesh first identified their groundwater arsenic contamination in 1993. But before the international arsenic conference in Dhaka in February 1998, the problem was not widely accepted. Even in the international arsenic conference in West-Bengal, India in February, 1995, representatives of international agencies in Bangladesh and Bangladesh government attended the conference but they denied the groundwater arsenic contamination in Bangladesh. School of Environmental Studies (SOES), Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India first identified arsenic patient in Bangladesh in 1992 and informed WHO, UNICEF of Bangladesh and Govt. of Bangladesh from April 1994 to August 1995. British Geological Survey (BGS) dug hand tube-wells in Bangladesh in 1980s and early 1990s but they did not test the water for arsenic. Again BGS came back to Bangladesh in 1992 to assess the quality of the water of the tube-wells they installed but they still did not test for arsenic when groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects in West Bengal in Bengal delta was already published in WHO Bulletin in 1988. From December 1996, SOES in collaboration with Dhaka Community Hospital (DCH), Bangladesh started analyzing hand tube-wells for arsenic from all 64 districts in four geomorphologic regions of Bangladesh. So far over 54,000 tube-well water samples had been analyzed by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). From SOES water analysis data at present we could assess status of arsenic groundwater contamination in four geo-morphological regions of Bangladesh and location of possible arsenic safe groundwater. SOES and DCH also made some preliminary work with their medical team to identify patients suffering from arsenic related diseases. SOES further analyzed few thousands biological samples (hair, nail, urine and skin scales) and foodstuffs for arsenic to know arsenic body burden and people sub

  15. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project overview of the pilot borehole investigation of the ventilation shaft (PB-V01). Hydrogeological investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Kunimaru, Takanori; Ishii, Eiichi; Hatsuyama, Yoshihiro; Ijiri, Yuji; Matsuoka, Kiyoyuki; Ibara, Tetsuo; Matsunami, Shinjiro; Makino, Akiya

    2009-02-01

    The Pilot Borehole Investigation of the Ventilation Shaft was conducted in Horonobe, Hokkaido, Japan from October 2007 to March 2008. Main purpose of the investigation is to understand geological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical properties of the formation where the Ventilation Shaft has been excavated. Hydraulic packer tests show that hydraulic conductivity lies in the range from 1.1E-11 to 1.4E-7 m/sec down to 500m in depth. This heterogeneity mainly depends on the distribution and permeability of groundwater inflow points, which were detected by Fluid Electric Conductivity logging. High conductive zones were found between 263m and 290m, 355m and 370m of the depth in the pilot borehole. An effective method for reducing groundwater inflow should be considered for the deeper Ventilation Shaft excavation. (author)

  16. Control of the surface radioactive contamination in the field of biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, S.; Encina, A. de la; Gaspar, J.; Macias, M. T.; Sanchez, A.; Usera, F.

    2012-01-01

    The manipulation of unsealed sources in biomedical research involves significant risk of radioactive contamination. the aim of this study has been to analyze the radioactive contamination occurring in the field of biomedical research, assessing its magnitude, identifying the equipment that can be contaminated with higher probability and monitoring the evolution of the contaminations production taking into account the radioisotopes and the activities uses, and the radiation protection control applied. The data used for this study correspond to a very lengthy period of time and it have been collected in the radioactive facility, of the Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia (CSIC), a very large biological research centre that can be used perfectly as a reference for this area. The results obtained show a gradual and significant decrease in the incidence of the radioactive contamination. This is due to the optimization of radiation protection standards applied and the implementation or a systematic operational radiation protection program. (Author) 13 refs.

  17. Time-lapse electrical resistivity anomalies due to contaminant transport around landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The extent of landfill leachate can be delineated by geo-electrical imaging as a response to the varying electrical resistivity in the contaminated area. This research was based on a combination of hydrogeological numerical simulation followed by geophysical forward and inversion modeling performed to evaluate the migration of a contaminant plume from a landfill. As a first step, groundwater flow and contaminant transport was simulated using the finite elements numerical modeling software FEFLOW. The extent of the contaminant plume was acquired through a hydrogeological model depicting the distributions of leachate concentration in the system. Next, based on the empirical relationship between the concentration and electrical conductivity of the leachate in the porous media, the corresponding geo-electrical structure was derived from the hydrogeological model. Finally, forward and inversion computations of geo-electrical anomalies were performed using the finite difference numerical modeling software DCIP2D/DCIP3D. The image obtained by geophysical inversion of the electric data was expected to be consistent with the initial hydrogeological model, as described by the distribution of leachate concentration. Numerical case studies were conducted for various geological conditions, hydraulic parameters and electrode arrays, from which conclusions were drawn regarding the suitability of the methodology to assess simple to more complex geo-electrical models. Thus, optimal mapping and monitoring configurations were determined.

  18. Dispersion of radioactively contamination turtles on the SRP: research and reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, T.; Taylor, B.; Gibbons, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Although SREL continued long-term studies on turtles during 1986, much research effort centered on contaminated turtle dispersion. The problem of radionuclide contamination in turtles and their dispersal through aquatic sites on and off the Savannah River Plant (SRP) was approached along three fronts. The first involved site reconnaissance, where aquatic habitats, adjacent to contaminated areas on the SRP were identified and surveyed for contaminated turtles. The second approach involved the development of a dispersal model. Third, mitochondrial DNA analysis was conducted to assess genetic differentiation between turtle populations inhabiting either side of the Savannah River near SRP. 1 figures, 2 tables

  19. Hydrogeological investigation for sitting disposal repository for high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonghai; Liu Shufen; Lv Chuanhe

    2005-01-01

    Based on the research experiences of our country and some developed countries in the world, the purpose, process and methods, as well as the function of hydrogeological investigation for sitting disposal repository for high radioactive waste are discussed. Meanwhile, the topic related to the acquisition of hydrogeological parameters is described as well, aiming at providing reference for the future study. (authors)

  20. The hydrogeology of urbanization: The lost springs of Washington, D.C., late Tertiary and Quaternary sediments of D.C., and the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research site (LTER): Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Aditi; Pavich, Milan J.; Sharp, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization is a major process now shaping the environment. This field trip looks at the hydrogeology of the general Washington, D.C., area and focuses on the city's lost springs. Until 150 years ago, springs and shallow dug wells were the main source of drinking water for residents of Washington, D.C. Celebrating the nation's bicentennial, Garnett P. Williams of the U.S. Geological Survey examined changes in water supply and water courses since 1776. He examined old newspaper files to determine the location of the city's springs. This field trip visits sites of some of these springs (few of which are now flowing), discusses the hydrologic impacts of urbanization and the general geological setting, and finishes with the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research site at Dead Run and its findings. The field trip visits some familiar locations in the Washington, D.C., area, and gives insights into their often hidden hydrologic past and present.

  1. Role of Hydrogeology in Professional Environmental Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this presentation is to acquaint hydrogeology students how hydrogeological principles are applied in environmental engineering projects. This presentation outlines EPA's Superfund processes of site characterization, feasibility studies, and remediation processes.

  2. Technical Writing in Hydrogeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A project for Writing Across the Curriculum at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire is described as a method to relate the process of writing to the process of learning hydrology. The project focuses on an actual groundwater contamination case and is designed to improve the technical writing skills of students. (JN)

  3. A compilation of subsurface hydrogeologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This volume contains the storage coefficient, porosity, compressibility and fracture data for the research sites discussed in Volume 1 which have been studied in sufficient detail to allow for analysis. These sites are the following: Stripa Mine, Sweden; Finnsjon, Kamlunge, Fjallveden, Gidea, Svartboberget, Sweden; Olkiluoto, Loviisa, Lavia, Finland; Climax Granite Nevada Test Site; OCRD Room, Colorado School of Mines; Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina; Oracle, Arizona; Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), Hanford, Washington; Underground Research Laboratory, AECL, Canada; Atikokan Research Area, AECL; Chalk River Research Area, AECL; Whiteshell Research Area, AECL. Other sources of information have been included where sufficient site specific geologic and hydrogeologic information is provided. The fracture data for the first three of the sites listed above are contained in this volume. The fracture data for the remaining research research sites are discussed in Volume 4

  4. HYDROGEOLOGICAL RELATIONS ON KARSTIFIED ISLANDS - VIS ISLAND CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Terzić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An approach to the hydrogeological investigations on Adriatic islands is presented on the Island of Vis case study. Infiltration, accumulation and discharge of the groundwater occur in karstified rock mass. Hydrogeological relations are mostly a consequence of the geological setting, because of the complete hydrogeologic barrier in Komiža bay, and relative barrier in the area of karst poljes. Significant research was performed in the 1999 – 2000 period aimed of better understanding of hydrogeological relations. These investigations, as well as reinterpretation of some previously known data, included structural geology, hydrogeology, hydrology and hydrochemistry. Approximate rock mass hydraulic conductivity calculation is also shown, as well as level of its usability in such terrain. Based on all these methods, it is possible to conclude that on the Island of Vis there is no saline water present underneath the entire island. There is only a saline water wedge which is formed on the top of relatively impermeable base rock, some few tens of meters under recent sea level. With such a model, and taking in account the hydrological balance, it is possible to conclude that there is possibility of higher amount of groundwater exploitation then it is today (the paper is published in Croatian.

  5. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections

  6. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections.

  7. Hydrogeological challenges through gender approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Maria Rosaria; Saltari, Davide; Di Giacomo, Tullia Valeria

    2017-04-01

    Women and Men play a different role in the society, tied from the differences (physical, biological, somatic, etc…) typical of each one. In the last decades, more gender approach has been introduced in a number of fields including the hydrogeological risk. Experiences, needs and potential of each one, women and men, covers both the risk reduction before the occurrence of extreme events (vulnerability assessment and prediction of the expected risk), then in the next emergency and intervention in follow-up actions to the overcoming of the event for the return to everyday life. The response of the extreme hydrological events are also subordinated from gender participation and it is closely related from other aspects, as natural disasters (flood events), gender inequalities and urban floodings. These aspects are also scheduled by the different approaches: a woman focuses different primary and social aspects than a man. How women can help organizations offering new 'policies' and government is the main aspect to be considered and how a gender approach can mitigate disasters to hydrological risk. It depends on some factors: gender inequalities (gender perception and sensibility), importance of natural disasters and urban floodings. Gender inequalities can match both in the natural disasters and urban floodings in a relevant way. ICT solutions can also give a helpful framework to accelerate and focus the quicker condition to get the better approach and solution. Gender has a particular significant, explanatory variable in disaster research. Many studies, show how women have higher mortality and morbidity rates than men during natural disasters, especially in lower income countries. In the aftermath disasters, at the same time, specific responsibilities on women are imposed from the gendered division of labour. Furthermore gender differences are sometimes attributed to traditional women's roles, discrimination, lower physical strength, nutritional deficiencies, etc. as

  8. Calendar year 1995 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeological Regime, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1995 Groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1995 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number for the Y-12 Plant is TN

  9. An integrated theoretical and practical approach for teaching hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Tullia; Fumagalli, Letizia; Cavallin, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeology as an earth science intersects the broader disciplines of geology, engineering, and environmental studies but it does not overlap fully with any of them. It is focused on its own range of problems and over time has developed a rich variety of methods and approaches. The resolution of many hydrogeological problems requires knowledge of elements of geology, hydraulics, physics and chemistry; moreover in recent years the knowledge of modelling techniques has become a necessary ability. Successful transfer of all this knowledge to the students depends on the breadth of material taught in courses, the natural skills of the students and any practical experience the students can obtain. In the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Milano-Bicocca, the teaching of hydrogeology is developed in three inter-related courses: 1) general hydrogeology, 2) applied hydrogeology, 3) groundwater pollution and remediation. The sequence focuses on both groundwater flux and contaminant transport, supplemented by workshops involving case studies and computer labs, which provide the students with practical translation of the theoretical aspects of the science into the world of work. A second key aspect of the program utilizes the students' skill at learning through online approaches, and this is done through three approaches: A) by developing the courses on a University e-learning platform that allows the students to download lectures, articles, and teacher comments, and to participate in online forums; B) by carring out exercises through computer labs where the student analyze and process hydrogeological data by means of different numerical codes, that in turn enable them to manage databases and to perform aquifer test analysis, geostatistical analysis, and flux and transport modelling both in the unsaturated and saturated zone. These exercises are of course preceded by theoretical lectures on codes and software, highlighting their features and

  10. Bacteriological research for the contamination of digital portable radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Yeong [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dong Eui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The study was performed to investigate the bacteriological contamination of portable digital radiography system and their detectors in a university hospital. CNS and VRE were detected in the samples collected from vinyl cover on detectors used for the infection control patients. On the other hand, no bacteria was detected in the samples collected from detectors with vinyl cover removed. In the series of imaging of patients from general wards, no bacteria was detected from the patient 1. However, CNS was detected from the patients 2 and 3, CNS and Enterococcus faecalis detected from the patient 4, CNS and Enterococcus casseliflavus detected from the patient 5, and CNS, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae all detected from the patient 6. CNS and Enterococcus faecium were detected in the controller handle of collimator. Also, CNS was detected from the handle of detector and exposure switch. In the treatment gloves of the radiological technologist after the imaging, CNS, Enterococcus gallinarum, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected. Therefore, it is recommended for DR portable to take images after sterilizing the detector after taking each image and to use disposable vinyl covers on detectors to remove after imaging. And treatment gloves must be changed after each imaging. Also, hospital infection via portables must be prevented by complete sterilization of the controller handles of collimator which are in frequent contact during imaging and infection education of employees.

  11. Levels of surface contamination with radioactive materials at workplaces of nuclear research centre at Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelgye, Z.; Nemcova, I.; Kasikova, M.; Popper, J.; Chysky, J.

    1983-01-01

    A hygiene supervision unit at workplaces of the nuclear Research Institute in Rez monitored on a long-term basis surface contamination with radioactive substances. Surface contamination was found at workplaces with open sources. Of the 4343 monitored places action levels were only exceeded in 13 cases. The obtained data were used for typifying workplaces with the highest level of surface contamination, to determine in certain instances the mechanism of the escape of radioactive substances from insulating facilities and to determine the rate of the spread of the radioactive substance into adjacent non-active workplaces. (author)

  12. Research and development program for transuranic-contaminated waste within the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    This overview examines the research and development program that has been established within the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to develop the technology to treat transuranic-contaminated waste. Also considered is the waste expected within the total nuclear fuel cycle

  13. hydrogeological caracterization and modeling of the aquifer of oued ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K. Baba-Hamed

    1 janv. 2018 ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0. International License. Libraries Resource Directory. We are listed under Research Associations category. HYDROGEOLOGICAL CARACTERIZATION AND MODELING OF THE AQUIFER.

  14. Hydrogeophysics and remote sensing for the design of hydrogeological conceptual models in hard rocks - Sardón catchment (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Francés, Alain; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Roy, Jean; Santos, Fernando A. Monteiro; Ardekani, Mohammad R. Mahmoudzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Hard rock aquifers are highly heterogeneous and hydrogeologically complex. To contribute to the design of hydrogeological conceptual models of hard rock aquifers, we propose a multi-techniques methodology based on a downward approach that combines remote sensing (RS), non-invasive hydrogeophysics and hydrogeological field data acquisition. The proposed methodology is particularly suitable for data scarce areas. It was applied in the pilot research area of Sardón catchment (80 km2)...

  15. Materials of conference: Hydrogeological Problems of South-West Poland; Materialy konferencji: Problemy Hydrogeologiczne Poludniowo-Zachodniej Polski

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogeological problems of South-west Poland is the collection of conference papers held in Szklarska Poreba on 20-22 June 1996. The materials have been gathered in three topical groups: water quality problems in hydrological cycle, regional hydrogeology of South-west Poland, theoretical problems and research methods in hydrogeology. More of performed articles have a interdisciplinary character taking into account the precipitation and surface water quality and their influence on ground water features.

  16. Developing Hydrogeological Site Characterization Strategies based on Human Health Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide better sustainable groundwater quality management and minimize the impact of contamination in humans, improved understanding and quantification of the interaction between hydrogeological models, geological site information and human health are needed. Considering the joint influence of these components in the overall human health risk assessment and the corresponding sources of uncertainty aid decision makers to better allocate resources in data acquisition campaigns. This is important to (1) achieve remediation goals in a cost-effective manner, (2) protect human health and (3) keep water supplies clean in order to keep with quality standards. Such task is challenging since a full characterization of the subsurface is unfeasible due to financial and technological constraints. In addition, human exposure and physiological response to contamination are subject to uncertainty and variability. Normally, sampling strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of their impacts on the overall system uncertainty. Therefore, quantifying the impact from each of these components (hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological) in final human health risk prediction can provide guidance for decision makers to best allocate resources towards minimal prediction uncertainty. In this presentation, a multi-component human health risk-based framework is presented which allows decision makers to set priorities through an information entropy-based visualization tool. Results highlight the role of characteristic length-scales characterizing flow and transport in determining data needs within an integrated hydrogeological-health framework. Conditions where uncertainty reduction in human health risk predictions may benefit from better understanding of the health component, as opposed to a more detailed hydrogeological characterization, are also discussed. Finally, results illustrate how different dose

  17. Synthetic Study on the Geological and Hydrogeological Model around KURT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Woo; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Yong Kwon; Choi, Jong Won

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the site specific properties of a study area for high-level radioactive waste disposal research in KAERI, the several geological investigations such as surface geological surveys and borehole drillings were carried out since 1997. Especially, KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) was constructed to understand the further study of geological environments in 2006. As a result, the first geological model of a study area was constructed by using the results of geological investigation. The objective of this research is to construct a hydrogeological model around KURT area on the basis of the geological model. Hydrogeological data which were obtained from in-situ hydraulic tests in the 9 boreholes were estimated to accomplish the objective. And, the hydrogeological properties of the 4 geological elements in the geological model, which were the subsurface weathering zone, the log angle fracture zone, the fracture zones and the bedrock were suggested. The hydrogeological model suggested in this study will be used as input parameters to carry out the groundwater flow modeling as a next step of the site characterization around KURT area

  18. Internal contamination: what challenges for tomorrow? Proceedings of the Research and Health Section technical day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, Philippe; Lecoix, Geraldine; Menetrier, Florence; Menetrier, Florence; Leiterer, Alexandra; Gremy, Olivier; Mougnard, Philippe; Gonin, Michele; Paquet, Francois; Davesne, Estelle; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Metivier, Henri; Abergel, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    The Research and Health Section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) organized a technical meeting on the radiation protection aspects of dismantlement, from the dismantling work to the risk, the measurement of body contamination, the potentially harmful health effects, the available medical treatments, the actual needs and the developments in progress. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Situation: what radionuclides, what situations? (Philippe BERARD, CEA); 2 - Dismantling workplace experience feedback with internal contamination hazard (Philippe MOUGNARD, AREVA); 3 - Experience feedback on internal exposure monitoring at power plants in France (Michele GONIN, EDF); 4 - Evolution of routine and intervention measurement methods (Geraldine LECOIX, CEA); 5 - Evolution of radiation dose calculation models (Francois PAQUET, IRSN); 6 - Taking uncertainties into account in internal contamination monitoring protocols (Estelle DAVESNE, IRSN); 7 - Radionuclides behaviour and effects in men (Florence MENETRIER, CEA); 8 - The plutonium case (Henri METIVIER, SFRP); 9 - Cesium-137 and internal contamination: status and perspectives (Jean-Marc BERTHO, IRSN); 10 - Iodine and thyroid (Florence MENETRIER, CEA); 11 - Actual treatments and research pathways (Alexandra LEITERER, CEA); 12 - Radionuclide contamination treatment: new developments in the US (Rebecca ABERGEL, Berkeley USA); 13 - Internal contaminations treatment: French recent effort for its improvement (Olivier GREMY, CEA)

  19. Bringing together raptor collections in Europe for contaminant research and monitoring in relation to chemicals regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movalli, Paola; Dekker, René; Koschorreck, Jan; Treu, Gabriele

    2017-11-01

    Raptors are good sentinels of environmental contamination and there is good capability for raptor biomonitoring in Europe. Raptor biomonitoring can benefit from natural history museums (NHMs), environmental specimen banks (ESBs) and other collections (e.g. specialist raptor specimen collections). Europe's NHMs, ESBs and other collections hold large numbers of raptor specimens and samples, covering long periods of time. These collections are potentially a valuable resource for contaminant studies over time and space. There are strong needs to monitor contaminants in the environment to support EU and national chemical management. However, data on raptor specimens in NHMs, ESBs and other collections are dispersed, few are digitised, and they are thus not easy to access. Specimen coverage is patchy in terms of species, space and time. Contaminant research with raptors would be facilitated by creating a framework to link relevant collections, digitising all collections, developing a searchable meta-database covering all existing collections, making them more visible and accessible for contaminant research. This would also help identify gaps in coverage and stimulate specimen collection to fill gaps in support of prioritised contaminant monitoring. Collections can further support raptor biomonitoring by making samples available for analysis on request.

  20. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This annual groundwater report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater report for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline.

  1. Hydrogeology baseline study Aurora Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A baseline hydrogeologic study was conducted in the area of Syncrude's proposed Aurora Mine in order to develop a conceptual regional hydrogeologic model for the area that could be used to understand groundwater flow conditions. Geologic information was obtained from over 2,000 coreholes and from data obtained between 1980 and 1996 regarding water level for the basal aquifer. A 3-D numerical groundwater flow model was developed to provide quantitative estimates of the potential environmental impacts of the proposed mining operations on the groundwater flow system. The information was presented in the context of a regional study area which encompassed much of the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, and a local study area which was defined by the lowlands of the Muskeg River Basin. Characteristics of the topography, hydrology, climate, geology, and hydrogeology of the region are described. The conclusion is that groundwater flow in the aquifer occurs mostly in a westerly direction beneath the Aurora Mine towards its inferred discharge location along the Athabasca River. Baseflow in the Muskeg River is mostly related to discharge from shallow surficial aquifers. Water in the river under baseflow conditions was fresh, of calcium-carbonate type, with very little indication of mineralization associated with deeper groundwater in the Aurora Mine area. 44 refs., 5 tabs., 31 figs

  2. Hydrogeological reconnaissance study: Dyfi Valley, Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendining, S.J.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes work carried out for the Department of the Environment as part of its research programme into radioactive waste management. It presents an account of a hydrogeological reconnaissance study in the Dyfi Valley area of Central Wales. Initially the purposes of such a study are given and the assumptions used in deriving parameters such as flow volume, path length and transit time in areas of massive fractured rocks are described. Using these assumptions with geological, topographic and hydrometeorological data the potential ranges in properties such as bulk hydraulic conductivity, path lengths, hydraulic gradients and volumes of groundwater flow have been determined. These ranges have been used to estimate solute transport model parameters. The limitations and usefulness of the reconnaissance study in planning research and siting exploratory boreholes in the Dyfi area are discussed. (author)

  3. Future human health research directions for the Canadian Northern Contaminants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Shawn G.; Curren, Meredith S.; Adlard, Bryan; Provost, Jonathan; Leech, Tara; Tikhonov, Constantine; Feeley, Mark; Tomlinson, Scott; Shearer, Russel

    2013-01-01

    Studies conducted in the mid-1980s and early 1990s demonstrated that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals were reaching the Arctic ecosystem at unexpectedly high levels, many of which had no Arctic or Canadian sources. Epidemiological and toxicological studies in Canada and in other countries have found that these contaminants may pose a risk to human health. The objective of this paper is to provide the foundation for the discussion on future northern human health research under the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) in Canada. This short discussion of human health priorities will help guide a path forward for future northern human health research in Canada to address on-going and new health concerns related to contaminants exposure in the Canadian Arctic. PMID:24282784

  4. Present status of contamination monitoring at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hoang Van [Dalat Nuclear Research Inst. (Viet Nam)

    1997-06-01

    The Dalat nuclear research reactor was renovated and upgraded from the previous TRIGA reactor. In Vietnam, it is a unique nuclear device having suitable neutron flux for the radioisotope production and neutron activation analysis. Soon after the reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983, a programme has been formed to develop the application of nuclear techniques in various fields. In addition, the use of radioisotopes for diagnostic, therapeutic and other research purposes has been in progress. In order to support these activities, the radiation protection, especially the radiation contamination monitoring has been properly paid attention to. In DNRI, the Radiation Protection Department is responsible for controlling and supervising radiation and working safety for all activities. In this paper, the following items are described on radiation contamination monitoring: controlled area, surface contamination monitoring, and airborne concentration monitoring. (G.K.)

  5. Determination of contamination operational value by routine monitoring in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomao, Edeilson; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Mattos, Maria Fernanda S.S.; Daros, Kellen Adriana Curci

    2008-01-01

    The radioisotopes have a large spectrum of applicability in many areas of science, as in medicine, agriculture and industry in general. In the biological area, the radioisotopes have brought many benefits to study physiological processes in living organisms and in vitro. The most radioisotopes used in biological research are emitters of radiation of low energy, mainly β, and are used as unsealed sources. The manipulation of these radioisotopes generates radioactive wastes and eventually can cause contamination in the areas of handling or even occasionally in areas to which access is not controlled. According to CNEN-NE-3.02 standard is necessary and mandatory the exposure and contamination levels control in the areas of handling of unsealed sources. The goal of the work is to establish how often the monitoring should be done through the survey of the contamination and exposure levels, in areas designed to manipulate 32 P and how this monitoring can contribute to the improvement the conditions of radiological protection. From the twenty eight research laboratories registered by 'Nucleo de Protecao Radiologica' (NPR) were selected four where the activities are not restrict to 32 P biological assays. The levels of contamination and exposure were evaluated using monitors GM and the layout of laboratories containing the points to be tracker defined based on the researchers' routine. At each point three values were obtained to measure the rate of contamination on the surface and exposure rate. The measures were made twice a week before and after the radioisotope manipulation. Based on these data was possible to establish the range from 0,306 to 0,678 Bq.cm -2 as operational average level to the superficial contamination. The average exposure rate measured was 5.16 n C/Kg.h. The results were important to demonstrating to researchers how they can contribute to the improvement of radiological protection conditions. (author)

  6. Verification of radioactive contamination surveys for practical use in biological research centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, M.T.; Requejo, C.; Ruiz, M.; Pina, R.

    2006-01-01

    Unsealed sources are commonly used in science research laboratories. Their manipulation may imply a radioactive contamination hazard. Therefore, adequate and sensitive survey meters must be available, and must have an effective and accurate response to intensity and type of radiation emitted by the used radionuclides to identify and quantify the possible contamination and then be able to avoid any associated or unwanted consequences that may arise. Periodic surveys are performed to show control, any time, any place radioactive contamination is suspected, and to ensure radioisotopes are being used safely. The immediate work areas must be often checked with portable survey monitors, including the entire lab and particularly bench tops, personnel protective equipment or solely designated equipment for isotope use (micro-fuges, water baths, incubators). These are carried out with portable survey instruments like Geiger-Muller tubes, proportional counters and scintillation detectors that provide direct or indirect measurements capabilities. The Radiation Safety Office (R.S.O.) as well as the radioactive compounds working laboratories at the Instituto de Inv. Biomedicas 'A. Sols' (Madrid-Spain) are provided with an adequate radiation measurement instrument. But, before a portable survey instrument is used, several quality checks should be made (batteries, calibration sticker), and the instrument response should be tested with a check source. This paper aims at determining, with a R.S.O. procedure, these surveys working parameters -detection efficiency, calibration factors and minimum detectable activities-, using reference checking sources ( 14 C, 36 Cl, and 90 Sr/ 90 Y) with known radioactivity covering the energy range of beta emitting isotopes used in biological research. No gamma portable monitors have been tested for the R.S.O. has no gamma checking sources. Therefore, 58 beta monitors were tested, obtaining t he efficiency values, the calibration factors (Bq cm-2 s

  7. Hydrogeological controls of variable microbial water quality in a complex subtropical karst system in Northern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Anna; Goeppert, Nadine; Goldscheider, Nico

    2018-05-01

    Karst aquifers are particularly vulnerable to bacterial contamination. Especially in developing countries, poor microbial water quality poses a threat to human health. In order to develop effective groundwater protection strategies, a profound understanding of the hydrogeological setting is crucial. The goal of this study was to elucidate the relationships between high spatio-temporal variability in microbial contamination and the hydrogeological conditions. Based on extensive field studies, including mapping, tracer tests and hydrochemical analyses, a conceptual hydrogeological model was developed for a remote and geologically complex karst area in Northern Vietnam called Dong Van. Four different physicochemical water types were identified; the most important ones correspond to the karstified Bac Son and the fractured Na Quan aquifer. Alongside comprehensive investigation of the local hydrogeology, water quality was evaluated by analysis for three types of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB): Escherichia coli, enterococci and thermotolerant coliforms. The major findings are: (1) Springs from the Bac Son formation displayed the highest microbial contamination, while (2) springs that are involved in a polje series with connections to sinking streams were distinctly more contaminated than springs with a catchment area characterized by a more diffuse infiltration. (3) FIB concentrations are dependent on the season, with higher values under wet season conditions. Furthermore, (4) the type of spring capture also affects the water quality. Nevertheless, all studied springs were faecally impacted, along with several shallow wells within the confined karst aquifer. Based on these findings, effective protection strategies can be developed to improve groundwater quality.

  8. Virtual Issue #1: Oil Spill Research in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology has been a venue for publishing oil spill research for over forty years. Rehwoldt et al. (1974) published the first oil spill focused paper in the Bulletin, reporting on the aquatic toxicity of two spill mitigating agents...

  9. Present state of the monitoring for internal contamination at Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaishi, J.; Fukuda, H.; Mizushita, S.

    1980-01-01

    At Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, over one thousand people work in hot areas such as reactors, accelerators, chemical laboratories and waste treatment plants. The monitoring for internal contamination of this personnel is presented. Routine and special monitoring are carried out. The object of the former is to check for the presence of significant contamination, and that of the latter is to estimate body burden and committed dose equivalent, if necessary. Heavy shield and shadow shield whole body counters, a low energy lung counter and a wound monitor are used to detect the internal contamination due to γ or chi ray emitters, and bioassay technique is used for α or β emitters and uranium. The results of the monitoring until now are presented. (H.K.)

  10. Present state of the monitoring for internal contamination at Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaishi, J.; Fukuda, H.; Mizushita, S.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of internal contamination surveys carried out since 1969 at Tokai Research Establishment. Routine monitoring sometimes revealed significant internal contamination for tritium workers, but almost never for others. The number of subjects for special monitoring varied according to the activities. In 1965, the number of subjects for special monitoring was nearly 300, due to a reactor repair that year. In recent years, the number or special monitoring has been several tens or so. With regard to special monitoring, the workers with significant internal contamination were less than 50%. The internal dose (50 years) estimated for the majority of subjects was of mrem order. During the past 15 years, only several cases of exposure of rem order were found. The highest dose experienced was about 4 rems ( 131 I thyroid) (U.K.)

  11. Hydrogeologic studies for CRNL's proposed shallow land burial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killey, R.W.D.; Devgun, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    The first phase of conversion from storage to disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes at CRNL is focussed on solids with hazardous lifetimes less than 500 years. In order to use a facility buried above the water table and to achieve maximum use of radionuclide migration information from studies of existing facilities, the proposed site is located in sands above an active groundwater flow system. The selection of a permeable and geologically-simple slow system has allowed application of a wide variety of techniques for hydrogeologic evaluation of the site. Ground-probing radar in conjunction with continuously cored boreholes have provided stratigraphic data and sediments for testing. Field hydrogeologic testing has included a detailed network of piezometers for hydraulic head mapping and a series of borehole dilution tests. Measurements of contaminant sorption behaviour are also being made in the field to reduce variations in uncontrolled parameters. Mathematical models successfully simulate the real system in terms of groundwater flow. Simulations of reactive contaminant transport are more difficult, but the application of data from field tests of radionuclide migration behaviour and from existing contaminant plumes will, we believe, provide acceptably reliable predictions of the impact of failures in the engineered disposal structure

  12. Progress of research and utilization of soil amendments in phytoremediation of radioactive contamination soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yangrui; Song Gang; Chen Yongheng

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing of soil pollution and degradation, it becomes more important to research and apply soil amendments in agriculture. This paper reviewed different kinds of soil amendments and their impacts on phytostabilization and phytoextraction techniques, and summarized the application of soil amendments in the radio-contaminated soils as well as their effects on the phytoremediation. The main repair mechanisms of the soil amendments are involved in adsorption, ion exchange, chelation, and complexation. The potential applications in the phytoremediation on radio-contaminated soils, as well as the main repair mechanisms and the existing problems were discussed. (authors)

  13. Experimental Research Regarding the Application of Electro-Flushing Method on Diesel Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streche Constantin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, as a result of the inventory conducted at the national level, The Ministry Of Environment concluded that the largest number of contaminated sites with hydrocarbons are due to the petroleum products distribution (nearly 400 sites, followed by the hydrocarbons extraction (about 310 sites. So, soil contamination with liquid petroleum products resulting from many industrial activities became an important issue of environment protection. Unfortunately not all local governments have provided a list of contaminated sites, which means that there is a possibility to have a bigger problem at the national level. All these surfaces are in a continuous growth due to industrial and social development and that is why it is necessary to study and improve decontamination methods of contaminated sites in order to regain one of our most important resources - the soil. In this paper, the main results obtained during a research that aimed to study two different treatment methods of contaminated soil in a combined solution, are presented. The newly developed method is called electro-flushing. Results proved that combining the two nominated methods could be a viable solution for treating diesel polluted soil with better performances comparing with using them separately. Concerning the electrochemical treatment of diesel contaminated soils an efficiency of 35-40 % could be obtained after 28 days; while using the flushing method up to 15-20% efficiency could be reached. On the other hand, if we combine these two methods, we can reach remediation efficiency up to 50%. So, the main interesting results of the present research is given by the fact that combining two known remediation methods, better performances could be achieved.

  14. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ping; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Chen, Hong-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. ► Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. ► The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. ► The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. ► Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m 3 of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, U, and α-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 μm filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb β-emitters, α-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously eliminate particles and adsorb ionic radionuclides from water.

  15. Hydrogeological map of Italy: the preliminary Sheet N. 348 Antrodoco (Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Amanti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Geological Survey of Italy, Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research is realizing the Sheet N.348 Antrodoco (Central Italy of the Hydrogeological map of Italy as a cartographical test of the Italian hydrogeological survey and mapping guidelines, in the frame of the Italian Geological Cartography Project. The study area is characterized by structural units deeply involved in the Apennine Orogeny (Latium and Abruzzi region territory, Rieti and L’Aquila provinces and including deposits of marine carbonate shelf, slope, basin and foredeep environments hosting relatively large amounts of groundwater resources. The map was realized to obtain the best possible representation of all hydrogeological elements deriving from field surveys, in order to characterize the hydrogeological asset. A control network for monthly measurement of surface and groundwater flow rates and hydrogeochemical parameters was performed. Data were uploaded in a geographic information system to perform the present preliminary hydrogeological cartography consisting in a main map showing the following hydrogeological complexes based on relative permeability degree (from bottom to top: i calcareous (Jurassic-Cretaceous; high permeability; ii calcareous-marly (Upper Cretaceous-Middle Eocene; intermediate permeability; iii marly-calcareous and marly (Upper Eocene- Upper Miocene; low permeability; iv flysch (Upper Miocene; low permeability; v conglomeratic-sandy and detritic (Upper Pliocene- Pleistocene; intermediate permeability; vi alluvial (Quaternary; low permeability. Among other elements shown in the main map there are hydrographical basin and sub-basin boundaries, stream gauging stations, meteo-climatic stations, streamwater-groundwater exchange processes, hydrostructure boundaries, point and linear spring flow rates, groundwater flow directions. Furthermore, complementary smaller-scale sketches at the margin of the main map were realized (e

  16. 2101-M Pond hydrogeologic characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Bates, D.J.; Martin, W.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory {sup (a)} at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report is the interpretation of the hydrogeologic environment at the 2101-M Pond, located in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretation were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the installation of four ground-water monitoring wells, in addition to data gathered from several previously existing wells. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a groundwater monitoring program initiated in 1988. The four new monitoring wells were installed around the 2101-M Pond between May 23 and August 27, 1988. Geologic sampling, aquifer testing, and initial ground-water sampling were performed during the installation of these wells. Laboratory analyses of the sediment samples for particle size, calcium carbonate content, and selected natural and contaminant constituents were performed. A full year of quarterly ground-water sampling and the first statistical analysis of background and downgradient data have also been performed. 112 refs., 49 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Research Trends in Emerging Contaminants on the Aquatic Environments of Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraji, H.; Othman, O. C.; Ngassapa, F. N.; Mureithi, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    The continuity for discovery and production of new chemicals, allied products, and uses has currently resulted into generation of recent form of contaminants known as Emerging Contaminants (ECs). Once in the aquatic environment ECs are carcinogenic and cause other threats to both human's and animals' health. Due to their effects this study was aimed at investigating research trends of ECs in Tanzania. Findings revealed that USA and EU countries were leading in ECs researches, little followed by Asia, South Africa, and then Zambia. Only few guidelines from USA-EPA, WHO, Canada, and Australia existed. Neither published guidelines nor regulations for ECs existed in Tanzania; rather only the occurrence of some disinfection by-products and antibiotics was, respectively, reported in Arusha and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. As these reports had a limited coverage of ECs, henceforth, these findings constitute the first-line reference materials for ECs research in Tanzania which shall be useful for future monitoring and regulation planning. PMID:26998381

  18. Resistivity profiling for mapping gravel layers that may control contaminant migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Abraham, Jared D.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous contaminants, including CFC 113, chloroform, and tritiated compounds, move preferentially in unsaturated subsurface gravel layers away from disposal trenches at a closed low-level radioactive waste-disposal facility in the Amargosa Desert about 17 kilometers south of Beatty, Nevada. Two distinct gravel layers are involved in contaminant transport: a thin, shallow layer between about 0.5 and 2.2 meters below the surface and a layer of variable thickness between about 15 and 30 meters below land surface. From 2003 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey used multielectrode DC and AC resistivity surveys to map these gravel layers. Previous core sampling indicates the fine-grained sediments generally have higher water content than the gravel layers or the sediments near the surface. The relatively higher electrical resistivity of the dry gravel layers, compared to that of the surrounding finer sediments, makes the gravel readily mappable using electrical resistivity profiling. The upper gravel layer is not easily distinguished from the very dry, fine-grained deposits at the surface. Two-dimensional resistivity models, however, clearly identify the resistive lower gravel layer, which is continuous near the facility except to the southeast. Multielectrode resistivity surveys provide a practical noninvasive method to image hydrogeologic features in the arid environment of the Amargosa Desert.

  19. Bedrock Hydrogeology - Site investigation SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan [Geosigma AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bockgaard, Niclas [Golder Assoes AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). This report presents an integrated analysis and interpretation of the historic data from the existing SFR (1980 - 1986), as well as, from the recent investigations for the planned extension of SFR (2008 - 2009). The primary objective is to establish a conceptual hydrogeological model of the bedrock for safety assessment and design analyses. Analyses and interpretations of all (old and new) hydraulic data are analysed with regard to the recently developed geological deformation zone model of the SFR model domain (Curtis et al. 2011). The methodology used by Curtis et al. (2011) has focussed on magnetic anomalies and deformation zone intercepts with ground surface greater than 300 m. In the hydrogeological modelling, however, it has been considered important to also explore the occurrence and characteristics of shallow horizontal to sub-horizontal structures (sheet joints) inside the SFR model domain. Such structures are of considerable importance for the hydrogeology in the uppermost c. 150 m of bedrock in SDM-Site Forsmark; hence the term Shallow Bedrock Aquifer was used to emphasise their hydraulic significance. In this study, the acronym SBA-structure is used for horizontal structures identified in the hydrogeological modelling. In addition to the predominantly steeply dipping geological deformation zones, eight so-called SBA-structures are modelled deterministically in the hydrogeological model. The SBA-structures are envisaged as hydraulically heterogeneous and composed of clusters of minor gently dipping to horizontal fractures rather than extensive single features. A type of structures that is partly included in the definition of the SBA-structures is the Unresolved Possible Deformations Zone (Unresolved PDZ) intercepts identified by Curtis et al. (2011). The Unresolved

  20. Deployment of Smart 3D Subsurface Contaminant Characterization at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.; Heiser, J.; Kalb, P.; Milian, L.; Newson, C.; Lilimpakas, M.; Daniels, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Historical Site Assessment (BNL 1999) identified contamination inside the Below Grade Ducts (BGD) resulting from the deposition of fission and activation products from the pile on the inner carbon steel liner during reactor operations. Due to partial flooding of the BGD since shutdown, some of this contamination may have leaked out of the ducts into the surrounding soils. The baseline remediation plan for cleanup of contaminated soils beneath the BGD involves complete removal of the ducts, followed by surveying the underlying and surrounding soils, then removing soil that has been contaminated above cleanup goals. Alternatively, if soil contamination around and beneath the BGD is either non-existent/minimal (below cleanup goals) or is very localized and can be ''surgically removed'' at a reasonable cost, the BGD can be decontaminated and left in place. The focus of this Department of Energy Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (DOE ASTD) project was to determine the extent (location, type, and level) of soil contamination surrounding the BGD and to present this data to the stakeholders as part of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) process. A suite of innovative characterization tools was used to complete the characterization of the soil surrounding the BGD in a cost-effective and timely fashion and in a manner acceptable to the stakeholders. The tools consisted of a tracer gas leak detection system that was used to define the gaseous leak paths out of the BGD and guide soil characterization studies, a small-footprint Geoprobe to reach areas surrounding the BGD that were difficult to access, two novel, field-deployed, radiological analysis systems (ISOCS and BetaScint) and a three-dimensional (3D) visualization system to facilitate data analysis/interpretation. All of the technologies performed as well or better than expected and the characterization could not have been completed in the same time or at

  1. Long-term agroecosystem research in the Central Mississippi River Basin: hydrogeologic controls and crop management influence on nitrates in loess and fractured glacial till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) from agricultural activities has been suspected as a primary source of elevated ground water nitrate (NO3-N). The objective of this research was to assess the impact of common cropping systems on NO3-N levels for a glacial till aquifer underlying claypan soils in a predominantly agricul...

  2. Hydrogeological Properties of Geological Elements in Geological Model around KURT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Woo; Kim, Kyung Soo; Koh, Yong Kwon; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Institue, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To develop site characterization technologies for a radioactive waste disposal research in KAERI, the geological and hydrogeological investigations have been carried out since 1997. In 2006, the KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) was constructed to study a solute migration, a microbiology and an engineered barrier system as well as deeply to understand geological environments in in-situ condition. This study is performed as one of the site characterization works around KURT. Several investigations such as a lineament analysis, a borehole/tunnel survey, a geophyscial survey and logging in borehole, were used to construct the geological model. As a result, the geological model is constructed, which includes the lithological model and geo-structural model in this study. Moreover, from the results of the in-situ hydraulic tests, the hydrogeological properties of elements in geological model were evaluated.

  3. Hydrogeological Properties of Geological Elements in Geological Model around KURT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Woo; Kim, Kyung Soo; Koh, Yong Kwon; Choi, Jong Won

    2012-01-01

    To develop site characterization technologies for a radioactive waste disposal research in KAERI, the geological and hydrogeological investigations have been carried out since 1997. In 2006, the KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) was constructed to study a solute migration, a microbiology and an engineered barrier system as well as deeply to understand geological environments in in-situ condition. This study is performed as one of the site characterization works around KURT. Several investigations such as a lineament analysis, a borehole/tunnel survey, a geophyscial survey and logging in borehole, were used to construct the geological model. As a result, the geological model is constructed, which includes the lithological model and geo-structural model in this study. Moreover, from the results of the in-situ hydraulic tests, the hydrogeological properties of elements in geological model were evaluated.

  4. Predictability of solute transport in diffusion-controlled hydrogeologic regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillham, R.W.; Cherry, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogeologic regimes that are favourable for the subsurface management of low-level radioactive wastes must have transport properties that will limit the migration velocity of contaminants to some acceptably low value. Of equal importance, for the purpose of impact assessment and licensing, is the need to be able to predict, with a reasonable degree of certainty and over long time periods, what the migration velocity of the various contaminants of interest will be. This paper presents arguments to show that in addition to having favourable velocity characteristics, transport in saturated, diffusion-controlled hydrogeologic regimes is considerably more predictable than in the most common alternatives. The classical transport models for unsaturated, saturated-advection-controlled and saturated-diffusion-controlled environments are compared, with particular consideration being given to the difficulties associated with the characterization of the respective transport parameters. Results are presented which show that the diffusion of non-reactive solutes and solutes that react according to a constant partitioning ratio (K/sub d/) are highly predictable under laboratory conditions and that the diffusion coefficients for the reactive solutes can be determined with a reasonable degree of accuracy from independent measurements of bulk density, porosity, distribution coefficient and tortuosity. Field evidence is presented which shows that the distribution of environmental isotopes and chloride in thick clayey deposits is consistent with a diffusion-type transport process in these media. These results are particularly important in that they not only demonstrate the occurrence of diffusion-controlled hydrogeologic regimes, but they also demonstrate the predictability of the migration characteristics over very long time periods

  5. HYDROGEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    of water resources,unbalanee disrriburion ofwater resourees,serious waste of water re-souree3,badly environmental eondition of wa-ter.At last gives out the eour一termeasures ofrational utilization of water resourees:En-haneing management,strerlgthening seieneeand teehnology in utilization of water re

  6. Socio-hydrogeology and low-income countries: taking science to rural society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Shrikant Daji

    2017-11-01

    Rural societies in low-income, high-population countries often faces scarcity of water of suitable quality for domestic use and agriculture. Hydrogeologists should therefore orientate their research work towards solving practical problems and impart basic knowledge about the hydrogeology of local watersheds to the village councils and communities so as to ensure their participation in better management of groundwater resources. Such cooperation between the hydrogeologists and villagers is the foundation of socio-hydrogeology, which aims at broader dissemination of information and discussions with hydrogeologists at village meetings regarding watershed management such as recharge augmentation, groundwater quality issues and prudent use of groundwater. Socio-hydrogeology implies improved accessibility of rural society to hydrogeological experts and better communication through the use of more appropriate and understandable language.

  7. Project plan-Surficial geologic mapping and hydrogeologic framework studies in the Greater Platte River Basins (Central Great Plains) in support of ecosystem and climate change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Margaret E.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Slate, Janet L.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Sawyer, David A.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2011-01-01

    The Greater Platte River Basin area spans a central part of the Midcontinent and Great Plains from the Rocky Mountains on the west to the Missouri River on the east, and is defined to include drainage areas of the Platte, Niobrara, and Republican Rivers, the Rainwater Basin, and other adjoining areas overlying the northern High Plains aquifer. The Greater Platte River Basin contains abundant surficial deposits that were sensitive to, or are reflective of, the climate under which they formed: deposits from multiple glaciations in the mountain headwaters of the North and South Platte Rivers and from continental ice sheets in eastern Nebraska; fluvial terraces (ranging from Tertiary to Holocene in age) along the rivers and streams; vast areas of eolian sand in the Nebraska Sand Hills and other dune fields (recording multiple episodes of dune activity); thick sequences of windblown silt (loess); and sediment deposited in numerous lakes and wetlands. In addition, the Greater Platte River Basin overlies and contributes surface water to the High Plains aquifer, a nationally important groundwater system that underlies parts of eight states and sustains one of the major agricultural areas of the United States. The area also provides critical nesting habitat for birds such as plovers and terns, and roosting habitat for cranes and other migratory birds that travel through the Central Flyway of North America. This broad area, containing fragile ecosystems that could be further threatened by changes in climate and land use, has been identified by the USGS and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as a region where intensive collaborative research could lead to a better understanding of climate change and what might be done to adapt to or mitigate its adverse effects to ecosystems and to humans. The need for robust data on the geologic framework of ecosystems in the Greater Platte River Basin has been acknowledged in proceedings from the 2008 Climate Change Workshop and in draft

  8. The UNESCO-IHP Working Group on Land Subsidence: Four Decades of International Contributions to Hydrogeological Related Subsidence Research and Knowledge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D. L.; Carreon-Freyre, D.; Teatini, P.; Ye, S.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence is globally prevalent and because much of it is related to hydrological processes affected by human development of local land and water resources, "Land Subsidence" was included in the UNESCO programme of the International Hydrological Decade (IHD), 1965-1974 and an ad hoc working group on land subsidence was formed. In 1975 subsidence was retained under the framework of the UNESCO IHP (subproject 8.4: "Investigation of Land Subsidence due to Groundwater Exploitation"), and UNESCO IHP formerly codified the Working Group on Land Subsidence (WGLS). In 1984 the WGLS produced a comprehensive guidebook to serve scientists and engineers, confronting land subsidence problems, particularly in developing countries (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/$other/unesdoc/pdf/065167eo.pdf). During the IHD, UNESCO IHP convened the 1st International Symposium on Land Subsidence in 1969 in Tokyo, Japan. In collaboration with UNESCO IHP, IAHS, and other scientific organizations, the WGLS has convened eight more International Symposia on Land Subsidence in different countries in Asia, Europe and North America. The 9 published symposia proceedings constitute an important source of global subsidence research and case studies during the past 45 years, covering both anthropogenic and natural subsidence processes. Currently, the WGLS comprising 20 subsidence experts from 9 countries promotes and facilitates the international exchange of information regarding the design, implementation and evaluation of risk assessments and mitigation measures, the definition of water and land resource-management strategies that support sustainable development in areas vulnerable to subsidence (http://landsubsidence-unesco.org), and the assessment of related geological risks such as earth fissuring and fault activation (www.igcp641.org). The WGLS has become an important global leader in promoting subsidence awareness, scientific research and its application to subsidence monitoring, analysis and management.

  9. Hydrogeological testing in the Sellafield area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    A summary of the hydrogeological test methodologies employed in the Sellafield geological investigations is provided in order that an objective appraisal of the quality of the data can be formed. A brief presentation of some of these data illustrates the corroborative nature of different test and measurement methodologies and provides a preliminary view of the results obtained. The programme of hydrogeological testing is an evolving one and methodologies are developing as work proceeds and targets become more clearly defined. As the testing is focused on relatively low permeability rocks at depth, the approach to testing differs slightly from conventional hydrogeological well testing and makes extensive use of oilfield technology. (author)

  10. Use of stratigraphic, petrographic, hydrogeologic and geochemical information for hydrogeologic modelling based on geostatistical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohlig, K.J.; Fischer, H.; Poltl, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the stepwise utilization of geologic information from various sources for the construction of hydrogeological models of a sedimentary site by means of geostatistical simulation. It presents a practical application of aquifer characterisation by firstly simulating hydrogeological units and then the hydrogeological parameters. Due to the availability of a large amount of hydrogeological, geophysical and other data and information, the Gorleben site (Northern Germany) has been used for a case study in order to demonstrate the approach. The study, which has not yet been completed, tries to incorporate as much as possible of the available information and to characterise the remaining uncertainties. (author)

  11. Contribution to optimisation of Environmental Isotopes tracing in Hydrogeology. Case study of Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAJAOBELISON, J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to suggest some improvements on the theory of interpretation and on the methodological approach for the optimum use of environmental isotopes tracing applied to hydrogeological investigation. A review of the theory of environmental isotopes used in hydrogeology has been made. The main constraints have been highlighted and led to some comments and proposals of improvement, in particular with regard to the continental effect on stable isotopes, to the seasonal variation of groundwater 1 4C content, and to the appropriate model for fractured crystalline aquifers. A literature survey on ten specific scientific papers, dealing with isotopic hydrology in miscellaneous types of aquifers and catchments, allowed to draw a synthesis of the hydrogeological, geochemical and isotopic constraints. A proposal of optimum methodological approach, taking into account the above mentioned constraints, have been inferred. The results of an on-going hydrogeological investigation carried out in the Southern crystalline basement and coastal sedimentary aquifers of Madagascar highlights an unusual methodological approach based on the lack of initial basic hydrogeological data. Besides, it shows to what extent the experience of the above mentioned research works can apply in the specific case of the complex aquifers of Madagascar. The lessons gained from this study contribute to enrich the synthesis of environmental isotopes constraints in hydrogeology and lead to a more realistic methodological approach proposal wich is likely to better make profitable the isotope hydrology technology

  12. Hydrogeological Characteristics of Groundwater Yield in Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogeological Characteristics of Groundwater Yield in Shallow Wells of the ... of Water Resources and Lower Niger River Basin Development Authority in Ilorin. ... moment correlation, multiple and stepwise multiple regression analysis.

  13. Hydrogeological and geophysical study for deeper groundwater ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lected using Syscal Pro Switch-10 channel system and covered a 2 km long profile in a tough terrain. The hydrogeological ... a rainwater harvesting structure to recharge the subsurface in ... southwest trend. The drainage pattern is dendritic.

  14. Plutonium contaminated materials research programme. Progress Report for 1983/84 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    Plutonium contaminated material (PCM) is a generic term applied to a wide variety of materials which have become contaminated by plutonium compounds, by virtue of their use inside the primary containment of fuel cycle plants, but which generally have low beta gamma content. The report falls under the headings: introduction; organisation and role of the PCMWP; management practices; 1983/84 progress report (a) reduction of arisings; (b) plutonium measurement; (c) treatment of solid PCM; (d) treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes; (e) actinide chemistry; (f) engineering objectives. (U.K.)

  15. Delivering research output to the user using ICT services: Marine contamination database web interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Abdul Khalik Wood; Zaleha Hashim; Burhanuddin Ahmad; Saaidi Ismail; Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Md Suhaimi Elias

    2010-01-01

    This project is about developing a web-based interface for accessing the Marine Contamination database records. The system contains of information pertaining to the occurrence of contaminants and natural elements in the marine eco-system based on samples taken at various locations within the shores of Malaysia in the form of sediment, seawater and marine biota. It represents a systematic approach for recording, storing and managing the vast amount of marine environmental data collected as output of the Marine Contamination and Transport Phenomena Research Project since 1990. The resultant collection of data is to form the background information (or baseline data) which could later be used to monitor the level of marine environmental pollutions around the country. Data collected from the various sampling and related laboratory activities are previously kept in conventional forms such as Excel worksheets and other documents, both in digital and/or paper form. With the help of modern database storage and retrieval techniques, the task of storage and retrieval of data has been made easier and manageable. It can also provide easy access to other parties who are interested in the data. (author)

  16. Comparison of procedures for reducing cross-contamination during steam distillations in nitrogen-15 tracer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvaney, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of various procedures for reduction of cross-contamination errors when unenriched samples of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 containing 0.5 mg of N were steam-distilled in a glass distillation apparatus following samples enriched with 50 atom % 15 N. Twelve procedures were compared in this study, including most of those previously proposed in the literature. None of the procedures completely eliminated cross-contamination; however, some were considerably more effective than others. The results suggest that, when a glass distillation apparatus is used in 15 N-tracer research, the best way to reduce cross-contamination error is to distill two aliquots of each sample whenever possible, discarding the first distillate and retaining the second for isotope-ratio analysis. When this is not possible, it is recommended that 1 mL of 1M formic acid be distilled for 1 min and 25 mL of 16.4 M (95%) ethanol be distilled for 3 min between samples. This procedure can be made more effective by increasing the amount of formic acid used and extending distillation beyond 1 min

  17. Description of hydrogeological data in SKB's database GEOTAB. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.

    1991-12-01

    During the research and development program performed by SKB for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, a large quantity of geoscientific data was collected. Most of this data was stored in a database called GEOTAB. The data is organized into eight groups (subjects) as follows: - Background information. - Geological data. - Borehole geophysical measurements. - Ground surface geophysical measurements. - Hydrogeological and meteorological data. - Hydrochemical data. - Petrophysical measurements. - Tracer tests. Except for the case of borehole geophysical data, ground surface geophysical data and petrophysical data, described in the same report, the data in each group is described in a separate SKB report. The present report described data within the hydrogeological data group. The hydrogeological data groups (subject), called HYDRO, is divided into several subgroups (methods). BHEQUIPE: equipments in borehole. CONDINT: electrical conductivity in pumped water. FLOWMETE: flowmeter tests. GRWB: groundwater level registrations in boreholes. HUFZ: hydraulic unit fracture zones. HURM: hydraulic unit rock mass. HYCHEM: hydraulic test during chemical Sampling. INTER: interference tests. METEOR: meteorological and hydrological measurements. PIEZO: piezometric measurements at depths in boreholes. RECTES: recovery tests. ROCKRM: hydraulic unit rock types in the rock mass. SFHEAD: single hole falling head test. SHBUP: single hole build up test. SHSINJ: single hole steady state tests. SHTINJ: single hole transient injection tests. SHTOLD: single hole transient injections tests - old data. A method consists of one or several data tables. In each chapter a method and its data tables are described. (au)

  18. Hydrogeology in North America: past and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    2005-03-01

    This paper is a retrospective on the evolution of hydrogeology in North America over the past two centuries, and a brief speculation of its future. The history of hydrogeology is marked by developments in many different fields such as groundwater hydrology, soil mechanics, soil science, economic geology, petroleum engineering, structural geology, geochemistry, geophysics, marine geology, and more recently, ecology. The field has been enriched by the contributions of distinguished researchers from all these fields. At present, hydrogeology is in transition from a state of discovering new resources and exploiting them efficiently for maximum benefit, to one of judicious management of finite, interconnected resources that are vital for the sustenance of humans and other living things. The future of hydrogeology is likely to be dictated by the subtle balance with which the hydrological, erosional, and nutritional cycles function, and the decision of a technological society to either adapt to the constraints imposed by the balance, or to continue to exploit hydrogeological systems for maximum benefit. Although there is now a trend towards ecological and environmental awareness, human attitudes could change should large parts of the populated world be subjected to the stresses of droughts that last for many decades. Cet article est une rétrospective de l'évolution de l'hydrogéologie en Amérique du Nord sur les deux derniers siècles, et une brève évaluation de son futur. L'histoire de l'hydrogéologie est marquée par le développement de plusieurs techniques de terrain telles, l'hydrologie des eaux souterraines, la mécanique des sols, les sciences du sol, la géologie économique, l' ingénierie pétrolière, la géologie structurale, la géochimie, la géophysique, la géologie marine et plus récemment l'écologie. La science a été enrichie par la contribution de plusieurs chercheurs distingués, provenant de toutes ces branches. A présent, l

  19. Research Progress of Artificial Forest in the Remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiafang, MA; Guangtao, MENG; Liping, HE; Guixiang, LI

    2017-01-01

    (1) Remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals has become a hot topic in the world, and phytoremediation technology is the most widely used. (2) In addition to traditional economic benefits, ecological benefits of artificial forest have been more and more important, which are very helpful to soil polluted with heavy metals in the environment. (3) The characteristics of heavy metal pollution of soil and plantations of repair mechanism have been reviewed, and the current mining areas, wetlands, urban plantations on heavy metal elements have enriched the research results. The purpose is to find a new path for governance of heavy metal soil pollution.

  20. Research Trends in Emerging Contaminants on the Aquatic Environments of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Miraji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuity for discovery and production of new chemicals, allied products, and uses has currently resulted into generation of recent form of contaminants known as Emerging Contaminants (ECs. Once in the aquatic environment ECs are carcinogenic and cause other threats to both human’s and animals’ health. Due to their effects this study was aimed at investigating research trends of ECs in Tanzania. Findings revealed that USA and EU countries were leading in ECs researches, little followed by Asia, South Africa, and then Zambia. Only few guidelines from USA-EPA, WHO, Canada, and Australia existed. Neither published guidelines nor regulations for ECs existed in Tanzania; rather only the occurrence of some disinfection by-products and antibiotics was, respectively, reported in Arusha and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. As these reports had a limited coverage of ECs, henceforth, these findings constitute the first-line reference materials for ECs research in Tanzania which shall be useful for future monitoring and regulation planning.

  1. Flow modelling and radionuclide transport research and development in saturated and unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Filho, Carlos Alberto de; Branco, Otavio Eurico de Aquino; Loureiro, Celso de Oliveira

    1996-01-01

    The Engenho Nogueira Hydrogeological Project, PROHBEN, was idealized with the goal of implementing an Experimental Hydrogeological basin within its limits, in order to permit the development of hydrogeological studies and techniques, mainly in the modeling of flow and transport of contaminants (radionuclides) in the saturated and unsaturated porous media. The PROHBEN is located in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, amounting a 5 km 2 area. The local porous-granular, heterogeneous and anisotropic, water-table aquifer reaches 40 meters of thickness, and is compound mainly by alluvial deposits and alteration rocks products, with a sandy texture. The flow and transport modeling are being done using the Modflow and MT3D codes. Three master degree researches are being done in the PROHBEN area and one expects is that more researchers come to use this experimental site. (author)

  2. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) for groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.E.; Van Pelt, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past decade, researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and elsewhere have greatly advanced the knowledge of waste site characterization technologies. As a result, many of the techniques used in the past to investigate waste sites have been replaced by newer technologies, designed to provide greater protection for human health and the environment, greater access to suspected zones of contamination, and more accurate information of subsurface conditions. Determining the most environmentally sound method of assessing a waste unit is a major component of the SRS environmental restoration program. In an effort to understand the distribution and migration of contaminants in the groundwater system, the cone penetrometer investigation of the A/M-Area Southern Sector was implemented. The program incorporated a phased approach toward characterization by first using the CPT to delineate the plume boundary, followed by installing groundwater monitoring wells. The study provided the additional hydrogeologic information necessary to better understand the nature and extent of the contaminant plume (Fig. 1) and the hydrogeologic system in the Southem Sector. This data is essential for the optimal layout of the planned groundwater monitoring well network and recovery system to remediate the aquifers in the area. A number of other test locations were selected in the area during this study for lithologic calibration of the tool and to collect confirmation water samples from the aquifer. Cone penetrometer testing and hydrocone sampling, were performed at 17 sites (Fig. 2). The hydrocone, a tool modification to the CPT, was used to collect four groundwater samples from confined aquifers. These samples were analyzed by SRS laboratories. Elevated levels of chlorinated compounds were detected from these samples and have aided in further delineating the southern sector contaminant plume

  3. Hydrogeology of the Judith River Formation in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, David; Lypka, Morgan; Ferguson, Grant

    2017-11-01

    The Judith River Formation forms an important regional aquifer in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada. This aquifer is used for domestic and agricultural purposes in some areas and supports oil and gas production in other areas. As a result, the available data come from a range of sources and integration is required to provide an overview of aquifer characteristics. Here, data from oil and gas databases are combined with data from groundwater resource assessments. Analysis of cores, drill-stem tests and pumping tests provide a good overview of the physical hydrogeology of the Judith River Aquifer. Water chemistry data from oil and gas databases were less helpful in understanding the chemical hydrogeology due contamination of samples and unreliable laboratory analyses. Analytical modeling of past pumping in the aquifer indicates that decreases in hydraulic head exceeding 2 m are possible over distances of 10s of kilometers. Similar decreases in head should be expected for additional large withdrawals of groundwater from the Judith River Aquifer. Long-term groundwater abstraction should be limited by low pumping rates. Higher pumping rates appear to be possible for short-term uses, such as those required by the oil and gas industry.

  4. The rodent research animal holding facility as a barrier to environmental contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. D., Jr.; Jahns, G. C.; Dalton, B. P.; Hogan, R. P.; Wray, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    The rodent Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), developed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) to separately house rodents in a Spacelab, was verified as a barrier to environmental contaminants during a 12-day biocompatibility test. Environmental contaminants considered were solid particulates, microorganisms, ammonia, and typical animal odors. The 12-day test conducted in August 1988 was designed to verify that the rodent RAHF system would adequately support and maintain animal specimens during normal system operations. Additional objectives of this test were to demonstrate that: (1) the system would capture typical particulate debris produced by the animal; (2) microorganisms would be contained; and (3) the passage of animal odors was adequately controlled. In addition, the amount of carbon dioxide exhausted by the RAHF system was to be quantified. Of primary importance during the test was the demonstration that the RAHF would contain particles greater than 150 micrometers. This was verified after analyzing collection plates placed under exhaust air ducts and rodent cages during cage maintenance operations, e.g., waste tray and feeder changeouts. Microbiological testing identified no additional organisms in the test environment that could be traced to the RAHF. Odor containment was demonstrated to be less than barely detectable. Ammonia could not be detected in the exhaust air from the RAHF system. Carbon dioxide levels were verified to be less than 0.35 percent.

  5. Outcomes of experimental researches on stainless steel decontamination from radioactive contamination using electric slag remelting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurim, A.D.; Pakhnitz, A.V.; Trukhachev, A.G.; Bukhtoyarov, O.I.; Goncharov, A.Ye.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Institute of Atomic Energy prepared and conducted the experiments the purpose of researching a possibility of applying of stainless steel electric slag remelting for its decontamination from radioactive contamination. The activities were conducted at participating of the specialists of Kurgan State University, Kurgan (Russian Federation). A stand, which includes the electroslag furnace (power - 150 kW, current - to 3000 A) and auxiliary equipment (the system of common and special ventilation, system of remote control, system of parameters measuring and registering and others) was created to conduct the experiments. The properties of slag compositions were researched in the course of experiments preparation. Oxide (CaO-Al 2 O 3 - CaO-SiO 2 - MgO-B 2 O 3 ) and fluoride-oxide (CaF 2 -SiO 2 - MgF 2 -SiO 2 ) slag systems and some their modifications were chosen to research physical and chemical properties. Physical and chemical properties of the slag systems were experimentally researched and it included: measuring of surface tension using the method of maximum pressure in a gas bubble (at the same time density was measured); measuring of slag alloys electrical conductivity; measuring of melt volt-ampere characteristics. The flue tubes of high temperature reactor gas cooling KET technological channels were chosen as a source of radioactive contaminated stainless steel. This reactor is meant for testing of the fuel pin and FA of the nuclear pulse propulsion. Decontamination effect for all the remelted flue tubes was indirectly confirmed by the outcomes of measuring of radioactive radiation dose rate of the materials, extracted of the crystallizer after experiments finishing. The outcomes of the experiments show that the following processes pass at electroslag remelting of radioactively contaminated steel: uranium extraction from steel; uranium transfer from steel to slag; saving or insignificant modification of steel initial composition; radionuclides deposing

  6. Contaminated Sediment Management in Dam Removals and River Restoration Efforts: Critical Need for Research and Policy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over 1,000 U.S. dams have been removed (1975-2015) for reasons including obsolescence, liability concerns, water quality upgrades, fisheries, or ecosystem enhancements. Contaminated sediment can significantly complicate the approval process, cost, and timeline of a dam removal, or stop it entirely. In a dam removal, reservoir sediment changes from a sink to a source of contaminants. Recently, the Sierra Club sued to stop the removal of a large dam in Ohio because of the potential impact of phosphate releases on toxic algal blooms in Lake Erie. Heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, and petroleum hydrocarbons can be present in reservoir sediments. In a non-dam removal scenario, reservoir management tools range from "no action" to dredging, dewatering and removal, or sediment capping. But it is not clear how these reservoir management techniques apply to dam removals. Case studies show typically >80% of the reservoir sediment is eventually eroded, precluding sediment capping as a containment option. However, the released contaminants are diluted by mixing with "clean" sediment and are transported to different physio-chemical environments which may immobilize or biodegrade the contaminants. Poorly understood options include phased drawdown/reseeding the former reservoir to contain sediments, diking contaminant "hot spots," and addressing contaminant stratigraphy (where historical use created "hot layers" in the reservoir sediment). Research and policy development needs include: (1) assessment methods based on synergistic effects of multiple contaminants being present; (2) ways to translate the pre-removal contaminant concentrations to post-removal health risks downstream; (3) evaluation of management practices for contaminant "hot spots" and "hot layers;" (4) tools to forecast the presence of contaminated sediment using easily accessible information; and (5) ways to limit liability risk for organizations participating in dam removals involving contaminated sediment.

  7. Teaching hydrogeology: a review of current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T.; Allen, D. M.; Ferguson, G.

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogeology is now taught in a broad spectrum of departments and institutions to students with diverse backgrounds. Successful instruction in hydrogeology thus requires a variety of pedagogical approaches depending on desired learning outcomes and the background of students. We review the pedagogical literature in hydrogeology to highlight recent advances and analyze a 2005 survey among 68 hydrogeology instructors. The literature and survey results suggest there are only ~ 15 topics that are considered crucial by most hydrogeologists and > 100 other topics that are considered crucial by some hydrogeologists. The crucial topics focus on properties of aquifers and fundamentals of groundwater flow, and should likely be part of all undergraduate hydrogeology courses. Other topics can supplement and support these crucial topics, depending on desired learning outcomes. Classroom settings continue to provide a venue for emphasizing fundamental knowledge. However, recent pedagogical advances are biased towards field and laboratory instruction with a goal of bolstering experiential learning. Field methods build on the fundamentals taught in the classroom and emphasize the collection of data, data uncertainty, and the development of vocational skills. Laboratory and computer-based exercises similarly build on theory, and offer an opportunity for data analysis and integration. The literature suggests curricula at all levels should ideally balance field, laboratory, and classroom pedagogy into an iterative and integrative whole. An integrated, iterative and balanced approach leads to greater student motivation and advancement of theoretical and vocational knowledge.

  8. Hydrogeological Characterization of Low-permeability Clayey Tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian

    The topic of this PhD thesis is an integrated investigation of sand lenses in glacial diamictons. Sand lenses indicate various deposition regimes and glaciotectonic deformation styles and are as such important features in studies of glacial sediments. In a hydrogeological framework, sand lenses......-dimensional realizations indicate clear channel networks, whereas only limited connectivity was found for the two-dimensional case. This is an important aspect because it emphasizes the need to collect data and to represent this type of heterogeneity in 3D. The physical response of sand lens heterogeneity was evaluated...... enhance the horizontal spreading of contaminants without a significant increase of the equivalent permeability in the till. Overall, sand lenses occur in all types of glacial sediments and with a broad range of shapes and hydraulic properties. Geometric characterization enabled classification of the most...

  9. Uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nilsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty in conceptual model structure and in environmental data is of essential interest when dealing with uncertainty in water resources management. To make quantification of uncertainty possible is it necessary to identify and characterise the uncertainty in geological and hydrogeological data. This paper discusses a range of available techniques to describe the uncertainty related to geological model structure and scale of support. Literature examples on uncertainty in hydrogeological variables such as saturated hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, effective porosity and dispersivity are given. Field data usually have a spatial and temporal scale of support that is different from the one on which numerical models for water resources management operate. Uncertainty in hydrogeological data variables is characterised and assessed within the methodological framework of the HarmoniRiB classification.

  10. Crosshole investigations: Hydrogeological results and interpretations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.H.; Holmes, D.C.; Brightman, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    The Crosshole Programme was an integrated geophysical and hydrogeological study of a limited volume of rock (known as the Crosshole Site) within the Stripa mine. Borehole radar, borehole seismic and hydraulic methods were developed for specific application to fractured crystalline rock. The hydrogeological investigations contained both single borehole and crosshole test techniques. A novel technique, using a sinusoidal variation of pressure, formed the main method of crosshole testing and was assessed during the programme. The strategy of crosshole testing was strongly influenced by the results from the geophysical measurements. The longer term, larger scale hydrogeological response of the region was asessed by examining the variation of heads over the region. These were responding to the presence of an old drift. A method of overall assessment involving minimising the divergence from a homogeneous response yielded credible values of hydraulic conductivity for the rock as a whole. (orig./DG)

  11. Chemical analysis of water in hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakova, R.; Zenisova, Z.; Seman, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the monograph is to give complete information on the chemical analysis of water hydrogeology not only for the students program of Geology study (Bachelor degree study), Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology (Master's degree study) and Engineering Geology (doctoral level study), but also for students from other colleges and universities schools in Slovakia, as well as in the Czech Republic, dealing with the chemical composition of water and its quality, from different perspectives. The benefit would be for professionals with hydrogeological, water and environmental practices, who can find there all the necessary information about proper water sampling, the units used in the chemical analysis of water, expressing the proper chemical composition of water in its various parameters through classification of chemical composition of the water up to the basic features of physical chemistry at thermodynamic calculations and hydrogeochemical modelling.

  12. Advances in molecular and genomic research to safeguard food and feed supply from aflatoxin contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide recognition that aflatoxin contamination of agricultural commodities by the fungus Aspergillus flavus is a global problem which has significantly benefitted from global collaboration for understanding the contaminating fungus as well as for developing and implementing solutions against the...

  13. USDA and university researchers work to prevent U.S. cotton contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. cotton is considered to have some of the lowest levels of contamination in the world. However, that reputation is in jeopardy as complaints of contamination from domestic and foreign mills are on the rise. Cotton contamination is classified by the International Textile Manufacturers Federation ...

  14. Effectiveness evaluation of remote data application in hydrogeologic explorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleshin, M I; Koloskova, V N

    1981-01-01

    Use of the information approach to evaluate the effectiveness of remote data in hydrogeologic cartography of Ustyurt is discussed. Space image, interval and final diagrams of hydrogeologic interpretation are represented like a communication channel. Using the information approach, quantitative evaluation is carried out, and hydrogeologic maps are compared (that, have been compiled by earth surface methods and via interpretation of remote data.

  15. SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1988-08-01

    The SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation was implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the SRP site. Phase III, which is discussed in this report, includes the drilling of 7 deep coreholes (sites P-24 through P-30) and the installation of 53 observation wells ranging in depth from approximately 50 ft to more than 970 ft below the ground surface. In addition to the collection of geologic cores for lithologic and stratigraphic study, samples were also collected for the determination of physical characteristics of the sediments and for the identification of microorganisms.

  16. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  17. Relation of water chemistry of the Edwards aquifer to hydrogeology and land use, San Antonio Region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Water-chemistry data from the Edwards aquifer for 1976-85, consisting of nearly 1,500 chemical analyses from 280 wells and 3 springs, were used to statistically evaluate relations among ground-water chemistry, hydrogeology, and land use. Five land uses associated with sampled wells were classified on the basis of published information and field surveys. Four major subareas of the aquifer were defined to reflect the relative susceptibility of ground water to contamination originating from human activities using hydrogeologic and tritium data.

  18. Summary of the Special Research Area 188 of the DFG - Cleaning Contaminated Soils. 2nd phase of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegmann, R.; Foerstner, U.; Hupe, K.

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, a Special Research Area (SFB) 'Cleaning Contaminated Soils' was set up by the German Research Association (DFG). In the context of this SFB the Technical University Hamburg-Harburg (Sprecher College) and the University of Hamburg researched the basis of processes for cleaning up contaminated soils in 17 part-projects. The SFB was supported in the first phase during the period 01.01.1989 to 31.12.1991. The second period of support will end on 31.12.1994. (orig.) [de

  19. Description of hydrogeological data in SKB's database GEOTAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentzschein, B.

    1986-12-01

    Since 1977 Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB has been performing a research and development programme for final disposal and spent nuclear fuel. The purpose of the programme is to acquire knowledge and data of radioactive waste. Measurement for the characterisation of geological, geophysical, hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions are performed in specific site investigations as well as for geoscientific projects. A database, called GEOTAB, was investigated. It is based on a concept from Mimer Information System, and have been further developed by Ergo-Data. The hardware is a VAX 750 computer located at KRAB (Kraftverksbolagens Redovisningsavdelning AB) in Stockholm. (orig./DG)

  20. Stepwise hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis on site scale (Step 0 and Step 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuya; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Onoe, Hironori

    2005-05-01

    One of the main goals of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment. To achieve this goal, a variety of investigations, analysis, and evaluations have been conducted using an iterative approach. In this study, hydrogeological modeling and ground water flow analyses have been carried out using the data from surface-based investigations at Step 0 and Step 1, in order to synthesize the investigation results, to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrogeological model, and to specify items for further investigation. The results of this study are summarized as follows: 1) As the investigation progresses Step 0 to Step 1, the understanding of groundwater flow was enhanced from Step 0 to Step 1, and the hydrogeological model could be revised, 2) The importance of faults as major groundwater flow pathways was demonstrated, 3) Geological and hydrogeological characteristics of faults with orientation of NNW and NE were shown to be especially significant. The main item specified for further investigations is summarized as follows: geological and hydrogeological characteristics of NNW and NE trending faults are important. (author)

  1. Research on establishment of emergency transportation of heavy-injured and radiation-exposed and contaminated patients. Toward rapid, contamination-preventive and safe land and air transportion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraguchi, Yoshikura; Tomoyasu, Y.; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Toru

    2004-01-01

    The authors has continued researches on countermeasures against various disasters including nuclear or radiation accident. Present paper deals with the following items; (1) Significance of preparation of a manual on countermeasures against disasters in relation to medical drills, (2) Status and prospects of disaster simulations and disaster drills, (3) Promotion and education on medical knowledge when nuclear disasters occur, (4) Network system study of broad area medicines throughout the country. (5) Study on how to approach mental an psychological cares, (6) Specialities of radioactive contamination in the general contamination of NBC (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical) disasters, (7) New concept and preparation of triage tags, and (8) Queueing theory application to many patients in a hospital. (H. Yokoo)

  2. Discovery of HeLa Cell Contamination in HES Cells: Call for Cell Line Authentication in Reproductive Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniss, Douglas A; Summerfield, Taryn L

    2014-08-01

    Continuous cell lines are used frequently in reproductive biology research to study problems in early pregnancy events and parturition. It has been recognized for 50 years that many mammalian cell lines contain inter- or intraspecies contaminations with other cells. However, most investigators do not routinely test their culture systems for cross-contamination. The most frequent contributor to cross-contamination of cell lines is the HeLa cell isolated from an aggressive cervical adenocarcinoma. We report on the discovery of HeLa cell contamination of the human endometrial epithelial cell line HES isolated in our laboratory. Short tandem repeat analysis of 9 unique genetic loci demonstrated molecular identity between HES and HeLa cells. In addition, we verified that WISH cells, isolated originally from human amnion epithelium, were also contaminated with HeLa cells. Inasmuch as our laboratory did not culture HeLa cells at the time of HES cell derivations, the source of contamination was the WISH cell line. These data highlight the need for continued diligence in authenticating cell lines used in reproductive biology research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Contamination in fractured-rock aquifers: Research at the former Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Tiedeman, Claire; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and cooperators are studying chlorinated solvents in a fractured sedimentary rock aquifer underlying the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. Fractured-rock aquifers are common in many parts of the United States and are highly susceptible to contamination, particularly at industrial sites. Compared to 'unconsolidated' aquifers, there can be much more uncertainty about the direction and rate of contaminant migration and about the processes and factors that control chemical and microbial transformations of contaminants. Research at the NAWC is improving understanding of the transport and fate of chlorinated solvents in fractured-rock aquifers and will compare the effectiveness of different strategies for contaminant remediation.

  4. Hydrogeological characteristics of Beishan preselected area, Gansu province for China's high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonghai; Yang Tianxiao; Liu Shufen

    2001-01-01

    Groundwater is the major carrier for radionuclide migration in the high-level radioactive waste disposal. For this reason the hydrogeological study is one of the main contents in repository siting. According to the field investigation which has been carried out during the last few years and some data from the previous study, the author describes the general hydrogeological situation and groundwater circulation, as well as chemical characteristics of groundwater in Beishan preselected area, Gansu province. The research shows that main hydrogeological characteristics of the Beishan area is water-bearing character, low permeability and slow water movement while the major chemical feature of groundwater is high mineralization. This recognition will provide an important basis for repository siting in the site area

  5. Hydrogeologic study of Cafam area. Melgar (Tolima)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel M, Carlos E; Perez C, Rosalbina

    1989-06-01

    The hydrogeologic study covers an area of 50 km 2 with the objectives of to determine the possibility of use of the underground waters and to locate places to carry out exploratory perforations in lands of Cafam, equally the elaboration of a hydrogeologic map of the region; for the effect it was carried out cartography geologic scale 1:10.000, inventory and sampling of water point, geoelectric prospecting and some permeability tests. In the area the exploitation of underground water is incipient, alone there are 20 points of water, of which none produce more than 1L/seg. The water has in general good physical chemistry quality for the human consumption. Geologically was recognized the groups Guadalupe and Gualanday, also some quaternary deposits; the previous ones were subdivided in 11 geological units for its composition and morphology, which are framed structurally in the E flank of the synclinal of Carmen de Apicala and displaced by traverse faults with address E-W and N-W. From the point of hydrogeologic view the units were grouped in 8 aquifer systems, of which four are considered of hydrogeologic importance for the area; the sector with better possibilities to capture these aquifer systems is the W of the area (in the terraces area) that extends to the Sumapaz River. For the Cafam sector a place was selected to build an exploratory well of 200 mts. of depth that would capture an aquifer of low transmissivity, corresponding to the Unit T3

  6. Small Scale Multisource Site – Hydrogeology Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A site impacted by brackish water was evaluated using traditional hydrogeologic and geochemical site characterization techniques. No single, specific source of the brine impacted ground water was identified. However, the extent of the brine impacted ground water was found to be...

  7. Hydrogeological And Geotechnical Investigations Of Gully Erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, hydrogeological and geotechnical studies of gully erosion sites were carried out in order to provide information on the genesis and continual expansion of gullies in the area. The results indicate that gullies are located in the upper aquifer of the Benin Formation (Coastal Plain Sands). The estimated hydraulic ...

  8. Hydrogeological evaluation of geological formations in Ashanti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, therefore, employed Geographical Information System to assess some of these hydrogeological parameters in the Ashanti Region using the ordinary kriging interpolation method. Data on 2,788 drilled boreholes in the region were used and the assessment focused on the various geological formations in the ...

  9. Final Technical Report - Integrated Hydrogeophysical and Hydrogeologic Driven Parameter Upscaling for Dual-Domain Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, John M

    2012-11-05

    The three major components of this research were: 1. Application of minimally invasive, cost effective hydrogeophysical techniques (surface and borehole), to generate fine scale (~1m or less) 3D estimates of subsurface heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is defined as spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and/or hydrolithologic zones. 2. Integration of the fine scale characterization of hydrogeologic parameters with the hydrogeologic facies to upscale the finer scale assessment of heterogeneity to field scale. 3. Determination of the relationship between dual-domain parameters and practical characterization data.

  10. Hydrogeological investigation of Melendiz basin (Aksaray)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogdu, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Within the scope of this M.Sc, study entitled Hydrogeologic Investigation of Melendiz basin, the geological, hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of a 600 km2 area have been studied and, 1/100.000 scale geological and hydrogeological maps have been prepared. Tetriary-Guaternary aged young volkanic rocks occupy nearly 80% (480 km2 ) of the area. The major aquifers are alluvium and andesite and basalt which are extensively fractured and jointed. Aquitard units comprise of ignimbirite, some of the andesites-basalts and formations that composes of limestone-sandstone-marl intercalations. The youngest geologic unit of the area, Hasandag volcanic ash formation, and also the tuffs have been indentified as aquiclude units. Mean areal precipitation, potential and real evapotranspiration rates and mean annual streamflow have been calculated on the basis of available data and, a hydrologic budget of the basin has been established. Hydrogeologic units have been classified as aquifer, aquitard and aquiclude with respect to their geohydrologic properties, field observations and the results of the pumping tests. On the other hand, hydrodynamic mechanism of the groundwater flow reaching major cold and thermal water discharges have also been explained. A hydrogeologic budget for the area covering Ciftlik township and its vicinity where extensively joint and fractured andesite-basalt and alluvial aquifers outcrop has been established. Major water points as thermal and cold springs, wells and streams have been sampled for major ion analysis. Beyond this, some water points have also been sampled for organic, trace,metal ald environmental isotropic analyses. Environmental isotope data of thermal springs point out a long-deep groundwater flow path

  11. Environmental assessment of a uranium experimental rock blasting in Portugal, using geophysical and hydrogeological methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, E C; Midões, C; Costa, A; Lourenço, M C; Monteiro Santos, F A

    2012-01-01

    The Nisa uranium deposit, located in Central Portugal, has been known since the late 1960s. Some areas were explored at that time. Today, a few open pits and dumps remain in place and are a concern to local authorities. To assess the geoenvironmental problems caused by the main mining exploration composed of an experimental rock blasting, 3D electrical conductivity and resistivity models were made to develop a hydrogeological model to understand the possibility of contaminants transportation, such as uranium, from the dumps towards a dam located nearby. These 3D models were the support to show alteration layer thickness variations and fault zones at depths controlling groundwater circulation. Spectrometric surveys were also carried out and correlated with geology and geoelectrical structure. All this information was used in the construction of the 3D steady state hydrogeological model of the experimental rock blasting of Nisa. In this model, groundwater flow and the contaminant pathways were simulated. Some areas have very high radioactive values resulting from the geological formation characteristics and old dumps. However, results of the environmental assessment using geophysical and hydrogeological methods point to a critical situation restricted only to the area of the experimental rock blasting of the Nisa uranium deposit and its dumps. (paper)

  12. Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Conditions of Old Mine Workings of the Former Jeroným Mine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grmela, A.; Žůrek, P.; Kukutsch, Radovan; Kořínek, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2011), s. 17-25 ISSN 1802-5420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Jeroným Mine * old mine workings * hydrogeology Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://gse.vsb.cz/

  13. Software for hydrogeologic time series analysis, interfacing data with physical insight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmuth, Jos R. von; Maas, K.; Knotters, M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Bakker, M.; Olsthoorn, T.; Cirkel, D.; Leunk, I.; Schaars, F.; Asmuth, Daniel C. von

    2012-01-01

    The program Menyanthes combines a variety of functions for managing, editing, visualizing, analyzing and modeling hydrogeologic time series. Menyanthes was initially developed within the scope of the PhD research of the first author, whose primary aimwas the integration of data and

  14. Summary of field operations Technical Area I well PGS-1. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, J.E.; McCord, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is managing the project to assess and, when necessary, to remediate sites contaminated by the lab operations. Within the ER project, the site-wide hydrogeologic characterization task is responsible for the area-wide hydrogeologic investigation. The purpose of this task is to reduce the uncertainty about the rate and direction of groundwater flow beneath the area and across its boundaries. This specific report deals with the installation of PGS-1 monitoring well which provides information on the lithology and hydrology of the aquifer in the northern area of the Kirtland Air Force Base. The report provides information on the well design; surface geology; stratigraphy; structure; drilling, completion, and development techniques; and borehole geophysics information

  15. Research programme related to the influence of wind on contamination containment in nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, S.; Gelain, T.; Laborde, J.C.; Ricciardi, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DSU/SERAC/LEMAC), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    In nuclear industry, the response of a ventilation network to accidental disturbances, either mechanical (fan failure, damper blockage,..) or thermal (fire..) is difficult to evaluate when the network becomes complex. In order to determine and analyze the consequences of these disturbances on the radioactive materials containment, a computer code called SIMEVENT has been developed. However, among the external parameters likely to affect a ventilation network, the wind effect is actually basically modeled, due to a lack of qualified data concerning the wind impact on complex building geometries and the interaction between wind and chimney exhaust. In view of the networks complexity and the facilities diversity, a research program including experimental and model studies has been launched to assess the wind influence on contamination containment. 1. step: improvement of data (2005-2006): The diversity of facilities geometries needs the use of a qualified multi-D code for pressure coefficients Cpi assessment, characterizing the wind effect on building walls and the interaction between wind and chimney exhaust. Different chimney terminals have then been placed in a wind tunnel (the parameters are the incline angle a, the wind velocity U and the air flow in the duct W); for each angle, the evolution of the pressure coefficient versus wind velocity is determined and is characteristic of a chimney terminal geometry. Furthermore, two types of scale-model have been chosen for representing either nuclear power plants (NPP) or plants and laboratories buildings. The different values of wind pressure coefficients have been measured on both scale-models placed in a wind-tunnel. The experimental data obtained are compared with CFD simulations (CFX code), in order to qualify such code for the assessment of pressure coefficient on complex geometries. The results are quite encouraging. 2. step - wind tunnel tests on a ventilated scale model (2007-2009): Wind tunnel tests will be

  16. Research programme related to the influence of wind on contamination containment in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, S.; Gelain, T.; Laborde, J.C.; Ricciardi, L.

    2006-01-01

    In nuclear industry, the response of a ventilation network to accidental disturbances, either mechanical (fan failure, damper blockage,..) or thermal (fire..) is difficult to evaluate when the network becomes complex. In order to determine and analyze the consequences of these disturbances on the radioactive materials containment, a computer code called SIMEVENT has been developed. However, among the external parameters likely to affect a ventilation network, the wind effect is actually basically modeled, due to a lack of qualified data concerning the wind impact on complex building geometries and the interaction between wind and chimney exhaust. In view of the networks complexity and the facilities diversity, a research program including experimental and model studies has been launched to assess the wind influence on contamination containment. 1. step: improvement of data (2005-2006): The diversity of facilities geometries needs the use of a qualified multi-D code for pressure coefficients Cpi assessment, characterizing the wind effect on building walls and the interaction between wind and chimney exhaust. Different chimney terminals have then been placed in a wind tunnel (the parameters are the incline angle a, the wind velocity U and the air flow in the duct W); for each angle, the evolution of the pressure coefficient versus wind velocity is determined and is characteristic of a chimney terminal geometry. Furthermore, two types of scale-model have been chosen for representing either nuclear power plants (NPP) or plants and laboratories buildings. The different values of wind pressure coefficients have been measured on both scale-models placed in a wind-tunnel. The experimental data obtained are compared with CFD simulations (CFX code), in order to qualify such code for the assessment of pressure coefficient on complex geometries. The results are quite encouraging. 2. step - wind tunnel tests on a ventilated scale model (2007-2009): Wind tunnel tests will be

  17. Hydrogeology, waste disposal, science and politics: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    A total of 48 papers were presented at the Engineering Geology and Geotechnical Engineering 30th Symposium. These papers are presented in this proceedings under the following headings: site characterization--Pocatello area; site characterization--Boise Area; site assessment; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; geophysical methods; remediation; geotechnical engineering; and hydrogeology, northern and western Idaho. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  18. Recent hydrogeologic study of the Vis island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janislav Kapelj

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The Vis Island belongs to the group of the Middle Dalmatian islands. It comprises an area of about 90.2 km2. Morphologically, three belts of highlands and two depressions with karst poljes are significant. The highest point on the island is Hum with 587 m a.s.l. theisland’s water supply is organized from the water-supply station “Korita”, situated in the central part of island, in tectonically formed depression. There are two additional capturedobjects: the well K-1 above the Komiža town and the spring “Pizdica”. The most important hydrogeological role on the island have two hydrogeological barriers, one in the KomižaBay, completely made of impermeable igneous and clastic rocks, and another one, the recently recognized relative barrier in the area of Dra~evo, Plisko and Velo polje. Since the island karst aquifer is in permanent dynamic relation with seawater, classical geologic,structural and hydrogeologic investigations have been performed with application of hydrogeochemical methods taking into account the natural chemical tracer content of groundwater and its variations in different hydrologic and vegetation conditions. Precipitationregime is very unfavorable with regard to the recharging of island’s aquifer, because dry periods are usually very long. During the summer tourist season, when the number of inhabitants and fresh water consumption considerably increase, amounts of island’sgroundwater suitable for water supply and irrigation rapidly decrease. Sometimes, insufficient quantity of fresh water on the Vis Island causes restrictions. Concerning the development of tourist potential and the present agricultural activities, summer lack ofwater is a serious restrictive factor. Some results of the performed hydrogeological study, important as a basis for island’s fresh water potential assessment, will be presented.

  19. HYDROGEOLOGICAL AND HYDROCHEMICAL FEATURES OF KALNIK MASSIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Mraz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Kalničko gorje consists of Cretaceous – Holocene sediments, which can be in hydrogeological sense classified in three hydrogeological units: (1 northern area from central massive of Kalnik, consists of Cretaceous and low Miocene impermeable and low permeable sediments which are hydrogeological barrier and low permeable Cretaceous eruptive sediments ; (2 Kalnik massive consists of Paleogen and Baden permeable carbonate – clastic sediments, which are aquifer; (3 southern Kalnik area consists of Neogene low permeable sediments and Quaternary medium permeable unconsolidated deposits. In the hydrogelogical units are several aquifers types: (i Paleogen carbonate aquifer consists of limestone – dolomite breccia and this is the most important aquifer in the Kalnik area; (ii Baden carbonate aquifer consists of lithothamnium, lithothamnium limestone, sandstone and breccia-conglomerate and it has high permeability, especially through the karst morphological features; (iii Quaternary alluvial aquifers – the most important is in the valley of the Kamešnica river and it’s permeability varies from poor to good depending on granulometric properties; (iv Cretaceous eruptive aquifer from which in the Apatovac area is abstraction of mineral water. The aquifers of the Kalnik area are very vulnerable considering the hydrogeological properties of the area. Nevertheless, physical, physicalchemical, and chemical properties of groundwater in the Kalnik area are showing that waters are of very good quality. The reasons of good quality of waters are that the area is poorly populated and there is no potential pollutant. The area is very valuable and important natural resource for water supply of whole region. In the future it is necessary to provide good protection and sustainable water management to obtain today’s good quality and quantity of groundwater (the paper is published in Croatian.

  20. A compilation of subsurface hydrogeologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report presents a compilation of both fracture properties and hydrogeological parameters relevant to the flow of groundwater in fractured rock systems. Methods of data acquisition as well as the scale of and conditions during the measurement are recorded. Measurements and analytical techniques for each of the parameters under consideration have been reviewed with respect to their methodology, assumptions and accuracy. Both the rock type and geologic setting associated with these measurements have also been recorded. 373 refs

  1. Hydrogeology, waste disposal, science and politics: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, P.K. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 48 papers were presented at the Engineering Geology and Geotechnical Engineering 30th Symposium. These papers are presented in this proceedings under the following headings: site characterization--Pocatello area; site characterization--Boise Area; site assessment; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; geophysical methods; remediation; geotechnical engineering; and hydrogeology, northern and western Idaho. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. On uncertainty quantification in hydrogeology and hydrogeophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Niklas; Ginsbourger, David; Irving, James; Nobile, Fabio; Doucet, Arnaud

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies, field methodologies, numerical modeling, and inversion approaches have contributed to unprecedented imaging of hydrogeological properties and detailed predictions at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Nevertheless, imaging results and predictions will always remain imprecise, which calls for appropriate uncertainty quantification (UQ). In this paper, we outline selected methodological developments together with pioneering UQ applications in hydrogeology and hydrogeophysics. The applied mathematics and statistics literature is not easy to penetrate and this review aims at helping hydrogeologists and hydrogeophysicists to identify suitable approaches for UQ that can be applied and further developed to their specific needs. To bypass the tremendous computational costs associated with forward UQ based on full-physics simulations, we discuss proxy-modeling strategies and multi-resolution (Multi-level Monte Carlo) methods. We consider Bayesian inversion for non-linear and non-Gaussian state-space problems and discuss how Sequential Monte Carlo may become a practical alternative. We also describe strategies to account for forward modeling errors in Bayesian inversion. Finally, we consider hydrogeophysical inversion, where petrophysical uncertainty is often ignored leading to overconfident parameter estimation. The high parameter and data dimensions encountered in hydrogeological and geophysical problems make UQ a complicated and important challenge that has only been partially addressed to date.

  3. Stochastic hydrogeology: what professionals really need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative hydrogeology celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2006. Geostatistics is younger but has had a very large impact in hydrogeology. Today, geostatistics is used routinely to interpolate deterministically most of the parameters that are required to analyze a problem or make a quantitative analysis. In a small number of cases, geostatistics is combined with deterministic approaches to forecast uncertainty. At a more academic level, geostatistics is used extensively to study physical processes in heterogeneous aquifers. Yet, there is an important gap between the academic use and the routine applications of geostatistics. The reasons for this gap are diverse. These include aspects related to the hydrogeology consulting market, technical reasons such as the lack of widely available software, but also a number of misconceptions. A change in this situation requires acting at different levels. First, regulators must be convinced of the benefit of using geostatistics. Second, the economic potential of the approach must be emphasized to customers. Third, the relevance of the theories needs to be increased. Last, but not least, software, data sets, and computing infrastructure such as grid computing need to be widely available.

  4. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chun-Ping, E-mail: chunping@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Chen, Hong-Bin [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m{sup 3} of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, U, and {alpha}-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 {mu}m filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb {beta}-emitters, {alpha}-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously

  5. Hydrochemistry and Characteristics of Groundwater: Case Study Water Contamination at Citarum River Upstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Sapari Dwi Hadian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rancaekek and Sayang area, West Java, are the area where many industrial factories are located.Thus, the region becomes the targeted destination for industrial development.The  population in the area is rising due to the growth of industries causing the regional development becomes uncontrollable. In addition, the constant increment of waste and also poor-coordinated disposal systems may result in groundwater contamination in the areas. The rapid growth of the area increase the need for groundwater as well as the need for more research about contamination at Rancaekek and Sayang. The research aims to explore the spread of groundwater contamination in the area. The research method is carried out based on the analysis of Geological Mapping, Hydrogeological Mapping and chemical characteristics of the groundwater in the area. Chemical analyses of the groundwater were conducted through laboratory test of groundwater samples at specific spots of dug wells. The lab test results were further analyzed to determine the contamination zone. The findings reveal that the distribution of contamination in the area follow the shallow ground water flow patterns, the water contamination contains heavy metal and there is degradation of soil fertility. The findings suggest the stakeholders to delineate the contaminated area, and increase the dissemination of environmental awareness.

  6. CASCADE - Chemicals as contaminants in the food chain. A network of excellence for research, risk assessment, and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeberg, M.; Haakansson, H. [Karolinska Institutet, Insitute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Pongratz, I.; Gustavsson, J.Aa. [Karolinska Institutet, Dept. of Biosciences, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Harmful effects of chemical contaminants in food are of major health concern in Europe today. Lack of integration between basic research, risk assessment, and education severely hampers the efforts to reach European excellence in this area. The research activities that are carried out are small in scale and are not well integrated into a coherent structure. To tackle the fragmentation problems and to achieve synergistic effects and full European research potential, the European Commission has initiated a Network of Excellence called CASCADE or ''Chemicals as contaminants in the food chain: a network of excellence for research, risk assessment, and education'' The contract is running for five years and is worth over 14 million with partners from eighteen research centres. The network has the potential and goal to be a world force in knowledge on health issues related to chemical contaminants in food. Focus is on chemical residues that act via and/or interfere with cell regulation at the level of nuclear receptors. The risk assessment integration parts of the network aim to increase the awareness among scientists and others of the need to bring multiple aspects of scientific information into use in risk assessment.

  7. A Comparative Approach for Ranking Contaminated Sites Based on the Risk Assessment Paradigm Using Fuzzy PROMETHEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejiang; Kluck, Cheryl; Achari, Gopal

    2009-11-01

    A ranking system for contaminated sites based on comparative risk methodology using fuzzy Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) was developed in this article. It combines the concepts of fuzzy sets to represent uncertain site information with the PROMETHEE, a subgroup of Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods. Criteria are identified based on a combination of the attributes (toxicity, exposure, and receptors) associated with the potential human health and ecological risks posed by contaminated sites, chemical properties, site geology and hydrogeology and contaminant transport phenomena. Original site data are directly used avoiding the subjective assignment of scores to site attributes. When the input data are numeric and crisp the PROMETHEE method can be used. The Fuzzy PROMETHEE method is preferred when substantial uncertainties and subjectivities exist in site information. The PROMETHEE and fuzzy PROMETHEE methods are both used in this research to compare the sites. The case study shows that this methodology provides reasonable results.

  8. Blueprint for a coupled model of sedimentology, hydrology, and hydrogeology in streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Daniel; Therrien, Rene; Simmons, Craig T.; Brunner, Philip

    2017-06-01

    The streambed constitutes the physical interface between the surface and the subsurface of a stream. Across all spatial scales, the physical properties of the streambed control surface water-groundwater interactions. Continuous alteration of streambed properties such as topography or hydraulic conductivity occurs through erosion and sedimentation processes. Recent studies from the fields of ecology, hydrogeology, and sedimentology provide field evidence that sedimentological processes themselves can be heavily influenced by surface water-groundwater interactions, giving rise to complex feedback mechanisms between sedimentology, hydrology, and hydrogeology. More explicitly, surface water-groundwater exchanges play a significant role in the deposition of fine sediments, which in turn modify the hydraulic properties of the streambed. We explore these feedback mechanisms and critically review the extent of current interaction between the different disciplines. We identify opportunities to improve current modeling practices. For example, hydrogeological models treat the streambed as a static rather than a dynamic entity, while sedimentological models do not account for critical catchment processes such as surface water-groundwater exchange. We propose a blueprint for a new modeling framework that bridges the conceptual gaps between sedimentology, hydrogeology, and hydrology. Specifically, this blueprint (1) fully integrates surface-subsurface flows with erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments and (2) accounts for the dynamic changes in surface elevation and hydraulic conductivity of the streambed. Finally, we discuss the opportunities for new research within the coupled framework.

  9. Dynamic interactions between hydrogeological and exposure parameters in daily dose prediction under uncertainty and temporal variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vikas, E-mail: vikas.kumar@urv.cat [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rovira i Virgili University, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Barros, Felipe P.J. de [Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90089, CA (United States); Schuhmacher, Marta [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rovira i Virgili University, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier [Hydrogeology Group, Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, University Politècnica de Catalunya-BarcelonaTech, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Dynamic parametric interaction in daily dose prediction under uncertainty. • Importance of temporal dynamics associated with the dose. • Different dose experienced by different population cohorts as a function of time. • Relevance of uncertainty reduction in the input parameters shows temporal dynamism. -- Abstract: We study the time dependent interaction between hydrogeological and exposure parameters in daily dose predictions due to exposure of humans to groundwater contamination. Dose predictions are treated stochastically to account for an incomplete hydrogeological and geochemical field characterization, and an incomplete knowledge of the physiological response. We used a nested Monte Carlo framework to account for uncertainty and variability arising from both hydrogeological and exposure variables. Our interest is in the temporal dynamics of the total dose and their effects on parametric uncertainty reduction. We illustrate the approach to a HCH (lindane) pollution problem at the Ebro River, Spain. The temporal distribution of lindane in the river water can have a strong impact in the evaluation of risk. The total dose displays a non-linear effect on different population cohorts, indicating the need to account for population variability. We then expand the concept of Comparative Information Yield Curves developed earlier (see de Barros et al. [29]) to evaluate parametric uncertainty reduction under temporally variable exposure dose. Results show that the importance of parametric uncertainty reduction varies according to the temporal dynamics of the lindane plume. The approach could be used for any chemical to aid decision makers to better allocate resources towards reducing uncertainty.

  10. Evaluation of Uncertainties in hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analyses. Model calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Ono, Makoto; Sugihara, Yutaka; Shimo, Michito; Yamamoto, Hajime; Fumimura, Kenichi

    2003-03-01

    This study involves evaluation of uncertainty in hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis. Three-dimensional groundwater flow in Shobasama site in Tono was analyzed using two continuum models and one discontinuous model. The domain of this study covered area of four kilometers in east-west direction and six kilometers in north-south direction. Moreover, for the purpose of evaluating how uncertainties included in modeling of hydrogeological structure and results of groundwater simulation decreased with progress of investigation research, updating and calibration of the models about several modeling techniques of hydrogeological structure and groundwater flow analysis techniques were carried out, based on the information and knowledge which were newly acquired. The acquired knowledge is as follows. As a result of setting parameters and structures in renewal of the models following to the circumstances by last year, there is no big difference to handling between modeling methods. The model calibration is performed by the method of matching numerical simulation with observation, about the pressure response caused by opening and closing of a packer in MIU-2 borehole. Each analysis technique attains reducing of residual sum of squares of observations and results of numerical simulation by adjusting hydrogeological parameters. However, each model adjusts different parameters as water conductivity, effective porosity, specific storage, and anisotropy. When calibrating models, sometimes it is impossible to explain the phenomena only by adjusting parameters. In such case, another investigation may be required to clarify details of hydrogeological structure more. As a result of comparing research from beginning to this year, the following conclusions are obtained about investigation. (1) The transient hydraulic data are effective means in reducing the uncertainty of hydrogeological structure. (2) Effective porosity for calculating pore water velocity of

  11. The hydrogeological well database TANGRAM©: a tool for data processing to support groundwater assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullia Bonomi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available At the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Milano-Bicocca (DISAT-UNIMIB, a hydrogeological well database, called TANGRAM©, has been developed and published on line at www.TANGRAM.samit.unimib.it, developing an earlier 1989 DOS version. This package can be used to store, display, and process all data related to water wells, including administrative information, well characteristics, stratigraphic logs, water levels, pumping rates, and other hydrogeological information. Currently, the database contains more than 39.200 wells located in the Italian region of Lombardy (90%, Piedmont (9% and Valle d’Aosta (1%. TANGRAM© has been created both as a tool for researches and for public administration’s administrators who have projects in common with DISAT-UNIMIB. Indeed, transferring wells data from paper into TANGRAM© offers both an easier and more robust way to correlate hydrogeological data and a more organized management of the administrative information. Some Administrations use TANGRAM© regularly as a tool for wells data management (Brescia Province, ARPA Valle Aosta. An innovative aspect of the database is the quantitative extraction of stratigraphic data. In the part of the software intended for research purposes, all well logs are translated into 8-digit alphanumeric codes and the user composes the code interpreting the description at each stratigraphic level. So the stratigraphic well data can be coded, then quantified and processed. This is made possible by attributing a weight to the digits of the code for textures. The program calculates the weighted percentage of the chosen lithology, as related to each individual layer. These extractions are the starting point for subsequent hydrogeological studies: well head protection area, reconstruction of the dynamics of flow, realization of the quarry plans and flux and transport hydrogeological models. The results of a two-dimensional distribution of coarse

  12. Environmental Baseline Survey for Installation of Five New Hydrogeologic Groundwater Monitoring Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catechis, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This Phase I Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) provides the findings of a survey and assessment for termination of an existing easement granted to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the installation of 5 new hydrogeologic groundwater monitoring wells located on KAFB, New Mexico. The purpose of this EBS is to: Document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property. Identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property. Develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks. Ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property. Determine possible effects of contamination on property valuation, and serve as the basis for notice of environmental condition for applicable federal or local real property disclosure requirements.

  13. Hydrogeologic analysis of remedial alternatives for the solar ponds plume, RFETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, C.F. III; Whidden, J.A.; Hopkins, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to develop a conceptual model and a hydrogeologic analysis plan for remedial alternatives being considered for the remediation of a ground water contaminant plume consisting of chiefly nitrate and uranium. The initial step in this process was to determine the adequacy of the existing data from the vast database of site information. Upon concluding that the existing database was sufficient to allow for the development of a conceptual model and then constructing the conceptual model, a hydrogeologic analysis plan was developed to evaluate several alternatives for plume remediation. The plan will be implemented using a combination of analytical and simple numerical ground water flow and contaminant transport models. This allows each portion of the study to be addressed using the appropriate tool, without having to develop a large three-dimensional numerical ground water flow and transport model, thereby reducing project costs. The analysis plan will consist of a preliminary phase of screening analyses for each of the remedial alternative scenarios, and a second phase of more comprehensive and in-depth analyses on a selected subset of remedial alternative scenarios. One of the alternatives which will be analyzed is phytoremediation (remediation of soil and ground water via uptake of chemicals by plants) because of the potential for relatively low capital and operation and maintenance costs, passive nature, and potential to provide long-term protection of the surface water. The results of these hydrogeological analyses will be factored into the selection of the preferred remedial alternative, or combination of alternatives, for the contaminant plume

  14. Hydrochemical uranium mining at the Straz ore deposit and its hydrogeological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzlik, J.; Moravec, J.; Macak, P.

    1992-01-01

    The uranium ore deposit at Straz is situated in the North Bohemian Cretaceous Massif. Uranium is extracted from the deposit by underground chemical leaching by means of drills from the ground. Relevant to this kind of extraction, from the hydrogeological and environmental aspects, are the hydrogeological location of the deposit, the kind and amounts of the leaching solution and ways of its injection. The following amounts, in thousand tons, have been injected underground throughout the entire period of practicing chemical extraction of uranium (till 1990): sulfuric acid 3700, nitric acid 270, ammonia 100, hydrofluoric acid 25. The overall area of the leaching fields is 630 hectares, which accommodate 9300 technological boreholes. The environmental burden of the Cenomanian rocks and Turonian water reservoir was analyzed, and significantly elevated heavy metal contents from the recirculation of the technological solutions were found. The solutions expand beyond the leaching fields, causing a contamination of underground water within wider surroundings. The volume of contaminated water in the Turonian reservoir is currently estimated at 2 - 20 million m 3 . Uranium extraction by leaching is harmful at this deposit, having far-reaching impacts on the hydrosphere and ecosystem (increased dust, deforestation of slopes of the Ralsko hill, contamination of water and soil, etc.). Abandoning the ore extraction appears to be the sole feasible approach to this problem. (Z.S.). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Allocating risk capital for a brownfields redevelopment project under hydrogeological and financial uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Soonyoung; Unger, Andre J A; Parker, Beth; Kim, Taehee

    2012-06-15

    In this study, we defined risk capital as the contingency fee or insurance premium that a brownfields redeveloper needs to set aside from the sale of each house in case they need to repurchase it at a later date because the indoor air has been detrimentally affected by subsurface contamination. The likelihood that indoor air concentrations will exceed a regulatory level subject to subsurface heterogeneity and source zone location uncertainty is simulated by a physics-based hydrogeological model using Monte Carlo realizations, yielding the probability of failure. The cost of failure is the future value of the house indexed to the stochastic US National Housing index. The risk capital is essentially the probability of failure times the cost of failure with a surcharge to compensate the developer against hydrogeological and financial uncertainty, with the surcharge acting as safety loading reflecting the developers' level of risk aversion. We review five methodologies taken from the actuarial and financial literature to price the risk capital for a highly stylized brownfield redevelopment project, with each method specifically adapted to accommodate our notion of the probability of failure. The objective of this paper is to develop an actuarially consistent approach for combining the hydrogeological and financial uncertainty into a contingency fee that the brownfields developer should reserve (i.e. the risk capital) in order to hedge their risk exposure during the project. Results indicate that the price of the risk capital is much more sensitive to hydrogeological rather than financial uncertainty. We use the Capital Asset Pricing Model to estimate the risk-adjusted discount rate to depreciate all costs to present value for the brownfield redevelopment project. A key outcome of this work is that the presentation of our risk capital valuation methodology is sufficiently generalized for application to a wide variety of engineering projects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  16. The Research of Nanoparticle and Microparticle Hydroxyapatite Amendment in Multiple Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangwei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was believed that when hydroxyapatite (HAP was used to remediate heavy metal-contaminated soils, its effectiveness seemed likely to be affected by its particle size. In this study, a pot trial was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of two particle sizes of HAP: nanometer particle size of HAP (nHAP and micrometer particle size of HAP (mHAP induced metal immobilization in soils. Both mHAP and nHAP were assessed for their ability to reduce lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, copper (Cu, and chromium (Cr bioavailability in an artificially metal-contaminated soil. The pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L. uptake and soil sequential extraction method were used to determine the immobilization and bioavailability of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cr. The results indicated that both mHAP and nHAP had significant effect on reducing the uptake of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cr by pakchoi. Furthermore, both mHAP and nHAP were efficient in covering Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cr from nonresidual into residual forms. However, mHAP was superior to nHAP in immobilization of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cr in metal-contaminated soil and reducing the Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cr utilized by pakchoi. The results suggested that mHAP had the better effect on remediation multiple metal-contaminated soils than nHAP and was more suitable for applying in in situ remediation technology.

  17. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas. This compilation contains country reports on the Second Research Coordination Meeting, Minamata

  18. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas. This compilation contains country reports on the Second Research Coordination Meeting, Minamata

  19. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: evolution of knowledge and understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  20. Regional hydrogeological study in the Tono area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Nobuhisa; Ota, Kunio; Hama, Katsuhiro; Tsubota, Kouji

    1998-01-01

    Regional hydrogeological studies have been carried out since fiscal 1992 to determine the regional groundwater flow in the Tono area of Japan. The following items have been investigated: 1) Understanding the geological structure, groundwater flow and groundwater chemistry of the deep geological environment in the Tono area. 2) Constructing conceptual models of the geological structure, groundwater flow and groundwater chemistry. 3) Developing appropriate techniques to investigate the geological structure, groundwater flow and groundwater chemistry of the deep geological environment. This report presents the results of the last six years of the study in the Tono area. (author)

  1. Hydrogeological Properties of the Rocks in Adansi Mining Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hydrogeological properties of an aquifer coupled with climatic conditions and geomorphology determines how much groundwater exists in that location. A hydrogeological study of the rocks in the Adansi area was carried out to obtain the aquifer hydraulic properties. Drilling and pumping test analysis information were ...

  2. Industrial--hydrogeological characteristics of water in the Orenburg Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortsenshtein, V N; Zhabrev, I P; Uchastkin, Yu V; Alekseeva, I V

    1977-06-01

    An examination is made of the industrial hydrogeological conditions of the Orenburg Field in connection with the beginning of its development. Features of pay dirt water manifestation are demonstrated, genetic types of water brought out by gas flow are described, and methods are suggested for processing hydrogeological information. 3 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  3. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nativ, R.; Hunley, A.E.

    1993-07-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation contains some areas contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater at that depth is saline and has previously been considered stagnant. On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of flow of the saline groundwater and its potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial temperature variations, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. In addition, chemical analyses of brine in adjacent areas in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia were compared with the deep water underlying the reservation to help assess the origin of the brine. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and freshwater-bearing units. The confined water (along with dissolved solutes) moves along open fractures (or man-made shortcuts) at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow probably are small

  4. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas.

  5. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas

  6. Evaluation of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to pollution: COP method for pilot area of Carrara hydrogeological system (Northern Tuscany, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, B.; Guastaldi, E.; Rossetto, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the characterization of the Apuan Alps groundwater body ( "Corpo Idrico Sotterraneo Significativo", briefly CISS) (Regione Toscana, 2007) the intrinsic vulnerability has been evaluated for Carrara hydrogeological system (Northern Tuscany, Italy) by means of COP method, developed within COST 620 European Action (Zwalhlen, 2003). This system is both characterized by large data availability and it is considered an highly risky zone since groundwater protection problems (turbidity of the tapped spring waters and hydrocarbons contamination) and anthropic activity (marble quarries). The study area, 20 Km2large, has high relief energy, with elevations ranging from 5 to 1700 m amsl in almost 5 km. Runoff is scarce except during heavy rainfall; due to the presence of carbonate rocks infiltration is high: groundwater discharge at 155-255 m amsl. The area is located in the north-western part of Apuan Alps Metamorphic Complex, characterized by carbonate and non-carbonate rocks belonging to the non-metamorphic Tuscan Units (Carnic-Oligocene), Mesozoic Succession, Middle-Triassic Succession, and metamorphic Paleozoic rocks. The main geological structure of the area is the Carrara Syncline, constituted prevalently by dolostones, marbles and cherty limestones. These carbonate formations define several moderately to highly productive hydrogeological units, characterized by fissured and karst flow. Hydrogeological system may be subdivided in two different subsets, because of both geo-structural set up and area conformation. However, these are hydrogeologically connected since anisotropy and fractures of karst groundwater. The southern boundary of Carrara hydrogeological system shows important dammed springs, defined by low productive units of Massa Unit (Cambriano?-Carnic). COP methodology for evaluating intrinsic vulnerability of karst groundwater is based on three main factors for the definition of vulnerability itself: COPIndex = C (flow Concentration) *O (Overlying layers

  7. Control of the surface radioactive contamination in the field of biological research; Control de la contaminacion radiactiva superficial en el ambito de la investigacion biologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, S.; Encina, A. de la; Gaspar, J.; Macias, M. T.; Sanchez, A.; Usera, F.

    2012-11-01

    The manipulation of unsealed sources in biomedical research involves significant risk of radioactive contamination. the aim of this study has been to analyze the radioactive contamination occurring in the field of biomedical research, assessing its magnitude, identifying the equipment that can be contaminated with higher probability and monitoring the evolution of the contaminations production taking into account the radioisotopes and the activities uses, and the radiation protection control applied. The data used for this study correspond to a very lengthy period of time and it have been collected in the radioactive facility, of the Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia (CSIC), a very large biological research centre that can be used perfectly as a reference for this area. The results obtained show a gradual and significant decrease in the incidence of the radioactive contamination. This is due to the optimization of radiation protection standards applied and the implementation or a systematic operational radiation protection program. (Author) 13 refs.

  8. The National Shipbuilding Research Program: Contaminated Sediment Management Guide for NSRP Shipyards. Appendix 5: Treatment Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-22

    Prc-trratmcnt technique for separatiojn sand/silt fraction and oxydation of organic pollutants be means of intensive aeration. r\\ SEDTEC Report...polyvinyl alcohol @‘VA) because it is a suitable carrier for the solid oxygen and it will gradually dissolve in water acting as a slow-release agent...polyvinyl alcohol (WA) encapsulated cells. Creosote contaminated sediment was seeded with PVA encapsulated sphingomonas paucimobilis strain EPA 505 and

  9. Bedrock Hydrogeology-Site investigation SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehman, Johan; Bockgaard, Niclas; Follin, Sven

    2012-06-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). This report presents an integrated analysis and interpretation of the historic data from the existing SFR (1980 - 1986), as well as, from the recent investigations for the planned extension of SFR (2008 - 2009). The primary objective is to establish a conceptual hydrogeological model of the bedrock for safety assessment and design analyses. Analyses and interpretations of all (old and new) hydraulic data are analysed with regard to the recently developed geological deformation zone model of the SFR model domain (Curtis et al. 2011). The methodology used by Curtis et al. (2011) has focussed on magnetic anomalies and deformation zone intercepts with ground surface greater than 300 m. In the hydrogeological modelling, however, it has been considered important to also explore the occurrence and characteristics of shallow horizontal to sub-horizontal structures (sheet joints) inside the SFR model domain. Such structures are of considerable importance for the hydrogeology in the uppermost c. 150 m of bedrock in SDM-Site Forsmark; hence the term Shallow Bedrock Aquifer was used to emphasise their hydraulic significance. In this study, the acronym SBA-structure is used for horizontal structures identified in the hydrogeological modelling. In addition to the predominantly steeply dipping geological deformation zones, eight so-called SBA-structures are modelled deterministically in the hydrogeological model. The SBA-structures are envisaged as hydraulically heterogeneous and composed of clusters of minor gently dipping to horizontal fractures rather than extensive single features. A type of structures that is partly included in the definition of the SBA-structures is the Unresolved Possible Deformations Zone (Unresolved PDZ) intercepts identified by Curtis et al. (2011). The Unresolved

  10. Hydrogeophysics and remote sensing for the design of hydrogeological conceptual models in hard rocks - Sardón catchment (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Alain P.; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Roy, Jean; Santos, Fernando A. M.; Mahmoudzadeh Ardekani, Mohammad R.

    2014-11-01

    Hard rock aquifers are highly heterogeneous and hydrogeologically complex. To contribute to the design of hydrogeological conceptual models of hard rock aquifers, we propose a multi-techniques methodology based on a downward approach that combines remote sensing (RS), non-invasive hydrogeophysics and hydrogeological field data acquisition. The proposed methodology is particularly suitable for data scarce areas. It was applied in the pilot research area of Sardón catchment (80 km2) located west of Salamanca (Spain). The area was selected because of hard-rock hydrogeology, semi-arid climate and scarcity of groundwater resources. The proposed methodology consisted of three main steps. First, we detected the main hydrogeological features at the catchment scale by processing: (i) a high resolution digital terrain model to map lineaments and to outline fault zones; and (ii) high-resolution, multispectral satellite QuickBird and WorldView-2 images to map the outcropping granite. Second, we characterized at the local scale the hydrogeological features identified at step one with: i) ground penetrating radar (GPR) to assess groundwater table depth complementing the available monitoring network data; ii) 2D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and frequency domain electromagnetic (FDEM) to retrieve the hydrostratigraphy along selected survey transects; iii) magnetic resonance soundings (MRS) to retrieve the hydrostratigraphy and aquifer parameters at the selected survey sites. In the third step, we drilled 5 boreholes (25 to 48 m deep) and performed slug tests to verify the hydrogeophysical interpretation and to calibrate the MRS parameters. Finally, we compiled and integrated all acquired data to define the geometry and parameters of the Sardón aquifer at the catchment scale. In line with a general conceptual model of hard rock aquifers, we identified two main hydrostratigraphic layers: a saprolite layer and a fissured layer. Both layers were intersected and drained by

  11. Black Swans and the Effectiveness of Remediating Groundwater Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D. I.; Otz, M. H.; Otz, I.

    2013-12-01

    Black swans, outliers, dominate science far more than do predictable outcomes. Predictable success constitutes the Black Swan in groundwater remediation. Even the National Research Council concluded that remediating groundwater to drinking water standards has failed in typically complex hydrogeologic settings where heterogeneities and preferential flow paths deflect flow paths obliquely to hydraulic gradients. Natural systems, be they biological or physical, build upon a combination of large-scale regularity coupled to chaos at smaller scales. We show through a review of over 25 case studies that groundwater remediation efforts are best served by coupling parsimonious site characterization to natural and induced geochemical tracer tests to at least know where contamination advects with groundwater in the subsurface. In the majority of our case studies, actual flow paths diverge tens of degrees from anticipated flow paths because of unrecognized heterogeneities in the horizontal direction of transport, let alone the vertical direction. Consequently, regulatory agencies would better serve both the public and the environment by recognizing that long-term groundwater cleanup probably is futile in most hydrogeologic settings except to relaxed standards similar to brownfielding. A Black Swan

  12. Bedrock hydrogeology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling, SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 concept. Site characterisation should provide all data required for an integrated evaluation of the suitability of the investigated site and an important component in the characterisation work is the development of a hydrogeological model. The hydrogeological model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It also provides input to the safety assessment. Another important use of the hydrogeological model is in the environmental impact assessment. This report presents the understanding of the hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at Forsmark reached following the completion of the surface-based investigations and provides a summary of the bedrock hydrogeological model and the underlying data supporting its development. It constitutes the main reference on bedrock hydrogeology for the site descriptive model concluding the surface-based investigations at Forsmark, SDM-site, and is intended to describe the hydraulic properties and hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at the site and to give the information essential for demonstrating understanding

  13. Morphometric analysis with open source software to explore shallow hydrogeological features in Senegal and Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussi, Fabio; Di Leo, Margherita; Bonomi, Tullia; Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Fumagalli, Letizia; Hamidou Kane, Cheikh; Faye, Gayane; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Hamidou, Barry; Colombo, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    stratigraphic logs from water boreholes. We observed the relationships between the spatial distribution of hydrogeological features and the morphology, applying multivariate statistical analysis. The ultimate goal of this study is to infer hydrogeological information of shallow aquifers, exploiting morphometric parameters (together with other layers of information from existing thematic maps and remote sensing) and to reconstruct the geometry and the characteristic of shallow porous aquifer. This research is part of a larger project financed by NERC (National Environment Research Council, UK) in the framework of the program UPGRO (Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poors), with the collaboration of different partners from Italy, Senegal and Guinea

  14. An introduction to joint research by the USEPA and USGS on contaminants of emerging concern in source and treated drinking waters of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvements in analytical methodology have allowed low-level detection of an ever increasing number of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, hormones, pathogens and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). The use of these improved analytical tools has allowed researche...

  15. Mycotoxin contamination in laboratory rat feeds and their implications in animal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, Laura; Font, Guillermina; Berrada, Houda; Manyes, Lara

    2016-09-01

    Compound feed is particularly vulnerable to multi-mycotoxin contamination. A method for the determination of 12 mycotoxins; enniatins A, A1, B, B1; aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2; OTA; ZEA; T-2 and HT-2 by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry has been developed and applied for the analysis of laboratory rat commercial feeds. The method trueness was checked by recovery assays at three different spiked levels (n = 9). Recoveries ranged from 73% to 112%, and the intra-day and inter-day precision were lower than 9% and 13%, respectively. Limits of quantitation were lower than 15 μg/kg. Twenty-seven laboratory rats feed samples showed multi-contamination by at least three up to six different mycotoxins. ENNs B and B1, followed by ZEA were the most prevalent mycotoxins. T-2, HT-2, and OTA were not detected. ZEA showed the highest concentration levels reaching 492 μg/kg. The results underline the importance of implementing mycotoxin regular surveillance programs for laboratory animal feeds.

  16. Caresoil: A multidisciplinar Project to characterize, remediate, monitor and evaluate the risk of contaminated soils in Madrid (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Antón, Loreto; Granja, Jose Luis; Villarroya, Fermín; Montero, Esperanza; Rodríguez, Vanesa

    2016-04-01

    Soil contamination can come from diffuse sources (air deposition, agriculture, etc.) or local sources, these last being related to anthropogenic activities that are potentially soil contaminating activities. According to data from the EU, in Spain, and particularly for the Autonomous Community of Madrid, it can be considered that heavy metals, toxic organic compounds (including Non Aqueous Phases Liquids, NAPLs) and combinations of both are the main problem of point sources of soil contamination in our community. The five aspects that will be applied in Caresoil Program (S2013/MAE-2739) in the analysis and remediation of a local soil contamination are: 1) the location of the source of contamination and characterization of soil and aquifer concerned, 2) evaluation of the dispersion of the plume, 3) application of effective remediation techniques, 4) monitoring the evolution of the contaminated soil and 5) risk analysis throughout this process. These aspects involve advanced technologies (hydrogeology, geophysics, geochemistry,...) that require new developing of knowledge, being necessary the contribution of several researching groups specialized in the fields previously cited, as they are those integrating CARESOIL Program. Actually two cases concerning hydrocarbon spills, as representative examples of soil local contamination in Madrid area, are being studied. The first is being remediated and we are monitoring this process to evaluate its effectiveness. In the second location we are defining the extent of contamination in soil and aquifer to define the most effective remediation technique.

  17. Hydrogeologic factors to be addressed in disposal guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report identifies the physical hydrogeologic factors that should be addressed for performance assessment of a radioactive waste disposal facility in plutonic rock. The hydrogeologic factors include theoretical methods, groundwater flow factors and solute transport parameters. Theoretical methods, including different deterministic and stochastic approaches for evaluating physical hydrogeolgic conditions, are evaluated with respect to data requirements, applications and limitations. Preferred methods for measurement and determination of the identified groundwater flow factors and solute transport parameters are discussed. A recommended set of procedures for reliable hydrogeologic characterization of a plutonic rock mass at both regional and site scales is also presented

  18. Hydrogeology of exogenic epigenic uranium deposits (sedimentary type) in Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irgashev, Yu.I.; Gavrilov, V.A.; Muslimov, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Common problems of hydrogeology and geotechnology for uranium deposits (sedimentary type) in the Republic of Uzbekistan are discussed in the paper. Hydrogeology includes studies of texture of water-bearing horizons, occurrences of ore bodies in horizons, hydrochemical survey, hydrodynamics and engineering geology. Features of deposits workable by underground leaching are presented. Such terms as 'water-bearing horizon', 'efficiency', 'water-bearing bed' are explained accounting the results of 30 year investigations conducted during prospecting, designing and exploitation of uranium deposits. Stages of hydrogeological survey are listed and features of each of them are described. Importance of geotechnology for a deposit characterization is shown. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  19. Hydrogeological characterization of the Stripa site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; Macleod, R.; Welhan, J.; Cole, C.; Vail, L.

    1987-06-01

    This study was initiated in January, 1986, to determine a) if the permeability of the rock mass in the immediate mine area was anisotropic, b) the effective and total fracture porosity distributions based on field and laboratory data and c) the three-dimensional configuration of the groundwater flow system at Stripa in order to properly interpret the hydrogeological, geochemical and isotopic data. The total and flow porosities of single fractures from Stripa were determined in the laboratory using a resin impregnation technique. The three-dimensional numerical model gave mine inflows that were consistent with the measured mine inflows with perturbations extending to at least 3,000 m of depth. (orig./DG)

  20. Hydrogeology of Montserrat review and new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brioch Hemmings

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Study region: The tropical, active volcanic arc island of Montserrat, Lesser Antilles, Caribbean. Study focus: New insights into hydrological recharge distribution, measurements of aquifer permeability, and geological and hydrological field observations from Montserrat are combined with a review of the current understanding of volcanic island hydrology. The aim is to begin to develop a conceptual model for the hydrology of Montserrat, and to inform and stimulate further investigation into the hydrology of volcanic arc islands, by combining a review of the current understanding of essential components of the hydrological system with fresh analysis of existing data, and new observations, data collection and analysis. This study provides new insights into hydrological recharge distribution, measurements of aquifer permeability, and geological and hydrological field observations from Montserrat. New hydrological insights for the region: A new groundwater recharge model predicts whole island recharge of 266 mm/year, between 10% and 20% of annual rainfall. Core scale permeability tests reveal ranges from 10−14 to 10−12 m2 for volcaniclastic rocks with coarse matrix, to a minimum of 10−18 m2 for andesitic lavas and volcaniclastics with fine or altered matrix. Analysis of historical pumping tests on aquifers in reworked, channel and alluvial sediment indicate permeabilities ∼10−10 m2. Springs at elevations between 200 and 400 m above mean sea level on Centre Hills currently discharge over 45 L/s. High discharge require a reasonably laterally continuous low permeability body. Contrasting conceptual models are presented to illustrate two potential hydrogeological scenarios. New field observations also reveal systematic spatial variations in spring water temperature and specific electrical conductivity indicating that meteoric waters supplying the springs are mixed with a deeper groundwater source at some sites. Keywords: Volcanic island

  1. Hydrogeological characterization of peculiar Apenninic springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervi, F.; Marcaccio, M.; Petronici, F.; Borgatti, L.

    2014-09-01

    In the northern Apennines of Italy, springs are quite widespread over the slopes. Due to the outcropping of low-permeability geologic units, they are generally characterized by low-yield capacities and high discharge variability during the hydrologic year. In addition, low-flow periods (discharge lower than 1 Ls-1) reflect rainfall and snowmelt distribution and generally occur in summer seasons. These features strongly condition the management for water-supply purposes, making it particularly complex. The "Mulino delle Vene" springs (420 m a.s.l., Reggio Emilia Province, Italy) are one of the largest in the Apennines for mean annual discharge and dynamic storage and are considered as the main water resource in the area. They flow out from several joints and fractures at the bottom of an arenite rock mass outcrop in the vicinity of the Tresinaro River. To date, these springs have not yet been exploited, as the knowledge about the hydrogeological characteristics of the aquifer and their hydrological behaviour is not fully achieved. This study aims to describe the recharge processes and to define the hydrogeological boundaries of the aquifer. It is based on river and spring discharge monitoring and groundwater balance assessment carried out during the period 2012-2013. Results confirm the effectiveness of the approach, as it allowed the total aliquot of discharge of the springs to be assessed. Moreover, by comparing the observed discharge volume with the one calculated with the groundwater balance, the aquifer has been identified with the arenite slab (mean altitude of 580 m a.s.l.), extended about 5.5 km2 and located 1 km west of the monitored springs.

  2. Stochastic hydrogeologic units and hydrogeologic properties development for total-system performance assessments. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenker, A.R.; Guerin, D.C.; Robey, T.H.; Rautman, C.A.; Barnard, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    A stochastic representation of the lithologic units and associated hydrogeologic parameters of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository are developed for use in performance-assessment calculations, including the Total-System Performance Assessment for Yucca Mountain-SNL Second Iteration (TSPA-1993). A simplified lithologic model has been developed based on the physical characteristics of the welded and nonwelded units at Yucca Mountain. Ten hydrogeologic units are developed from site-specific data (lithologic and geophysical logs and core photographs) obtained from the unsaturated and saturated zones. The three-dimensional geostatistical model of the ten hydrogeologic units is based on indicator-coding techniques and improves on the two-dimensional model developed for TSPA91. The hydrogeologic properties (statistics and probability distribution functions) are developed from the results of laboratory tests and in-situ aquifer tests or are derived through fundamental relationships. Hydrogeologic properties for matrix properties, bulk conductivities, and fractures are developed from existing site specific data. Extensive data are available for matrix porosity, bulk density, and matrix saturated conductivity. For other hydrogeologic properties, the data are minimal or nonexistent. Parameters for the properties are developed as beta probability distribution functions. For the model units without enough data for analysis, parameters are developed as analogs to existing units. A relational, analytic approach coupled with bulk conductivity parameters is used to develop fracture parameters based on the smooth-wall-parallel-plate theory. An analytic method is introduced for scaling small-core matrix properties to the hydrogeologic unit scales

  3. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment and study plan for a regional ground-water resource investigation of the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Charles C.; Dahlen, Paul R.

    2002-01-01

    , Groundwater Section, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, initiated a multiyear study of ground water in the Blue Ridge and Piedmont Provinces. The study began in 1999.Most of the study area is underlain by a complex, two-part, regolith-fractured crystalline rock aquifer system. Thickness of the regolith throughout the study area is highly variable and ranges from 0 to more than 150 feet. The regolith consists of an unconsolidated or semiconsolidated mixture of clay and fragmental material ranging in grain size from silt to boulders. Because porosities range from 35 to 55 percent, the regolith provides the bulk of the water storage within the Blue Ridge and Piedmont ground-water system. At the base of the regolith is the transition zone where saprolite grades into unweathered bedrock. The transition zone has been identified as a potential conduit for rapid ground-water flow. If this is the case, the transition zone also may serve as a conduit for rapid movement of contaminants to nearby wells or to streams with channels that cut into 1 U.S. Geological Survey, Raleigh, North Carolina. 2 North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, Groundwater Section. or through the transition zone. How rapidly a contaminant moves through the system largely may be a function of the characteristics of the transition zone. The transition zone is one of several topics identified during the literature review and data synthesis, for which there is a deficiency in data and understanding of the processes involved in the movement of ground water to surface water.Because the Blue Ridge and Piedmont study area is so large, and the hydrogeology diverse, it is not feasible to study all of the area in detail. A more feasible approach is to select areas that are most representative of the land use, geology, and hydrology to obtain an understanding of the hydrologic processes in the selected areas, and transfer the knowledge from these local "type

  4. Marine hydrogeology: recent accomplishments and future opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, A. T.

    2005-03-01

    Marine hydrogeology is a broad-ranging scientific discipline involving the exploration of fluid-rock interactions below the seafloor. Studies have been conducted at seafloor spreading centers, mid-plate locations, and in plate- and continental-margin environments. Although many seafloor locations are remote, there are aspects of marine systems that make them uniquely suited for hydrologic analysis. Newly developed tools and techniques, and the establishment of several multidisciplinary programs for oceanographic exploration, have helped to push marine hydrogeology forward over the last several decades. Most marine hydrogeologic work has focused on measurement or estimation of hydrogeologic properties within the shallow subsurface, but additional work has emphasized measurements of local and global fluxes, fluid source and sink terms, and quantitative links between hydrogeologic, chemical, tectonic, biological, and geophysical processes. In addition to summarizing selected results from a small number of case studies, this paper includes a description of several new experiments and programs that will provide outstanding opportunities to address fundamental hydrogeologic questions within the seafloor during the next 20-30 years. L'hydrogéologie marine est une large discipline scientifique impliquant l' exploration des interactions entre les fluides et les roches sous les fonds marins. Des études ont été menées dans les différents environnements sous-marins (zone abyssale, plaque océanique, marges continentales). Bien que de nombreux fonds marins soient connus, il existe des aspects des systèmes marins qui les rendent inadaptés à l'analyse hydrologique. De nouveaux outils et techniques, et la mise en oeuvre de nombreux programmes multidisciplinaires d'exploration océanographique, ont aidé à pousser en avant l'hydrogéologie marine ces dix dernières années. La plus part des études hydrogéologiques se sont concentrées jusqu'à présent sur la mesure ou

  5. Remediation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the site of Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhov, E.P.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Volkov, V.G.

    2007-01-01

    One discusses the efforts to rehabilitate the radiation hazard installations and to remediate the contaminated territory of the Kurchatov Institute RSC undertaken in 2006-2007 in terms of the Remediation Project. The old radwaste storage facilities constructed at the site when the Institute was involved in activities to elaborate both war and civil nuclear technologies were the basic objects of the rehabilitation efforts. Paper describes the structure of the storage facilities covering the volume and the characteristics of the stored radwaste. Paper discusses the storage facility site layout parameters taken into consideration in the course of the remediation efforts. Paper describes the procedures, the sequence of the remediation efforts and the peculiar features of the planning and engineering approaches. Paper dwells upon the results of the rehabilitation and the remediation efforts [ru

  6. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Cachoeira Deposit Massif, Caetite, state of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottura, J.A.; Albuquerque Filho, J.L.; Ojima, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrogeologic applications for the characterization of rock massifs in future mining activity areas are presented. The study was performed in the Cachoeira uranium deposit (Anomaly no.13 - Lagoa Real Project) located in the south-central portion of the state of Bahia, Caetite municipality, belonging to the Brazilian Nuclear Enterprise - NUCLEBRAS. The massif occuring in the area is composed of a group or series of rocks classified generically as gneisses, displaying different geotechnical classes. In order to consubstantiate the hydrogeologic/ hydrogeotechnical characterization, pumping and infiltration tests were performed, as well as periodic water level measurements in piezometers and drill-holes. In this manner, a hydrogeotechnical classification was made possible and a quantitative evaluation of the volume of water that will be drained was elaborated, orviding necessary contributions for research diggings and exploration. (D.J.M.) [pt

  7. Numerical model for mapping of complex hydrogeological conditions: the Chmielnik area (South Poland) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszta, Kamila; Szklarczyk, Tadeusz; Malina, Grzegorz

    2017-04-01

    the model boundary conditions of type: I, II and III were established. Data from of 36 groundwater observation points (hydrogeological boreholes and dug wells) measured in September 2015 were used to calibrate the model. The correlation coefficient of the model is 0,998. Two variants were simulated on the model: natural conditions (without water abstraction) and with groundwater exploitation (September 2015). The carried out analysis of hydrogeological conditions and developed numerical model will be the basis for assessing the impact of a drainage of an open limestone pit mine realized in this area on the soil-water system and for designing a sustainable distribution system of mine waters to protect groundwater depending ecosystems. This study is financially supported by AGH research grant no. 15.11.140.828.

  8. Radiological aspects of non-fixed contamination of packages and conveyances. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This publication reports the findings of an international Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) organized by the IAEA in which scientists from France, Germany, Japan, UK, USA and the World Nuclear Transport Institute participated. On the basis of extensive studies, the possible radiation exposure that may result due to the presence of non-fixed contamination on packages and conveyances has been estimated. The study reveals that the limits on non-fixed contamination prescribed in the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and also adopted by the various other international and national regulations are adequate for ensuring that the potential radiation exposure of workers and public due to the presence of non-fixed contamination is not significant. Related work carried out by the researchers, which is reported in the CD-ROM supplied with this publication, provides useful leads for further work by researchers interested in estimating exposures from non-fixed contamination by a large variety of radionuclides

  9. Urban hydrogeology in Indonesia: A highlight from Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, R. F.

    2018-02-01

    In many cities in the developing countries, groundwater is an important source of public water supply. The interaction between groundwater systems and urban environments has become an urgent challenge for many developing cities in the world, Indonesia included. Contributing factors are, but not limited to, the continuous horizontal and vertical expansion of cities, population growth, climate change, water scarcity and groundwater quality degradation. Jakarta as the capital city of Indonesia becomes a good example to study and implement urban hydrogeology. Urban hydrogeology is a science for investigating groundwater at the hydrological cycle and its change, water regime and quality within the urbanized landscape and zones of its impact. The present paper provides a review of urban groundwater studies in Jakarta in the context of urban water management, advances in hydrogeological investigation, monitoring and modelling since the city was established. The whole study emphasizes the necessity of an integrated urban groundwater management and development supporting hydrogeological techniques for urban areas.

  10. Litho-stratigraphic and Hydrogeological Evaluation of Groundwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2015-10-30

    ://www.ajol.info/index.php/jasem http://www.bioline.org.br/ja. Litho-stratigraphic and Hydrogeological Evaluation of Groundwater System in Parts of. Benin Metropolis, Benin City Nigeria: The Key to Groundwater Sustainability.

  11. Surficial geology and hydrogeology of the Town Londonderry, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG08-2 De Simone, D., and Gale, M., 2008,�Surficial geology and hydrogeology of the Town Londonderry, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open-File...

  12. Study of hydrogeological and engineering-geological conditions of deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Methods for hydrogeological and engineering-geological studies are considered as a part of the complex works dUring eXploration of hydrogenic uranium deposits to develop them by Underground ieaching (UL). Problems are enumerated and peculiarities Of hydrogeologic and engipeering-geological works at different stages are outlined (prospeccing - evaluating works, preliminary and detailed survey). Attention is paid to boring and equipment for hydrogeological and engineering - geological boreholes. Testing-filtering works are described, the latter includes: evacuations, fulnesses ( forcings), and tests of fulness-evacuation. The problem on steady-state observations in boreholes and laboratory studies of rocks and underground waters is discussed. Geological and geophysical methods for evaluation of rock and ore filtering properties are presented. Necessity of hydrogeological zonation of deposits as applied to UL is marked

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIE(PRESENTATION FOR MNA WORKSHOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  14. Geology and hydrogeology of the Town of Calais, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG2016-1 Springston, G., Kim, J., Gale. M. and Thomas, E., 2016, Geology and hydrogeology of the Town of Calais, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey...

  15. Anthropogenic wetlands due to over-irrigation of desert areas: a challenging hydrogeological investigation with extensive geophysical input from TEM and MRS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad Ali; Teatini, Pietro; Bjergsted Pedersen, Jesper; Auken, Esben; Tosatto, Omar; Vest Christiansen, Anders

    2017-03-01

    During the last century, many large irrigation projects were carried out in arid lands worldwide. Despite a tremendous increase in food production, a common problem when characterizing these zones is land degradation in the form of waterlogging. A clear example of this phenomenon is in the Nubariya depression in the Western Desert of Egypt. Following the reclamation of desert lands for agricultural production, an artificial brackish and contaminated pond started to develop in the late 1990s, which at present extends for about 2.5 km2. The available data provide evidence of a simultaneous general deterioration of the groundwater system. An extensive hydrogeophysical investigation was carried out in this challenging environment using magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) and ground-based time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) techniques with the following main objectives: (1) understanding the hydrological evolution of the area; (2) characterizing the hydrogeological setting; and (3) developing scenarios for artificial aquifer remediation and recharge. The integrated interpretation of the geophysical surveys provided a hydrogeological picture of the upper 100 m sedimentary setting in terms of both lithological distribution and groundwater quality. The information is then used to set up (1) a regional groundwater flow and (2) a local density-dependent flow and transport numerical model to reproduce the evolution of the aquifer system and develop a few scenarios for artificial aquifer recharge using the treated water provided by a nearby wastewater treatment plant. The research outcomes point to the hydrological challenges that emerge for the effective management of water resources in reclaimed desert areas, and they highlight the effectiveness of using advanced geophysical and modeling methodologies.

  16. Bedrock Hydrogeology - Groundwater flow modelling. Site investigation SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden); Oden, Magnus [SKB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    The hydrogeological model developed for the SFR extension project (PSU) consists of 40 geologically modelled deformation zones (DZ) and 8 sub-horizontal structural-hydraulic features, called SBAstructures, not defined in the geological model. However, some of the SBA-structures coincide with what is defined as unresolved possible deformation zones (Unresolved PDZ) in the geological modelling. In addition, the hydrogeological model consists of a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) model intended for the less fractured rock mass volumes (fracture domains) between the zones and the SBA-structures, and a stochastic fracture model intended to handle remaining Unresolved PDZs in the geological modelling not modelled as SBA-structures in the hydrogeological modelling. The four structural components of the bedrock in the hydrogeological model, i.e. DZ, SBA, Unresolved PDZ and DFN, are assigned hydraulic properties in the hydrogeological model based on the transmissivities interpreted from single-hole hydraulic tests. The main objective of the present work is to present the characteristics of the hydrogeological model with regard to the needs of the forthcoming safety assessment SR-PSU. In concrete words, simulated data are compared with measured data, i.e. hydraulic heads in boreholes and tunnel inflow to the existing repository (SFR). The calculations suggest that the available data for flow model calibration cannot be used to motivate a substantial adjustment of the initial hydraulic parameterisation (assignment of hydraulic properties) of the hydrogeological model. It is suggested that uncertainties in the hydrogeological model are studied in the safety assessment SR-PSU by means of a large number of calculation cases. These should address hydraulic heterogeneity of deterministic structures (DZ and SBA) and realisations of stochastic fractures/fracture networks (Unresolved PDZ and DFN) within the entire SFR Regional model domain.

  17. Bedrock Hydrogeology-Groundwater flow modelling. Site investigation SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehman, Johan; Follin, Sven; Oden, Magnus

    2013-05-01

    The hydrogeological model developed for the SFR extension project (PSU) consists of 40 geologically modelled deformation zones (DZ) and 8 sub-horizontal structural-hydraulic features, called SBAstructures, not defined in the geological model. However, some of the SBA-structures coincide with what is defined as unresolved possible deformation zones (Unresolved PDZ) in the geological modelling. In addition, the hydrogeological model consists of a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) model intended for the less fractured rock mass volumes (fracture domains) between the zones and the SBA-structures, and a stochastic fracture model intended to handle remaining Unresolved PDZs in the geological modelling not modelled as SBA-structures in the hydrogeological modelling. The four structural components of the bedrock in the hydrogeological model, i.e. DZ, SBA, Unresolved PDZ and DFN, are assigned hydraulic properties in the hydrogeological model based on the transmissivities interpreted from single-hole hydraulic tests. The main objective of the present work is to present the characteristics of the hydrogeological model with regard to the needs of the forthcoming safety assessment SR-PSU. In concrete words, simulated data are compared with measured data, i.e. hydraulic heads in boreholes and tunnel inflow to the existing repository (SFR). The calculations suggest that the available data for flow model calibration cannot be used to motivate a substantial adjustment of the initial hydraulic parameterisation (assignment of hydraulic properties) of the hydrogeological model. It is suggested that uncertainties in the hydrogeological model are studied in the safety assessment SR-PSU by means of a large number of calculation cases. These should address hydraulic heterogeneity of deterministic structures (DZ and SBA) and realisations of stochastic fractures/fracture networks (Unresolved PDZ and DFN) within the entire SFR Regional model domain

  18. Contamination monitoring of Na 131 I levels in therapy unit of Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences by indirect method (Wipe test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiki, D.; Shahhosseini, S.; Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Fard-Esfahani, A.

    2003-01-01

    Contamination with radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine centres in addition to being a health concern requires time consuming decontamination efforts. According to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Contamination should be monitored in nuclear medicine centers where radiopharmaceuticals are prepared and administrated at the end of each working session; otherwise, contamination spread to other areas not only equipment but also personnel and other people will be expected. The wipe test for the presence of radioactivity is accomplished by wiping the surface over an area approximately 100 cm 2 with an absorbent paper, then counting it in an appropriate radiation detector. In this study, contamination monitoring of patient's rooms (4 rooms), entrance corridor, patient's corridor, waiting room, control room (nursing station), radiopharmaceutical storage room in therapy unit of Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Shariati hospital was performed by indirect method. Based on the results, some areas including storage room were contaminated. There was also a direct relationship between dose administrated and levels of contamination in patient's rooms. Regarding high uptake of iodine by thyroid gland and damaging effects of Na 131 I, weekly wipe tests are required to determine the level of contamination. Patient's rooms after discharging the patients and before re hospitalization specially should be checked. If these tests reveal contamination over standard levels, appropriate decontamination procedures should be carried out immediately

  19. Hydrogeology and historical assessment of a classic sequential-land use landfill site, Illinois, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Colin J.; Vagt, Peter J.

    1990-05-01

    The Blackwell site in northeastern Illinois was a classic sequential-use project combining land reclamation, a sanitary landfill, and a recreational park. This paper adds a recent assessment of leachate generation and groundwater contamination to the site's unfinished record. Hydrogeological studies show that (1) the landfill sits astride an outwash aquifer and a till mound, which are separated from an underlying dolomite aquifer by a thin, silty till; (2) leachate leaks from the landfill at an estimated average rate between 48 and 78 m3/d; (3) the resultant contaminant plume is virtually stagnant in the till but rapidly diluted in the outwash aquifer, so that no off-site contamination is detected; (4) trace VOC levels in the dolomite probably indicate that contaminants have migrated there from the landfill-derived plume in the outwash. Deviations from the original landfill concepts included elimination of a leachate collection system, increased landfill size, local absence of a clay liner, and partial use of nonclay cover. The hydrogeological setting was unsuitable for the landfill as constructed, indicating the importance of detailed geological consideration in landfill and land-use planning.

  20. Contaminated Sites in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Sites contaminated by hazardous materials or wastes. These sites are those administered by the Contaminated Sites Section of Iowa DNR. Many are sites which are...

  1. Hydrogeology - HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN: Hydrogeologic Terrains and Settings of Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:100,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows hydrogeologic terrains and settings of Indiana. The methodology of the investigation and definitions of terms...

  2. Impact of hydrogeological factors on groundwater salinization due to ocean-surge inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Huichen; Yu, Xuan; Graf, Thomas; Michael, Holly A.

    2018-01-01

    Ocean surges cause seawater inundation of coastal inland areas. Subsequently, seawater infiltrates into coastal aquifers and threatens the fresh groundwater resource. The severity of resulting salinization can be affected by hydrogeological factors including aquifer properties and hydrologic conditions, however, little research has been done to assess these effects. To understand the impacts of hydrogeological factors on groundwater salinization, we numerically simulated an ocean-surge inundation event on a two-dimensional conceptual coastal aquifer using a coupled surface-subsurface approach. We varied model permeability (including anisotropy), inland hydraulic gradient, and recharge rate. Three salinization-assessment indicators were developed, based on flushing time, depth of salt penetration, and a combination of the two, weighted flushing time, with which the impact of hydrogeological factors on groundwater vulnerability to salinization were quantitatively assessed. The vulnerability of coastal aquifers increases with increasing isotropic permeability. Low horizontal permeability (kx) and high vertical permeability (kz) lead to high aquifer vulnerability, and high kx and low kz lead to low aquifer vulnerability. Vulnerability decreases with increasing groundwater hydraulic gradient and increasing recharge rate. Additionally, coastal aquifers with a low recharge rate (R ≤ 300 mm yr-1) may be highly vulnerable to ocean-surge inundation. This study shows how the newly introduced indicators can be used to quantitatively assess coastal aquifer vulnerability. The results are important for global vulnerability assessment of coastal aquifers to ocean-surge inundation.

  3. Stepwise hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis on site scale (step 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Hironori; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Endo, Yoshinobu

    2005-02-01

    One of the main goals of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment. To achieve this goal, a variety of investigations are being conducted using an iterative approach. In this study, hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analyses have been carried out using the data from surface-based investigations at Step 2, in order to synthesize the investigation results, to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrogeological model, and to specify items for further investigation. The results of this study are summarized as follows: 1) The understanding of groundwater flow is enhanced, and the hydrogeological model has renewed; 2) The importance of faults as major groundwater flow pathways has been demonstrated; 3) The importance of iterative approach as progress of investigations has been demonstrated; 4) Geological and hydraulic characteristics of faults with orientation of NNW, NW and NE were shown to be especially significant; 5) the hydraulic properties of the Lower Sparsely Fractured Domain (LSFD) significantly influence the groundwater flow. The main items specified for further investigations are summarized as follows: 1) Geological and hydraulic characteristics of NNW, NW and NE trending faults; 2) Hydraulic properties of the LSFD; 3) More accuracy upper and lateral boundary conditions of the site scale model. (author)

  4. Prioritizing research for trace pollutants and emerging contaminants in the freshwater environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Kyle E., E-mail: Kyle.Murray@utsa.ed [Center for Water Research, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249-0663 (United States); Thomas, Sheeba M [San Antonio River Authority, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bodour, Adria A [Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment (AFCEE), Brooks City-Base, TX (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Organic chemicals have been detected at trace concentrations in the freshwater environment for decades. Though the term trace pollutant indicates low concentrations normally in the nanogram or microgram per liter range, many of these pollutants can exceed an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for humans. Trace pollutants referred to as emerging contaminants (ECs) have recently been detected in the freshwater environment and may have adverse human health effects. Analytical techniques continue to improve; therefore, the number and frequency of detections of ECs are increasing. It is difficult for regulators to restrict use of pollutants that are a human health hazard; scientists to improve treatment techniques for higher priority pollutants; and the public to modify consumption patterns due to the vast number of ECs and the breadth of literature on the occurrence, use, and toxicity. Hence, this paper examines literature containing occurrence and toxicity data for three broad classes of trace pollutants and ECs (industrials, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs)), and assesses the relevance of 71 individual compounds. The evaluation indicates that widely used industrials (BPF) and PPCPs (AHTN, HHCB, ibuprofen, and estriol) occur frequently in samples from the freshwater environment but toxicity data were not available; thus, it is important to establish their ADI. Other widely used industrials (BDE-47, BDE-99) and pesticides (benomyl, carbendazim, aldrin, endrin, ethion, malathion, biphenthrin, and cypermethrin) have established ADI values but occurrence in the freshwater environment was not well documented. The highest priority pollutants for regulation and treatment should include industrials (PFOA, PFOS and DEHP), pesticides (diazinon, methoxychlor, and dieldrin), and PPCPs (EE2, carbamazepine, {beta}E2, DEET, triclosan, acetaminophen, and E1) because they occur frequently in the freshwater environment and pose a human health hazard at

  5. Prioritizing research for trace pollutants and emerging contaminants in the freshwater environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Kyle E.; Thomas, Sheeba M.; Bodour, Adria A.

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemicals have been detected at trace concentrations in the freshwater environment for decades. Though the term trace pollutant indicates low concentrations normally in the nanogram or microgram per liter range, many of these pollutants can exceed an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for humans. Trace pollutants referred to as emerging contaminants (ECs) have recently been detected in the freshwater environment and may have adverse human health effects. Analytical techniques continue to improve; therefore, the number and frequency of detections of ECs are increasing. It is difficult for regulators to restrict use of pollutants that are a human health hazard; scientists to improve treatment techniques for higher priority pollutants; and the public to modify consumption patterns due to the vast number of ECs and the breadth of literature on the occurrence, use, and toxicity. Hence, this paper examines literature containing occurrence and toxicity data for three broad classes of trace pollutants and ECs (industrials, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs)), and assesses the relevance of 71 individual compounds. The evaluation indicates that widely used industrials (BPF) and PPCPs (AHTN, HHCB, ibuprofen, and estriol) occur frequently in samples from the freshwater environment but toxicity data were not available; thus, it is important to establish their ADI. Other widely used industrials (BDE-47, BDE-99) and pesticides (benomyl, carbendazim, aldrin, endrin, ethion, malathion, biphenthrin, and cypermethrin) have established ADI values but occurrence in the freshwater environment was not well documented. The highest priority pollutants for regulation and treatment should include industrials (PFOA, PFOS and DEHP), pesticides (diazinon, methoxychlor, and dieldrin), and PPCPs (EE2, carbamazepine, βE2, DEET, triclosan, acetaminophen, and E1) because they occur frequently in the freshwater environment and pose a human health hazard at

  6. Point Source contamination approach for hydrological risk assessment of a major hypothetical accident from second research reactor at Inshas site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, M.A.; Tawfik, F.S.

    2002-01-01

    The point source contamination mechanism and the deterministic conservative approach have been implemented to demonstrate the hazards of hydrological pollution due to a major hypothetical accident in the second research reactor at Inshas. The radioactive inventory is assumed to be dissolved in 75% of the cooling water (25% are lost) and comes directly into contact with ground water and moved down gradient. Five radioisotopes(I-129, Sr-90, Ru-106, Cs-134 and Cs-137) of the entire inventory are found to be highly durable and represent vulnerability in the environment. Their downstream spread indices; C max : maximum concentration at the focus of the moving ellipse, delta: pollution duration at different distances, A:polluted area at different distances and X min : safety distance from the reactor, were calculated based on analytical solutions of the convection-dispersion partial differential equation for absorbable and decaying species. The largest downstream contamination range was found for Sr-90 and Ru-106 but still no potential. The geochemical and hydrological parameters of the water bearing formations play a great role in buffering and limiting the radiation effects. These reduce the retention time of the radioisotopes several order of magnitudes in the polluted distances. Sensitivity analysis of the computed pollution ranges shows low sensitivity to possible potential for variations activity of nuclide inventory, dispersivity and saturated thickness and high sensitivity for possible variations in groundwater velocity and retention factors

  7. Stepwise hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis on site scale (The former part of the step 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Hironori; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Endo, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-01

    One of the main goals of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project is to establish comprehensive techniques for investigation, analysis, and assessment of the deep geological environment. To achieve this goal, a variety of investigations are being conducted using an iterative approach. In this study, hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analyses have been carried out using the data from surface-based investigations at the former part of Step 3 (deep borehole investigations without vertical seismic profiling investigations), in order to synthesize the investigation results, to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrogeological model, and to specify items for further investigation. The results of this study are summarized as follows: 1) The uncertainty of hydrogeological model of the site scale is decreased as stepwise research; 2) Borehole investigations combined with hydraulic monitoring are useful for decreasing the uncertainty of hydrogeological model; The main items specified for further investigations are summarized as follows: 1) Trend, length, and hydraulic parameters of faults confirmed in the MIU construction site; 2) Shape of boundary of geological layer, and hydraulic parameters of rock; 3) Hydraulic head distribution of deep underground. (author)

  8. A discussion on validation of hydrogeological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.; Mousavi, S.F.; Usunoff, E.J.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Galarza, G.

    1993-01-01

    Groundwater flow and solute transport are often driven by heterogeneities that elude easy identification. It is also difficult to select and describe the physico-chemical processes controlling solute behaviour. As a result, definition of a conceptual model involves numerous assumptions both on the selection of processes and on the representation of their spatial variability. Validating a numerical model by comparing its predictions with actual measurements may not be sufficient for evaluating whether or not it provides a good representation of 'reality'. Predictions will be close to measurements, regardless of model validity, if these are taken from experiments that stress well-calibrated model modes. On the other hand, predictions will be far from measurements when model parameters are very uncertain, even if the model is indeed a very good representation of the real system. Hence, we contend that 'classical' validation of hydrogeological models is not possible. Rather, models should be viewed as theories about the real system. We propose to follow a rigorous modeling approach in which different sources of uncertainty are explicitly recognized. The application of one such approach is illustrated by modeling a laboratory uranium tracer test performed on fresh granite, which was used as Test Case 1b in INTRAVAL. (author)

  9. Hydrogeologic investigations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, W.L.; Trudeau, D.A.; Drellack, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices and, since 1963, all nuclear detonations there have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts with a small percentage conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks or alluvium. In the testing areas the water table is 450--700 m below the surface. Pre- and post- event geologic investigations are conducted for each test location and long-term studies assess the impact of underground testing on a more regional scale. Studies in progress have not identified any impact on the regional ground water system from testing, but some local effects have been recognized. In some areas where several large tests have been conducted below the water table, water levels hundreds of meters above the regional water table have been measured and radioactivity has been discovered associated with fractures in a few holes. Flow-through and straddle packer testing has revealed unexpectedly high hydraulic pressures at depth. Recently, a multiple completion monitoring well installed to study three zones has confirmed the existence of a significant upward hydraulic gradient. These observations of local pressurization and fracture flow are being further explored to determine the influence of underground nuclear testing on the regional hydrogeologic system

  10. Manual on mathematical models in isotope hydrogeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    Methodologies based on the use of naturally occurring isotopes are, at present, an integral part of studies being undertaken for water resources assessment and management. Quantitative evaluations based on the temporal and/or spatial distribution of different isotopic species in hydrological systems require conceptual mathematical formulations. Different types of model can be employed depending on the nature of the hydrological system under investigation, the amount and type of data available, and the required accuracy of the parameter to be estimated. This manual provides an overview of the basic concepts of existing modelling approaches, procedures for their application to different hydrological systems, their limitations and data requirements. Guidance in their practical applications, illustrative case studies and information on existing PC software are also included. While the subject matter of isotope transport modelling and improved quantitative evaluations through natural isotopes in water sciences is still at the development stage, this manual summarizes the methodologies available at present, to assist the practitioner in the proper use within the framework of ongoing isotope hydrological field studies. In view of the widespread use of isotope methods in groundwater hydrology, the methodologies covered in the manual are directed towards hydrogeological applications, although most of the conceptual formulations presented would generally be valid. Refs, figs, tabs.

  11. Manual on mathematical models in isotope hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    Methodologies based on the use of naturally occurring isotopes are, at present, an integral part of studies being undertaken for water resources assessment and management. Quantitative evaluations based on the temporal and/or spatial distribution of different isotopic species in hydrological systems require conceptual mathematical formulations. Different types of model can be employed depending on the nature of the hydrological system under investigation, the amount and type of data available, and the required accuracy of the parameter to be estimated. This manual provides an overview of the basic concepts of existing modelling approaches, procedures for their application to different hydrological systems, their limitations and data requirements. Guidance in their practical applications, illustrative case studies and information on existing PC software are also included. While the subject matter of isotope transport modelling and improved quantitative evaluations through natural isotopes in water sciences is still at the development stage, this manual summarizes the methodologies available at present, to assist the practitioner in the proper use within the framework of ongoing isotope hydrological field studies. In view of the widespread use of isotope methods in groundwater hydrology, the methodologies covered in the manual are directed towards hydrogeological applications, although most of the conceptual formulations presented would generally be valid. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: IN-SITU MITIGATION OF MERCURY CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER IN KAZAKHSTAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) OIA receives funding from the U.S. State Department's Bio-Chem Redirect program to engage former Soviet biological and chemical weapons scientists in civilian research in environmental monitoring and remediation. Scientists in t...

  13. Regional hydrogeological conceptual model of candidate Beishan area for high level radioactive waste disposal repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hailong; Guo Yonghai

    2014-01-01

    The numerical modeling of groundwater flow is an important aspect of hydrogeological assessment in siting of a high level radioactive waste disposal repository. Hydrogeological conceptual model is the basic and premise of numerical modeling of groundwater flow. Based on the hydrogeological analysis of candidate Beishan area, surface water system was created by using DEM data and the modeling area is determined. Three-dimensional hydrogeological structure model was created through GMS software. On the basis of analysis and description of boundary condition, flow field, groundwater budget and hydrogeological parameters, hydrogeological conceptual model was set up for the Beishan area. (authors)

  14. Hydrodynamic analysis application of contaminated groundwater remediation to oil hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajić Predrag R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the application of the hydrodynamic analysis in the selected ‘pumping and treatment’ remediation method of groundwater hydrocarbon pollution in the case of the Pancevo oil refinery is examined. The applied hydrodynamic analysis represents a regular and necessary approach in modern hydrogeology. Previous chemical analysis of soil and groundwater samples at observation objects revealed their pollution by oil products. New researches included the constraction of 12 piezometric boreholes of varying depths, geoelectric soil sounding, ‘in situ’ measurement of the present contaminant, detected as a hydrophobic phase of LNAPL, chemical analysis of soil and groundwater samples with emphasis on total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH content, total fats and mineral oils, mercury cations and other characteristic compounds, etc. These researches define the volume of contamination issued by the ‘light’ (LNAPL contamination phase. The selected remediation method for this type of pollution is the ‘Pump and Treat’ method, which implies the pumping of contaminated groundwater from aquifer and their subsequent treatment. A hydrodynamic method was used to select the optimal hydrotechnical solution for LNAPL extraction. On the mathematical model, the prediction calculations for two variant solutions were carried out (‘hydraulic isolation’ and complex for the application of groundwater contamination remediation characterized as front pollution substance (by extraction and injection wells or infiltration pool. By extraction wells performing, it would be possible to remove the LNAPL from the surface of the water with special pumps-skimmers. The importance of the hydrodynamic method application is, in addition to the hydrotechnical solution selection for the LNAPL drainage, the provision of quality basis for the dimensioning of these objects based on the results of the groundwater balance.

  15. Hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study in the municipality of Mani, Casanare Dept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloza Franco, Jairo Alfredo; Morales Arias, Carlos Julio

    2009-01-01

    Geology, Hydrogeology and Hydrogeochemistry play a crucial role in the evaluation of wells and cisterns for drinking water especially in municipalities like Mani because in times of low rainfall has not been sustainable water resources. Mani hydrogeological system is determined by interesting primary porosity reservoirs. However, given the inaccuracy and poor analysis that has been done to the aquifer is necessary to develop this study because the wells and cisterns were built in craft conditions without any professional and technical support. It is important to emphasize that Mani has no a sewer system, so the groundwater resources are highly vulnerable to contamination, which has been analyzed for the temporal and spatial evolution of the aquifer through piezometers maps in times of low and high precipitation. Hydrogeochemistry evaluation becomes more important to confirm the possible hydraulic connections surface water - groundwater, identifying chemical conditions and their behavior in the deposits and geological formations from the Pie de monte Llanero. High PO 4 levels and the presence of As are mainly due to agricultural activities using large amounts of pesticides, fertilizers and insecticides.

  16. Hydrogeology of a hazardous-waste disposal site near Brentwood, Williamson County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Patrick; Hanchar, D.W.; Lee, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 44,000 gal of industrial solvent wastes were disposed in pits on a farm near Brentwood, Tennessee, in 1978, and contaminants were reported in the soil and shallow groundwater on the site in 1985. In order for the State to evaluate possible remedial-action alternatives, an 18-month study was conducted to define the hydrogeologic setting of the site and surrounding area. The area is underlain by four hydrogeologic units: (1) an upper aquifer consisting of saturated regolith, Bigby-Cannon Limestone, and weathered Hermitage Formation; (2) the Hermitage confining unit; (3) a lower aquifer consisting of the Carters Limestone; and (4) the Lebanon confining unit. Wells generally are low yielding less than 1 gal/min ), although locally the aquifers may yield as much as 80 gal/minute. This lower aquifer is anisotropic, and transmissivity of this aquifer is greatest in a northwest-southeast direction. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily from precipitation, and estimates of average annual recharge rates range from 6 to 15 inches/year. Discharge from the groundwater system is primarily to the Little Harpeth River and its tributaries. Groundwater flow at the disposal site is mainly to a small topographic depression that drains the site. Geochemical data indicate four distinct water types. These types represent (1) shallow, rapidly circulating groundwater; (2) deeper (> than 100 ft), rapidly circulating groundwater; (3) shallow, slow moving groundwater; and (4) deeper, slow moving groundwater. Results of the numerical model indicate that most flow is in the upper aquifer. (USGS)

  17. New research discovery may mean less radioactive contamination, safer nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-20

    Murph has now made another nanoparticle breakthrough that could benefit various work environments such as nuclear power plants. Murph and her team have created nanoparticle treated stainless steel filters that are capable to capturing radioactive vapor materials. Just like air filters capture dust and dirt, these filters are capable of capturing large amounts of radioactive vapors. The new research may one day mean that nuclear power plant workers, and other workers in related fields, will have a safer working environment.

  18. Impact of Hydrogeological Uncertainty on Estimation of Environmental Risks Posed by Hydrocarbon Transportation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, V.; Lauriola, I.; Bonvicini, S.; Cozzani, V.; Di Federico, V.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2017-11-01

    Ubiquitous hydrogeological uncertainty undermines the veracity of quantitative predictions of soil and groundwater contamination due to accidental hydrocarbon spills from onshore pipelines. Such predictions, therefore, must be accompanied by quantification of predictive uncertainty, especially when they are used for environmental risk assessment. We quantify the impact of parametric uncertainty on quantitative forecasting of temporal evolution of two key risk indices, volumes of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated by a surface spill of light nonaqueous-phase liquids. This is accomplished by treating the relevant uncertain parameters as random variables and deploying two alternative probabilistic models to estimate their effect on predictive uncertainty. A physics-based model is solved with a stochastic collocation method and is supplemented by a global sensitivity analysis. A second model represents the quantities of interest as polynomials of random inputs and has a virtually negligible computational cost, which enables one to explore any number of risk-related contamination scenarios. For a typical oil-spill scenario, our method can be used to identify key flow and transport parameters affecting the risk indices, to elucidate texture-dependent behavior of different soils, and to evaluate, with a degree of confidence specified by the decision-maker, the extent of contamination and the correspondent remediation costs.

  19. Application of stable isotopes to hydrogeology in coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Qi; Duan Yucheng

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopes including Oxygen-18 and Deuterium have been applied to investigation of hydrogeology in main coal mines. By determination of stable isotopic composition of hydrogen and oxygen together with water analysis, the following studies have been developed: Identification of the hydrogeochemical characteristics of the groundwater from varied aquifers; Analysis of the hydraulic relationship between varied aquifers; Interpretation of the probable recharge source of mine water. The research results mentioned above reveal that: 1. The groundwater from main aquifers at coal mines in north China is of meteoric origin, which is recharged from hilly area surrounding the coal mine. Its isotopic composition differs slightly from that of the local precipitation. 2. There is a mutual hydraulic relationship between the Ordovician and Quarternary aquifers, so the difference of isotopic composition is very small. 3. By way of the variation of isotopic composition of groundwater from coal-bearing strata, we can infer the hydraulic relationship extent between overlaid alluvial layer and underlaid Ordovician limestone. (author). 9 refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs

  20. Insights and participatory actions driven by a socio-hydrogeological approach for groundwater management: the Grombalia Basin case study (Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, C.; Re, V.; Siciliano, G.; Chkir, N.; Tuci, C.; Zouari, K.

    2017-08-01

    Sustainable groundwater management strategies in water-scarce countries need to guide future decision-making processes pragmatically, by simultaneously considering local needs, environmental problems and economic development. The socio-hydrogeological approach named `Bir Al-Nas' has been tested in the Grombalia region (Cap Bon Peninsula, Tunisia), to evaluate the effectiveness of complementing hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological investigations with the social dimension of the issue at stake (which, in this case, is the identification of groundwater pollution sources). Within this approach, the social appraisal, performed through social network analysis and public engagement of water end-users, allowed hydrogeologists to get acquainted with the institutional dimension of local groundwater management, identifying issues, potential gaps (such as weak knowledge transfer among concerned stakeholders), and the key actors likely to support the implementation of the new science-based management practices resulting from the ongoing hydrogeological investigation. Results, hence, go beyond the specific relevance for the Grombaila basin, showing the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the importance of including social assessment in any given hydrogeological research aimed at supporting local development through groundwater protection measures.

  1. Masteŕ s Programme at Stockholm University: Hydrology, Hydrogeology and Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarsjö, J.; Destouni, G.; Lyon, S. W.; Seibert, J.

    2009-04-01

    dealing with hydrologic and hydrogeologic problems, and as a basis for sustainable governance and management of water resources. · Mathematical equations that are used in models for describing water flow and contaminant transport and their physico-chemical basis. · Handling of hydrologic data including methods for time series analyses and management of spatial data using geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics. · Integrated natural and social science studies of natural and anthropogenic flows of water, nutrients, pollutants and other biogeochemical substances that are important for environmental risk assessment, ecosystem development, and management of environmental resources.

  2. Research on using Mineral Sorbents for A Sorption Process in the Environment Contaminated with Petroleum Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pijarowski Piotr Marek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A research on diatomite sorbents was carried out to investigate their ability to remove hazardous substances from oil spillages. We used two types of sorbents available on the market with differences in material density and particles size of composition. As sorbents we used Ekoterm oil and unleaded petrol 95 coming from refinery PKN Orlen S.A. Two types of sorbents with similar chemical composition but different granulometric composition were used. They are marked as D1 and C1 samples. The fastest absorbent was C1, but D1 sample was the most absorptive.

  3. Hydrogeologic investigations sampling plan: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    The goal of this sampling plan is to identify and develop specific plans for those investigative actions necessary to: (1) characterize the hydrologic regime; (2) define the extent and impact of contamination; and (3) predict future contaminant migration for the Weldon Spring Site (WSS) and vicinity. The plan is part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and has been developed in accordance with US EPA Remedial Investigation (RI) and Data Quality Objective (DQO) guidelines. The plan consists of a sequence of activities including the evaluation of data, development of a conceptual model, identification of data uses and needs, and the design and implementation of a data collection program. Data will be obtained to: (1) confirm the presence or absence of contaminants; (2) define contaminant sources and modes of transport; (3) delineate extent of contaminant migration and predict future migration; and (4) provide information to support the evaluation and selection of remedial actions. 81 refs., 62 figs., 26 tabs

  4. Proposal for coordinated health research in PFAS-contaminated communities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Thomas A; Blum, Arlene

    2017-11-14

    The drinking water of more than six million Americans in numerous communities has been found to contain highly fluorinated chemicals at concentrations of concern. Certain of these chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, are known to be persistent, bioaccumulative, and associated with adverse health outcomes in humans and animal models. The possible health impacts of exposure to highly fluorinated chemicals are of great concern to communities whose water has been impacted. Community members want information, and are asking for biomonitoring, exposure pathway analysis, and health studies. Governmental agencies are striving to deal with these multiple concerns in the face of information and resource constraints. We propose the development of a high-level research strategy to maximize what can be learned about health effects of highly fluorinated chemicals and methods to reduce or eliminate exposure. We suggest coordinating the research across multiple communities for greater statistical power. If implemented, such a strategy could help to generate information and evidence integration to enable regulatory decision making and contribute to reducing future exposures.

  5. Hydrogeological structure model of the Olkiluoto Site. Update in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaittinen, T.; Ahokas, H.; Nummela, J.; Paulamaeki, S.

    2011-09-01

    As part of the programme for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, a hydrogeological structure model containing the hydraulically significant zones on Olkiluoto Island has been compiled. The structure model describes the deterministic site scale zones that dominate the groundwater flow. The main objective of the study is to provide the geometry and the hydrogeological properties related to the groundwater flow for the zones and the sparsely fractured bedrock to be used in the numerical modelling of groundwater flow and geochemical transport and thereby in the safety assessment. Also, these zones should be taken into account in the repository layout and in the construction of the disposal facility and they have a long-term impact on the evolution of the site and the safety of the disposal repository. The previous hydrogeological model was compiled in 2008 and this updated version is based on data available at the end of May 2010. The updating was based on new hydrogeological observations and a systematic approach covering all drillholes to assess measured fracture transmissivities typical of the site-scale hydrogeological zones. New data consisted of head observations and interpreted pressure and flow responses caused by field activities. Essential background data for the modelling included the ductile deformation model and the site scale brittle deformation zones modelled in the geological model version 2.0. The GSM combine both geological and geophysical investigation data on the site. As a result of the modelling campaign, hydrogeological zones HZ001, HZ008, HZ19A, HZ19B, HZ19C, HZ20A, HZ20B, HZ21, HZ21B, HZ039, HZ099, OL-BFZ100, and HZ146 were included in the structure model. Compared with the previous model, zone HZ004 was replaced with zone HZ146 and zone HZ039 was introduced for the first time. Alternative zone HZ21B was included in the basic model. For the modelled zones, both the zone intersections, describing the fractures with dominating groundwater

  6. Study of the influence of hydrogeological conditions in the upper aquifer on radionuclide migration from a geological repository using a 2D groundwater flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestopalov, Vyacheslav; Bohuslavskyy, Alexander; Shybetskyi, Iurii [National Academy of Science of Ukaraine, Kyiv (Ukraine). Radioenvironmental Centre

    2015-07-01

    Results are presented of a case groundwater flow-transport modeling to predict the radionuclide migration from a deep geological repository (DGR) of radioactive waste. The influence of hydrogeological conditions in the upper aquifers of a storey water exchange system on the rate of contaminant migration from the DGR to its natural far-field groundwater discharges (a shallow well and a river) as a general DGR safety condition is considered.

  7. Flowing with the changing needs of hydrogeology instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T.; Allen, D. M.; Ferguson, G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogeology is now taught in a broad spectrum of departments and institutions to students with diverse backgrounds. Successful instruction in hydrogeology thus requires a variety of pedagogical approaches depending on desired learning outcomes and the diverse background of students. We review the pedagogical literature in hydrogeology to highlight recent advances and analyze a 2005 survey of 68 hydrogeology instructors. The literature and survey results suggest there are ~15 topics that are considered crucial by most hydrogeologists and >100 other topics that are considered crucial by some hydrogeologists. The crucial topics focus on properties of aquifers and fundamentals of groundwater flow, and should likely be part of all undergraduate hydrogeology courses. Other topics can supplement and support these crucial topics, depending on desired learning outcomes. Classroom settings continue to provide a venue for emphasizing fundamental knowledge. However, recent pedagogical advances are biased towards field and laboratory instruction with a goal of bolstering experiential learning. Field methods build on the fundamentals taught in the classroom and emphasize the collection of data, data uncertainty, and the development of vocational skills. Laboratory and computer-based exercises similarly build on theory, and offer an opportunity for data analysis and integration. The literature suggests curricula at all levels should ideally balance field, laboratory, and classroom pedagogy into an iterative and integrative whole. An integrated approach leads to greater student motivation and advancement of theoretical and vocational knowledge.

  8. Experience of management of plutonium-contaminated solid and liquid wastes at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcaillou, J.; Faure, J.C.; Tourret, G.

    1981-01-01

    At Cadarache the principal sources of alpha-contaminated waste are the facilities of the plutonium fuel assembly fabrication complex. The chosen management scheme shows two points where it is possible to implement procedures to limit the activities released and to reduce the storage volumes of treated waste: (1) At the fabrication units, three categories of solid waste ('rich', 'poor' and 'special') are distinguished by sorting at the time of production and by γ,n counting of the drums. The rich and special wastes with a high plutonium content are stored while awaiting treatment for recycling of the plutonium. In the case of liquid waste, different circuits are used to separate contaminated effluents and thus to limit their production; (2) In the solid-waste treatment shops, the waste has so far been compacted and then coated with bituminous cement mortar. At the same time, a new incinerator facility has been installed. The preliminary studies dealt mainly with: waste preparation (crushing) to obtain a continuous and regular feed for the incinerator; combustion (pyrolysis followed by burning of the gases and unburnt matter in the presence of excess air); containment of the equipment. Further studies will be made to determine what is to be done with the ash (treatment for plutonium recovery and/or coating). At the Effluent Treatment Station some adjustments have had to be made in order to cope with the increase in volume activity due mainly to the presence of americium. At the same time, with a view to limiting the production of treatment residues with a high alpha-emitter content it has been decided to carry out a research and development programme on the separation of americium and the improvement of the recycling of the plutonium contained in the process effluents. (author)

  9. Modern and Unconventional Approaches to Karst Hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukop, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    Karst hydrogeology is frequently approached from a hydrograph/statistical perspective where precipitation/recharge inputs are converted to output hydrographs and the conversion process reflects the hydrology of the system. Karst catchments show hydrological response to short-term meteorological events and to long-term variation of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Modern approaches to analysis of these data include, for example, multiresolution wavelet techniques applied to understand relations between karst discharge and climate fields. Much less effort has been directed towards direct simulation of flow fields and transport phenomena in karst settings. This is primarily due to the lack of information on the detailed physical geometry of most karst systems. New mapping, sampling, and modeling techniques are beginning to enable direct simulation of flow and transport. A Conduit Flow Process (CFP) add-on to the USGS ModFlow model became available in 2007. FEFLOW and similar models are able to represent flows in individual conduits. Lattice Boltzmann models have also been applied to flow modeling in karst systems. Regarding quantitative measurement of karst system geometry, at scales to 0.1 m, X-ray computed tomography enables good detection of detailed (sub-millimeter) pore space in karstic rocks. Three-dimensional printing allows reconstruction of fragile high porosity rocks, and surrogate samples generated this way can then be subjected to laboratory testing. Borehole scales can be accessed with high-resolution ( 0.001 m) Digital Optical Borehole Imaging technologies and can provide virtual samples more representative of the true nature of karst aquifers than can obtained from coring. Subsequent extrapolation of such samples can generate three-dimensional models suitable for direct modeling of flow and transport. Finally, new cave mapping techniques are beginning to provide information than can be applied to direct simulation of flow. Due to flow rates and cave

  10. Hydrogeology and ground-water flow of the drift and Platteville aquifer system, St Louis Park, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Three aquifers and two confining units have been delineated within the drift underlying the area near the site of a former coal-tar distillation and wood-preserving plant in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. The hydrogeologic units of the drift, in descending order, are the upper drift aquifer, the upper drift confining unit, the middle drift aquifer, the lower drift confining unit. and the lower drift aquifer. A contamination plume consisting of coal-tar derivatives exists in the drift aquifers and in the Platteville aquifer underlying the southern part of the plant site and areas to the south and east of the plant site.

  11. New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership Role ofIEST in Shaping Future Research and Practices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang; Eudy, Jane; Berndt, Charles

    2007-01-01

    develop, revise, and publish new documents at a faster pace than had been seen in recent decades. For example, eight updated revisions of existing or brand new RPs have been published since 2005 (marked as yellow), and approximately seven more RPs and RDs are well positioned in the pipeline for official publication by early 2007 (marked as green). Due to their quality and timeliness, many IEST RPs are primary references and sources of information for compliance with the ISO 14644 series of International Standards developed by ISO Technical Committee (ISO/TC) 209, Cleanrooms and associated controlled environments. Additionally, IEST conducts technical seminars, workshops, and tutorials at its annual technical meeting (ESTECH), its Fall Conference, and online to assist related industries to better understand the 'state-of-the art' philosophies and effectively utilize IEST Recommended Practices and ISO Standards. Being the leading organization and a voting member of the ANSI-accredited US Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to ISO/TC 229, Nanotechnologies, IEST is in a unique position to contribute its expertise in developing international standards for controlled environments to anticipate the unique needs of the emerging nanoscience/nanotechnology industry. For example, the IEST has formulated a new program to address the complex issues relevant to all industries working in this area and includes nanoparticles, other relevant contamination control 2 issues, and building facilities to conduct research and produce products related to nanotechnology. Leading industry experts in this area have been gathering at IEST conferences since the Fall Conference in 2005 and are working diligently on a first-ever industry road map and subsequent RPs the IEST Recommended Practices NANO200 series. The first document titled 'Planning, Design, Construction & Operations Considerations for Facilities Engaged in Research or Production at the Nanometer Scale' is, as mentioned

  12. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Glen Rose limestone, Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allan K.

    2004-01-01

    The Trinity aquifer is a regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas that supplies water for agriculture, commercial, domestic, and stock purposes. Rocks of the Glen Rose Limestone, which compose the upper zone and upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer, crop out at the Camp Stanley Storage Activity (CSSA), a U.S. Army weapons and munitions supply, maintenance, and storage facility in northern Bexar County (San Antonio area) (fig. 1). On its northeastern, eastern, and southern boundaries, the CSSA abuts the Camp Bullis Training Site, a U.S. Army field training site for military and Federal government agencies. During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army, studied the outcropping Glen Rose Limestone at the CSSA and immediately adjacent area (Camp Stanley study area, fig. 1) to identify and map the hydrogeologic subdivisions and faults of the Glen Rose Limestone at the facility. The results of the study are intended to help resource managers improve their understanding of the distribution of porosity and permeability of the outcropping rocks, and thus the conditions for recharge and the potential for contaminants to enter the Glen Rose Limestone. This study followed a similar study done by the USGS at Camp Bullis (Clark, 2003). The purpose of this report is to present the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Glen Rose Limestone in the study area. The hydrogeologic nomenclature follows that introduced by Clark (2003) for the outcropping Glen Rose Limestone at Camp Bullis in which the upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone (hereinafter, upper Glen Rose Limestone), which is coincident with the upper zone of the Trinity aquifer, is divided into five intervals on the basis of observed lithologic and hydrogeologic properties. An outcrop map, two generalized sections, related illustrations, and a table summarize the description of the framework and distribution of characteristics.

  13. Structural and geochemical techniques for the hydrogeological characterisation and stochastic modelling of fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela, A.; Elorza, F.J.; Florez, F.; Paredes, C.; Mazadiego, L.; Llamas, J.F.; Perez, E.; Vives, L.; Carrera, J.; Munoz, A.; De Vicente, G.; Casquet, C.

    1999-01-01

    Safety analysis of radioactive waste storage systems require fractured rock studies. The performance assessment studies of this type of problems include the development of radionuclide flow and transport models to predict the evolution of possible contaminants released from the repository to the biosphere. The methodology developed in the HIDROBAP project and some results obtained with its application in El Berrocal granite batholith are presented. It integrates modern tools belonging to different disciplines. A Discrete Fracture Network model (DFT) was selected to simulate the fractured medium and a 3D finite element flow and transport model that includes the inverse problem techniques has been coupled to the DFT model to simulate the water movement trough the fracture network system. Preliminary results show that this integrated methodology can be very useful for the hydrogeological characterisation of rock fractured media. (author)

  14. Interdisciplinary hydrogeologic site characterization at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, W.L.; Wagoner, J.L.; Drellack, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices. Hydrogeologic investigations began in earnest with the US Geological Survey mapping much of the area from 1960 to 1965. Since 1963, all nuclear detonations have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts, but a small percentage are conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks, but sometimes in alluvium. Hydrogeologic investigations began in earnest with the US Geological Survey's mapping of much of the NTS region from 1960 to 1965. Following the BANEBERRY test in December 1970, which produced an accidental release of radioactivity to the atmosphere, the US Department of Energy (then the Atomic Energy Commission) established the Containment Evaluation Panel (CEP). Results of interdisciplinary hydrogeologic investigations for each test location are included in a Containment Prospectus which is thoroughly reviewed by the CEP

  15. The geology and hydrogeology of Sellafield: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplow, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Nirex is responsible for providing and managing a national facility for solid intermediate-level and low-level radioactive waste. Geological and hydrogeological investigations have been in progress at Sellafield in west Cumbria since 1989 aimed at determining whether or not the site is suitable for such a deep repository. Geological investigations have included the drilling of 20 deep boreholes with over 20 000 metres of drilling, together with almost 2000 line kilometres of seismic surveys and over 8000 line kilometres of airborne geophysical surveys. Hydrogeological testing and groundwater sampling and testing have provided additional information on the ground conditions at the site. (author)

  16. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  17. Heavy Metal Soil Contamination at U.S. Army Installations: Proposed Research and Strategy for Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    metal contamination problems. Unlike organic contaminants that can be destroyed (or mineralized) by bioremediation , chemical oxidation, or incineration...Range Granite City, IL 62040 A STEWS-FE-F 618-452-4211 White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002 Cdr, Sunflower AAP 505-678-2121 ATIN: SMCSU P.O. Box 640 Cdr

  18. Hydrogeology of Cibola County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J.A.; Rankin, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogeology of Cibola County, New Mexico, was evaluated to determine the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground-water resources. Rocks of Precambrian through Quaternary age are present in Cibola County. Most rocks are sedimentary in origin except for Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Zuni Uplift and Tertiary and Quaternary basalts in northern and central parts of the county. The most productive aquifers in the county include (youngest to oldest) Quaternary deposits, sandstones in the Mesaverde Group, the Dakota-Zuni-Bluff aquifer, the Westwater Canyon aquifer, the Todilto- Entrada aquifer, sandstone beds in the Chinle Formation, and the San Andres-Glorieta aquifer. Unconsolidated sand, silt, and gravel form a mantle ranging from a few inches to 150 to 200 feet over much of the bedrock in Cibola County. Well yields range from 5 to 1,110 gallons per minute. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water range from 200 to more than 5,200 milligrams per liter. Calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate are the predominant ions in ground water in alluvial material. The Mesaverde Group mainly occurs in three areas of the county. Well yields range from less than 1 to 12 gallons per minute. The predominant ions in water from wells in the Mesaverde Group are calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. The transition from calcium-predominant to sodium-predominant water in the southwestern part of the county likely is a result of ion exchange. Wells completed in the Dakota-Zuni-Bluff aquifer yield from 1 to 30 gallons per minute. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 220 to 2,000 milligrams per liter in water from 34 wells in the western part of the county. Predominant ions in the ground water include calcium, sodium, sulfate, and bicarbonate. Calcium predominates in areas where the aquifer is exposed at the surface or is overlain with alluvium. Sandstones in the Chinle Formation yield from 10 to 300 gallons per minute to wells in the Grants

  19. Acid-digestion plant for plutonium-contaminated waste at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentensperger, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR), plutonium-contaminated material (PCM) is accumulated in the ''hot-laboratory''. Acid digestion has been chosen for conditioning the combustible PCM at EIR. The acid-digestion process is based on the carbonization and oxidative decomposition of the PCM by means of concentrated sulphuric and nitric acids at temperatures around 250 0 C. The design study for the acid-digestion plant (ADA) for EIR has almost been completed, and the detailed design has begun. The shredded waste will be fed batchwise on to the surface of hot sulphuric acid in the digester tray where carbonization occurs. The oxidation of the carbonized particles to gaseous products occurs in the heater vessel where nitric acid is added to accelerate the reaction. The inorganic residues of the digested PCM accumulate in the heater vessel as suspended particles. Periodically the acid is drained and the solid residue is separated. The gaseous effluents pass through a battery of oxidation/absorption columns where SO 2 and NOsub(x) are oxidized to sulphuric and nitric acids, respectively. These acids are almost entirely absorbed in the washing solution which is fed continuously to the acid-rectification system. The separated and reconcentrated acids are reused. For safety reasons the ADA will be semi-automatic; the principal alarms are transmitted to a control centre. Automatic shut-down is achieved by cutting off the heater current and adding cold sulphuric acid. (author)

  20. Hydrogeology of the Mogollon Highlands, central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John T.C.; Steinkampf, William C.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2005-01-01

    The Mogollon Highlands, 4,855 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain at the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau in central Arizona, is characterized by a bedrock-dominated hydrologic system that results in an incompletely integrated regional ground-water system, flashy streamflow, and various local water-bearing zones that are sensitive to drought. Increased demand on the water resources of the area as a result of recreational activities and population growth have made necessary an increased understanding of the hydrogeology of the region. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geology and hydrology of the region in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources under the auspices of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative, a program launched in 1998 to assist rural areas in dealing with water-resources issues. The study involved the analysis of geologic maps, surface-water and ground-water flow, and water and rock chemical data and spatial relationships to characterize the hydrogeologic framework. The study area includes the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau and the Mogollon Rim, which is the eroded edge of the plateau. A 3,000- to 4,000-foot sequence of early to late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks forms the generally south-facing scarp of the Mogollon Rim. The area adjacent to the edge of the Mogollon Rim is an erosional landscape of rolling, step-like terrain exposing Proterozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks. Farther south, the Sierra Ancha and Mazatzal Mountain ranges, which are composed of various Proterozoic rocks, flank an alluvial basin filled with late Cenozoic sediments and volcanic flows. Eight streams with perennial to intermittent to ephemeral flow drain upland regions of the Mogollon Rim and flow into the Salt River on the southern boundary or the Verde River on the western boundary. Ground-water flow paths generally are controlled by large-scale fracture systems or by karst features in carbonate rocks. Stream

  1. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  2. The availability of hydrogeologic data associated with areas identified by the US Geological Survey as experiencing potentially induced seismicity resulting from subsurface injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Caitlin; Halihan, Todd

    2018-05-01

    A critical need exists for site-specific hydrogeologic data in order to determine potential hazards of induced seismicity and to manage risk. By 2015, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) had identified 17 locations in the USA that are experiencing an increase in seismicity, which may be potentially induced through industrial subsurface injection. These locations span across seven states, which vary in geological setting, industrial exposure and seismic history. Comparing the research across the 17 locations revealed patterns for addressing induced seismicity concerns, despite the differences between geographical locations. Most induced seismicity studies evaluate geologic structure and seismic data from areas experiencing changes in seismic activity levels, but the inherent triggering mechanism is the transmission of hydraulic pressure pulses. This research conducted a systematic review of whether data are available in these locations to generate accurate hydrogeologic predictions, which could aid in managing seismicity. After analyzing peer-reviewed research within the 17 locations, this research confirms a lack of site-specific hydrogeologic data availability for at-risk areas. Commonly, formation geology data are available for these sites, but hydraulic parameters for the seismically active injection and basement zones are not available to researchers conducting peer-reviewed research. Obtaining hydrogeologic data would lead to better risk management for injection areas and provide additional scientific evidential support for determining a potentially induced seismic area.

  3. A New Hydrogeological Research Site in the Willamette River Floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Willamette River is a ninth-order tributary of the Columbia which passes through a productive and populous region in northwest Oregon. Where unconstrained by shoreline revetments, the floodplain of this river is a high-energy, dynamic system which supports a variety of ripari...

  4. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Leetown area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Weary, David J.; Field, Malcolm S.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Schill, William Bane; Young, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s Leetown Science Center and the co-located U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture both depend on large volumes of cold clean ground water to support research operations at their facilities. Currently, ground-water demands are provided by three springs and two standby production wells used to augment supplies during periods of low spring flow. Future expansion of research operations at the Leetown Science Center is dependent on assessing the availability and quality of water to the facilities and in locating prospective sites for additional wells to augment existing water supplies. The hydrogeology of the Leetown area, West Virginia, is a structurally complex karst aquifer. Although the aquifer is a karst system, it is not typical of most highly cavernous karst systems, but is dominated by broad areas of fractured rock drained by a relatively small number of solution conduits. Characterization of the aquifer by use of fluorometric tracer tests, a common approach in most karst terranes, therefore only partly defines the hydrogeologic setting of the area. In order to fully assess the hydrogeology and water quality in the vicinity of Leetown, a multi-disciplinary approach that included both fractured rock and karst research components was needed. The U.S. Geological Survey developed this multi-disciplinary research effort to include geologic, hydrologic, geophysical, geographic, water-quality, and microbiological investigations in order to fully characterize the hydrogeology and water quality of the Leetown area, West Virginia. Detailed geologic and karst mapping provided the framework on which hydrologic investigations were based. Fracture trace and lineament analysis helped locate potential water-bearing fractures and guided installation of monitoring wells. Monitoring wells were drilled for borehole geophysical surveys, water-quality sampling, water-level measurements, and aquifer tests to

  5. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Katelyn A; Mayer, Alex S; Reeves, Howard W

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  6. International excursion hydrogeology, Slovakia, [September 8 - 15, 1996

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksma, R.

    1996-01-01

    This is a report of the hydrogeological excursion to Slovakia, held in the period from September 8 up to September 15, 1996. This report is a compilation of the work of the participating students, parts of the excursion guide and also information, provided by the Slovak excursion guides.

  7. a significant site for hydrogeological investigation in crystalline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Estimating the hydrogeologic control of fractured aquifers in hard crystalline and metamorphosed rocks is challenging due to complexity in the development of secondary porosity. The present study in the Precambrian metamorphic terrain in and around the Balarampur of Purulia district, West Bengal, India, aims to estimate ...

  8. Hydrogeological investigation programmes: best practice. Proof of evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Proof of Evidence by an expert witness is presented in support of the case by Friends of the Earth (FOE) against the proposed construction by UK Nirex Ltd of an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at a site in the Sellafield area. The RCF is part of an investigation by Nirex into a suitable site for an underground repository for the disposal of radioactive waste. The objections were raised at a Planning Inquiry in 1995. Drawing on best practice in hydrogeological investigation from case studies of groundwater assessment in the UK and the Canadian nuclear waste disposal programme, the hydrogeological monitoring work undertaken to date at Sellafield is found to be inadequate in both scope and duration. The lack of adequate equilibrium hydrogeological data is significant in its implications for the RCF both in terms of the effects on local water resources and the proposed repository. It is concluded, therefore, that the construction of the RCF should be postponed pending the establishment of the equilibrium hydrogeological regime. (10 figures; 33 references). (UK)

  9. Uruguay Hydrogeological map scale 1/1.000.000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzen, W.; Carrion, R.; Massa, E.; Pena, S.; Stapff, M.

    2003-06-01

    Between the main items the Uruguayan Hydrogeological map show us: aquifers productivity, geographical references, well information, depth, level, caudal, dry waste, from Hydrologic unit cuaternario differenced, Villa Soriano, Chuy, Raigon, Salto, Cretacico Superior, Tacuarembo, Las Arenas, Del Terciario, Cretacico Superior, Tres Islas, Cerrezuelo, Arapey, Neoproterozoico, Paleoproterozoico. It shows a brief map about Guarani Aquifer

  10. Subsoil Characteristics and Hydrogeology of the Export Processing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subsoil characterization and hydrogeological investigation of the Export Processing Zone (EPZ), Calabar Southeastern Nigeria was undertaken using geotechnical analysis of soils and water level monitoring. Geotechnical analysis of soils in the EPZ show that the grain size range from poorly graded (well sorted) to well ...

  11. Source water assessment and nonpoint sources of acutely toxic contaminants: A review of research related to survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark J.; Montemagno, Carlo D.; Jenkins, Michael B.

    1998-12-01

    Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (PL-930123) in 1996 required that public water supply managers identify potential sources of contamination within contributing areas. Nonpoint sources of acutely toxic microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium parvum, challenge current approaches to source identification and management as a first step toward developing management plans for public water supply protection. Little may be known about survival and transport in the field environment, prescribed practices may not be designed to manage such substances, and infective stages may be present in vast numbers and may resist water treatment and disinfection processes. This review summarizes research related to survival and transport of C. parvum oocysts, as an example of an acutely toxic contaminant with nonpoint sources in animal agriculture. It discusses ∥1) significance of infected domesticated animals as potential sources of C. parvum, (2) laboratory and field studies of survival and transport, and (3) approaches to source control in the context of public health protection.

  12. Bioremediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum, pesticides, chlorophenols and heavy metals by composting: Applications, microbes and future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Piao; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Chunping; Huang, Danlian; Zhang, Jiachao

    2015-11-01

    Increasing soil pollution problems have caused world-wide concerns. Large numbers of contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), petroleum and related products, pesticides, chlorophenols and heavy metals enter the soil, posing a huge threat to human health and natural ecosystem. Chemical and physical technologies for soil remediation are either incompetent or too costly. Composting or compost addition can simultaneously increase soil organic matter content and soil fertility besides bioremediation, and thus is believed to be one of the most cost-effective methods for soil remediation. This paper reviews the application of composting/compost for soil bioremediation, and further provides a critical view on the effects of this technology on microbial aspects in contaminated soils. This review also discusses the future research needs for contaminated soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Co-ordinated research project on health impact of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant because of its ability to undergo long distance transport into the atmosphere. In view of these global concerns the IAEA has organised a CRP to elucidate the biological, chemical, and physical factors, which influence the transformations of Hg and its compounds in the ecosystem and the dynamics of the mercury recycling. Under the title 'Health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques' the CRP was started in October 1999 and concluded in February 2004. This report provides an overview of the various activities performed under the CRP by the various participants. The overall achievements are summarized and those aspects that require a further deeper look are also pointed out. The individual country reports are also given which detail on the progress made by the respective participants, during the CRP period. It is hoped that the results would encourage further research activities on these and related issues in the respective countries with the CRP participant as a catalyst to further these studies

  14. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above

  15. Efforts toward validation of a hydrogeological model of the Asse area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, E.; Klarr, K.; von Stempel, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Asse anticline (8 x 3 km) near Braunschweig (Germany) is part of the Subhercynian Basin and is characterized by a NW-SE orientation. In 1965, the GSF Research Center for Environment and Health acquired the former Asse salt mine on behalf of the FRG in order to carry out research and development work with a view of safe disposal of radioactive waste. To assess long term safety and predict groundwater flow nd radionuclide transport, an experimental program was carried out to validate hydrogeological models of the overburden of the Asse salt mine and to provide these with data. Five deep boreholes from 700 to 2250 m and 4 geological exploration shallow boreholes where drilled in the Asse area. Moreover, 19 piezometers and 27 exploration boreholes were sunk to perform pumping and tracer tests and yearly borehole loggings. In the end, about 50 boreholes and wells, 25 measuring weirs and about 70 creeks, drainage and springs were available to collect hydrological data and water samples. The different experiments and their evaluations as well as different hydrogeological models are presented and discussed. (J.S.). 9 refs., 7 figs

  16. Hydrogeological and multi-isotopic approach to define nitrate pollution and denitrification processes in a coastal aquifer (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittalis, Daniele; Carrey, Raul; Da Pelo, Stefania; Carletti, Alberto; Biddau, Riccardo; Cidu, Rosa; Celico, Fulvio; Soler, Albert; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Agricultural coastal areas are frequently affected by the superimposition of various processes, with a combination of anthropogenic and natural sources, which degrade groundwater quality. In the coastal multi-aquifer system of Arborea (Italy)—a reclaimed morass area identified as a nitrate vulnerable zone, according to Nitrate Directive 91/676/EEC—intensive agricultural and livestock activities contribute to substantial nitrate contamination. For this reason, the area can be considered a bench test for tuning an appropriate methodology aiming to trace the nitrate contamination in different conditions. An approach combining environmental isotopes, water quality and hydrogeological indicators was therefore used to understand the origins and attenuation mechanisms of nitrate pollution and to define the relationship between contaminant and groundwater flow dynamics through the multi-aquifer characterized by sandy (SHU), alluvial (AHU), and volcanic hydrogeological (VHU) units. Various groundwater chemical pathways were consistent with both different nitrogen sources and groundwater dynamics. Isotope composition suggests a mixed source for nitrate (organic and synthetic fertilizer), especially for the AHU and SHU groundwater. Moreover, marked heterotrophic denitrification and sulfate reduction processes were detected; although, for the contamination related to synthetic fertilizer, the attenuation was inefficient at removing NO3 - to less than the human consumption threshold of 50 mg/L. Various factors contributed to control the distribution of the redox processes, such as the availability of carbon sources (organic fertilizer and the presence of lagoon-deposited aquitards), well depth, and groundwater flow paths. The characterization of these processes supports water-resource management plans, future actions, and regulations, particularly in nitrate vulnerable zones.

  17. Hydrogeological investigations of river bed clogging at a river bank filtration site along the River Warta, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przybyłek Jan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available River bank filtration (RBF is a system that enriches groundwater resources by induced infiltration of river water to an aquifer. Problematic during operation of RBF systems is the deterioration of infiltration effectiveness caused by river bed clogging. This situation was observed in the Krajkowo well field which supplies fresh water to the city of Poznań (Poland during and after the long hydrological drought between the years 1989 and 1992. The present note discusses results of specific hydrogeological research which included drilling of a net of boreholes to a depth of 10 m below river bottom (for sediment sampling as well as for hydrogeological measurements, analyses of grain size distribution and relative density studies. The results obtained have allowed the recognition of the origin of the clogging processes, as well as the documentation of the clogged parts of the river bottom designated for unclogging activities.

  18. Site investigation methods used in Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program to determine the hydrogeological conditions of plutonic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is investigating the concept of disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes in a mined vault at a depth of 500 m to 1000 m within a plutonic rock body. Much effort has been directed at developing site investigation methods that can be used to determine the hydrogeological conditions of plutonic rock bodies. The primary objective of this research is to define the physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater flow systems at the various scales that are relevant to the prediction of potential radionuclide migration from a disposal vault. Groundwater movement through plutonic rock is largely controlled by fractures within the rock, and the hydrogeological parameters of fractured geological media are extremely scale dependent

  19. Further research on melting activated and contaminated materials from the decommissioning of nuclear installations for the final storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deipenau, H.; Seidler, M.

    1990-07-01

    The unconditional reuse of activated and contaminated materials by melting and the production of qualified casks (type A- and type B-containers) was proved. Investigations on nuclide distribution in the melting furnace, molten material, dust and slag were used as a basis for the erection of a new central melting facility. Melting contaminated carbon steel a mass of 2-5% of the contaminated material was generated as dust and slag. They must be handled and transported as radioactive waste. Melting non-ferrous material activity contents could be reached for unconditional reuse. Binding radioactive carbon in the metal matrix of cast iron is only possible by using crushed graphite. The investigations of this project showed that unconditional reuse of contaminated material is possible in industrial scale. Doses of the workers and of the people in the environment of the facility resulting from melting were far below the limits of the German radiation protection law. Up to 1990 a mass of 2000 Mg of contaminated material was melted in the Siempelkamp foundry. Mass inventories for the dismantling of a reference power plant SWR 900 MWe are calculated. (orig./HP) With 7 refs., 18 tabs., 12 figs [de

  20. Multidisciplinary Studies of the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Ground Water at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program Research Site, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts multidisciplinary research on the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes affecting ground-water contaminants of global concern at its Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program site in Massachusetts, USA. The work centers on a 6-kilometer-long plume of treated wastewater in a glacial sand and gravel aquifer. The plume is characterized by distinct geochemical zones caused by the biodegradation of organic materials in treated wastewater that was disposed to the aquifer by rapid infiltration during the period 1936-95. A core group of hydrogeologists, geochemists, microbiologists, and geophysicists has been involved in the research effort for more than two decades. The effort has been enhanced by stable funding, a readily accessible site, a relatively simple hydrologic setting, and logistical support from an adjacent military base. The research team uses a three-part approach to plan and conduct research at the site. First, detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of the plume since the late 1970s provides field evidence of important contaminant-transport processes and provides the basis for multidisciplinary, process-oriented studies. Second, ground-water tracer experiments are conducted in various geochemical zones in the plume to study factors that control the rate and extent of contaminant transport. Several arrays of multilevel sampling devices, including an array with more than 15,000 individual sampling points, are used to conduct these experiments. Plume-scale (kilometers) and tracer-test-scale (1- 100 meters) studies are complemented by laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling of flow and reactive transport. Third, results are applied to the treated-wastewater plume, other contaminant plumes at the military base, and other sites nationally to evaluate the applicability of the findings and to point toward further research. Examples of findings to date include that (1) macrodispersivity can be related to

  1. Hydrogeological effects of dredging navigable canals through lagoon shallows. A case study in Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Teatini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a comprehensive investigation has been carried out to quantify the possible effects of dredging a navigable canal on the hydrogeological system underlying a coastal lagoon. The study is focused on the Venice Lagoon, Italy, where the port authority is planning to open a new 10 m deep and 3 km long canal to connect the city passenger terminal to the central lagoon inlet, thus avoiding the passage of large cruise ships through the historic center of Venice. A modeling study has been developed to evaluate the short (minutes, medium (months, and long (decades term processes of water and pollutant exchange between the shallow aquifer system and the lagoon, possibly enhanced by the canal excavation, and ship wakes. An in-depth characterization of the lagoon subsurface along the channel has supported the numerical modeling. Piezometer and sea level records, geophysical acquisitions, laboratory analyses of groundwater and sediment samples (chemical analyses and ecotoxicity testing, and the outcome of 3-D hydrodynamic and computational fluid dynamic (CFD models have been used to set up and calibrate the subsurface multi-model approach. The numerical outcomes allow us to quantify the groundwater volume and estimate the mass of anthropogenic contaminants (As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Se likely leaked from the nearby industrial area over the past decades, and released into the lagoon from the canal bed by the action of depression waves generated by ships. Moreover, the model outcomes help to understand the effect of the hydrogeological layering on the propagation of the tidal fluctuation and salt concentration into the shallow brackish aquifers underlying the lagoon bottom.

  2. Characterization of aquifer heterogeneity in a complex fluvial hydrogeologic system to evaluate migration in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, F.G.; Pavlik, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogeology and extent of ground water contamination were characterized at a site in northern California. Wood preserving compounds, primarily pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote, have been detected in the soil and ground water. A plume of dissolved PCP up to 1.5 miles long has been identified south of the plant. The aquifer consists of a complex multizonal system of permeable gravels and sands composed of units from four geologic formations deposited by the ancestral Feather River. Fluvial channel gravels form the principal aquifer zones and contain overbank clay and silt deposits which locally form clay lenses or more continuous aquitards. The geometric mean horizontal hydraulic conductivities for channel gravels range between 120 to 530 feet/day. Mean vertical aquitard hydraulic conductivity is 0.07 feet/day. Ground water flow is generally southward with a velocity ranging from 470 to 1000 feet/year. The spatial distribution of dissolved PCP in the aquifer documents the interactions between major permeable zones. Hydrostratigraphic evidence pointing to the separation of aquifer zones is supported by the major ion chemistry of ground water. The sodium and calcium-magnesium bicarbonate-rich water present in the upper aquifer zones is significantly different in chemical composition from the predominantly sodium chloride-rich water present in the deeper permeable zone. This indicates that hydrodynamic separation exists between the upper and lower zones of the aquifer, limiting the vertical movement of the PCP plume. A numerical ground water model, based on this conceptual hydrogeologic model, was developed to evaluate groundwater transport pathways and for use in the design of a ground water extraction and treatment system. (9 refs., 7 figs., tab.)

  3. Hydrogeologic model for the old Hanford townsite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Q.; Csun, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state produced the country's first plutonium during WW II, and production continued through the end of the cold war. This plutonium production generated significant volumes of chemical and radioactive wastes, some of which were discharged directly to the local sediments as wastewater. Artifical recharge is still the dominating influence on the uppermost and unconfined aquifer over much of the Hanford site. Groundwater from a portion of this aquifer, which is in excess of drinking water standards for tritium, discharges to the Columbia River in the vicinity of the old Hanford townsite. The Hanford site lies within the Pasco basin, which is a structural basin in the Columbia Plateau. Columbia River basalt is overlain by the fluvial and lacustrian Ringold formation. The Ringold is unconformably overlain by the informal Hanford formation. Relatively impermeable basalt outcrops and subcrops along a northwest-southeast-trending anticline across the study area. Hanford sediments include both fluvial and glacial flood deposits lying on an irregular surface of basalt and sedimentary rocks. The coarser flood deposits have very high hydraulic conductivity and probably are the most important conduit for contaminant transport within the aquifer. A finite element model (CFEST-SC) is being used to study the effect of changing river stage on baseflow to the Columbia River near the old Hanford townsite. A steady-state version of the model produces calculated head within 1 m of observed values. Transient flow and solute transport results are expected to help further define the relationship between the contaminated aquifer and the Columbia River

  4. Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

  5. [Research on the application of in-situ biological stabilization solidification technology in chromium contaminated site management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-rong; Li, Juan; Xu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    In-situ biological stabilization solidification (SS) technology is an effective ground water risk control method for chromium contaminated sites. Through on-site engineering test, this paper has preliminarily validated the remediation effect of in-situ SS method on a southern chromium contaminated site. The engineering test site has an area of approximately 600 m2, and is located at the upstream of the contaminated area. Due to the severe contamination of chromium, the total chromium concentration reached up to 11,850 mg x kg(-1), while the hexavalent chromium concentration reached up to 349 mg x kg(-1), and the most severely contaminated soil had a depth of -0.5 - -2 m. Variations in hexavalent chromium and total chromium concentration in groundwater were observed through the injection of reducing agents and microbial regulators into the injection wells in the test site, and through the monitoring analysis at different time and different depth under the action of the injection agents. Results of the engineering test showed that the on-site SS technology significantly changed the chromium speciation in soil and then reduced the migration of chromium, thus the groundwater risk was reduced. The injected agents had a good effect of hexavalent chromium remediation in groundwater within the effective range of the injection wells, and the SS rate of hexavalent chromium into trivalent chromium reached 94%-99.9%, the SS rate of total chromium fixation reached 83.9%-99.8%. The test results are of significant reference value for the remediation of contaminated sites with features of shallow groundwater depth and soil mainly consisting of silty clay and sandy clay.

  6. Hydrogeology and hydrologic conditions of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Phillip D.; Knierim, Katherine J.; Breaker, Brian K.; Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2016-11-23

    The hydrogeology and hydrologic characteristics of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system were characterized as part of ongoing U.S. Geological Survey efforts to assess groundwater availability across the Nation. The need for such a study in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province (Ozark Plateaus) is highlighted by increasing demand on groundwater resources by the 5.3 million people of the Ozark Plateaus, water-level declines in some areas, and potential impacts of climate change on groundwater availability. The subject study integrates knowledge gained through local investigation within a regional perspective to develop a regional conceptual model of groundwater flow in the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system (Ozark system), a key phase of groundwater availability assessment. The Ozark system extends across much of southern Missouri and northwestern and north-central Arkansas and smaller areas of southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma. The region is one of the major karst landscapes in the United States, and karst aquifers are predominant in the Ozark system. Groundwater flow is ultimately controlled by aquifer and confining unit lithologies and stratigraphic relations, geologic structure, karst development, and the character of surficial lithologies and regolith mantle. The regolith mantle is a defining element of Ozark Plateaus karst, affecting recharge, karst development, and vulnerability to surface-derived contaminants. Karst development is more advanced—as evidenced by larger springs, hydraulic characteristics, and higher well yields—in the Salem Plateau and in the northern part of the Springfield Plateau (generally north of the Arkansas-Missouri border) as compared with the southern part of the Springfield Plateau in Arkansas, largely due to thinner, less extensive regolith and purer carbonate lithology.Precipitation is the ultimate source of all water to the Ozark system, and the hydrologic budget for the Ozark system includes inputs from recharge

  7. Hydrogeology and chemical quality of water and soil at Carroll Island, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbus, F.J.; Phillips, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    Carroll Island was used for open-air testing of chemical warfare agents from the late 1940's until 1971. Testing and disposal activities weresuspected of causing environmental contamination at 16 sites on the island. The hydrogeology and chemical quality of ground water, surface water, and soil at these sites were investigated with borehole logs, environmental samples, water-level measurements, and hydrologic tests. A surficial aquifer, upper confining unit, and upper confined aquifer were defined. Ground water in the surficial aquifer generally flows from the east-central part of the island toward the surface-water bodies, butgradient reversals caused by evapotranspiration can occur during dry seasons. In the confined aquifer, hydraulic gradients are low, and hydraulic head is affected by tidal loading and by seasonal pumpage from the west. Inorganic chemistry in the aquifers is affected by brackish-water intrusion from gradient reversals and by dissolution ofcarboniferous shell material in the confining unit.The concentrations of most inorganic constituents probably resulted from natural processes, but some concentrations exceeded Federal water-quality regulations and criteria. Organic compounds were detected in water and soil samples at maximum concentrations of 138 micrograms per liter (thiodiglycol in surface water) and 12 micrograms per gram (octadecanoic acid in soil).Concentrations of organic compounds in ground water exceeded Federal drinking-water regulations at two sites. The organic compounds that weredetected in environmental samples were variously attributed to natural processes, laboratory or field- sampling contamination, fallout from industrial air pollution, and historical military activities.

  8. Waste Disposal: Long-term Performance Studies for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Hydrogeological Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marivoet, J

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on long-term performance studies are: (1) to develop a methodology and associated tools for assessing the long-term safety of geological disposal of all types of radioactive waste in clay formations and of the shallow-land burial of low-level waste; (2) to assess the performance and to identify the most influential elements of integrated repository systems for the disposal of radioactive waste; (3) to collect geological, piezometric and hydraulic data required for studying the hydrogeological system in north-eastern Belgium; (4) to develop a regional aquifer model for north-easter Belgium and to apply it in the performance assessments for the Mol site; (5) to test, verify and improve computer codes used in the performance assessment calculations of waste disposal concepts and contaminated sites (the computer codes simulate water flow and transport of radionuclides in engineered barriers, aquifers and contaminated sites). The scientific programme and achievements in 1999 are described.

  9. Hydrogeological and biogeochemical constrains of arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers from the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Huaming; Zhang Bo; Li Yuan; Berner, Zsolt; Tang Xiaohui; Norra, Stefan; Stueben, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the importance of drainage/irrigation channels and biogeochemical processes in arsenic distribution of shallow groundwaters from the Hetao basin. This investigation shows that although As concentrations are primarily dependent on reducing conditions, evaporation increases As concentration in the centre of palaeo-lake sedimentation. Near drainage channels, groundwater As concentrations are the lowest in suboxic-weakly reducing conditions. Results demonstrate that both drainage and irrigation channels produce oxygen-rich water that recharges shallow groundwaters and therefore immobilize As. Groundwater As concentration increases with a progressive decrease in redox potential along the flow path in an alluvial fan. A negative correlation between SO 4 2- concentrations and δ 34 S values indicates that bacterial reduction of SO 4 2- occurs in reducing aquifers. Due to high concentrations of Fe (>0.5 mg L -1 ), reductive dissolution of Fe oxides is believed to cause As release from aquifer sediments. Target aquifers for safe drinking water resources are available in alluvial fans and near irrigation channels. - Research highlights: → Low As groundwaters occur in alluvial fans. → We find low As groundwaters near irrigation and drainage channels. → Both hydrogeologic conditions and biogeochemical processes control As distribution. - Both hydrogeologic conditions and biogeochemical processes control As distribution of shallow groundwaters, which results in the occurrence of low As groundwater in alluvial fans and near irrigation channels and drainage channels.

  10. Development of a Hydrogeological Model of the Borrowdale Volcanics at Sellafield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, R. J.; Lunn, A. D.; Mackay, R.

    This work has arisen out of recent developments within the radioactive waste research programme managed by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution, UK (HMIP)*, to develop an integrated flow and transport model for the potential deep radioactive waste repository at Sellafield. One of the largest sources of uncertainty in model predictions, is the characterisation of the hydrogeological properties of the underlying strata, in particular, of the Borrowdale Volcanic Group (BVG) within which the repository is to be located. Analysis of the available borehole data (that released by the proponent company, Nirex, by December 1995) for the BVG formation has indicated a dual regime consisting of flow within faults and flow within the matrix (or an equivalent porous medium containing micro-fractures). Significant relationships between permeability, depth and the presence and orientation of faults have been identified; they account for a variation of up to 6 orders of magnitude in mean permeability measurements. This can be explained in part by the effect of the orientation of the current maximum principal stress directions within the BVG: however, it is likely that permeability is also dependent on the existence of fracture families, which cannot be effectively identified from the data currently available. These analyses have enabled considerable insight to be gained into the dominant features of flow within the BVG. The conceptual hydrogeological model derived here will have a significant effect on the outcome and reliability of future radionuclide transport predictions in the Sellafield area.

  11. Site investigation - equipment for geological, geophysical, hydrogeological and hydrochemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, K.E.; Fridh, B.; Johansson, B.E.; Sehlstedt, M.

    1986-11-01

    The investigations are performed within a site investigation program. In total about 60,000 m of cored 56 mm boreholes have been drilled and investigated at eight study sites. A summarized description of the main investigation methods is included. Instruments for geophysical investigations contains equipment for ground measurements as well as for borehole logging. The Geophysical investigations including the borehole radar measurements, are indirect methods for the geological and hydrogeological characterization of the rock formation. Great effort has been laid on the development of hydrogeological instruments for hydraulic tests and groundwater head measurements. In order to obtain hydrochemical investigations with high quality, a complete system for sampling and analysis of ground water has been developed. (orig./PW)

  12. Goal-oriented Site Characterization in Hydrogeological Applications: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, W.; de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we address the importance of goal-oriented site characterization. Given the multiple sources of uncertainty in hydrogeological applications, information needs of modeling, prediction and decision support should be satisfied with efficient and rational field campaigns. In this work, we provide an overview of an optimal sampling design framework based on Bayesian decision theory, statistical parameter inference and Bayesian model averaging. It optimizes the field sampling campaign around decisions on environmental performance metrics (e.g., risk, arrival times, etc.) while accounting for parametric and model uncertainty in the geostatistical characterization, in forcing terms, and measurement error. The appealing aspects of the framework lie on its goal-oriented character and that it is directly linked to the confidence in a specified decision. We illustrate how these concepts could be applied in a human health risk problem where uncertainty from both hydrogeological and health parameters are accounted.

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE U-3bl COLLAPSE ZONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada and National Security Technologies, LLC

    2006-01-01

    The U-3bl collapse crater was formed by an underground nuclear test in August 1962. This crater and the adjoining U-3ax crater were subsequently developed and used as a bulk low-level radioactive waste disposal cell (U-3ax/bl), which is part of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Various investigations have been conducted to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics and properties in the vicinity of the U-3ax/bl waste disposal cell. This report presents data from one of these investigations, conducted in 1996. Also included in this report is a review of pertinent nuclear testing records, which shows that the testing operations and hydrogeologic setting of the U-3ax/bl site were typical for the period and location of testing

  14. Application of GIS in hydrogeology and engineering geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Mihalová

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogeology as a specific science discipline has a multi spectral interest focused to officiating sources in drink water and utilization water and also in area aimed for pure mineral water sources. Although engineering geology works exercise with piece of knowledge, geosciences are focused to territorial planning, investment construction and protection environment. Application of GIS in appointed problems purvey possibility quality, quick and high special analysis appointed problems and take advantage all accessible quality and quantity related information of water focused to hydrogeology, as to occurrence varied basement soil, appropriate for building activity, possibly appointed for protection. Solution of this probleme is on first name terms definite interest area, as to adjudication sources focused economic significance state.

  15. Results of monitoring at Olkiluoto in 2013. Hydrology and hydrogeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaittinen, T.; Ahokas, H.; Komulainen, J.; Nummela, J.; Pentti, E.; Turku, J. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Karvonen, T. [WaterHope, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.

    2014-12-15

    The impact of the construction of ONKALO is monitored by measuring and observing numerous different parameters related to hydrology, geochemistry, environment, rock mechanics and foreign materials. The Hydrological Monitoring Programme consists of the following parameters: groundwater level, hydraulic head, flow conditions in open drillholes, transverse flow, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity (in situ EC), precipitation (including snow), sea-water level, surface flow (runoff), infiltration, ground frost, leakages in tunnels, and water balance in the tunnel system and in Korvensuo Reservoir. This Report focuses on hydrogeological parameters. Other parameters, like precipitation, ground frost etc. will be reported in the Monitoring Report of Environment. Updated monitoring program was introduced in the beginning of 2012. The updated program will be used for the period before repository operation. Only minor changes were implemented. Monitoring has been carried out according to plan. This Report presents the results for the year 2013. Excavation of the access tunnel was completed in 2012. Demonstration tunnels 3 and 4 were excavated and central tunnel 1 was continued from chainage 4366-22 m to chainage 4366-60 m in 2013. Total inflow into ONKALO down to chainage 4580 m including shaft ONK-KU2 down to level -437 m was on average 35 l/min in 2013. The mapping of water leakages and moisture conditions on the tunnel walls and the ceiling has been continued. The general pattern of leakages has remained similar during the construction of ONKALO. Most significant differences are caused by seasonal effects like condensation of warm ventilation air on tunnel walls and ceiling. The changes observed in the groundwater level in observation tubes in the overburden and in shallow drillholes in the bedrock are not necessarily caused by the construction of ONKALO. However, weak indications of a local decrease in groundwater level have been observed. Effects on the head

  16. Neutron-activation analysis of natural water applied to hydrogeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landstroem, O [AB Atomenergi, Stockholm (Sweden); Wenner, C G [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Quaternary Research

    1965-12-15

    The natural content of elements in water has been utilized to characterize different groundwater supplies and reveal the presence of groundwater streams. A neutron-activation method including chemical group separation techniques has been used for the determination of trace elements. Analyzed water samples from three different places in northern Sweden illustrate the application to common and important hydrogeological problems, such as the quality and capacity of water supplies, the origin and existence of groundwater streams and groundwater exchange with rivers.

  17. Characterization of hydrogeologic units using matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    Determination of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste requires the use of numerical flow and transport models. Input for these models includes parameters that describe hydrologic properties and the initial and boundary conditions for all rock materials within the unsaturated zone, as well as some of the upper rocks in the saturated zone. There are 30 hydrogeologic units in the unsaturated zone, and each unit is defined by limited ranges where a discrete volume of rock contains similar hydrogeologic properties. These hydrogeologic units can be easily located in space by using three-dimensional lithostratigraphic models based on relation- ships of the properties with the lithostratigraphy. Physical properties of bulk density, porosity, and particle density; flow properties of saturated hydraulic conductivity and moisture-retention characteristics; and the state variables (variables describing the current state of field conditions) of saturation and water potential were determined for each unit. Units were defined using (1) a data base developed from 4,892 rock samples collected from the coring of 23 shallow and 8 deep boreholes, (2) described lithostratigraphic boundaries and corresponding relations to porosity, (3) recognition of transition zones with pronounced changes in properties over short vertical distances, (4) characterization of the influence of mineral alteration on hydrologic properties such as permeability and moisture-retention characteristics, and (5) a statistical analysis to evaluate where boundaries should be adjusted to minimize the variance within layers. This study describes the correlation of hydrologic properties to porosity, a property that is well related to the lithostratigraphy and depositional and cooling history of the volcanic deposits and can, therefore, be modeled to be distributed laterally. Parameters of the hydrogeologic units developed in this study and the

  18. Neutron-activation analysis of natural water applied to hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landstroem, O.; Wenner, C.G.

    1965-12-01

    The natural content of elements in water has been utilized to characterize different groundwater supplies and reveal the presence of groundwater streams. A neutron-activation method including chemical group separation techniques has been used for the determination of trace elements. Analyzed water samples from three different places in northern Sweden illustrate the application to common and important hydrogeological problems, such as the quality and capacity of water supplies, the origin and existence of groundwater streams and groundwater exchange with rivers

  19. Hydrogeological, hydrochemical and isotope-hydrological investigations of surface and crevice waters in the Grimsel area (Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, A.

    1995-12-01

    The Grimsel rock laboratory (Hasli valley, Berner Oberland, Switzerland) has been used since 1984 by NAGRA (Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle, Wettingen, Switzerland). It is about 450 metres deep under the Juchli ridge in the crystalline rock basement of the Aar massif. Within the framework of an international cooperation, a great many research topics in connection with the underground storage of radioactive waste are being studied at this location. Their focus is, inter alia, on the following: hydrogeological investigations of crevice water movement, investigations of geophysical structures and rock tension measurements, migration of radionuclides in an individual crevice. So far, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conditions have only been studied as far as they related to the needs of individual investigations, and systematic information on global waterways in the Juchli basement was scarce. By contrast, this work aimed at the chemical characterization of surface and spring waters in the catchment area of the rock laboratory as well as the crevice waters in the day-drift system, the description of the chemical development of the waters during their passage through the crevice system, and the assessment of the mean underground retention time of crevice waters by means of different stable and radioactive isotopes. In addition, hydrogeological mapping of the system of waters above ground and crevice water accesses underground was carried out. (orig./SR) [de

  20. Determination of hydrogeological conditions in large unconfined aquifer: A case study in central Drava plain (NE Slovenia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keršmanc, Teja; Brenčič, Mihael

    2016-04-01

    In several countries, many unregulated landfills exits which releasing harmful contaminations to the underlying aquifer. The Kidričevo industrial complex is located in southeastern part of Drava plain in NW Slovenia. In the past during the production of alumina and aluminum approximately 11.2 million tons of wastes were deposit directly on the ground on two landfills covering an area of 61 hectares. Hydrogeological studies were intended to better characterized conditions bellow the landfill. Geological and hydrogeological conditions of Quaternary unconfined aquifer were analyzed with lithological characterization of well logs and cutting debris and XRF diffraction of silty sediments on 9 boreholes. Hydrogeological conditions: hydraulic permeability aquifer was determined with hydraulic tests and laboratory grain size analyses where empirical USBR and Hazen methods were applied. Dynamics of groundwater was determined by groundwater contour maps and groundwater level fluctuations. The impact of landfill was among chemical analyses of groundwater characterised by electrical conductivity measurements and XRF spectrometry of sand sediments. The heterogeneous Quaternary aquifer composed mainly of gravel and sand, is between 38 m and 47.5 m thick. Average hydraulic permeability of aquifer is within the decade 10-3 m/s. Average hydraulic permeability estimated on grain size curves is 6.29*10-3 m/s, and for the pumping tests is 4.0*10-3 m/s. General direction of groundwater flow is from west to east. During high water status the groundwater flow slightly changes flow direction to the southwest and when pumping station in Kidričevo (NW of landfill) is active groundwater flows to northeast. Landfills have significant impact on groundwater quality.

  1. Use of a risk-based hydrogeologic model to set remedial goals in a Puget Sound basin watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascoe, G.; Gould, L.; Martin, J.; Riley, M.; Floyd, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Port of Seattle is redeveloping industrial land for a container terminal along the southwest Seattle waterfront. Concrete, asphalt, ballast, and a landfill geomembrane will cover the site and prevent direct contact with surface soils, so remedial goals focused on groundwater contamination from subsurface soils. Groundwater at the site flows along an old stormwater drain, in a filled estuary of a small creek, to Elliott Bay. Remedial goals for a variety of organic chemicals, metals, and TPH in subsurface soils were identified to protect marine receptors in the bay and their consumers. Washington State and federal marine water quality criteria were the starting points in the risk-based model, and corresponding concentrations of chemicals in groundwater were back-calculated through a hydrogeologic model. The hydrogeologic model included a mixing zone component in the bay and dilution/attenuation factors along the groundwater transport pathway that were determined from onsite groundwater and surface water chemical concentrations. A rearranged Summers equation was then applied in a second back-calculation to determine subsurface soil concentrations corresponding to the back calculated groundwater concentrations. The equation was based on calculated aquifer flow rates for the small creek watershed and rates of infiltration through surface materials calculated for each redevelopment soil cover type by the HELP model. Results of the risk-based hydrogeologic back-calculation model indicate that, depending on soil cover type at the site, concentrations in subsurface soils of PCBs from 2 to 1,000 mg/kg and of TPH up to free phase concentration would not result in risks to marine organisms or their consumers in Elliott Bay

  2. Hydrogeological characterization and surveillance of the Asse site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempel, C. Von; Brewitz, W.

    1995-01-01

    The Asse salt mine is located about 20 km southeast of Braunschweig in Northern Germany and the testing of radioactive waste disposal took place in the mine during 1967 to 1978. Observations of the hydrogeological conditions have been carried out for 25 years in the covering rock strata above the caprock and at the flanks of the Asse salt anticline. For geological and hydrogeological investigations 27 large diameter boreholes, 19 piezometers and 5 deep boreholes were sunk into the rock formations above the Asse salt anticline and 29 hydrological observation points (mostly measuring weirs) were constructed. Hydraulic conductivities between 10 -4 and 10 -9 m/s, mostly between 10 -5 and 10 -8 m/s were determined in the Triassic formations by pumping tests, the oscillation method and packer-tests. The groundwater recharge rate is between 10 and 20% of the yearly precipitation. Isotopic analyses showed that in the rocks above the Asse salt anticline there are three kinds of groundwater: near-surface precipitation; an intermediate-depth ground water corresponding to near-surface 2H/18O but without tritium from young precipitations; and deep groundwater below 740 m, without any tritium. In the vicinity of the Asse mine, the surface rocks above the Asse salt anticline, shows good conditions as a hydrogeological barrier

  3. IAEA co-ordinated research programme on the transport of low specific activity materials and surface contaminated objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) prepares regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material, and periodically revised editions of these are published. These regulations are adopted by individual countries across the world and by international organisations concerned with transport. Whilst it is desirable to have a stable framework of regulatory requirements, there is also a need to take account of technical advances and operational experience and revise the regulations. From time to time Co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRP) are established to investigate particular areas of the regulations that are giving concern. In 1996 the IAEA Standing Advisory Group on the Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM) concluded that the requirements for classification, packaging and transport of low specific activity (LSA) material and surface contaminated objects (SCO) did not always have a strong radiation protection basis. Accordingly SAGSTRAM established a CRP with an overall objective to develop a dose-based approach for establishing LSA/SCO requirements. Six countries are participating in this CRP. Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom and United States. Each country is carrying out work that is outlined in agreements with the IAEA, with the work aimed at meeting the specific objective of the agreement and also contributing to achieving the overall objective of the CRP. Completion of the CRP usually involves the preparation of an IAEA TECDOC by a Consultant Services Meeting (CSM), and this TECDOC will summarise the work performed under the CRP and include any recommendations made by the CRP. Following the establishment of the CRP in 1997, the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) was held in December 1997. The second RCM was held in March 1999, with the final RCM planned for the end of 2000. The work being carried out by Brazil and Canada is focused upon the transport of uranium and thorium ores, and is a mixture of theoretical and

  4. Drinking Water Contaminants -- Standards and Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Drinking Water Contaminants – Standards and Regulations EPA identifies contaminants to regulate ... other partners to implement these SDWA provisions. Regulated Contaminants National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWRs) - table of ...

  5. Hydrogeologic characterization of devonian aquifers in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, E.

    1988-01-01

    This article carried out the assistance research project implementation in devonian sedimentary units as a potentials aquifers and their best use to school supplying and rural population in central area of Uruguay.

  6. Long-term ERT monitoring of biogeochemical changes of an aged hydrocarbon contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterina, David; Flores Orozco, Adrian; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Adequate management of contaminated sites requires information with improved spatio-temporal resolution, in particular to assess bio-geochemical processes, such as the transformation and degradation of contaminants, precipitation of minerals or changes in groundwater geochemistry occurring during and after remediation procedures. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), a geophysical method sensitive to pore-fluid and pore-geometry properties, permits to gain quasi-continuous information about subsurface properties in real-time and has been consequently widely used for the characterization of hydrocarbon-impacted sediments. However, its application for the long-term monitoring of processes accompanying natural or engineered bioremediation is still difficult due to the poor understanding of the role that biogeochemical processes play in the electrical signatures. For in-situ studies, the task is further complicated by the variable signal-to-noise ratio and the variations of environmental parameters leading to resolution changes in the electrical images. In this work, we present ERT imaging results for data collected over a period of two years on a site affected by a diesel fuel contamination and undergoing bioremediation. We report low electrical resistivity anomalies in areas associated to the highest contaminant concentrations likely due transformations of the contaminant due to microbial activity and accompanying release of metabolic products. We also report large seasonal variations of the bulk electrical resistivity in the contaminated areas in correlation with temperature and groundwater level fluctuations. However, the amplitude of bulk electrical resistivity variations largely exceeds the amplitude expected given existing petrophysical models. Our results suggest that the variations in electrical properties are mainly controlled by microbial activity which in turn depends on soil temperature and hydrogeological conditions. Therefore, ERT can be suggested as

  7. Long-term ERT monitoring of biogeochemical changes of an aged hydrocarbon contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterina, David; Flores Orozco, Adrian; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Adequate management of contaminated sites requires information with improved spatio-temporal resolution, in particular to assess bio-geochemical processes, such as the transformation and degradation of contaminants, precipitation of minerals or changes in groundwater geochemistry occurring during and after remediation procedures. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), a geophysical method sensitive to pore-fluid and pore-geometry properties, permits to gain quasi-continuous information about subsurface properties in real-time and has been consequently widely used for the characterization of hydrocarbon-impacted sediments. However, its application for the long-term monitoring of processes accompanying natural or engineered bioremediation is still difficult due to the poor understanding of the role that biogeochemical processes play in the electrical signatures. For in-situ studies, the task is further complicated by the variable signal-to-noise ratio and the variations of environmental parameters leading to resolution changes in the electrical images. In this work, we present ERT imaging results for data collected over a period of two years on a site affected by a diesel fuel contamination and undergoing bioremediation. We report low electrical resistivity anomalies in areas associated to the highest contaminant concentrations likely due transformations of the contaminant due to microbial activity and accompanying release of metabolic products. We also report large seasonal variations of the bulk electrical resistivity in the contaminated areas in correlation with temperature and groundwater level fluctuations. However, the amplitude of bulk electrical resistivity variations largely exceeds the amplitude expected given existing petrophysical models. Our results suggest that the variations in electrical properties are mainly controlled by microbial activity which in turn depends on soil temperature and hydrogeological conditions. Therefore, ERT can be suggested as

  8. Contamination analysis unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig

  9. Consoil '98 ; 6th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil, organized by Research Centre Karlsruhe (KZK, D), TNO, in cooperation with Scottish enterprise, May 17-21, 1998, EICC Edinburgh; vol. 1 en 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harder, W.; Ahrendt, F.; Hart, I.

    1998-01-01

    These volumes present the proceedings of ConSoil '98, the sixth international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil. This series of conferences focuses on policies, research and development, regulation, practical implementation and experience related to contaminated sites. Legal, financial and

  10. Summary of Available Hydrogeologic Data for the Northeast Portion of the Alluvial Aquifer at Louisville, Kentucky

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unthank, Michael D; Nelson, Jr., Hugh L

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogeologic characteristics of the unconsolidated glacial outwash sand and gravel deposits that compose the northeast portion of the alluvial aquifer at Louisville, Kentucky, indicate a prolific...

  11. The necessity and application of stratigraphic borings in hydrogeologic site assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciacca, J.

    1991-01-01

    The siting and placement of monitoring wells is one of the most critical elements in hydrogeologic assessments of contaminated sites. Monitoring wells are placed to collect hydraulic and chemical concentration data to: (1) determine potential groundwater flow paths and rates: (2) analyze the nature and extent of chemical constituents in groundwater; and (3) estimate contaminant fate and transport. In many instances monitoring wells provide inappropriate or erroneous hydraulic data, do not provide coverage of potential high permeability flow pathways (such as channel sands) or may themselves create (through improper construction) a vertical conduit for contaminant flow from low permeability to high permeability units. This problem is commonly due to installing monitoring wells before conducting essential stratigraphic analysis and formulating a depositional model for the site area. This paper presents case examples where stratigraphic borings were drilled and logged in the vicinity of proposed well locations to effectively design and install the monitoring well network. The borings were continuously sampled or geophysically logged to provide a vertical profile of the borehole. In addition, the geophysical logs provided curve signatures which allowed interpretation of depositional facies. These data were used to interpret subsurface stratigraphy and effectively position monitoring wells that achieve the above objectives and prevent problems associated with faulty well positioning. This method may cost more initially. However, these initial costs are cheaper than long-term project expenses for abandoning improperly completed wells. subsequently installing supplemental monitoring wells or modifying poorly designed treatment systems which resulted from improper or insufficient data generated from the initial monitoring network

  12. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix

  13. Preliminary hydrogeologic evaluation of the Cincinnati Arch region for underground high-level radioactive waste disposal, Indiana, Kentucky , and Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, O.B.; Davis, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary interpretation of available hydrogeologic data suggests that some areas underlying eastern Indiana, north-central Kentucky, and western Ohio might be worthy of further study regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Precambrian crystalline rocks buried beneath Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the area. The data indicate that (1) largest areas of deepest potential burial and thickest sedimentary rock cover occur in eastern Indiana; (2) highest concentrations of dissolved solids in the basal sandstone aquifer, suggesting the most restricted circulation, are found in the southern part of the area near the Kentucky-Ohio State line and in southeastern Indiana; (3) largest areas of lowest porosity in the basal sandstone aquifer, low porosity taken as an indicator of the lowest groundwater flow velocity and contaminant migration, are found in northeastern Indiana and northwestern Ohio, central and southeastern Indiana, and central Kentucky; (4) the thickest confining units that directly overlie the basal sandstone aquifer are found in central Kentucky and eastern Indiana where their thickness exceeds 500 ft; (5) steeply dipping faults that form potential hydraulic connections between crystalline rock, the basal sandstone aquifer, and the freshwater circulation system occur on the boundaries of the study area mainly in central Kentucky and central Indiana. Collectively, these data indicate that the hydrogeology of the sedimentary rocks in the western part of the study area is more favorably suited than that in the remainder of the area for the application of the buried crystalline-rock concept. (USGS)

  14. Preliminary hydrogeologic evaluation of the Cincinnati arch region for underground high-level radioactive waste disposal, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, O.B.; Davis, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary interpretation of available hydrogeologic data suggests that some areas underlying eastern Indiana, north-central Kentucky, and western Ohio might be worthy of further study regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Precambrian crystalline rocks buried beneath Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the area. The data indicate that (1) largest areas of deepest potential burial and thickest sedimentary rock cover occur in eastern Indiana; (2) highest concentrations of dissolved solids in the basal sandstone aquifer, suggesting the most restricted circulation, are found in the southern part of the area near the Kentucky-Ohio State line and in southeastern Indiana; (3) largest areas of lowest porosity in the basal sandstone aquifer, low porosity taken as an indicator of the lowest groundwater flow velocity and contaminant migration, are found in northeastern Indiana and northwestern Ohio, central and southeastern Indiana, and central Kentucky; (4) the thickest confining units that directly overlie the basal sandstone aquifer are found in central Kentucky and eastern Indiana where their thickness exceeds 500 ft; (5) steeply dipping faults that form potential hydraulic connections between crystalline rock, the basal sandstone aquifer, and the freshwater circulation system occur on the boundaries of the study area mainly in central Kentucky and central Indiana. Collectively, these data indicate that the hydrogeology of the sedimentary rocks in the western part of the study area is more favorably suited than that in the remainder of the area for the application of the buried crystalline-rock concept. 39 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Hydrogeologic characterization of wells HTH-1, UE18r, UE6e, and HTH-3, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, B.F.; McKay, W.A.; Chapman, J.B.; Tyler, S.W.

    1991-06-01

    Monitoring for the migration of contaminants in groundwater or for the proper design of nuclear test emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires proper placement and completion of monitoring wells. This is only possible if the hydrogeologic system is understood in a regional and local context, necessitating data from existing wells and boreholes. Though the NTS Groundwater Characterization Project will be drilling wells, their great expense limits the number of new wells. However, there are many existing boreholes and wells on the NTS which have not been completely evaluated hydrologically. Some of these are incorporated in the Long Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), others are related to the testing programs. In all cases, additional site investigation in necessary to properly interpret the hydrogeologic data from these wells. Monitoring wells on the NTS are poorly characterized with regard to aquifers penetrated, vertical hydraulic gradients, and vertical variations in water quality. One of the goals of the well validation program was to gain a thorough understanding of the parameters needed to interpret the source and fate potential hazardous and radioactive substances that may be detected in these wells in the future. One of the most critical parameters for monitoring is the knowledge of what aquifer or geologic unit is being sampled when a water sample is collected. Pumped water samples are weighted most heavily to the water quality of the most productive (highest transmissivity) aquifer penetrated by the well

  16. Use of data fusion to optimize contaminant transport predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeckhout, E. van

    1997-10-01

    The original data fusion workstation, as envisioned by Coleman Research Corp., was constructed under funding from DOE (EM-50) in the early 1990s. The intent was to demonstrate the viability of fusion and analysis of data from various types of sensors for waste site characterization, but primarily geophysical. This overall concept changed over time and evolved more towards hydrogeological (groundwater) data fusion after some initial geophysical fusion work focused at Coleman. This initial geophysical fusion platform was tested at Hanford and Fernald, and the later hydrogeological fusion work has been demonstrated at Pantex, Savannah River, the US Army Letterkenny Depot, a DoD Massachusetts site and a DoD California site. The hydrogeologic data fusion package has been spun off to a company named Fusion and Control Technology, Inc. This package is called the Hydrological Fusion And Control Tool (Hydro-FACT) and is being sold as a product that links with the software package, MS-VMS (MODFLOW-SURFACT Visual Modeling System), sold by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. MODFLOW is a USGS development, and is in the public domain. Since the government paid for the data fusion development at Coleman, the government and their contractors have access to the data fusion technology in this hydrogeologic package for certain computer platforms, but would probably have to hire FACT (Fusion and Control Technology, Inc.,) and/or HydroGeoLogic for some level of software and services. Further discussion in this report will concentrate on the hydrogeologic fusion module that is being sold as Hydro-FACT, which can be linked with MS-VMS

  17. Logs of wells and boreholes drilled during hydrogeologic studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, January 1, 1991--September 1, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, N.B.; McConihe, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 is located in the Altamont Hills between Livermore and Tracy, about 18 road miles southeast of Livermore, California. The site is used as a test facility to support national defense research carried out by LLNL. This Addendum 2 to the Logs of Wells and Boreholes Drilled During Hydrogeologic Studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 presents hydrogeologic logs for monitor wells and boreholes drilled primarily between January 1, 1991 and September 1, 1992. Some logs drilled earlier and not incorporated in earlier volumes of this document are also included here. A small number of logs drilled before September 1, 1992, are not available at the time of closing the report for publication of this volume (Addendum 2), but will be included in subsequent documents. By September 1, 1992, a total of 495 monitor wells and 285 exploratory boreholes had been drilled at Site 300 since the beginning of hydrogeologic studies in 1982. The primary purpose of these logs is to document lithologic and hydrogeologic conditions together with well completion information. For this reason, not all chemical analytical data are presented. These logs report concentrations of only the most commonly encountered volatile organic compounds, trace metals, and radionuclides detected in ground water and soil samples collected during drilling

  18. Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE's Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE's Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D ampersand D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D ampersand D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation

  19. Groundwater quality assessment for the Bear Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant, 1990: Data interpretations and proposed program modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This report is a detailed assessment of groundwater quality at several hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The sites are located in an area defined as the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR), which is one of three hydrogeologic regimes that have been defined at the Y-12 Plant in an effort to unify and coordinate site-specific monitoring activities for planning and reporting purposes. Section 2.0 contains background information regarding the monitored sites and a discussion of the program objectives. An overview of the complex hydrogeologic system in the BCHR is provided in Section 3.0. A discussion of the interpretive assumptions used in evaluating the 1990 assessment data, a review of groundwater geochemistry and background water quality, detailed descriptions of groundwater contaminant plumes, and a discussion regarding the quality of groundwater and surface water exiting the BCHR are presented in Section 4.0. Findings of the 1990 assessment program are summarized in Section 5.0. Modification to the assessment monitoring program proposed for 1991 are in Section 6.0, and a list of references (Section 7.0) concludes the report. 20 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs

  20. Groundwater quality assessment for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: Data interpretations and proposed program modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This report is a detailed assessment of groundwater quality at several hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The sites are located in an area defined as the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (UEFPCHR), which is one of three hydrogeologic regimes that have been established at the Y-12 Plant in an effort to unify and coordinate site-specific monitoring activities for planning and reporting purposes. Section 2.0 contains background information and a discussion of the 1990 program objectives. An overview of the complex hydrogeologic system in the UEFPCHR is provided in Section 3.0. A discussion of the interpretive assumptions used in evaluating the 1990 assessment data, a review of groundwater geochemistry and background water quality, detailed descriptions of groundwater contaminant plumes, and a discussion regarding the quality of groundwater exiting the UEFPCHR are presented in Section 4.0. Findings of the 1990 assessment program are summarized in Section 5.0. Modifications to the assessment monitoring program proposed for 1991 are presented in Section 6.0, and a list of references (Section 7.0) concludes the report. 20 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs

  1. NEA's analysis of the needs in innovation and research in the domain of dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, G.

    2014-01-01

    Today's approach of the dismantling of nuclear facilities is labour intensive and consequently very expensive. NEA's study suggests that research works should be done to find more efficient technologies for decontamination and dismantling. 5 lines of research have been identified by NEA. First, new technologies must be found to get a more accurate spatial distribution of contaminants. Secondly, the different cutting methods must be assessed in terms of efficiency, dosimetry and secondary waste generation. Thirdly, a better understanding of the chemical and physical processes that may be used for the decontamination of metals, concretes, underground water and soil. Fourthly, the management of radioactive waste implies to know the interaction between wastes and packages over a very long period. Fifthly, an accurate characterization of a complex site housing various contaminating sources and different hydro-geological conditions implies the development of 3-dimensional radiation transport codes and the use of innovative means like satellite monitoring. (A.C.)

  2. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  3. Enhancing Location-Related Hydrogeological Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kmoch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the corpus of three geoscientific journals to investigate if there are enough locational references in research articles to apply a geographical search method, such as the example of New Zealand. Based on all available abstracts and all freely available papers of the “New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics”, the “New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research”, and the “Journal of Hydrology, New Zealand”, we searched title, abstracts, and full texts for place name occurrences that match records from the official Land Information New Zealand (LINZ gazetteer. We generated ISO standard compliant metadata records for each article including the spatial references and made them available in a public catalogue service. This catalogue can be queried for articles based on authors, titles, keywords, topics, and spatial reference. We visualize the results in a map to show which area the research articles are about, and how much and how densely geographic space is described through these geoscientific research articles by mapping mentioned place names by their geographic locations. We outlined the methodology and technical framework for the geo-referencing of the journal articles and the platform design for this knowledge inventory. The results indicate that the use of well-crafted abstracts for journal articles with carefully chosen place names of relevance for the article provides a guideline for geographically referencing unstructured information like journal articles and reports in order to make such resources discoverable through geographical queries. Lastly, this approach can actively support integrated holistic assessment of water resources and support decision making.

  4. The value of DCIP geophysical surveys for contaminated site investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balbarini, Nicola; Rønde, Vinni Kampman; Maurya, Pradip Kumar

    an old factory site by combining traditional geological, hydrological, and contaminant concentration data with DCIP surveys. The plume consisted of xenobiotic organic compounds and inorganics. The study assesses benefits and limitations of DCIP geophysics for contaminated site investigations. A 3D......Geophysical methods are increasingly being used in contaminant hydrogeology to map lithology, hydraulic properties, and contaminant plumes with a high ionic strength. Advances in the Direct Current resistivity and Induced Polarization (DCIP) method allow the collection of high resolution three...... water and below the streambed. Surface DCIP surveys supported the characterization of the spatial variability in geology, hydraulic conductivity and contaminant concentration. Though DCIP data interpretation required additional borehole data, the DCIP survey reduced the number of boreholes required...

  5. Research Implementation and Quality Assurance Project Plan: An Evaluation of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technologies for the Detection of Fugitive Contamination at Selected Superfund Hazardous Waste Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a research collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC), for the purpose of evaluating the utility of hyperspectral remote sensing technology for post-closure monitoring of residual contamination at delisted and closed hazardous waste sites as defined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act [CERCLA (also known as 'Superfund')] of 1980 and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986.

  6. Hydrogeologic and hydrologic investigations in connection with the underground disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempel, C. v.; Batsche, H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to permit an assessment of the sometimes very long storage periods occurring in connection with final disposals and of the consequences resulting in the case of an eventual failure, the migration behaviour of selected radionuclides was investigated in the strata of the surface rock masses sourrounding the respective salt stocks. Our Institute performed the corresponding activities in three districts: In the area of the former salt mine Asse II a hydrogeologic research programme is realized in close cooperation with the GSF Institut fuer Tieflagerung, Braunschweig. Within the scope of the ''Projekt Sicherheitsstudien Entsorgung (PSE)'' the required investigations are carried out in the district of the salt stock Gorleben. Within the scope of a NAGRA project, isotope-hydrological measurements were taken up in connection with investigations on the storage of radioactive waste materials in crystalline rocks of Switzerland. (orig./RW) [de

  7. Index-based groundwater vulnerability mapping models using hydrogeological settings: A critical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Bansod, Baban K.S.; Debnath, Sanjit K.; Thakur, Praveen Kumar; Ghanshyam, C.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater vulnerability maps are useful for decision making in land use planning and water resource management. This paper reviews the various groundwater vulnerability assessment models developed across the world. Each model has been evaluated in terms of its pros and cons and the environmental conditions of its application. The paper further discusses the validation techniques used for the generated vulnerability maps by various models. Implicit challenges associated with the development of the groundwater vulnerability assessment models have also been identified with scientific considerations to the parameter relations and their selections. - Highlights: • Various index-based groundwater vulnerability assessment models have been discussed. • A comparative analysis of the models and its applicability in different hydrogeological settings has been discussed. • Research problems of underlying vulnerability assessment models are also reported in this review paper

  8. Index-based groundwater vulnerability mapping models using hydrogeological settings: A critical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Prashant, E-mail: prashantkumar@csio.res.in [CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research—CSIO, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Bansod, Baban K.S.; Debnath, Sanjit K. [CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research—CSIO, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Thakur, Praveen Kumar [Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (ISRO), Dehradun 248001 (India); Ghanshyam, C. [CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research—CSIO, Chandigarh 160030 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Groundwater vulnerability maps are useful for decision making in land use planning and water resource management. This paper reviews the various groundwater vulnerability assessment models developed across the world. Each model has been evaluated in terms of its pros and cons and the environmental conditions of its application. The paper further discusses the validation techniques used for the generated vulnerability maps by various models. Implicit challenges associated with the development of the groundwater vulnerability assessment models have also been identified with scientific considerations to the parameter relations and their selections. - Highlights: • Various index-based groundwater vulnerability assessment models have been discussed. • A comparative analysis of the models and its applicability in different hydrogeological settings has been discussed. • Research problems of underlying vulnerability assessment models are also reported in this review paper.

  9. Coupled geochemical/hydrogeological modelling to assess the origin of salinity at the Tono area (Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimera, Jordi; Ruiz, Eduardo; Luna, Miguel; Arcos, David; Jordana, Salvador; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2005-01-01

    Numerical models are powerful tools for the characterization of groundwater flow, especially when integrating geochemical and hydrogeological data. This paper describes modeling exercises performed in the area surrounding the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Construction Site in central Japan. A particular issue being investigated at the MIU Site is the presence of saline water detected at depth in certain boreholes. The main objective of this study is to develop conceptual physical models for the origin of this salinity and to test these conceptual models using numerical modeling techniques. One scenario being investigated is that the saline fluids represent residual Miocene age seawater which has been slightly altered by water-rock interactions. It is likely that during Miocene times, seawater inundated the Tono area. This hypothesis is partially supported by carbon and oxygen isotopic data of the calcite fracture filling materials. (author)

  10. Characterization of hydrogeologic units using matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    Determination of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste requires the use of numerical flow and transport models. Input for these models includes parameters that describe hydrologic properties and the initial and boundary conditions for all rock materials within the unsaturated zone, as well as some of the upper rocks in the saturated zone. There are 30 hydrogeologic units in the unsaturated zone, and each unit is defined by limited ranges where a discrete volume of rock contains similar hydrogeologic properties. These hydrogeologic units can be easily located in space by using three-dimensional lithostratigraphic models based on relationships of the properties with the lithostratigraphy. Physical properties of bulk density, porosity, and particle density; flow properties of saturated hydraulic conductivity and moisture-retention characteristics; and the state variables (variables describing the current state of field conditions) of saturation and water potential were determined for each unit. Units were defined using (1) a data base developed from 4,892 rock samples collected from the coring of 23 shallow and 8 deep boreholes, (2) described lithostratigraphic boundaries and corresponding relations to porosity, (3) recognition of transition zones with pronounced changes in properties over short vertical distances, (4) characterization of the influence of mineral alteration on hydrologic properties such as permeability and moisture-retention characteristics, and (5) a statistical analysis to evaluate where boundaries should be adjusted to minimize the variance within layers. This study describes the correlation of hydrologic properties to porosity, a property that is well related to the lithostratigraphy and depositional and cooling history of the volcanic deposits and can, therefore, be modeled to be distributed laterally

  11. Hydrogeological modelling of the eastern region of Areco river locally detailed on Atucha I and II nuclear power plants area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattone, Natalia I.; Fuentes, Nestor O.

    2009-01-01

    Water flow behaviour of Pampeano aquifer was modeled using Visual Mod-flow software Package 2.8.1 with the assumption of a free aquifer, within the region of the Areco river and extending to the rivers of 'Canada Honda' and 'de la Cruz'. Steady state regime was simulated and grid refinement allows obtaining locally detailed calculation in the area of Atucha I and II Nuclear power plants, in order to compute unsteady situations as the consequence of water flow variations from and to the aquifer, enabling the model to study the movement of possible contaminant particles in the hydrogeologic system. In this work the effects of rivers action, the recharge conditions and the flow lines are analyzed, taking always into account the range of reliability of obtained results, considering the incidence of uncertainties introduced by data input system, the estimates and interpolation of parameters used. (author)

  12. Activation analysis of indium used as tracer in hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, S.P.; Farcasiu, O.M.; Gaspar, E.; Spiridon, S.; Nazarov, V.M.; Frontasieva, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    About 2500 samples of 18 hydro-karstic structures from Romania have been analyzed. The water flow rates were in the range of 0.05 to 2.7 m 3 /s and transit time values were from 30 h to 200 days. The quantity of indium used for a labelling was a calculated function of the emergency flow rate and the estimated transit time and varied from 1 to 100 g. The results prove that the activation analysis of indium in water samples combined with preconcentration by coprecipitation is an useful method in hydrogeological studies

  13. Hydrogeologic impacts of underground (Longwall) mining in the Illinois basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that hydrogeological impacts of active longwall mining were studied at two sites in Illinois. At the site with the more transmissive sandstone aquifer, aquifer permeabilities increased an order of magnitude due to subsidence. Piezometric levels declined with subsidence due to increased porosity, and ahead of mining due to a transmitted drawdown. Levels recovered rapidly at first and fully over two years. At the site with the less transmissive aquifer, impacts were similar except that recovery has been limited. Local aquifer enhancement through increased yield can occur, but only where the aquifer is transmissive enough for recovery

  14. Origin of VC-only plumes from naturally enhanced dechlorination in a peat-rich hydrogeologic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, Maria; Amorosi, Alessandro; Campo, Bruno; Herrero-Martìn, Sara; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Parker, Beth L.; Gargini, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of vinyl chloride (VC) is often a main concern at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents due to its high degree of toxicity and carcinogenicity. VC occurrence in aquifers is most often related to the degradation of higher chlorinated ethenes or ethanes and it is generally detected in plumes along with parent contaminants. However, specific combination of stratigraphic, hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions can enhance the degradation of parents and lead to the formation of plumes almost entirely composed of VC (i.e. VC-only plumes). This paper investigates the causes of VC-only plumes in the aquifers below the city of Ferrara (northern Italy) by combining multiple lines of evidence. The City of Ferrara is located on an alluvial lowland, built by the River Po, and is made up of alternating unconsolidated sandy aquifer and silt-clay aquitard deposits of fluvial origin. This region has been strongly impacted by prior industrial activities, with the occurrence of chlorinated compounds at several sites. VC-only plumes with uncertain source location were found at two contaminated sites. The source zone of a third plume composed of chloroethenes from PCE to VC was investigated for high resolution depositional facies architecture and contaminant distribution (contaminant concentration and Compound Specific Isotope Analysis - CSIA). The investigation suggested that degradation of PCE and TCE takes place during contaminant migration through peat-rich (swamp) layers related to the Holocene transgression, which locally act as a ;reactor; for stimulating degradation with the accumulation of VC in the strongly reducing environment of the peat. Regional-scale stratigraphic architecture showed the ubiquitous occurrence of swamp layers at distinct stratigraphic levels in the investigated system and their apparent linkage to the in situ creation of the VC-only plumes.

  15. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of low-permeability oil-shales - Case study from HaShfela sub-basin, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Avihu; Gersman, Ronen

    2016-09-01

    Low permeability rocks are of great importance given their potential role in protecting underlying aquifers from surface and buried contaminants. Nevertheless, only limited data for these rocks is available. New appraisal wells drilled into the oil shale unit (OSU) of the Mt. Scopus Group in the HaShfela sub-basin, Central Israel, provided a one-time opportunity for detailed study of the hydrogeology and geochemistry of this very low permeability unit. Methods used include: slug tests, electrical logs, televiewer imaging, porosity and permeability measurements on core samples, chemical analyses of the rock column and groundwater analyses. Slug tests yielded primary indication to the low permeability of the OSU despite its high porosity (30-40%). Hydraulic conductivities as low as 10-10-10-12 m/s were calculated, using both the Hvorslev and Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos decoding methods. These low conductivities were confirmed by direct measurements of permeability in cores, and from calculations based on the Kozeny-Carman approach. Storativity was found to be 1 · 10-6 and specific storage - 3.8 · 10-9 m-1. Nevertheless, the very limited water flow in the OSU is argued to be driven gravitationally. The extremely slow recovery rates as well as the independent recovery of two adjacent wells, despite their initial large head difference of 214 m, indicate that the natural fractures are tight and are impermeable due to the confining stress at depth. Laboratory measured permeability is similar or even higher than the field-measured values, thereby confirming that fractures and bedding planes do not form continuous flow paths. The vertical permeability along the OSU is highly variable, implying hydraulic stratification and extremely low vertical hydraulic conductivity. The high salinity of the groundwater (6300-8000 mgCl/L) within the OSU and its chemical and isotopic compositions are explained by the limited water flow, suggesting long residence time of the water

  16. Hydrogeologic characterization of the former Vitro processing site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    During fiscal year (FY) 1992, the US Department of Energy received Congressional direction to investigate whether contamination from former processing activities is present in groundwater and soils at the former Vitro processing site in Salt Lake City, Utah. A total of $100,000 was appropriated for this activity. The surface of the Vitro site was cleaned up by the state of Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during the mid- to late 1980s. The basis for the directive was the desire of the site owners, the Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF), to develop the site. This report, as well as the final Vitro Site Certification Report and the Clive Completion Report (both to be prepared and submitted by the state of Utah), will have to be reviewed and concurred with by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) prior to release of the Vitro site for restricted development. The groundwater and soil investigation was performed by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to the DOE UMTRA Project Office during FY92. The investigation at the Vitro site consisted of the installation of monitoring wells and soil borings, aquifer testing, and the collection and analyses of groundwater and soil samples. This report presents the results of this hydrogeologic investigation

  17. Sinkhole formation and hydrogeological situation at the salt mining area of Solotvyno, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, L.; Banks, V.

    2017-12-01

    In Solotvyno, Ukraine, several salt mines were unexpectedly flooded in the recent past. As a result, dozens of sinkholes formed and are still forming with diameters up to 250 m. A one month advisory mission by the European Commission was launched in fall 2016 to conduct a risk assessment. The former mining area is situated in close vicinity to the river Theiss, which is the largest contributory of the largest river in Europe: the Danube. As river contamination by the release of large quantities of saltwater would lead to an international disaster, hydrogeological measurements were taken on-site to study the system. Saturated (hyper-saline) water as well as fresh surface and groundwater were encountered in different locations of the former mining area. Water samples were analyzed for chemistry and stable isotopes at BGR revealing insight into groundwater flow dynamics. Satellite imaging and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) were applied to study ground movements and evaluate the risk of further collapses. A resulting conceptual model explains the processes of sinkhole formation as well as the natural restoration of the salt dome prior to mining operations. This study shows the advantage of an interdisciplinary approach to conduct a risk assessment in the case of large mine collapses.

  18. A Novel Hybridization of Applied Mathematical, Operations Research and Risk-based Methods to Achieve an Optimal Solution to a Challenging Subsurface Contamination Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. D.; Pinder, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the project is the creation of a new, computationally based, approach to the collection, evaluation and use of data for the purpose of determining optimal strategies for investment in the solution of remediation of contaminant source areas and similar environmental problems. The research focuses on the use of existing mathematical tools assembled in a unique fashion. The area of application of this new capability is optimal (least-cost) groundwater contamination source identification; we wish to identify the physical environments wherein it may be cost-prohibitive to identify a contaminant source, the optimal strategy to protect the environment from additional insult and formulate strategies for cost-effective environmental restoration. The computational underpinnings of the proposed approach encompass the integration into a unique of several known applied-mathematical tools. The resulting tool integration achieves the following: 1) simulate groundwater flow and contaminant transport under uncertainty, that is when the physical parameters such as hydraulic conductivity are known to be described by a random field; 2) define such a random field from available field data or be able to provide insight into the sampling strategy needed to create such a field; 3) incorporate subjective information, such as the opinions of experts on the importance of factors such as locations of waste landfills; 4) optimize a search strategy for finding a potential source location and to optimally combine field information with model results to provide the best possible representation of the mean contaminant field and its geostatistics. Our approach combines in a symbiotic manner methodologies found in numerical simulation, random field analysis, Kalman filtering, fuzzy set theory and search theory. Testing the algorithm for this stage of the work, we will focus on fabricated field situations wherein we can a priori specify the degree of uncertainty associated with the

  19. Clinical outcomes after hepatitis C infection from contaminated anti-D immune globulin. Irish Hepatology Research Group.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny-Walsh, E

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: In February 1994, batches of anti-D immune globulin used in Ireland during 1977 and 1978 to prevent Rh isoimmunization were found to be contaminated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) from a single infected donor. In March 1994, a national screening program was initiated for all women who had received anti-D immune globulin between 1970 and 1994. Of the 62,667 women who had been screened when this study began, 704 (1.1 percent) had evidence of past or current HCV infection, and 390 of those 704 (55 percent) had positive tests for serum HCV RNA on reverse-transcription-polymerase-chain-reaction analysis. All 390 were offered a referral for clinical assessment and therapy. We evaluated 376 of these 390 women (96 percent); the other 14 were not seen at one of the designated treatment centers. RESULTS: The mean (+\\/-SD) age of the 376 women was 45+\\/-6 years at the time of screening. They had been infected with hepatitis C for about 17 years. A total of 304 women (81 percent) reported symptoms, most commonly fatigue (248 [66 percent]). Serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations were slightly elevated (40 to 99 U per liter) in 176 of 371 women (47 percent), and the concentrations were 100 U per liter or higher in 31 (8 percent). Liver biopsies showed inflammation in 356 of 363 women (98 percent); in most cases the inflammation was slight (41 percent) or moderate (52 percent). Although the biopsy samples from 186 of the 363 women (51 percent) showed evidence of fibrosis, only 7 women (2 percent) had probable or definite cirrhosis. Two of the seven reported excessive alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the women with HCV infection 17 years after receiving HCV-contaminated anti-D immune globulin had evidence of slight or moderate hepatic inflammation on liver biopsy, about half had fibrosis, and 2 percent had probable or definite cirrhosis.

  20. Synthetic hydrogeological study on Beishan preselected area for high-level radioactive waste repository in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonghai; Su Rui; Ji Ruili; Wang Hailong; Liu Shufen; Zong Zihua; Dong Jiannan; Zhang Ming

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of large scale field hydrogeological investigation, synthetic hydrogeological studies related to groundwater system characteristics, permeability of rock bodies, groundwater dynamic, hydrogeochemistry, isotopic hydrology, CFC's of groundwater and groundwater flow field simulation were carried out for Beishan area, Gansu province. According to analysis on a large amount of hydrogeological data, the characteristics of groundwater circulation, groundwater hydrodynamics and hydrgeochemistry were described and the suitability of Beishan area as the potential area of high-level radioactive waste disposal was evaluated in the paper. Through this study, the hydrogeological study and evaluation methods in the siting of China's high level radioactive waste repository were set up. Furthermore, the important hydrogeological scientific evidence was provided for optimal site filtration of China's high-level radioactive waste repository in Beishan area. (authors)

  1. Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

  2. Hydrogeologic framework of the middle San Pedro watershed, southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jesse; Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Pool, D.R.; Cordova, Jeffrey T.; Parker, John T.; Macy, J.P.; Thomas, Blakemore

    2010-01-01

    Water managers in rural Arizona are under increasing pressure to provide sustainable supplies of water despite rapid population growth and demands for environmental protection. This report describes the results of a study of the hydrogeologic framework of the middle San Pedro watershed. The components of this report include: (1) a description of the geologic setting and depositional history of basin fill sediments that form the primary aquifer system, (2) updated bedrock altitudes underlying basin fill sediments calculated using a subsurface density model of gravity data, (3) delineation of hydrogeologic units in the basin fill using lithologic descriptions in driller's logs and models of airborne electrical resistivity data, (4) a digital three-dimensional (3D) hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) that represents spatial extents and thicknesses of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs), and (5) description of the hydrologic properties of the HGUs. The lithologic interpretations based on geophysical data and unit thickness and extent of the HGUs included in the HFM define potential configurations of hydraulic zones and parameters that can be incorporated in groundwater-flow models. The hydrogeologic framework comprises permeable and impermeable stratigraphic units: (1) bedrock, (2) sedimentary rocks predating basin-and-range deformation, (3) lower basin fill, (4) upper basin fill, and (5) stream alluvium. The bedrock unit includes Proterozoic to Cretaceous crystalline rocks, sedimentary rocks, and limestone that are relatively impermeable and poor aquifers, except for saturated portions of limestone. The pre-basin-and-range sediments underlie the lower basin fill but are relatively impermeable owing to cementation. However, they may be an important water-bearing unit where fractured. Alluvium of the lower basin fill, the main water-bearing unit, was deposited in the structural trough between the uplifted ridges of bedrock and (or) pre-basin-and-range sediments. Alluvium of

  3. The FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme on ''Evaluation of Methods of Analysis for Determining Mycotoxin Contamination of Food and Feed''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doko, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    The present Co-ordinated Research Programme is to complement the FAO/IAEA Training and Reference Centre (TRC) for Food and Pesticide Control under the Centre's mission ''to assist Member States and their institutions to fulfill requirements to support the implementation of international safeguards/agreements relevant to food safety and control, the safe use of pesticides and sanitary and phytosanitary measures, by providing training, quality assurance services and technology transfer''. Based on the Global Environment Monitoring System - Food Contamination Monitoring and Assessment Programme (GEMS/Food) data and other national data on mycotoxin contamination, mycotoxins are a widespread problem of the food supplies in most countries. As a result, many countries have enacted regulations to control the level of mycotoxins in the national food supply as well as in food moving in international trade. At the international level, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, through its Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants and relevant commodity committees is considering the establishment of international guideline levels for various mycotoxins based on risk assessments performed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. Codex activities are of particular importance in view of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS) Agreement specifically refers to Codex standards, guidelines and recommendations as representing the international consensus on health and safety requirements for food based on sound scientific risk assessment. This will require national authorities to give greater attention to the development of consistent and standardised approaches to regulations and their enforcement, including sampling and methods of analysis. Consequently, it is essential that the analytical capabilities of laboratories in developing countries are strengthened in order to enable them to effectively monitor the mycotoxin content of food in

  4. Regional assessment of groundwater resources (hydrogeological map of Younggwang area, Korea vol.8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S H; Kim, Y K; Hong, Y K; Cho, M J; Lee, D W; Bae, D J; Lee, C W; Kim, H C; Kim, S J; Park, S W; Lee, P K; Yum, B W; Moon, S H; Lee, S K; Lee, S R; Park, Y S; Lim, M T; Sung, K S; Park, I H; Ham, S Y; Kim, Y J; Woo, N C [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    This study is objected to characterize groundwater resources, to assess groundwater contamination, and to produce hydrogeological and related thematic maps of the study area. The study area, Younggwang County, Chonnam Province, covers the area of 460 km{sup 2}. To accomplish the objectives various studies have been carried out including general and structural geology, GIS, hydrogeology, geophysics and hydrogeochemical analysis. Geophysical explorations, dipole-dipole resistivity, Schulumberger sounding and magnetic method, were executed for investigating geologic structure and determining test borehole sites. Some test boreholes such as, Honggok, Donggan, Weolsan and Seolmae hit aquifer structures. Geophysical logging, such as gamma ray, temperature, water conductivity, electrical resistivity, self-potential were also executed for petrological differentiation and in out flow of groundwater. The recharge rate of granitic region is more than the others, which derived by the analysis of 7 low-flow measurements in 10 small watersheds in the area. The recharge rate has been estimated at 7.2%(99.3 mm/year) in the vicinity. Well inventory of the area included 197 deep wells and 43 shallow wells. In addition, 10 stream samples and one spring were surveyed for water level, water temperature, pH, EC, TDS and the concentration of dissolved oxygen(DO). Regional groundwater pollution susceptibility was analyzed using GIS technique. A standard method, `DRASTIC` developed by US EPA, was applied to evaluate groundwater pollution potential and aquifer susceptibility. Resulting DRASTIC indices ranged from 52 to 141, and the Pesticide indices from 61 to 187. Seawater intrusion phenomena in Sangsari-Hasari are considered and evaluated by well inventory and the selected borehole`s electric conductivity(EC) logging. Seawater intrusion to the vulnerable coastal alluvium aquifers is generally depleted with time. The amount of potential groundwater resources in the study area is estimated

  5. Vulsino volcanic aquifer in Umbria Region : Hydrogeological survey for the characterization of the presence of arsenic and aluminium and the correct use of groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Fratini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In December 2009 and the first months of 2010, a large water crisis took place in the Orvieto area, because of sudden high concentration of aluminum (Al in the groundwater of the vulsino aquifer. This represents a supply for Orvieto’s population and other near municipalities (about 20,000 people. The contamination had reached values of about 3000 μg/l. Water crisis was made worse because of the expiring, in the same period, as expected, of the derogation of European Commission that allowed Arsenic concentrations above 10 μg/l (up to 50 μg/l. The contamination by Al occurred after intense and persistent rains, that mobilized a large amount of aluminum hydroxides in perched water table, in the form of colloidal particles. The field analysis showed that the potable water catchments are not interested in the same way by the contamination, i.e. the vulsino aquifer was not wholly conditioned by the presence of Al; in addition, in the same period in which the Al contamination occurred, there were no changes in the levels of As in groundwater. This paper shows the study of the complex hydrogeological Vulsino system; the aim is to identify technical solutions for realizing new catchments in order to manage the resource, in qualitative and quantitative terms, replacing/integrating the current equipments, which represent a risk because of the presence of Al and, secondly, As. A numerical flow and transport model was implemented to support the hydrogeological study, that has allowed us to formulate reliable predictions regarding the risk of Al contamination of future new wells.

  6. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2012-08-12

    Aug 12, 2012 ... The hydrogeological study revea sediment .... literature review, field investigation, and data analysis using ... hydrogeological information, i.e., locating of water points ... models, the geophysical survey was conducted with the ...

  7. Hydrogeologic structures in two Serbian spa towns - Sijarinska Banja and Selters Banja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Goran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to identify the boundaries of hydrogeologic structures in which natural mineral waters occur, using two examples: old mineral water (Sijarinska Banja and young mineral water (Selters Banja. The research addresses the distance from recharge zones, depth of occurrence, and points of discharge. Apart from the three spatial dimensions, the study also includes the time dimension - water age. The following parameters are examined: geologichydrogeologic conditions in the places of occurrence of mineral water, connection between mineral water and permeable fault zones, distance of surface water divides, previously-defined maximum possible depths of occurrence, possible flow rates, and the determined age. If the flow followed a straight line, the maximum distance of the recharge zone would be up to 7 m for the young and up to 11 km for the old mineral water. However, it is obvious that this is never the case in fractured systems, given that water travels much longer distances from the point of entry to the point of drainage from aquifers. Assessment of geologic-hydrogeologic and hydrodynamic conditions, relative to the determined age of the mineral water, leads to the conclusion that the distance between the recharge and drainage zones can be less than 5 km. The paper shows that insight into the depth of infiltration into permeable fault zones can also be gained by studying the depth of circulation relative to known hydrodynamic zones. The inference is that the largest amount of groundwater is restored in the hydrodynamic zone of slow groundwater renewal, which is below a depth of 1.5 km at Sijarinska Banja and below 1.3 km at Selters Banja.

  8. Groundwater dynamics in mountain peatlands with contrasting climate, vegetation, and hydrogeological setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, David J.; Cooper, David J.; Ronayne, Michael J.

    2018-06-01

    Hydrological dynamics act as a primary control on ecosystem function in mountain peatlands, serving as an important regulator of carbon fluxes. In western North America, mountain peatlands exist in different hydrogeological settings, across a range climatic conditions, and vary in floristic composition. The sustainability of these ecosystems, particularly those at the low end of their known elevation range, is susceptible to a changing climate via changes in the water cycle. We conducted a hydrological investigation of two mountain peatlands, with differing vegetation, hydrogeological setting (sloping vs basin), and climate (strong vs weak monsoon influence). Growing season saturated zone water budgets were modeled on a daily basis, and subsurface flow characterizations were performed during multiple field campaigns at each site. The sloping peatland expectedly showed a strong lateral groundwater potential gradient throughout the growing season. Alternatively, the basin peatland had low lateral gradients but more pronounced vertical gradients. A zero-flux plane was apparent at a depth of approximately 50 cm below the peat surface at the basin peatland; shallow groundwater above this depth moved upward towards the surface via evapotranspiration. The differences in groundwater flow dynamics between the two sites also influenced water budgets. Higher groundwater inflow at the sloping peatland offset higher rates of evapotranspiration losses from the saturated zone, which were apparently driven by differences in vegetative cover. This research revealed that although sloping peatlands cover relatively small portions of mountain watersheds, they provide unique settings where vegetation directly utilizes groundwater for transpiration, which were several-fold higher than typically reported for surrounding uplands.

  9. Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A large research and development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the ambient air sampling program for collection, analysis, and reporting of radioactive air contaminants in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Particulate matter and water vapor are sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These samples are collected every two weeks and then analyzed for tritium, and gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma ray radiation. The alpha, beta, and gamma measurements are used to detect unexpected radionuclide releases. Quarterly composites are analyzed for isotopes of uranium ( 234 U, 235 U, 238 U), plutonium ( 238 Pu, 239/249 Pu), and americium ( 241 Am). All of the data is stored in a relational database with hard copies as the official records. Data used to determine environmental concentrations are validated and verified before being used in any calculations. This evaluation demonstrates that the sampling and analysis process can detect tritium, uranium, plutonium, and americium at levels much less than one percent of the public dose limit of 10 millirems. The isotopic results also indicate that, except for tritium, off-site concentrations of radionuclides potentially released from LANL are similar to typical background measurements

  10. Light contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda Pena, William Enrique

    1998-01-01

    The article tries on the wrong use of the artificial light, of the main problems of the light contamination, dispersion of the light, noxious effects of the light contamination, ecological effects, effects on the man's biological rhythm, economic effects and effects about the civic and vial security, among other topics

  11. Calendar year 1995 groundwater quality report for the Beak Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Part 2: 1995 groundwater quality data interpretations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during the 1995 calendar year (CY) for several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities associated with the US DOE Y-12 Plant. The sites addressed by this document are located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime. The Bear Creek Regime is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements. Each annual Part 2 GWQR addresses RCRA interim status reporting requirements regarding assessment of the horizontal and vertical extent of groundwater contamination. This report includes background information regarding the extent of groundwater and surface water contamination in the Bear Creek Regime based on the conceptual models described in the remedial investigation report (Section 2); a summary of the groundwater and surface water monitoring activities performed during CY 1995 (Section 3.0); analysis and interpretation of the CY 1995 monitoring data for groundwater (Section 4.0) and surface water (Section 5.0); a summary of conclusions and recommendations (Section 6.0); and a list of cited references (Section 7.0). Appendices contain diagrams, graphs, data tables, and summaries and the evaluation and decision criteria for data screening

  12. Calendar year 1995 groundwater quality report for the Beak Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Part 2: 1995 groundwater quality data interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during the 1995 calendar year (CY) for several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities associated with the US DOE Y-12 Plant. The sites addressed by this document are located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime. The Bear Creek Regime is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements. Each annual Part 2 GWQR addresses RCRA interim status reporting requirements regarding assessment of the horizontal and vertical extent of groundwater contamination. This report includes background information regarding the extent of groundwater and surface water contamination in the Bear Creek Regime based on the conceptual models described in the remedial investigation report (Section 2); a summary of the groundwater and surface water monitoring activities performed during CY 1995 (Section 3.0); analysis and interpretation of the CY 1995 monitoring data for groundwater (Section 4.0) and surface water (Section 5.0); a summary of conclusions and recommendations (Section 6.0); and a list of cited references (Section 7.0). Appendices contain diagrams, graphs, data tables, and summaries and the evaluation and decision criteria for data screening.

  13. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  14. Important considerations related to the construction of observation wells in radiation facilities sites: A review research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, S. A.; Salem, W. M.; Atta, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Observation wells in radiation facility sites are considered the main sources of the required subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic data. They are the most important means to detect the radioactive and/or chemical contaminants within the ground water. Also, they are used to observe the groundwater level fluctuations and perform the different aquifer tests to understand the hydraulic properties of aquifers and the behavior of contaminants transportation. This research reviews the necessary considerations and available techniques for constructing the observation wells properly. The review process depends on the international guidelines presented in the literature and the field experience. The proper well completion is essential for the well efficiency and longevity. Three main important topics are considered and discussed briefly in this review. They are the preliminary considerations, the drilling program and the well protection procedures. The preliminary considerations included are the collection of the available geologic and hydrogeologic data and information, selection of drilling method and the legal requirements. The drilling program comprises the site preparation, drilling processes, sampling, well logging, well design, casing components and materials, gravel pack and well development. The well protection procedures include well grout, concrete slab and others requirements. Observation wells should be constructed to a high standard and should be properly maintained and protected to ensure ongoing and reliable data collection

  15. Research on the contamination levels of norovirus in food facilities using groundwater in South Korea, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Su; Joo, In Sun; Ju, Si Yeon; Jeong, Min Hee; Song, Yun-Hee; Kwak, Hyo Sun

    2018-09-02

    Norovirus (NoV) is a major pathogenic virus that is responsible for foodborne and waterborne gastroenteritis outbreaks. Groundwater is an important source of drinking water and is used in agriculture and food manufacturing processes. This study investigated norovirus contamination of groundwater treatment systems at 1360 sites in seven metropolitan areas and nine provinces in 2015-2016. Temperature, pH, residual chlorine, and turbidity content were assessed to analyze the water quality. In 2015, six sites were positive for the presence of NoV (0.88%) and in 2016, two sites were positive (0.29%); in total, NoV was detected in 8 of the 1360 sample sites (0.59%) investigated. Identified genotypes of NoV in groundwater included GI.5, 9 and GII.4, 6, 13, 17, and 21. GII.17 was the most prevalent genotype in treated groundwater used in the food industry. This dominance of GII.17 was corroborated by NoV infection outbreak cases and the results of a survey of coastal waters in South Korea in 2014-2015. Although a low detection rate was observed in this study, NoV is a pathogen that can spread extensively. Therefore, it is necessary to periodically monitor levels of norovirus which is responsible for food poisoning in groundwater. This is a first report to reveal epidemic genotype shift of norovirus in groundwater treatment system of food facilities in South Korea. Our results may contribute to the enhancement of public health and sanitary conditions by providing molecular epidemiological information on groundwater NoV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosphere modelling for safety assessment of geological disposal taking account of denudation of contaminated soils. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoko

    2003-03-01

    Biosphere models for safety assessment of geological disposal have been developed on the assumption that the repository-derived radionuclides reach surface environment by groundwater. In the modelling, river, deep well and marine have been considered as geosphere-biosphere (GBIs) and some Japanese-specific ''reference biospheres'' have been developed using an approach consistent with the BIOMOVS II/BIOMASS Reference Biosphere Methodology. In this study, it is assumed that the repository-derived radionuclide would reach surface environment in the form of solid phase by uplift and erosion of contaminated soil and sediment. The radionuclides entered into the surface environment by these processes could be distributed between solid and liquid phases and could spread within the biosphere via solid phase and also liquid phase. Based on these concepts, biosphere model that considers variably saturated zone under surface soil (VSZ) as a GBI was developed for calculating the flux-to-dose conversion factors of three exposure groups (farming, freshwater fishing, marine fishing) based on the Reference Biosphere Methodology. The flux-to-dose conversion factors for faming exposure group were the highest, and ''inhalation of dust'', external irradiation from soil'' and ''ingestion of soil'' were the dominant exposure pathways for most of radionuclides considered in this model. It is impossible to compare the flux-to-dose conversion factors calculated by the biosphere model in this study with those calculated by the biosphere models developed in the previous studies because the migration processes considered when the radionuclides entered the surface environment through the aquifer are different among the models; i.e. it has been assumed that the repository-derived radionuclides entered the GBIs such as river, deep well and marine via groundwater without dilution and retardation at the aquifer in the previous biosphere models. Consequently, it must be modelled the migration of

  17. Studying Legacy Uranium Contamination On Navajo, Laguna, and Isleta Lands In Collaboration With Native American Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadol, D. D.; Frey, B.; Chee, C.

    2017-12-01

    Personally relevant research experiences at key points in a student's education are potentially powerful influences on their long-term career path. With this in mind, New Mexico EPSCoR created the STEM Advancement Program (STEMAP) to provide a summer research experience for students from the non-graduate-degree granting institutions in New Mexico. Recruitment focused on underrepresented minorities, primarily Native American and Hispanic students, who applied to work with one of six research components. Our research component focused on understanding the fate and transport of environmental uranium in the Four Corners region. The geosciences are especially amenable to providing meaningful research experiences, particularly for groups that have a strong cultural connection with the land. Uranium mining activities were extensive on several reservations in the 1950s to 1980s, and many of the sites have not been remediated. The impact of mining likely contributed to the high interest among Native American (especially Navajo) STEMAP applicants in this research topic. In four years of summer research we mentored four Native American students (two male and two female) and one white non-Hispanic female. Following their work in our research group, one student extended her research, three graduated, and one transferred to a research institution. This success likely reflects a combination of recruitment efforts, which built on community connections, as well as efforts to provide personal mentoring and to create an inclusive environment. The work of these students has advanced our understanding of fluvial transport of uranium from inactive mining districts, an important pathway given the role of these streams in providing water for agriculture and aggregate for construction. Findings demonstrate an affinity of uranium to sorb to fine-grained sediment, meaning standing water in stock ponds is of particular concern. The students also studied uranium-bearing dust generated from

  18. The Greenland Analogue Project (GAP). Literature review of hydrogeology/ hydrogeochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallroth, Thomas; Lokrantz, Hanna; Rimsa, Andrius

    2010-09-01

    This report is produced as part of the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), carried out as a collaboration project with the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), Posiva Oy and the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). The overall aim of the project is to improve the current understanding of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with continental-scale glacial periods including with the presence of permafrost and the advance/retreat of ice sheets. The project will focus on studying how an ice sheet affects groundwater flow and water chemistry around a deep geological repository in crystalline bedrock. The Greenland Analogue Project consists of three active sub-projects (A-C) with individual objectives. Field studies are conducted in the Kangerlussuaq region, in central Western Greenland. Sub-projects A and B collectively aim at improving the understanding of ice sheet hydrology by combining investigations on surface water processes with ice sheet drilling and instrumentation. In sub-project C, the penetration of glacial melt water into the bedrock, groundwater flow and the chemical composition of water will be studied. Main planned activities in sub-project C include drilling of a deep borehole in front of the ice sheet, in which different downhole surveys, sampling and monitoring will be carried out. The primary aim of this report is to review available information about hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry in central Western Greenland, with special emphasis on the area around Kangerlussuaq. The relevant information about this area is however very limited, and it was decided to extend the review to briefly include studies made in other regions with similar conditions in terms of geology, climate and glaciology. The number of published studies made in other areas with glaciers, ice sheets or permafrost is very large, and the review and list of references in this report is far from complete. It is also obvious that both

  19. Numerical modeling of the hydrogeological effects of ONKALO in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raemae, T.

    2011-10-01

    The underground rock characterization facility ONKALO is currently being excavated in the bedrock of the Olkiluoto Island. The construction work of the ONKALO begun in 2004 and the tunnel will remain open for the whole period of the operation of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel. The open tunnels cause a disturbance on the local groundwater system. The leakage water flowing into the open tunnels withdraw water from the bedrock and locally alter the natural flow routes. One of the possible consequences of the convergent flow towards the ONKALO is that the highly saline deeper groundwater might be drawn towards the ONKALO, this process is called upconing. The purpose of this work is to estimate the possible upconing of the deep saline waters up to the repository level. A numerical flow and transport simulation is conducted with conservative approach to ensure overestimation of the effects of the ONKALO. In this study a 3D model of the hydrogeological system of the Olkiluoto is used as the basis for numerical flow and transport modeling of the saline groundwater movement in the bedrock of Olkiluoto. The numerical modelling is conducted using the commercial Comsol 3.5a code. The modelled geometry of the ONKALO includes the already excavated ONKALO and the extension according to the layout plan used in this work. The ONKALO and the hydrogeological zones are simplified for this study. In addition the used hydrogeological zones are modelled as 3D blocks with constant thickness of 50 meters. With the used boundary conditions upconing occurs even with the lowest leakage values. The influence of the leakage water is small on the maximum TDS-value at the depth near ONKALO. In this work this phenomenon is explained by the increase in the fresh water infiltration rate as the leakage water is increased, since the low density fresh water is transported more easily downwards than the high density saline water transported upwards towards the ONKALO. Further away from

  20. The Greenland Analogue Project (GAP). Literature review of hydrogeology/ hydrogeochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallroth, Thomas; Lokrantz, Hanna; Rimsa, Andrius (Bergab Consulting Geologists, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    This report is produced as part of the Greenland Analogue Project (GAP), carried out as a collaboration project with the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), Posiva Oy and the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). The overall aim of the project is to improve the current understanding of hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical processes associated with continental-scale glacial periods including with the presence of permafrost and the advance/retreat of ice sheets. The project will focus on studying how an ice sheet affects groundwater flow and water chemistry around a deep geological repository in crystalline bedrock. The Greenland Analogue Project consists of three active sub-projects (A-C) with individual objectives. Field studies are conducted in the Kangerlussuaq region, in central Western Greenland. Sub-projects A and B collectively aim at improving the understanding of ice sheet hydrology by combining investigations on surface water processes with ice sheet drilling and instrumentation. In sub-project C, the penetration of glacial melt water into the bedrock, groundwater flow and the chemical composition of water will be studied. Main planned activities in sub-project C include drilling of a deep borehole in front of the ice sheet, in which different downhole surveys, sampling and monitoring will be carried out. The primary aim of this report is to review available information about hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry in central Western Greenland, with special emphasis on the area around Kangerlussuaq. The relevant information about this area is however very limited, and it was decided to extend the review to briefly include studies made in other regions with similar conditions in terms of geology, climate and glaciology. The number of published studies made in other areas with glaciers, ice sheets or permafrost is very large, and the review and list of references in this report is far from complete. It is also obvious that both

  1. Development of a hydrogeological conceptual wetland model in the data-scarce north-eastern region of Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghof, Sonja; Gabiri, Geofrey; Stumpp, Christine; Chesnaux, Romain; Reichert, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    Understanding groundwater/surface-water interactions in wetlands is crucial because wetlands provide not only a high potential for agricultural production, but also sensitive and valuable ecosystems. This is especially true for the Kilombero floodplain wetland in Tanzania, which represents a data-scarce region in terms of hydrological and hydrogeological data. A comprehensive approach combining hydrogeological with tracer-based assessments was conducted, in order to develop a conceptual hydrogeological wetland model of the area around the city of Ifakara in the north-eastern region of Kilombero catchment. Within the study site, a heterogeneous porous aquifer, with a range of hydraulic conductivities, is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer. Groundwater chemistry is mainly influenced by silicate weathering and depends on groundwater residence times related to the hydraulic conductivities of the porous aquifer. Groundwater flows from the hillside to the river during most of the year. While floodwater close to the river is mainly derived from overbank flow of the river, floodwater at a greater distance from the river mainly originates from precipitation and groundwater discharge. Evaporation effects in floodwater increase with increasing distance from the river. In general, the contribution of flood and stream water to groundwater recharge is negligible. In terms of an intensification of agricultural activities in the wetland, several conclusions can be drawn from the conceptual model. Results of this study are valuable as a base for further research related to groundwater/surface-water interactions and the conceptual model can be used in the future to set up numerical flow and transport models.

  2. Hydrogeology of Valley-Fill Aquifers and Adjacent Areas in Eastern Chemung County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2015-10-19

    The extent, hydrogeologic framework, and potential well yields of valley-fill aquifers within a 151-square-mile area of eastern Chemung County, New York, were investigated, and the upland distribution of till thickness over bedrock was characterized. The hydrogeologic framework of these valleyfill aquifers was interpreted from multiple sources of surficial and subsurface data and an interpretation of the origin of the glacial deposits, particularly during retreat of glacial ice from the region. Potential yields of screened wells are based on the hydrogeologic framework interpretation and existing well-yield data, most of which are from wells finished with open-ended well casing.

  3. Study on the methodology for hydrogeological site descriptive modelling by discrete fracture networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuya; Ando, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Shuuji; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Takeuchi, Shinji; Amano, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to establish comprehensive techniques for site descriptive modelling considering the hydraulic heterogeneity due to the Water Conducting Features in fractured rocks. The WCFs was defined by the interpretation and integration of geological and hydrogeological data obtained from the deep borehole investigation campaign in the Mizunami URL project and Regional Hydrogeological Study. As a result of surface based investigation phase, the block-scale hydrogeological descriptive model was generated using hydraulic discrete fracture networks. Uncertainties and remaining issues associated with the assumption in interpreting the data and its modelling were addressed in a systematic way. (author)

  4. Perspectives of natural isotopes application for solving hydrogeological problems of mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozkowski, A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of hydrogeological studies made with use of natural isotopes and carried out within the Lublin Coal Field are presented in the paper. The studies have proved advantageous possibilities of isotope technique application for solving the hydrogeological problems of mineral deposits. Examination of isotope relations in ground waters complements traditional hydrogeological methods. This trend of complex investigations enables solving some peculiar hydrodynamic and hydrochemical problems. Exact recognition of these conditions is required to elaborate out proper prognosis on water content degree in given deposit and on value of ground water inflow into areas of designed mines. (author)

  5. Mineralization of the ancient hydrogeological conditions in the northeast of Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Junyi

    2012-01-01

    Ordos basin, North East, to the Eocene as a turning point, in the generation of the ancient hydrogeological conditions have distinct changes experienced at least two ancient evolution of hydrogeological conditions, that is closed in the early flow into basin Late open drain basin. Closed in the early period of the inner flow basin, since the purpose of layer deposition, the direction of the ancient hydrodynamic interlayer oxidation is consistent with the direction of oxidation. Hydrogeological conditions of the ancient point of view, in the Ordos basin, North East looking for interlayer oxidation zone type uranium has a guiding role. (author)

  6. Summary of hydrogeologic conditions at Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.; Gurban, I. [INTERA KB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Rhen, I. [VBB Viak AB (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    This report is a compilation of existing data and descriptions for use in the hydrogeologic modelling of three hypothetical sites for a nuclear waste repository in Sweden. It provides modelling teams with preliminary conceptual models, parameter values and uncertainties for inputs to numerical flow and transport models on the regional and site scales. Its primary objective is to provide consistent data sets and conceptual models so that the results of performance assessment modelling will be as comparable as possible. Where possible, this report also provides alternative conceptual models that should be evaluated as part of the modelers` sensitivity analysis. The information contained in this report is taken from several key sources, including the SKB SICADA database, the Swedish Geological Survey well database, the SKB Geographic Information System, the Swedish Land Survey databases, and published SKB reports. 148 refs, 25 tabs, 60 figs.

  7. Simple method for quick estimation of aquifer hydrogeological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.; Li, Y. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Development of simple and accurate methods to determine the aquifer hydrogeological parameters was of importance for groundwater resources assessment and management. Aiming at the present issue of estimating aquifer parameters based on some data of the unsteady pumping test, a fitting function of Theis well function was proposed using fitting optimization method and then a unitary linear regression equation was established. The aquifer parameters could be obtained by solving coefficients of the regression equation. The application of the proposed method was illustrated, using two published data sets. By the error statistics and analysis on the pumping drawdown, it showed that the method proposed in this paper yielded quick and accurate estimates of the aquifer parameters. The proposed method could reliably identify the aquifer parameters from long distance observed drawdowns and early drawdowns. It was hoped that the proposed method in this paper would be helpful for practicing hydrogeologists and hydrologists.

  8. In-EDTA as activable tracer in hydrogeological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, S.P.; Gaspar, E.; Spiridon, S.; Farcasiu, O.M.; Catilina, R.

    1982-12-01

    Two experiments are presented, on the possibilities of the use of indium in the form of the In-EDTA complex, as an activable tracer for hydrogeological studies. The determination of indium concentrations in the sampled water has been carried out by using the coprecipitation of indium with bismuth hydroxide, the neutron activation at the VVR-S reactor of the Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering - Bucharest and the measurement on the 417.0 keV line of sup(116m)In with the Ge(Li) spectrometric device. The advantages of the utilization of In-EDTA as a tracer for marking large volumes of water and of some long transit waters (of the order of months) have resulted. (authors)

  9. Hydrogeology of the Besparmak (Pentadactilos) Mountains (TRNC) Karstic Aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erduran, B.; Goekmenoglu, O.; Keskin, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Besparmak Mountains are located on the Nothern part of North Cyprus and lay paralel to the sea, 160 km 2 in length 10 km in width. Karstification, potential constituent and the hydro-dynamic structure of the Mesosoic aged carbonate rocks, located at high altitudes of the Besparmak Mountains have been investigated in this study. The Mesosoic aged carbonate rocks; dolomite, dolomitic limestones and recrytallized limestones are yhe units suitable for karstification in the exploration area. Surface area of the carbonate rocks is 84 km 2 . Chemical and isotopic samples have been collected, groundwater fluctuations have been observed and investigation wells have been openned for the definition of the karst aquifer. As the result of the geological, hydrogeological, drilling and geophysical investigations it was found that the Besparmak Mountains Karst Aquifer was formed of independent karstic systems and a total dynamic groundwater potential of aproximately 9 x 10 6 m 3 /year for these systems has been determined

  10. Hydrogeological investigations at the surface of the Wellenberg region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, A.; Frieg, B.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the surface investigations carried out at Wellenberg is twofold, namely to provide a record of the actual hydrogeological situation before commencing operations at a site and to suppplement data obtained using other methods. The initial phase involved drawing up an inventory of all springs, streams and groundwater observation points and determining various physical parameters. The observation points are now checked periodically. In order to supplement the network for monitoring groundwater in the valley of the Engelberger Aa, new shallow boreholes have been drilled and equipped as piezometers. Isotopic investigations are carried out on samples of precipitation and spring-water. This allows infiltration conditions, and seasonal variations therein, to be determined. Finally, hydrochemical and bacteriological investigations were carried out for selected springs. (author) 2 figs

  11. Summary of hydrogeologic conditions at Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.; Gurban, I.; Rhen, I.

    1997-10-01

    This report is a compilation of existing data and descriptions for use in the hydrogeologic modelling of three hypothetical sites for a nuclear waste repository in Sweden. It provides modelling teams with preliminary conceptual models, parameter values and uncertainties for inputs to numerical flow and transport models on the regional and site scales. Its primary objective is to provide consistent data sets and conceptual models so that the results of performance assessment modelling will be as comparable as possible. Where possible, this report also provides alternative conceptual models that should be evaluated as part of the modelers' sensitivity analysis. The information contained in this report is taken from several key sources, including the SKB SICADA database, the Swedish Geological Survey well database, the SKB Geographic Information System, the Swedish Land Survey databases, and published SKB reports

  12. Progress in Geo-Electrical Methods for Hydrogeological Mapping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In most of the 20th century the geo-electrical methods were primarily used for groundwater exploration and the application of the methods were normally followed by a borehole, and a moment of truth. In this process the use of DC (direct current) soundings have been developed to a high grade...... of excellence. In the last 25 years the geo-electrical methods are more used in connection with groundwater protection and planning, and new methods, as transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings, have been developed that provide more measurements per hour. In Denmark this change is very explicit, and a paper....... The test area was earlier mapped by DC-soundings, so it is possible to test the methods against each other. It is concluded that well performed DC-soundings with a Schlumberger configuration still provide the best base for hydrogeological mapping...

  13. Hydrogeology of the Krafla geothermal system, northeast Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Bird, D. K.; Arnórsson, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Krafla geothermal system is located in Iceland's northeastern neovolcanic zone, within the Krafla central volcanic complex. Geothermal fluids are superheated steam closest to the magma heat source, two-phase at higher depths, and sub-boiling at the shallowest depths. Hydrogen isotope ratios...... of geothermal fluids range from -87‰, equivalent to local meteoric water, to -94‰. These fluids are enriched in 18O relative to the global meteoric line by +0.5-3.2‰. Calculated vapor fractions of the fluids are 0.0-0.5 wt% (~0-16% by volume) in the northwestern portion of the geothermal system and increase...... the benefits of combining phase segregation effects in two-phase systems during analysis of wellhead fluid data with stable isotope values of hydrous alteration minerals when evaluating the complex hydrogeology of volcano-hosted geothermal systems....

  14. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazer, P.; Wilson, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The unsaturated volcanic tuff beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy as a host rock for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Assessment of site suitability needs an efficient and focused investigative program. A conceptual hydrogeologic model that simulates the flow of fluids through the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain was developed to guide the program and to provide a basis for preliminary assessment of site suitability. The study was made as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project of the US Department of Energy. Thickness of the unsaturated zone is about 1640 to 2460 feet (500 to 750 meters). Based on physical properties, the rocks in the unsaturated zone are grouped for the purpose of this paper into five informal hydrogeologic units. From top to bottom these units are: Tiva Canyon welded unit, Paintbrush nonwelded unit. Topopah Spring welded unit, Calico Hills nonwelded unit, and Crater Flat unit. Welded units have a mean fracture density of 8 to 40 fractures per unit cubic meter, mean matrix porosities of 12 to 23%, matrix hydraulic conductivities with geometric means ranging from 6.5 x 10 -6 to 9.8 x 10 -6 foot per day (2 x 10 -6 to 3 x 10 -6 meter per day), and bulk hydraulic conductivities of 0.33 to 33 feet per day (0.1 to 10 meters per day). The nonwelded units have a mean fracture density of 1 to 3 fractures per unit cubic meter, mean matrix porosities of 31 to 46%, and saturated hydraulic conductivities with geometric means ranging from 2.6 x 10 -5 to 2.9 x 10 -2 foot per day (8 x 10 -6 to 9 x 10 -3 meter per day). 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors

  16. Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics Training & Education Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Water Contamination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ...

  17. Evaluation and design of a rain gauge network using a statistical optimization method in a severe hydro-geological hazard prone area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattoruso, Grazia; Longobardi, Antonia; Pizzuti, Alfredo; Molinara, Mario; Marocco, Claudio; De Vito, Saverio; Tortorella, Francesco; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2017-06-01

    Rainfall data collection gathered in continuous by a distributed rain gauge network is instrumental to more effective hydro-geological risk forecasting and management services though the input estimated rainfall fields suffer from prediction uncertainty. Optimal rain gauge networks can generate accurate estimated rainfall fields. In this research work, a methodology has been investigated for evaluating an optimal rain gauges network aimed at robust hydrogeological hazard investigations. The rain gauges of the Sarno River basin (Southern Italy) has been evaluated by optimizing a two-objective function that maximizes the estimated accuracy and minimizes the total metering cost through the variance reduction algorithm along with the climatological variogram (time-invariant). This problem has been solved by using an enumerative search algorithm, evaluating the exact Pareto-front by an efficient computational time.

  18. Characterization of Contaminant Transport using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murrell, Michael T.; Ku, Teh-Lung

    2001-01-01

    The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydrogeology. Thus, to characterize contaminant transport, it is best to cross-check figures derived from any small-scale laboratory experiments over limited times with that obtained from field-oriented, natural analog studies. We propose such a study using the naturally-occurring U and Th decay-series disequilibria. The work of ours and other researchers have shown that the parent/daughter disequilibrium patterns existing in groundwater systems can be modeled in terms of local nuclide mass balance to arrive at such information as the rock-water contact time (fluid flow) and rates of contaminant transport, taking into account the retardation effect due to nuclide/rock interaction contaminants at INEL by grouping them into three categories, represented by isotopes of (1) Th and Pa, (2) U and (3) Ra. Mass spectrometric measurements of these elements will be emphasized in order to minimize sample size requirements and to maximize precision. Results will form the data base for a model code for computing: (1) Fluid residence time (transport rates) in the basalt aquifers at various locations, (2) The in-situ adsorption and desorption rate constants, as well as the retardation factors, of various radionuclide wastes, and (3) Rock dissolution rate and its relation to preferential flow and contamination transport in the fractured rock

  19. GIS-based model of groundwater occurrence using geological and hydrogeological data in Precambrian Oban Massif southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikakwe, Gregory Udie

    2018-06-01

    This research modeled geological and hydrogeological controls on groundwater occurrence in Oban Massif and environs southeastern Nigeria. Topographical, hydrogeological, and structural maps, including lithology samples from drilled bores, well completion, and pumping test data in the study area were procured. Collection of coordinates of rock sample locations and structural data on strike and dip of rock exposures was collected. Geological and structural information collected was overlaid on the topographical, hydrogeological and structural map and digitized to produce the geological map of the study area. Thematic map on geological groundwater prospect map of the study was prepared using multicriteria evaluation. Relative weights were assigned to various rock types based on their relative contribution to groundwater occurrence and the map was reclassified using geographic information system (ArcGIS10.1) analysis. Depth ranges of the various lithologic units from drilled boreholes were used to construct lithologic correlation section of the boreholes across the study area using RockWorks16 Program software. Hydrogeological parameters such as storativity, specific capacity, transmissivity, drawdown, pumping rate, static water level, total depth, and well yield were computed from well completion reports and aquifer test. Results shows that the geologic groundwater prospect map was categorized into very good (28.73 m2), good (9.66 m2), moderate (35.08 m2), fair (49.38 m2), and poor (77.63 m2) zones. Aquifer parameters showed ranges such as (specific capacity (1.81-31.16 m2/day/m), transmissivity (0.0033-12 m2/day), storativity (9.4 × 10-3-2.3), drawdown (2.2-17.65 m), pumping rate (0.75-3.57 l/s), static water level (0-20.5 m), and total depth (3.3-61 m). Borehole depths obtained in the basement are shallower than those in the sedimentary area. Aquifer test parameters obtained from boreholes across the study indicate better correspondence with zones identified as

  20. Hydrogeological study in the catalonian potassic tertiary basin. Sallent-Barcelona, Spain; Estudio hidrogeologico de la cuenca potasica catalana en el entorno de Sallent y la antigua Mina Enrique. Provincia de Barcelona (Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribera, F.; Dorca, H.; Martinez, P.; Pina, J.; Otero, N.; Palau, J.; Solar, A.

    2009-07-01

    The Catalonian Potassic Basin is described as a thick regressive-sedimentary Tertiary basin that includes marine, evaporitic-transitional and continental facies, overlying by no-consolidated quaternary alluvial sediments. The intense underground mining activity used in the exploitation of salts with rich K contents in the CPC during the last century, has provoked some problems related to surface and groundwater contamination and the existence of subsidence areas. The objective of the hydrogeological studies in the CPC area are focused in the characterization of the Tertiary aquifer and the definition of their conceptual model of behaviour. The last challenge of the project is to determine the relationship between subsidence and hydrogeology in these salt bodies. (Author) 14 refs.

  1. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic features of the Glen Rose Limestone, Camp Bullis Training Site, Bexar County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allan K.

    2003-01-01

    The Glen Rose Limestone crops out over most of the Camp Bullis Training Site in northern Bexar County, Texas, where it consists of upper and lower members and composes the upper zone and the upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. Uncharacteristically permeable in northern Bexar County, the Glen Rose Limestone can provide avenues for recharge to and potential contamination of the downgradient Edwards aquifer, which occupies the southeastern corner of Camp Bullis.The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone characteristically is thin-bedded and composed mostly of soft limestone and marl, and the lower Glen Rose typically is composed mostly of relatively massive, fossiliferous limestone. The upper member, about 410 to 450 feet thick at Camp Bullis, was divided in this study into five hydrogeologic subdivisions, A through E (youngest to oldest).The approximately 120-foot-thick Interval A has an abundance of caves, which is indicative of its generally well developed fracture, channel, and cavern porosity that in places provides appreciable permeability. The 120- to 150-foot-thick Interval B is similar to Interval A but with less cave development and considerably less permeability. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval C, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved soluble carbonate minerals, is characterized by breccia porosity, boxwork permeability, and collapse structures that typically divert ground water laterally to discharge at land surface. The 135- to 180-foot-thick Interval D generally has low porosity and little permeability with some local exceptions, most notably the caprinid biostrome just below the top of the interval, which appears to be permeable by virtue of excellent moldic, vug, fracture, and cavern porosity. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval E, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved evaporites similar to Interval C, has similar hydrogeologic properties and a tendency to divert ground water laterally.

  2. Hydrogeologic correlations for selected wells on Long Island, New York; a data base with retrieval program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, H.T.; Shernoff, P.K.; Smolensky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate delineation of the internal hydrogeologic structure of Long Island, NY is integral to the understanding and management of the groundwater system. This report presents a computerized data base of hydrogeologic correlations for 3,146 wells on Long Island and adjacent parts of New York City. The data base includes the well identification number, the latitude-longitude of the well location, the altitude of land surface at the well and of the bottom of the drilled hole, and the altitude of the top of the major hydrogeologic units penetrated by the well. A computer program is included that allows retrieval of selected types of data for all of, or any local area of, Long Island. These data retrievals are a valuable aid to the construction of hydrogeologic surface maps. (USGS)

  3. Current status of regional hydrogeological studies and numerical simulations on geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Kikuchi, Tsuneo; Ishido, Tsuneo

    2004-01-01

    Current status of regional hydrogeological studies on geological disposal including hydrogeological modeling using numerical simulators is reviewed in this report. A regional scale and boundary conditions of numerical models are summarized mainly from the results of the RHS (regional hydrogeological study) project conducted by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) in the Tono area. We also refer to the current conceptual modes of hydrology and numerical models of unsaturated zone flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is the arid site proposed for consideration as the United States' first underground high-level radioactive waste repository. Understanding behavior of a freshwater-saltwater transition zone seems to play a key role in the hydrogeological modeling in a coastal region. Technical features of a numerical simulator as a tool for geothermal reservoir modeling is also briefly described. (author)

  4. Hydrogeology and Analysis of Aquifer Characteristics in West-Central Pinellas County, Florida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broska, James C; Barnette, Holly L

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County, Florida, conducted an investigation to describe the hydrogeology and analyze the aquifer characteristics in west-central Pinellas County...

  5. The efficiency of the use of penetration nuclear logging in hydrogeology and engineering geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferronsky, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    The latest developments in equipment and techniques for nuclear and combined non-nuclear logging in friable unconsolidated deposits, including marine bottom sediments are described. The effectiveness of these techniques in hydrogeological and engineering geological investigations is discussed. (Author)

  6. Assessment of site-scale hydrogeological modelling possibilities in crystalline hard rock for safety appraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, J. [Cleanwater Hardrock Consulting, Corvallis, OR (United States); Luukkonen, A.

    2012-09-15

    This review describes the state-of-the-art in hydrogeological modelling for safety-case studies related to spent-fuel repositories in crystalline hard rock, focusing on issues of relevance for the KBS-3 disposal concept in Nordic environments. The review includes a survey of model capabilities and assumptions regarding groundwater flow processes, geological and excavation-related features, and boundary conditions for temperate, periglacial, and glacial climates. Modelling approaches are compared for research sites including the Stripa mine (Sweden), the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland), the Whiteshell Underground Research Laboratory (Canada), the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory and Simpevarp-Laxemar site (Sweden), the Forsmark site (Sweden), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site (USA), and Olkiluoto (Finland). Current hydrogeological models allow realistic representations, but are limited by availability of data to constrain their properties. Examples of calibrations of stochastic representations of heterogeneity are still scarce. Integrated models that couple flow and non-reactive transport are now well established, particularly those based on continuum representations. Models that include reactive transport are still mainly in the realm of research tools. Thus far, no single software tool allows fully coupled treatment of all relevant thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical transport processes in the bedrock, together with climate-related physical processes at the ground surface, and with explicit treatment of bedrock heterogeneity. Hence practical applications require combinations of models based on different simplifications. Key improvements can be expected in treatment of the unsaturated zone, simulation of heterogeneous infiltration at the surface, and hydromechanical coupling. Significant advances have already been made in the amounts and types of data that can be used in site-scale models, including large datasets to define topography and other surface

  7. Regulatory controls on the hydrogeological characterization of a mixed waste disposal site, Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebelmann, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Following the detection of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in the groundwater beneath the SDA in the summer of 1987, hydrogeological characterization of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The waste site, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), is the subject of a RCRA Corrective Action Program. Regulatory requirements for the Corrective Action Program dictate a phased approach to evaluation of the SDA. In the first phase of the program, the SDA is the subject of a RCRA Facility Investigation (RIF), which will obtain information to fully characterize the physical properties of the site, determine the nature and extent of contamination, and identify pathways for migration of contaminants. If the need for corrective measures is identified during the RIF, a Corrective Measures Study (CMS) will be performed as second phase. Information generated during the RIF will be used to aid in the selection and implementation of appropriate corrective measures to correct the release. Following the CMS, the final phase is the implementation of the selected corrective measures. 4 refs., 1 fig

  8. Improving the Efficiency of 3-D Hydrogeological Mixers: Dilution Enhancement Via Coupled Engineering-Induced Transient Flows and Spatial Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dato, Mariaines; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Fiori, Aldo; Bellin, Alberto

    2018-03-01

    Natural attenuation and in situ oxidation are commonly considered as low-cost alternatives to ex situ remediation. The efficiency of such remediation techniques is hindered by difficulties in obtaining good dilution and mixing of the contaminant, in particular if the plume deformation is physically constrained by an array of wells, which serves as a containment system. In that case, dilution may be enhanced by inducing an engineered sequence of injections and extractions from such pumping system, which also works as a hydraulic barrier. This way, the aquifer acts as a natural mixer, in a manner similar to the industrialized engineered mixers. Improving the efficiency of hydrogeological mixers is a challenging task, owing to the need to use a 3-D setup while relieving the computational burden. Analytical solutions, though approximated, are a suitable and efficient tool to seek the optimum solution among all possible flow configurations. Here we develop a novel physically based model to demonstrate how the combined spatiotemporal fluctuations of the water fluxes control solute trajectories and residence time distributions and therefore, the effectiveness of contaminant plume dilution and mixing. Our results show how external forcing configurations are capable of inducing distinct time-varying groundwater flow patterns which will yield different solute dilution rates.

  9. Hydrogeological properties of bank storage area in Changwon city, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, S.-Y.; Kim, H.-S.; Cheong, J.-Y.; Ryu, S. M.; Kim, M. J.

    2003-04-01

    Bank filtrated water has been used in developed countries such as United States, France, Germany, Austria, Nederland and so on. In Korea, most of the drinking water is provided from the surface water. However, drinking water acquisition is becoming difficult due to the degradation of surface water quality. In special, the quality of drinking water source is much lower in downstream area than in upstream area. Thus, the use of bank filtrated water is getting attracted by central and local governments in Korea. The bank filtrated water was surveyed in the areas of Yeongsan river, Nakdong river, Geum river and Han river. Up to present, however, the downstream areas of Nakdong river are most suitable places to apply the bank filtration system. This study investigates hydrogeological characteristics of bank-storage area located in Daesan- Myeon, Changwon city, adjacent the downstream of Nakdong river. Changwon city is the capital city of Gyeongsangnam-Do province. Changwon city uses water derived from Nakdong river as municipal water. However, the quantity and quality of the river water are gradually decreased. Thus, Changwon city developed two sites of bank filtration system in Daesan-myeon and Buk-myeon. Pumping rate is 2,000m3/day at present and will be increased to 60,000m3/day in Daesan-myeon site at the end of the first stage of the project. For the study, we conducted pumping tests four times on seven pumping wells (PW1, PW2, PW3, PW4, PW5, PW6, and PW7) and twelve drill holes (BH-2, OW2-OW12) in the area of 370 m x 100 m. Pumping wells PW1 and PW2 were drilled in 1999 by Samjung Engineering Co. and pumping wells PW3, PW4, PW5, PW6 and PW7 were drilled in 2000 by Donga Construction Co. and Daeduk Gongyeong Co. The pumping wells are located at 45-110 meters from Nakdong riverside. The geology of the study area is composed of volcanic rocks (Palryeongsan tuff and Jusasan andesitic rock) and alluvium. Palryeongsan tuff consists of mostly green tuff with partly

  10. Analysis on paleo-hydrogeological conditions of uranium formation in Sawafuqi uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaobin; Hao Weilin; Wang Zhiming

    2013-01-01

    Sawafuqi uranium deposit is located in Kuergan intermontane basin of the South Tianshan (STS) fold belt. On the basis of regional tectonics, paleogeography, paleoclimate and related data, the evolution of intermontane basin could be divided into three hydrogeological cycles. The relationship of uranium mineralization to each cycle was analyzed from the perspective of the evolution of palaeo-hydrogeological conditions, and the uranium metallogenic model in palaeohydrogeology under strongly constructive background was established. (authors)

  11. U.S. national issues on environmental hydrology and hydrogeology - Local and emerging global perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, J.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In the US, hydrologic considerations have risen to the forefront of a number of important national issues. These issues focus on aspects of water availability and quality, but also impact other environmental, economic, and social situations. Surface-water resources in the US are essentially allocated and new socioenvironmental concerns may limit further surface-water exploitation. Ground-water use is increasing, but availability is not uniform. Some areas suffer from ground-water depletion and associated social and economic hardships. The quality of US coastal waters, rivers, lakes, and ground-water resources has seriously deteriorated in the last fifty years. Pollution is ubiquitous; vast sums of money have been spent in attempts at remediation. New methods for the disposal of sewage, industrial wastes, and nuclear wastes and for water treatment must be developed. Furthermore, the widespread agricultural contamination of ground water is just now being documented. This is leading to development of well-head protection criteria, a small but important venture into land-use planning. It is in comprehensive land-use planning that hydrology and hydrogeology should be of greatest value. The loss of prime agricultural lands and wildlife habitat as well as localized problems, such as flooding, subsidence, and pollution of water resources are problems which require vigorous emerging global issues will place great reliance on hydrologists and hydrogeologists of the future. Potential climate changes may alter our water resources base; population growth and third-world development will stress global water resources; aerosols are polluting water resources; and pollution does not stop at national boundaries. How to solve these newly emerging global problems is also an important US national issue

  12. GIS-based hydrogeological databases and groundwater modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, Radu Constantin; Carabin, Guy; Hallet, Vincent; Peters, Valerie; Dassargues, Alain

    2001-12-01

    Reliability and validity of groundwater analysis strongly depend on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data into a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure validity and availability and provides a powerful tool for hydrogeological studies. A hydrogeological geographic information system (GIS) database that offers facilities for groundwater-vulnerability analysis and hydrogeological modelling has been designed in Belgium for the Walloon region. Data from five river basins, chosen for their contrasting hydrogeological characteristics, have been included in the database, and a set of applications that have been developed now allow further advances. Interest is growing in the potential for integrating GIS technology and groundwater simulation models. A "loose-coupling" tool was created between the spatial-database scheme and the groundwater numerical model interface GMS (Groundwater Modelling System). Following time and spatial queries, the hydrogeological data stored in the database can be easily used within different groundwater numerical models. Résumé. La validité et la reproductibilité de l'analyse d'un aquifère dépend étroitement de la disponibilité de grandes quantités de données de très bonne qualité. Le fait de mettre toutes les données dans une structure cohérente et logique soutenue par les logiciels nécessaires aide à assurer la validité et la disponibilité et fournit un outil puissant pour les études hydrogéologiques. Une base de données pour un système d'information géographique (SIG) hydrogéologique qui offre toutes les facilités pour l'analyse de la vulnérabilité des eaux souterraines et la modélisation hydrogéologique a été établi en Belgique pour la région Wallonne. Les données de cinq bassins de rivières, choisis pour leurs caractéristiques hydrogéologiques différentes, ont été introduites dans la base de données, et un ensemble d

  13. An interdisciplinary approach for groundwater management in area contaminated by fluoride in East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pelo, Stefania; Melis, M. Teresa; Dessì, Francesco; Pistis, Marco; Funedda, Antonio; Oggiano, Giacomo; Carletti, Alberto; Soler Gil, Albert; Barbieri, Manuela; Pittalis, Daniele; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater is the main source of fresh water supply for most of the rural communities in Africa (approximately 75% of Africans has confidence in groundwater as their major source of drinking water). Many African countries has affected by high fluoride concentration in groundwater (up to 90 mg/L), generating the contamination of waters, soils and food, in particular in the eastern part of the continent. It seems that fluoride concentration is linked to geology of the Rift Valley: geogenic occurrence of fluoride is often connected to supergenic enrichment due to the weathering of alkaline volcanic rocks, fumaric gases and presence of thermal waters. The H2020 project FLOWERED (de-FLuoridation technologies for imprOving quality of WatEr and agRo-animal products along the East African Rift Valley in the context of aDaptation to climate change) wish to address environmental and health (human and animal) issues associated to the fluoride contamination in the African Rift Valley, in particular in three case study area located in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya. FLOWERED aims to develop an integrated, sustainable and participative water and agriculture management at a cross-boundary catchment scale through a strong interdisciplinary research approach. It implies knowledge of geology, hydrogeology, mineralogy, geochemistry, agronomy, crop and animal sciences, engineering, technological sciences, data management and software design, economics and communication. The proposed approach is based on a detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological setting, with the identification and mapping of the specific geological conditions of water contamination and its relation with the different land uses. The East African Rift System (EARS) groundwater circulation and storage, today already poorly understood, is characterized by a complex arrangement of aquifers. It depends on the type of porosity and permeability created during and after the rock formation, and is strongly conditioned by the

  14. Monitoring and characterization of radionuclide transport in the hydrogeologic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Raymond, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The groundwater monitoring program provides information and data on groundwater quality required to evaluate the impact of waste disposal practices on the Hanford Reservation. The program includes: collection and analysis of groundwater samples on a routine basis; data processing, analysis and reporting; design, construction and maintenance of well sampling structures; and design and implementation of supporting research studies. Within the overall framework of the Groundwater Monitoring Program, the 300 Area and Wye Burial Ground Characterization Program was initiated to evaluate transport of radionuclides in the partially saturated zone above the water table and to provide site characterization at solid waste burial locations on the Reservation. Methods for collecting and analyzing program data include geophysical exploration by ground penetrating radar, refraction and reflection acoustics, magnetics, and metal detection; stratigraphic investigations by drilling and sample collection techniques; evaluation of transport phenomena by in situ psychrometric and gamma-neutron techniques; laboratory characterization of fluid and vapor transport-controlling mechanisms; and evaluation of biological radionuclide transport by organisms inhabiting contaminated areas

  15. Aquifer recharging in South Carolina: radiocarbon in environmental hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, P.A.; Knox, R.L.; Mathews, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocarbon activities of dissolved inorganic carbon (and tritium activities where infiltration rates are rapid and aquifers shallow) provide relatively unambiguous and inexpensive evidence for identification of significant recharge areas. Such evidence is for the actual occurrence of modern recharge in the aquifer and thus is less inferential than stratigraphic or potentiometric evidence. These underutilized isotopic techniques are neither arcane nor complex and have been more-or-less standardized by earlier researchers. In South Carolina, isotopic evidence has been used from both calcareous and siliceous sedimentary aquifers and fractured crystalline rock aquifers. The Tertiary limestone aquifer is shown not to be principally recharged in its subcrop area, unlike conditions assumed for many other sedimentary aquifers in southeastern United States, and instead receives considerable lateral recharge from interfingering updip Tertiary sand aquifers in the middle coastal plain. Induced recharging at Hilton Head Island is mixing ancient relict water and modern recharge water. Recharging to deeper portions of the Cretaceous Middendorf basal sand aquifer occurs at least as far coastward as the middle coastal plain, near sampling sites that stratigraphically appear to be confined. Pronounced mineralization of water in fractured rocks cannot be considered as evidence of ancient or relict ground water that is isolated from modern contaminants, some of these waters contain considerable radiocarbon and hydrogen-bomb tritium

  16. Hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of the Midnite Mine, northeastern Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcy, A.D.; Scheibner, B.J.; Toews, K.L.; Boldt, C.M.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Midnite Mine is an inactive, hard-rock uranium mine in Stevens County, WA. Oxidation of sulfide-containing minerals, primarily pyrite, in the ore body produces large quantities of acidic water. An interception system installed by the mining company limits the discharge of contaminated water from the mine. The US Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have been actively involved in planning remediation of the disturbed areas. To assist in remediation, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) initiated research to determine water quality and to define ground water flow characteristics. USBM personnel designed a monitoring network, supervised installation of sampling wells, and collected and analyzed water samples. This Report of Investigations described interpretation of data collected between December 1989 and April 1992. The computer program WATEQ4F was used to identify aqueous species distribution and to calculate potential solid phase controls of solubility. To assist in interpretation of changes in water quality between sampling locations and to develop models describing proposed flow paths, the computer program BALANCE was used. Using output from these programs and field observations, a description of the chemistry along proposed ground water flow paths at the mine is presented

  17. A hydrogeologic map of the Death Valley region, Nevada, and California, developed using GIS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faunt, C.C.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Turner, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    In support of Yucca Mountain site characterization studies, a hydrogeologic framework was developed, and a hydrogeologic map was constructed for the Death Valley region. The region, covering approximately 100,000 km 2 along the Nevada-California border near Las Vegas, is characterized by isolated mountain ranges juxtaposed against broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. The regional ground-water flow system can best be described as a series of connected intermontane basins in which ground-water flow occurs in basin-fill deposits, carbonate rocks, clastic rocks, and volcanic rocks. Previous investigations have developed more site-specific hydrogeologic relationships; however, few have described all the lithologies within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Information required to characterize the hydrogeologic units in the region was obtained from regional geologic maps and reports. Map data were digitized from regional geologic maps and combined into a composite map using a geographic information system. This map was simplified to show 10 laterally extensive hydrogeologic units with distinct hydrologic properties. The hydraulic conductivity values for the hydrogeologic units range over 15 orders of magnitude due to the variability in burial depth and degree of fracturing

  18. The Induction of Mental and Contact Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Shafran, Roz; Burgess, Charlotte; Carpenter, Jodi; Millard, Emma; Thorpe, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extreme fear of contamination within obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is traditionally conceptualised as a physical phenomenon. More recent research has supported the notion of "mental" contamination (MC) in which people feel contaminated in the absence of physical contact. The current research sought to determine whether…

  19. Hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Rick M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water supply in Highlands County, Florida. As the demand for water in the county increases, additional information about local groundwater resources is needed to manage and develop the water supply effectively. To address the need for additional data, a study was conducted to evaluate the hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County. Total groundwater use in Highlands County has increased steadily since 1965. Total groundwater withdrawals increased from about 37 million gallons per day in 1965 to about 107 million gallons per day in 2005. Much of this increase in water use is related to agricultural activities, especially citrus cultivation, which increased more than 300 percent from 1965 to 2005. Highlands County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer, which is underlain by the intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system, which consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, as many as three middle confining units, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer consists primarily of fine-to-medium grained quartz sand with varying amounts of clay and silt. The aquifer system is unconfined and underlies the entire county. The thickness of the surficial aquifer is highly variable, ranging from less than 50 to more than 300 feet. Groundwater in the surficial aquifer is recharged primarily by precipitation, but also by septic tanks, irrigation from wells, seepage from lakes and streams, and the lateral groundwater inflow from adjacent areas. The intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit acts as a confining layer (except where breached by sinkholes) that restricts the vertical movement of water between the surficial aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The sediments have varying degrees of permeability and consist of permeable limestone, dolostone, or

  20. Costs of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D.; Braumiller, S.

    1992-01-01

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  2. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townley, L R; Trefry, M G; Barr, A D [CSIRO Div of Water Resources, PO Wembley, WA (Australia); Braumiller, S [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Kawanishi, M [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko-Shi, Chiba-Ken (Japan); and others

    1993-12-31

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  3. Hydrogeology of the Potsdam Sandstone in northern New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Franzi, David A.; Romanowicz, Edwin A.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2010-01-01

    The Potsdam Sandstone of Cambrian age forms a transboundary aquifer that extends across northern New York and into southern Quebec. The Potsdam Sandstone is a gently dipping sequence of arkose, subarkose, and orthoquartzite that unconformably overlies Precambrian metamorphic bedrock. The Potsdam irregularly grades upward over a thickness of 450 m from a heterogeneous feldspathic and argillaceous rock to a homogeneous, quartz-rich and matrix-poor rock. The hydrogeological framework of the Potsdam Sandstone was investigated through an analysis of records from 1,500 wells and geophysical logs from 40 wells, and through compilation of GIS coverages of bedrock and surficial geology, examination of bedrock cores, and construction of hydrogeological sections. The upper several metres of the sandstone typically is weathered and fractured and, where saturated, readily transmits groundwater. Bedding-related fractures in the sandstone commonly form sub-horizontal flow zones of relatively high transmissivity. The vertical distribution of sub-horizontal flow zones is variable; spacings of less than 10 m are common. Transmissivity of individual flow zones may be more than 100 m2/d but typically is less than 10 m2/d. High angle fractures, including joints and faults, locally provide vertical hydraulic connection between flow zones. Hydraulic head gradients in the aquifer commonly are downward; a laterally extensive series of sub-horizontal flow zones serve as drains for the groundwater flow system. Vertical hydraulic head differences between shallow and deep flow zones range from 1 m to more than 20 m. The maximum head differences are in recharge areas upgradient from the area where the Chateauguay and Chazy Rivers, and their tributaries, have cut into till and bedrock. Till overlies the sandstone in much of the study area; its thickness is generally greatest in the western part, where it may exceed 50 m. A discontinuous belt of bedrock pavements stripped of glacial drift extends

  4. Contamination shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, W.; Pecornik, D.

    1982-01-01

    An acrylate resin is presented as contamination protection coating for components and instruments in nuclear facilities and for spent fuel transport containers. The resin is evaporated or sublimated at 130 0 C and can thus be removed easily from the protected component. The radioactive particles entrained during evaporation are retained by suitable filters. (TK) [de

  5. Cotton contamination

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Sluijs, MHJ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focusses on physical forms of contaminant including the presence, prevention and/or removal of foreign bodies, stickiness and seed-coat fragments rather than the type and quantity of chemical residues that might be present in cotton...

  6. Analysis on regional hydrogeological condition of Beishan preselected area for high level radioactive waste disposal repository in Gansu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonghai; Su Rui; Liu Shufen; Lu Chuanhe

    2004-01-01

    Based on the field investigation which has been carried out in the Beishan preselected area for high level radioactive waste repository in Gansu province during the last few years and the previous hydrogeological investigation results, the different groundwater types are divided initially and the hydrogeological features of different water-bearing media are described in this paper. Meanwhile, the preliminary evaluation of the regional hydrogeological condition of the study area is carried out. (author)

  7. CMI Remedy Selection for HE- and Barium-Contaminated Vadose Zone and Alluvium at LANL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, D.; Reid, K.; Pietz, J.; Ware, D.

    2008-12-01

    A high explosives (HE) machining building outfall at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 16 discharged millions of gallons of HE- and barium-contaminated water into the Canon de Valle watershed. The effluent contaminated surface soils, the alluvial aquifer, vadose zone waters, and deep-perched and regional groundwaters with HE and barium, frequently at levels greater than regulatory standards. Site characterization studies began in 1995 and included extensive monitoring of surface water, groundwater, soils, and subsurface solid media. Hydrogeologic and geophysical studies were conducted to help understand contaminant transport mechanisms and pathways. Results from the characterization studies were used to develop a site conceptual model. In 2000 the principal source area was removed. The ongoing Corrective Measure Study (CMS) and Corrective Measure Implementation (CMI) focus on residual vadose zone contamination and on the contaminated alluvial system. Regulators recently selected a CMI remedy that combined: 1) augmented source removal; 2) grouting of an HE- contaminated surge bed; 3) deployment of Stormwater Management System (SMS) stormfilters in contaminated springs; and 4) permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) in contaminated alluvium. The hydrogeologic conceptual model for the vadose zone and alluvial system as well as the status of the canyon as habitat for the Mexican Spotted Owl were key factors in selection of these minimal-environmental-impact remedies. The heterogeneous vadose zone, characterized by flow and contaminant transport in fractures and in surge beds, requires contaminant treatment at a point of discharge. The canyon PRB is being installed to capture water and contaminants prior to infiltration into the vadose zone. Pilot-scale testing of the SMS and lab-scale batch and column tests of a range of media suggest that granular activated carbon, zeolite, and gypsum may be effective media for removal of HE and/or barium from contaminated

  8. Adsorption and desorption of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B.

    1994-01-01

    The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL's are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry

  9. Hydrogeological problems in the ultimate storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uerpmann, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The following work shows how one can achieve the safe closure of ultimate-stored radioactive wastes by connecting a series of various barriers to the biosphere. The propagation of radionuclides by ground water is considered to be the most important long-term transport mechanism. Salt occurences in the Federal Republic of Germany are considered to be the best form suitable for end storage formations for known reasons. When not observing mining and hydrogeological knowledge, the danger of uncontrollable water flow in the end storage can arise from the water solubility of the salt rocks. Therefore the filling of salt mines and the subsequent procedures are dealt with in detail. The leading of radioactive nuclides is influenced by the properties of the ultimately stored wastes and by the quality of the remaining filling of the caves. These problems are dealt with in detail. A series of barriers to the closure of the underground caves are suggested and discussed. The most important barriers consist of the stability of the corresponding selected end storage structure. Possible arrangements of the storage cave are given which even after storage must maintain a high stability. Proposals are made on how the ultimately stored wastes can protect themselves against contact with free water or salt solutions. (orig.) [de

  10. Hydrogeologic testing strategy for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logsdon, M.J.; Verma, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    At the time of licensing for a proposed deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to present and defend a complete licensing/performance assessment of the geologic repository system. As part of its responsibilities, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff will be required to perform an independent assessment of the groundwater flow system with respect to the technical criteria of 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 60. Specifically, the staff expects to use mathematical models to predict pre-emplacement and post-emplacement groundwater flow paths and travel times. These predictive assessments will be used to reach findings on compliance with the proposed EPA Standards (10 CFR 60.112), which apply to post-emplacement groundwater travel time along the path of likely radionuclide travel (10 CFR 60.113(2)). Predictive modeling of groundwater flow will require defensible conceptual models of the flow system, defensible boundary conditions, and defensible values of hydraulic parameters. The purpose fo this technical position is to provide guidance to DOE on an approach that the NRC staff considers acceptable in determining what hydrogeologic testing (including types of tests, scale of tests, and number of tests) at the Hanford site will be required to produce the hydraulic data necessary and sufficient to perform rigorous, quantitative modeling to support predictions of repository performance. 2 figures

  11. Hydrogeology of the Salamanca area, Cattaraugus County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogeology of a 132-sq mi area centered at Salamanca, NY, is summarized in five maps at 1:24,000 scale. The maps show locations of wells and test holes, surficial geology and geologic sections, water-table surface, soil permeability, and land use. The valley-fill aquifer in the Salamanca area serves approximately 7,000 people through two major distribution systems with an average daily pumpage of 1.2 million gal/day. The aquifer, composed of outwash sand and gravel, averages 60 ft in thickness and overlies as much as 200 ft of lacustrine silt and clay. The aquifer is recharged directly from precipitation and through seepage from streams. Average annual recharge to the aquifer from direct precipitation and infiltration of runoff from adjacent hillsides is estimated to be 13 inches or 0.6 million gal/day/sq mi. The glacial features in the Allegheny valley near Salamanca are associated with Illinoian and Wisconsin glaciations. Illinoian features consist of small, isolated exposures of outwash and till emplaced against the valley walls. Wisconsin features deposited during Altonian and Woodfordian Times of the Wisconsin consist mainly of end moraines and valley-train outwash. (USGS)

  12. Hydrogeologic effects of natural disruptive events on nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.N.

    1980-06-01

    Some possible hydrogeologic effects of disruptive events that may affect repositories for nuclear waste are described. A very large number of combinations of natural events can be imagined, but only those events which are judged to be most probable are covered. Waste-induced effects are not considered. The disruptive events discussed above are placed into four geologic settings. Although the geology is not specific to given repository sites that have been considered by other agencies, the geology has been generalized from actual field data and is, therefore, considered to be physically reasonable. The geologic settings considered are: (1) interior salt domes of the Gulf Coast, (2) bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico, (3) argillaceous rocks of southern Nevanda, and (4) granitic stocks of the Basin and Range Province. Log-normal distributions of permeabilities of rock units are given for each region. Chapters are devoted to: poresity and permeability of natural materials, regional flow patterns, disruptive events (faulting, dissolution of rock forming minerals, fracturing from various causes, rapid changes of hydraulic regimen); possible hydrologic effects of disruptive events; and hydraulic fracturing

  13. Hydrogeology of rocks of low permeability: region studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogeological regional studies on low permeability rocks are rather scarce in comparison to similar studies on normal permeability rocks. Economic and technological difficulties to develop ground water from these terrains may be the main cause of this scarcity. Several facts may indicate that these studies will increase in the near future. First, the need to supply water to the people living in underdeveloped arid zones over extensive areas of low permeability rocks. Second, the relevant role that some low permeability large groundwater basins may play in conjunctive ground and surface-water use. And last but not least the feasibility of some low permeability rock areas as sites for nuclear waste repositories. Some specific difficulties in these regional studies may be: a) intrinsic difficulties in obtaining representative water samples and measuring hydraulic heads; b) scarcity of observation and/or pumping wells; c) important hydraulic head and chemical properties variations in a vertical direction; d) old groundwater ages; this may require paleohydrological considerations to understand certain apparent anomalies. In most of these regional studies hydrogeochemical methods and modelling (flow and mass transport) may be very valuable tools. 77 references, 7 figures

  14. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents information derived from the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. This volume contains the main text. Volume 2 contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text. This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report are the preliminary interpretations of the hydrogeologic environment of six low-level burial grounds, which comprise four waste management areas (WMAs) located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretations were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the construction of 35 ground-water monitoring wells as well as a multitude of previously existing boreholes. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a ground-water monitoring program initiated in 1986. This ground-water monitoring program is based on requirements for interim status facilities in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (1976)

  15. A Bayesian Markov geostatistical model for estimation of hydrogeological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.; Gustafson, G.

    1996-01-01

    A geostatistical methodology based on Markov-chain analysis and Bayesian statistics was developed for probability estimations of hydrogeological and geological properties in the siting process of a nuclear waste repository. The probability estimates have practical use in decision-making on issues such as siting, investigation programs, and construction design. The methodology is nonparametric which makes it possible to handle information that does not exhibit standard statistical distributions, as is often the case for classified information. Data do not need to meet the requirements on additivity and normality as with the geostatistical methods based on regionalized variable theory, e.g., kriging. The methodology also has a formal way for incorporating professional judgments through the use of Bayesian statistics, which allows for updating of prior estimates to posterior probabilities each time new information becomes available. A Bayesian Markov Geostatistical Model (BayMar) software was developed for implementation of the methodology in two and three dimensions. This paper gives (1) a theoretical description of the Bayesian Markov Geostatistical Model; (2) a short description of the BayMar software; and (3) an example of application of the model for estimating the suitability for repository establishment with respect to the three parameters of lithology, hydraulic conductivity, and rock quality designation index (RQD) at 400--500 meters below ground surface in an area around the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in southeastern Sweden

  16. Hydrogeological Studies of Mendhwan Watershed, Ahmadnagar District, Maharashtra, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, R. B.; Babar, Md.; Kulkarni, P. S.

    2011-07-01

    The Mendhwan watershed area is a part of chronic drought prone region of Ahmadnagar district of Maharashtra state, India which is considered for the study with reference to hydrogeological characteristics in Deccan basaltic terrain. In order to enhance groundwater availability and to demarcate the area of high groundwater potential, Geoforum, Parbhani Chapter has carried out hydrological investigation of this watershed area. Geologically, the study area belongs to the Deccan trap basalts of late Cretaceous to early Eocene period. The entire study area consists of thin irregular vesicular-amygdaloidal basalt flows also known as compound pahoehoe flows. The area is traversed by two prominent dykes, which are almost perpendicular to each other. In most of the southern part of the area, amygdaloidal basalt is exposed at the surface. The fresh amygdaloidal basalt flow is free from joints and occurs as homogeneous watertight mass. As dykes are jointed, they provide favorable conditions for percolation and ground water potential of this area is found to be satisfactory. It was observed that in Mendhwan area a large number of water conservation structures have been constructed across the streams. Incidentally groundwater potential shows notable increase only in those localities where the structures had been constructed on the dyke rock. The result of the study is found to be very much beneficial to the rural populace of this draught prone area so as to plan the optimum utilization of this precious natural resource.

  17. Hydrogeologic characterization of a fractured granitic rock aquifer, Raymond, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Andrew J.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The hydrogeologic properties of a shallow, fractured granitic rock aquifer in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California were investigated via the analysis of borehole geophysical logs and pumping tests. The drawdowns produced during these tests are not indicative of any simple conceptual aquifer model, and borehole logs show that the granite is intensely fractured. These observations are suggestive of a complex fracture-flow geometry which is extremely difficult to decipher. However, through the measurement of orientations of individual subsurface fractures from acoustic televiewer logs, and correlation between particular fractures and electrical resistivity and thermal-pulse flowmeter logs, it was found that the aquifer is, in general, comprised of two subhorizontal and nearly parallel zones of unloading fractures. Downhole flowmeter measurements taken in several wells provide further evidence for the inferred dual-layer structure of the aquifer, as well as yield quantitative measures of the contribution of flow from each zone. Analysis of drawdowns in pumped wells reveals that there are zones of relatively high transmissivity immediately around them. It was found that these properties, as well as a nearby zone of lower transmissivity, can account for their observed drawdowns. A numerical model was constructed to test whether these major heterogeneities could also account for the drawdowns in observation wells. This stepwise analysis of both the geophysical and hydrological data resulted in the formulation of a conceptual model of the aquifer which is consistent with observations, and which can account for its behavior when subjected to pumping.

  18. Hydrogeologic reconnaissance of the San Miguel River basin, southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, D.J.; Rush, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    The San Miguel River Basin encompasses 4,130 square kilometers of which about two-thirds is in the southeastern part of the Paradox Basin. The Paradox Basin is a part of the Colorado Plateaus that is underlain by a thick sequence of evaporite beds of Pennsylvanian age. The rock units that underlie the area have been grouped into hydrogeologic units based on their water-transmitting ability. Evaporite beds of mostly salt are both overlain and underlain by confining beds. Aquifers are present above and below the confining-bed sequence. The principal element of ground-water outflow from the upper aquifer is flow to the San Miguel River and its tributaries; this averages about 90 million cubic meters per year. A water budget for the lower aquifer has only two equal, unestimated elements, subsurface outflow and recharge from precipitation. The aquifers are generally isolated from the evaporite beds by the bounding confining beds; as a result, most ground water has little if any contact with the evaporites. No brines have been sampled and no brine discharges have been identified in the basin. Salt water has been reported for petroleum-exploration wells, but no active salt solution has been identified. (USGS)

  19. Hydrogeological modelling for assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, L.; Hoek, J.; Swan, D.; Appleyard, P.; Baxter, S.; Roberts, D.; Simpson, T. [AMEC (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing the programme for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel produced by its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy in Finland. Olkiluoto in Eurajoki has been selected as the primary site for the repository, subject to further detailed investigation which is currently focused on the construction of an underground rock characterisation and research facility (the ONKALO). An essential part of the assessment of long-term safety of a repository is the analysis of groundwater flow since it is the only means of transport of radionuclides to the biosphere (besides human intrusion). The analysis of long-term safety for a KBS-3 concept requires as input a description of details of the groundwater flow around and through components of the engineered barrier system as well as details of the groundwater pathway to the biosphere during the current temperate climate period, as well as indications of behaviour under future climate periods such as glacial conditions. This report describes the groundwater flow modelling study performed to provide some of the necessary inputs required by Safety Assessment (i.e. radionuclide transport analysis). Underlying this study is the understanding of the site developed during the site investigations as summarised in the site descriptive model (SDM), and in particular the description of Olkiluoto Hydrogeological DFN model (Hydro-DFN). The main focus of this study is the temperate climate period, i.e. the evolution over the next 10,000 years, but the hydrogeological situation under various glacial climate conditions is also evaluated. Primary outputs of the study are repository performance measures relating to: the distributions of groundwater flow around the deposition holes; deposition tunnels and through the EDZ; flow-related transport resistance along groundwater pathways from the repository to the surface; and their the exit locations. Other analyses consider the

  20. Hydrogeological modelling for assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, L.; Hoek, J.; Swan, D.; Appleyard, P.; Baxter, S.; Roberts, D.; Simpson, T.

    2013-07-01

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing the programme for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel produced by its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy in Finland. Olkiluoto in Eurajoki has been selected as the primary site for the repository, subject to further detailed investigation which is currently focused on the construction of an underground rock characterisation and research facility (the ONKALO). An essential part of the assessment of long-term safety of a repository is the analysis of groundwater flow since it is the only means of transport of radionuclides to the biosphere (besides human intrusion). The analysis of long-term safety for a KBS-3 concept requires as input a description of details of the groundwater flow around and through components of the engineered barrier system as well as details of the groundwater pathway to the biosphere during the current temperate climate period, as well as indications of behaviour under future climate periods such as glacial conditions. This report describes the groundwater flow modelling study performed to provide some of the necessary inputs required by Safety Assessment (i.e. radionuclide transport analysis). Underlying this study is the understanding of the site developed during the site investigations as summarised in the site descriptive model (SDM), and in particular the description of Olkiluoto Hydrogeological DFN model (Hydro-DFN). The main focus of this study is the temperate climate period, i.e. the evolution over the next 10,000 years, but the hydrogeological situation under various glacial climate conditions is also evaluated. Primary outputs of the study are repository performance measures relating to: the distributions of groundwater flow around the deposition holes; deposition tunnels and through the EDZ; flow-related transport resistance along groundwater pathways from the repository to the surface; and their the exit locations. Other analyses consider the

  1. Consoil 2000 : 7th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil, organized by Research Centre Karlsruhe (KZK, D), TNO, in cooperation with UFZ Leipzig, 18-22 Sept 2000. Vol. 1 en 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    These volumes present the proceedings of ConSoil 2000, the 7th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil (in cooperation with UFZ Leipzig-Halle). This series of conferences focuses on policies, research and development, regulations, practical implementation and experiences related to

  2. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donohue, Shane; McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick; Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar

  3. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, Shane [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick [Department of Applied Sciences, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Dundalk (Ireland); Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar

  4. Phytovolatilization of Organic Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Matt; Burken, Joel

    2016-07-05

    Plants can interact with a variety of organic compounds, and thereby affect the fate and transport of many environmental contaminants. Volatile organic compounds may be volatilized from stems or leaves (direct phytovolatilization) or from soil due to plant root activities (indirect phytovolatilization). Fluxes of contaminants volatilizing from plants are important across scales ranging from local contaminant spills to global fluxes of methane emanating from ecosystems biochemically reducing organic carbon. In this article past studies are reviewed to clearly differentiate between direct- and indirect-phytovolatilization and we discuss the plant physiology driving phytovolatilization in different ecosystems. Current measurement techniques are also described, including common difficulties in experimental design. We also discuss reports of phytovolatilization in the literature, finding that compounds with low octanol-air partitioning coefficients are more likely to be phytovolatilized (log KOA < 5). Reports of direct phytovolatilization at field sites compare favorably to model predictions. Finally, future research needs are presented that could better quantify phytovolatilization fluxes at field scale.

  5. The geology, hydrogeology and geochemistry of the Needle's Eye natural analogue site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey has been carrying out a research investigation of the Needle's Eye site at Southwick on the Solway coast in south-western Scotland. This study of a naturally radioactive geochemical system has the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This summary report describes results from the integrated use of hydrogeological, mineralogical and geochemical techniques applied to the study of the transport and distribution of uranium. Pitchblende veins exposed in the cliffs are a major source of soluble uranium in ground-waters flowing into organic-rich post-glacial flood plain and intertidal mudflat deposits. Organic matter both living and dead has played a key role in the retardation of uranium in these sediments. Chemical transport modelling of the uranium dispersion/retardation is described and the implications for performance assessment work are discussed. Computer codes used: CHEMVAL (thermodynamic data base constants). CHIMERE (chemical equilibrium code). METIS (flow code). PHREEQE (chemical equilibrium code). STELE (coupled chemical transport code)

  6. Preliminary Test Results of Heshe Hydrogeological Experimental Well Station in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, P.; Liu, C.; Lin, M.; Chan, W.; Lee, T.; Chia, Y.; Teng, M.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Safe disposal of radioactive waste is a critical issue for the development of nuclear energy. The design of final disposal system is based on the concept of multiple barriers which integrate the natural barriers and engineering barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive wastes. As groundwater is the major medium that can transport radionuclides to our living environment, it is essential to characterize groundwater flow at the disposal site. Taiwan is located at the boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. Geologic formations are often fractured due to tectonic compression and extension. In this study, a well station for the research and development of hydrogeological techniques was established at the Experimental Forest of the National Taiwan University in central Taiwan. There are 10 testing wells, ranging in depth from 25 m to 100 m, at the station. The bedrock beneath the regolith is highly fractured mudstone. As fracture is the preferential pathway of the groundwater flow, the focus of in-situ tests is to investigate the location of permeable fractures and the connection of permeable fractures. Several field tests have been conducted, including geophysical logging, heat-pulse flowmeter, hydraulic test, tracer test and double packer test, for the development of advanced technologies to detect the preferential groundwater flow in fractured rocks.

  7. Hydrogeology and water chemistry of Infranz catchment springs, Bahir Dar Area, Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, F. N.

    2017-12-01

    The major springs in the Infranz catchment are a significant source of water for Bahir city and nearby villages, while they help to sustain Infranz River and the downstream wetlands. The aim of the research was to understand the hydrogeological conditions of these high-discharge springs, and to explain the hydrochemical composition of spring waters. Water samples from rainwater and springs were collected and analyzed and compared for major cations and anions. The hydrochemical data analysis showed that all water samples of the springs have freshwater chemistry, Ca-HCO3 type, while deep groundwater shows more evolved types. This indicates limited water-rock interaction and short residence time for the spring waters. The rise of NO3- and PO43- may indicate future water quality degradation unless the anthropogenic activities upgradient and nearby are restricted. The uptake of 75% of spring water for water supply of Bahir Dar results in wetland degradation. Key words: Spring water, Infranz River, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, hydrochemistry

  8. Separation of contaminated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakiewicz, J.L.; Reymer, A.P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Separating the contaminated parts from the non-contaminated parts from decommissioned nuclear facilities may strongly reduce the amount of contaminated concrete. The reduction in volume of the radioactive contaminated concrete is dependent on how much cementstone is in the concrete. This research program shows that the radioactive contamination is mostly in the cementstone. However the choice that the cementstone parts, (or better said the radioactive parts) are smaller than 1 mm may not always be true